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Sample records for downregulate dna mismatch

  1. Mismatch repair in heteroduplex DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wildenberg, J; Meselson, M

    1975-01-01

    DNA with base pair mismatches was prepared by annealing mixtures of genetically marked DNA from bacteriophage lambda. This heteroduplex DNA was used to transfect bacteria under conditions minimizing recombination. Genetic analysis of the progeny phages indicates that: (i) Mismatch repair occurs, usually giving rise to a DNA molecule with one chain with the genotype arising from repair and one parental chain. (ii) The frequency of repair of a given mismatch to wild type depends on the marker, ranging from 3 to 20%. (iii) Excision tracts may extend several hundred nucleotides but are usually shorter than about 2000 nucleotides. (iv) In Rec-mediated bacteriophage crosses, recombination of markers closer than about 10-3 nucleotide pairs frequently occurs by mismatch repair within heteroduplex DNA. (V) The average amount of heteroduplex DNA formed in a Rec-mediated recombination event is a few thousand nucleotide pairs. PMID:1094458

  2. Dynamics of DNA Mismatch Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Julie; Lin, Yuyen; Rasnik, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    DNA mismatch repair protects the genome from spontaneous mutations by recognizing errors, excising damage, and re-synthesizing DNA in a pathway that is highly conserved. Mismatch recognition is accomplished by the MutS family of proteins which are weak ATPases that bind specifically to damaged DNA, but the specific molecular mechanisms by which these proteins recognize damage and initiate excision are not known. Previous structural investigations have implied that protein-induced conformational changes are central to mismatch recognition. Because damage detection is a highly dynamic process in which conformational changes of the protein-DNA complexes occur on a time scale of a few seconds, it is difficult to obtain meaningful kinetic information with traditional ensemble techniques. In this work, we use single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study the conformational dynamics of fluorescently labeled DNA substrates in the presence of the mismatch repair protein MutS from E. coli and its human homolog MSH2/MSH6. Our studies allow us to obtain quantitative kinetic information about the rates of binding and dissociation and to determine the conformational states for each protein-DNA complex.

  3. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  4. The structural impact of DNA mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D.; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  5. Osmium complexation of mismatched DNA: effect of the bases adjacent to mismatched 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-03-18

    The efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes is a key point for the design of sequence-specific detection of DNA methylation. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes changed depending on the type of 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine forming a mismatched base pair. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique "side reaction" was observed. However, the nature of the mismatched base pairs in the reaction site did not influence the selectivity of osmium complex formation with methylated DNA.

  6. Eukaryotic Mismatch Repair in Relation to DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Thomas A; Erie, Dorothy A

    2015-01-01

    Three processes act in series to accurately replicate the eukaryotic nuclear genome. The major replicative DNA polymerases strongly prevent mismatch formation, occasional mismatches that do form are proofread during replication, and rare mismatches that escape proofreading are corrected by mismatch repair (MMR). This review focuses on MMR in light of increasing knowledge about nuclear DNA replication enzymology and the rate and specificity with which mismatches are generated during leading- and lagging-strand replication. We consider differences in MMR efficiency in relation to mismatch recognition, signaling to direct MMR to the nascent strand, mismatch removal, and the timing of MMR. These studies are refining our understanding of relationships between generating and repairing replication errors to achieve accurate replication of both DNA strands of the nuclear genome.

  7. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  8. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H; Hsieh, Peggy

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Myc down-regulation sensitizes melanoma cells to radiotherapy by inhibiting MLH1 and MSH2 mismatch repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Barbara; D'Agnano, Igea; Amendola, Donatella; Citti, Arianna; Raza, Giorgio H; Miceli, Roberto; De Paula, Ugo; Marchese, Rodolfo; Albini, Sonia; Felsani, Armando; Brunetti, Ercole; Vecchione, Aldo

    2005-04-01

    Melanoma patients have a very poor prognosis with a response rate of <1% due to advanced diagnosis. This type of tumor is particularly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and the surgery remains the principal treatment for patients with localized melanoma. For this reason, there is particular interest in the melanoma biological therapy. Using two p53 mutant melanoma models stably expressing an inducible c-myc antisense RNA, we have investigated whether Myc protein down-regulation could render melanoma cells more susceptible to radiotherapy, reestablishing apoptotic p53-independent pathway. In addition to address the role of p53 in the activation of apoptosis, we studied the effect of Myc down-regulation on radiotherapy sensitivity also in a p53 wild-type melanoma cell line. Myc down-regulation is able per se to induce apoptosis in a fraction of the cell population (approximately 40% at 72 hours) and in combination with gamma radiation efficiently enhances the death process. In fact, approximately 80% of apoptotic cells are evident in Myc down-regulated cells exposed to gamma radiation for 72 hours compared with approximately 13% observed after only gamma radiation treatment. Consistent with the enhanced apoptosis is the inhibition of the MLH1 and MSH2 mismatch repair proteins, which, preventing the correction of ionizing radiation mismatches occurring during DNA replication, renders the cells more prone to radiation-induced apoptosis. Data herein reported show that Myc down-regulation lowers the apoptotic threshold in melanoma cells by inhibiting MLH1 and MSH2 proteins, thus increasing cell sensitivity to gamma radiation in a p53-independent fashion. Our results indicate the basis for developing new antitumoral therapeutic strategy, improving the management of melanoma patients.

  10. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  11. The Effect of Basepair Mismatch on DNA Strand Displacement.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, D W Bo; Kim, Harold D

    2016-04-12

    DNA strand displacement is a key reaction in DNA homologous recombination and DNA mismatch repair and is also heavily utilized in DNA-based computation and locomotion. Despite its ubiquity in science and engineering, sequence-dependent effects of displacement kinetics have not been extensively characterized. Here, we measured toehold-mediated strand displacement kinetics using single-molecule fluorescence in the presence of a single basepair mismatch. The apparent displacement rate varied significantly when the mismatch was introduced in the invading DNA strand. The rate generally decreased as the mismatch in the invader was encountered earlier in displacement. Our data indicate that a single base pair mismatch in the invader stalls branch migration and displacement occurs via direct dissociation of the destabilized incumbent strand from the substrate strand. We combined both branch migration and direct dissociation into a model, which we term the concurrent displacement model, and used the first passage time approach to quantitatively explain the salient features of the observed relationship. We also introduce the concept of splitting probabilities to justify that the concurrent model can be simplified into a three-step sequential model in the presence of an invader mismatch. We expect our model to become a powerful tool to design DNA-based reaction schemes with broad functionality.

  12. Bubbles and mismatches in DNA melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan

    We obtained the first experimental measurements of the length of the denaturation bubble appearing in the DNA melting transition. This is achieved by working with short oligomers which can form only one bubble per molecule. We used sequences clamped at the ends with GC pairs (strong binding) and possessing AT rich (weaker binding) middle regions in order to have the bubble open in the middle, and sequences with GC pairs at one end and AT pairs at the other end in order to form the bubble at the end. Use a quenching technique to trap the bubble states, we could measure the length of the bubble and the relative weights of the bubble states as a function of temperature. We found that the average bubble size <ℓ> grows for increasing temperature, but reaches a plateau at a length of order B (the length of the AT region). After the plateau, the average bubble length jumps to 1. This jump of the order parameter is a signature of a discontinuous transition, one where the bubble size remains finite up to critical temperature of strand separation. When B increases, the extension of the plateau shrinks. This suggests a continuous transition for a homogenous sequence (e.g. all AT base pairs) in the thermodynamic limit. The presence of the bubble states decreases as B is reduced. By plotting the average statistical weight of the bubble states vs. B, we obtained the first direct measurement of the nucleation size of the bubble. For a bubble flanked by double-stranded regions, the nucleation size is ˜ 3 bases. For bubbles opening at the ends of the molecule there is no nucleation threshold. The measured statistical weights of the bubble states agree with the predictions of the widely used thermodynamic models in the case of unzipping from the ends; however, internal bubble states are not completely described by the model. For the first time we show experimentally that a single mismatch transforms a transition with many intermediates into a nearly two-state transition for

  13. DNA mismatch repair: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Peggy

    2012-09-14

    In this issue, Peña-Diaz et al. (2012) describe a pathway for somatic mutation in nonlymphoid cells termed noncanonical DNA mismatch repair, whereby the error-prone translesion polymerase Pol-η substitutes for high-fidelity replicative polymerases to resynthesize excised regions opposite DNA damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mismatch repair balances leading and lagging strand DNA replication fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Scott A; Williams, Jessica S; Pursell, Zachary F; Abdulovic-Cui, Amy A; Clark, Alan B; Nick McElhinny, Stephanie A; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    The two DNA strands of the nuclear genome are replicated asymmetrically using three DNA polymerases, α, δ, and ε. Current evidence suggests that DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) is the primary leading strand replicase, whereas Pols α and δ primarily perform lagging strand replication. The fact that these polymerases differ in fidelity and error specificity is interesting in light of the fact that the stability of the nuclear genome depends in part on the ability of mismatch repair (MMR) to correct different mismatches generated in different contexts during replication. Here we provide the first comparison, to our knowledge, of the efficiency of MMR of leading and lagging strand replication errors. We first use the strand-biased ribonucleotide incorporation propensity of a Pol ε mutator variant to confirm that Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We then use polymerase-specific error signatures to show that MMR efficiency in vivo strongly depends on the polymerase, the mismatch composition, and the location of the mismatch. An extreme case of variation by location is a T-T mismatch that is refractory to MMR. This mismatch is flanked by an AT-rich triplet repeat sequence that, when interrupted, restores MMR to > 95% efficiency. Thus this natural DNA sequence suppresses MMR, placing a nearby base pair at high risk of mutation due to leading strand replication infidelity. We find that, overall, MMR most efficiently corrects the most potentially deleterious errors (indels) and then the most common substitution mismatches. In combination with earlier studies, the results suggest that significant differences exist in the generation and repair of Pol α, δ, and ε replication errors, but in a generally complementary manner that results in high-fidelity replication of both DNA strands of the yeast nuclear genome.

  15. DNA Bending Propensity in the Presence of Base Mismatches: Implications for DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Monika; Predeus, Alexander V.; Mukherjee, Shayantani; Feig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    DNA bending is believed to facilitate the initial recognition of the mismatched base for repair. The repair efficiencies are dependent on both the mismatch type and neighboring nucleotide sequence. We have studied bending of several DNA duplexes containing canonical matches: A:T, G:C, various mismatches: A:A, A:C, G:A, G:G, G:T, C:C, C:T, T:T, and a bis-abasic site: X:X. Free energy profiles were generated for DNA bending using umbrella sampling. The highest energetic cost associated with DNA bending is observed for canonical matches while bending free energies are lower in the presence of mismatches, with the lowest value for the abasic site. In all of the sequences, DNA duplexes bend towards the major groove with widening of the minor groove. For homoduplexes, DNA bending is observed to occur via smooth deformations, whereas for heteroduplexes, kinks are observed at the mismatch site during strong bending. In general, pyrimidine:pyrimidine mismatches are the most destabilizing, while purine:purine mismatches lead to intermediate destabilization and purine:pyrimidine mismatches are the least destabilizing. The ease of bending is partially correlated with the binding affinity of MutS to the mismatch pairs and subsequent repair efficiencies, indicating that intrinsic DNA bending propensities are a key factor of mismatch recognition. PMID:23621762

  16. New insights into the mechanism of DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Gloria X.; Schmidt, Tobias T.; Kolodner, Richard D.; Hombauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The genome of all organisms is constantly being challenged by endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage. Errors like base:base mismatches or small insertions and deletions, primarily introduced by DNA polymerases during DNA replication are repaired by an evolutionary conserved DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. The MMR system, together with the DNA replication machinery, promote repair by an excision and resynthesis mechanism during or after DNA replication, increasing replication fidelity by upto-three orders of magnitude. Consequently, inactivation of MMR genes results in elevated mutation rates that can lead to increased cancer susceptibility in humans. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of MMR with a focus on the different MMR protein complexes, their function and structure. We also discuss how recent findings have provided new insights in the spatio-temporal regulation and mechanism of MMR. PMID:25862369

  17. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  18. Copper(II)-Controlled Molecular Glue for Mismatched DNA.

    PubMed

    Kotera, Naoko; Guillot, Régis; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Granzhan, Anton

    2017-04-04

    Isothermal hybridization of two DNA strands bearing three thymine-thymine (T:T) mismatches can be brought about in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of a bis-naphthalene macrocycle, 2,7-BisNP-NH. This process can be reverted by addition of a Cu(II) salt due to formation of a dinuclear metal complex which does not bind to DNA. Subsequent sequestration of Cu(II) releases the macrocycle and restores the hybridization state of DNA strands, thus allowing implementation of a fast fluorescent two-state DNA switch. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Guanine- 5-carboxylcytosine base pairs mimic mismatches during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Toshihiro; Ito, Shinsuke; Toda, Mariko; Kanao, Rie; Collins, Leonard B; Shibata, Marika; Urabe, Miho; Koseki, Haruhiko; Masuda, Yuji; Swenberg, James A; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2014-06-09

    The genetic information encoded in genomes must be faithfully replicated and transmitted to daughter cells. The recent discovery of consecutive DNA conversions by TET family proteins of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) suggests these modified cytosines act as DNA lesions, which could threaten genome integrity. Here, we have shown that although 5caC pairs with guanine during DNA replication in vitro, G·5caC pairs stimulated DNA polymerase exonuclease activity and were recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Knockdown of thymine DNA glycosylase increased 5caC in genome, affected cell proliferation via MMR, indicating MMR is a novel reader for 5caC. These results suggest the epigenetic modification products of 5caC behave as DNA lesions.

  20. Tolerance of DNA Mismatches in Dmc1 Recombinase-mediated DNA Strand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, María V; Monti, Mariela R; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Argaraña, Carlos E; Pezza, Roberto J

    2016-03-04

    Recombination between homologous chromosomes is required for the faithful meiotic segregation of chromosomes and leads to the generation of genetic diversity. The conserved meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase catalyzes homologous recombination triggered by DNA double strand breaks through the exchange of parental DNA sequences. Although providing an efficient rate of DNA strand exchange between polymorphic alleles, Dmc1 must also guard against recombination between divergent sequences. How DNA mismatches affect Dmc1-mediated DNA strand exchange is not understood. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the mechanism of Dmc1-mediated strand exchange between DNA oligonucleotides with different degrees of heterology. The efficiency of strand exchange is highly sensitive to the location, type, and distribution of mismatches. Mismatches near the 3' end of the initiating DNA strand have a small effect, whereas most mismatches near the 5' end impede strand exchange dramatically. The Hop2-Mnd1 protein complex stimulates Dmc1-catalyzed strand exchange on homologous DNA or containing a single mismatch. We observed that Dmc1 can reject divergent DNA sequences while bypassing a few mismatches in the DNA sequence. Our findings have important implications in understanding meiotic recombination. First, Dmc1 acts as an initial barrier for heterologous recombination, with the mismatch repair system providing a second level of proofreading, to ensure that ectopic sequences are not recombined. Second, Dmc1 stepping over infrequent mismatches is likely critical for allowing recombination between the polymorphic sequences of homologous chromosomes, thus contributing to gene conversion and genetic diversity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Tolerance of DNA Mismatches in Dmc1 Recombinase-mediated DNA Strand Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Borgogno, María V.; Monti, Mariela R.; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Argaraña, Carlos E.; Pezza, Roberto J.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination between homologous chromosomes is required for the faithful meiotic segregation of chromosomes and leads to the generation of genetic diversity. The conserved meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase catalyzes homologous recombination triggered by DNA double strand breaks through the exchange of parental DNA sequences. Although providing an efficient rate of DNA strand exchange between polymorphic alleles, Dmc1 must also guard against recombination between divergent sequences. How DNA mismatches affect Dmc1-mediated DNA strand exchange is not understood. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the mechanism of Dmc1-mediated strand exchange between DNA oligonucleotides with different degrees of heterology. The efficiency of strand exchange is highly sensitive to the location, type, and distribution of mismatches. Mismatches near the 3′ end of the initiating DNA strand have a small effect, whereas most mismatches near the 5′ end impede strand exchange dramatically. The Hop2-Mnd1 protein complex stimulates Dmc1-catalyzed strand exchange on homologous DNA or containing a single mismatch. We observed that Dmc1 can reject divergent DNA sequences while bypassing a few mismatches in the DNA sequence. Our findings have important implications in understanding meiotic recombination. First, Dmc1 acts as an initial barrier for heterologous recombination, with the mismatch repair system providing a second level of proofreading, to ensure that ectopic sequences are not recombined. Second, Dmc1 stepping over infrequent mismatches is likely critical for allowing recombination between the polymorphic sequences of homologous chromosomes, thus contributing to gene conversion and genetic diversity. PMID:26709229

  2. Electrical current through DNA containing mismatched base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edirisinghe, Neranjan; Apalkov, Vadym; Berashevich, Julia; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2010-06-01

    Mismatched base pairs, such as different conformations of the G·A mispair, cause only minor structural changes in the host DNA molecule, thereby making mispair recognition an arduous task. Electron transport in DNA that depends strongly on the hopping transfer integrals between the nearest base pairs, which in turn are affected by the presence of a mispair, might be an attractive approach in this regard. We report here on our investigations, via the I-V characteristics, of the effect of a mispair on the electrical properties of homogeneous and generic DNA molecules. The I-V characteristics of DNA were studied numerically within the double-stranded tight-binding model. The parameters of the tight-binding model, such as the transfer integrals and on-site energies, are determined from first-principles calculations. The changes in electrical current through the DNA chain due to the presence of a mispair depend on the conformation of the G·A mispair and are appreciable for DNA consisting of up to 90 base pairs. For homogeneous DNA sequences the current through DNA is suppressed and the strongest suppression is realized for the G(anti)·A(syn) conformation of the G·A mispair. For inhomogeneous (generic) DNA molecules, the mispair result can be either a suppression or an enhancement of the current, depending on the type of mispairs and actual DNA sequence.

  3. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  4. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-03-22

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3'- or 5'-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5'-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2-HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5' → 3' exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1-HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5'-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2-HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1-HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5' MMR.

  5. DNA mismatch repair and its many roles in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dekang; Keijzers, Guido; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-07-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an important DNA repair pathway that plays critical roles in DNA replication fidelity, mutation avoidance and genome stability, all of which contribute significantly to the viability of cells and organisms. MMR is widely-used as a diagnostic biomarker for human cancers in the clinic, and as a biomarker of cancer susceptibility in animal model systems. Prokaryotic MMR is well-characterized at the molecular and mechanistic level; however, MMR is considerably more complex in eukaryotic cells than in prokaryotic cells, and in recent years, it has become evident that MMR plays novel roles in eukaryotic cells, several of which are not yet well-defined or understood. Many MMR-deficient human cancer cells lack mutations in known human MMR genes, which strongly suggests that essential eukaryotic MMR components/cofactors remain unidentified and uncharacterized. Furthermore, the mechanism by which the eukaryotic MMR machinery discriminates between the parental (template) and the daughter (nascent) DNA strand is incompletely understood and how cells choose between the EXO1-dependent and the EXO1-independent subpathways of MMR is not known. This review summarizes recent literature on eukaryotic MMR, with emphasis on the diverse cellular roles of eukaryotic MMR proteins, the mechanism of strand discrimination and cross-talk/interactions between and co-regulation of MMR and other DNA repair pathways in eukaryotic cells. The main conclusion of the review is that MMR proteins contribute to genome stability through their ability to recognize and promote an appropriate cellular response to aberrant DNA structures, especially when they arise during DNA replication. Although the molecular mechanism of MMR in the eukaryotic cell is still not completely understood, increased used of single-molecule analyses in the future may yield new insight into these unsolved questions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  7. DnaN clamp zones provide a platform for spatiotemporal coupling of mismatch detection to DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Justin S; Sharma, Anushi; Hingorani, Manju M; Simmons, Lyle A

    2013-02-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) increases the fidelity of DNA replication by identifying and correcting replication errors. Processivity clamps are vital components of DNA replication and MMR, yet the mechanism and extent to which they participate in MMR remains unclear. We investigated the role of the Bacillus subtilis processivity clamp DnaN, and found that it serves as a platform for mismatch detection and coupling of repair to DNA replication. By visualizing functional MutS fluorescent fusions in vivo, we find that MutS forms foci independent of mismatch detection at sites of replication (i.e. the replisome). These MutS foci are directed to the replisome by DnaN clamp zones that aid mismatch detection by targeting the search to nascent DNA. Following mismatch detection, MutS disengages from the replisome, facilitating repair. We tested the functional importance of DnaN-mediated mismatch detection for MMR, and found that it accounts for 90% of repair. This high dependence on DnaN can be bypassed by increasing MutS concentration within the cell, indicating a secondary mode of detection in vivo whereby MutS directly finds mismatches without associating with the replisome. Overall, our results provide new insight into the mechanism by which DnaN couples mismatch recognition to DNA replication in living cells. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Maternal effect for DNA mismatch repair in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Gurtu, Vanessa E; Verma, Shelly; Grossmann, Allie H; Liskay, R Michael; Skarnes, William C; Baker, Sean M

    2002-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (DMR) functions to maintain genome stability. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells deficient in DMR show a microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype characterized by repeat length alterations at microsatellite sequences. Mice deficient in Pms2, a mammalian homolog of bacterial mutL, develop cancer and display MSI in all tissues examined, including the male germ line where a frequency of approximately 10% was observed. To determine the consequences of maternal DMR deficiency on genetic stability, we analyzed F(1) progeny from Pms2(-/-) female mice mated with wild-type males. Our analysis indicates that MSI in the female germ line was approximately 9%. MSI was also observed in paternal alleles, a surprising result since the alleles were obtained from wild-type males and the embryos were therefore DMR proficient. We propose that mosaicism for paternal alleles is a maternal effect that results from Pms2 deficiency during the early cleavage divisions. The absence of DMR in one-cell embryos leads to the formation of unrepaired replication errors in early cell divisions of the zygote. The occurrence of postzygotic mutation in the early mouse embryo suggests that Pms2 deficiency is a maternal effect, one of a limited number identified in the mouse and the first to involve a DNA repair gene. PMID:11805062

  9. Novel DNA mismatch-repair activity involving YB-1 in human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Mason, Penelope A; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Weissman, Lior; Tian, Jingyan; Guay, David; Lebel, Michel; Stevnsner, Tinna V; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2009-06-04

    Maintenance of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is essential for proper cellular function. The accumulation of damage and mutations in the mtDNA leads to diseases, cancer, and aging. Mammalian mitochondria have proficient base excision repair, but the existence of other DNA repair pathways is still unclear. Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), which corrects base mismatches and small loops, are associated with DNA microsatellite instability, accumulation of mutations, and cancer. MMR proteins have been identified in yeast and coral mitochondria; however, MMR proteins and function have not yet been detected in human mitochondria. Here we show that human mitochondria have a robust mismatch-repair activity, which is distinct from nuclear MMR. Key nuclear MMR factors were not detected in mitochondria, and similar mismatch-binding activity was observed in mitochondrial extracts from cells lacking MSH2, suggesting distinctive pathways for nuclear and mitochondrial MMR. We identified the repair factor YB-1 as a key candidate for a mitochondrial mismatch-binding protein. This protein localizes to mitochondria in human cells, and contributes significantly to the mismatch-binding and mismatch-repair activity detected in HeLa mitochondrial extracts, which are significantly decreased when the intracellular levels of YB-1 are diminished. Moreover, YB-1 depletion in cells increases mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis. Our results show that human mitochondria contain a functional MMR repair pathway in which YB-1 participates, likely in the mismatch-binding and recognition steps.

  10. DNA hybridization to mismatched templates: A chip study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naef, Felix; Lim, Daniel A.; Patil, Nila; Magnasco, Marcelo

    2002-04-01

    High-density oligonucleotide arrays are among the most rapidly expanding technologies in biology today. In the GeneChip system, the reconstruction of the sample mRNA concentrations depends upon the differential signal generated by hybridizing the RNA to two nearly identical templates: a perfect match probe (PM) containing the exact biological sequence; and a single mismatch (MM) differing from the PM by a single base substitution. It has been observed that a large fraction of MMs repeatably bind targets better than the PMs, against the obvious expectation of sequence specificity. We examine this problem via statistical analysis of a large set of microarray experiments. We classify the probes according to their signal to noise (S/N) ratio, defined as the eccentricity of a (PM,MM) pair's ``trajectory'' across many experiments. Of those probes having large S/N (>3) only a fraction behave consistently with the commonly assumed hybridization model. Our results imply that the physics of DNA hybridization in microarrays is more complex than expected, and suggest estimators for the target RNA concentration.

  11. Mouse models of DNA mismatch repair in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeryoung; Tosti, Elena; Edelmann, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are the cause of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome (HNPCC/LS) one of the most common cancer predisposition syndromes, and defects in MMR are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. In the past, the generation and analysis of mouse lines with knockout mutations in all of the known MMR genes has provided insight into how loss of individual MMR genes affects genome stability and contributes to cancer susceptibility. These studies also revealed essential functions for some of the MMR genes in B cell maturation and fertility. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the cancer predisposition phenotypes of recently developed mouse models with targeted mutations in MutS and MutL homologs (Msh and Mlh, respectively) and their utility as preclinical models. The focus will be on mouse lines with conditional MMR mutations that have allowed more accurate modeling of human cancer syndromes in mice and that together with new technologies in gene targeting, hold great promise for the analysis of MMR-deficient intestinal tumors and other cancers which will drive the development of preventive and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:26708047

  12. Mouse models of DNA mismatch repair in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeryoung; Tosti, Elena; Edelmann, Winfried

    2016-02-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are the cause of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome (HNPCC/LS) one of the most common cancer predisposition syndromes, and defects in MMR are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. In the past, the generation and analysis of mouse lines with knockout mutations in all of the known MMR genes has provided insight into how loss of individual MMR genes affects genome stability and contributes to cancer susceptibility. These studies also revealed essential functions for some of the MMR genes in B cell maturation and fertility. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the cancer predisposition phenotypes of recently developed mouse models with targeted mutations in MutS and MutL homologs (Msh and Mlh, respectively) and their utility as preclinical models. The focus will be on mouse lines with conditional MMR mutations that have allowed more accurate modeling of human cancer syndromes in mice and that together with new technologies in gene targeting, hold great promise for the analysis of MMR-deficient intestinal tumors and other cancers which will drive the development of preventive and therapeutic treatment strategies.

  13. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer.

    PubMed

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-02-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind by the replicative polymerases and results in increased mutation load at the genome. The realization that defective MMR leads to a hypermutation phenotype and increased risk of tumorigenesis highlights the relevance of this pathway for human disease. The association of MMR defects with increased risk of cancer development was first observed in colorectal cancer patients that carried inactivating germline mutations in MMR genes and the disease was named as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Currently, a growing list of cancers is found to be MMR defective and HNPCC has been renamed Lynch syndrome (LS) partly to include the associated risk of developing extra-colonic cancers. In addition, a number of non-hereditary, mostly epigenetic, alterations of MMR genes have been described in sporadic tumors. Besides conferring a strong cancer predisposition, genetic or epigenetic inactivation of MMR genes also renders cells resistant to some chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, diagnosis of MMR deficiency has important implications for the management of the patients, the surveillance of their relatives in the case of LS and for the choice of treatment. Some of the alterations found in MMR genes have already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR genes and anticipates the need of diagnostic tools for rapid assessment of their pathogenicity. This review describes current tools and future strategies for addressing the relevance

  14. DNA Mismatch Repair-Induced Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Nowosielska, Anetta; Marinus, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli dam mutants are sensitized to the cytotoxic action of base analogs, cisplatin and N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), while their mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient derivatives are tolerant to these agents. We showed previously, using pulse field gel electrophoresis, that MMR-mediated double-strand breaks (DSBs) are produced by cisplatin in dam recB (Ts) cells at the non-permissive temperature. We demonstrate here that the majority of these DSBs require DNA replication for their formation, consistent with a model in which replication forks collapse at nicks or gaps formed during MMR. DSBs were also detected in dam recB(Ts) ada ogt cells exposed to MNNG in a dose- and MMR-dependent manner. In contrast to cisplatin, the formation of these DSBs was not affected by DNA replication and it is proposed that two separate mechanisms result in DSB formation. Replication-independent DSBs arise from overlapping base excision and MMR repair tracts on complementary strands and constitute the majority of detectable DSBs in dam recB(Ts) ada ogt cells exposed to MNNG. Replication-dependent DSBs result from replication fork collapse at O6-meG base pairs undergoing MMR futile cycling and are more likely to contribute to cytotoxicity. This model is consistent with the observation that fast-growing dam recB (Ts) ada ogt cells, which have more chromosome replication origins, are more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of MNNG than the same cells growing slowly. PMID:17827074

  15. Human DNA Polymerase Kappa Encircles DNA: Implicatins for Mismatch Extension and Lesion Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Lone,S.; Townson, S.; Uljon, S.; Johnson, R.; Brahma, A.; Nair, D.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.; Aggarwal, A.

    2007-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase (Pol ) is a proficient extender of mispaired primer termini on undamaged DNAs and is implicated in the extension step of lesion bypass. We present here the structure of Pol catalytic core in ternary complex with DNA and an incoming nucleotide. The structure reveals encirclement of the DNA by a unique 'N-clasp' at the N terminus of Pol , which augments the conventional right-handed grip on the DNA by the palm, fingers, and thumb domains and the PAD and provides additional thermodynamic stability. The structure also reveals an active-site cleft that is constrained by the close apposition of the N-clasp and the fingers domain, and therefore can accommodate only a single Watson-Crick base pair. Together, DNA encirclement and other structural features help explain Pol 's ability to extend mismatches and to promote replication through various minor groove DNA lesions, by extending from the nucleotide incorporated opposite the lesion by another polymerase.

  16. Mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA intermediates of extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W P; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    Previous work indicated that extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells could be explained by the single-strand annealing (SSA) model. This model predicts that extrachromosomal recombination leads to nonconservative crossover products and that heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) is formed by annealing of complementary single strands. Mismatched bases in hDNA may subsequently be repaired to wild-type or mutant sequences, or they may remain unrepaired and segregate following DNA replication. We describe a system to examine the formation and mismatch repair of hDNA in recombination intermediates. Our results are consistent with extrachromosomal recombination occurring via SSA and producing crossover recombinant products. As predicted by the SSA model, hDNA was present in double-strand break-induced recombination intermediates. By placing either silent or frameshift mutations in the predicted hDNA region, we have shown that mismatches are efficiently repaired prior to DNA replication. Images PMID:8264607

  17. Is thymidine glycol containing DNA a substrate of E. coli DNA mismatch repair system?

    PubMed

    Perevozchikova, Svetlana A; Trikin, Roman M; Heinze, Roger J; Romanova, Elena A; Oretskaya, Tatiana S; Friedhoff, Peter; Kubareva, Elena A

    2014-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a crucial role in the prevention of replication errors and in the correction of some oxidative damages of DNA bases. In the present work the most abundant oxidized pyrimidine lesion, 5,6-dihydro-5,6-dihydroxythymidine (thymidine glycol, Tg) was tested for being recognized and processed by the E. coli MMR system, namely complex of MutS, MutL and MutH proteins. In a partially reconstituted MMR system with MutS-MutL-MutH proteins, G/Tg and A/Tg containing plasmids failed to provoke the incision of DNA. Tg residue in the 30-mer DNA duplex destabilized double helix due to stacking disruption with neighboring bases. However, such local structural changes are not important for E. coli MMR system to recognize this lesion. A lack of repair of Tg containing DNA could be due to a failure of MutS (a first acting protein of MMR system) to interact with modified DNA in a proper way. It was shown that Tg in DNA does not affect on ATPase activity of MutS. On the other hand, MutS binding affinities to DNA containing Tg in G/Tg and A/Tg pairs are lower than to DNA with a G/T mismatch and similar to canonical DNA. Peculiarities of MutS interaction with DNA was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence anisotropy. Binding of MutS to Tg containing DNAs did not result in the formation of characteristic DNA kink. Nevertheless, MutS homodimer orientation on Tg-DNA is similar to that in the case of G/T-DNA. In contrast to G/T-DNA, neither G/Tg- nor A/Tg-DNA was able to stimulate ADP release from MutS better than canonical DNA. Thus, Tg residue in DNA is unlikely to be recognized or processed by the E. coli MMR system. Probably, the MutS transformation to active "sliding clamp" conformation on Tg-DNA is problematic.

  18. Single-molecule views of MutS on mismatched DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Bong; Cho, Won-Ki; Park, Jonghyun; Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Fishel, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Base-pair mismatches that occur during DNA replication or recombination can reduce genetic stability or conversely increase genetic diversity. The genetics and biophysical mechanism of mismatch repair (MMR) has been extensively studied since its discovery nearly 50 years ago. MMR is a strand-specific excision-resynthesis reaction that is initiated by MutS homolog (MSH) binding to the mismatched nucleotides. The MSH mismatch-binding signal is then transmitted to the immediate downstream MutL homolog (MLH/PMS) MMR components and ultimately to a distant strand scission site where excision begins. The mechanism of signal transmission has been controversial for decades. We have utilized single molecule Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET), Fluorescence Tracking (smFT) and Polarization Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (smP-TIRF) to examine the interactions and dynamic behaviors of single Thermus aquaticus MutS (TaqMutS) particles on mismatched DNA. We determined that Taq-MutS forms an incipient clamp to search for a mismatch in ∼1 s intervals by 1-dimensional (1D) thermal fluctuation-driven rotational diffusion while in continuous contact with the helical duplex DNA. When MutS encounters a mismatch it lingers for ∼3 s to exchange bound ADP for ATP (ADP → ATP exchange). ATP binding by TaqMutS induces an extremely stable clamp conformation (∼10 min) that slides off the mismatch and moves along the adjacent duplex DNA driven simply by 1D thermal diffusion. The ATP-bound sliding clamps rotate freely while in discontinuous contact with the DNA. The visualization of a train of MSH proteins suggests that dissociation of ATP-bound sliding clamps from the mismatch permits multiple mismatch-dependent loading events. These direct observations have provided critical clues into understanding the molecular mechanism of MSH proteins during MMR. PMID:24629484

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection modulates the expression of miRNAs associated with DNA mismatch repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana C; Brianti, Mitsue T; Almeida, Victor R; Ortega, Manoela M; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer; Matheu, Ander; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2017-04-01

    Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes might lead to modifications in cancer-related gene expression and cancer development. Recently, it has been shown that the infection by Helicobacter pylori, the major causative agent of gastric cancer, induces DNA damage and inhibits MMR DNA repair. Also, it has been reported that microRNAs (miRs) have an important role in regulating genomic stability and MMR DNA repair. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify miRs regulating MMR pathway in H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. To address this question, a gastric epithelial cell line and AGS cancer gastric cells were infected with several H. pylori strains. MMR gene expression and miRs correlating with H. pylori strain infection were evaluated. The results showed that H. pylori infection significantly down-regulated the expression of all selected MMR genes. Also, H. pylori infection modulated the expression of several miRs (including miR-150-5p, miR-155-5p, and miR-3163), after 4, 8, and 12 h of infection. Computational prediction of candidate miRs and their predicted MMR targeting sites were obtained from TargetScan, mirDB, and MetaCore. The generated data indicated that the selected miRs (miR-150-5p, miR-155-5p, and miR-3163) could possibly target and modulate MMR genes (POLD3, MSH2, and MSH3, respectively). The target validation was performed using mimics and luciferase gene reporter assays. Briefly, this study shows that H. pylori impairs MMR DNA repair pathway and identifies miRs that regulate MMR gene expression in gastric cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Exonuclease processivity of archaeal replicative DNA polymerase in association with PCNA is expedited by mismatches in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Takuya; Tanabe, Maiko; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yoda, Takao; Ishino, Sonoko; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Takeyama, Haruko; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2017-01-01

    Family B DNA polymerases comprise polymerase and 3′ −>5′ exonuclease domains, and detect a mismatch in a newly synthesized strand to remove it in cooperation with Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which encircles the DNA to provide a molecular platform for efficient protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions during DNA replication and repair. Once the repair is completed, the enzyme must stop the exonucleolytic process and switch to the polymerase mode. However, the cue to stop the degradation is unclear. We constructed several PCNA mutants and found that the exonuclease reaction was enhanced in the mutants lacking the conserved basic patch, located on the inside surface of PCNA. These mutants may mimic the Pol/PCNA complex processing the mismatched DNA, in which PCNA cannot interact rigidly with the irregularly distributed phosphate groups outside the dsDNA. Indeed, the exonuclease reaction with the wild type PCNA was facilitated by mismatched DNA substrates. PCNA may suppress the exonuclease reaction after the removal of the mismatched nucleotide. PCNA seems to act as a “brake” that stops the exonuclease mode of the DNA polymerase after the removal of a mismatched nucleotide from the substrate DNA, for the prompt switch to the DNA polymerase mode. PMID:28300173

  1. Mismatch repair proteins recruit DNA methyltransferase 1 to sites of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Bonham, Emily M; Hannon, Brooke E; Amick, Thomas R; Baylin, Stephen B; O'Hagan, Heather M

    2016-06-01

    At sites of chronic inflammation, epithelial cells are exposed to high levels of reactive oxygen species and undergo cancer-associated DNA methylation changes, suggesting that inflammation may initiate epigenetic alterations. Previously, we demonstrated that oxidative damage causes epigenetic silencing proteins to become part of a large complex that is localized to GC-rich regions of the genome, including promoter CpG islands that are epigenetically silenced in cancer. However, whether these proteins were recruited directly to damaged DNA or during the DNA repair process was unknown. Here we demonstrate that the mismatch repair protein heterodimer MSH2-MSH6 participates in the oxidative damage-induced recruitment of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) to chromatin. Hydrogen peroxide treatment induces the interaction of MSH2-MSH6 with DNMT1, suggesting that the recruitment is through a protein-protein interaction. Importantly, the reduction in transcription for genes with CpG island-containing promoters caused by oxidative damage is abrogated by knockdown of MSH6 and/or DNMT1. Our findings provide evidence that the role of DNMT1 at sites of oxidative damage is to reduce transcription, potentially preventing transcription from interfering with the repair process. This study uniquely brings together several factors that are known to contribute to colon cancer, namely inflammation, mismatch repair proteins, and epigenetic changes. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Discriminating DNA mismatches by electrochemical and gravimetric techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazouz, Zouhour; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Ommezine, Asma; Rebhi, Lamia; Yaakoubi, Nourdin; Kalfat, Rafik; Othmane, Ali

    2013-10-15

    A silicon nitride functionalized electrode and a 104 MHz lithium tantalate (LiTaO₃) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor have been used to investigate target-probe recognition processes. Electrochemical and gravimetric measurements have been considered to monitor hybridization of single base mismatch (SBM) in synthetic oligonucleotides and single-nucleotide polymorphisms ApoE in real clinical genotypes. Obvious discrimination of SBM in nucleotides has been shown by both gravimetric and electrochemical techniques, without labeling nor amplification. Investigations on mismatches nature and position have also been considered. For guanine-adenine (GA), guanine-thymine (GT) and guanine-guanine (GG) mismatches, the sensors responses present a dependence upon positions. Considering the capacitance variations and hybridization rates, results showed that gravimetric transduction is more sensitive than electrochemical one. Moreover, the highest value of GT hybridization rate (in the middle position) was found in accordance with the nearest-neighbor model, where the considered configuration appears as the most thermodynamically stable. For the real samples, where the electrochemical transduction, by combining capacitance and flat-band potential measurements, were found more sensitive, the results show that the realized sensor permits an unambiguous discrimination of recognition between fully complementary, non-complementary and single base mismatched targets, and even between the combination of differently matched strands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional role of DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Chang, Inik; Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Lau, Yun-Fai C; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-06-30

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintains genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. MMR has also been shown to influence cell signaling and the regulation of tumor development. MMR consists of various genes and includes post-meiotic segregation (PMS) 2 which is a vital component of mutL-alpha. In prostate, the functional role of this gene has never been reported and in this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of PMS2 on growth properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Previous studies have shown PMS2 to be deficient in DU145 cells and this lack of expression was confirmed by Western blotting whereas normal prostatic PWR-1E and RWPE-1 cells expressed this gene. PMS2 effects on various growth properties of DU145 were then determined by creating stable gene transfectants. Interestingly, PMS2 caused decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vivo growth; and increased apoptosis as compared to vector control. We further analyzed genes affected by PMS2 expression and observe the apoptosis-related TMS1 gene to be significantly upregulated whereas anti-apoptotic BCL2A1 was downregulated. These results demonstrate a functional role for PMS2 to protect against PCa progression by enhancing apoptosis of PCa cells.

  4. Probing DNA hybridization efficiency and single base mismatch by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Chun; Zhang, Xin; He, Nong-Yue; Lu, Zu-Hong; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study DNA hybridization. Target DNA labeled with hexachloro-fluorescein (HEX) was hybridized to DNA arrays with four different probes. Each probe dot of the hybridized arrays was detected with XPS. The XPS Cl2p peak areas were found to decrease with an increase in mismatched bases in DNA probes. The Cl2p core-level peak area ratio of a probe perfectly matched to one, two and three base-mismatched probes accorded well with the results of conventional fluorescent imaging, which shows that XPS is a potential tool for analyzing DNA arrays. The DNA arrays' hybridization efficiency was assessed by the molar ratio of chlorine to phosphorus in a DNA strand, which was determined from the relevant XPS Cl2p and P2p core-level peak areas after hybridization. This could provide a new method to detect DNA hybridization efficiency.

  5. Native mass spectrometry provides direct evidence for DNA mismatch-induced regulation of asymmetric nucleotide binding in mismatch repair protein MutS.

    PubMed

    Monti, Maria Chiara; Cohen, Serge X; Fish, Alexander; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Barendregt, Arjan; Friedhoff, Peter; Perrakis, Anastassis; Heck, Albert J R; Sixma, Titia K; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Lebbink, Joyce H G

    2011-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair protein MutS recognizes mispaired bases in DNA and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. Understanding of the allosteric coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and two asymmetric nucleotide binding sites at opposing sides of the MutS dimer requires identification of the relevant MutS.mmDNA.nucleotide species. Here, we use native mass spectrometry to detect simultaneous DNA mismatch binding and asymmetric nucleotide binding to Escherichia coli MutS. To resolve the small differences between macromolecular species bound to different nucleotides, we developed a likelihood based algorithm capable to deconvolute the observed spectra into individual peaks. The obtained mass resolution resolves simultaneous binding of ADP and AMP.PNP to this ABC ATPase in the absence of DNA. Mismatched DNA regulates the asymmetry in the ATPase sites; we observe a stable DNA-bound state containing a single AMP.PNP cofactor. This is the first direct evidence for such a postulated mismatch repair intermediate, and showcases the potential of native MS analysis in detecting mechanistically relevant reaction intermediates.

  6. The DNA mismatch repair protein MutS forms a one-dimensional Tonks gas on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf; Klajner, Piotr; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M.; Liu, Jianquan; Park, Jonghyun; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2014-03-01

    MutS is a protein involved in DNA mismatch repair. It recognizes the mismatch, forms a sliding clamp around the DNA, and displaces other proteins bound to the DNA prior to the actual repair process. Here, we present a quantitative model of an ensemble of MutS molecules on a short strand of DNA with one mismatch. We model the ensemble as a Tonks gas of passively diffusing one-dimensional particles of finite extension and include clamp formation at the mismatch and random detachment. The distributions of MutS number bound to the DNA for different mismatch positions and different MutS concentrations in solution fit very well with distributions determined by single molecule experiments, thereby establishing the Tonks gas as an excellent model of MutS action on DNA. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 01105458 (RB), the National Institutes of Health under Grant No. CA67007 (RF), and the National Research Foundation of Korea under Grant No. 2011-0013901 (JBL).

  7. Determinants of DNA mismatch recognition within the polymerase domain of the Klenow fragment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth H Z; Bailey, Michael F; van der Schans, Edwin J C; Joyce, Catherine M; Millar, David P

    2002-01-22

    The Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I catalyzes template-directed synthesis of DNA and uses a separate 3'-5' exonuclease activity to edit misincorporated bases. The polymerase and exonuclease activities are contained in separate structural domains. In this study, nine Klenow fragment derivatives containing mutations within the polymerase domain were examined for their interaction with model primer-template duplexes. The partitioning of the DNA primer terminus between the polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease active sites of the mutant proteins was assessed by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, utilizing a dansyl fluorophore attached to the DNA. Mutation of N845 or R668 disrupted favorable interactions between the Klenow fragment and a duplex containing a matched terminal base pair but had little effect when the terminus was mismatched. Thus, N845 and R668 are required for recognition of correct terminal base pairs in the DNA substrate. Mutation of N675, R835, R836, or R841 resulted in tighter polymerase site binding of DNA, suggesting that the side chains of these residues induce strain in the DNA and/or protein backbone. A double mutant (N675A/R841A) showed an even greater polymerase site partitioning than was displayed by either single mutation, indicating that such strain is additive. In both groups of mutant proteins, the ability to discriminate between duplexes containing matched or mismatched base pairs was impaired. In contrast, mutation of K758 or Q849 had no effect on partitioning relative to wild type, regardless of DNA mismatch character. These results demonstrate that DNA mismatch recognition is dependent on specific amino acid residues within the polymerase domain and is not governed solely by thermodynamic differences between correct and mismatched base pairs. Moreover, this study suggests a mechanism whereby the Klenow fragment is able to recognize polymerase errors following a misincorporation event, leading to their eventual

  8. The Eukaryotic Mismatch Recognition Complexes Track with the Replisome during DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Haye, Joanna E.; Gammie, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    During replication, mismatch repair proteins recognize and repair mispaired bases that escape the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase. In this work, we tested the model that the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex tracks with the advancing replisome. Using yeast, we examined the dynamics during replication of the leading strand polymerase Polε using Pol2 and the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex using Msh2, the invariant protein involved in mismatch recognition. Specifically, we synchronized cells and processed samples using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with custom DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-chip). The Polε signal was not detectable in G1, but was observed at active origins and replicating DNA throughout S-phase. The Polε signal provided the resolution to track origin firing timing and efficiencies as well as replisome progression rates. By detecting Polε and Msh2 dynamics within the same strain, we established that the mismatch recognition complex binds origins and spreads to adjacent regions with the replisome. In mismatch repair defective PCNA mutants, we observed that Msh2 binds to regions of replicating DNA, but the distribution and dynamics are altered, suggesting that PCNA is not the sole determinant for the mismatch recognition complex association with replicating regions, but may influence the dynamics of movement. Using biochemical and genomic methods, we provide evidence that both MutS complexes are in the vicinity of the replisome to efficiently repair the entire spectrum of mutations during replication. Our data supports the model that the proximity of MutSα/β to the replisome for the efficient repair of the newly synthesized strand before chromatin reassembles. PMID:26684201

  9. Improvement of DNA adenylation using T4 DNA ligase with a template strand and a strategically mismatched acceptor strand

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maha P.; Baum, Dana A.; Silverman, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    DNA with a 5′-adenylpyrophosphoryl cap (5′-adenylated DNA; AppDNA) is an activated form of DNA that is the biochemical intermediate of the reactions catalyzed by DNA ligase, RNA ligase, polynucleotide kinase, and other nucleic acid modifying enzymes. 5′-Adenylated DNA is also useful for in vitro selection experiments. Efficient preparation of 5′-adenylated DNA is therefore desirable for several biochemical applications. Here we have developed a DNA adenylation procedure that uses T4 DNA ligase and is more reliable than a previously reported approach that used the 5′-phosphorylated donor DNA substrate to be adenylated, a DNA template, and ATP but no acceptor strand. Our improved DNA adenylation procedure uses the above components as well as an acceptor strand that has a strategically chosen C-T acceptor-template mismatch directly adjacent to the adenylation site. This mismatch permits adenylation of the donor DNA substrate but largely suppresses subsequent ligation of the donor with the acceptor, as assayed on nine different DNA substrates that collectively have all four DNA nucleotides represented at each of the first two positions. The new DNA adenylation procedure is successful using either laboratory-prepared or commercial T4 DNA ligase and works well on the preparative (2 nmol) scale for all nine of the test DNA substrates. PMID:18022669

  10. Mismatch Repair Proteins Are Activators of Toxic Responses to Chromium-DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Mindy; Quievryn, George; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2005-01-01

    Chromium(VI) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal that causes the formation of DNA phosphate-based adducts. Cr-DNA adducts are genotoxic in human cells, although they do not block replication in vitro. Here, we report that induction of cytotoxicity in Cr(VI)-treated human colon cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts requires the presence of all major mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Cr-DNA adducts lost their ability to block replication of Cr-modified plasmids in human colon cells lacking MLH1 protein. The presence of functional mismatch repair caused induction of p53-independent apoptosis associated with activation of caspases 2 and 7. Processing of Cr-DNA damage by mismatch repair resulted in the extensive formation of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase, indicating generation of double-stranded breaks as secondary toxic lesions. Induction of γ-H2AX foci was observed at 6 to 12 h postexposure, which was followed by activation of apoptosis in the absence of significant G2 arrest. Our results demonstrate that mismatch repair system triggers toxic responses to Cr-DNA backbone modifications through stress mechanisms that are significantly different from those for other forms of DNA damage. Selection for Cr(VI) resistant, MMR-deficient cells may explain the very high frequency of lung cancers with microsatellite instability among chromate workers. PMID:15831465

  11. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S N

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green's function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  12. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green’s function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  13. Unique magnetic signatures of mismatched base pairs in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apalkov, Vadim; Berashevich, Julia; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic properties of DNA containing mispairs, such as different conformations of the GṡA mispair, or a GṡT mispair inserted into the DNA chain, have been theoretically investigated. The essential ingredients for these studies, the charge transfer integrals, were evaluated from the DNA sequences containing the mispair and optimized in the solvent. We find that the magnetic susceptibilities of the host DNA chain containing a large number of Watson-Crick base pairs are significantly altered in the presence of the mispairs, and the effects depend on the choice of mispairs. In particular, insertion of even a single GṡA mispair changes the nature of magnetization (sign of the susceptibility) of the host DNA. We propose that measurement of the magnetic properties of DNA might provide a direct route to detection and identification of those mispairs.

  14. Structure of the EndoMS-DNA Complex as Mismatch Restriction Endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Setsu; Hijikata, Atsushi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Kouki; Kouyama, Ken-Ichi; Mayanagi, Kouta; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Archaeal NucS nuclease was thought to degrade the single-stranded region of branched DNA, which contains flapped and splayed DNA. However, recent findings indicated that EndoMS, the orthologous enzyme of NucS, specifically cleaves double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing mismatched bases. In this study, we determined the structure of the EndoMS-DNA complex. The complex structure of the EndoMS dimer with dsDNA unexpectedly revealed that the mismatched bases were flipped out into binding sites, and the overall architecture most resembled that of restriction enzymes. The structure of the apo form was similar to the reported structure of Pyrococcus abyssi NucS, indicating that movement of the C-terminal domain from the resting state was required for activity. In addition, a model of the EndoMS-PCNA-DNA complex was preliminarily verified with electron microscopy. The structures strongly support the idea that EndoMS acts in a mismatch repair pathway.

  15. Saturation of DNA mismatch repair and error catastrophe by a base analogue in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Kazuo; Loakes, David; Schaaper, Roel M

    2002-01-01

    Deoxyribosyl-dihydropyrimido[4,5-c][1,2]oxazin-7-one (dP) is a potent mutagenic deoxycytidine-derived base analogue capable of pairing with both A and G, thereby causing G. C --> A. T and A. T --> G. C transition mutations. We have found that the Escherichia coli DNA mismatch-repair system can protect cells against this mutagenic action. At a low dose, dP is much more mutagenic in mismatch-repair-defective mutH, mutL, and mutS strains than in a wild-type strain. At higher doses, the difference between the wild-type and the mutator strains becomes small, indicative of saturation of mismatch repair. Introduction of a plasmid containing the E. coli mutL(+) gene significantly reduces dP-induced mutagenesis. Together, the results indicate that the mismatch-repair system can remove dP-induced replication errors, but that its capacity to remove dP-containing mismatches can readily be saturated. When cells are cultured at high dP concentration, mutant frequencies reach exceptionally high levels and viable cell counts are reduced. The observations are consistent with a hypothesis in which dP-induced cell killing and growth impairment result from excess mutations (error catastrophe), as previously observed spontaneously in proofreading-deficient mutD (dnaQ) strains. PMID:12196386

  16. Mismatched DNTP Incorporation By DNA Polymerase Beta Does Not Proceed Via Globally Different Conformational Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.-H.; Niebuhr, M.; Tung, C.-S.; Chan, H.-c.; Chou, C.-C.; Tsai, M.-D.

    2009-05-26

    Understanding how DNA polymerases control fidelity requires elucidation of the mechanisms of matched and mismatched dNTP incorporations. Little is known about the latter because mismatched complexes do not crystallize readily. In this report, we employed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and structural modeling to probe the conformations of different intermediate states of mammalian DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) in its wild-type and an error-prone variant, I260Q. Our structural results indicate that the mismatched ternary complex lies in-between the open and the closed forms, but more closely resembles the open form for WT and the closed form for I260Q. On the basis of molecular modeling, this over-stabilization of mismatched ternary complex of I260Q is likely caused by formation of a hydrogen bonding network between the side chains of Gln{sup 260}, Tyr{sup 296}, Glu{sup 295} and Arg{sup 258}, freeing up Asp{sup 192} to coordinate MgdNTP. These results argue against recent reports suggesting that mismatched dNTP incorporations follow a conformational path distinctly different from that of matched dNTP incorporation, or that its conformational closing is a major contributor to fidelity.

  17. MSH-MLH complexes formed at a DNA mismatch are disrupted by the PCNA sliding clamp.

    PubMed

    Bowers, J; Tran, P T; Joshi, A; Liskay, R M; Alani, E

    2001-03-09

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mismatch repair (MMR) is initiated by the binding of heterodimeric MutS homolog (MSH) complexes to mismatches that include single nucleotide and loop insertion/deletion mispairs. In in vitro experiments, the mismatch binding specificity of the MSH2-MSH6 heterodimer is eliminated if ATP is present. However, addition of the MutL homolog complex MLH1-PMS1 to binding reactions containing MSH2-MSH6, ATP, and mismatched substrate results in the formation of a stable ternary complex. The stability of this complex suggests that it represents an intermediate in MMR that is subsequently acted upon by other MMR factors. In support of this idea, we found that the replication processivity factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which plays a critical role in MMR at step(s) prior to DNA resynthesis, disrupted preformed ternary complexes. These observations, in conjunction with experiments performed with streptavidin end-blocked mismatch substrates, suggested that PCNA interacts with an MSH-MLH complex formed on DNA mispairs.

  18. Phosphorylation of PCNA by EGFR inhibits mismatch repair and promotes misincorporation during DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Janice; Li, Jessie Y.; Lee, Sanghee; Tong, Dan; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2015-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays essential roles in eukaryotic cells during DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair (MMR), and other events at the replication fork. Earlier studies show that PCNA is regulated by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation of tyrosine 211 (Y211) by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, the functional significance of Y211-phosphorylated PCNA remains unknown. Here, we show that PCNA phosphorylation by EGFR alters its interaction with mismatch-recognition proteins MutSα and MutSβ and interferes with PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, thereby inhibiting MMR at the initiation step. Evidence is also provided that Y211-phosphorylated PCNA induces nucleotide misincorporation during DNA synthesis. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which Y211-phosphorylated PCNA promotes cancer development and progression via facilitating error-prone DNA replication and suppressing the MMR function. PMID:25825764

  19. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  20. Mismatch Repair Balances Leading and Lagging Strand DNA Replication Fidelity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-11

    Pol e mutator variant to confirm that Pol e is the primary leading strand replicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . We then use polymerase-specific error...variables using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains containing mutant alleles of the POL1 (Pol a), POL2 (Pol e) and POL3 (Pol d) genes. These mutant...AL, Johnston LH, Sugino A (1993) Pathway correcting DNA replication errors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Embo J 12: 1467–1473. 17. Morrison A, Sugino A

  1. Poorly repaired mismatches in heteroduplex DNA are hyper-recombinagenic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Manivasakam, P.; Hastings, P.J.; Rosenberg, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    In yeast meiotic recombination, alleles used as genetic markers fall into two classes as regards their fate when incorporated into heteroduplex DNA. Normal alleles are those that form heteroduplexes that are nearly always recognized and corrected by the mismatch repair system operating in meiosis. High PMS (postmeiotic segregation) alleles form heteroduplexes that are inefficiently mismatch repaired. We propose that this hyperrecombination is caused by the high PMS allele blocking a mismatch repair tract initiated from the normal allele, thus preventing corepair of the two alleles, which would prevent formation of recombinants. The results of three point crosses involving two PMS alleles and a normal allele suggest that high PMS alleles placed between two alleles that are normally corepaired block that corepair. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. p53 downregulates the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Sara; Toufektchan, Eléonore; Lejour, Vincent; Bardot, Boris; Toledo, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations affecting telomere maintenance or DNA repair may, respectively, cause dyskeratosis congenita or Fanconi anaemia, two clinically related bone marrow failure syndromes. Mice expressing p53Δ31, a mutant p53 lacking the C terminus, model dyskeratosis congenita. Accordingly, the increased p53 activity in p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts correlated with a decreased expression of 4 genes implicated in telomere syndromes. Here we show that these cells exhibit decreased mRNA levels for additional genes contributing to telomere metabolism, but also, surprisingly, for 12 genes mutated in Fanconi anaemia. Furthermore, p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts exhibit a reduced capacity to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks, a typical feature of Fanconi anaemia cells. Importantly, the p53-dependent downregulation of Fanc genes is largely conserved in human cells. Defective DNA repair is known to activate p53, but our results indicate that, conversely, an increased p53 activity may attenuate the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway, defining a positive regulatory feedback loop. PMID:27033104

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection and expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Vahid; Molaei, Mahsa; Shalmani, Hamid Mohaghegh; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of DNA (MMR) proteins, including hMLH1 and hMSH2, in gastric epithelial cells in the patients with or without Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-infected gastritis. METHODS: Fifty H pylori-positive patients and 50 H pylori-negative patients were enrolled in the study. During endoscopy of patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia, two antral and two corpus biopsies were taken for histological examination (Giemsa stain) and for immunohistochemical staining of hMLH1 and hMSH2. RESULTS: The percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMLH1 staining was 84.14 ± 7.32% in H pylori-negative patients, while it was 73.34 ± 10.10% in H pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was seen between the two groups regarding the percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMSH2 staining (81.16 ± 8.32% in H pylori-negative versus 78.24 ± 8.71% in H pylori-positive patients; P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: This study indicates that H pylori might promote development of gastric carcinoma at least in part through its ability to affect the DNA MMR system. PMID:19034977

  4. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation: making sense of apparently conflicting data.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lynn M; Marples, Brian; Coffey, Mary; Lawler, Mark; Lynch, Thomas H; Hollywood, Donal; Marignol, Laure

    2010-11-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway detects and repairs DNA replication errors. While DNA MMR-proficiency is known to play a key role in the sensitivity to a number of DNA damaging agents, its role in the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation (IR) is less well characterized. Available literature to date is conflicting regarding the influence of MMR status on radiosensitivity, and this has arisen as a subject of controversy in the field. The aim of this paper is to provide the first comprehensive overview of the experimental data linking MMR proteins and the DNA damage response to IR. A PubMed search was conducted using the key words "DNA mismatch repair" and "ionizing radiation". Relevant articles and their references were reviewed for their association between DNA MMR and IR. Recent data suggest that radiation dose and the type of DNA damage induced may dictate the involvement of the MMR system in the cellular response to IR. In particular, the literature supports a role for the MMR system in DNA damage recognition, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. In this review we discuss our current understanding of the impact of MMR status on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells gained from past and present studies and attempt to provide an explanation for how MMR may determine the response to radiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. DNA conformations in mismatch repair probed in solution by X-ray scattering from gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hura, Greg L; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Claridge, Shelley A; Mendillo, Marc L; Smith, Jessica M; Williams, Gareth J; Mastroianni, Alexander J; Alivisatos, A Paul; Putnam, Christopher D; Kolodner, Richard D; Tainer, John A

    2013-10-22

    DNA metabolism and processing frequently require transient or metastable DNA conformations that are biologically important but challenging to characterize. We use gold nanocrystal labels combined with small angle X-ray scattering to develop, test, and apply a method to follow DNA conformations acting in the Escherichia coli mismatch repair (MMR) system in solution. We developed a neutral PEG linker that allowed gold-labeled DNAs to be flash-cooled and stored without degradation in sample quality. The 1,000-fold increased gold nanocrystal scattering vs. DNA enabled investigations at much lower concentrations than otherwise possible to avoid concentration-dependent tetramerization of the MMR initiation enzyme MutS. We analyzed the correlation scattering functions for the nanocrystals to provide higher resolution interparticle distributions not convoluted by the intraparticle distribution. We determined that mispair-containing DNAs were bent more by MutS than complementary sequence DNA (csDNA), did not promote tetramer formation, and allowed MutS conversion to a sliding clamp conformation that eliminated the DNA bends. Addition of second protein responder MutL did not stabilize the MutS-bent forms of DNA. Thus, DNA distortion is only involved at the earliest mispair recognition steps of MMR: MutL does not trap bent DNA conformations, suggesting migrating MutL or MutS/MutL complexes as a conserved feature of MMR. The results promote a mechanism of mismatch DNA bending followed by straightening in initial MutS and MutL responses in MMR. We demonstrate that small angle X-ray scattering with gold labels is an enabling method to examine protein-induced DNA distortions key to the DNA repair, replication, transcription, and packaging.

  6. DNA conformations in mismatch repair probed in solution by X-ray scattering from gold nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Hura, Greg L.; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Claridge, Shelley A.; Mendillo, Marc L.; Smith, Jessica M.; Williams, Gareth J.; Mastroianni, Alexander J.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.; Tainer, John A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA metabolism and processing frequently require transient or metastable DNA conformations that are biologically important but challenging to characterize. We use gold nanocrystal labels combined with small angle X-ray scattering to develop, test, and apply a method to follow DNA conformations acting in the Escherichia coli mismatch repair (MMR) system in solution. We developed a neutral PEG linker that allowed gold-labeled DNAs to be flash-cooled and stored without degradation in sample quality. The 1,000-fold increased gold nanocrystal scattering vs. DNA enabled investigations at much lower concentrations than otherwise possible to avoid concentration-dependent tetramerization of the MMR initiation enzyme MutS. We analyzed the correlation scattering functions for the nanocrystals to provide higher resolution interparticle distributions not convoluted by the intraparticle distribution. We determined that mispair-containing DNAs were bent more by MutS than complementary sequence DNA (csDNA), did not promote tetramer formation, and allowed MutS conversion to a sliding clamp conformation that eliminated the DNA bends. Addition of second protein responder MutL did not stabilize the MutS-bent forms of DNA. Thus, DNA distortion is only involved at the earliest mispair recognition steps of MMR: MutL does not trap bent DNA conformations, suggesting migrating MutL or MutS/MutL complexes as a conserved feature of MMR. The results promote a mechanism of mismatch DNA bending followed by straightening in initial MutS and MutL responses in MMR. We demonstrate that small angle X-ray scattering with gold labels is an enabling method to examine protein-induced DNA distortions key to the DNA repair, replication, transcription, and packaging. PMID:24101514

  7. Method for locating and purifying DNA containing single base mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, J.P.; Novack, D.F.; Casna, N.J.

    1988-12-27

    A method is described for detecting guanine and thymine bases which are unpaired according to the Watson-Crick base pairing scheme in a double stranded polynucleotide molecule, each unpaired guanine or thymine base being immediately preceded by at least one base which is paired, and immediately followed by at least one base which is paired, the preceding and following paired bases being on the same polynucleotide sequence as the unpaired guanine or thymine base comprising: (a) reacting the double stranded polynucleotide molecule with a reagent capable of altering the electrophoretic mobility of a double stranded polynucleotide molecule by derivatizing unpaired guanine and thymine bases in the double stranded polynucleotide molecule, wherein the double stranded polynucleotide molecule is not a covalently closed circular DNA; (b) observing the electrophoretic mobility of the double stranded polynucleotide molecule which has been reacted with the reagent; and (c) determining the presence or absence of an alteration in the electrophoretic mobility; whereby the presence or absence of unpaired guanine and thymine bases in the double stranded polynucleotide molecule is detected.

  8. Identification of Polycomb Group Protein EZH2-Mediated DNA Mismatch Repair Gene MSH2 in Human Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Laknaur, Archana; Elam, Lelyand; Ismail, Nahed; Gavrilova-Jordan, Larisa; Lue, John; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-10-01

    Uterine fibroids (UFs) are benign smooth muscle neoplasms affecting up to 70% of reproductive age women. Treatment of symptomatic UFs places a significant economic burden on the US health-care system. Several specific genetic abnormalities have been described as etiologic factors of UFs, suggesting that a low DNA damage repair capacity may be involved in the formation of UF. In this study, we used human fibroid and adjacent myometrial tissues, as well as an in vitro cell culture model, to evaluate the expression of MutS homolog 2 (MSH2), which encodes a protein belongs to the mismatch repair system. In addition, we deciphered the mechanism by which polycomb repressive complex 2 protein, EZH2, deregulates MSH2 in UFs. The RNA expression analysis demonstrated the deregulation of MSH2 expression in UF tissues in comparison to its adjacent myometrium. Notably, protein levels of MSH2 were upregulated in 90% of fibroid tissues (9 of 10) as compared to matched adjacent myometrial tissues. Human fibroid primary cells treated with 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep), chemical inhibitor of EZH2, exhibited a significant increase in MSH2 expression (P < .05). Overexpression of EZH2 using an adenoviral vector approach significantly downregulated the expression of MSH2 (P < .05). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that enrichment of H3K27me3 in promoter regions of MSH2 was significantly decreased in DZNep-treated fibroid cells as compared to vehicle control. These data suggest that EZH2-H3K27me3 regulatory mechanism dynamically changes the expression levels of DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, through epigenetic mark H3K27me3. MSH2 may be considered as a marker for early detection of UFs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Mechanism of mismatch recognition revealed by human MutS[beta] bound to unpaired DNA loops

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shikha; Gellert, Martin; Yang, Wei

    2012-04-17

    DNA mismatch repair corrects replication errors, thus reducing mutation rates and microsatellite instability. Genetic defects in this pathway cause Lynch syndrome and various cancers in humans. Binding of a mispaired or unpaired base by bacterial MutS and eukaryotic MutS{alpha} is well characterized. We report here crystal structures of human MutS{beta} in complex with DNA containing insertion-deletion loops (IDL) of two, three, four or six unpaired nucleotides. In contrast to eukaryotic MutS{alpha} and bacterial MutS, which bind the base of a mismatched nucleotide, MutS{beta} binds three phosphates in an IDL. DNA is severely bent at the IDL; unpaired bases are flipped out into the major groove and partially exposed to solvent. A normal downstream base pair can become unpaired; a single unpaired base can thereby be converted to an IDL of two nucleotides and recognized by MutS{beta}. The C-terminal dimerization domains form an integral part of the MutS structure and coordinate asymmetrical ATP hydrolysis by Msh2 and Msh3 with mismatch binding to signal for repair.

  10. The vsr gene product of E. coli K-12 is a strand- and sequence-specific DNA mismatch endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Hennecke, F; Kolmar, H; Bründl, K; Fritz, H J

    1991-10-24

    In Escherichia coli K-12, the Dcm methyltransferase catalyses methylation of the inner cytosine residue in the sequence CCA/TGG. Hydrolytic deamination of 5-methylcytosine bases in DNA leads to thymine residues, and hence to T/G mismatches, pre-mutagenic DNA lesions consisting of two natural DNA constituents and thus devoid of an obvious marker of the damaged DNA strand. These mismatches are corrected by the VSP repair pathway, which is characterized by very short patches of DNA repair synthesis. It depends on genes vsr and polA and is strongly stimulated by mutL and mutS. The vsr gene product (Vsr; Mr 18,000) was purified and characterized as a DNA mismatch endonuclease, a unique and hitherto unknown type of enzyme. Vsr endonuclease nicks double-stranded DNA within the sequence CTA/TGN or NTA/TGG next to the underlined thymidine residue, which is mismatched to 2'-deoxyguanosine. The incision is mismatch-dependent and strand-specific. These results illustrate how Vsr endonuclease initiates VSP mismatch repair.

  11. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  12. A monofunctional platinum complex coordinated to a rhodium metalloinsertor selectively binds mismatched DNA in the minor groove.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Alyson G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-10-05

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh-O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA nonclassically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and it triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors.

  13. A Monofunctional Platinum Complex Coordinated to a Rhodium Metalloinsertor Selectively Binds Mismatched DNA in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, Alyson G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh—O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA non-classically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors. PMID:26397309

  14. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  15. Cyclin E and histone H3 levels are regulated by 5-fluorouracil in a DNA mismatch repair-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Heekyung; Chaudhry, Joy; Lopez, Claudia G

    2010-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system may trigger cytotoxicity upon 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) recognition, but signaling pathways regulated by MMR in response to 5-FU are unknown. We hypothesize that recognition of 5-FU in DNA by MMR proteins trigger specific signaling cascades that results in slowing of the cell cycle and cell death. Whole human genome cDNA microarrays were used to examine relative signaling responses induced in MMR-proficient cells after 5-FU (5 µM) treatment for 24 hours. Analysis revealed 43 pathways differentially affected by 5-FU compared to control (p < 0.05), including cyclin and cell cycle regulation involving G1-S cell cycle transition, activation of Src, MAP K, p53 and base excision repair. In particular, 5-FU upregulated cyclins E1 and E2 (≥1.4-fold) and downregulated cdc25C, cyclins B1 and B2, histone H2A, H2B and H3 (≤-1.4-fold) over control. Cell cycle analysis revealed a G1/S arrest by 5-FU that was congruent with increased cyclin E and decreased cdc25C protein expression. Importantly, with knockdown of hMLH1 and hMSH2, we observed that decreased histone H3 expression by 5-FU was dependent on hMLH1. Additionally, 5-FU treatment dramatically decreased levels of several histone H3 modifications. Our data suggest that 5-FU induces a G1/S arrest by regulating cyclin E and cdc25C expression and MMR recognition of 5-FU in DNA may modulate cyclin E to affect the cell cycle. Furthermore, MMR recognition of 5-FU reduces histone H3 levels that could be related to DNA access by proteins and/or cell death during the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. PMID:20930505

  16. Cascading MutS and MutL sliding clamps control DNA diffusion to activate mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaquan; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M; Bennett, Jared; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2016-11-24

    Mismatched nucleotides arise from polymerase misincorporation errors, recombination between heteroallelic parents and chemical or physical DNA damage. Highly conserved MutS (MSH) and MutL (MLH/PMS) homologues initiate mismatch repair and, in higher eukaryotes, act as DNA damage sensors that can trigger apoptosis. Defects in human mismatch repair genes cause Lynch syndrome or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and 10-40% of related sporadic tumours. However, the collaborative mechanics of MSH and MLH/PMS proteins have not been resolved in any organism. We visualized Escherichia coli (Ec) ensemble mismatch repair and confirmed that EcMutS mismatch recognition results in the formation of stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that randomly diffuse along the DNA with intermittent backbone contact. The EcMutS sliding clamps act as a platform to recruit EcMutL onto the mismatched DNA, forming an EcMutS-EcMutL search complex that then closely follows the DNA backbone. ATP binding by EcMutL establishes a second long-lived DNA clamp that oscillates between the principal EcMutS-EcMutL search complex and unrestricted EcMutS and EcMutL sliding clamps. The EcMutH endonuclease that targets mismatch repair excision only binds clamped EcMutL, increasing its DNA association kinetics by more than 1,000-fold. The assembly of an EcMutS-EcMutL-EcMutH search complex illustrates how sequential stable sliding clamps can modulate one-dimensional diffusion mechanics along the DNA to direct mismatch repair.

  17. DNA binding and cleavage selectivity of the Escherichia coli DNA G:T-mismatch endonuclease (vsr protein).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Nicieza, R; Turner, D P; Connolly, B A

    2001-07-13

    The Escherichia coli vsr endonuclease recognises T:G base-pair mismatches in double-stranded DNA and initiates a repair pathway by hydrolysing the phosphate group 5' to the incorrectly paired T. The gene encoding the vsr endonuclease is next to the gene specifying the E. coli dcm DNA-methyltransferase; an enzyme that adds CH3 groups to the first dC within its target sequence CC[A/T]GG, giving C5MeC[A/T]GG. Deamination of the d5MeC results in CT[A/T]GG in which the first T is mis-paired with dG and it is believed that the endonuclease preferentially recognises T:G mismatches within the dcm recognition site. Here, the preference of the vsr endonuclease for bases surrounding the T:G mismatch has been evaluated. Determination of specificity constant (kst/KD; kst = rate constant for single turnover, KD = equilibrium dissociation constant) confirms vsr's preference for a T:G mismatch within a dcm sequence i.e. CT[A/T]GG (the underlined T being mis-paired with dG) is the best substrate. However, the enzyme is capable of binding and hydrolysing sequences that differ from the dcm target site by a single base-pair (dcm star sites). Individual alteration of any of the four bases surrounding the mismatched T gives a substrate, albeit with reduced binding affinity and slowed turnover rates. The vsr endonuclease has a much lower selectivity for the dcm sequence than type II restriction endonucleases have for their target sites. The results are discussed in the light of the known crystal structure of the vsr protein and its possible physiological role. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. Structural and thermodynamic studies on the adenine.guanine mismatch in B-DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, G A; Booth, E D; Brown, T

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the synthetic dodecamer d(CGCAAATTGGCG) has been shown by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods to be that of a B-DNA helix containing two A(anti).G(syn) base pairs. The refinement, based on data to a resolution of 2.25 A shows that the mismatch base pairs are held together by two hydrogen bonds. The syn-conformation of the guanine base of the mismatch is stabilised by hydrogen bonding to a network of solvent molecules in both the major and minor grooves. A pH-dependent ultraviolet melting study indicates that the duplex is stabilised by protonation, suggesting that the bases of the A.G mispair are present in their most common tautomeric forms and that the N(1)-atom of adenine is protonated. The structure refinement shows that there is some disorder in the sugar-phosphate backbone. PMID:2216754

  19. Femtomolar detection of single mismatches by discriminant analysis of DNA hybridization events using gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingyi; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-03-21

    Even though DNA-based nanosensors have been demonstrated for quantitative detection of analytes and diseases, hybridization events have never been numerically investigated for further understanding of DNA mediated interactions. Here, we developed a nanoscale platform with well-designed capture and detection gold nanoprobes to precisely evaluate the hybridization events. The capture gold nanoprobes were mono-laid on glass and the detection probes were fabricated via a novel competitive conjugation method. The two kinds of probes combined in a suitable orientation following the hybridization with the target. We found that hybridization efficiency was markedly dependent on electrostatic interactions between DNA strands, which can be tailored by adjusting the salt concentration of the incubation solution. Due to the much lower stability of the double helix formed by mismatches, the hybridization efficiencies of single mismatched (MMT) and perfectly matched DNA (PMT) were different. Therefore, we obtained an optimized salt concentration that allowed for discrimination of MMT from PMT without stringent control of temperature or pH. The results indicated this to be an ultrasensitive and precise nanosensor for the diagnosis of genetic diseases.

  20. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  1. Stability of DNA duplexes containing GG, CC, AA, and TT mismatches.

    PubMed

    Tikhomirova, Anna; Beletskaya, Irina V; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2006-09-05

    We employed salt-dependent differential scanning calorimetric measurements to characterize the stability of six oligomeric DNA duplexes (5'-GCCGGAXTGCCGG-3'/5'-CCGGCAYTCCGGC-3') that contain in the central XY position the GC, AT, GG, CC, AA, or TT base pair. The heat-induced helix-to-coil transitions of all the duplexes are associated with positive changes in heat capacity, DeltaC(p), ranging from 0.43 to 0.53 kcal/mol. Positive values of DeltaC(p) result in strong temperature dependences of changes in enthalpy, DeltaH degrees, and entropy, DeltaS degrees , accompanying duplex melting and cause melting free energies, DeltaG degrees, to exhibit characteristically curved shapes. These observations suggest that DeltaC(p) needs to be carefully taken into account when the parameters of duplex stability are extrapolated to temperatures distant from the transition temperature, T(M). Comparison of the calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpies revealed that none of the duplexes studied in this work exhibits two-state melting. Within the context of the central AXT/TYA triplet, the thermal and thermodynamic stabilities of the duplexes in question change in the following order: GC > AT > GG > AA approximately TT > CC. Our estimates revealed that the thermodynamic impact of the GG, AA, and TT mismatches is confined within the central triplet. In contrast, the thermodynamic impact of the CC mismatch propagates into the adjacent helix domains and may involve 7-9 bp. We discuss implications of our results for understanding the origins of initial recognition of mismatched DNA sites by enzymes of the DNA repair machinery.

  2. Impact of DNA mismatch repair system alterations on human fertility and related treatments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min-hao; Liu, Shu-yuan; Wang, Ning; Wu, Yan; Jin, Fan

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the biological pathways, which plays a critical role in DNA homeostasis, primarily by repairing base-pair mismatches and insertion/deletion loops that occur during DNA replication. MMR also takes part in other metabolic pathways and regulates cell cycle arrest. Defects in MMR are associated with genomic instability, predisposition to certain types of cancers and resistance to certain therapeutic drugs. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the MMR system demonstrate a significant relationship with human fertility and related treatments, which helps us to understand the etiology and susceptibility of human infertility. Alterations in the MMR system may also influence the health of offspring conceived by assisted reproductive technology in humans. However, further studies are needed to explore the specific mechanisms by which the MMR system may affect human infertility. This review addresses the physiological mechanisms of the MMR system and associations between alterations of the MMR system and human fertility and related treatments, and potential effects on the next generation.

  3. Loss of DNA mismatch repair facilitates reactivation of a reporter plasmid damaged by cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, B; Kim, H-K; Bubley, G J; Aebi, S; Fink, D; Teicher, B A; Howell, S B; Christen, R D

    1999-01-01

    In addition to recognizing and repairing mismatched bases in DNA, the mismatch repair (MMR) system also detects cisplatin DNA adducts and loss of MMR results in resistance to cisplatin. A comparison was made of the ability of MMR-proficient and -deficient cells to remove cisplatin adducts from their genome and to reactivate a transiently transfected plasmid that had previously been inactivated by cisplatin to express the firefly luciferase enzyme. MMR deficiency due to loss of hMLH1 function did not change the extent of platinum (Pt) accumulation or kinetics of removal from total cellular DNA. However, MMR-deficient cells, lacking either hMLH1 or hMSH2, generated twofold more luciferase activity from a cisplatin-damaged reporter plasmid than their MMR-proficient counterparts. Thus, detection of the cisplatin adducts by the MMR system reduced the efficiency of reactivation of the damaged luciferase gene compared to cells lacking this detector. The twofold reduction in reactivation efficiency was of the same order of magnitude as the difference in cisplatin sensitivity between the MMR-proficient and -deficient cells. We conclude that although MMR-proficient and -deficient cells remove Pt from their genome at equal rates, the loss of a functional MMR system facilitates the reactivation of a cisplatin-damaged reporter gene. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360646

  4. Impact of DNA mismatch repair system alterations on human fertility and related treatments*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Min-hao; Liu, Shu-yuan; Wang, Ning; Wu, Yan; Jin, Fan

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the biological pathways, which plays a critical role in DNA homeostasis, primarily by repairing base-pair mismatches and insertion/deletion loops that occur during DNA replication. MMR also takes part in other metabolic pathways and regulates cell cycle arrest. Defects in MMR are associated with genomic instability, predisposition to certain types of cancers and resistance to certain therapeutic drugs. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the MMR system demonstrate a significant relationship with human fertility and related treatments, which helps us to understand the etiology and susceptibility of human infertility. Alterations in the MMR system may also influence the health of offspring conceived by assisted reproductive technology in humans. However, further studies are needed to explore the specific mechanisms by which the MMR system may affect human infertility. This review addresses the physiological mechanisms of the MMR system and associations between alterations of the MMR system and human fertility and related treatments, and potential effects on the next generation. PMID:26739522

  5. The spontaneous replication error and the mismatch discrimination mechanisms of human DNA polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Koag, Myong-Chul; Nam, Kwangho; Lee, Seongmin

    2014-01-01

    To provide molecular-level insights into the spontaneous replication error and the mismatch discrimination mechanisms of human DNA polymerase β (polβ), we report four crystal structures of polβ complexed with dG•dTTP and dA•dCTP mismatches in the presence of Mg2+ or Mn2+. The Mg2+-bound ground-state structures show that the dA•dCTP-Mg2+ complex adopts an ‘intermediate’ protein conformation while the dG•dTTP-Mg2+ complex adopts an open protein conformation. The Mn2+-bound ‘pre-chemistry-state’ structures show that the dA•dCTP-Mn2+ complex is structurally very similar to the dA•dCTP-Mg2+ complex, whereas the dG•dTTP-Mn2+ complex undergoes a large-scale conformational change to adopt a Watson–Crick-like dG•dTTP base pair and a closed protein conformation. These structural differences, together with our molecular dynamics simulation studies, suggest that polβ increases replication fidelity via a two-stage mismatch discrimination mechanism, where one is in the ground state and the other in the closed conformation state. In the closed conformation state, polβ appears to allow only a Watson–Crick-like conformation for purine•pyrimidine base pairs, thereby discriminating the mismatched base pairs based on their ability to form the Watson–Crick-like conformation. Overall, the present studies provide new insights into the spontaneous replication error and the replication fidelity mechanisms of polβ. PMID:25200079

  6. Loss of DNA mismatch repair function and cancer predisposition in the mouse: animal models for human hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Lisa; Edelmann, Winfried

    2004-08-15

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes underlie one of the most common hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes known in humans, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Defects of the DNA mismatch repair system are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. The generation of mice with targeted inactivating mutations in the mismatch repair genes has facilitated the in vivo study of how these genes function and how their individual loss contributes to tumorigenesis. Although there are notable limitations when using murine models to study the molecular basis of human cancer, there is remarkable similarity between the two species with respect to the contribution of individual members of the mismatch repair system to cancer susceptibility, and mouse mutants have greatly enhanced our understanding of the normal role of these genes in mutation avoidance and suppression of tumorigenesis.

  7. DNA mismatch repair proteins are required for efficient herpes simplex virus 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Mohni, Kareem N; Mastrocola, Adam S; Bai, Ping; Weller, Sandra K; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that replicates in the nucleus of its human host cell and is known to interact with many cellular DNA repair proteins. In this study, we examined the role of cellular mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in the virus life cycle. Both MSH2 and MLH1 are required for efficient replication of HSV-1 in normal human cells and are localized to viral replication compartments. In addition, a previously reported interaction between MSH6 and ICP8 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and extended to show that UL12 is also present in this complex. We also report for the first time that MLH1 associates with ND10 nuclear bodies and that like other ND10 proteins, MLH1 is recruited to the incoming genome. Knockdown of MLH1 inhibits immediate-early viral gene expression. MSH2, on the other hand, which is generally thought to play a role in mismatch repair at a step prior to that of MLH1, is not recruited to incoming genomes and appears to act at a later step in the viral life cycle. Silencing of MSH2 appears to inhibit early gene expression. Thus, both MLH1 and MSH2 are required but appear to participate in distinct events in the virus life cycle. The observation that MLH1 plays an earlier role in HSV-1 infection than does MSH2 is surprising and may indicate a novel function for MLH1 distinct from its known MSH2-dependent role in mismatch repair.

  8. DNA Mismatch Repair System: Repercussions in Cellular Homeostasis and Relationship with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Pérezprina, Juan Cristóbal; León-Galván, Miguel Ángel; Konigsberg, Mina

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that concern DNA repair have been studied in the last years due to their consequences in cellular homeostasis. The diverse and damaging stimuli that affect DNA integrity, such as changes in the genetic sequence and modifications in gene expression, can disrupt the steady state of the cell and have serious repercussions to pathways that regulate apoptosis, senescence, and cancer. These altered pathways not only modify cellular and organism longevity, but quality of life (“health-span”). The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) is highly conserved between species; its role is paramount in the preservation of DNA integrity, placing it as a necessary focal point in the study of pathways that prolong lifespan, aging, and disease. Here, we review different insights concerning the malfunction or absence of the DNA-MMR and its impact on cellular homeostasis. In particular, we will focus on DNA-MMR mechanisms regulated by known repair proteins MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and MHL1, among others. PMID:23213348

  9. Evidence that the DNA mismatch repair system removes 1-nucleotide Okazaki fragment flaps.

    PubMed

    Kadyrova, Lyudmila Y; Dahal, Basanta K; Kadyrov, Farid A

    2015-10-02

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a major role in promoting genome stability and suppressing carcinogenesis. In this work, we investigated whether the MMR system is involved in Okazaki fragment maturation. We found that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MMR system and the flap endonuclease Rad27 act in overlapping pathways that protect the nuclear genome from 1-bp insertions. In addition, we determined that purified yeast and human MutSα proteins recognize 1-nucleotide DNA and RNA flaps. In reconstituted human systems, MutSα, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and replication factor C activate MutLα endonuclease to remove the flaps. ATPase and endonuclease mutants of MutLα are defective in the flap removal. These results suggest that the MMR system contributes to the removal of 1-nucleotide Okazaki fragment flaps.

  10. Differential DNA mismatch repair underlies mutation rate variation across the human genome.

    PubMed

    Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2015-05-07

    Cancer genome sequencing has revealed considerable variation in somatic mutation rates across the human genome, with mutation rates elevated in heterochromatic late replicating regions and reduced in early replicating euchromatin. Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to underlie this, but the actual cause is unknown. Here we identify variable DNA mismatch repair (MMR) as the basis of this variation. Analysing ∼17 million single-nucleotide variants from the genomes of 652 tumours, we show that regional autosomal mutation rates at megabase resolution are largely stable across cancer types, with differences related to changes in replication timing and gene expression. However, mutations arising after the inactivation of MMR are no longer enriched in late replicating heterochromatin relative to early replicating euchromatin. Thus, differential DNA repair and not differential mutation supply is the primary cause of the large-scale regional mutation rate variation across the human genome.

  11. Loss of DNA mismatch repair imparts a selective advantage in planarian adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Resch, Alissa M; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Graveley, Brenton R; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) leads to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal and other types of cancer and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Loss of MMR function results in a mutator phenotype that likely underlies its role in tumorigenesis. However, loss of MMR also results in the elimination of a DNA damage-induced checkpoint/apoptosis activation barrier that may allow damaged cells to grow unchecked. A fundamental question is whether loss of MMR provides pre-cancerous stem cells an immediate selective advantage in addition to establishing a mutator phenotype. To test this hypothesis in an in vivo system, we utilized the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea which contains a significant population of identifiable adult stem cells. We identified a planarian homolog of human MSH2, a MMR gene which is mutated in 38% of LS cases. The planarian Smed-msh2 is expressed in stem cells and some progeny. We depleted Smed-msh2 mRNA levels by RNA-interference and found a striking survival advantage in these animals treated with a cytotoxic DNA alkylating agent compared to control animals. We demonstrated that this tolerance to DNA damage is due to the survival of mitotically active, MMR-deficient stem cells. Our results suggest that loss of MMR provides an in vivo survival advantage to the stem cell population in the presence of DNA damage that may have implications for tumorigenesis.

  12. Loss of DNA Mismatch Repair Imparts a Selective Advantage in Planarian Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbach, Jessica P.; Resch, Alissa M.; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Graveley, Brenton R.; Heinen, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) leads to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal and other types of cancer and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Loss of MMR function results in a mutator phenotype that likely underlies its role in tumorigenesis. However, loss of MMR also results in the elimination of a DNA damage-induced checkpoint/apoptosis activation barrier that may allow damaged cells to grow unchecked. A fundamental question is whether loss of MMR provides pre-cancerous stem cells an immediate selective advantage in addition to establishing a mutator phenotype. To test this hypothesis in an in vivo system, we utilized the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea which contains a significant population of identifiable adult stem cells. We identified a planarian homolog of human MSH2, a MMR gene which is mutated in 38% of LS cases. The planarian Smed-msh2 is expressed in stem cells and some progeny. We depleted Smed-msh2 mRNA levels by RNA-interference and found a striking survival advantage in these animals treated with a cytotoxic DNA alkylating agent compared to control animals. We demonstrated that this tolerance to DNA damage is due to the survival of mitotically active, MMR-deficient stem cells. Our results suggest that loss of MMR provides an in vivo survival advantage to the stem cell population in the presence of DNA damage that may have implications for tumorigenesis. PMID:21747960

  13. NMR study of the conformation of the 2-aminopurine: Cytosine mismatch in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, P.A.; Wemmer, D.E. |; Goodman, M.F.

    1996-04-02

    DNA polymerase makes errors by misincorporating natural DNA bases and base analogs. Because of the wide variety of possible mismatches and the varying efficiency with which they are repaired, structural studies are necessary to understand in detail how these mispairs differ and can be distinguished from standard Watson-Crick base pairs. 2-Aminopurine (AP) is a highly mutagenic base analog. The objective of this study was to determine the geometry of the AP{center_dot}C mispair in DNA at neutral pH. Although several studies have focused on the AP{center_dot} mispair in DNA, there is not as of yet consensus on its structure. At least four models have been proposed for this mispair. Through the use of NMR spectroscopy with selective {sup 15}N-labeling of exocyclic amino nitrogens on bases of interest, we are able to resolve ambiguities in previous studies. We find here that, in two different DNA sequences, the AP{center_dot}C mispair at neutral and high pH is in a wobble geometry. The structure and stability of this base mispair is dependent upon the local base sequence. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Probing the interactions of the solvated electron with DNA by molecular dynamics simulations: II. bromodeoxyuridine-thymidine mismatched DNA.

    PubMed

    Gantchev, Tsvetan G; Hunting, Darel J

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of solvated electrons (e(-)(aq)) with DNA results in various types of DNA lesions. The in vitro and in vivo sensitisation of DNA to (e(-)(aq))-induced damage is achieved by incorporation of the electron-affinity radiosensitiser bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) in place of thymidine. However, in DNA duplexes containing single-stranded regions (bulged BUdR-DNA), the type of lesion is different and the efficiency of damage is enhanced. In particular, DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL) form at high efficiency in bulged DNA but are not detectable in completely duplex DNA. Knowledge about the processes and interactions leading to these differences is obscure. Previously, we addressed the problem by applying molecular modelling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to a system of normal (BUdR.A)-DNA and a hydrated electron, where the excess electron was modelled as a localised e(-)(H2O6) anionic cluster. The goal of the present study was to apply the same MD simulation to a wobble DNA-e(-)(aq) system, containing a pyrimidine-pyrimidine mismatched base pair, BUdR.T. The results show an overall dynamic pattern similar to that of the e(-)(aq) motion around normal DNA. However, the number of configuration states when e(-)(aq)) was particularly close to DNA is different. Moreover, in the (BUdR.T)-wobble DNA system, the electron frequently approaches the brominated strand, including BUdR, which was not observed with the normal (BUdR.A)-DNA. The structure and exchange of water at the sites of e(-)(aq) immobilisation near DNA were also characterised. The structural dynamics of the wobble DNA is prone to more extensive perturbations, including frequent formation of cross-strand (cs) interatomic contacts. The structural deviations correlated with e(-)(aq) approaching DNA from the major groove side, with sodium ions trapped deep in the minor groove. Altogether, the obtained results confirm and/or throw light on dynamic-structure determinants possibly responsible for the

  15. Effect of bis(beta-chloroethyl)sulfide (BCES) on base mismatch repair of DNA in monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, L J; Bernstein, I A

    1991-11-01

    Sulfur mustard, bis(beta-chloroethyl)sulfide (BCES), a bifunctional alkylating agent, is a vesicant whose mode of action involves interference with the integrity of cellular DNA. Alkylation of DNA is responsible for some of the biological effects of BCES in tissue. Another possible mechanism by which BCES could exert its toxic effect is interference with high fidelity repair of damaged DNA. This study evaluated the possible effects of BCES on the repair of specific errors, i.e., mismatched bases, in the DNA. Heteroduplex (ht) DNA, formed between two temperature-sensitive mutants of SV40 virus, tsA239 and tsA255, each having a different point mutation in the gene for large T antigen, was used to study the effect of BCES on mismatched base repair in African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells. AGMK cells were exposed to dilute solutions of BCES in methylene chloride (MC) prior to cationic lipofection with ht DNA. In order for the cells to produce wild type (wt) SV40 DNA at a nonpermissive temperature (41 degrees C), repair of at least one of the two mismatches in the DNA had to occur. It was observed that (a) as the concentration of BCES was increased, a proportionally longer delay in the appearance of wt DNA at 41 degrees C was observed in treated cells transfected with ht DNA as compared with cultures exposed to MC alone and then transfected with ht DNA, (b) there was no such effect in exposed AGMK cells transfected with wt DNA, (c) wt and ht DNA were transfected at similar rates in unexposed cells, and (d) BCES did not affect the rate of transfection of wt cells. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that BCES affects mismatched base repair.

  16. Molecular recognition of T:G mismatched base pairs in DNA as studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riccardi Sirtori, Federico; Aldini, Giancarlo; Colombo, Maristella; Colombo, Nicoletta; Malyszko, Jan; Vistoli, Giulio; D'Alessio, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Postreplicative mismatch repair (MMR) is a cellular system involved in the recognition and correction of DNA polymerase errors that escape detection in proofreading. Of the various mismatched bases, T:G pairing in DNA is one of the more common mutations leading to the formation of tumors in humans. In addition, the absence of the MMR system can generate resistance to several chemotherapeutic agents, particularly DNA-damaging substances. The main purpose of this study was the setup and validation of an electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry method for the identification of small molecules that are able to recognize T:G mismatches in DNA targets. These findings could be useful for the discovery of new antitumor drugs. The analytical method is based on the ability of electrospray to preserve the noncovalent adducts present in solution and transfer them to the gas phase. Lexitropsin derivatives (polyimidazole compounds) have been previously described as selective for T:G mismatch binding by NMR and ITC studies. We synthesized and tested various polyimidazole derivatives, one of which in particular (NMS-057) showed a higher affinity for an oligonucleotide DNA sequence containing a T:G mismatched base pair. To rationalize these findings, molecular docking studies were performed using available NMR structures. Moreover, ESI-MS experiments, performed on an orbitrap mass spectrometer, highlighted the formation of heterodimeric complexes between DNA sequences, distamycin A, and polyimidazole compounds. Our results confirm that this ESI method could be a valuable tool for the identification of new molecules able to specifically recognize T:G mismatched base pairs.

  17. Effects of suppressing the DNA mismatch repair system on homeologous recombination in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tam, Sheh May; Hays, John B; Chetelat, Roger T

    2011-12-01

    In plant breeding, the ability to manipulate genetic (meiotic) recombination would be beneficial for facilitating gene transfer from wild relatives of crop plants. The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system helps maintain genetic integrity by correcting base mismatches that arise via DNA synthesis or damage, and antagonizes recombination between homeologous (divergent) DNA sequences. Previous studies have established that the genomes of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and the wild relative S. lycopersicoides are substantially diverged (homeologous) such that recombination between their chromosomes is strongly reduced. Here, we report the effects on homeologous recombination of suppressing endogenous MMR genes in S. lycopersicum via RNAi-induced silencing of SlMSH2 and SlMSH7 or overexpressing dominant negatives of Arabidopsis MSH2 (AtMSH2-DN) in an alien substitution line (SL-8) of S. lycopersicoides in tomato. We show that certain inhibitions of MMR (RNAi of SlMSH7, AtMSH2-DN) are associated with modest increases in homeologous recombination, ranging from 3.8 to 29.2% (average rate of 17.8%) compared to controls. Unexpectedly, only the AtMSH2-DN proteins but not RNAi-induced silencing of MSH2 was found to increase homeologous recombination. The ratio of single to double crossovers (SCO:DCO ratio) decreased by approximately 50% in progeny of the AtMSH2-DN parents. An increase in the frequency of heterozygous SL-8 plants was also observed in the progeny of the SlMSH7-RNAi parents. Our findings may contribute to acceleration of introgression in cultivated tomato.

  18. DNA methylation by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea: methylation pattern changes in single- and double-stranded DNA, and in DNA with mismatched or bulged guanines.

    PubMed Central

    Wurdeman, R L; Douskey, M C; Gold, B

    1993-01-01

    The detection of abnormal DNA base pairing arrangements and conformations is chemically probed in synthetic 32P-end-labeled deoxyribonucleotide oligomers using N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and 2,12,-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetraazabicyclo-[11.3.1]heptadeca-1 -[17],2,11,13,15 pentaene-Ni (II) (Ni-complex) with KHSO5. The DNA targets studied are single-stranded (s-s) DNA, double-stranded (d-s) DNA, d-s DNA with G-G, G-A and G-T mismatches, d-s DNA with a single bulged G and d-s DNA with two bulged G's. The effect of the non-Watson--Crick structures on the formation of N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) by MNU and the oxidation of G by Ni-complex is reported along with the Tm's and circular dichroism spectra of the different duplex oligomers. The results for MNU and Ni-complex show that the qualitative and quantitative character of the cleavage patterns at a G3 run change with the nature of the abnormal base pairing motif. Based on the DNA substrates studied, the results indicate that a combination of reagents which report electronic and steric perturbations can be a useful approach to monitor DNA mismatches and bulges. Images PMID:8177747

  19. Single-mismatch position-sensitive detection of DNA based on a bifunctional ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    García, T; Revenga-Parra, M; Abruña, H D; Pariente, F; Lorenzo, E

    2008-01-01

    A ruthenium complex, pentaamine ruthenium [3-(2-phenanthren-9-yl-vinyl)-pyridine] (which we refer to as RuL in the text) generated in situ has been used as a sensitive and selective electrochemical indicator in DNA sensing. The complex incorporates dual functionalities with the Ru center providing a redox probe and the ligand (L) providing a fluorescent tag. The presence of the aromatic groups in the ligand endows the complex with an intercalative character and makes it capable of binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) more efficiently than to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Combining spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques, we have elucidated the nature of the interactions. From these data we conclude that the binding mode is fundamentally intercalative. The ligand-based fluorescence allows characterization of the complex formation as well as for melting experiments to be carried out. The metal-based redox center is employed as an electrochemical indicator to detect the hybridization event in a DNA biosensor. The biosensor has been developed by immobilization of a thiolated capture probe sequence from Helicobacter pylori onto gold electrodes. With the use of this approach, complementary target sequences of Helicobacter can be quantified over the range of 106 to 708 pmol with a detection limit of 92+/-0.4 pmol and a linear correlation coefficient of 0.995. In addition, this approach allows the detection, without the need for a hybridization suppressor in solution, such as formamide, of not only a single mismatch but also its position in a specific sequence of H. pylori, due to the selective interaction of this bifunctional ruthenium complex with dsDNA.

  20. The impact of sequence divergence and DNA mismatch repair on homeologous recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François

    2006-03-01

    We examined the effects of substrate divergence and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) on recombination in Arabidopsis thaliana. Relative to the frequency observed in plants with a homologous construct (0% divergence), recombination was decreased 4.1-, 9.6-, 11.7- or 20.3-fold, respectively, in lines with constructs containing 0.5%, 2%, 4% or 9% divergence between the recombination substrates. To evaluate the contribution of the MMR system in this decrease, 12 independent reporter lines (two or three lines per reporter construct) were crossed to an AtMSH2 T-DNA insertional mutant. We examined the recombination frequency in progeny homozygous for a reporter T-DNA and homozygous either for the wild type or the mutant allele of AtMSH2. The loss of MMR activity led to a two- to ninefold increase in homeologous recombination and the size of the increase did not seem to correlate with the amount of divergence. Inversely, complementation of the insertional mutant with a wild-type cDNA of AtMSH2 reduced recombination. Our results demonstrate clearly that sequence divergence can dramatically reduce the recombination frequency in plants and that the MMR system plays a part in this decrease.

  1. Slow conformational changes in MutS and DNA direct ordered transitions between mismatch search, recognition and signaling of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anushi; Doucette, Christopher; Biro, F Noah; Hingorani, Manju M

    2013-11-15

    MutS functions in mismatch repair (MMR) to scan DNA for errors, identify a target site and trigger subsequent events in the pathway leading to error removal and DNA re-synthesis. These actions, enabled by the ATPase activity of MutS, are now beginning to be analyzed from the perspective of the protein itself. This study provides the first ensemble transient kinetic data on MutS conformational dynamics as it works with DNA and ATP in MMR. Using a combination of fluorescence probes (on Thermus aquaticus MutS and DNA) and signals (intensity, anisotropy and resonance energy transfer), we have monitored the timing of key conformational changes in MutS that are coupled to mismatch binding and recognition, ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as sliding clamp formation and signaling of repair. Significant findings include (a) a slow step that follows weak initial interaction between MutS and DNA, in which concerted conformational changes in both macromolecules control mismatch recognition, and (b) rapid, binary switching of MutS conformations that is concerted with ATP binding and hydrolysis and (c) is stalled after mismatch recognition to control formation of the ATP-bound MutS sliding clamp. These rate-limiting pre- and post-mismatch recognition events outline the mechanism of action of MutS on DNA during initiation of MMR.

  2. Characterization of a Thermostable 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Specific for GO/N Mismatches from the Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Thermoplasma volcanium

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Miki; Hata, Chieri; Ukita, Munetada; Fukushima, Chie; Matsuura, Chihiro; Kawashima-Ohya, Yoshie; Tomobe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of guanine (G) to 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (GO) forms one of the major DNA lesions generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The GO can be corrected by GO DNA glycosylases (Ogg), enzymes involved in base excision repair (BER). Unrepaired GO induces mismatched base pairing with adenine (A); as a result, the mismatch causes a point mutation, from G paired with cytosine (C) to thymine (T) paired with adenine (A), during DNA replication. Here, we report the characterization of a putative Ogg from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma volcanium. The 204-amino acid sequence of the putative Ogg (TVG_RS00315) shares significant sequence homology with the DNA glycosylases of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MjaOgg) and Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsoOgg). The six histidine-tagged recombinant TVG_RS00315 protein gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The Ogg protein is thermostable, with optimal activity near a pH of 7.5 and a temperature of 60°C. The enzyme displays DNA glycosylase, and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) lyase activities on GO/N (where N is A, T, G, or C) mismatch; yet it cannot eliminate U from U/G or T from T/G, as mismatch glycosylase (MIG) can. These results indicate that TvoOgg-encoding TVG_RS00315 is a member of the Ogg2 family of T. volcanium. PMID:27799846

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction and increased sensitivity to excitotoxicity in mice deficient in DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Francisconi, Simona; Codenotti, Mara; Ferrari Toninelli, Giulia; Uberti, Daniela; Memo, Maurizio

    2006-07-01

    The expression profile in the hippocampus of mice lacking one allele of the MutS homologue (Msh2), gene, which is one of the most representative components of the DNA mismatch repair system, was analysed to understand whether defects in the repair or in response to DNA damage could impact significantly on brain function. The overall results suggested a reduction in mitochondrial function as indicated by gene expression analysis, biochemical and behavioural studies. In the hippocampus of Msh2+/- mice, array data, validated by RT-PCR and western blot analysis, showed reduced expression levels of genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (CoxII), ATP synthase subunit beta and superoxide dismutase 1. Biochemically, mitochondria from the hippocampus and cortex of these mice show reduced CoxII and increased aconitase activity. Behaviourally, these alterations resulted in mice with increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures and hippocampal neuronal loss. These data suggest that lack of an efficient system involved in recognizing and repairing DNA damage may generate a brain mitochondriopathy.

  4. Faster, safer, and better DNA purification by ultracentrifugation using GelRed stain and development of mismatch oligo DNA for genome walking.

    PubMed

    Kasajima, Ichiro; Ohtsubo, Norihiro; Sasaki, Katsutomo

    2014-01-01

    Purification of plant DNA involves lengthy ultracentrifugation using ethidium bromide. Here, ultracentrifugation method is improved by staining with GelRed. The resulting method is faster, safer and of higher sensitivity. Purified DNA quality was confirmed by treatment with restriction enzymes and isolation of gene promoters. New type of long adaptor with mismatch sequence was also developed for promoter isolation.

  5. The MutSα-Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Interaction in Human DNA Mismatch Repair*S⃞♦

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pohlhaus, Timothy J.; Chen, Sihong; Hura, Gregory L.; Dzantiev, Leonid; Beese, Lorena S.; Modrich, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the interaction parameters, conformation, and functional significance of the human MutSα· proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) complex in mismatch repair. The two proteins associate with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a KD of 0.7 μm in the absence or presence of heteroduplex DNA. PCNA does not influence the affinity of MutSα for a mismatch, and mismatch-bound MutSα binds PCNA. Small angle x-ray scattering studies have established the molecular parameters of the complex, which are consistent with an elongated conformation in which the two proteins associate in an end-to-end fashion in a manner that does not involve an extended unstructured tether, as has been proposed for yeast MutSα and PCNA (Shell, S. S., Putnam, C. D., and Kolodner, R. D. (2007) Mol. Cell26 ,565 -57817531814). MutSα variants lacking the PCNA interaction motif are functional in 3′- or 5′-directed mismatch-provoked excision, but display a partial defect in 5′-directed mismatch repair. This finding is consistent with the modest mutability conferred by inactivation of the MutSα PCNA interaction motif and suggests that interaction of the replication clamp with other repair protein(s) accounts for the essential role of PCNA in MutSα-dependent mismatch repair. PMID:18326858

  6. An Optimized Pentaplex PCR for Detecting DNA Mismatch Repair-Deficient Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hamelin, Richard; Boland, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Microsatellite instability (MSI) is used to screen colorectal cancers (CRC) for Lynch Syndrome, and to predict outcome and response to treatment. The current technique for measuring MSI requires DNA from normal and neoplastic tissues, and fails to identify tumors with specific DNA mismatch repair (MMR) defects. We tested a panel of five quasi-monomorphic mononucleotide repeat markers amplified in a single multiplex PCR reaction (pentaplex PCR) to detect MSI. Experimental Design We investigated a cohort of 213 CRC patients, comprised of 114 MMR-deficient and 99 MMR-proficient tumors. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis evaluated the expression of MLH1, MSH2, PMS2 and MSH6. MSI status was defined by differences in the quasi-monomorphic variation range (QMVR) from a pool of normal DNA samples, and measuring differences in allele lengths in tumor DNA. Results Amplification of 426 normal alleles allowed optimization of the QMVR at each marker, and eliminated the requirement for matched reference DNA to define MSI in each sample. Using ≥2/5 unstable markers as the criteria for MSI resulted in a sensitivity of 95.6% (95% CI = 90.1–98.1%) and a positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI = 96.6%–100%). Detection of MSH6-deficiency was limited using all techniques. Data analysis with a three-marker panel (BAT26, NR21 and NR27) was comparable in sensitivity (97.4%) and positive predictive value (96.5%) to the five marker panel. Both approaches were superior to the standard approach to measuring MSI. Conclusions An optimized pentaplex (or triplex) PCR offers a facile, robust, very inexpensive, highly sensitive, and specific assay for the identification of MSI in CRC. PMID:20195377

  7. Quantifying the contributions of base selectivity, proofreading and mismatch repair to nuclear DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    St Charles, Jordan A; Liberti, Sascha E; Williams, Jessica S; Lujan, Scott A; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-07-01

    Mismatches generated during eukaryotic nuclear DNA replication are removed by two evolutionarily conserved error correction mechanisms acting in series, proofreading and mismatch repair (MMR). Defects in both processes are associated with increased susceptibility to cancer. To better understand these processes, we have quantified base selectivity, proofreading and MMR during nuclear DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the absence of proofreading and MMR, the primary leading and lagging strand replicases, polymerase ɛ and polymerase δ respectively, synthesize DNA in vivo with somewhat different error rates and specificity, and with apparent base selectivity that is more than 100 times higher than measured in vitro. Moreover, leading and lagging strand replication fidelity rely on a different balance between proofreading and MMR. On average, proofreading contributes more to replication fidelity than does MMR, but their relative contributions vary from nearly all proofreading of some mismatches to mostly MMR of other mismatches. Thus accurate replication of the two DNA strands results from a non-uniform and variable balance between error prevention, proofreading and MMR.

  8. Spontaneous frameshift mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: accumulation during DNA replication and removal by proofreading and mismatch repair activities.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, C N; Jinks-Robertson, S

    2001-01-01

    The accumulation of frameshift mutations during DNA synthesis is determined by the rate at which frameshift intermediates are generated during DNA polymerization and the efficiency with which frameshift intermediates are removed by DNA polymerase-associated exonucleolytic proofreading activity and/or the postreplicative mismatch repair machinery. To examine the relative contributions of these factors to replication fidelity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we determined the reversion rates and spectra of the lys2 Delta Bgl +1 frameshift allele. Wild-type and homozygous mutant diploid strains with all possible combinations of defects in the exonuclease activities of DNA polymerases delta and epsilon (conferred by the pol3-01 and pol2-4 alleles, respectively) and in mismatch repair (deletion of MSH2) were analyzed. Although there was no direct correlation between homopolymer run length and frameshift accumulation in the wild-type strain, such a correlation was evident in the triple mutant strain lacking all repair capacity. Furthermore, examination of strains defective in one or two repair activities revealed distinct biases in the removal of the corresponding frameshift intermediates by exonucleolytic proofreading and/or mismatch repair. Finally, these analyses suggest that the mismatch repair machinery may be important for generating some classes of frameshift mutations in yeast. PMID:11560887

  9. A Novel Electrochemical Sensor Based on [Ru(NH3)6]Cl3 as a Redox Indicator for the Detection of G-G Mismatched DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqian; Huang, Min; Li, Jiao; He, Hanping; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel electrochemical sensor was developed for the rapid detection of G-G mismatched DNA based on hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride ([Ru(NH3)6]Cl3) as a redox indicator. The sensor platform was constructed by immobilizing small molecules (NC-linker) on the gold electrode via amide bonds. The as-prepared NC-linker as the nucleic acids recognition molecule can interact with the G base of DNA. After the sensor was incubated with G-G mismatched DNA, the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) acted as carriers of the signal tags-[Ru(NH3)6]Cl3, which resulted in a remarkable electrochemical signal. More binding of [Ru(NH3)6]Cl3 led to increases of the electrochemical signal. Other mismatched DNA produced only a low response, as well as complementary DNA. Thus G-G mismatched DNA can be easily discriminated from other mismatched and complementary DNA based on the sensor. Furthermore, the method was simple, rapid and repeatable for the detection of G-G mismatched DNA. The selective detection of target dsDNA was achieved by a relative current ratio of the target and control DNA. These results demonstrated that this strategy could provide great promise for the rapid and specific detection of other sequence-specific DNA.

  10. Short Hairpin RNA Suppression of Thymidylate Synthase Produces DNA Mismatches and Results in Excellent Radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Sheryl A.; Cooper, Kristin S.; Mannava, Sudha; Nikiforov, Mikhail A.; Shewach, Donna S.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA)-mediated suppression of thymidylate synthase (TS) on cytotoxicity and radiosensitization and the mechanism by which these events occur. Methods and Materials: shRNA suppression of TS was compared with 5-fluoro-2 Prime -deoxyuridine (FdUrd) inactivation of TS with or without ionizing radiation in HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were measured by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle effects were measured by flow cytometry. The effects of FdUrd or shRNA suppression of TS on dNTP deoxynucleotide triphosphate imbalances and consequent nucleotide misincorporations into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and as pSP189 plasmid mutations, respectively. Results: TS shRNA produced profound ({>=}90%) and prolonged ({>=}8 days) suppression of TS in HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas FdUrd increased TS expression. TS shRNA also produced more specific and prolonged effects on dNTPs deoxynucleotide triphosphates compared with FdUrd. TS shRNA suppression allowed accumulation of cells in S-phase, although its effects were not as long-lasting as those of FdUrd. Both treatments resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1. TS shRNA alone was less cytotoxic than FdUrd but was equally effective as FdUrd in eliciting radiosensitization (radiation enhancement ratio: TS shRNA, 1.5-1.7; FdUrd, 1.4-1.6). TS shRNA and FdUrd produced a similar increase in the number and type of pSP189 mutations. Conclusions: TS shRNA produced less cytotoxicity than FdUrd but was equally effective at radiosensitizing tumor cells. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FdUrd on TS alone is sufficient to elicit radiosensitization with FdUrd, but it only partially explains FdUrd-mediated cytotoxicity and cell cycle inhibition. The increase in DNA mismatches after TS shRNA or FdUrd supports a causal and sufficient role for the depletion of dTTP thymidine triphosphate and consequent DNA

  11. Concurrent genetic alterations in DNA polymerase proofreading and mismatch repair in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Rintaro; Miyashita, Kaname; Inoue, Mayuko; Shimamoto, Akiyoshi; Yan, Zhao; Egashira, Akinori; Oki, Eiji; Kakeji, Yoshishiro; Oda, Shinya; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Genomic sequences encoding the 3′ exonuclease (proofreading) domains of both replicative DNA polymerases, pol delta and pol epsilon, were explored simultaneously in human colorectal carcinomas including six established cell lines. Three unequivocal sequence alterations, including one previously reported, were found, and all these were considered as dysfunctional mutations in light of the local amino-acid sequences. In particular, the F367S mutation found in the POLE gene encoding the pol epsilon catalytic subunit, which includes the proofreading domain, is the first found in human diseases. Surprisingly, the tumours carrying these proofreading domain mutations were all defective in DNA mismatch repair (MMR). In addition to the two cell lines with acknowledged MMR gene mutations, the third tumour was also demonstrated to harbour a distinct mutation in MLH1, and indeed exhibited a microsatellite-unstable phenotype. These findings suggest that, in concert with MMR deficiency, defective polymerase proofreading may also contribute to the mutator phenotype observed in human colorectal cancer. Our observations may suggest previously unrecognised complexities in the molecular abnormalities underlying the mutator phenotype in human neoplasms. PMID:21157497

  12. Flanking sequence specificity determines coding microsatellite heteroduplex and mutation rates with defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR).

    PubMed

    Chung, H; Lopez, C G; Young, D J; Lai, J F; Holmstrom, J; Ream-Robinson, D; Cabrera, B L; Carethers, J M

    2010-04-15

    The activin type II receptor (ACVR2) contains two identical microsatellites in exons 3 and 10, but only the exon 10 microsatellite is frameshifted in mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colonic tumors. The reason for this selectivity is not known. We hypothesized that ACVR2 frameshifts were influenced by DNA sequences surrounding the microsatellite. We constructed plasmids in which exons 3 or 10 of ACVR2 were cloned +1 bp out of frame of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), allowing -1 bp frameshift to express EGFP. Plasmids were stably transfected into MMR-deficient cells, and subsequent non-fluorescent cells were sorted, cultured and harvested for mutation analysis. We swapped DNA sequences flanking the exon 3 and 10 microsatellites to test our hypothesis. Native ACVR2 exon 3 and 10 microsatellites underwent heteroduplex formation (A(7)/T(8)) in hMLH1(-/-) cells, but only exon 10 microsatellites fully mutated (A(7)/T(7)) in both hMLH1(-/-) and hMSH6(-/-) backgrounds, showing selectivity for exon 10 frameshifts and inability of exon 3 heteroduplexes to fully mutate. Substituting nucleotides flanking the exon 3 microsatellite for nucleotides flanking the exon 10 microsatellite significantly reduced heteroduplex and full mutation in hMLH1(-/-) cells. When the exon 3 microsatellite was flanked by nucleotides normally surrounding the exon 10 microsatellite, fully mutant exon 3 frameshifts appeared. Mutation selectivity for ACVR2 lies partly with flanking nucleotides surrounding each microsatellite.

  13. Thermodynamic properties of the specific binding between Ag+ ions and C:C mismatched base pairs in duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Miyakawa, Yukako; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2011-02-01

    Metal-mediated base pairs formed by the interaction between metal ions and artificial bases in oligonucleotides have been developed for potential applications in nanotechnology. We recently found that a natural C:C mismatched base pair bound to an Ag(+) ion to generate a novel metal-mediated base pair in duplex DNA. Preparation of the novel C-Ag-C base pair involving natural bases is more convenient than that of metal-mediated base pairs involving artificial bases because time-consuming base synthesis is not required. Here, we examined the thermodynamic properties of the binding between the Ag(+) ion and each of single and double C:C mismatched base pair in duplex DNA by isothermal titration calorimetry. The Ag(+) ion specifically bound to the C:C mismatched base pair at a 1:1 molar ratio with 10(6) M(-1) binding constant, which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion-DNA interactions. The specific binding between the Ag(+) ion and the single C:C mismatched base pair was mainly driven by the positive dehydration entropy change and the negative binding enthalpy change. In the interaction between the Ag(+) ion and each of the consecutive and interrupted double C:C mismatched base pairs, stoichiometric binding at a 1:1 molar ratio was achieved in each step of the first and second Ag(+) binding. The binding affinity for the second Ag(+) binding was similar to that for the first Ag(+) binding. Stoichiometric binding without interference and negative cooperativity may be favorable for aligning multiple Ag(+) ions in duplex DNA for applications of the metal-mediated base pairs in nanotechnology.

  14. Crystal Structure of Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Bound to DNA Elucidates Sequence-Specific Mismatch Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Morgan, M.T.; Pozharski, E.; Drohat, A.C.

    2009-05-19

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides produces m{sup 5}CpG, an epigenetic modification that is important for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability in vertebrate cells. However, m{sup 5}C deamination yields mutagenic G{center_dot}T mispairs, which are implicated in genetic disease, cancer, and aging. Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) removes T from G{center_dot}T mispairs, producing an abasic (or AP) site, and follow-on base excision repair proteins restore the G{center_dot}C pair. hTDG is inactive against normal A{center_dot}T pairs, and is most effective for G{center_dot}T mispairs and other damage located in a CpG context. The molecular basis of these important catalytic properties has remained unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure of hTDG (catalytic domain, hTDG{sup cat}) in complex with abasic DNA, at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme crystallized in a 2:1 complex with DNA, one subunit bound at the abasic site, as anticipated, and the other at an undamaged (nonspecific) site. Isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility-shift experiments indicate that hTDG and hTDG{sup cat} can bind abasic DNA with 1:1 or 2:1 stoichiometry. Kinetics experiments show that the 1:1 complex is sufficient for full catalytic (base excision) activity, suggesting that the 2:1 complex, if adopted in vivo, might be important for some other activity of hTDG, perhaps binding interactions with other proteins. Our structure reveals interactions that promote the stringent specificity for guanine versus adenine as the pairing partner of the target base and interactions that likely confer CpG sequence specificity. We find striking differences between hTDG and its prokaryotic ortholog (MUG), despite the relatively high (32%) sequence identity.

  15. DNA Mismatch Repair Complex MutSβ Promotes GAA·TTC Repeat Expansion in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Anasheh; Ditch, Scott; Wang, Jeffrey; Grabczyk, Ed

    2012-01-01

    While DNA repair has been implicated in CAG·CTG repeat expansion, its role in the GAA·TTC expansion of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is less clear. We have developed a human cellular model that recapitulates the DNA repeat expansion found in FRDA patient tissues. In this model, GAA·TTC repeats expand incrementally and continuously. We have previously shown that the expansion rate is linked to transcription within the repeats. Our working hypothesis is that structures formed within the GAA·TTC repeat during transcription attract DNA repair enzymes that then facilitate the expansion process. MutSβ, a heterodimer of MSH2 and MSH3, is known to have a role in CAG·CTG repeat expansion. We now show that shRNA knockdown of either MSH2 or MSH3 slowed GAA·TTC expansion in our system. We further characterized the role of MutSβ in GAA·TTC expansion using a functional assay in primary FRDA patient-derived fibroblasts. These fibroblasts have no known propensity for instability in their native state. Ectopic expression of MSH2 and MSH3 induced GAA·TTC repeat expansion in the native FXN gene. MSH2 is central to mismatch repair and its absence or reduction causes a predisposition to cancer. Thus, despite its essential role in GAA·TTC expansion, MSH2 is not an attractive therapeutic target. The absence or reduction of MSH3 is not strongly associated with cancer predisposition. Accordingly, MSH3 has been suggested as a therapeutic target for CAG·CTG repeat expansion disorders. Our results suggest that MSH3 may also serve as a therapeutic target to slow the expansion of GAA·TTC repeats in the future. PMID:22787155

  16. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  17. Mechanism of cadmium-mediated inhibition of Msh2-Msh6 function in DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Markus; Levin, Mikhail K; Hingorani, Karan S; Biro, F Noah; Hingorani, Manju M

    2009-10-13

    The observation that Cadmium (Cd(2+)) inhibits Msh2-Msh6, which is responsible for identifying base pair mismatches and other discrepancies in DNA, has led to the proposal that selective targeting of this protein and consequent suppression of DNA repair or apoptosis promote the carcinogenic effects of the heavy metal toxin. It has been suggested that Cd(2+) binding to specific sites on Msh2-Msh6 blocks its DNA binding and ATPase activities. To investigate the mechanism of inhibition, we measured Cd(2+) binding to Msh2-Msh6, directly and by monitoring changes in protein structure and enzymatic activity. Global fitting of the data to a multiligand binding model revealed that binding of about 100 Cd(2+) ions per Msh2-Msh6 results in its inactivation. This finding indicates that the inhibitory effect of Cd(2+) occurs via a nonspecific mechanism. Cd(2+) and Msh2-Msh6 interactions involve cysteine sulfhydryl groups, and the high Cd(2+):Msh2-Msh6 ratio implicates other ligands such as histidine, aspartate, glutamate, and the peptide backbone as well. Our study also shows that cadmium inactivates several unrelated enzymes similarly, consistent with a nonspecific mechanism of inhibition. Targeting of a variety of proteins, including Msh2-Msh6, in this generic manner would explain the marked broad-spectrum impact of Cd(2+) on biological processes. We propose that the presence of multiple nonspecific Cd(2+) binding sites on proteins and their propensity to change conformation on interaction with Cd(2+) are critical determinants of the susceptibility of corresponding biological systems to cadmium toxicity.

  18. Relationship between DNA mismatch repair genes expression, Ku-genes expression and ploidy-related parameters in the progression of pigmented lesions of the skin.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Tscherny, Michael; Stachura, Jerzy; Ruschenburg, Ilka; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Defects of DNA repair systems in cutaneous tumours are related to DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, PMS1, PMS2) and Ku70/80 genes involved in double- strand repair. In this study we investigated the statistical relationship between these systems and DNA-ploidy-related parameters in 19 naevus cell naevi, 23 lentigos maligna, 76 primary melanomas and 31 melanoma metastases, applying the correlation coefficient according to Spearman. In naevi significant correlations were found between Ku70/80 gene expression and some ploidy-related parameters. In lentigos, additionally, some significant correlations between the expression of DNA mismatch repair genes were found. Similar results were demonstrated for primary melanomas. In metastases no one significant correlation between DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku-genes was present. We postulate that DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku70/80 genes are functionally independent and that some of them are able to influence ploidy-related parameters.

  19. The Arabidopsis DNA mismatch repair gene PMS1 restricts somatic recombination between homeologous sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Dion, Eric; Richard, Gabriel; Domingue, Olivier; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François J

    2009-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system contributes to maintaining the fidelity of genetic information by correcting replication errors and preventing illegitimate recombination events. This study aimed to examine the function(s) of the Arabidopsis thaliana PMS1 gene (AtPMS1), one of three homologs of the bacterial MutL gene in plants. Two independent mutant alleles (Atpms1-1 and Atpms1-2) were obtained and one of these (Atpms1-1) was studied in detail. The mutant exhibited a reduction in seed set and a bias against the transmission of the mutant allele. Somatic recombination, both homologous and homeologous, was examined using a set of reporter constructs. Homologous recombination remained unchanged in the mutant while homeologous recombination was between 1.7- and 4.8-fold higher than in the wild type. This increase in homeologous recombination frequency was not correlated with the degree of sequence divergence. In RNAi lines, a range of increases in homeologous recombination were observed with two lines showing a 3.3-fold and a 3.6-fold increase. These results indicate that the AtPMS1 gene contributes to an antirecombination activity aimed at restricting recombination between diverged sequences.

  20. DNA mismatch repair gene MSH6 implicated in determining age at natural menopause

    PubMed Central

    Perry, John R.B.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Chasman, Daniel I.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Elks, Cathy; Albrecht, Eva; Andrulis, Irene L.; Beesley, Jonathan; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bergmann, Sven; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Brown, Judith; Buring, Julie E.; Campbell, Harry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Corre, Tanguy; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davies, Gail; Deary, Ian J.; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Esko, Tõnu; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flyger, Henrik; Fraser, Abigail; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Giles, Graham; Guenel, Pascal; Hägg, Sara; Hall, Per; Hayward, Caroline; Hopper, John; Ingelsson, Erik; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kasiman, Katherine; Knight, Julia A.; Lahti, Jari; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Margolin, Sara; Marsh, Julie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Olson, Janet E.; Pennell, Craig E.; Polasek, Ozren; Rahman, Iffat; Ridker, Paul M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Salumets, Andres; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Smith, Erin N.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Southey, Melissa; Stöckl, Doris; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Truong, Therese; Ulivi, Sheila; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Qin; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F.; Zgaga, Lina; Ong, Ken K.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Karasik, David; Murray, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The length of female reproductive lifespan is associated with multiple adverse outcomes, including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and infertility. The biological processes that govern the timing of the beginning and end of reproductive life are not well understood. Genetic variants are known to contribute to ∼50% of the variation in both age at menarche and menopause, but to date the known genes explain <15% of the genetic component. We have used genome-wide association in a bivariate meta-analysis of both traits to identify genes involved in determining reproductive lifespan. We observed significant genetic correlation between the two traits using genome-wide complex trait analysis. However, we found no robust statistical evidence for individual variants with an effect on both traits. A novel association with age at menopause was detected for a variant rs1800932 in the mismatch repair gene MSH6 (P = 1.9 × 10−9), which was also associated with altered expression levels of MSH6 mRNA in multiple tissues. This study contributes to the growing evidence that DNA repair processes play a key role in ovarian ageing and could be an important therapeutic target for infertility. PMID:24357391

  1. A novel conception for spontaneous transversions caused by homo-pyrimidine DNA mismatches: a QM/QTAIM highlight.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-09-07

    We have firstly shown that the T·T(w) and C·C(w) DNA mismatches with wobble (w) geometry stay in slow tautomeric equilibrium with short T·T*(WC) and C·C*(WC) Watson-Crick (WC) mispairs. These non-dissociative tautomeric rearrangements are controlled by the plane-symmetric, highly stable, highly polar and zwitterionic transition states. The obtained results allow us to understand in what way the T·T(w) and C·C(w) mismatches acquire enzymatically competent T·T*(WC) and C·C*(WC) conformations directly in the hydrophobic recognition pocket of a high-fidelity DNA-polymerase, thereby producing thermodynamically non-equilibrium spontaneous transversions. The simplest numerical estimation of the frequency ratio of the TT to CC spontaneous transversions satisfactorily agrees with experimental data.

  2. DNA Binding and Recognition of a CC Mismatch in a DNA Duplex by Water-Soluble Peptidocalix[4]arenes: Synthesis and Applications.

    PubMed

    Alavijeh, Nahid S; Zadmard, Reza; Balalaie, Saeed; Alavijeh, Mohammad S; Soltani, Nima

    2016-10-07

    Water-soluble peptidocalix[4]arenes were synthesized by the introduction of arginine-rich narrow groove-binding residues at lower rims through solid-phase synthesis. The study of binding of these water-soluble bidentate ligands to well-matched and mismatched DNA duplexes by fluorescent titrations, ethidium bromide (EB) displacement assays, DNA-melting experiments, and circular dichroism (CD) analysis revealed a sequence-dependent groove-binding mechanism.

  3. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells.

    PubMed

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J; Te Riele, Hein P J

    2016-04-12

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype.

  4. Altered expression and new mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 in melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; König, Fatima; Verheggen, Raphaela; Schlott, Thilo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Romeike, Bernd; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    Brain metastases, including those of malignant melanoma (known for its high genomic instability), are the most common intracranial tumors. The main objective of this study was to investigate expression and mutation in the DNA mismatch repair system in melanoma brain metastases. Expression of MLH1, MSH2, PMS1 and PMS2 was investigated immunohistochemically in 31 melanoma metastatic tumors. Mutational analysis of MLH1 and MSH2 was performed in 17 melanoma brain metastases. Loss of MLH1 and MSH2 expression was found in 10/31 and 12/31 tumors. PMS1 (27/31) and PMS2 (28/31) expression was preserved in the majority of lesions. Potential missense mutation was found in MSH2 (exon 13) in 2/17 melanomas. Mutation in the intron sequence between exon 14 and 15 of MLH1 (exon 15) was observed in 4/17 cases. Our results indicate that the two major DNA mismatch repair genes, MLH1 and MSH2, are more frequently affected by alterations in the DNA mismatch repair system than the helper genes PMS1 and PMS2. The presence of mutations of MSH2 and MLH1 in melanoma brain metastases, which has not been found in primary melanomas, indicates the high genomic instability of melanoma brain metastases.

  5. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells

    PubMed Central

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W.; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K.; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J.; te Riele, Hein P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype. PMID:26951689

  6. HNA and ANA high-affinity arrays for detections of DNA and RNA single-base mismatches.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Mikhail; Schepers, Guy; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Van Hummelen, Paul; Herdewijn, Piet

    2008-06-15

    DNA microarrays and sensors have become essential tools in the functional analysis of sequence information. Recently we reported that chimeric hexitol (HNA) and altritol (ANA) nucleotide monomers with an anhydrohexitol sugar moiety are easily available and proved their chemistry to be compatible with DNA and RNA synthesis. In this communication we describe a novel analytical platform based on HNA and ANA units to be used as synthetic oligonucleotide arrays on a glass solid support for match/mismatch detection of DNA and RNA targets. Arrays were fabricated by immobilization of diene-modified oligonucleotides on maleimido-activated glass slides. To demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the HNA/ANA arrays and to compare their properties with regular DNA arrays, sequences in the reverse transcriptase gene (codon 74) and the protease gene of HIV-1 (codon 10) were selected. Both, the relative intensity of the signal and match/mismatch discrimination increased up to fivefold for DNA targets and up to 3-3.5-fold for RNA targets applying HNA or ANA arrays (ANA>HNA>DNA). Certainly in the new field of miRNA detection, ANA arrays could prove very beneficial and their properties should be investigated in more detail.

  7. Evolving approach and clinical significance of detecting DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Jinru

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen significant advancement in our understanding of colorectal tumors with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. The ever-emerging revelations of new molecular and genetic alterations in various clinical conditions have necessitated constant refinement of disease terminology and classification. Thus, a case with the clinical condition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer as defined by the Amsterdam criteria may be one of Lynch syndrome characterized by a germline defect in one of the several MMR genes, one of the yet-to-be-defined “Lynch-like syndrome” if there is evidence of MMR deficiency in the tumor but no detectable germline MMR defect or tumor MLH1 promoter methylation, or “familial colorectal cancer type X” if there is no evidence of MMR deficiency. The detection of these conditions carries significant clinical implications. The detection tools and strategies are constantly evolving. The Bethesda guidelines symbolize a selective approach that uses clinical information and tumor histology as the basis to select high-risk individuals. Such a selective approach has subsequently been found to have limited sensitivity, and is thus gradually giving way to the alternative universal approach that tests all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers. Notably, the universal approach also has its own limitations; its cost-effectiveness in real practice, in particular, remains to be determined. Meanwhile, technological advances such as the next-generation sequencing are offering the promise of direct genetic testing for MMR deficiency at an affordable cost probably in the near future. This article reviews the up-to-date molecular definitions of the various conditions related to MMR deficiency, and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolving nature and the clinical importance of the disease definitions and the detection strategies. PMID:25716099

  8. Stability and Mismatch Discrimination of Locked Nucleic Acid–DNA Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Locked nucleic acids (LNA; symbols of bases, +A, +C, +G, and +T) are introduced into chemically synthesized oligonucleotides to increase duplex stability and specificity. To understand these effects, we have determined thermodynamic parameters of consecutive LNA nucleotides. We present guidelines for the design of LNA oligonucleotides and introduce free online software that predicts the stability of any LNA duplex oligomer. Thermodynamic analysis shows that the single strand–duplex transition is characterized by a favorable enthalpic change and by an unfavorable loss of entropy. A single LNA modification confines the local conformation of nucleotides, causing a smaller, less unfavorable entropic loss when the single strand is restricted to the rigid duplex structure. Additional LNAs adjacent to the initial modification appear to enhance stacking and H-bonding interactions because they increase the enthalpic contributions to duplex stabilization. New nearest-neighbor parameters correctly forecast the positive and negative effects of LNAs on mismatch discrimination. Specificity is enhanced in a majority of sequences and is dependent on mismatch type and adjacent base pairs; the largest discriminatory boost occurs for the central +C·C mismatch within the +T+C+C sequence and the +A·G mismatch within the +T+A+G sequence. LNAs do not affect specificity in some sequences and even impair it for many +G·T and +C·A mismatches. The level of mismatch discrimination decreases the most for the central +G·T mismatch within the +G+G+C sequence and the +C·A mismatch within the +G+C+G sequence. We hypothesize that these discrimination changes are not unique features of LNAs but originate from the shift of the duplex conformation from B-form to A-form. PMID:21928795

  9. Dynamic basis for one-dimensional DNA scanning by the mismatch repair complex Msh2-Msh6.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jason; Chowdhury, Arindam; Surtees, Jennifer A; Shimada, Jun; Reichman, David R; Alani, Eric; Greene, Eric C

    2007-11-09

    The ability of proteins to locate specific sites or structures among a vast excess of nonspecific DNA is a fundamental theme in biology. Yet the basic principles that govern these mechanisms remain poorly understood. For example, mismatch repair proteins must scan millions of base pairs to find rare biosynthetic errors, and they then must probe the surrounding region to identify the strand discrimination signals necessary to distinguish the parental and daughter strands. To determine how these proteins might function we used single-molecule optical microscopy to answer the following question: how does the mismatch repair complex Msh2-Msh6 interrogate undamaged DNA? Here we show that Msh2-Msh6 slides along DNA via one-dimensional diffusion. These findings indicate that interactions between Msh2-Msh6 and DNA are dominated by lateral movement of the protein along the helical axis and have implications for how MutS family members travel along DNA at different stages of the repair reaction.

  10. Trifunctional fluorescent unnatural nucleoside: Label free detection of T-T/C-C base mismatches, abasic site and bulge DNA.

    PubMed

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar; Talukdar, Sangita

    2017-08-01

    The detection and targeting of both the mismatched and abasic DNA is highly important which would ultimately help in designing new diagnostics and chemotherapeutics. Furthermore, sensing and targeting the bulge sequence with a fluorescent probe would be useful to study the role of bulges in nucleic acid function or could have significant therapeutic potential. Thus, detection of specific bulges by small fluorescent molecules is an attractive research area since the past several years. Many attempts have been made to prepare such compounds. We report herein a label free strategy for the detection of pyrimidine base mismatches (T/T and C/C), sensing of abasic site, and pyrimidine base bulge DNA using an unnatural tetrazolylpyrene nucleoside ((TPy)B(Do)) as a bare fluorescent probe. The H-bonding/hydrophobic force mediated interactions allow the sensing of all three deformed DNA via an enhancement of fluorescence signal using our simple "Just-Mix and Read" strategy. The binding of the probe to all the three deformed DNA duplexes is accompanied by an increase in the thermal melting stability of the deformed DNAs. That the probe binds efficiently to the minor groove near the deformed site was evident from spectroscopic studies. All the spectral evidences open up a multitude of possibilities for using our probe, tetrazolylpyrene nucleoside, as an efficient fluorescent light-up bio-probe for label free DNA detection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Mutation detection by mismatch binding protein, MutS, in amplified DNA: Application to the cystic fibrosis gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lishanski, A.; Ostrander, E.A.; Rine, J. |

    1994-03-29

    An experimental strategy for detecting heterozygosity in genomic DNA has been developed based on preferential binding of Escherichia coli MutS protein to DNA molecules containing mismatched bases. The binding was detected by a gel mobility-shift assay. This approach was tested by using as a model the most commonly occurring mutations within the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) gene. Genomic DNA samples were amplified with 5{prime}-end-labeled primers that bracket the site of the {Delta}F508 3-bp deletion in exon 10 of the CFTR gene. The renatured PCR products from homozygotes produced homoduplexes; the PCR products from heterozygotes produced heteroduplexes and homoduplexes (1:1). MutS protein bound more strongly to heteroduplexes that correspond to heterozygous carriers of {Delta}F508 and contain a CTT or a GAA loop in one of the strands than to homoduplexes corresponding to homozygotes. The ability of MutS protein to detect heteroduplexes in PCR-amplified DNA extended to fragments {approximately} 500 bp long. The method was also able to detect carriers of the point mutations in exon 11 of the CFTR gene by a preferential binding of MutS to single-base mismatches in PCR-amplified DNA.

  12. Mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Fishel, Richard

    2015-10-30

    Highly conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS) are the fundamental components of mismatch repair (MMR). After decades of debate, it appears clear that the MSH proteins initiate MMR by recognizing a mismatch and forming multiple extremely stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that diffuse without hydrolysis along the adjacent DNA. The function(s) of MLH/PMS proteins is less clear, although they too bind ATP and are targeted to MMR by MSH sliding clamps. Structural analysis combined with recent real-time single molecule and cellular imaging technologies are providing new and detailed insight into the thermal-driven motions that animate the complete MMR mechanism.

  13. DNA Mismatch Repair Status Predicts Need for Future Colorectal Surgery for Metachronous Neoplasms in Young Individuals Undergoing Colorectal Cancer Resection.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Melyssa; Holter, Spring; Semotiuk, Kara; Winter, Laura; Pollett, Aaron; Gallinger, Steven; Cohen, Zane; Gryfe, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of colorectal cancer in young patients involves both management of the incident cancer and consideration of the possibility of Lynch syndrome and the development of metachronous colorectal cancers. This study aims to assess the prognostic role of DNA mismatch repair deficiency and extended colorectal resection for metachronous colorectal neoplasia risk in young patients with colorectal cancer. This is a retrospective review of 285 patients identified in our GI cancer registry with colorectal cancer diagnosed at 35 years or younger in the absence of polyposis. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we assessed the prognostic role of mismatch repair deficiency and standard clinicopathologic characteristics, including the extent of resection, on the rate of developing metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in biospecimens from 44% of patients and was significantly associated with an increased risk for metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection (10-year cumulative risk, 13.5% ± 4.2%) compared with 56% of patients with mismatch repair-intact colorectal cancer (10-year cumulative risk, 5.8% ± 3.3%; p = 0.011). In multivariate analysis, mismatch repair deficiency was associated with a HR of 3.65 (95% CI, 1.44-9.21; p = 0.006) for metachronous colorectal neoplasia, whereas extended resection with ileorectal or ileosigmoid anastomosis significantly decreased the risk of metachronous colorectal neoplasia (HR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.05-0.90; p = 0.036). This study had a retrospective design, and, therefore, recommendations for colorectal cancer surgery and screening were not fully standardized. Quality of life after colorectal cancer surgery was not assessed. Young patients with colorectal cancer with molecular hallmarks of Lynch syndrome were at significantly higher risk for the development of subsequent colorectal neoplasia. This risk was significantly reduced in those who underwent extended

  14. Design of enzyme-interfaced DNA logic operations (AND, OR and INHIBIT) with an assaying application for single-base mismatch.

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Diao, Aipo

    2015-06-25

    We devised AND, OR and INHIBIT logic gates. They were based on the enzyme-induced DNA base flipping mechanism, which caused significant local conformation changes in DNA. This can be monitored via photonic signals as outputs. We also provided a prototype of a built-in biosensor capable of distinguishing single-base mismatches in a DNA duplex.

  15. The unstructured linker arms of Mlh1-Pms1 are important for interactions with DNA during mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Plys, Aaron J; Rogacheva, Maria V; Greene, Eric C; Alani, Eric

    2012-09-14

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) models have proposed that MSH (MutS homolog) proteins identify DNA polymerase errors while interacting with the DNA replication fork. MLH (MutL homolog) proteins (primarily Mlh1-Pms1 in baker's yeast) then survey the genome for lesion-bound MSH proteins. The resulting MSH-MLH complex formed at a DNA lesion initiates downstream steps in repair. MLH proteins act as dimers and contain long (20-30 nm) unstructured arms that connect two terminal globular domains. These arms can vary between 100 and 300 amino acids in length, are highly divergent between organisms, and are resistant to amino acid substitutions. To test the roles of the linker arms in MMR, we engineered a protease cleavage site into the Mlh1 linker arm domain of baker's yeast Mlh1-Pms1. Cleavage of the Mlh1 linker arm in vitro resulted in a defect in Mlh1-Pms1 DNA binding activity, and in vivo proteolytic cleavage resulted in a complete defect in MMR. We then generated a series of truncation mutants bearing Mlh1 and Pms1 linker arms of varying lengths. This work revealed that MMR is greatly compromised when portions of the Mlh1 linker are removed, whereas repair is less sensitive to truncation of the Pms1 linker arm. Purified complexes containing truncations in Mlh1 and Pms1 linker arms were analyzed and found to have differential defects in DNA binding that also correlated with the ability to form a ternary complex with Msh2-Msh6 and mismatch DNA. These observations are consistent with the unstructured linker domains of MLH proteins providing distinct interactions with DNA during MMR.

  16. Relevance of GC content to the conservation of DNA polymerase III/mismatch repair system in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Motohiro; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of DNA replication is one of the driving forces of genome evolution. Bacterial DNA polymerase III, the primary complex of DNA replication, consists of PolC and DnaE. PolC is conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, especially in the Firmicutes with low GC content, whereas DnaE is widely conserved in most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PolC contains two domains, the 3′-5′exonuclease domain and the polymerase domain, while DnaE only possesses the polymerase domain. Accordingly, DnaE does not have the proofreading function; in Escherichia coli, another enzyme DnaQ performs this function. In most bacteria, the fidelity of DNA replication is maintained by 3′-5′ exonuclease and a mismatch repair (MMR) system. However, we found that most Actinobacteria (a group of Gram-positive bacteria with high GC content) appear to have lost the MMR system and chromosomes may be replicated by DnaE-type DNA polymerase III with DnaQ-like 3′-5′ exonuclease. We tested the mutation bias of Bacillus subtilis, which belongs to the Firmicutes and found that the wild type strain is AT-biased while the mutS-deletant strain is remarkably GC-biased. If we presume that DnaE tends to make mistakes that increase GC content, these results can be explained by the mutS deletion (i.e., deletion of the MMR system). Thus, we propose that GC content is regulated by DNA polymerase and MMR system, and the absence of polC genes, which participate in the MMR system, may be the reason for the increase of GC content in Gram-positive bacteria such as Actinobacteria. PMID:24062730

  17. Evolutionary Covariance Combined with Molecular Dynamics Predicts a Framework for Allostery in the MutS DNA Mismatch Repair Protein

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is an essential, evolutionarily conserved pathway that maintains genome stability by correcting base-pairing errors in DNA. Here we examine the sequence and structure of MutS MMR protein to decipher the amino acid framework underlying its two key activities—recognizing mismatches in DNA and using ATP to initiate repair. Statistical coupling analysis (SCA) identified a network (sector) of coevolved amino acids in the MutS protein family. The potential functional significance of this SCA sector was assessed by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for alanine mutants of the top 5% of 160 residues in the distribution, and control nonsector residues. The effects on three independent metrics were monitored: (i) MutS domain conformational dynamics, (ii) hydrogen bonding between MutS and DNA/ATP, and (iii) relative ATP binding free energy. Each measure revealed that sector residues contribute more substantively to MutS structure–function than nonsector residues. Notably, sector mutations disrupted MutS contacts with DNA and/or ATP from a distance via contiguous pathways and correlated motions, supporting the idea that SCA can identify amino acid networks underlying allosteric communication. The combined SCA/MD approach yielded novel, experimentally testable hypotheses for unknown roles of many residues distributed across MutS, including some implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. PMID:28135092

  18. Crosstalk between BRCA-Fanconi anemia and mismatch repair pathways prevents MSH2-dependent aberrant DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Peng, Min; Xie, Jenny; Ucher, Anna; Stavnezer, Janet; Cantor, Sharon B

    2014-08-01

    Several proteins in the BRCA-Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, such as FANCJ, BRCA1, and FANCD2, interact with mismatch repair (MMR) pathway factors, but the significance of this link remains unknown. Unlike the BRCA-FA pathway, the MMR pathway is not essential for cells to survive toxic DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), although MMR proteins bind ICLs and other DNA structures that form at stalled replication forks. We hypothesized that MMR proteins corrupt ICL repair in cells that lack crosstalk between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways. Here, we show that ICL sensitivity of cells lacking the interaction between FANCJ and the MMR protein MLH1 is suppressed by depletion of the upstream mismatch recognition factor MSH2. MSH2 depletion suppresses an aberrant DNA damage response, restores cell cycle progression, and promotes ICL resistance through a Rad18-dependent mechanism. MSH2 depletion also suppresses ICL sensitivity in cells deficient for BRCA1 or FANCD2, but not FANCA. Rescue by Msh2 loss was confirmed in Fancd2-null primary mouse cells. Thus, we propose that regulation of MSH2-dependent DNA damage response underlies the importance of interactions between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways.

  19. Crosstalk between BRCA-Fanconi anemia and mismatch repair pathways prevents MSH2-dependent aberrant DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Min; Xie, Jenny; Ucher, Anna; Stavnezer, Janet; Cantor, Sharon B

    2014-01-01

    Several proteins in the BRCA-Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, such as FANCJ, BRCA1, and FANCD2, interact with mismatch repair (MMR) pathway factors, but the significance of this link remains unknown. Unlike the BRCA-FA pathway, the MMR pathway is not essential for cells to survive toxic DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), although MMR proteins bind ICLs and other DNA structures that form at stalled replication forks. We hypothesized that MMR proteins corrupt ICL repair in cells that lack crosstalk between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways. Here, we show that ICL sensitivity of cells lacking the interaction between FANCJ and the MMR protein MLH1 is suppressed by depletion of the upstream mismatch recognition factor MSH2. MSH2 depletion suppresses an aberrant DNA damage response, restores cell cycle progression, and promotes ICL resistance through a Rad18-dependent mechanism. MSH2 depletion also suppresses ICL sensitivity in cells deficient for BRCA1 or FANCD2, but not FANCA. Rescue by Msh2 loss was confirmed in Fancd2-null primary mouse cells. Thus, we propose that regulation of MSH2-dependent DNA damage response underlies the importance of interactions between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways. PMID:24966277

  20. Interaction of the E. coli DNA G:T-mismatch endonuclease (vsr protein) with oligonucleotides containing its target sequence.

    PubMed

    Turner, D P; Connolly, B A

    2000-12-15

    The Escherichia coli vsr endonuclease recognises G:T base-pair mismatches in double-stranded DNA and initiates a repair pathway by hydrolysing the phosphate group 5' to the incorrectly paired T. The enzyme shows a preference for G:T mismatches within a particular sequence context, derived from the recognition site of the E. coli dcm DNA-methyltransferase (CC[A/T]GG). Thus, the preferred substrate for the vsr protein is (CT[A/T]GG), where the underlined T is opposed by a dG base. This paper provides quantitative data for the interaction of the vsr protein with a number of oligonucleotides containing G:T mismatches. Evaluation of specificity constant (k(st)/K(D); k(st)=rate constant for single turnover, K(D)=equilibrium dissociation constant) confirms vsr's preference for a G:T mismatch within a hemi-methylated dcm sequence, i.e. the best substrate is a duplex (both strands written in the 5'-3' orientation) composed of CT[A/T]GG and C(5Me)C[T/A]GG. Conversion of the mispaired T (underlined) to dU or the d(5Me)C to dC gave poorer substrates. No interaction was observed with oligonucleotides that lacked a G:T mismatch or did not possess a dcm sequence. An analysis of the fraction of active protein, by "reverse-titration" (i.e. adding increasing amounts of DNA to a fixed amount of protein followed by gel-mobility shift analysis) showed that less than 1% of the vsr endonuclease was able to bind to the substrate. This was confirmed using "competitive titrations" (where competitor oligonucleotides are used to displace a (32)P-labelled nucleic acid from the vsr protein) and burst kinetic analysis. This result is discussed in the light of previous in vitro and in vivo data which indicate that the MutL protein may be needed for full vsr activity. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. DNA promoter and histone H3 methylation downregulate NGX6 in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Zhu, Xinjiang; Xu, Xiaoyang; Dai, Dongqiu

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma-associated gene 6 (NGX6) is a novel candidate tumor metastasis suppressor gene. Our study was to determine whether DNA hypermethylation and histone modification at the NGX6 gene promoter play important roles in silencing NGX6 expression in gastric cancer. NGX6 expression was downregulated in all gastric cancer cells and 76.19 % tissues. In three GC cell lines, hypermethylated NGX6 loci were characterized by histone H3-K9 hypoacetylation and hypermethylation. Trichostatin A treatment could moderately increase H3-K9 acetylation at the silenced loci; however, it had no effect on DNA and H3-K9 methylation and minimal effects on NGX6 expression. In contrast, 5'aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment could rapidly decrease DNA and H3-K9 methylation at the silenced loci, leading to the reexpression of NGX6. Combined treatment with 5'aza-2'-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A had synergistic effects on the reexpression of NGX6 at the hypermethylation loci. Our current study shows that NGX6 expression is downregulated in GC cancer cells and tissues due to NGX6 promoter methylation and H3-K9 methylation, but not H3-K9 acetylation. Our findings indicate that the downregulation of NGX6 expression contributes to the development and progression of gastric cancer. More studies are needed to determine the precise mechanism of NGX6 in the progression of gastric cancer.

  2. Label-free detection of DNA single-base mismatches using a simple reflectance-based optical technique.

    PubMed

    Nava, G; Ceccarello, E; Giavazzi, F; Salina, M; Damin, F; Chiari, M; Buscaglia, M; Bellini, T; Zanchetta, G

    2016-05-21

    Rapid and quantitative detection of the binding of nucleic acids to surface-immobilized probes remains a challenge in many biomedical applications. We investigated the hybridization of a set of fully complementary and defected 12-base long DNA oligomers by using the Reflective Phantom Interface (RPI), a recently developed multiplexed label-free detection technique. Based on the simple measurement of reflected light intensity, this technology enables to quantify the hybridization directly as it occurs on the surface with a sensitivity of 10 pg mm(-2). We found a strong effect of single-base mismatches and of their location on hybridization kinetics and equilibrium binding. In line with previous studies, we found that DNA-DNA binding is weaker on a surface than in the bulk. Our data indicate that this effect is a consequence of weak nonspecific binding of the probes to the surface.

  3. Mutations in the Bacillus subtilis β Clamp That Separate Its Roles in DNA Replication from Mismatch Repair▿

    PubMed Central

    Dupes, Nicole M.; Walsh, Brian W.; Klocko, Andrew D.; Lenhart, Justin S.; Peterson, Heather L.; Gessert, David A.; Pavlick, Cassie E.; Simmons, Lyle A.

    2010-01-01

    The β clamp is an essential replication sliding clamp required for processive DNA synthesis. The β clamp is also critical for several additional aspects of DNA metabolism, including DNA mismatch repair (MMR). The dnaN5 allele of Bacillus subtilis encodes a mutant form of β clamp containing the G73R substitution. Cells with the dnaN5 allele are temperature sensitive for growth due to a defect in DNA replication at 49°C, and they show an increase in mutation frequency caused by a partial defect in MMR at permissive temperatures. We selected for intragenic suppressors of dnaN5 that rescued viability at 49°C to determine if the DNA replication defect could be separated from the MMR defect. We isolated three intragenic suppressors of dnaN5 that restored growth at the nonpermissive temperature while maintaining an increase in mutation frequency. All three dnaN alleles encoded the G73R substitution along with one of three novel missense mutations. The missense mutations isolated were S22P, S181G, and E346K. Of these, S181G and E346K are located near the hydrophobic cleft of the β clamp, a common site occupied by proteins that bind the β clamp. Using several methods, we show that the increase in mutation frequency resulting from each dnaN allele is linked to a defect in MMR. Moreover, we found that S181G and E346K allowed growth at elevated temperatures and did not have an appreciable effect on mutation frequency when separated from G73R. Thus, we found that specific residue changes in the B. subtilis β clamp separate the role of the β clamp in DNA replication from its role in MMR. PMID:20453097

  4. Universal and blocking primer mismatches limit the use of high-throughput DNA sequencing for the quantitative metabarcoding of arthropods.

    PubMed

    Piñol, J; Mir, G; Gomez-Polo, P; Agustí, N

    2015-07-01

    The quantification of the biological diversity in environmental samples using high-throughput DNA sequencing is hindered by the PCR bias caused by variable primer-template mismatches of the individual species. In some dietary studies, there is the added problem that samples are enriched with predator DNA, so often a predator-specific blocking oligonucleotide is used to alleviate the problem. However, specific blocking oligonucleotides could coblock nontarget species to some degree. Here, we accurately estimate the extent of the PCR biases induced by universal and blocking primers on a mock community prepared with DNA of twelve species of terrestrial arthropods. We also compare universal and blocking primer biases with those induced by variable annealing temperature and number of PCR cycles. The results show that reads of all species were recovered after PCR enrichment at our control conditions (no blocking oligonucleotide, 45 °C annealing temperature and 40 cycles) and high-throughput sequencing. They also show that the four factors considered biased the final proportions of the species to some degree. Among these factors, the number of primer-template mismatches of each species had a disproportionate effect (up to five orders of magnitude) on the amplification efficiency. In particular, the number of primer-template mismatches explained most of the variation (~3/4) in the amplification efficiency of the species. The effect of blocking oligonucleotide concentration on nontarget species relative abundance was also significant, but less important (below one order of magnitude). Considering the results reported here, the quantitative potential of the technique is limited, and only qualitative results (the species list) are reliable, at least when targeting the barcoding COI region.

  5. AP endonuclease 1 prevents the extension of a T/G mismatch by DNA polymerase β to prevent mutations in CpGs during base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yanhao; Jiang, Zhongliang; Zhou, Jing; Osemota, Emmanuel; Liu, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics of DNA methylation and demethylation at CpG clusters are involved in gene regulation. CpG clusters have been identified as hot spots of mutagenesis because of their susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage. Damaged Cs and Gs at CpGs can disrupt a normal DNA methylation pattern through modulation of DNA methylation and demethylation, leading to mutations and deregulation of gene expression. DNA base excision repair (BER) plays a dual role of repairing oxidative DNA damage and mediating an active DNA demethylation pathway on CpG clusters through removal of a T/G mismatch resulting from deamination of a 5mC adjacent to a guanine that can be simultaneously damaged by oxidative stress. However, it remains unknown how BER processes clustered lesions in CpGs and what are the consequences from the repair of these lesions. In this study, we examined BER of an abasic lesion next to a DNA demethylation intermediate, the T/G mismatch in a CpG dinucleotide, and its effect on the integrity of CpGs. Surprisingly, we found that the abasic lesion completely abolished the activity of thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) for removing the mismatched T. However, we found that APE1 could still efficiently incise the abasic lesion leaving a 3-terminus mismatched T, which was subsequently extended by pol β. This in turn resulted in a C to T transition mutation. Interestingly, we also found that APE1 3'-5' exonuclease activity efficiently removed the mismatched T, thereby preventing pol β extension of the mismatched nucleotide and the resulting mutation. Our results demonstrate a crucial role of APE1 3'-5' exonuclease activity in combating mutations in CpG clusters caused by an intermediate of DNA demethylation during BER. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. HEREDITARY, SPORADIC AND METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER ARE COMMONLY DRIVEN BY SPECIFIC SPECTRUMS OF DEFECTIVE DNA MISMATCH REPAIR COMPONENTS

    PubMed Central

    CARETHERS, JOHN M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of several human cell mechanisms utilized to repair mutable mistakes within DNA, particularly after DNA is replicated. MMR function is dependent upon heterodimerization of specific MMR proteins that can recognize base-base mispairs as well as frameshifts at microsatellite sequences, followed by the triggering of other complementary proteins that execute excision and repair or initiate cell demise if repair is futile. MMR function is compromised in specific disease states, all of which can be biochemically recognized by faulty repair of microsatellite sequences, causing microsatellite instability. Germline mutation of an MMR gene causes Lynch syndrome, the most common inherited form of colorectal cancer (CRC), and biallelic germline mutations cause the rare constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome. Somatic inactivation of MMR through epigenetic mechanisms is observed in 15% of sporadic CRC, and a smaller portion of CRCs possess biallelic somatic mutations. A novel inflammation-driven nuclear-to-cytoplasmic shift of the specific MMR protein hMSH3 is seen in up to 60% of sporadic CRCs that associates with metastasis and poor patient prognosis, unlike improved outcome when MMR is genetically inactivated. The mechanism for MMR inactication as well as the component affected dictates the clinical spectrum and clinical response for patients. PMID:28066040

  7. The mismatched nucleotides in the 5'-terminal hairpin of minute virus of mice are required for efficient viral DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, E; Sahli, R; Hirt, B; Beard, P

    1995-01-01

    The 5'-terminal sequence in the DNA of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) is a palindrome. It can form a hairpin, the stem of which is entirely base-paired except for three consecutive unpaired nucleotides which form a bubble. Since this structure is well conserved among different parvoviruses, we examined its importance for viral replication by generating MVM mutants with alterations in this region. A clone of MVMp DNA which contained the entire 3' end and more than half of the 5' palindrome was made. Although it lacked the sequence information to form a wild-type bubble, this DNA was infectious. On transfection into A9 fibroblasts, it gave rise to a virus (MVMs) which had a bubble in its 5' palindrome. The bubble consisted of four mismatched nucleotides in the same location as the unpaired nucleotides of the wild-type palindrome. Apparently, neighboring plasmid sequences were incorporated into the viral DNA, enabling formation of the mismatch. This observation suggested that a bubble is critical for growth of MVM but that its sequence is not. To find out whether MVM lacking a bubble in the 5' palindrome is viable, we made a second clone in which the plasmid sequences incorporated in MVMs were removed. Transfection of this DNA gave rise to a virus (MVMx) in which the nucleotides unpaired in the wild-type hairpin are now fully base-paired. Although MVMx can be propagated, it is defective in comparison with wild-type MVMp; it exhibited about a 50-fold-lower ratio of plaque-forming units to DNA content. In mixed infections, MVMp consistently outgrew the bubbleless MVMx. The rate of accumulation of DNA replication intermediates was lower for MVMx than for the wild-type virus. Quantitative analysis of the 5' termini of replicative form DNA suggested that the ability of MVMx to convert hairpin 5' termini to extended termini is impaired. In contrast, the virus with the altered bubble, MVMs, behaved like the wild-type MVMp in all the assays. We conclude that MVM

  8. Enhancement of RecA-mediated self-assembly in DNA nanostructures through basepair mismatches and single-strand nicks.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Sybilla Louise; Sharma, Rajan; Davies, Alexander Giles; Wälti, Christoph

    2017-01-23

    The use of DNA as a structural material for nanometre-scale construction has grown extensively over the last decades. The development of more advanced DNA-based materials would benefit from a modular approach enabling the direct assembly of additional elements onto nanostructures after fabrication. RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments encapsulating short ssDNA have been demonstrated as a tool for highly efficient and fully programmable post-hoc patterning of duplex DNA scaffold. However, the underlying assembly process is not fully understood, in particular when patterning complex DNA topologies. Here, we report the effect of basepair-mismatched regions and single-strand nicks in the double-stranded DNA scaffold on the yield of RecA-based assembly. Significant increases in assembly yield are observed upon the introduction of unpaired basepairs directly adjacent to the assembly region. However, when the unpaired regions were introduced further from the assembly site the assembly yield initially decreased as the length of the unpaired region was increased. These results suggest that an unpaired region acts as a kinetic trap for RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments, impeding the assembly mechanism. Conversely, when the unpaired region is located directly adjacent to the assembly site, it leads to an increase in efficiency of RecA patterning owing to increased breathing of the assembly site.

  9. Enhancement of RecA-mediated self-assembly in DNA nanostructures through basepair mismatches and single-strand nicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Sybilla Louise; Sharma, Rajan; Davies, Alexander Giles; Wälti, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The use of DNA as a structural material for nanometre-scale construction has grown extensively over the last decades. The development of more advanced DNA-based materials would benefit from a modular approach enabling the direct assembly of additional elements onto nanostructures after fabrication. RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments encapsulating short ssDNA have been demonstrated as a tool for highly efficient and fully programmable post-hoc patterning of duplex DNA scaffold. However, the underlying assembly process is not fully understood, in particular when patterning complex DNA topologies. Here, we report the effect of basepair-mismatched regions and single-strand nicks in the double-stranded DNA scaffold on the yield of RecA-based assembly. Significant increases in assembly yield are observed upon the introduction of unpaired basepairs directly adjacent to the assembly region. However, when the unpaired regions were introduced further from the assembly site the assembly yield initially decreased as the length of the unpaired region was increased. These results suggest that an unpaired region acts as a kinetic trap for RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments, impeding the assembly mechanism. Conversely, when the unpaired region is located directly adjacent to the assembly site, it leads to an increase in efficiency of RecA patterning owing to increased breathing of the assembly site.

  10. Enhancement of RecA-mediated self-assembly in DNA nanostructures through basepair mismatches and single-strand nicks

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Sybilla Louise; Sharma, Rajan; Davies, Alexander Giles; Wälti, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The use of DNA as a structural material for nanometre-scale construction has grown extensively over the last decades. The development of more advanced DNA-based materials would benefit from a modular approach enabling the direct assembly of additional elements onto nanostructures after fabrication. RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments encapsulating short ssDNA have been demonstrated as a tool for highly efficient and fully programmable post-hoc patterning of duplex DNA scaffold. However, the underlying assembly process is not fully understood, in particular when patterning complex DNA topologies. Here, we report the effect of basepair-mismatched regions and single-strand nicks in the double-stranded DNA scaffold on the yield of RecA-based assembly. Significant increases in assembly yield are observed upon the introduction of unpaired basepairs directly adjacent to the assembly region. However, when the unpaired regions were introduced further from the assembly site the assembly yield initially decreased as the length of the unpaired region was increased. These results suggest that an unpaired region acts as a kinetic trap for RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments, impeding the assembly mechanism. Conversely, when the unpaired region is located directly adjacent to the assembly site, it leads to an increase in efficiency of RecA patterning owing to increased breathing of the assembly site. PMID:28112216

  11. Aberrant DNA Methylation in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer without Mismatch Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Ajay; Xicola, Rosa M.; Nguyen, Thuy-Phuong; Doyle, Brian J; Sohn, Vanessa R.; Bandipalliam, Prathap; Reyes, Josep; Cordero, Carmen; Balaguer, Francesc; Castells, Antoni; Jover, Rodrigo; Andreu, Montserrat; Syngal, Sapna; Boland, C. Richard; Llor, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Approximately half of the families that fulfill Amsterdam criteria for Lynch syndrome or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) do not have evidence of the germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations that define this syndrome and result in microsatellite instability. The carcinogenic pathways and the best diagnostic approaches to detect microsatellite stable (MSS) HNPCC tumors are unclear. We investigated the contribution of epigenetic alterations to development of MSS HNPCC tumors. Methods Colorectal cancers were divided in four groups: 1. Microsatellite stable, Amsterdam positive (MSS HNPCC) (N=22); 2. Lynch syndrome cancers (identified mismatch repair mutations) (N=21); 3. Sporadic MSS (N=92); 4. Sporadic MSI (N=46). Methylation status was evaluated for CACNAG1, SOCS1, RUNX3, NEUROG1, MLH1, and LINE-1. KRAS and BRAF mutations status was analyzed. Results MSS HNPCC tumors displayed a significantly lower degree of LINE-1 methylation, marker for global methylation, than any other group. Whereas most MSS HNPCC tumors had some degree of CpG island methylation, none presented a high index of methylation. MSS HNPCC tumors had KRAS mutations exclusively in codon 12, but none harbored V600E BRAF mutations. Conclusions Tumors from Amsterdam-positive patients without mismatch repair deficiency (MSS HNPCC) have certain molecular features, including global hypomethylation that distinguish them from all other colorectal cancers. These characteristics could have an important impact on tumor behavior or treatment response. Studies are underway to further assess the cause and effects of these features. PMID:20102720

  12. Mutant IDH1 downregulates ATM and alters DNA repair and sensitivity to DNA damage independent of TET2

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Satoshi; Li, Wanda Y.; Tseng, Alan; Beerman, Isabel; Elia, Andrew J.; Bendall, Sean C.; Lemonnier, François; Kron, Ken J.; Cescon, David W.; Hao, Zhenyue; Lind, Evan F.; Takayama, Naoya; Planello, Aline C.; Shen, Shu Yi; Shih, Alan H.; Larsen, Dana M.; Li, Qinxi; Snow, Bryan E.; Wakeham, Andrew; Haight, Jillian; Gorrini, Chiara; Bassi, Christian; Thu, Kelsie L.; Murakami, Kiichi; Elford, Alisha R.; Ueda, Takeshi; Straley, Kimberly; Yen, Katharine E.; Melino, Gerry; Cimmino, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; Levine, Ross L.; De Carvalho, Daniel D.; Lupien, Mathieu; Rossi, Derrick J.; Nolan, Garry P.; Cairns, Rob A.; Mak, Tak W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 gene (IDH1) are common drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but their mechanism is not fully understood. It is thought that IDH1 mutants act by inhibiting TET2 to alter DNA methylation, but there are significant unexplained clinical differences between IDH1- and TET2-mutant diseases. We have discovered that mice expressing endogenous mutant IDH1 have reduced numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), in contrast to Tet2 knockout (TET2-KO) mice. Mutant IDH1 downregulates the DNA damage (DD) sensor ATM by altering histone methylation, leading to impaired DNA repair, increased sensitivity to DD, and reduced HSC self-renewal, independent of TET2. ATM expression is also decreased in human IDH1-mutated AML. These findings may have implications for treatment of IDH-mutant leukemia. PMID:27424808

  13. Comparative study of affinity and selectivity of ligands targeting abasic and mismatch sites in DNA using a fluorescence-melting assay.

    PubMed

    Kotera, Naoko; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several families of small-molecule ligands have been developed to selectively target DNA pairing defects, such as abasic sites and mismatched base pairs, with the aim to interfere with the DNA repair and the template function of the DNA. However, the affinity and selectivity (with respect to well-matched DNA) of these ligands has barely been evaluated in a systematic way. Herein, we report a comparative study of binding affinity and selectivity of a representative panel of 16 ligands targeting abasic sites and a T-T mismatch in DNA, using a fluorescence-monitored melting assay. We demonstrate that bisintercalator-type macrocyclic ligands are characterized by moderate affinity but exceptionally high selectivity with respect to well-matched DNA, whereas other reported ligands show either modest selectivity or rather low affinity in identical conditions.

  14. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA. Progress report, March 1, 1990--February 28, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  15. A Modified Protocol with Improved Detection Rate for Mis-Matched Donor HLA from Low Quantities of DNA in Urine Samples from Kidney Graft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Janette; Choi, Leo C W; Ho, Jenny C Y; Chan, Gavin S W; Mok, Maggie M Y; Lam, Man-Fei; Chak, Wai-Leung; Cheuk, Au; Chau, Ka-Foon; Tong, Matthew; Chan, Kwok-Wah; Chan, Tak-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Urine from kidney transplant recipient has proven to be a viable source for donor DNA. However, an optimized protocol would be required to determine mis-matched donor HLA specificities in view of the scarcity of DNA obtained in some cases. In this study, fresh early morning urine specimens were obtained from 155 kidney transplant recipients with known donor HLA phenotype. DNA was extracted and typing of HLA-A, B and DRB1 loci by polymerase chain reaction-specific sequence primers was performed using tailor-made condition according to the concentration of extracted DNA. HLA typing of DNA extracted from urine revealed both recipient and donor HLA phenotypes, allowing the deduction of the unknown donor HLA and hence the degree of HLA mis-match. By adopting the modified procedures, mis-matched donor HLA phenotypes were successfully deduced in all of 35 tested urine samples at DNA quantities spanning the range of 620-24,000 ng. This urine-based method offers a promising and reliable non-invasive means for the identification of mis-matched donor HLA antigens in kidney transplant recipients with unknown donor HLA phenotype or otherwise inadequate donor information.

  16. A Modified Protocol with Improved Detection Rate for Mis-Matched Donor HLA from Low Quantities of DNA in Urine Samples from Kidney Graft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Janette; Choi, Leo C. W.; Ho, Jenny C. Y.; Chan, Gavin S. W.; Mok, Maggie M. Y.; Lam, Man-Fei; Chak, Wai-Leung; Cheuk, Au; Chau, Ka-Foon; Tong, Matthew; Chan, Kwok-Wah; Chan, Tak-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Background Urine from kidney transplant recipient has proven to be a viable source for donor DNA. However, an optimized protocol would be required to determine mis-matched donor HLA specificities in view of the scarcity of DNA obtained in some cases. Methods In this study, fresh early morning urine specimens were obtained from 155 kidney transplant recipients with known donor HLA phenotype. DNA was extracted and typing of HLA-A, B and DRB1 loci by polymerase chain reaction-specific sequence primers was performed using tailor-made condition according to the concentration of extracted DNA. Results HLA typing of DNA extracted from urine revealed both recipient and donor HLA phenotypes, allowing the deduction of the unknown donor HLA and hence the degree of HLA mis-match. By adopting the modified procedures, mis-matched donor HLA phenotypes were successfully deduced in all of 35 tested urine samples at DNA quantities spanning the range of 620–24,000 ng. Conclusions This urine-based method offers a promising and reliable non-invasive means for the identification of mis-matched donor HLA antigens in kidney transplant recipients with unknown donor HLA phenotype or otherwise inadequate donor information. PMID:27861530

  17. Kaempferol Modulates DNA Methylation and Downregulates DNMT3B in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Yichen; Zhang, Jian; Zeng, Liping; Su, Ming; Tian, Ye

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA methylation plays an important role in both the occurrence and development of bladder cancer. Kaempferol (Kae), a natural flavonoid that is present in many fruits and vegetables, exhibits potent anti-cancer effects in bladder cancer. Similar to other flavonoids, Kae possesses a flavan nucleus in its structure. This structure was reported to inhibit DNA methylation by suppressing DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). However, whether Kae can inhibit DNA methylation remains unclear. Nude mice bearing bladder cancer were treated with Kae for 31 days. The genomic DNA was extracted from xenografts and the methylation changes was determined using an Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip Array. The ubiquitination was detected using immuno-precipitation assay. Our data indicated that Kae modulated DNA methylation in bladder cancer, inducing 103 differential DNA methylation positions (dDMPs) associated with genes (50 hyper-methylated and 53 hypo-methylated). DNA methylation is mostly relied on the levels of DNMTs. We observed that Kae specifically inhibited the protein levels of DNMT3B without altering the expression of DNMT1 or DNMT3A. However, Kae did not downregulate the transcription of DNMT3B. Interestingly, we observed that Kae induced a premature degradation of DNMT3B by inhibiting protein synthesis with cycloheximide (CHX). By blocking proteasome with MG132, we observed that Kae induced an increased ubiquitination of DNMT3B. These results suggested that Kae could induce the degradation of DNMT3B through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our data indicated that Kae is a novel DNMT3B inhibitor, which may promote the degradation of DNMT3B in bladder cancer. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Role of the 5' --> 3' exonuclease and Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I in base mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Imai, Masaru; Tago, Yu-ichiro; Ihara, Makoto; Kawata, Masakado; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2007-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the Escherichia coli strain mutS DeltapolA had a higher rate of transition and minus frameshift mutations than mutS or DeltapolA strains. We argued that DNA polymerase I (PolI) corrects transition mismatches. PolI, encoded by the polA gene, possesses Klenow and 5' --> 3' exonuclease domains. In the present study, rates of mutation were found to be higher in Klenow-defective mutS strains and 5' --> 3' exonuclease-defective mutS strains than mutS or polA strains. The Klenow-defective or 5' --> 3' exonuclease-defective mutS strains showed a marked increase in transition mutations. Sites of transition mutations in mutS, Klenow-defective mutS and 5' --> 3' exonuclease-defective mutS strains are different. Thus, it is suggested that, in addition to mutS function, both the Klenow and 5' --> 3' exonuclease domains are involved in the decrease of transition mutations. Transition hot and warm spots in mutS+ polA+ strains were found to differ from those in mutS and mutS DeltapolA strains. We thus argue that all the spontaneous transition mutations in the wild-type strain do not arise from transition mismatches left unrepaired by the MutS system or MutS PolI system.

  19. The G-quadruplex DNA stabilizing drug pyridostatin promotes DNA damage and downregulates transcription of Brca1 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Moruno-Manchon, Jose F; Koellhoffer, Edward C; Gopakumar, Jayakrishnan; Hambarde, Shashank; Kim, Nayun; McCullough, Louise D; Tsvetkov, Andrey S

    2017-09-12

    The G-quadruplex is a non-canonical DNA secondary structure formed by four DNA strands containing multiple runs of guanines. G-quadruplexes play important roles in DNA recombination, replication, telomere maintenance, and regulation of transcription. Small molecules that stabilize the G-quadruplexes alter gene expression in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesized that the G-quadruplexes regulate transcription in neurons. We discovered that pyridostatin, a small molecule that specifically stabilizes G-quadruplex DNA complexes, induced neurotoxicity and promoted the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cultured neurons. We also found that pyridostatin downregulated transcription of the Brca1 gene, a gene that is critical for DSB repair. Importantly, in an in vitro gel shift assay, we discovered that an antibody specific to the G-quadruplex structure binds to a synthetic oligonucleotide, which corresponds to the first putative G-quadruplex in the Brca1 gene promoter. Our results suggest that the G-quadruplex complexes regulate transcription in neurons. Studying the G-quadruplexes could represent a new avenue for neurodegeneration and brain aging research.

  20. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system consists of a number of proteins that play important roles in repair of base pair mismatch mutations and in maintenance of genomic integrity. A defect in this system can cause genetic instability, which can lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair proteins, especially MLH1 or MSH2, is responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. These MMR proteins also play an important role in the induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, altered expression of or a defect in MLH1 or MSH2 may confer resistance to anti-cancer drugs used in chemotherapy. We hypothesized that the ability of these two MMR proteins to regulate apoptosis are interdependent. Moreover, a defect in either one may confer resistance to chemotherapy by an inability to trigger apoptosis. To this end, we studied three cell lines-SW480, LoVo, and HTC116. These cell lines were selected based on their differential expression of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. SW480 expresses both MLH1 and MSH2; LoVo expresses only MLH1 but not MSH2; HCT116 expresses only MSH2 but not MLH1 protein. MTT assays, a measure of cytotoxicity, showed that there were different cytotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, on these cell lines, effects that were correlated with the MMR status of the cells. Cells that are deficient in MLH1 protein (HCT116 cells) were resistant to the drug. Cells that express both MLH1 and MSH2 proteins (SW480 cells) showed caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptosis. Cells that lack MLH1 (HCT116 cells) did not show any caspase-3 cleavage. Expression of full-length MLH1 protein was decreased in MMR proficient (SW480) cells during apoptosis; it remained unchanged in cells that lack MSH2 (LoVo cells). The expression of MSH2 protein remained unchanged during apoptosis both in MMR proficient (SW480) and deficient (HCT116) cells. Studies on translocation of MLH1 protein from nucleus to cytosolic fraction, an

  1. Label-free DNA hybridization detection and single base-mismatch discrimination using CE-ICP-MS assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Sun, Shao-kai; Yang, Jia-lin; Jiang, Yan

    2011-12-07

    Detecting a specific DNA sequence and discriminating single base-mismatch is critical to clinical diagnosis, paternity testing, forensic sciences, food and drug industry, pathology, genetics, environmental monitoring, and anti-bioterrorism. To this end, capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method is developed using the displacing interaction between the target ssDNA and the competitor Hg(2+) for the first time. The thymine-rich capture ssDNA 1 is interacted with the competitor Hg(2+), forming an assembled complex in a hairpin-structure between the thymine bases arrangement at both sides of the capture ssDNA 1. In the presence of a target ssDNA with stronger affinity than that of the competitor Hg(2+), the energetically favorable hybridization between capture ssDNA 1 and the target ssDNA destroys the hairpin-structure and releases the competitor as free Hg(2+), which was then read out and accurately quantified by CE-ICP-MS assay. Under the optimal CE separation conditions, free Hg(2+) ions and its capture ssDNA 1 adduct were baseline separated and detected on-line by ICP-MS; the increased peak intensity of free Hg(2+) against the concentration of perfectly complementary target ssDNA was linear over the concentration range of 30-600 nmol L(-1) with a limit of detection of 8 nmol L(-1) (3s, n = 11) in the pre-incubated mixture containing 1 μmol L(-1) Hg(2+) and 0.2 μmol L(-1) capture ssDNA 1. This new assay method is simple in design since any target ssDNA binding can in principle result in free Hg(2+) release by 6-fold Hg(2+) signal amplification, avoiding oligonucleotide labeling or assistance by excess signal transducer and signal reporter to read out the target. Due to element-specific detection of ICP-MS in our assay procedure, the interference from the autofluorescence of substrata was eliminated.

  2. DPT tautomerisation of the G·A(syn) and A*·G*(syn) DNA mismatches: a QM/QTAIM combined atomistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-05-21

    By applying a combined QM and QTAIM atomistic computational approach we have established for the first time that the G·A(syn) and A*·G*(syn) DNA mismatches (rare tautomers are marked with an asterisk), causing spontaneous transversions with substantially various probabilities, radically differ from each other in their ability to tautomerise through the double proton transfer (DPT). The A*·G*(syn) mismatch tautomerises quite easily (ΔΔG(TS) ≈ 4·kT at room temperature) into the A·G*(syn) mismatch through the asynchronous concerted mechanism, whereas the G·A(syn) base mispair does not tautomerise via the DPT at all, since there is no local minimum corresponding to the tautomerised G*·A*(syn) mismatch on the potential energy surface. It was established that the A·G*(syn) base mispair is a dynamically unstable H-bonded complex with an extremely short lifetime of 2.17 × 10(-13) s. Consequently, the obtained results allow us to believe that spontaneous or forced dissociation of both the G·A(syn) and A*·G*(syn) DNA mismatches by the DNA-polymerase occurs with the preservation of the tautomeric status of the bases.

  3. New Therapeutic Opportunities Based on DNA Mismatch Repair and BRAF Status in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Romain; Svrcek, Magali; Dreyer, Chantal; Cervera, Pascale; Duval, Alex; Pocard, Marc; Fléjou, Jean-François; de Gramont, Aimery; André, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Recently, colorectal cancer (CRC) subtyping consortium identified four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS1-4). CMS1 is enriched for deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) and BRAF (V600E) tumors. Intriguingly, this subtype has better relapse-free survival but worse overall survival after relapse compared with the other subtypes. Growing evidence is accumulating on the benefit of specific therapeutic strategies such as immune checkpoint inhibition therapy in dMMR tumors and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway targeted therapy in tumors harboring BRAF (V600E) mutation. After reviewing dMMR prognostic value, immune checkpoints as major targets for dMMR carcinomas will be highlighted. Following, BRAF (V600E) prognostic impact will be reviewed and therapeutic strategies with the combination of cytotoxic agents and especially the combinations of BRAF and MAPK inhibitors will be discussed.

  4. Kinetics of Mismatch Formation opposite Lesions by the Replicative DNA Polymerase from Bacteriophage RB69

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, Matthew; Rudnicki, Jean; Midkiff, John; Reha-Krantz, Linda; Doubli, Sylvie; Wallace, Susan S.

    2010-04-12

    The fidelity of DNA replication is under constant threat from the formation of lesions within the genome. Oxidation of DNA bases leads to the formation of altered DNA bases such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, commonly called 8-oxoG, and 2-hydroxyadenenine, or 2-OHA. In this work we have examined the incorporation kinetics opposite these two oxidatively derived lesions as well as an abasic site analogue by the replicative DNA polymerase from bacteriophage RB69. We compared the kinetic parameters for both wild type and the low fidelity L561A variant. While nucleotide incorporation rates (k{sub pol}) were generally higher for the variant, the presence of a lesion in the templating position reduced the ability of both the wild-type and variant DNA polymerases to form ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes. Thus, the L561A substitution does not significantly affect the ability of the RB69 DNA polymerase to recognize damaged DNA; instead, the mutation increases the probability that nucleotide incorporation will occur. We have also solved the crystal structure of the L561A variant forming an 8-oxoG {center_dot} dATP mispair and show that the propensity for forming this mispair depends on an enlarged polymerase active site.

  5. Diabetes causes multiple genetic alterations and downregulates expression of DNA repair genes in the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yuying; Cai, Mengyin; Zhu, Baoyi; Mu, Panwei; Xia, Xuan; Zhao, Yi; Weng, Jianping; Gao, Xin; Wen, Xingqiao

    2011-09-01

    The molecular impact of diabetes mellitus on prostate gland has not been elucidated. In this study, we performed a whole-genome cDNA microarray analysis using a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model to identify the effects of diabetes on the gene expression profiles in prostate. Our study shows that diabetes causes changes in the expression of multiple genes, particularly those related to cell proliferation and differentiation, oxidative stress, DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoints, angiogenesis and apoptosis. These findings were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining using rat and human prostate tissue. We also used a cell culture model (human normal prostatic RWPE-1 cell line) to study the direct effect of high glucose. We found that high glucose caused increased intracellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as downregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and DNA damage repair genes MRE11 and XRCC3. Our findings provide important insights into understanding the pathogenesis of the diabetes-induced changes in prostate as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets for future studies.

  6. DNA mismatch repair deficiency and hereditary syndromes in Latino patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ricker, Charité N; Hanna, Diana L; Peng, Cheng; Nguyen, Nathalie T; Stern, Mariana C; Schmit, Stephanie L; Idos, Greg E; Patel, Ravi; Tsai, Steven; Ramirez, Veronica; Lin, Sonia; Shamasunadara, Vinay; Barzi, Afsaneh; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2017-10-01

    The landscape of hereditary syndromes and clinicopathologic characteristics among US Latino/Hispanic individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains poorly understood. A total of 265 patients with CRC who were enrolled in the Hispanic Colorectal Cancer Study were included in the current study. Information regarding CRC risk factors was elicited through interviews, and treatment and survival data were abstracted from clinical charts. Tumor studies and germline genetic testing results were collected from medical records or performed using standard molecular methods. The mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 53.7 years (standard deviation, 10.3 years), and 48.3% were female. Overall, 21.2% of patients reported a first-degree or second-degree relative with CRC; 3.4% met Amsterdam I/II criteria. With respect to Bethesda guidelines, 38.5% of patients met at least 1 criterion. Of the 161 individuals who had immunohistochemistry and/or microsatellite instability testing performed, 21 (13.0%) had mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient (dMMR) tumors. dMMR tumors were associated with female sex (61.9%), earlier age at the time of diagnosis (50.4 ± 12.4 years), proximal location (61.9%), and first-degree (23.8%) or second-degree (9.5%) family history of CRC. Among individuals with dMMR tumors, 13 (61.9%) had a germline MMR mutation (MutL homolog 1 [MLH1] in 6 patients; MutS homolog 2 [MSH2] in 4 patients; MutS homolog 6 [MHS6] in 2 patients; and PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component [PMS2] in 1 patient). The authors identified 2 additional MLH1 mutation carriers by genetic testing who had not received immunohistochemistry/microsatellite instability testing. In total, 5.7% of the entire cohort were confirmed to have Lynch syndrome. In addition, 6 individuals (2.3%) had a polyposis phenotype. The percentage of dMMR tumors noted among Latino individuals (13%) is similar to estimates in non-Hispanic white individuals. In the current study, the majority of

  7. Enhanced thermal stability and mismatch discrimination of mutation-carrying DNA duplexes and their kinetic and thermodynamic properties in microchannel laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Maria Portia B; Yamashita, Kenichi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    This article reports the enhancement of thermal stability involving normal duplex and mutation-carrying DNA duplexes in microchannel laminar flow. The application of an in-house temperature-controllable microchannel-type flow cell is demonstrated for improved discrimination of mismatch base pairs such as A-G and T-G that are difficult to distinguish due to the rather small thermal destabilizations. Enhancement in thermal stability is reflected by an increased thermal melting temperature achieved in microchannel laminar flow as compared with batch reactions. To examine the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex-coil equilibrium of DNA oligomers, denaturation-renaturation hysteresis curves were measured. The influence of microchannel laminar flow on DNA base mismatch analysis was described from the kinetic and thermodynamic perspectives. An increasing trend was observed for association rate constant as flow rate increased. In contrast, an apparent decrease in dissociation rate constant was observed with increasing flow rate. The magnitudes of the activation energies of dissociation were nearly constant for both the batch and microchannel laminar flow systems at all flow rates. In contrast, the magnitudes of activation energies of association decreased as flow rate increased. These results clearly show how microchannel laminar flow induces change in reaction rate by effecting change in activation energy. We anticipate, therefore, that this approach based on microchannel laminar flow system holds great promise for improved mismatch discrimination in DNA analyses, particularly on single-base-pair mismatch, by pronouncedly enhancing thermal stability.

  8. Selenium compounds activate ATM-dependent DNA damage responses via the mismatch repair protein hMLH1 in colorectal cancer cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that selenium supplementation suppresses risk of colorectal and other cancers. The majority of colorectal cancers are characterized by a defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) process. Here, we have employed the MMR-deficient HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells ...

  9. Arsenic Inhibits DNA Mismatch Repair by Promoting EGFR Expression and PCNA Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Dan; Ortega, Janice; Kim, Christine; Huang, Jian; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2015-01-01

    Both genotoxic and non-genotoxic chemicals can act as carcinogens. However, while genotoxic compounds lead directly to mutations that promote unregulated cell growth, the mechanism by which non-genotoxic carcinogens lead to cellular transformation is poorly understood. Using a model non-genotoxic carcinogen, arsenic, we show here that exposure to arsenic inhibits mismatch repair (MMR) in human cells, possibly through its ability to stimulate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA). HeLa cells exposed to exogenous arsenic demonstrate a dose- and time-dependent increase in the levels of EGFR and tyrosine 211-phosphorylated PCNA. Cell extracts derived from arsenic-treated HeLa cells are defective in MMR, and unphosphorylated recombinant PCNA restores normal MMR activity to these extracts. These results suggest a model in which arsenic induces expression of EGFR, which in turn phosphorylates PCNA, and phosphorylated PCNA then inhibits MMR, leading to increased susceptibility to carcinogenesis. This study suggests a putative novel mechanism of action for arsenic and other non-genotoxic carcinogens. PMID:25907674

  10. Downregulation of Wip1 phosphatase modulates the cellular threshold of DNA damage signaling in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Macurek, Libor; Benada, Jan; Müllers, Erik; Halim, Vincentius A.; Krejčíková, Kateřina; Burdová, Kamila; Pecháčková, Sona; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lindqvist, Arne; Medema, René H.; Bartek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Cells are constantly challenged by DNA damage and protect their genome integrity by activation of an evolutionary conserved DNA damage response pathway (DDR). A central core of DDR is composed of a spatiotemporally ordered net of post-translational modifications, among which protein phosphorylation plays a major role. Activation of checkpoint kinases ATM/ATR and Chk1/2 leads to a temporal arrest in cell cycle progression (checkpoint) and allows time for DNA repair. Following DNA repair, cells re-enter the cell cycle by checkpoint recovery. Wip1 phosphatase (also called PPM1D) dephosphorylates multiple proteins involved in DDR and is essential for timely termination of the DDR. Here we have investigated how Wip1 is regulated in the context of the cell cycle. We found that Wip1 activity is downregulated by several mechanisms during mitosis. Wip1 protein abundance increases from G1 phase to G2 and declines in mitosis. Decreased abundance of Wip1 during mitosis is caused by proteasomal degradation. In addition, Wip1 is phosphorylated at multiple residues during mitosis, and this leads to inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Importantly, ectopic expression of Wip1 reduced γH2AX staining in mitotic cells and decreased the number of 53BP1 nuclear bodies in G1 cells. We propose that the combined decrease and inhibition of Wip1 in mitosis decreases the threshold necessary for DDR activation and enables cells to react adequately even to modest levels of DNA damage encountered during unperturbed mitotic progression. PMID:23255129

  11. How reliable is immunohistochemical staining for DNA mismatch repair proteins performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiation?

    PubMed

    Vilkin, Alex; Halpern, Marisa; Morgenstern, Sara; Brazovski, Eli; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Boltin, Doron; Purim, Ofer; Kundel, Yulia; Welinsky, Sara; Brenner, Baruch; Niv, Yaron; Levi, Zohar

    2014-10-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing for mismatch repair proteins (MMRP) is currently being used primarily in colorectal cancer resection specimens. We aimed to compare the results of IHC staining performed on biopsy specimens obtained at endoscopy with that performed on surgical specimens after neoadjuvant therapy. Thirty-two rectal cancer subjects had paired preneoadjuvant and postneoadjuvant tissue available for IHC staining (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2), whereas 39 rectosigmoid cancer patients who did not receive neoadjuvant treatment served as controls. Each slide received a qualitative (absent, focal, and strong) and quantitative score (immunoreactivity [0-3] × percent positivity [0-4]). The quantitative scores of MMRP from the operative material were significantly lower in the neoadjuvant group than in the control (P < .05 for all).The scores of all MMRP from endoscopic biopsies were not significantly different between the neoadjuvant and the control groups. Disagreement between the endoscopic biopsy and the operative material was evident in 23 of 128 stains (18.5%) in the neoadjuvant group and in 12 of 156 stains (7.7%) in the control group (P = .009). In the neoadjuvant group, a disagreement pattern of "endoscopic strong operative focal" was observed in 28.1% for PMS2, 12.5% for MSH6, 12.5% for MLH1, and 6.3% for MSH2, and in the control group, this same disagreement pattern was found in 12.8% for PMS2, 7.7% for MSH6, 7.7% for MLH1, and 0% for MSH2. Based on our findings, we suggest that for rectal cancer, the endoscopic material rather than the operative material should serve as the primary material for IHC staining.

  12. Sequence and stress-response analyses of the DNA mismatch repair gene hexA in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Park, J H; Dunn, N W; Kim, W S

    2001-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair gene hexA was identified in Lactococcus lactis by PCR amplification by using a pair of primers homologous to the DNA-binding Dps protein. The gene in its entirety, including the regulatory regions, was sequenced, by using a strategy of chromosomal walking based on two PCR protocols. The open reading frame of 2526 bp was preceded by a strong ribosome-binding site (AGGAAG) and was followed by a potential transcription terminator (hairpin loop structure). The 5' terminus of the hexA mRNA was located 135 bp upstream of the start codon, and putative -10 and -35 regions were identified. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed two motifs, the ATP/GTP-binding site (P-loop) and the "MutS family signature". The hexA promoter was cloned into pMU1327, which contained a promoter-less CAT reporter gene, and the promoter activity was examined under oxidative-stress conditions. It appears that the promoter activity is down-shifted by H2O2 at 4 mM.

  13. The mismatch repair system modulates curcumin sensitivity through induction of DNA strand breaks and activation of G2-M checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihua; Jin, ShunQian; Yalowich, Jack C; Brown, Kevin D; Rajasekaran, Baskaran

    2010-03-01

    The highly conserved mismatch (MMR) repair system corrects postreplicative errors and modulates cellular responses to genotoxic agents. Here, we show that the MMR system strongly influences cellular sensitivity to curcumin. Compared with MMR-proficient cells, isogenically matched MMR-deficient cells displayed enhanced sensitivity to curcumin. Similarly, cells suppressed for MLH1 or MSH2 expression by RNA interference displayed increased curcumin sensitivity. Curcumin treatment generated comparable levels of reactive oxygen species and the mutagenic adduct 8-oxo-guanine in MMR-proficient and MMR-deficient cells; however, accumulation of gammaH2AX foci, a marker for DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), occurred only in MMR-positive cells in response to curcumin treatment. Additionally, MMR-positive cells showed activation of Chk1 and induction of G(2)-M cell cycle checkpoint following curcumin treatment and inhibition of Chk1 by UCN-01 abrogated Chk1 activation and heightened apoptosis in MMR-proficient cells. These results indicate that curcumin triggers the accumulation of DNA DSB and induction of a checkpoint response through a MMR-dependent mechanism. Conversely, in MMR-compromised cells, curcumin-induced DSB is significantly blunted, and as a result, cells fail to undergo cell cycle arrest, enter mitosis, and die through mitotic catastrophe. The results have potential therapeutic value, especially in the treatment of tumors with compromised MMR function.

  14. Solution structure of DAPI selectively bound in the minor groove of a DNA T.T mismatch-containing site: NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, E; Paci, M

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of the complex between 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and DNA oligomer [d(GCGATTCGC)]2, containing a central T.T mismatch, has been characterized by combined use of proton one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics computations including relaxation matrix refinement. The results show that the DAPI molecule binds in the minor groove of the central region 5'-ATT-3' of the DNA oligomer, which predominantly adopts a duplex structure with a global right-handed B-like conformation. In the final models of the complex, the DAPI molecule is located nearly isohelical with its NH indole proton oriented towards the DNA helix axis and forming a bifurcated hydrogen bond with the carbonyl O2 groups of a mismatched T5 and the T6 residue of the opposite strand. Mismatched thymines adopt a wobble base pair conformation and are found stacked between the flanking base pairs, inducing only minor local conformational changes in global duplex structure. In addition, no other binding mechanisms were observed, showing that minor groove binding of DAPI to the mismatch-containing site is favoured in comparison with any other previously reported interaction with G.C sequences. PMID:9753740

  15. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries.

    PubMed

    Trebitz, Anett S; Hoffman, Joel C; Grant, George W; Billehus, Tyler M; Pilgrim, Erik M

    2015-07-22

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections.

  16. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebitz, Anett S.; Hoffman, Joel C.; Grant, George W.; Billehus, Tyler M.; Pilgrim, Erik M.

    2015-07-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections.

  17. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trebitz, Anett S.; Hoffman, Joel C.; Grant, George W.; Billehus, Tyler M.; Pilgrim, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections. PMID:26199185

  18. The cumulative effects of polymorphisms in the DNA mismatch repair genes and tobacco smoking in oesophageal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Matjaz; Wang, Yabing; Veber, Nika; Mwapagha, Lamech M; Parker, M Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes repair errors in DNA that occur during normal DNA metabolism or are induced by certain cancer-contributing exposures. We assessed the association between 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 MMR genes and oesophageal cancer risk in South Africans. Prior to genotyping, SNPs were selected from the HapMap database, based on their significantly different genotypic distributions between European ancestry populations and four HapMap populations of African origin. In the Mixed Ancestry group, the MSH3 rs26279 G/G versus A/A or A/G genotype was positively associated with cancer (OR = 2.71; 95% CI: 1.34-5.50). Similar associations were observed for PMS1 rs5742938 (GG versus AA or AG: OR = 1.73; 95% CI: 1.07-2.79) and MLH3 rs28756991 (AA or GA versus GG: OR = 2.07; 95% IC: 1.04-4.12). In Black individuals, however, no association between MMR polymorhisms and cancer risk was observed in individual SNP analysis. The interactions between MMR genes were evaluated using the model-based multifactor-dimensionality reduction approach, which showed a significant genetic interaction between SNPs in MSH2, MSH3 and PMS1 genes in Black and Mixed Ancestry subjects, respectively. The data also implies that pathogenesis of common polymorphisms in MMR genes is influenced by exposure to tobacco smoke. In conclusion, our findings suggest that common polymorphisms in MMR genes and/or their combined effects might be involved in the aetiology of oesophageal cancer.

  19. Complexes of mismatched and complementary DNA with minor groove binders. Structures at nucleotide resolution via an improved hydroxyl radical cleavage methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bialonska, Dobroslawa; Song, Kenneth; Bolton, Philip H.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cell lines can replicate faster than normal cells and many also have defective DNA repair pathways. This has lead to the investigation of the inhibition of DNA repair proteins as a means of therapeutic intervention. An alternative approach is to hide or mask damaged DNA from the repair systems. We have developed a protocol to investigate the structures of the complexes of damaged DNA with drug like molecules. Nucleotide resolution structural information can be obtained using an improved hydroxyl radical cleavage protocol. The use of a dTn tail increases the length of the smallest fragments of interest and allows efficient co-precipitation of the fragments with poly(A). The use of a fluorescent label, on the 5′ end of the dTn tail, in conjunction with modified cleavage reaction conditions, avoids the lifetime and other problems with 32P labeling. The structures of duplex DNAs containing AC and CC mismatches in the presence and absence of minor groove binders have been investigated as have those of the fully complementary DNA. The results indicate that the structural perturbations of the mismatches are localized, are sequence dependent and that the presence of a mismatch can alter the binding of drug like molecules. PMID:21893212

  20. Complexes of mismatched and complementary DNA with minor groove binders. Structures at nucleotide resolution via an improved hydroxyl radical cleavage methodology.

    PubMed

    Bialonska, Dobroslawa; Song, Kenneth; Bolton, Philip H

    2011-11-27

    Tumor cell lines can replicate faster than normal cells and many also have defective DNA repair pathways. This has lead to the investigation of the inhibition of DNA repair proteins as a means of therapeutic intervention. An alternative approach is to hide or mask damaged DNA from the repair systems. We have developed a protocol to investigate the structures of the complexes of damaged DNA with drug like molecules. Nucleotide resolution structural information can be obtained using an improved hydroxyl radical cleavage protocol. The use of a dT(n) tail increases the length of the smallest fragments of interest and allows efficient co-precipitation of the fragments with poly(A). The use of a fluorescent label, on the 5' end of the dT(n) tail, in conjunction with modified cleavage reaction conditions, avoids the lifetime and other problems with (32)P labeling. The structures of duplex DNAs containing AC and CC mismatches in the presence and absence of minor groove binders have been investigated as have those of the fully complementary DNA. The results indicate that the structural perturbations of the mismatches are localized, are sequence dependent and that the presence of a mismatch can alter the binding of drug like molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Adenovirus core protein VII down-regulates the DNA damage response on the host genome.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Della Fera, Ashley N; Otter, Clayton J; Herrmann, Christin; Pancholi, Neha J; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-08-09

    Viral manipulation of cellular proteins allows viruses to suppress host defenses and generate infectious progeny. Due to the linear double-stranded DNA nature of the adenovirus genome, the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is considered a barrier for successful infection. The adenovirus genome is packaged with protein VII, a viral-encoded histone-like core protein that is suggested to protect incoming viral genomes from detection by cellular DNA damage machinery. We showed that protein VII localizes to host chromatin during infection, leading us to hypothesize that protein VII may affect DNA damage responses on the cellular genome. Here, we show that protein VII at cellular chromatin results in a significant decrease in accumulation of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) following irradiation, indicating that protein VII inhibits DDR signaling. The oncoprotein SET was recently suggested to modulate the DDR by affecting access of repair proteins to chromatin. Since protein VII binds SET, we investigated a role for SET in DDR inhibition by protein VII. We show that knockdown of SET partially rescues the protein VII-induced decrease in γH2AX accumulation on the host genome, suggesting that SET is required for inhibition. Finally, we show that knockdown of SET also allows ATM to localize to incoming viral genomes bound by protein VII during infection with a mutant lacking early region E4. Together, our data suggest that the protein VII-SET interaction contributes to DDR evasion by adenovirus. Our results provide an additional example of a strategy used by adenovirus to manipulate the host DDR and show how viruses can modify cellular processes through manipulation of host chromatin.IMPORTANCE The DNA damage response (DDR) is a cellular network crucial for maintaining genome integrity. DNA viruses replicating in the nucleus challenge the resident genome and must overcome cellular responses, including the DDR. Adenoviruses are prevalent human pathogens that can cause a

  2. Targeting DNA base pair mismatch with artificial nucleobases. Advances and perspectives in triple helix strategy.

    PubMed

    Malnuit, Vincent; Duca, Maria; Benhida, Rachid

    2011-01-21

    This review, divided into three sections, describes the contribution of the chemists' community to the development and application of triple helix strategy by using artificial nucleic acids, particularly for the recognition of DNA sequences incorporating base pair inversions. Firstly, the development of nucleobases that recognise CG inversion is surveyed followed secondly by specific recognition of TA inverted base pair. Finally, we point out in the last section recent perspectives and applications, driven from knowledge in nucleic acids interactions, in the growing field of nanotechnology and supramolecular chemistry at the border area of physics, chemistry and molecular biology.

  3. ATM-dependent downregulation of USP7/HAUSP by PPM1G activates p53 response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Khoronenkova, Svetlana V; Dianova, Irina I; Ternette, Nicola; Kessler, Benedikt M; Parsons, Jason L; Dianov, Grigory L

    2012-03-30

    The deubiquitylation enzyme USP7/HAUSP plays a major role in regulating genome stability and cancer prevention by controlling the key proteins involved in the DNA damage response. Despite this important role in controlling other proteins, USP7 itself has not been recognized as a target for regulation. Here, we report that USP7 regulation plays a central role in DNA damage signal transmission. We find that stabilization of Mdm2, and correspondingly p53 downregulation in unstressed cells, is accomplished by a specific isoform of USP7 (USP7S), which is phosphorylated at serine 18 by the protein kinase CK2. Phosphorylation stabilizes USP7S and thus contributes to Mdm2 stabilization and downregulation of p53. After ionizing radiation, dephosphorylation of USP7S by the ATM-dependent protein phosphatase PPM1G leads to USP7S downregulation, followed by Mdm2 downregulation and accumulation of p53. Our findings provide a quantitative transmission mechanism of the DNA damage signal to coordinate a p53-dependent DNA damage response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. DDB1-DDB2 (xeroderma pigmentosum group E) protein complex recognizes a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, mismatches, apurinic/apyrimidinic sites, and compound lesions in DNA.

    PubMed

    Wittschieben, Birgitte Ø; Iwai, Shigenori; Wood, Richard D

    2005-12-02

    The DDB protein complex, comprising the subunits DDB1 and DDB2, binds tightly to UV light-irradiated DNA. Mutations in DDB2 are responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum group E, a disorder with defects in nucleotide excision repair of DNA. Both subunits are also components of a complex involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Cellular defects in DDB2 disable repair of the major UV radiation photoproduct in DNA, a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, but no significant direct binding of DDB to this photoproduct in DNA has ever been demonstrated. Thus, it has been uncertain how DDB could play a specific role in DNA repair of such damage. We investigated DDB function using highly purified proteins. Co-purified DDB1-DDB2 or DDB reconstituted with individual DDB1 and DDB2 subunits binds to damaged DNA as a ternary complex. We found that DDB can indeed recognize a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in DNA with an affinity (K(app)a) 6-fold higher than that of nondamaged DNA. The DDB1-DDB2 complex also bound with high specificity to a UV radiation-induced (6-4) photoproduct and to an apurinic site in DNA. Unexpectedly, DDB also bound avidly to DNA containing a 2- or 3-bp mismatch (and does not bind well to DNA containing larger mismatches). These data indicate that DDB does not detect lesions per se. It instead recognizes other structural features of damaged DNA, acting as a sensor that probes DNA for a subset of conformational changes. Lesions recognized may include those arising when translesion polymerases such as POLH incorporate bases across from DNA lesions caused by UV radiation.

  5. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: Match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to biotic condition assessment and non-native species early-detection monitoring. However, the abi...

  6. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: Match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to biotic condition assessment and non-native species early-detection monitoring. However, the abi...

  7. A novel DNA damage response mediated by DNA mismatch repair in Caenorhabditis elegans: induction of programmed autophagic cell death in non-dividing cells

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Takahito; Kato, Yuichi; Nakamura, Chihiro; Ishikawa, Satoru; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) contributes to genome integrity by correcting errors of DNA polymerase and inducing cell death in response to DNA damage. Dysfunction of MMR results in increased mutation frequency and cancer risk. Clinical researches revealed that MMR abnormalities induce cancers of non-dividing tissues, such as kidney and liver. However, how MMR suppresses cancer in non-dividing tissues is not understood. To address that mechanism, we analyzed the roles of MMR in non-dividing cells using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), in which all somatic cells are non-dividing in the adult stage. In this study, we used stable MMR-mutant lines with a balancer chromosome. First, we confirmed that deficiency of MMR leads to resistance to various mutagens in C. elegans dividing cells. Next, we performed drug resistance assays, and found that MMR-deficient adult worms were resistant to SN1-type alkylating and oxidizing agents. In addition, dead cell staining and reporter assays of an autophagy-related gene demonstrated that the cell death was autophagic cell death. Interestingly, this autophagic cell death was not suppressed by caffeine, implying that MMR induces death of non-dividing cells in an atl-1-independent manner. Hence, we propose the hypothesis that MMR prevents cancers in non-dividing tissues by directly inducing cell death. PMID:26413217

  8. MonoSeq Variant Caller Reveals Novel Mononucleotide Run Indel Mutations in Tumors with Defective DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher J.; Miranda, Mario A.; O’Hern, Matthew J.; Blachly, James S.; Moyer, Cassandra L.; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Kroll, Karl W.; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Sapp, Caroline E.; Mutch, David G.; Cohn, David E.; Bundschuh, Ralf; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized cancer genetics, but accurately detecting mutations in repetitive DNA sequences, especially mononucleotide runs, remains a challenge. This is a particular concern for tumors with defective mismatch repair (MMR) that accumulate strand-slippage mutations. We developed MonoSeq to improve indel mutation detection in mononucleotide runs, and used MonoSeq to investigate strand-slippage mutations in endometrial cancers, a tumor type that has frequent loss of MMR. We performed extensive Sanger sequencing to validate both clonal and sub-clonal MonoSeq mutation calls. Eighty-one regions containing mononucleotide runs were sequenced in 542 primary endometrial cancers (223 with defective MMR). Our analyses revealed that the overall mutation rate in MMR-deficient tumors was 20–30-fold higher than in MMR normal tumors. MonoSeq analysis identified several previously unreported mutations, including a novel hotspot in an A7 run in the terminal exon of ARID5B.The ARID5B indel mutations were seen in both MMR-deficient and MMR normal tumors, suggesting biologic selection. Analysis of tumor mRNAs revealed the presence of mutant transcripts that could result in translation of neopeptides. Improved detection of mononucleotide run strand-slippage mutations has clear implications for comprehensive mutation detection in tumors with defective MMR. Indel frameshift mutations and the resultant antigenic peptides could help guide immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27346418

  9. MonoSeq Variant Caller Reveals Novel Mononucleotide Run Indel Mutations in Tumors with Defective DNA Mismatch Repair.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher J; Miranda, Mario A; O'Hern, Matthew J; Blachly, James S; Moyer, Cassandra L; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Kroll, Karl W; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Sapp, Caroline E; Mutch, David G; Cohn, David E; Bundschuh, Ralf; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized cancer genetics, but accurately detecting mutations in repetitive DNA sequences, especially mononucleotide runs, remains a challenge. This is a particular concern for tumors with defective mismatch repair (MMR) that accumulate strand-slippage mutations. We developed MonoSeq to improve indel mutation detection in mononucleotide runs, and used MonoSeq to investigate strand-slippage mutations in endometrial cancers, a tumor type that has frequent loss of MMR. We performed extensive Sanger sequencing to validate both clonal and subclonal MonoSeq mutation calls. Eighty-one regions containing mononucleotide runs were sequenced in 540 primary endometrial cancers (223 with defective MMR). Our analyses revealed that the overall mutation rate in MMR-deficient tumors was 20-30-fold higher than in MMR-normal tumors. MonoSeq analysis identified several previously unreported mutations, including a novel hotspot in an A7 run in the terminal exon of ARID5B.The ARID5B indel mutations were seen in both MMR-deficient and MMR-normal tumors, suggesting biologic selection. The analysis of tumor mRNAs revealed the presence of mutant transcripts that could result in translation of neopeptides. Improved detection of mononucleotide run strand-slippage mutations has clear implications for comprehensive mutation detection in tumors with defective MMR. Indel frameshift mutations and the resultant antigenic peptides could help guide immunotherapy strategies.

  10. Mechanism of the Escherichia coli DNA T:G-mismatch endonuclease (Vsr protein) probed with thiophosphate-containing oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Sarah L; Brazier, John; Cosstick, Richard; Connolly, Bernard A

    2005-10-28

    The mechanism of the Escherichia coli DNA T:G mismatch endonuclease (Vsr) has been investigated using oligodeoxynucleotides substituted, at the scissile phosphate, with isomeric phosphorothioates and a 3'-phosphorothiolate. Binding and kinetic data with the phosphorothioates/phosphorothiolate indicate that the two magnesium ions, which constitute essential co-factors, are required to stabilise the extra negative charge developed on the phosphate as the transition state is formed. Additionally one of the magnesium ions serves to activate the leaving group (the non-bridging 3'-oxygen atom of the scissile phosphate) during the hydrolysis reaction. Stereochemical analysis, using the R(p) phosphorothioate isomer, indicates that Vsr carries out a hydrolytic reaction with inversion of stereochemistry at phosphorus, compatible with an in-line attack of water and a pentacovalent transition state with trigonal bipyramidal geometry. In conjunction with structures of Vsr bound to its products, these data allow the reconstruction of the enzyme-substrate complex and a comprehensive description of the hydrolysis mechanism.

  11. Applying and testing the conveniently optimized enzyme mismatch cleavage method to clinical DNA diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Niida, Yo; Kuroda, Mondo; Mitani, Yusuke; Okumura, Akiko; Yokoi, Ayano

    2012-11-01

    Establishing a simple and effective mutation screening method is one of the most compelling problems with applying genetic diagnosis to clinical use. Because there is no reliable and inexpensive screening system, amplifying by PCR and performing direct sequencing of every coding exon is the gold standard strategy even today. However, this approach is expensive and time consuming, especially when gene size or sample number is large. Previously, we developed CEL nuclease mediated heteroduplex incision with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining (CHIPS) as an ideal simple mutation screening system constructed with only conventional apparatuses and commercially available reagents. In this study, we evaluated the utility of CHIPS technology for genetic diagnosis in clinical practice by applying this system to screening for the COL2A1, WRN and RPS6KA3 mutations in newly diagnosed patients with Stickler syndrome (autosomal dominant inheritance), Werner syndrome (autosomal recessive inheritance) and Coffin-Lowry syndrome (X-linked inheritance), respectively. In all three genes, CHIPS detected all DNA variations including disease causative mutations within a day. Direct sequencing of all coding exons of these genes confirmed 100% sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrate high sensitivity, high cost performance and reliability of this simple system, with compatibility to all inheritance modes. Because of its low technology, CHIPS is ready to use and potentially disseminate to any laboratories in the world.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA variability in the Titicaca basin: Matches and mismatches with linguistics and ethnohistory.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Chiara; Heggarty, Paul; Castrì, Loredana; Luiselli, Donata; Pettener, Davide

    2011-01-01

    The Titicaca basin was the cradle of some of the major complex societies of pre-Columbian South America and is today home to three surviving native languages: Quechua, Aymara, and Uro. This study seeks to contribute to reconstructing the population prehistory of the region, by providing a first genetic profile of its inhabitants, set also into the wider context of South American genetic background. We report the first mitochondrial DNA first hypervariable segment sequences of native populations of the environs of Lake Titicaca: speakers of Aymara and Quechua, and the "Uros" of the Lake's floating islands. We sampled Aymara speakers from a locality where the Uro language was formerly documented, to check for possible language shift patterns. These data are compared with those for other Amerindian populations, collated from already published sources. Our results uncover the genetic distinctiveness of our formerly Uro but now Aymara-speaking sample, in contrast with a relative homogeneity for all the other Central Andean samples. The genetic affinities that characterize Central Andean populations are highly consistent with the succession of expansive polities in the region, culminating with the Incas. In the environs of Lake Titicaca, however, one subset of the present day Aymara-speaking population exhibits a peculiar position: perhaps a genetic correlate to their original Uro linguistic lineage (now extinct in the area), tallying with ethnohistorical claims for the distinctiveness of the Uro population. Our results emphasize the need for genetic descriptions to consider the widespread phenomenon of language shift. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Cocaine-mediated downregulation of microglial miR-124 expression involves promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Liao, Ke; Kook, Yeon Hee; Niu, Fang; Callen, Shannon E; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-11-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the development of reward-related behavior in cocaine self-administration rodents. Cocaine, one of most commonly abused drugs, has been shown to activate microglia both in vitro and in vivo. Detailed molecular mechanisms underlying cocaine-mediated microglial activation remain poorly understood. microRNAs (miRs) belonging to a class of small noncoding RNA superfamily have been shown to modulate the activation status of microglia. miR-124, one of the microglia-enriched miRs, functions as an anti-inflammatory regulator that maintains microglia in a quiescent state. To date, the possible effects of cocaine on microglial miR-124 levels and the associated underlying mechanisms have not been explored. In the current study, we demonstrated that cocaine exposure decreased miR-124 levels in both BV-2 cells and rat primary microglia. These findings were further validated in vivo, wherein we demonstrated decreased abundance of miR-124 in purified microglia isolated from cocaine-administered mice brains compared with cells from saline administered animals. Molecular mechanisms underlying these effects involved cocaine-mediated increased mRNA and protein expression of DNMTs in microglia. Consistently, cocaine substantially increased promoter DNA methylation levels of miR-124 precursors (pri-miR-124-1 and -2), but not that of pri-miR-124-3, both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, our findings demonstrated that cocaine exposure increased DNA methylation of miR-124 promoter resulting into its downregulation, which, in turn, led to microglial activation. Our results thus implicate that epigenetic modulation of miR-124 could be considered as a potential therapeutic approach to ameliorate microglial activation and, possibly, the development of cocaine addiction.

  14. PTEN downregulates p75NTR expression by decreasing DNA-binding activity of Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Sherri L.; Guy, Clifford S.; Mearow, Karen M.

    2009-02-13

    p75NTR is expressed throughout the nervous system and its dysregulation is associated with pathological conditions. We have recently demonstrated a signalling cascade initiated by laminin (LN), which upregulates PTEN and downregulates p75NTR. Here we investigate the mechanism by which PTEN modulates p75NTR. Studies using PTEN mutants show that its protein phosphatase activity directly modulates p75NTR protein expression. Nuclear relocalization of PTEN subsequent to LN stimulation suggests transcriptional control of p75NTR expression, which was confirmed following EMSA and ChIP analysis of Sp1 transcription factor binding activity. LN and PTEN independently decrease the DNA-binding ability of PTEN to the p75NTR promoter. Sp1 regulation of p75NTR occurs via dephosphorylation of Sp1, thus reducing p75NTR transcription and protein expression. This mechanism represents a novel regulatory pathway which controls the expression level of a receptor with broad implications not only for the development of the nervous system but also for progression of pathological conditions.

  15. DNA Methylation-Mediated Downregulation of DEFB1 in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaehyouk; Han, Jun Hyun; Jang, Ara; Kim, Jin Wook; Hong, Soon Auck; Myung, Soon Chul

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic aberrations play crucial roles in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. The DEFB1 gene, which encodes human ß-defensin-1 (HBD-1), contributes to innate immune responses and functions as a potential tumor suppressor in urological cancers. We investigated whether differential DNA methylation at the low CpG-content promoter (LCP) of DEFB1 was associated with transcriptional regulation of DEFB1 in PCa cells. To identify distinct CpG loci within the DEFB1 LCP related to the epigenetic regulation of DEFB1, we performed an in vitro methylated reporter assay followed by bisulfite sequencing of the DEFB1 promoter fragment. The methylation status of two adjacent CpG loci in the DEFB1 LCP was found to be important for DEFB1 expression in PCa cells. Paired epithelial specimens of PCa patients (n = 60), which were distinguished as non-tumor and tumor tissues by microdissection, were analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing of site-specific CpG dinucleotide units in the DEFB1 LCP. CpG methylation frequencies in the DEFB1 LCP were significantly higher in malignant tissues than in adjacent benign tissues across almost all PCa patients. These results suggested that methylation status of each CpG site in the DEFB1 promoter could mediate downregulation of DEFB1 in PCa cells. PMID:27835705

  16. Cdt1 downregulation by proteolysis and geminin inhibition prevents DNA re-replication in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Anatoliy; Blow, J Julian

    2005-01-01

    In late mitosis and G1, Mcm2–7 are assembled onto replication origins to ‘license' them for initiation. At other cell cycle stages, licensing is inhibited, thus ensuring that origins fire only once per cell cycle. Three additional factors—the origin recognition complex, Cdc6 and Cdt1—are required for origin licensing. We examine here how licensing is regulated in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that Cdt1 is downregulated late in the cell cycle by two different mechanisms: proteolysis, which occurs in part due to the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C), and inhibition by a protein called geminin. If both these regulatory mechanisms are abrogated, extracts undergo uncontrolled re-licensing and re-replication. The extent of re-replication is limited by checkpoint kinases that are activated as a consequence of re-replication itself. These results allow us to build a comprehensive model of how re-replication of DNA is prevented in Xenopus, with Cdt1 regulation being the key feature. The results also explain the original experiments that led to the proposal of a replication licensing factor. PMID:15616577

  17. 5-Methylcytosine DNA glycosylase activity is also present in the human MBD4 (G/T mismatch glycosylase) and in a related avian sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B; Zheng, Y; Angliker, H; Schwarz, S; Thiry, S; Siegmann, M; Jost, J P

    2000-11-01

    A 1468 bp cDNA coding for the chicken homolog of the human MBD4 G/T mismatch DNA glycosylase was isolated and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence (416 amino acids) shows 46% identity with the human MBD4 and the conserved catalytic region at the C-terminal end (170 amino acids) has 90% identity. The non-conserved region of the avian protein has no consensus sequence for the methylated DNA binding domain. The recombinant proteins from human and chicken have G/T mismatch as well as 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) DNA glycosylase activities. When tested by gel shift assays, human recombinant protein with or without the methylated DNA binding domain binds equally well to symmetrically, hemimethylated DNA and non-methylated DNA. However, the enzyme has only 5-MeC DNA glycosylase activity with the hemimethylated DNA. Footprinting of human MBD4 and of an N-terminal deletion mutant with partially depurinated and depyrimidinated substrate reveal a selective binding of the proteins to the modified substrate around the CpG. As for 5-MeC DNA glycosylase purified from chicken embryos, MBD4 does not use oligonucleotides containing mCpA, mCpT or mCpC as substrates. An mCpG within an A+T-rich oligonucleotide is a much better substrate than an A+T-poor sequence. The K:(m) of human MBD4 for hemimethylated DNA is approximately 10(-7) M with a V:(max) of approximately 10(-11) mol/h/microgram protein. Deletion mutations show that G/T mismatch and 5-MeC DNA glycosylase are located in the C-terminal conserved region. In sharp contrast to the 5-MeC DNA glycosylase isolated from the chicken embryo DNA demethylation complex, the two enzymatic activities of MBD4 are strongly inhibited by RNA. In situ hybridization with antisense RNA indicate that MBD4 is only located in dividing cells of differentiating embryonic tissues.

  18. The Histone Mark H3K36me3 Regulates Human DNA Mismatch Repair through its Interaction with MutSα

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Mao, Guogen; Tong, Dan; Huang, Jian; Gu, Liya; Yang, Wei; Li, Guo-Min

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA mismatch repair (MMR) ensures replication fidelity by correcting mismatches generated during DNA replication. Although human MMR has been reconstituted in vitro, how MMR occurs in vivo is unknown. Here, we show that an epigenetic histone mark, H3K36me3, is required in vivo to recruit the mismatch recognition protein hMutSα (hMSH2-hMSH6) onto chromatin through direct interactions with the hMSH6 PWWP domain. The abundance of H3K36me3 in G1 and early S phases ensures that hMutSα is enriched on chromatin before mispairs are introduced during DNA replication. Cells lacking the H3K36 tri-methyltransferase SETD2 display microsatellite instability (MSI) and an elevated spontaneous mutation frequency, characteristic of MMR-deficient cells. This work reveals that a histone mark regulates MMR in human cells and explains the long-standing puzzle of MSI-positive cancer cells that lack detectable mutations in known MMR genes. PMID:23622243

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of DNA mismatch repair protein and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase in melanoma metastases in relation to clinical response to DTIC-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuhua; Egyházi, Suzanne; Ringborg, Ulrik; Hansson, Johan

    2002-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency and increased O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) activity have been related to resistance to O6-guanine methylating agents in tumour cell lines. However, the clinical relevance of MMR and MGMT as drug resistance factors is still unclear. In a retrospective study, the expression levels of the MMR proteins, hMSH2, hMSH6 and hMLH1, were analysed by immunohistochemistry in melanoma metastases from 64 patients, who had received dacarbazine (DTIC) based chemotherapy. More than half of the melanoma patients had tumours with no nuclear staining for either hMSH2 or hMSH6 or both, while all tumours showed positive nuclear staining for hMLH1. The response rates were similar in patients with hMSH2 and/or hMSH6 positive tumours to these in patients with negative tumours. By combination of MMR with previously obtained MGMT data, only 2 of 12 responders had tumours with low MGMT and positive MMR expression. Still all except 3 of the non-responders were identified by having either high MGMT expression or absent staining for hMSH2 or hMSH6 or both in their tumours. However, there was no significant correlation of MMR expression alone or combined with MGMT levels with clinical response to DTIC-based chemotherapy in metastatic melanoma.

  20. Reduction of DNA mismatch repair protein expression in airway epithelial cells of premenopausal women chronically exposed to biomass smoke.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bidisha; Dutta, Anindita; Chowdhury, Saswati; Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of indoor air pollution in rural India. This study examined whether chronic inhalation of biomass smoke causes change in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway in the airway cells. For this, airway cells exfoliated in sputum were collected from 72 premenopausal nonsmoking rural women (median age 34 years) who cooked with biomass (wood, dung, crop residues) and 68 control women who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for the past 5 years or more. The levels of particulate matters with diameters less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5) in indoor air were measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Benzene exposure was monitored by measuring trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in airway cells were measured by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Immunocytochemical assay revealed lower percentage of airway epithelial cells expressing MMR proteins mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2) in biomass-using women compared to LPG-using controls. Women who cooked with biomass had 6.7 times higher level of urinary t,t-MA, twofold increase in ROS generation, and 31 % depletion of SOD. Indoor air of biomass-using households had three times more particulate matters than that of controls. ROS, urinary t,t-MA, and particulate pollution in biomass-using kitchen had negative correlation, while SOD showed positive correlation with MSH2 and MLH1 expression. It appears that chronic exposure to biomass smoke reduces MMR response in airway epithelial cells, and oxidative stress plays an important role in the process.

  1. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene.

    PubMed

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P; Cleary, Sean P; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G; MacInnis, Robert J; Tucker, Katherine M; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understandin g the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.19-50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95% CI 0.63-5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative.

  2. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    PubMed Central

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95 % CI 0.63–5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  3. Expression of hMSH2 protein of the human DNA mismatch repair system in oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous disease of inflammatory nature and unknown etiology. It is characterized by a cell-mediated immunological response to induced antigenic change in skin and/or mucosa. The possible malignant transformation of lichen planus remains a subject of controversial discussions in the literature. hMSH2 is one of the human DNA mismatch repair (hMMR) genes and it plays an important role in reducing mutation and maintaining genomic stability. hMSH2 alterations have been reported in oral squamous cell carcinoma and there are evidences suggesting the association between oral lichen planus and squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we aim to investigate the immunolocalization of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus compared to oral normal mucosa epithelium. We examined the expression of hMSH2 protein by immunohistochemistry in twenty-six cases of oral lichen planus. Clinically, 12 of them were categorized into reticular subtype and 14 were atrophic/erosive. Ten cases of normal mucosa were added to the control group. Results showed that the percentage of positive cells to hMSH2 was smaller in reticular (46.54%; p=0,006) and atrophic/erosive (48.79%; p=0,028) subtypes of oral lichen planus compared to normal mucosa (61.29%). The reduced expression of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus suggests that this lesion is more susceptible to mutation and therefore facilitate the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:15912193

  4. Detection of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiencies by immunohistochemistry can effectively diagnose the microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype in endometrial carcinomas.

    PubMed

    McConechy, M K; Talhouk, A; Li-Chang, H H; Leung, S; Huntsman, D G; Gilks, C B; McAlpine, J N

    2015-05-01

    A proportion of endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are associated with deficient DNA mismatch repair (MMR). These tumors are characterized by high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI). Identification of MSI is important in identifying women who should be tested for Lynch syndrome and identifying a phenotype that may have specific prognostic and predictive implications. Genomic characterization of ECs has shown that MSI tumors form a distinct subgroup. The two most common methodologies for MSI assessment have not been compared in EC. Pentaplex mono and di-nucleotide PCR for MSI testing was compared to MMR IHC (presence/absence of MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2) in a cohort of patients with EC. Concordance, Kappa statistic, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were obtained on the cross-tabulation of results. Comparison of both MSI and MMR status was complete for 89 cases. Overall agreement between methods (concordance) was 93.3% (95% CI[85.9%-97.5%]). A one-sided test to determine whether the accuracy is better than the "no information rate," which is taken to be the largest class percentage in the data, is significant (p<0.00001). Unweighted Kappa was 0.84, along with the sensitivity (88.5%), specificity (95.2%), PPV (88.5%), and NPV (95.2%). The balanced accuracy (i.e. the average between sensitivity and specificity) was 92%. We show the equivalence of MSI testing and MMR IHC. We advocate the implementation of MMR IHC in future EC classification schemes, enabling stratification of cases for future clinical trials as well as assisting identification of Lynch syndrome, so that screening and risk reducing interventions can be undertaken. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Disruption of CTCF/cohesin-mediated high-order chromatin structures by DNA methylation downregulates PTGS2 expression.

    PubMed

    Kang, J Y; Song, S H; Yun, J; Jeon, M S; Kim, H P; Han, S W; Kim, T Y

    2015-11-05

    The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)/cohesin complex regulates gene transcription via high-order chromatin organization of the genome. De novo methylation of CpG islands in the promoter region is an epigenetic hallmark of gene silencing in cancer. Although the CTCF/cohesin complex preferentially targets hypomethylated DNA, it remains unclear whether the CTCF/cohesin-mediated high-order chromatin structure is affected by DNA methylation during tumorigenesis. We found that DNA methylation downregulates the expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), which is an inducible, rate-limiting enzyme for prostaglandin synthesis, by disrupting CTCF/cohesin-mediated chromatin looping. We show that the CTCF/cohesin complex is enriched near a CpG island associated with PTGS2 and that the PTGS2 locus forms chromatin loops through methylation-sensitive binding of the CTCF/cohesin complex. DNA methylation abolishes the association of the CTCF/cohesin complex with the PTGS2 CpG island. Disruption of chromatin looping by DNA methylation abrogates the enrichment of transcriptional components, such as positive elongation factor b, at the transcriptional start site of the PTGS2 locus. These alterations result in the downregulation of PTGS2. Our results provide evidence that CTCF/cohesin-mediated chromatin looping of the PTGS2 locus is dynamically influenced by the DNA methylation status.

  6. SPATIAL MISMATCH OR RACIAL MISMATCH?*

    PubMed Central

    Hellerstein, Judith K.; Neumark, David; McInerney, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    We contrast the spatial mismatch hypothesis with what we term the racial mismatch hypothesis – that the problem is not a lack of jobs, per se, where blacks live, but a lack of jobs where blacks live into which blacks are hired. We first report new evidence on the spatial mismatch hypothesis, using data from Census Long-Form respondents. We construct direct measures of the presence of jobs in detailed geographic areas, and find that these job density measures are related to employment of black male residents in ways that would be predicted by the spatial mismatch hypothesis – in particular that spatial mismatch is primarily an issue for low-skilled black male workers. We then look at mismatch along not only spatial lines but racial lines as well, by estimating the effects of job density measures that are disaggregated by race. We find that it is primarily black job density that influences black male employment, whereas white job density has little if any influence on their employment. The evidence implies that space alone plays a relatively minor role in low black male employment rates. PMID:19727422

  7. Down-regulation of histone H2B by DNA-dependent protein kinase in response to DNA damage through modulation of octamer transcription factor 1.

    PubMed

    Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Shih, Amy; Yarymowich, Nicholas C; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-11-01

    Cells respond to double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) by pausing cell cycle progression to allow the repair machinery to restore genomic integrity. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), comprising a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(cs)) and the Ku antigen regulatory subunit (Ku70/Ku80), is activated in response to DSBs and is required for DNA repair through the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Here we provide evidence that DNA-PK participates in altering specific gene expression in response to DNA damage by modulating the stability and transcriptional regulatory potential of the essential transcription factor octamer transcription factor 1 (Oct-1). Histone H2B and U2 RNA, whose expression are highly dependent on Oct-1, were strongly decreased in response to ionizing radiation in a DNA-PK-dependent manner, and Oct-1-dependent reporter gene transcription was repressed. Furthermore, Oct-1 phosphorylation in response to ionizing radiation increased in a DNA-PK-dependent manner. Paradoxically, down-regulation of transactivation correlated with the rapid DNA-PK-dependent stabilization of Oct-1. Stabilization of Oct-1 was dependent on the NH(2)-terminal region of Oct-1, which contains a transcriptional activation domain and which was phosphorylated by DNA-PK in vitro. These results suggest a mechanism for the regulation of Oct-1 in response to DNA damage through specific phosphorylation within the NH(2)-terminal transcriptional regulatory domain.

  8. Atomistic understanding of the C·T mismatched DNA base pair tautomerization via the DPT: QM and QTAIM computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2013-11-15

    It was established that the cytosine·thymine (C·T) mismatched DNA base pair with cis-oriented N1H glycosidic bonds has propeller-like structure (|N3C4C4N3| = 38.4°), which is stabilized by three specific intermolecular interactions-two antiparallel N4H…O4 (5.19 kcal mol(-1)) and N3H…N3 (6.33 kcal mol(-1)) H-bonds and a van der Waals (vdW) contact O2…O2 (0.32 kcal mol(-1)). The C·T base mispair is thermodynamically stable structure (ΔG(int) = -1.54 kcal mol(-1) ) and even slightly more stable than the A·T Watson-Crick DNA base pair (ΔG(int) = -1.43 kcal mol(-1)) at the room temperature. It was shown that the C·T ↔ C*·T* tautomerization via the double proton transfer (DPT) is assisted by the O2…O2 vdW contact along the entire range of the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC). The positive value of the Grunenberg's compliance constants (31.186, 30.265, and 22.166 Å/mdyn for the C·T, C*·T*, and TS(C·T ↔ C*·T*), respectively) proves that the O2…O2 vdW contact is a stabilizing interaction. Based on the sweeps of the H-bond energies, it was found that the N4H…O4/O4H…N4, and N3H…N3 H-bonds in the C·T and C*·T* base pairs are anticooperative and weaken each other, whereas the middle N3H…N3 H-bond and the O2…O2 vdW contact are cooperative and mutually reinforce each other. It was found that the tautomerization of the C·T base mispair through the DPT is concerted and asynchronous reaction that proceeds via the TS(C·T ↔ C*·T*) stabilized by the loosened N4-H-O4 covalent bridge, N3H…N3 H-bond (9.67 kcal mol(-1) ) and O2…O2 vdW contact (0.41 kcal mol(-1) ). The nine key points, describing the evolution of the C·T ↔ C*·T* tautomerization via the DPT, were detected and completely investigated along the IRC. The C*·T* mispair was revealed to be the dynamically unstable structure with a lifetime 2.13·× 10(-13) s. In this case, as for the A·T Watson-Crick DNA base pair, activates the mechanism of the quantum protection of the C

  9. Anomeric 2'-Deoxycytidines and Silver Ions: Hybrid Base Pairs with Greatly Enhanced Stability and Efficient DNA Mismatch Detection with α-dC.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiurong; Seela, Frank

    2017-09-04

    α-d-Nucleosides are rare in nature but can develop fascinating properties when incorporated into DNA. This work reports on the first silver-mediated base pair constructed from two anomeric nucleosides: α-dC and β-dC. The hybrid base pair was integrated into the DNA and DNA/RNA double helix. A 12-mer duplex with α-dC and β-dC pair exhibits a higher thermal stability (Tm =43 °C) than that incorporating the β-dC-Ag(+) -β-dC homo pair (Tm =34 °C). Furthermore, α-dC shows excellent mismatch discrimination for DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). All four SNPs were identified on the basis of large Tm value differences measured in the presence of silver ions. High resolution melting was not required. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Methylation Analysis of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes Using DNA Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Endometrial Cancer: Epimutation in Endometrial Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Takashi; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Adachi, Masataka; Iijima, Moito; Kunitomi, Haruko; Nakamura, Kanako; Iida, Miho; Nogami, Yuya; Umene, Kiyoko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamagami, Wataru; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2016-10-14

    Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes is a cause of Lynch syndrome. Methylation of MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) has been detected in peripheral blood cells of patients with colorectal cancer. This methylation is referred to as epimutation. Methylation of these genes has not been studied in an unselected series of endometrial cancer cases. Therefore, we examined methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 promoter regions of peripheral blood cells in 206 patients with endometrial cancer using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). Germline mutation of MMR genes, microsatellite instability (MSI), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were also analyzed in each case with epimutation. MLH1 epimutation was detected in a single patient out of a total of 206 (0.49%)-1 out of 58 (1.72%) with an onset age of less than 50 years. The patient with MLH1 epimutation showed high level MSI (MSI-H), loss of MLH1 expression and had developed endometrial cancer at 46 years old, complicated with colorectal cancer. No case had epimutation of MSH2 or MSH6. The MLH1 epimutation detected in a patient with endometrial cancer may be a cause of endometrial carcinogenesis. This result indicates that it is important to check epimutation in patients with endometrial cancer without a germline mutation of MMR genes.

  11. Methylation Analysis of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes Using DNA Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Endometrial Cancer: Epimutation in Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Takashi; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Adachi, Masataka; Iijima, Moito; Kunitomi, Haruko; Nakamura, Kanako; Iida, Miho; Nogami, Yuya; Umene, Kiyoko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamagami, Wataru; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes is a cause of Lynch syndrome. Methylation of MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) has been detected in peripheral blood cells of patients with colorectal cancer. This methylation is referred to as epimutation. Methylation of these genes has not been studied in an unselected series of endometrial cancer cases. Therefore, we examined methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 promoter regions of peripheral blood cells in 206 patients with endometrial cancer using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). Germline mutation of MMR genes, microsatellite instability (MSI), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were also analyzed in each case with epimutation. MLH1 epimutation was detected in a single patient out of a total of 206 (0.49%)—1 out of 58 (1.72%) with an onset age of less than 50 years. The patient with MLH1 epimutation showed high level MSI (MSI-H), loss of MLH1 expression and had developed endometrial cancer at 46 years old, complicated with colorectal cancer. No case had epimutation of MSH2 or MSH6. The MLH1 epimutation detected in a patient with endometrial cancer may be a cause of endometrial carcinogenesis. This result indicates that it is important to check epimutation in patients with endometrial cancer without a germline mutation of MMR genes. PMID:27754426

  12. Gene expression profiling identifies eleven DNA repair genes down-regulated during mouse neural crest cell migration.

    PubMed

    Albino, Domenico; Brizzolara, Antonella; Moretti, Stefano; Falugi, Carla; Mirisola, Valentina; Scaruffi, Paola; Di Candia, Michele; Truini, Mauro; Coco, Simona; Bonassi, Stefano; Tonini, Gian Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Neural Crest Cells (NCCs) are transient multipotent migratory cells that derive from the embryonic neural crest which is itself derived from the margin of the neural tube. DNA repair genes are expressed in the early stages of mammalian development to reduce possible replication errors and genotoxic damage. Some birth defects and cancers are due to inappropriate or defective DNA repair machinery, indicating that the proper functioning of DNA repair genes in the early stages of fetal development is essential for maintaining DNA integrity. We performed a genome-wide expression analysis combining laser capture microdissection (LCM) and high-density oligo-microarray of murine NCCs at pre-migratory embryonic days 8.5 (E8.5), and at E13.5, as well as on neural crest-derived cells from the adrenal medulla at postnatal day 90. We found 11 genes involved in DNA repair activity (response to DNA damage stimulus, DNA damage checkpoint, base-excision repair, mismatch repair), over-expressed in the early stages of mouse embryo development. Expression of these 11 genes was very low or undetectable in the differentiated adrenal medulla of the adult mouse. Amongst the 11 genes, 6 had not been previously reported as being over-expressed during mouse embryonic development. High expression of DNA repair genes in enriched NCCs during early embryonic development may contribute to maintaining DNA integrity whilst failure of some of these genes may be associated with the onset of genetic disease and cancer. Our model of enriched murine NCCs and neural crest-derived cells can be used to elucidate the key roles of genes during normal embryonic development and in cancer pathogenesis.

  13. Fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatched DNA by initial reaction rate of catalytic hairpin assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Li, Yixin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Yang; Yang, Xiaoda; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2014-10-15

    The widely used catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) amplification strategy generally needs several hours to accomplish one measurement based on the prevailingly used maximum intensity detection mode, making it less practical for assays where high throughput or speed is desired. To make the best use of the kinetic specificity of toehold domain for circuit reaction initiation, we developed a mathematical model and proposed an initial reaction rate detection mode to quantitatively differentiate the single-base mismatch. Using the kinetic mode, assay time can be reduced substantially to 10 min for one measurement with the comparable sensitivity and single-base mismatch differentiating ability as were obtained by the maximum intensity detection mode. This initial reaction rate based approach not only provided a fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatch, but also helped in-depth understanding of the CHA system, which will be beneficial to the design of highly sensitive and specific toehold-mediated hybridization reactions.

  14. NMR and molecular modeling evidence for a Gter dot A mismatch base pair in a purine-rich DNA duplex

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Wilson, W.D. ); Zon, G. )

    1991-01-01

    {sup 1}H NMR experiments indicate that the oligomer 5{prime}-d(ATGAGCGAATA) forms an unusual 10-base-pair duplex with 4 G{center dot}A base pairs and a 3{prime} unpaired adenosine. NMR results indicate that guanoxine imino protons of the F{center dot}A mismatches are not hydrogen bonded but are stacked in the helix. A G{r arrow} I substitution in either G{center dot}A base pair causes a dramatic decrtease in duplex stability and indicates that hydrogen bonding of the guanosine amino group is critical. Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and two-dimensional correlated spectroscopy (COSY) results indicate that the overall duplex conformation is in the B-family. Cross-strand NOEs in two-dimensional NOESY spectra between a mismatched AH2 and an AH1{prime} of the other mismatched base pair and between a mismatched GH8 and GNH1 of the other mismatch establish a purine-purine stacking pattern, adenosine over adenosine and guanosine over guanosine, which strongly stabilizes the duplex. A computer graphics molecular model of the ususual duplex was constructed with G{center dot}A base pairs containing A-NH{sub 2} to GN3 and G-NH{sub 2} to AN7 hydrogen bonds and B-form base pairs on both sides of the G{center dot}A pairs (5{prime}-d(ATGAGC)). The energy-minimized duplex satisfies all experimental constraints from NOESY and COSY results. A hydrogen bond from G-NH{sub 2} of the mismatch to a phosphate oxygen is predicted.

  15. Solution structure and intramolecular exchange of methyl-cytosine binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) on DNA suggests a mechanism to scan for mCpG/TpG mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Walavalkar, Ninad M.; Cramer, Jason M.; Buchwald, William A.; Scarsdale, J. Neel; Williams, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other members of the methyl-cytosine binding domain (MBD) family, MBD4 serves as a potent DNA glycosylase in DNA mismatch repair specifically targeting mCpG/TpG mismatches arising from spontaneous deamination of methyl-cytosine. The protein contains an N-terminal MBD (MBD4MBD) and a C-terminal glycosylase domain (MBD4GD) separated by a long linker. This arrangement suggests that the MBD4MBD either directly augments enzymatic catalysis by the MBD4GD or targets the protein to regions enriched for mCpG/TpG mismatches. Here we present structural and dynamic studies of MBD4MBD bound to dsDNA. We show that MBD4MBD binds with a modest preference formCpG as compared to mismatch, unmethylated and hydroxymethylated DNA. We find that while MBD4MBD exhibits slow exchange between molecules of DNA (intermolecular exchange), the domain exhibits fast exchange between two sites in the same molecule of dsDNA (intramolecular exchange). Introducing a single-strand defect between binding sites does not greatly reduce the intramolecular exchange rate, consistent with a local hopping mechanism for moving along the DNA. These results support a model in which the MBD4MBD4 targets the intact protein to mCpG islands and promotes scanning by rapidly exchanging between successive mCpG sites which facilitates repair of nearby mCpG/TpG mismatches by the glycosylase domain. PMID:25183517

  16. DNA Methylation-mediated Down-regulation of DNA Methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) Is Coincident with, but Not Essential for, Global Hypomethylation in Human Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Boris; Wong, Nick C.; Sibson, Mandy; Ng, Hong-Kiat; Morley, Ruth; Manuelpillai, Ursula; Down, Thomas; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Beck, Stephan; Hiendleder, Stefan; Roberts, Claire T.; Craig, Jeffrey M.; Saffery, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The genome of extraembryonic tissue, such as the placenta, is hypomethylated relative to that in somatic tissues. However, the origin and role of this hypomethylation remains unclear. The DNA methyltransferases DNMT1, -3A, and -3B are the primary mediators of the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation in mammals. In this study, we investigated promoter methylation-mediated epigenetic down-regulation of DNMT genes as a potential regulator of global methylation levels in placental tissue. Although DNMT3A and -3B promoters lack methylation in all somatic and extraembryonic tissues tested, we found specific hypermethylation of the maintenance DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) gene and found hypomethylation of the DNMT3L gene in full term and first trimester placental tissues. Bisulfite DNA sequencing revealed monoallelic methylation of DNMT1, with no evidence of imprinting (parent of origin effect). In vitro reporter experiments confirmed that DNMT1 promoter methylation attenuates transcriptional activity in trophoblast cells. However, global hypomethylation in the absence of DNMT1 down-regulation is apparent in non-primate placentas and in vitro derived human cytotrophoblast stem cells, suggesting that DNMT1 down-regulation is not an absolute requirement for genomic hypomethylation in all instances. These data represent the first demonstration of methylation-mediated regulation of the DNMT1 gene in any system and demonstrate that the unique epigenome of the human placenta includes down-regulation of DNMT1 with concomitant hypomethylation of the DNMT3L gene. This strongly implicates epigenetic regulation of the DNMT gene family in the establishment of the unique epigenetic profile of extraembryonic tissue in humans. PMID:20071334

  17. DNA methylation-mediated down-regulation of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) is coincident with, but not essential for, global hypomethylation in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Boris; Wong, Nick C; Sibson, Mandy; Ng, Hong-Kiat; Morley, Ruth; Manuelpillai, Ursula; Down, Thomas; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Beck, Stephan; Hiendleder, Stefan; Roberts, Claire T; Craig, Jeffrey M; Saffery, Richard

    2010-03-26

    The genome of extraembryonic tissue, such as the placenta, is hypomethylated relative to that in somatic tissues. However, the origin and role of this hypomethylation remains unclear. The DNA methyltransferases DNMT1, -3A, and -3B are the primary mediators of the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation in mammals. In this study, we investigated promoter methylation-mediated epigenetic down-regulation of DNMT genes as a potential regulator of global methylation levels in placental tissue. Although DNMT3A and -3B promoters lack methylation in all somatic and extraembryonic tissues tested, we found specific hypermethylation of the maintenance DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) gene and found hypomethylation of the DNMT3L gene in full term and first trimester placental tissues. Bisulfite DNA sequencing revealed monoallelic methylation of DNMT1, with no evidence of imprinting (parent of origin effect). In vitro reporter experiments confirmed that DNMT1 promoter methylation attenuates transcriptional activity in trophoblast cells. However, global hypomethylation in the absence of DNMT1 down-regulation is apparent in non-primate placentas and in vitro derived human cytotrophoblast stem cells, suggesting that DNMT1 down-regulation is not an absolute requirement for genomic hypomethylation in all instances. These data represent the first demonstration of methylation-mediated regulation of the DNMT1 gene in any system and demonstrate that the unique epigenome of the human placenta includes down-regulation of DNMT1 with concomitant hypomethylation of the DNMT3L gene. This strongly implicates epigenetic regulation of the DNMT gene family in the establishment of the unique epigenetic profile of extraembryonic tissue in humans.

  18. Mechanism of the Glycosidic Bond Cleavage of Mismatched Thymine in Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Revealed by Classical Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Natalia; Crehuet, Ramon; Imhof, Petra

    2015-09-24

    Base excision of mismatched or damaged nucleotides catalyzed by glycosylase enzymes is the first step of the base excision repair system, a machinery preserving the integrity of DNA. Thymine DNA glycosylase recognizes and removes mismatched thymine by cleaving the C1'-N1 bond between the base and the sugar ring. Our quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of this reaction in human thymine DNA glycosylase reveal a requirement for a positive charge in the active site to facilitate C1'-N1 bond scission: protonation of His151 significantly lowers the free energy barrier for C1'-N1 bond dissociation compared to the situation with neutral His151. Shuttling a proton from His151 to the thymine base further reduces the activation free energy for glycosidic bond cleavage. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of the H151A mutant suggest that the mutation to the smaller, neutral, residue increases the water accessibility of the thymine base, rendering direct proton transfer from the bulk feasible. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of the glycosidic bond cleavage reaction in the H151A mutant show that the activation free energy is slightly lower than in the wild-type enzyme, explaining the experimentally observed higher reaction rates in this mutant.

  19. Single-turnover and pre-steady-state kinetics of the reaction of the adenine glycosylase MutY with mismatch-containing DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Porello, S L; Leyes, A E; David, S S

    1998-10-20

    The DNA repair enzyme MutY plays an important role in the prevention of DNA mutations resulting from the presence of the oxidatively damaged lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (OG) in DNA by the removal of misincorporated adenine residues in OG:A mispairs. MutY also exhibits adenine glycosylase activity toward adenine in G:A and C:A mismatches, although the importance of this activity in vivo has not been established. We have investigated the kinetic properties of MutY's glycosylase activity with OG:A and G:A containing DNA duplexes. Our results indicate that MutY's processing of these two substrates is distinctly different. By using single-turnover experiments, the intrinsic rate for adenine removal by MutY from an OG:A substrate was found to be at least 6-fold faster than that from the corresponding G:A substrate. However, under conditions where [MutY] < [DNA], OG:A substrates are not quantitatively converted to product due to the inefficient turnover resulting from slow product release. In contrast, with a G:A substrate MutY's dissociation from the corresponding product is more facile, such that complete conversion of the substrate to product can be achieved under similar conditions. The kinetic results illustrate that the glycosylase reaction catalyzed by MutY has significant differences depending on the characteristics of the substrate. The lingering of MutY with the product of its reaction with OG:A mispairs may be biologically significant to prevent premature removal of OG. Thus, this approach is providing insight into factors that may be influencing the repair of damaged and mismatched DNA in vivo by base-excision repair glycosylases.

  20. Preliminary Studies on Base Substitutions and Repair of DNA Mismatch Damage Stimulated by Low Energy N+ Ion Beam Implantation in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chuan-xiao; Guo, Jin-hua; Cheng, Bei-jiu; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2003-02-01

    Ever since the low energy N+ ion beam has been accepted that the mutation effects of ionizing radiation are attributed mainly to direct or indirect damage to DNA. Evidences based on naked DNA irradiation in support of a mutation spectrum appears to be consistent, but direct proof of such results in vivo are limited. Using mutS, dam and/or dcm defective Eschericha coli mutator strains, an preliminary experimental system on induction of in vivo mutation spectra of low energy N+ ion beam has been established in this study. It was observed that the mutation rates of rifampicin resistance induced by N+ implantation were quite high, ranging from 9.2 × 10-8 to 4.9 × 10-5 at the dosage of 5.2 × 1014 ions/cm2. Strains all had more than 90-fold higher mutation rate than its spontaneous mutation rate determined by this method. It reveals that base substitutions involve in induction of mutation of low energy nitrogen ion beam implantation. The mutation rates of mutator strains were nearly 500-fold (GM2929), 400-fold (GM5864) and 6-fold larger than that of AB1157. The GM2929 and GM5864 both lose the ability of repair DNA mismatch damage by virtue of both dam and dcm pathways defective (GM2929) or failing to assemble the repair complex (GM5864) respectively. It may explain the both strains had a similar higher mutation rate than GM124 did. It indicated that DNA cytosine methylase might play an important role in mismatch repair of DNA damage induced by N+ implantation. The further related research were also discussed.

  1. Comparison of Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay with DNA Sequencing for Characterization of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Zafar; Nahar, Shamsun; Wretlind, Bengt; Lindback, Emma; Rahman, Motiur

    2004-01-01

    A mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) was developed for identification of point mutations in quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA at codons 91 and 95. MAMA PCR was used to detect mutations at codons 91 and 95 of gyrA in 117 Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates (with ciprofloxacin MICs of 0.004 to >32 μg/ml) from Bangladesh during 1997 to 2001. The QRDR regions of the gyrA genes from 31 randomly selected isolates were sequenced, and the results were compared with those of MAMA PCR. Using mismatch PCR, a mutation at Ser91 could be detected in all 27 (resistant and intermediate) isolates, and an Asp95-to-Gly95 mutation could be detected in all 15 isolates, as detected by sequencing. MAMA PCR offers a simple, inexpensive, rapid, and easier alternative for detection of point mutations in fluoroquinolone resistance in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:14766821

  2. Comprehensive study of interactions between DNA and new electroactive Schiff base ligands. Application to the detection of singly mismatched Helicobacter pylori sequences.

    PubMed

    Revenga-Parra, Mónica; García, Tania; Lorenzo, Encarnación; Pariente, Félix

    2007-05-15

    N,N'-Bis(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-diaminobenzene (3,4-DHS) and N,N'-bis(2,5-dihydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-diaminobenzene (2,5-DHS) have been used as electrochemical probes in DNA sensing. These ligands, containing ortho and para quinone functional groups, respectively, as well as planar aromatic domains, are capable of binding to double stranded DNA (ds-DNA) more efficiently than to single stranded DNA (ss-DNA). Emphasis has been placed on the elucidation of the nature of the interaction by combining spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. From spectrophotometric titration experiments, the binding constants of 3,4-DHS and 2,5-DHS with ds-DNA were found to be (9.0+/-0.3) x 10(3) and (3.3+/-0.2) x 10(3)M(-1), respectively. These values are consistent with a binding mode dominated by interactions with the minor groove of ds-DNA. The electroactivity of the quinone moiety in 3,4-DHS bound to DNA could be employed as an electrochemical indicator to detect hybridization events in DNA biosensors. These biosensors have been constructed by immobilization of a thiolated capture probe sequence from Helicobacter pylori onto gold electrodes. After hybridization with the complementary target sequence, 3,4-DHS was accumulated within the double stranded DNA layer. Electrochemical detection was performed by differential pulse voltammetry over the potential range where the quinone moiety is redox active. Using this approach, complementary target sequences of H. pylori can be quantified over the range of 8.9-22.2 microM with a detection limit of 8.3+/-0.4 microM and a linear correlation coefficient of 0.989. In addition this approach is capable of detecting hybridization of complementary sequences containing a single mismatch.

  3. Selenium compounds activate ATM-dependent DNA damage response via the mismatch repair protein hMLH1 in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongmei; Schoene, Norberta W; Lartey, Frederick M; Cheng, Wen-Hsing

    2010-10-22

    Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that selenium supplementation suppresses risk of colorectal and other cancers. The majority of colorectal cancers are characterized by a defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR). Here, we have employed the MMR-deficient HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells and the MMR-proficient HCT 116 cells with hMLH1 complementation to investigate the role of hMLH1 in selenium-induced DNA damage response, a tumorigenesis barrier. The ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) protein responds to clastogens and initiates DNA damage response. We show that hMLH1 complementation sensitizes HCT 116 cells to methylseleninic acid, methylselenocysteine, and sodium selenite via reactive oxygen species and facilitates the selenium-induced oxidative 8-oxoguanine damage, DNA breaks, G(2)/M checkpoint response, and ATM pathway activation. Pretreatment of the hMLH1-complemented HCT 116 cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl or the ATM kinase inhibitor KU55933 suppresses hMLH1-dependent DNA damage response to selenium exposure. Selenium treatment stimulates the association between hMLH1 and hPMS2 proteins, a heterodimer critical for functional MMR, in a manner dependent on ATM and reactive oxygen species. Taken together, the results suggest a new role of selenium in mitigating tumorigenesis by targeting the MMR pathway, whereby the lack of hMLH1 renders the HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells resistant to selenium-induced DNA damage response.

  4. Structural, energetic and tautomeric properties of the T·T∗/T∗·T DNA mismatch involving mutagenic tautomer of thymine: A QM and QTAIM insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Zhurakivsky, Roman O.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2014-01-01

    It was revealed by thorough study of the T·T∗ (C1) ↔ T∗·T (C1) tautomerisation via the synchronous concerted double proton transfer (DPT) through the TS (C2v) that the T·T∗/T∗·T H-bonded mismatch is dynamically stable non-planar complex with a lifetime 1.6 × 10-10 s. The 5 key points were firstly detected and completely investigated along the intrinsic reaction coordinate of the DPT tautomerisation. The reported data allow us to suggest that the T∗ mutagenic tautomer of the thymine (T) is shared with approximately equal probability between two DNA strands during the dissociation of the mispair by DNA polymerase.

  5. Stable expression of MutLγ in human cells reveals no specific response to mismatched DNA, but distinct recruitment to damage sites.

    PubMed

    Roesner, Lennart M; Mielke, Christian; Fähnrich, Silke; Merkhoffer, Yvonne; Dittmar, Kurt E J; Drexler, Hans G; Dirks, Wilhelm G

    2013-10-01

    The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene family comprises four MutL paralogues capable of forming heterodimeric MutLα (MLH1-PMS2), MutLβ (MLH1-PMS1), and MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3) protein complexes. Human MutL subunits PMS2 and MLH3 contain an evolutionarily conserved amino acid motif DQHA(X)2E(X)4E identified as an endonucleolytic domain capable of incising a defective DNA strand. PMS2 of MutLα is generally accepted to be the sole executor of endonucleolytic activity, but since MLH3 was shown to be able to perform DNA repair at low levels in vitro, our aim was to investigate whether or not MLH3 is activated as a backup under MutLα-deficient conditions. Here, we report stable expression of GFP-tagged MLH3 in the isogenic cell lines 293 and 293T which are functional or defective for MLH1 expression, respectively. As expected, MLH3 formed dimeric complexes with endogenous and recombinant MLH1. MutLγ dimers were recruited to sites of DNA damage induced by UVA micro-irradiation as shown for MutLα. Surprisingly, splicing variant MLH3Δ7 lacking the endonucleolytic motif displayed congruent foci formation, implying that recruitment is not necessarily representing active DNA repair. As an alternative test for repair enzyme activity, we combined alkylation-directed DNA damage with comet formation assays. While recombinant MutLα led to full recovery of DNA damage response in MMR deficient cells, expression of MutLγ or single MLH3 failed to do so. These experiments show recruitment and persistence of MutLγ-heterodimers at UVA-induced DNA lesions. However, we demonstrate that in a MutLα-deficient background no DNA repair-specific function carried out by MutLγ can be detected in living cells. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Role for the MutL Mismatch Repair Mlh3 Protein in Immunoglobulin Class Switch DNA Recombination and Somatic Hypermutation1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoping; Tsai, Connie Y.; Patam, Marienida B.; Zan, Hong; Chen, Jessica P.; Lipkin, Steve M.; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) are central to the maturation of the Ab response. Both processes involve DNA mismatch repair (MMR). MMR proteins are recruited to dU:dG mispairs generated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase-mediated deamination of dC residues, thereby promoting S-S region synapses and introduction of mismatches (mutations). The MutL homolog Mlh3 is the last complement of the mammalian set of MMR proteins. It is highly conserved in evolution and is essential to meiosis and microsatellite stability. We used the recently generated knockout mlh3−/− mice to address the role of Mlh3 in CSR and SHM. We found that Mlh3 deficiency alters both CSR and SHM. mlh3−/− B cells switched in vitro to IgG and IgA but displayed preferential targeting of the RGYW/WRCY (R = A or G, Y = C or T, W = A or T) motif by Sγ1 and Sγ3 breakpoints and introduced more insertions and fewer donor/acceptor microhomologies in Sμ-Sγ1 and Sμ-Sγ3 DNA junctions, as compared with mlh3+/+ B cells. mlh3−/− mice showed only a slight decrease in the frequency of mutations in the intronic DNA downstream of the rearranged JH4 gene. However, the residual mutations were altered in spectrum. They comprised a decreased proportion of mutations at dA/dT and showed preferential RGYW/WRCY targeting by mutations at dC/dG. Thus, the MMR Mlh3 protein plays a role in both CSR and SHM. PMID:16622010

  7. Down-regulation of G9a triggers DNA damage response and inhibits colorectal cancer cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; He, Pengxing; Xi, Yong; Geng, Meiyu; Chen, Yi; Ding, Jian

    2015-02-20

    G9a, a histone methyltransferase, is aberrantly expressed in some human tumor types. By comparing 182 paired colorectal cancer and peritumoral tissues, we found that G9a was highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC). Overexpression of G9a promoted CRC cells proliferation and colony formation, whereas knockdown of G9a inhibited CRC cells proliferation. Depletion of G9a increased the rate of chromosome aberration, induced DNA double strand breaks and CRC cells senescence. G9a inhibition synergistically increased γH2AX expression induced by topoisomerase I inhibitors and ultimately led to CRC cell death. The findings that down-regulation of G9a triggers DNA damage response and inhibits colorectal cancer cells proliferation may define G9a as potential oncotarget in CRC.

  8. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, John K.; Okely, Ewa A.; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K.; Leach, David R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  9. Downregulation of Aedes aegypti chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7/Kismet by Wolbachia and its effect on dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Asad, Sultan; Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; Asgari, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus imposing a significant burden on human health around the world. Since current control strategies are not sufficient, there is an urgent need to find alternative methods to control DENV transmission. It has been demonstrated that introduction of Wolbachia pipientis in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes can impede DENV transmission with the mechanism(s) not fully understood. Recently, a number of studies have found the involvement of chromodomain DNA binding helicases in case of Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Influenza A virus infection. In this study, we have identified three chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein (CHD) genes in Ae. aegypti and looked at their response in the case of Wolbachia and DENV infections. Foremost amongst them we have found that AeCHD7/Kismet is significantly downregulated in the presence of Wolbachia infection only in female mosquitoes. Furthermore, AeCHD7 levels showed significant increase during DENV infection, and AeCHD7 depletion led to severe reduction in the replication of DENV. Our data have identified AeCHD7 as a novel Ae. aegypti host factor that is important for DENV replication, and Wolbachia downregulates it, which may contribute towards the mechanism(s) of limiting DENV replication. PMID:27827425

  10. Thymosin beta-4 knockdown in IEC-6 normal intestinal epithelial cells induces DNA re-replication via downregulating Emi1.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ta-Chung; Chen, Ke-Jay; Tang, Mei-Chuan; Chan, Li-Chuan; Chen, Po-Min; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Su, Yeu

    2014-11-01

    Thymosin β4 (Tβ4 ) is a multifunctional protein already used clinically to treat various diseases; however, the promoting effect of this protein on tumor malignancy should not be neglected. Here, we assessed whether Tβ4 alteration influences normal intestinal epithelial cells because Tβ4 is deemed a novel target for treating colorectal cancer (CRC). For this purpose, we examined the consequences of shRNA-mediated knockdown of Tβ4 in IEC-6 normal rat small intestinal cells and found that inhibiting Tβ4 expression significantly suppressed their growth and induced apoptosis in some cells. Flow cytometric analysis further revealed a marked decrease of G0/G1 population but a drastic increase of polyploid ones in these cells. The increase of polyploidy likely resulted from DNA re-replication because not only the de novo DNA synthesis was greatly increased but also the expression levels of Cdc6 (a replication-licensing factor), cyclin A, and phosphorylated-checkpoint kinase 1 were all dramatically elevated. Moreover, marked reductions in both RNA and protein levels of Emi1 (early mitotic inhibitor 1) were also detected in Tβ4 -downregulated IEC-6 cells which might be accounted by the downregulation of E2F1, a transcription factor capable of inducing Emi1 expression, mediated by glycogen synthase-3β (GSK-3β). To our best knowledge, this is the first report showing that inhibiting Tβ4 expression triggers DNA re-replication in normal intestinal epithelial cells, suggesting that this G-actin sequester may play a crucial role in maintaining genome stability in these cells. More importantly, clinical oncologists should take this novel activity into consideration when design CRC therapy based on targeting Tβ4 . © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The mismatch repair and meiotic recombination endonuclease Mlh1-Mlh3 is activated by polymer formation and can cleave DNA substrates in trans

    PubMed Central

    Manhart, Carol M.; Ni, Xiaodan; White, Martin A.; Ortega, Joaquin; Surtees, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    Crossing over between homologs is initiated in meiotic prophase by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks that occur throughout the genome. In the major interference-responsive crossover pathway in baker’s yeast, these breaks are resected to form 3' single-strand tails that participate in a homology search, ultimately forming double Holliday junctions (dHJs) that primarily include both homologs. These dHJs are resolved by endonuclease activity to form exclusively crossovers, which are critical for proper homolog segregation in Meiosis I. Recent genetic, biochemical, and molecular studies in yeast are consistent with the hypothesis of Mlh1-Mlh3 DNA mismatch repair complex acting as the major endonuclease activity that resolves dHJs into crossovers. However, the mechanism by which the Mlh1-Mlh3 endonuclease is activated is unknown. Here, we provide evidence that Mlh1-Mlh3 does not behave like a structure-specific endonuclease but forms polymers required to generate nicks in DNA. This conclusion is supported by DNA binding studies performed with different-sized substrates that contain or lack polymerization barriers and endonuclease assays performed with varying ratios of endonuclease-deficient and endonuclease-proficient Mlh1-Mlh3. In addition, Mlh1-Mlh3 can generate religatable double-strand breaks and form an active nucleoprotein complex that can nick DNA substrates in trans. Together these observations argue that Mlh1-Mlh3 may not act like a canonical, RuvC-like Holliday junction resolvase and support a novel model in which Mlh1-Mlh3 is loaded onto DNA to form an activated polymer that cleaves DNA. PMID:28453523

  12. Does the G.G*syn DNA mismatch containing canonical and rare tautomers of the guanine tautomerise through the DPT? A QM/QTAIM microstructural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2014-12-01

    We have established that the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer (DPT), moving with a time gap and without stable intermediates, is the underlying mechanism for the tautomerisation of the G.G*syn DNA base mispair (C1 symmetry), formed by the keto and enol tautomers of the guanine in the anti- and syn-configurations, into the G*.G*syn base mispair (C1), formed by the enol and imino tautomers of the G base, using quantum-mechanical calculations and Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules. By constructing the sweeps of the geometric, electron-topological, energetic, polar and natural bond orbital properties along the intrinsic reaction coordinate of the G.G*syn↔G*.G*syn DPT tautomerisation, the nine key points, that are critical for the atomistic understanding of the tautomerisation reaction, were set and comprehensively analysed. It was found that the G.G*syn mismatch possesses pairing scheme with the formation of the O6...HO6 (7.01) and N1H...N7 (6.77) H-bonds, whereas the G*.G*syn mismatch - of the O6H...O6 (10.68) and N1...HN7 (9.59 kcal mol-1) H-bonds. Our results highlight that these H-bonds are significantly cooperative and mutually reinforce each other in both mismatches. The deformation energy necessary to apply for the G.G*syn base mispair to acquire the Watson-Crick sizes has been calculated. We have shown that the thermodynamically stable G*.G*syn base mispair is dynamically unstable structure with a lifetime of 4.1 × 10-15 s and any of its six low-lying intermolecular vibrations can develop during this period of time. These data exclude the possibility to change the tautomeric status of the bases under the dissociation of the G.G*syn mispair into the monomers during DNA replication. Finally, it has been made an attempt to draw from the physico-chemical properties of all four incorrect purine-purine DNA base pairs a general conclusion, which claims the role of the transversions in spontaneous point mutagenesis.

  13. Downregulation of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Genes by HDAC Inhibition in Prostate Cancer Is Mediated through the E2F1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kachhap, Sushant K.; Rosmus, Nadine; Collis, Spencer J.; Kortenhorst, Madeleine S. Q.; Wissing, Michel D.; Hedayati, Mohammad; Shabbeer, Shabana; Mendonca, Janet; Deangelis, Justin; Marchionni, Luigi; Lin, Jianqing; Höti, Naseruddin; Nortier, Johan W. R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Hammers, Hans; Carducci, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) re-express silenced tumor suppressor genes and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Although HDACis have been known to induce gene expression, an equal number of genes are downregulated upon HDAC inhibition. The mechanism behind this downregulation remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that several DNA repair genes are downregulated by HDAC inhibition and provide a mechanism involving the E2F1 transcription factor in the process. Methodology/Principal Findings Applying Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA) on microarray data of prostate cancer cells treated with HDACis, we found a number of genes of the DNA damage response and repair pathways are downregulated by HDACis. AFA revealed enrichment of homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair genes of the BRCA1 pathway, as well as genes regulated by the E2F1 transcription factor. Prostate cancer cells demonstrated a decreased DNA repair capacity and an increased sensitization to chemical- and radio-DNA damaging agents upon HDAC inhibition. Recruitment of key HR repair proteins to the site of DNA damage, as well as HR repair capacity was compromised upon HDACi treatment. Based on our AFA data, we hypothesized that the E2F transcription factors may play a role in the downregulation of key repair genes upon HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer cells. ChIP analysis and luciferase assays reveal that the downregulation of key repair genes is mediated through decreased recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor and not through active repression by repressive E2Fs. Conclusions/Significance Our study indicates that several genes in the DNA repair pathway are affected upon HDAC inhibition. Downregulation of the repair genes is on account of a decrease in amount and promoter recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor. Since HDAC inhibition affects several pathways that could potentially have an impact on DNA repair, compromised DNA repair upon HDAC inhibition could

  14. Epigenetic Enhancement of the Post-replicative DNA Mismatch Repair of Mammalian Genomes by a Hemi-mCpG-Np95-Dnmt1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Keh-Yang; Chen, Chun-Chang; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Shen, Che-Kun James

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation at C of CpG dyads (mCpG) in vertebrate genomes is essential for gene regulation, genome stability and development. We show in this study that proper functioning of post-replicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in mammalian cells relies on the presence of genomic mCpG, as well as on the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1 independently of its catalytic activity. More importantly, high efficiency of mammalian MMR surveillance is achieved through a hemi-mCpG-Np95(Uhrf1)-Dnmt1 axis, in which the MMR surveillance complex(es) is recruited to post-replicative DNA by Dnmt1, requiring its interactions with MutSα, as well as with Np95 bound at the hemi-methylated CpG sites. Thus, efficiency of MMR surveillance over the mammalian genome in vivo is enhanced at the epigenetic level. This synergy endows vertebrate CpG methylation with a new biological significance and, consequently, an additional mechanism for the maintenance of vertebrate genome stability. PMID:27886214

  15. The Structure of a High Fidelity DNA Polymerase Bound to a Mismatched Nucleotide Reveals an ;Ajar; Intermediate Conformation in the Nucleotide Selection Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Eugene Y.; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-10-10

    To achieve accurate DNA synthesis, DNA polymerases must rapidly sample and discriminate against incorrect nucleotides. Here we report the crystal structure of a high fidelity DNA polymerase I bound to DNA primer-template caught in the act of binding a mismatched (dG:dTTP) nucleoside triphosphate. The polymerase adopts a conformation in between the previously established 'open' and 'closed' states. In this 'ajar' conformation, the template base has moved into the insertion site but misaligns an incorrect nucleotide relative to the primer terminus. The displacement of a conserved active site tyrosine in the insertion site by the template base is accommodated by a distinctive kink in the polymerase O helix, resulting in a partially open ternary complex. We suggest that the ajar conformation allows the template to probe incoming nucleotides for complementarity before closure of the enzyme around the substrate. Based on solution fluorescence, kinetics, and crystallographic analyses of wild-type and mutant polymerases reported here, we present a three-state reaction pathway in which nucleotides either pass through this intermediate conformation to the closed conformation and catalysis or are misaligned within the intermediate, leading to destabilization of the closed conformation.

  16. 'Escherichia Coli' MutS Tetramerization Domain Structure Reveals That Stable Dimers But Not Tetramers are Essential for DNA Mismatch Repair in Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Mendillo, M.L.; Putnam, C.D.; Kolodner, R.D.; /UC, San Diego

    2007-07-10

    The E. coli mispair binding protein MutS forms dimers and tetramers in vitro, although the functional form in vivo is under debate. Here we demonstrate that the MutS tetramer is extended in solution using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and the crystal structure of the C-terminal 34 amino acids of MutS containing the tetramer-forming domain fused to maltose binding protein (MBP). Wild-type C-terminal MBP fusions formed tetramers and could bind MutS and MutS-MutL-DNA complexes. In contrast, Asp835Arg and Arg840Glu mutations predicted to disrupt tetrameric interactions only allowed dimerization of MBP. A chromosomal MutS truncation mutation eliminating the dimerization/tetramerization domain eliminated mismatch repair, whereas the tetramer-disrupting MutS Asp835Arg and Arg840Glu mutations only modestly affected MutS function. These results demonstrate that dimerization but not tetramerization of the MutS C- terminus is essential for mismatch repair.

  17. Contribution of polar residues of the J-helix in the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment): Q677 regulates the removal of terminal mismatch.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kamalendra; Modak, Mukund J

    2005-06-07

    Previous structural and biochemical data indicate a participation of the J-helix of Escherichia coli pol I in primer positioning at the polymerase and exonuclease sites. The J-helix contains three polar residues: N675, Q677, and N678. Preliminary characterization of alanine substitutions of these residues showed that only Q677A DNA polymerase has substantially decreased polymerase and increased exonuclease activity. The Q677A enzyme had approximately 2- and approximately 5-fold greater exonuclease activity than the wild type (WT) with mismatched and matched template-primers (TPs), respectively. N675A and N678A DNA polymerases did not differ significantly from the WT in these activities, despite the fact that both residues are seen to interact with the TP in various pol I-DNA complexes. Pre-steady-state kinetic measurements for the exonuclease activity of WT and mutant enzymes indicated nearly identical DNA binding affinity for ssDNA and mismatched TPs. However, with a matched TP, Q677A DNA polymerase exhibited increased exonuclease site affinity. The most important characteristic of Q677A DNA polymerase was its ability to continue cleavage into the matched region of the TP after mismatch excision, in contrast to the WT and other mutant enzymes. The increase in the exonuclease activity of Q677A DNA polymerase was further determined not to be solely due to the weakened binding at the polymerase site, by comparison with another polymerase-defective mutant enzyme, namely, R668A DNA polymerase. These enzymes have significantly decreased DNA binding affinity at the polymerase site, yet the exonuclease activity parameters of R668A DNA polymerase remain similar to those of the WT. These results strongly suggest that participation of Q677 is required for positioning the primer terminus (a) in the polymerase site for continued nucleotide addition and (b) in the 3'-exonuclease site for the controlled removal of mismatched nucleotides.

  18. Truncation of the MSH2 C-terminal 60 amino acids disrupts effective DNA mismatch repair and is causative for Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wielders, Eva; Delzenne-Goette, Elly; Dekker, Rob; van der Valk, Martin; Te Riele, Hein

    2017-04-01

    Missense variants of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes pose a problem in clinical genetics as long as they cannot unambiguously be assigned as the cause of Lynch syndrome (LS). To study such variants of uncertain clinical significance, we have developed a functional assay based on direct measurement of MMR activity in mouse embryonic stem cells expressing mutant protein from the endogenous alleles. We have applied this protocol to a specific truncation mutant of MSH2 that removes 60 C-terminal amino acids and has been found in suspected LS families. We show that the stability of the MSH2/MSH6 heterodimer is severely perturbed, causing attenuated MMR in in vitro assays and cancer predisposition in mice. This mutation can therefore unambiguously be considered as deleterious and causative for LS.

  19. Frequent loss of heterozygosity at the DNA mismatch-repair loci hMLH1 and hMSH3 in sporadic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benachenhou, N; Guiral, S; Gorska-Flipot, I; Labuda, D; Sinnett, D

    1999-01-01

    To study the involvement of DNA mismatch-repair genes in sporadic breast cancer, matched normal and tumoral DNA samples of 22 patients were analysed for genetic instability and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) with 42 microsatellites at or linked to hMLH1 (3p21), hMSH2 (2p16), hMSH3 (5q11–q13), hMSH6 (2p16), hPMS1 (2q32) and hPMS2 (7p22) loci. Chromosomal regions 3p21 and 5q11–q13 were found hemizygously deleted in 46% and 23% of patients respectively. Half of the patients deleted at hMLH1 were also deleted at hMSH3. The shortest regions of overlapping (SRO) deletions were delimited by markers D3S1298 and D3S1266 at 3p21 and by D5S647 and D5S418 at 5q11–q13. Currently, the genes hMLH1 (3p21) and hMSH3 (5q11–q13) are the only known candidates located within these regions. The consequence of these allelic losses is still unclear because none of the breast cancers examined displayed microsatellite instability, a hallmark of mismatch-repair defect during replication error correction. We suggest that hMLH1 and hMSH3 could be involved in breast tumorigenesis through cellular functions other than replication error correction. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098729

  20. Screening of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 in a Greek cohort of Lynch syndrome suspected families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes predispose to Lynch syndrome, thus conferring a high relative risk of colorectal and endometrial cancer. The MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutational spectrum reported so far involves minor alterations scattered throughout their coding regions as well as large genomic rearrangements. Therefore, a combination of complete sequencing and a specialized technique for the detection of genomic rearrangements should be conducted during a proper DNA-testing procedure. Our main goal was to successfully identify Lynch syndrome families and determine the spectrum of MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutations in Greek Lynch families in order to develop an efficient screening protocol for the Greek colorectal cancer patients' cohort. Methods Forty-two samples from twenty-four families, out of which twenty two of Greek, one of Cypriot and one of Serbian origin, were screened for the presence of germline mutations in the major mismatch repair genes through direct sequencing and MLPA. Families were selected upon Amsterdam criteria or revised Bethesda guidelines. Results Ten deleterious alterations were detected in twelve out of the twenty-four families subjected to genetic testing, thus our detection rate is 50%. Four of the pathogenic point mutations, namely two nonsense, one missense and one splice site change, are novel, whereas the detected genomic deletion encompassing exon 6 of the MLH1 gene has been described repeatedly in the LOVD database. The average age of onset for the development of both colorectal and endometrial cancer among mutation positive families is 43.2 years. Conclusion The mutational spectrum of the MMR genes investigated as it has been shaped by our analysis is quite heterogeneous without any strong indication for the presence of a founder effect. PMID:20937110

  1. Hepatitis C virus Core protein stimulates cell growth by down-regulating p16 expression via DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Hye; Lim, Joo Song; Lim, Su-Yeon; Tiwari, Indira; Jang, Kyung Lib

    2011-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus Core plays a vital role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma; however, its action mechanism is still controversial. Here, we showed that Core down-regulated levels of p16, resulting in inactivation of Rb and subsequent activation of E2F1, which lead to growth stimulation of hepatocytes. For this effect, Core inhibited p16 expression by inducing promoter hypermethylation via up-regulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and DNMT3b. The growth stimulatory effect of Core was abolished when levels of p16 were restored by either exogenous complementation or treatment with 5-Aza-2'dC, indicating that the effect is critical for the stimulation of cell growth by Core. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intragenic DNA methylation status down-regulates bovine IGF2 gene expression in different developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhan, Zhao-Yang; Sun, Yu-Jia; Cao, Xiu-Kai; Li, Ming-Xun; Wang, Jing; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-25

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic modification in mammals and has an essential and important role in muscle development. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a fetal growth and differentiation factor that plays an important role in muscle growth and in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of IGF2 and the methylation pattern on the differentially methylated region (DMR) of the last exon of IGF2 in six tissues with two different developmental stages. The DNA methylation pattern was compared using bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (BSP) and combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA). The quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis indicated that IGF2 has a broad tissue distribution and the adult bovine group showed significant lower mRNA expression levels than that in the fetal bovine group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Moreover, the DNA methylation level analysis showed that the adult bovine group exhibited a significantly higher DNA methylation levels than that in the fetal bovine group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). These results indicate that IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status of the IGF2 DMR during the two developmental stages. Our results suggest that the methylation pattern in this DMR may be a useful parameter to investigate as a marker-assisted selection for muscle developmental in beef cattle breeding program and as a model for studies in other species.

  3. Tautomeric transition between wobble A·C DNA base mispair and Watson-Crick-like A·C* mismatch: microstructural mechanism and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-06-21

    Here, we use MP2/DFT quantum-chemical methods combined with Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules to study the tautomeric transition between wobble A·C(w) mismatch and Watson-Crick-like A·C*(WC) base mispair, proceeding non-dissociatively via sequential proton transfer between bases through the planar, highly stable and zwitterionic TS(A∙C-)(A∙C(W)<-->A∙C&(WC)) transition state joined by the participation of (A)N6(+)H∙∙∙N4(-)(C), (A)N1(+)H∙∙∙N4(-)(C) and (A)C2(+)H∙∙∙N3(-)(C) H-bonds. Notably, the A·C(w) ↔ A·C*(WC) tautomerization reaction is accompanied by 10 unique patterns of the specific intermolecular interactions that consistently replace each other. Our data suggest that biologically significant A·C(w) → A·C*(WC) tautomerization is a kinetically controlled pathway for formation of the enzymatically competent Watson-Crick-like A·C*(WC) DNA base mispair in the essentially hydrophobic recognition pocket of the high-fidelity DNA-polymerase, responsible for the occurrence of spontaneous point AC/CA incorporation errors during DNA biosynthesis.

  4. Melatonin sensitizes human breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation by downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, Carolina; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Gómez-Arozamena, José; Cos, Samuel

    2015-03-01

    Radiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy are nowadays considered a standard treatment option after surgery in breast cancer. Melatonin exerts oncostatic actions on human breast cancer cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of a combination of radiotherapy and melatonin on human breast cancer cells. Melatonin (1 mm, 10 μm and 1 nm) significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Radiation alone inhibited the MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of breast cancer cells with melatonin 1 wk before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease of MCF-7 cell proliferation compared with radiation alone. Melatonin pretreatment before radiation also decreased G2 -M phase arrest compared with irradiation alone, with a higher percentage of cells in the G0 -G1 phase and a lower percentage of cells in S phase. Radiation alone diminished RAD51 and DNA-protein kinase (PKcs) mRNA expression, two main proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. Treatment with melatonin for 7 days before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease in RAD51 and DNA-PKcs mRNA expression compared with radiation alone. Our findings suggest that melatonin pretreatment before radiation sensitizes breast cancer cells to the ionizing effects of radiation by decreasing cell proliferation, inducing cell cycle arrest and downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. These findings may have implications for designing clinical trials using melatonin and radiotherapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Recognition of GT mismatches by Vsr mismatch endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Keith R.; Allinson, Sarah L.; Sahagun-Krause, Heidi; Brown, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The Vsr mismatch endonuclease recognises the sequence CTWGG (W = A or T) in which the underlined thymine is paired with guanine and nicks the DNA backbone on the 5′-side of the mispaired thymine. By using base analogues of G and T we have explored the functional groups on the mismatch pair which are recognised by the enzyme. Removal of the thymine 5-methyl group causes a 60% reduction in activity, while removing the 2-amino group of guanine reduces cleavage by 90%. Placing 2-aminopurine or nebularine opposite T generates mismatches which are cut at a much lower rate (0.1%). When either base is removed, generating a pseudoabasic site (1′,2′-dideoxyribose), the enzyme still produces site-specific cleavage, but at only 1% of the original rate. Although TT and CT mismatches at this position are cleaved at a low rate (~1%), mismatches with other bases (such as GA and AC) and Watson–Crick base pairs are not cleaved by the enzyme. There is also no cleavage when the mismatched T is replaced with difluorotoluene. PMID:10871403

  6. Recognition of GT mismatches by Vsr mismatch endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Fox, K R; Allinson, S L; Sahagun-Krause, H; Brown, T

    2000-07-01

    The Vsr mismatch endonuclease recognises the sequence CTWGG (W = A or T) in which the underlined thymine is paired with guanine and nicks the DNA backbone on the 5'-side of the mispaired thymine. By using base analogues of G and T we have explored the functional groups on the mismatch pair which are recognised by the enzyme. Removal of the thymine 5-methyl group causes a 60% reduction in activity, while removing the 2-amino group of guanine reduces cleavage by 90%. Placing 2-amino-purine or nebularine opposite T generates mis-matches which are cut at a much lower rate (0.1%). When either base is removed, generating a pseudoabasic site (1', 2'-dideoxyribose), the enzyme still produces site-specific cleavage, but at only 1% of the original rate. Although TT and CT mismatches at this position are cleaved at a low rate (approximately 1%), mismatches with other bases (such as GA and AC) and Watson-Crick base pairs are not cleaved by the enzyme. There is also no cleavage when the mismatched T is replaced with difluorotoluene.

  7. Osmium complex binding to mismatched methylcytosine: effect of adjacent bases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes depended on the 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique side reaction was observed. However, the mismatched base pairs did not influence the selectivity of osmium complexation with methylated DNA.

  8. [Phenylhexyl isothiocyanate induces gene p15 demethylation by down-regulating DNA methyltransferases in Molt-4 cells].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shao-hong; Ma, Xu-dong; Huang, Yi-qun; Xu, Yun-lu; Zheng, Rui-ji

    2009-04-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of phenylhexyl isothiocyanate (PHI), which has been proved to be a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) recently, on gene p15 de novo expression in acute leukemia cell line Molt-4, and to further study its potential mechanism. Modified methylation specific PCR (MSP) was used to screen p15-M and p15-U mRNA. DNA methyltransferasel (DNMT1), 3A (DNMT3A), 3B (DNMT3B) and p15 mRNA were measured by RT-PCR. P15 protein was detected by Western blotting. Hypermethylation of gene p15 was reversed and activation transcription of gene p15 in Molt-4 was de novo after 5 days exposure to PHI in a concentration dependent manner. DNMT1 and DNMT3B were inhibited by exposure to PHI for 5 days (P < 0.05). Alteration of DNMT3A was not significant. It is showed that PHI could reverse hypermethylation of gene p15 and transcriptional activation of gene p15 is de novo by PHI. It may result from down-regulating DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3B, or up-regulating the histone acetylation that allows chromatin unfolding and the accessibility of regulators for transcriptional activation in the p15 promoter.

  9. Solution structure of an oncogenic DNA duplex, the K-ras gene and the sequence containing a central C.A or A.G mismatch as a function of pH: nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Boulard, Y; Cognet, J A; Gabarro-Arpa, J; Le Bret, M; Carbonnaux, C; Fazakerley, G V

    1995-02-10

    The DNA duplex 5' d(GCCACCAGCTC)-d(GAGCTGGTGGC) corresponds to the sequence 29 to 39 of the K-ras gene, which contains a hot spot for mutations. This has been studied by one and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, energy minimization and molecular dynamics. The results show that it adopts a globally B-DNA type structure. We have introduced, at the central base-pair, the mismatches C.A and A.G. The mismatch position is that of the first base of the Gly12 codon, the hot spot. For the C.A mismatch we observe a structural change as a function of pH with an apparent pKa of 7.2. At low pH, the mismatch pair adopts a structure close to a classic wobble conformation with the cytidine residue displaced into the major groove. It is stabilised by two hydrogen bonds in which the adenosine residue is protonated and the cytidine residue has a significant C3'-endo population. At high pH, the mispair structure is in equilibrium between wobble and reverse wobble conformations. Similar studies are reported on the A.G mismatch, which also undergoes a transition as a function of pH. 31P spectra have been recorded on all systems and as a function of pH. No evidence for BII phosphodiester backbone conformations was found. The NMR results are well corroborated by molecular dynamics calculations performed with or without distance constraints. The dynamics at the mismatch sites have been examined. Although the overall structures are close to B-DNA, helical parameters fluctuate differently at these sites. Different hydrogen bonding alternatives in dynamic equilibrium that can involve three-centred hydrogen bonds are observed.

  10. Introduction of specific point mutations into RNA polymerase II by gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells: evidence for a DNA mismatch repair mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Steeg, C M; Ellis, J; Bernstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We have introduced two specific point mutations, located 20 base pairs apart, into the endogenous murine gene that encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPII215). The first mutation conferred resistance to the mushroom toxin alpha-amanitin (amar), and the second mutation generated a restriction fragment length polymorphism without altering the protein sequence. Targeted amar clones were generated at a frequency of 1 in 30 totipotent embryonic stem cells that expressed stably integrated DNA vectors after electroporation. Thirty to 40% of these clones had acquired both mutations, whereas, surprisingly, the remaining clones had acquired the specific amar point mutation but lacked the restriction fragment length polymorphism. We suggest that the latter clones were generated by independent DNA mismatch repair rather than by double crossover or gene conversion. These results demonstrate that it is possible to introduce specific point mutations into an endogenous gene in embryonic stem cells. Thus it should be possible to introduce single base substitutions into other cellular genes, including nonselectable genes, by optimizing the efficiency of gene transfer and/or the sensitivity of screening for targeted clones. Images PMID:1972278

  11. SET overexpression decreases cell detoxification efficiency: ALDH2 and GSTP1 are downregulated, DDR is impaired and DNA damage accumulates.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciana O; Goto, Renata N; Pestana, Cezar R; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Gutkind, Silvio; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2012-12-01

    Alcohol and tobacco consumption are risk factors for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1) are important enzymes for cellular detoxification and low efficiencies are implicated in cancer. We assessed the potential role of SET protein overexpression, a histone acetylation modulator accumulated in HNSCC, in gene regulation and protein activity of ALDH2 and GSTP1. SET was knocked down in HN13, HN12 and Cal27, and overexpressed in HEK293 cells; ethanol and cisplatin were the chemical agents. Cells with SET overexpression (HEK293/SET, HN13 and HN12) showed lower ALDH2 and GSTP1 mRNA levels and trichostatin A increased them (real-time PCR). Ethanol upregulated GSTP1 and ALDH2 mRNAs, whereas cisplatin upregulated GSTP1 in HEK293 cells. SET-chromatin binding revealed SET interaction with ALDH2 and GSTP1 promoters, specifically via SET NAP domain; ethanol and cisplatin abolished SET binding. ALDH2 and GSTP1 efficiency was assessed by enzymatic and comet assay. A lower ALDH2 activity was associated with greater DNA damage (tail intensity) in HEK293/SET compared with HEK293 cells, whereas HN13/siSET showed ALDH2 activity higher than HN13 cells. HN13/siSET cells showed increased tail intensity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage response showed negative relationship between SET overexpression and BRCA2 recruitment. SET downregulated repair genes ATM, BRCA1 and CHEK2 and upregulated TP53. Cisplatin-induced cell-cycle arrest occurred in G(0) /G(1) and S in HEK293 cells, whereas HEK293/SET showed G(2) /M stalling. Overall, cisplatin was more cytotoxic for HN13 than HN13/siSET cells. Our data suggest a role for SET in cellular detoxification, DNA damage response and genome integrity.

  12. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by mismatch and double-strand break repair DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M; Bianco, Piero R; Surtees, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3' non-homologous tail removal (3'NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3'NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype.

  13. Association between expression of DNA mismatch repair genes and clinical features and prognosis of patients with radical resection of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, J B; Ma, D L; Li, J Y; Sun, Q D; Liu, Y E

    2016-08-19

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of the expression of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes in patients subjected to radical surgical removal of colon cancer, as well as their correlation with disease prognosis. Ninety stage II and III colon cancer patients who received laparoscopic radical resection of colon cancer at our hospital were recruited in this study. The expression of hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH6, and hPMS2 in the resected tumor tissues was examined by SP immunohistochemistry, in order to analyze the relationship between defective DNA MMR (dMMR) and the clinico-pathological features and prognosis of colon cancer. Patients were followed up over a period of 5-35 months, and the Kaplan-Meier survival curve was plotted. dMMR was confirmed in 27 subjects (30.0%), among whom recurrence with metastasis and death was reported in 5 (18.5%) and 2 (7.4%) patients, respectively. The remaining 63 subjects displayed proficient DNA MMR (pMMR); among these, 19 (30.2%) and 7 (11.1%) recurrences with metastasis and death were reported, respectively. dMMR showed no significant correlation with gender, age, or therapeutic modality (P > 0.05), but was significantly correlated with the degree of differentiation, tumor location, number of resected lymph nodes, presence of ileus, and TNM stage (P < 0.05). The prognosis of patients with dMMR was better than that of patients with pMMR. dMMR serves as a biomarker for the prognosis of stage II/III colon cancers.

  14. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by Mismatch and Double-strand Break Repair DNA substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M.; Bianco, Piero R.; Surtees, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3′ non-homologous tail removal (3′NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3′ NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3′ NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3′ NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype. PMID:24746922

  15. Influence of the length of target DNA overhang proximal to the array surface on discrimination of single-base mismatches on a 25-mer oligonucleotide array

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The performance of probes on an oligonucleotide microarray can be characterised in terms of hybridisation signal strength and the ability to discriminate sequence mismatches between the probe and the hybridising target strand, such as those resulting from SNPs. Various properties of the probe affect mismatch discrimination, such as probe length and the position of mismatched bases, and the effects of these factors have been well characterised in a variety of array formats. Results A low-density microarray was developed to systematically investigate the effect of a probe’s position within hybridised target PCR products on the tolerance and discrimination of single-nucleotide mismatches between the probe and target. In line with previous reports, hybridisation signals were attenuated by different degrees depending on the identity of the mismatch, the position of the mismatch within the probe, and the length of the PCR product. However, the same mismatch caused different degrees of attenuation depending on the position of the probe within the hybridising product, such that improved mismatch discrimination was observed for PCR products where a greater proportion of the total length was proximal to the array surface. Conclusions These results suggest that the degree of mismatch discrimination can be influenced by the choice of PCR primers, providing a means by which array performance could be fine-tuned in addition to manipulation of the properties of the probes themselves. PMID:24742004

  16. How many tautomerization pathways connect Watson-Crick-like G*·T DNA base mispair and wobble mismatches?

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have theoretically demonstrated the intrinsic ability of the wobble G·T(w)/G*·T*(w)/G·T(w1)/G·T(w2) and Watson-Crick-like G*·T(WC) DNA base mispairs to interconvert into each other via the DPT tautomerization. We have established that among all these transitions, only one single G·T(w) ↔ G*·T(WC) pathway is eligible from a biological perspective. It involves short-lived intermediate - the G·T*(WC) base mispair - and is governed by the planar, highly stable, and zwitterionic [Formula: see text] transition state stabilized by the participation of the unique pattern of the five intermolecular O6(+)H⋯O4(-), O6(+)H⋯N3(-), N1(+)H⋯N3(-), N1(+)H⋯O2(-), and N2(+)H⋯O2(-) H-bonds. This non-dissociative G·T(w) ↔ G*·T(WC) tautomerization occurs without opening of the pair: Bases within mispair remain connected by 14 different patterns of the specific intermolecular interactions that successively change each other along the IRC. Novel kinetically controlled mechanism of the thermodynamically non-equilibrium spontaneous point GT/TG incorporation errors has been suggested. The mutagenic effect of the analogues of the nucleotide bases, in particular 5-bromouracil, can be attributed to the decreasing of the barrier of the acquisition by the wobble pair containing these compounds of the enzymatically competent Watson-Crick's geometry via the intrapair mutagenic tautomerization directly in the essentially hydrophobic recognition pocket of the replication DNA-polymerase machinery. Proposed approaches are able to explain experimental data, namely growth of the rate of the spontaneous point incorporation errors during DNA biosynthesis with increasing temperature.

  17. Germline PMS2 and somatic POLEexo mutations cause hypermutability of the leading DNA strand in Biallelic Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Andrianova, Maria A; Chetan, Ghati Kasturirangan; Sibin, Madathan Kandi; Mckee, Thomas; Merkler, Doron; Narasinga, Rao Kvl; Ribaux, Pascale; Blouin, Jean-Louis; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Nikolaev, Sergey I

    2017-08-14

    Biallelic Mismatch Repair Deficiency (bMMRD) in tumors is frequently associated with somatic mutations in the exonuclease domains of DNA polymerases POLE or POLD1 and results to a characteristic mutational profile. In this study we describe the genetic basis of ultramutated high grade brain tumors in the context of bMMRD. We performed exome sequencing of two second-cousin patients from a large consanguineous family of Indian origin with early onset of high grade glioblastoma and astrocytoma. We identified a germline homozygous nonsense variant R802X in the PMS2 gene. Additionally, by genome sequencing of these tumors we have observed extremely high somatic mutation rates (237 and 123 mut/Mb) as well as somatic mutations in the proofreading domain of POLE polymerase (P436H and L424V), that replicates the leading DNA strand. Most interestingly, we have observed in both cancers that the vast majority of mutations were consistent with the signature of PolE exo-, i.e. the abundance of C > A and C > T mutations, particularly in special contexts, on the leading strand. We showed that the fraction of mutations under positive selection among mutations in tumor suppressor genes is more than 2-fold lower in ultramutated tumors compared to other glioblastomas. Genetic analyses enabled the diagnosis of the two consanguineous childhood brain tumors due to a combination of PMS2 germline and POLE somatic variants and confirmed them as a bMMRD/POLEexo- disorder. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Aspirin-induced nuclear translocation of NFκB and apoptosis in colorectal cancer is independent of p53 status and DNA mismatch repair proficiency

    PubMed Central

    Din, F V N; Stark, L A; Dunlop, M G

    2005-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) protect against colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the molecular basis for this anti-tumour activity has not been fully elucidated. We previously reported that aspirin induces signal-specific IκBα degradation followed by NFκB nuclear translocation in CRC cells, and that this mechanism contributes substantially to aspirin-induced apoptosis. We have also reported the relative specificity of this aspirin-induced NFκB-dependent apoptotic effect for CRC cells, in comparison to other cancer cell types. It is now important to establish whether there is heterogeneity within CRC, with respect to the effects of aspirin on the NFκB pathway and apoptosis. p53 signalling and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) are known to be deranged in CRC and have been reported as potential molecular targets for the anti-tumour activity of NSAIDs. Furthermore, both p53 and MMR dysfunction have been shown to confer resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Here, we set out to determine the p53 and hMLH1 dependency of the effects of aspirin on NFκB signalling and apoptosis in CRC. We specifically compared the effects of aspirin treatment on cell viability, apoptosis and NFκB signalling in an HCT-116 CRC cell line with the p53 gene homozygously disrupted (HCT-116p53−/−) and an HCT-116 cell line rendered MMR proficient by chromosomal transfer (HCT-116+ch3), to the parental HCT-116 CRC cell line. We found that aspirin treatment induced apoptosis following IκBα degradation, NFκB nuclear translocation and repression of NFκB-driven transcription, irrespective of p53 and DNA MMR status. These findings are relevant for design of both novel chemopreventative agents and chemoprevention trials in CRC. PMID:15770215

  19. Prognostic Impact of Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair in Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer From a Randomized Trial of FOLFOX-Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinicrope, Frank A.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Warren, Robert S.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Nelson, Garth D.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Alberts, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The association of deficient DNA mismatch repair (dMMR) with prognosis in patients with colon cancer treated with adjuvant fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) chemotherapy remains unknown. Patients and Methods Resected, stage III colon carcinomas from patients (N = 2,686) randomly assigned to FOLFOX ± cetuximab (North Central Cancer Treatment Group N0147 trial) were analyzed for mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression and mutations in BRAFV600E (exon 15) and KRAS (codons 12 and 13). Association of biomarkers with disease-free survival (DFS) was determined using Cox models. A validation cohort (Cancer and Leukemia Group B 88903 trial) was used. Results dMMR was detected in 314 (12%) of 2,580 tumors, of which 49.3% and 10.6% had BRAFV600E or KRAS mutations, respectively. MMR status was not prognostic overall (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.07; P = .14), yet significant interactions were found between MMR and primary tumor site (Pinteraction = .009) and lymph node category (N1 v N2; Pinteraction = .014). Favorable DFS was observed for dMMR versus proficient MMR proximal tumors (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.94; P = .018) but not dMMR distal tumors (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 0.99 to 2.95; P = .056), adjusting for mutations and covariates. Any survival benefit of dMMR was lost in N2 tumors. Mutations in BRAFV600E (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.70; P = .009) or KRAS (HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.21 to 1.70; P < .001) were independently associated with worse DFS. The observed MMR by tumor site interaction was validated in an independent cohort of stage III colon cancers (Pinteraction = .037). Conclusion The prognostic impact of MMR depended on tumor site, and this interaction was validated in an independent cohort. Among dMMR cancers, proximal tumors had favorable outcome, whereas distal or N2 tumors had poor outcome. BRAF or KRAS mutations were independently associated with adverse outcome. PMID:24019539

  20. PI3K/AKT Mediated P53 Down-Regulation Participates in CpG DNA Inhibition of Spontaneous B Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yongxin; Zhen, Huiling; Mei, Yunqing; Wang, Yongwu; Feng, Jing; Xu, Shuchang; Fu, Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    The unmethylated CpG DNA can prevent spontaneous apoptosis of B cells. However, the precise mechanisms by which CpG DNA blocks apoptosis remain unclear. In this study, we showed B cell apoptosis was significantly inhibited by addition of CpG DNA. Treatment of CpG DNA could reduce the expression of caspase 3, increase IAP and Bcl-xL expressions, and inhibit p53 protein expression which level was increased in B cell spontaneous apoptosis at 24 h. AKT kinase activity was increased with the incubation of CpG DNA. The wortmannin and Ly294002 could abrogate the protection of B cell from apoptosis by CpG DNA. The up-regulations of Bcl-xL and IAP by CpG DNA were not inhibited when blocking PI3K by specific inhibitor Ly294002, while the inhibition of p53 by CpG DNA could be blocked by Ly294002. These results demonstrated that the inhibition of spontaneous B cell apoptosis by CpG DNA was correlated to up-regulation of Bcl-xL, IAP and down-regulation of p53 and caspase 3. CpG DNA inhibition of p53 is mediated through PI3K/AKT signaling. PMID:19567200

  1. PI3K/AKT mediated p53 down-regulation participates in CpG DNA inhibition of spontaneous B cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongxin; Zhen, Huiling; Mei, Yunqing; Wang, Yongwu; Feng, Jing; Xu, Shuchang; Fu, Xiaoying

    2009-06-01

    The unmethylated CpG DNA can prevent spontaneous apoptosis of B cells. However, the precise mechanisms by which CpG DNA blocks apoptosis remain unclear. In this study, we showed B cell apoptosis was significantly inhibited by addition of CpG DNA. Treatment of CpG DNA could reduce the expression of caspase 3, increase IAP and Bcl-xL expressions, and inhibit p53 protein expression which level was increased in B cell spontaneous apoptosis at 24 h. AKT kinase activity was increased with the incubation of CpG DNA. The wortmannin and Ly294002 could abrogate the protection of B cell from apoptosis by CpG DNA. The up-regulations of Bcl-xL and IAP by CpG DNA were not inhibited when blocking PI3K by specific inhibitor Ly294002, while the inhibition of p53 by CpG DNA could be blocked by Ly294002. These results demonstrated that the inhibition of spontaneous B cell apoptosis by CpG DNA was correlated to up-regulation of Bcl-xL, IAP and down-regulation of p53 and caspase 3. CpG DNA inhibition of p53 is mediated through PI3K/AKT signaling.

  2. MicroRNA-21 induces resistance to 5-fluorouracil by down-regulating human DNA MutS homolog 2 (hMSH2).

    PubMed

    Valeri, Nicola; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Braconi, Chiara; Paone, Alessio; Lovat, Francesca; Fabbri, Muller; Sumani, Khlea M; Alder, Hansjuerg; Amadori, Dino; Patel, Tushar; Nuovo, Gerard J; Fishel, Richard; Croce, Carlo M

    2010-12-07

    The overexpression of microRNA-21 (miR-21) is linked to a number of human tumors including colorectal cancer, where it appears to regulate the expression of tumor suppressor genes including p21, phosphatase and tensin homolog, TGFβ receptor II, and B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 -associated X protein. Here we demonstrate that miR-21 targets and down-regulates the core mismatch repair (MMR) recognition protein complex, human mutS homolog 2 (hMSH2) and 6 (hMSH6). Colorectal tumors that express a high level of miR-21 display reduced hMSH2 protein expression. Cells that overproduce miR-21 exhibit significantly reduced 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced G2/M damage arrest and apoptosis that is characteristic of defects in the core MMR component. Moreover, xenograft studies demonstrate that miR-21 overexpression dramatically reduces the therapeutic efficacy of 5-FU. These studies suggest that the down-regulation of the MMR mutator gene associated with miR-21 overexpression may be an important clinical indicator of therapeutic efficacy in colorectal cancer.

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the hexA gene for DNA mismatch repair in Streptococcus pneumoniae and homology of hexA to mutS of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Priebe, S.D.; Hadi, S.M.; Greenberg, B.; Lacks, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Hex system of heteroduplex DNA base mismatch repair operates in Streptococcus pneumoniae after transformation and replication to correct donor and nascent DNA strands, respectively. A functionally similar system, called Mut, operates in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The nucleotide sequence of a 3.8-kilobase segment from the S. pneumoniae chromosome that includes the 2.7-kilobase hexA gene was determined. Chromosomal DNA used as donor to measure Hex phenotype was irradiated with UV light. An open reading frame that could encode a 17-kilodalton polypeptide (OrfC) was located just upstream of the gene encoding a polypeptide of 95 kilodaltons corresponding to HexA. Shine-Dalgarno sequences and putative promoters were identified upstream of each protein start site. Insertion mutations showed that only HexA functioned in mismatch repair and that the promoter for hexA transcription was located within the OrfC-coding region. The HexA polypeptide contains a consensus sequence for ATP- or GTP-binding sites in proteins. Comparison of the entire HexA protein sequence to that of MutS of S. typhimurium, showed the proteins to be homologous, inasmuch as 36% of their amino acid residues were identical. This homology indicates that the Hex and Mut systems of mismatch repair evolved from an ancestor common to the gram-positive streptococci and the gram-negative enterobacteria. It is the first direct evidence linking the two systems.

  4. Development of DNA mismatch repair gene, MutS, as a diagnostic marker for detection and phylogenetic analysis of algal Megaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William H; Gilg, Ilana C; Duarte, Amy; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-01

    Megaviruses are generically defined as giant viruses with genomes up to 1.26Mb that infect eukaryotic unicellular protists; they are clearly delineated in DNA polymerase B phylogenetic trees; in addition, common features often include an associated virophage observed during infection; the presence of an amino acyl tRNA synthetase gene; and a nucleic acid mismatch repair protein, MutS gene. The archetypal representative of this evolving putative family is Mimivirus, an opportunistic pathogen of Acanthamoeba spp. originally thought to be a bacterium until its genome sequence was published in 2004. Subsequent analysis of marine metagenomic data revealed Megaviruses are likely ubiquitous on the surface ocean. Analysis of genome sequences of giant viruses isolated from naturally occurring marine protists such as microalgae and a microflagellate grazer, started the expansion of the Megaviridae. Here, we explored the possibility of developing Megavirus specific markers for mutS that could be used in virus molecular ecology studies. MutS is split into 15 different clades representing a wide range of cellular life, and two that contain Megaviruses, clade MutS7 and clade MutS8. We developed specific PCR primers that recognized Megavirus clade MutS8, a clade that we propose discriminates most of the algal Megaviruses. Analysis of seawater off the coast of Maine, US, revealed novel groups of algal Megaviruses that were present in all samples tested. The Megavirus clade MutS8 marker should be considered as a tool to reveal new diversity and distribution of this enigmatic group of viruses.

  5. Association of obesity with DNA mismatch repair status and clinical outcome in patients with stage II or III colon carcinoma participating in NCCTG and NSABP adjuvant chemotherapy trials.

    PubMed

    Sinicrope, Frank A; Foster, Nathan R; Yoon, Harry H; Smyrk, Thomas C; Kim, George P; Allegra, Carmen J; Yothers, Greg; Nikcevich, Daniel A; Sargent, Daniel J

    2012-02-01

    Although the importance of obesity in colon cancer risk and outcome is recognized, the association of body mass index (BMI) with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status is unknown. BMI (kg/m(2)) was determined in patients with TNM stage II or III colon carcinomas (n = 2,693) who participated in randomized trials of adjuvant chemotherapy. The association of BMI with MMR status and survival was analyzed by logistic regression and Cox models, respectively. Overall, 427 (16%) tumors showed deficient MMR (dMMR), and 630 patients (23%) were obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Obesity was significantly associated with younger age (P = .021), distal tumor site (P = .012), and a lower rate of dMMR tumors (10% v 17%; P < .001) compared with normal weight. Obesity remained associated with lower rates of dMMR (odds ratio, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.79; P < .001) after adjusting for tumor site, stage, sex, and age. Among obese patients, rates of dMMR were lower in men compared with women (8% v 13%; P = .041). Obesity was associated with higher recurrence rates (P = .0034) and independently predicted worse disease-free survival (DFS; hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.64; P = .0010) and overall survival (OS), whereas dMMR predicted better DFS (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.74; P < .001) and OS. The favorable prognosis of dMMR was maintained in obese patients. Colon cancers from obese patients are less likely to show dMMR, suggesting obesity-related differences in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. Although obesity was independently associated with adverse outcome, the favorable prognostic impact of dMMR was maintained among obese patients.

  6. Regulation of p53 by metal ions and by antioxidants: dithiocarbamate down-regulates p53 DNA-binding activity by increasing the intracellular level of copper.

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegh, G W; Richard, M J; Hainaut, P

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene frequently fall within the specific DNA-binding domain and prevent the molecule from transactivating normal targets. DNA-binding activity is regulated in vitro by metal ions and by redox conditions, but whether these factors also regulate p53 in vivo is unclear. To address this question, we have analyzed the effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) on p53 DNA-binding activity in cell lines expressing wild-type p53. PDTC is commonly regarded as an antioxidant, but it can also bind and transport external copper ions into cells and thus exert either pro- or antioxidant effects in different situations. We report that PDTC, but not N-acetyl-L-cysteine, down-regulated the specific DNA-binding activity of p53. Loss of DNA binding correlated with disruption of the immunologically "wild-type" p53 conformation. Using different chelators to interfere with copper transport by PDTC, we found that bathocuproinedisulfonic acid (BCS), a non-cell-permeable chelator of Cu1+, prevented both copper import and p53 down-regulation. In contrast, 1,10-orthophenanthroline, a cell-permeable chelator of Cu2+, promoted the redox activity of copper and up-regulated p53 DNA-binding activity through a DNA damage-dependent pathway. We have previously reported that p53 protein binds copper in vitro in the form of Cu1+ (P. Hainaut, N. Rolley, M. Davies, and J. Milner, Oncogene 10:27-32, 1995). The data reported here indicate that intracellular levels and redox activity of copper are critical for p53 protein conformation and DNA-binding activity and suggest that copper ions may participate in the physiological control of p53 function. PMID:9315628

  7. Human cytomegalovirus miR-US33-5p inhibits viral DNA synthesis and viral replication by down-regulating expression of the host Syntaxin3.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Ma, Yanping; Shao, Yaozhong; Jiang, Shujuan; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-02-13

    During infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), overexpression of hcmv-miR-US33 can inhibit the lytic viral replication and down-regulate US29 mRNA. However, it remains unknown whether inhibition of viral replication by miR-US33 is mediated by down-regulation of expression of US29 or another host gene. Here, we identified the host gene Syntaxin3 (STX3) to be a direct target of hcmv-miR-US33-5p using Hybrid-PCR and luciferase-reporter assays. It was further demonstrated that the levels of STX3 protein were down-regulated in hcmv-miR-US33-5p-overexpressing cells. Experiments with STX3-specific siRNA, or with an inhibitor of hcmv-miR-US33-5p confirmed that hcmv-miR-US33-5p-mediated inhibition of HCMV DNA synthesis and of viral replication are specifically mediated by down-regulation of STX3 expression.

  8. Non-canonical actions of mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Crouse, Gray F.

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of the mismatch repair (MMR) system are proteins that recognize mismatches in DNA. Such mismatches can be mispairs involving normal or damaged bases or insertion/deletion loops due to strand misalignment. When such mispairs are generated during replication or recombination, MMR will direct removal of an incorrectly paired base or block recombination between nonidentical sequences. However, when mispairs are recognized outside the context of replication, proper strand discrimination between old and new DNA is lost, and MMR can act randomly and mutagenically on mispaired DNA. Such non-canonical actions of MMR are important in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, expansion of triplet repeats, and potentially in mutations arising in nondividing cells. MMR involvement in damage recognition and signaling is complex, with the end result likely dependent on the amount of DNA damage in a cell. PMID:26698648

  9. Mechanisms in E. coli and Human Mismatch Repair (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Modrich, Paul

    2016-07-18

    DNA molecules are not completely stable, they are subject to chemical or photochemical damage and errors that occur during DNA replication resulting in mismatched base pairs. Through mechanistic studies Paul Modrich showed how replication errors are corrected by strand-directed mismatch repair in Escherichia coli and human cells.

  10. Identification of a new motif required for the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment): the RRRY motif is necessary for the binding of single-stranded DNA substrate and the template strand of the mismatched duplex.

    PubMed

    Kukreti, Pinky; Singh, Kamalendra; Ketkar, Amit; Modak, Mukund J

    2008-06-27

    The Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I houses catalytic centers for both polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities that are separated by about 35 A. Upon the incorporation of a mismatched nucleotide, the primer terminus is transferred from the polymerase site to an exonuclease site designed for excision of the mismatched nucleotides. The structural comparison of the binary complexes of DNA polymerases in the polymerase and the exonuclease modes, together with a molecular modeling of the template strand overhang in Klenow fragment, indicated its binding in the region spanning residues 821-824. Since these residues are conserved in the "A" family DNA polymerases, we have designated this region as the RRRY motif. The alanine substitution of individual amino acid residues of this motif did not change the polymerase activity; however, the 3'-5' exonuclease activity was reduced 2-29-fold, depending upon the site of mutation. The R821A and R822A/Y824A mutant enzymes showed maximum cleavage defect with single-stranded DNA, mainly due to a large decrease in the ssDNA binding affinity of these enzymes. Mismatch removal by these enzymes was only moderately affected. However, data from the exonuclease-polymerase balance assays with mismatched template-primer suggest that the mutant enzymes are defective in switching mismatched primer from the polymerase to the exonuclease site. Thus, the RRRY motif provides a binding track for substrate ssDNA and for nonsubstrate single-stranded template overhang, in a polarity-dependent manner. This binding then facilitates cleavage of the substrate at the exonuclease site.

  11. Thermodynamic and structural properties of the specific binding between Ag⁺ ion and C:C mismatched base pair in duplex DNA to form C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Okamoto, Itaru; Dairaku, Takenori; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    Metal ion-nucleic acid interactions have attracted considerable interest for their involvement in structure formation and catalytic activity of nucleic acids. Although interactions between metal ion and mismatched base pair duplex are important to understand mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions, they have not been well-characterized. We recently found that the Ag(+) ion stabilized a C:C mismatched base pair duplex DNA. A C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair was supposed to be formed by the binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C mismatched base pair to stabilize the duplex. Here, we examined specificity, thermodynamics and structure of possible C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair. UV melting indicated that only the duplex with the C:C mismatched base pair, and not of the duplexes with the perfectly matched and other mismatched base pairs, was specifically stabilized on adding the Ag(+) ion. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that the Ag(+) ion specifically bound with the C:C base pair at 1:1 molar ratio with a binding constant of 10(6) M(-1), which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion-DNA interactions. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also supported the specific 1:1 binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C base pair. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and NMR revealed that the Ag(+) ion may bind with the N3 positions of the C:C base pair without distorting the higher-order structure of the duplex. We conclude that the specific formation of C-Ag-C base pair with large binding affinity would provide a binding mode of metal ion-DNA interactions, similar to that of the previously reported T-Hg-T base pair. The C-Ag-C base pair may be useful not only for understanding of molecular mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions but also for wide variety of potential applications of metal-mediated base pairs in various fields, such as material, life and environmental sciences.

  12. Decreased cell survival and DNA repair capacity after UVC irradiation in association with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP in human RSa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Ling; Kita, Kazuko . E-mail: kita@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Wano, Chieko; Wu Yuping; Sugaya, Shigeru; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-05-01

    In contrast to extensive studies on the roles of molecular chaperones, such as heat shock proteins, there are only a few reports about the roles of GRP78/BiP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced molecular chaperone, in mammalian cell responses to DNA-damaging stresses. To investigate whether GRP78/BiP is involved in resistance to a DNA-damaging agent, UVC (principally 254 nm in wavelength), we established human cells with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP by transfection of human RSa cells with antisense cDNA for GRP78/BiP. We found that the transfected cells showed higher sensitivity to UVC-induced cell death than control cells transfected with the vector alone. In the antisense-cDNA transfected cells, the removal capacities of the two major types of UVC-damaged DNA (thymine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts) in vivo and DNA synthesis activity of whole cell extracts to repair UVC-irradiated plasmids in vitro were remarkably decreased compared with those in the control cells. Furthermore, the antisense-cDNA transfected cells also showed slightly higher sensitivity to cisplatin-induced cell death than the control cells. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage is primarily repaired by nucleotide excision repair, like UVC-induced DNA damage. The present results suggest that GRP78/BiP plays a protective role against UVC-induced cell death possibly via nucleotide excision repair, at least in the human RSa cells tested.

  13. Mismatch repair during homologous and homeologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans.

  14. Mismatch Repair during Homologous and Homeologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans. PMID:25731766

  15. Testicular Dnmt3 expression and global DNA methylation are down-regulated by gonadotropin releasing hormones in the ricefield eel Monopterus albus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yize; Sun, Xin; Zhang, Lihong; Zhang, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    In vertebrates, DNA methyltransferase 3 (Dnmt3) homologues are responsible for de novo DNA methylation and play important roles in germ cell development. In the present study, four dnmt3 genes, dnmt3aa, dnmt3ab, dnmt3ba and dnmt3bb.1, were identified in ricefield eels. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that all four dnmt3 mRNAs were detected broadly in tissues examined, with testicular expression at relatively high levels. In the testis, immunostaining for all four Dnmt3 forms was mainly localized to spermatocytes, which also contained highly methylated DNA. All three forms of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) in the ricefield eel were shown to decrease the expression of dnmt3 genes in the in vitro incubated testicular fragments through cAMP and IP3/Ca2+ pathways. Moreover, in vivo treatment of male fish with three forms of Gnrh decreased significantly the testicular Dnmt3 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, and the global DNA methylation levels. These results suggest that the expression of Dnmt3 and global DNA methylation in the testis of ricefield eels are potentially down-regulated by Gnrh, and reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of testicular Dnmt3 expression in vertebrates. PMID:28225069

  16. Pathological complete response after cisplatin neoadjuvant therapy is associated with the downregulation of DNA repair genes in BRCA1-associated triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Domagala, Pawel; Hybiak, Jolanta; Rys, Janusz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2016-10-18

    Pathologic complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is considered a suitable surrogate marker of treatment efficacy in patients with triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying pCR as a result of such treatment remain obscure. Using real-time PCR arrays we compared the expression levels of 120 genes involved in the main mechanisms of DNA repair in 43 pretreatment biopsies of BRCA1-associated TNBCs exhibiting pCR and no pathological complete response (non-pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin. Altogether, 25 genes were significantly differentially expressed between tumors exhibiting pCR and non-pCR, and these genes were downregulated in the pCR group compared to the non-pCR group. A difference in expression level greater than 1.5-fold was detected for nine genes: MGMT, ERCC4, FANCB, UBA1, XRCC5, XPA, XPC, PARP3, and RPA1. The non-homologous end joining and nucleotide excision repair pathways of DNA repair showed the most significant relevance. Expression profile of DNA repair genes associated with pCR was different in the node-positive (20 genes with fold change >1.5) and node-negative (only 3 genes) subgroups. Although BRCA1 germline mutations are the principal defects in BRCA1-associated TNBC, our results indicate that the additional downregulation of other genes engaged in major pathways of DNA repair may play a decisive role in the pathological response of these tumors to cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The results suggest that patients with node-positive BRCA1-associated TNBCs that do not exhibit pCR after cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be candidates for subsequent therapy with PARP inhibitors, whereas UBA1 may be a potential therapeutic target in node-negative subgroup.

  17. Involvement of DNA hypermethylation in down-regulation of the zinc transporter ZIP8 in cadmium-resistant metallothionein-null cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujishiro, Hitomi; Okugaki, Satomi; Yasumitsu, Saori; Enomoto, Shuichi; Himeno, Seiichiro

    2009-12-01

    The Zrt/Irt-related protein 8 (ZIP8) encoded by slc39a8 is now emerging as an important zinc transporter involved in cellular cadmium incorporation. We have previously shown that mRNA and protein levels of ZIP8 were decreased in cadmium-resistant metallothionein-null (A7) cells, leading to a decrease in cadmium accumulation. However, the mechanism by which ZIP8 expression is suppressed in these cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the possibility that epigenetic silencing of the slc39a8 gene by DNA hypermethylation is involved in the down-regulation of ZIP8 expression. A7 cells showed a higher mRNA level of DNA methyltransferase 3b than parental cells. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the slc39a8 gene was detected in A7 cells. Treatment of A7 cells with 5-aza-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase, caused demethylation of the CpG island of the slc39a8 gene and enhancement of mRNA and protein levels of ZIP8. In response to the recovery of ZIP8 expression, A7 cells treated with 5-aza-deoxycytidine showed an increase in cadmium accumulation and consequently an increase in sensitivity to cadmium. These results suggest that epigenetic silencing of the slc39a8 gene by DNA hypermethylation plays an important role in the down-regulation of ZIP8 in cadmium-resistant metallothionein-null cells.

  18. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  19. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA by down-regulation of deoxyguanosine kinase expression in non-proliferating HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Maribel; Johansson, Magnus . E-mail: magnus.johansson@ki.se; Karlsson, Anna

    2007-07-15

    Purine deoxyribonucleotides required for mitochondrial DNA replication are either imported from the cytosol or derived from phosphorylation of deoxyadenosine or deoxyguanosine catalyzed by mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK). DGUOK deficiency has been linked to mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes suggesting an important role for this enzyme in dNTP supply. We have generated HeLa cell lines with 20-30% decreased levels of DGUOK mRNA by the expression of small interfering RNAs directed towards the DGUOK mRNA. The cells with decreased expression of the enzyme showed similar levels of mtDNA as control cells when grown exponentially in culture. However, mtDNA levels rapidly decreased in the cells when cell cycle arrest was induced by serum starvation. DNA incorporation of 9-{beta}-D-arabino-furanosylguanine (araG) was lower in the cells with decreased deoxyguanosine kinase expression, but the total rate of araG phosphorylation was increased in the cells. The increase in araG phosphorylation was shown to be due to increased expression of deoxycytidine kinase. In summary, our findings show that DGUOK is required for mitochondrial DNA replication in resting cells and that small changes in expression of this enzyme may cause mitochondrial DNA depletion. Our data also suggest that alterations in the expression level of DGUOK may induce compensatory changes in the expression of other nucleoside kinases.

  20. Doxycycline down-regulates DNA-PK and radiosensitizes tumor initiating cells: Implications for more effective radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Rebecca; Fiorillo, Marco; Chadwick, Amy; Ozsvari, Bela; Reeves, Kimberly J.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clarke, Robert B.; Howell, Sacha J.; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-PK is an enzyme that is required for proper DNA-repair and is thought to confer radio-resistance in cancer cells. As a consequence, it is a high-profile validated target for new pharmaceutical development. However, no FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitors have emerged, despite many years of drug discovery and lead optimization. This is largely because existing DNA-PK inhibitors suffer from poor pharmacokinetics. They are not well absorbed and/or are unstable, with a short plasma half-life. Here, we identified the first FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitor by “chemical proteomics”. In an effort to understand how doxycycline targets cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), we serendipitously discovered that doxycycline reduces DNA-PK protein expression by nearly 15-fold (> 90%). In accordance with these observations, we show that doxycycline functionally radio-sensitizes breast CSCs, by up to 4.5-fold. Moreover, we demonstrate that DNA-PK is highly over-expressed in both MCF7- and T47D-derived mammospheres. Interestingly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK in MCF7 cells is sufficient to functionally block mammosphere formation. Thus, it appears that active DNA-repair is required for the clonal expansion of CSCs. Mechanistically, doxycycline treatment dramatically reduced the oxidative mitochondrial capacity and the glycolytic activity of cancer cells, consistent with previous studies linking DNA-PK expression to the proper maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity and copy number. Using a luciferase-based assay, we observed that doxycycline treatment quantitatively reduces the anti-oxidant response (NRF1/2) and effectively blocks signaling along multiple independent pathways normally associated with stem cells, including STAT1/3, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), Notch, WNT and TGF-beta signaling. In conclusion, we propose that the efficacy of doxycycline as a DNA-PK inhibitor should be tested in Phase-II clinical trials, in combination with radio-therapy. Doxycycline has

  1. Doxycycline down-regulates DNA-PK and radiosensitizes tumor initiating cells: Implications for more effective radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Rebecca; Fiorillo, Marco; Chadwick, Amy; Ozsvari, Bela; Reeves, Kimberly J; Smith, Duncan L; Clarke, Robert B; Howell, Sacha J; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-06-10

    DNA-PK is an enzyme that is required for proper DNA-repair and is thought to confer radio-resistance in cancer cells. As a consequence, it is a high-profile validated target for new pharmaceutical development. However, no FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitors have emerged, despite many years of drug discovery and lead optimization. This is largely because existing DNA-PK inhibitors suffer from poor pharmacokinetics. They are not well absorbed and/or are unstable, with a short plasma half-life. Here, we identified the first FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitor by "chemical proteomics". In an effort to understand how doxycycline targets cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), we serendipitously discovered that doxycycline reduces DNA-PK protein expression by nearly 15-fold (> 90%). In accordance with these observations, we show that doxycycline functionally radio-sensitizes breast CSCs, by up to 4.5-fold. Moreover, we demonstrate that DNA-PK is highly over-expressed in both MCF7- and T47D-derived mammospheres. Interestingly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK in MCF7 cells is sufficient to functionally block mammosphere formation. Thus, it appears that active DNA-repair is required for the clonal expansion of CSCs. Mechanistically, doxycycline treatment dramatically reduced the oxidative mitochondrial capacity and the glycolytic activity of cancer cells, consistent with previous studies linking DNA-PK expression to the proper maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity and copy number. Using a luciferase-based assay, we observed that doxycycline treatment quantitatively reduces the anti-oxidant response (NRF1/2) and effectively blocks signaling along multiple independent pathways normally associated with stem cells, including STAT1/3, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), Notch, WNT and TGF-beta signaling. In conclusion, we propose that the efficacy of doxycycline as a DNA-PK inhibitor should be tested in Phase-II clinical trials, in combination with radio-therapy. Doxycycline has excellent

  2. Short-term magnesium deficiency downregulates telomerase, upregulates neutral sphingomyelinase and induces oxidative DNA damage in cardiovascular tissues: relevance to atherogenesis, cardiovascular diseases and aging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilank C; Shah, Gatha J; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2014-01-01

    The present work tested the hypotheses that: 1) short-term dietary deficiency of magnesium (Mg; 21 days) in rats (MgD) would result in a downregulation of telomerase in cardiac and aortic smooth muscle cells, 2) low levels of Mg2+ added to drinking water (DW) would either prevent or greatly reduce the downregulation of telomerase in MgD, 3) MgD in rats would cause an upregulation of neutral-sphingomyelinase (N-SMAse) and p53, 4) short-term MgD would result in oxidation of DNA in diverse cardiac muscle and aortic smooth muscle cells as exemplified by measurement of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), and 5) cross-talk between telomerase, N-SMase, p53, and 8-OH-dG would be evident in left ventricular (LV), right ventricular (RV), atrial and aortic smooth muscle obtained from rats subjected to short-term MgD. The data indicated that short-term MgD (10% normal dietary intake) resulted in downregulation of telomerase in LV, RV, atrial and aortic muscle cells; even very low levels of water-bourne Mg2+ (e.g., 15-40 mg/lday) either prevented or ameliorated the downregulation of telomerase. Our experiments also showed that MgD resulted in a 7-10 fold increased formation of 8-OH-dG in the cardiac and aortic muscle cells. The experiments also confirmed that short-term dietary deficiency of Mg resulted in greatly increased upregulation of N-SMAse and p53 in the cardiac and aortic muscle tissues. These new experiments point to a sizeable cross-talk among telomerase, N-SMAse, and p53 in rat cardiac and peripheral vascular muscle exposed to a short-term MgD. These studies would be compatible with the idea that even short-term MgD could cause alterations of the genome in diverse cell types leading to mutations of cardiac, vascular, and endothelial cells seen in aging and atherogenesis. Since we have shown, previously, that activation of N-SMAse in MgD leads to synthesis and release of ceramide in cardiovascular tissues and cells, we believe this pathway, most likely, helps to

  3. Does the tautomeric status of the adenine bases change upon the dissociation of the A*·A(syn) Topal-Fresco DNA mismatch? A combined QM and QTAIM atomistic insight.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Zhurakivsky, Roman O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-02-28

    We have scrupulously explored the tautomerisation mechanism via the double proton transfer of the A*·A(syn) Topal-Fresco base mispair (C(s) symmetry), formed by the imino and amino tautomers of the adenine DNA base in the anti- and syn-conformations, respectively, bridging quantum-mechanical calculations with Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules. It was found that the A*·A(syn) ↔ A·A*(syn) tautomerisation is the asynchronous concerted process. It was established that the A*·A(syn) DNA mismatch is stabilized by the N6H···N6 (6.35) and N1H···N7 (6.17) hydrogen (H) bonds, whereas the A·A*(syn) base mispair (Cs) by the N6H···N6 (8.82) and N7H···N1 (9.78) H-bonds and the C8H···HC2 HH-bond (0.30 kcal mol(-1)). Using the sweeps of the energies of the intermolecular H-bonds, it was observed that the N6H···N6 and N1H···N7/N7H···N1 H-bonds are anti-cooperative and mutually weaken each other in the A*·A(syn) and A·A*(syn) mispairs. It was revealed that the A·A*(syn) DNA mismatch is a dynamically unstable structure with a short lifetime of 1.12 × 10(-13) s and any of its 6 low-frequency intermolecular vibrations can develop during this period of time. This observation makes it impossible to change the tautomeric status of the A bases upon the dissociation of the A*·A(syn) base mispair into the monomers during DNA replication.

  4. Down-regulation of c-myc gene expression with induction of high molecular weight DNA fragments by fluorodeoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Li, Z R; Yin, M B; Arredondo, M A; Schöber, C; Rustum, Y M

    1994-07-19

    5-Fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FdUrd), a potent inhibitor of thymidylate synthase, induces extensive bulk DNA damage at drug concentrations that produce significant in vitro growth inhibition of human ileocecal carcinoma (HCT-8) cells. Constant- and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE and PFGE), to detect size distribution of DNA double-strand breaks and repair kinetics, in parallel with northern and western blot analyses, to quantitate c-myc gene and protein expression, were utilized to analyze drug effects. At 24-hr post in vitro drug treatment, when maximum bulk DNA damage was detected, FdUrd produced a broad range of high molecular weight DNA fragments, clustering between 0.1 and 5.7 megabases in size, and resulted in a decrease in the level of c-myc transcripts and protein with no significant effect on the level of v-myc and H-ras. These effects preceded the observed cellular growth inhibition. Addition of the reduced folate leucovorin potentiated the effects induced by FdUrd, indicating that thymidylate synthase inhibition is an important initial step in drug effect followed by DNA fragmentation and suppression of c-myc expression. Changes in the integrity of the genetic materials and regulatory genes occurred prior to the observed cell growth inhibition by FdUrd, suggesting that these molecular alterations by FdUrd may be associated with subsequent FdUrd-induced cell growth inhibition.

  5. Café-au-lait macules and pediatric malignancy caused by biallelic mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene PMS2.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carl-Christian; Holter, Spring; Pollett, Aaron; Clendenning, Mark; Chou, Shirley; Senter, Leigha; Ramphal, Raveena; Gallinger, Steven; Boycott, Kym

    2008-06-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with a T4 sigmoid adenocarcinoma, <10 colonic adenomas and multiple café-au-lait macules. Family history was not suggestive of a dominant hereditary form of colorectal cancer. Evaluation of the tumor revealed abnormal immunohistochemical staining of the PMS2 protein and high frequency microsatellite instability. Germline analysis identified biallelic PMS2 missense mutations. A new cancer syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in the mismatch repair genes, including PMS2, is now emerging and is characterized by café-au-lait macules, colonic polyps and a distinctive tumor spectrum.

  6. Potential effect of smoking on semen quality through DNA damage and the downregulation of Chk1 in sperm

    PubMed Central

    CUI, XIANGRONG; JING, XUAN; WU, XUEQING; WANG, ZHENQIANG; LI, QIANG

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that smoking is associated with decreased male fertility via altering the quality of semen. However, the mechanism by which cigarette smoking affects semen quality remains to be fully elucidated. Heavy smoking-induced DNA damage has been reported to correlate with abnormal spermatozoa and male infertility. It has been reported that, in response to DNA damage, activation of the checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) facilitates S and G2 checkpoint arrest. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of Chk1 in sperm cells of smoking and non-smoking men, and to further examine the correlation between DNA fragmentation rates and the expression levels of Chk1 with smoking. The present study was performed on a cohort of 841 smoking men and 287 non-smoking men. In the investigation, sperm concentration, motility, viability, seminal plasma zinc concentration, acrosin activity and sperm DNA fragmentation were examined. The gene and protein expression levels of Chk1 were detected using reverse transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, respectively. It was observed that the progressive motility of the sperm was significantly decreased in the moderate and heavy smoking groups, whereas no significant changes were observed in the mild smoking group. The sperm in the medium-term smoking group had significantly decreased progressive motility, and the semen concentration, sperm count and progressive motility vitality were markedly decreased in the long-term smoking group. Compared with the non-smoking group, the abnormal head rates in the heavy smoking group and long-term smoking group were significantly increased. The sperm viability and seminal plasma zinc concentration were markedly increased in the smoking group. Increased DNA fragmentation rates were found in the smoking group. The expression of Chk1 was significantly decreased in the smoking group, compared with the non-smoking group. Progressive

  7. A polymorphism in the MSH3 mismatch repair gene is associated with the levels of somatic instability of the expanded CTG repeat in the blood DNA of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients.

    PubMed

    Morales, Fernando; Vásquez, Melissa; Santamaría, Carolina; Cuenca, Patricia; Corrales, Eyleen; Monckton, Darren G

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism of the expanded CTG repeat in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is age-dependent, tissue-specific and expansion-biased, contributing toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the symptoms. Previously, using regression modelling of repeat instability we showed that variation in the rate of somatic expansion in blood DNA contributes toward variation in age of onset, directly implicating somatic expansion in the disease pathway. Here, we confirm these results using a larger more genetically homogenous Costa Rican DM1 cohort (p<0.001). Interestingly, we also provide evidence that supports subtle sex-dependent differences in repeat length-dependent age at onset and somatic mutational dynamics. Previously, we demonstrated that variation in the rate of somatic expansion was a heritable quantitative trait. Given the important role that DNA mismatch repair genes play in mediating expansions in mouse models, we tested for modifier gene effects with 13 DNA mismatch gene polymorphisms (one each in MSH2, PMS2, MSH6 and MLH1; and nine in MSH3). After correcting for allele length and age effects, we identified three polymorphisms in MSH3 that were associated with variation in somatic instability: Rs26279 (p=0.003); Rs1677658 (p=0.009); and Rs10168 (p=0.031). However, only the association with Rs26279 remained significant after multiple testing correction. Although we revealed a statistically significant association between Rs26279 and somatic instability, we did not detect an association with the age at onset. Individuals with the A/A genotype for Rs26279 tended to show a greater propensity to expand the CTG repeat than other genotypes. Interestingly, this SNP results in an amino acid change in the critical ATPase domain of MSH3 and is potentially functionally dimorphic. These data suggest that MSH3 is a key player in generating somatic variation in DM1 patients and further highlight MSH3 as a potential therapeutic target.

  8. Apigenin induces DNA damage through the PKCδ-dependent activation of ATM and H2AX causing down-regulation of genes involved in cell cycle control and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Daniel; Parihar, Arti; Villamena, Frederick A.; Wang, Liwen; Freitas, Michael A.; Grotewold, Erich; Doseff, Andrea I.

    2014-01-01

    Apigenin, an abundant plant flavonoid, exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-carcinogenic activities through mechanisms yet not fully defined. In the present study, we show that the treatment of leukemia cells with apigenin resulted in the induction of DNA damage preceding the activation of the apoptotic program. Apigenin-induced DNA damage was mediated by p38 and protein kinase C-delta (PKCδ), yet was independent of reactive oxygen species or caspase activity. Treatment of monocytic leukemia cells with apigenin induced the phosphorylation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and histone H2AX, two key regulators of the DNA damage response, without affecting the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Rad-3-related (ATR) kinase. Silencing and pharmacological inhibition of PKCδ abrogated ATM and H2AX phosphorylation, whereas inhibition of p38 reduced H2AX phosphorylation independently of ATM. We established that apigenin delayed cell cycle progression at G1/S and increased the number of apoptotic cells. In addition, genome-wide mRNA analyses showed that apigenin-induced DNA damage led to down-regulation of genes involved in cell-cycle control and DNA repair. Taken together, the present results show that the PKCδ-dependent activation of ATM and H2AX define the signaling networks responsible for the regulation of DNA damage promoting genome-wide mRNA alterations that result in cell cycle arrest, hence contributing to the anti-carcinogenic activities of this flavonoid. PMID:22985621

  9. Down-regulation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 expression in the airway epithelium ameliorates allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bacsi, Attila; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Szczesny, Bartosz; Radak, Zsolt; Hazra, Tapas K; Sur, Sanjiv; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Allergic airway inflammation is characterized by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, inflammatory cell infiltration, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness, in parallel with oxidative DNA base and strand damage, whose etiological role is not understood. Our goal was to establish the role of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common oxidatively damaged base, and its repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) in allergic airway inflammatory processes. Airway inflammation was induced by intranasally administered ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grain extract (RWPE) in sensitized BALB/c mice. We utilized siRNA technology to deplete Ogg1 from airway epithelium; 8-oxoG and DNA strand break levels were quantified by Comet assays. Inflammatory cell infiltration and epithelial methaplasia were determined histologically, mucus and cytokines levels biochemically and enhanced pause was used as the main index of airway hyperresponsiveness. Decreased Ogg1 expression and thereby 8-oxoG repair in the airway epithelium conveyed a lower inflammatory response after RWPE challenge of sensitized mice, as determined by expression of Th2 cytokines, eosinophilia, epithelial methaplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, 8-oxoG repair in Ogg1-proficient airway epithelium was coupled to an increase in DNA single-strand break (SSB) levels and exacerbation of allergen challenge-dependent inflammation. Decreased expression of the Nei-like glycosylases Neil1 and Neil2 that preferentially excise ring-opened purines and 5-hydroxyuracil, respectively, did not alter the above parameters of allergic immune responses to RWPE. These results show that DNA SSBs formed during Ogg1-mediated repair of 8-oxoG augment antigen-driven allergic immune responses. A transient modulation of OGG1 expression/activity in airway epithelial cells could have clinical benefits.

  10. Homologous and homeologous intermolecular gene conversion are not differentially affected by mutations in the DNA damage or the mismatch repair genes RAD1, RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, PMS1 and MSH2

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.; Westmoreland, J.; Priebe, S.

    1996-06-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes or genes involved in both DNA damage repair and homologous recombination might affect homeologous vs. homologous recombination differentially. Spontaneous mitotic gene conversion between a chromosome and a homologous or homeologous donor sequence (14% diverged) on a single copy plasmid was examined in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and in MMR or DNA damage repair mutants. Homologous recombination in rad51, rad52 and rad54 mutants was considerably reduced, while there was little effect of rad1, rad50, pms1 and msh2 null mutations. DNA divergence resulted in no differential effect on recombination rates in the wild type or the mutants; there was only a five- to 10-fold reduction in homeologous relative to homologous recombination regardless of background. Since DNA divergence is known to affect recombination in some systems, we propose that differences in the role of MMR depends on the mode of recombination and/or the level of divergence. Based on analysis of the recombination breakpoints, there is a minimum of three homologous bases required at a recombination junction. A comparison of Rad{sup +} vs. rad52 strains revealed that while all conversion tracts are continuous, elimination of RAD52 leads to the appearance of a novel class of very short conversion tracts. 67 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Homologous and Homeologous Intermolecular Gene Conversion Are Not Differentially Affected by Mutations in the DNA Damage or the Mismatch Repair Genes Rad1, Rad50, Rad51, Rad52, Rad54, Pms1 and Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Porter, G.; Westmoreland, J.; Priebe, S.; Resnick, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes or genes involved in both DNA damage repair and homologous recombination might affect homeologous vs. homologous recombination differentially. Spontaneous mitotic gene conversion between a chromosome and a homologous or homeologous donor sequence (14% diverged) on a single copy plasmid was examined in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and in MMR or DNA damage repair mutants. Homologous recombination in rad51, rad52 and rad54 mutants was considerably reduced, while there was little effect of rad1, rad50, pms1 and msh2 null mutations. DNA divergence resulted in no differential effect on recombination rates in the wild type or the mutants; there was only a five- to 10-fold reduction in homeologous relative to homologous recombination regardless of background. Since DNA divergence is known to affect recombination in some systems, we propose that differences in the role of MMR depends on the mode of recombination and/or the level of divergence. Based on analysis of the recombination breakpoints, there is a minimum of three homologous bases required at a recombination junction. A comparison of Rad(+) vs. rad52 strains revealed that while all conversion tracts are continuous, elimination of RAD52 leads to the appearance of a novel class of very short conversion tracts. PMID:8725224

  12. Mismatch binding, ADP-ATP exchange and intramolecular signaling during mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Manju M.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the DNA binding and ATPase activities of the mismatch repair (MMR) protein, MutS—our current understanding of how this protein uses ATP to fuel its actions on DNA and initiate repair via interactions with MutL, the next protein in the pathway. Structure-function and kinetic studies have yielded detailed views of the MutS mechanism of action in MMR. How MutS and MutL work together after mismatch recognition to enable strand-specific nicking, which leads to strand excision and synthesis, is less clear and remains an active area of investigation. PMID:26704427

  13. Downregulated ECRG4 is associated with poor prognosis in renal cell cancer and is regulated by promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liya; Wu, Jianting; Xie, Jun; Xia, Lingling; Qian, Xuemin; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Zesong

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer-related gene 4 (ECRG4) has been proposed as a putative tumor suppressor gene in several tumors. However, the role and regulation of ECRG4 in the pathogenesis of human renal cancer remain largely unknown. Our current study revealed that expression of ECRG4 is downregulated in renal cell lines and renal cancer tissues. ECRG4 expression was significantly associated with histological grade of tumors (p < 0.001), primary tumor stage (p = 0.017), and distant metastasis (p = 0.017). Low expression of ECRG4 was an independent prognostic indicator for survival of renal cancer patients. Silencing of ECRG4 expression in renal cell lines was associated with its promoter methylation. Moreover, ectopic expression of ECRG4 markedly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion in renal cancer cell lines. These results indicated that ECRG4 is frequently silenced by the methylation of promoter in renal cell cancers. ECRG4 may be a tumor suppressor in renal cancer and serve as a prognostic marker.

  14. Interleukin-8 induces DNA synthesis, migration and down-regulation of cleaved caspase-3 in cultured human gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Yoshimoto, T; Matsuda, S; Kajiya, M; Kittaka, M; Imai, H; Iwata, T; Uchida, Y; Shiba, H; Kurihara, H

    2015-08-01

    Migration of the junctional epithelium occurs in association with the formation of a periodontal pocket. Although the migration of junctional epithelium is known to be related to the proliferation and migration of gingival junctional epithelial cells, the mechanism has not been clarified. In patients with periodontitis, the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in both gingival tissue and gingival crevicular fluid are dramatically increased. IL-8 has broad bioactive functions. In this study, we examined the role of IL-8 in DNA synthesis, migration and protection against apoptosis in cultured human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC). DNA synthesis was estimated by measuring the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine. The migration of gingival epithelial cells was assessed in a wound-healing assay. The expression of integrin beta-1 was analyzed using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and western blotting. Cleaved caspase-3 was detected using western blotting and a Caspase-Glo assay kit. IL-8 increased the synthesis of DNA in HGEC, and the maximal effect was seen at 25 or 50 ng/mL of IL-8. In addition, 50 ng/mL of IL-8 induced cell migration, and a neutralizing antibody of integrin beta-1 inhibited the migration. IL-8 also activated expression of integrin beta-1. Furthermore, IL-8 reduced the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced increase in caspase-3 expression in HGEC. IL-8 may facilitate the migration of gingival junctional epithelium by enhancing DNA synthesis, migration and preventing apoptosis of gingival epithelial cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Myosin 16 levels fluctuate during the cell cycle and are downregulated in response to DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Richard S; Liu, Changdan; Pihkala, Jeanene P S

    2013-06-01

    Myosins comprise a highly conserved superfamily of eukaryotic actin-dependent motor proteins implicated in a large repertoire of functions in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Class XVI myosin, MYO16, reveals expression in most somatic as well as meiotic cells with prominent localization in the nucleus, excepting the nucleolus; however, the role(s) of Myo16 in the nucleus remain unknown. In this report, we investigated Myo16 abundance during transit through the cell cycle. Immunolocalization, immunoblot, flow cytometric and quantitative RT-PCR studies performed in Rat2 cells indicate that Myo16 mRNA and protein abundance are cell cycle regulated: in the unperturbed cell cycle, each rises to peak levels in late G1 and thereon through S-phase and each decays as cells enter M-phase. Notably, RNA interference-induced Myo16 depletion results in altered cell cycle distribution as well as in large-scale cell death. In response to DNA replication stress (impaired replication fork progression as a consequence of DNA damage, lack of sufficient deoxynucleotides, or inhibition of DNA polymerases), Myo16 protein shows substantial loss. Attenuation of replication stress (aphidicolin or hydroxyurea) is followed by a recovery of Myo16 expression and resumption of S-phase progression. Collectively, these observations suggest that Myo16 may play a regulatory role in cell cycle progression.

  16. Increased DNA double-strand break was associated with downregulation of repair and upregulation of apoptotic factors in rat hippocampus after alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; N'Gouemo, Prosper; Datta, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Binge drinking is known to cause damage in critical areas of the brain, including the hippocampus, which is important for relational memory and is reported to be sensitive to alcohol toxicity. However, the roles of DNA double-strand break (DSB) and its repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in alcohol-induced hippocampal injury remain to be elucidated. The purpose of this first study was to assess alcohol-induced DNA DSB and the mechanism by which alcohol affects DSB repair pathways in rat hippocampus. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (8-10 weeks old) were put on a 4-day binge ethanol treatment regimen. Control animals were maintained under similar conditions but were given the vehicle without ethanol. All animals were humanely euthanized 24 h after the last dose of ethanol administration and the hippocampi were dissected for immunoblot and immunohistochemistry analysis. Ethanol exposure caused increased 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) staining as well as elevated γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in hippocampal cells. Immunoblot analysis showed decreased Mre11, Rad51, Rad50, and Ku86 as well as increased Bax and p21 in samples from ethanol-treated rats. Additionally, we also observed increased activated caspase3 staining in hippocampal cells 24 h after ethanol withdrawal. Taken together, our data demonstrated that ethanol concurrently induced DNA DSB, downregulated DSB repair pathway proteins, and increased apoptotic factors in hippocampal cells. We believe these findings will provide the impetus for further research on DNA DSB and its repair pathways in relation to alcohol toxicity in brain.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition downregulates Helicobacter pylori-induced epithelial inflammatory responses, DNA damage and gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Johanna C; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Delgado, Alberto G; Wroblewski, Lydia E; Barry, Daniel P; Peek, Richard M; Gobert, Alain P; Wilson, Keith T

    2017-05-04

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor. We have reported increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in the H. pylori-induced human carcinogenesis cascade, and association with DNA damage. Our goal was to determine the role of EGFR activation in gastric carcinogenesis. We evaluated gefitinib, a specific EGFR inhibitor, in chemoprevention of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and cancer development. Mice with genetically targeted epithelial cell-specific deletion of Egfr (Efgr(Δepi) mice) were also used. In C57BL/6 mice, gefitinib decreased Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 expression by gastric epithelial cells, myeloperoxidase-positive inflammatory cells in the mucosa and epithelial DNA damage induced by H. pylori infection. Similar reductions in chemokines, inflammatory cells and DNA damage occurred in infected Egfr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) control mice. In H. pylori-infected transgenic insulin-gastrin (INS-GAS) mice and gerbils, gefitinib treatment markedly reduced dysplasia and carcinoma. Gefitinib blocked H. pylori-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 (MAPK1/3) and activator protein 1 in gastric epithelial cells, resulting in inhibition of chemokine synthesis. MAPK1/3 phosphorylation and JUN activation was reduced in gastric tissues from infected wild-type and INS-GAS mice treated with gefitinib and in primary epithelial cells from Efgr(Δepi) versus Egfr(fl/fl) mice. Epithelial EGFR activation persisted in humans and mice after H. pylori eradication, and gefitinib reduced gastric carcinoma in INS-GAS mice treated with antibiotics. These findings suggest that epithelial EGFR inhibition represents a potential strategy to prevent development of gastric carcinoma in H. pylori-infected individuals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Vitamin C down-regulate apo(a) expression via Tet2-dependent DNA demethylation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Kai; Ma, Xiao-Feng; Li, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Hai; Liu, Ya-Mi; Zhang, Kai; Zeng, Jun-Fa; Lei, Jian-Jun; Wei, Dang-Heng; Wang, Zuo

    2017-05-01

    Lipoprotein(a)[Lp(a)] is a risk factor for coronary heart diseases. However, the metabolism of this protein remains poorly understood. Efficient and specific drugs that can decrease high plasma levels of Lp(a) have not been developed yet. Vitamin C is responsible for maintaining the catalytic activity of a group of iron and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent dioxygenases and induces the generation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) via Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases. In addition, It has been reported vitamin C deficiency induces atherosclerosis and increases Lp(a) and apo(a) plasma levels in Lp(a)+ mice. However, the mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of vitamin C on apo(a) expression and the possible molecular mechanism of vitamin C that influences apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] biosynthesis in HepG2 cells. Results showed that vitamin C significantly inhibited the expression and secretion levels of apo(a). Vitamin C can also increase ELK1 expression and hydroxymethylation of ELK1 promoter and the globle DNA in HepG2 cells. In addition, the effects of vitamin C inhibiting the apo(a) expression were attenuated by ELK1siRNA and Tet2siRNA. These results suggested vitamin C down-regulate apo(a) expression via Tet2-dependent DNA demethylation in HepG2 cells.

  19. Metabolic Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Yenari, Midori; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Lyden, Patrick; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose The search for effective neuroprotectants remains frustrating, particularly with regard to specific pharmaceuticals. However, laboratory studies have consistently shown remarkable neuroprotection with 2 nonpharmacological strategies—therapeutic hypothermia and ischemic preconditioning. Recent studies have shown that the mechanism of protection underlying both of these treatments is correlated to downregulation of cellular and tissue metabolism. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying such robust protective effects could lead to appropriate translation at the clinical level. In fact, hypothermia is already being used at many centers to improve neurological outcome from cardiac arrest. Methods A systematic review of both topics is presented in terms of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and application at the clinical level. Results Although the mechanisms of protection for both therapeutic strategies are multifold, both share features of downregulating metabolism. Both therapeutic strategies are robust neuroprotectants, but translating them to the clinical arena is challenging, though not impossible, and clinical studies have shown or suggest benefits of both treatments. Conclusions The strategy of metabolic downregulation should be further explored to identify effective neuroprotectants that can be easily applied clinically. PMID:18658035

  20. A Jobs Mismatch. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marina, Brenda L. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the article "A Jobs Mismatch", Jaschik has compiled the findings of a new report that was released by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The Georgetown University report claims that there is a severe shortage of college graduates in America, and that this shortage has the United States on a…

  1. Resveratrol Induced Premature Senescence Is Associated with DNA Damage Mediated SIRT1 and SIRT2 Down-Regulation.

    PubMed

    Kilic Eren, Mehtap; Kilincli, Ayten; Eren, Özkan

    2015-01-01

    The natural polyphenolic compound resveratrol (3,4,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) has broad spectrum health beneficial activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, anti-cancer, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective effects. Remarkably, resveratrol also induces apoptosis and cellular senescence in primary and cancer cells. Resveratrol's anti-aging effects both in vitro and in vivo attributed to activation of a (NAD)-dependent histone deacetylase family member sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) protein. In mammals seven members (SIRT1-7) of sirtuin family have been identified. Among those, SIRT1 is the most extensively studied with perceptive effects on mammalian physiology and suppression of the diseases of aging. Yet no data has specified the role of sirtuins, under conditions where resveratrol treatment induces senescence. Current study was undertaken to investigate the effects of resveratrol in human primary dermal fibroblasts (BJ) and to clarify the role of sirtuin family members in particular SIRT1 and SIRT2 that are known to be involved in cellular stress responses and cell cycle, respectively. Here, we show that resveratrol decreases proliferation of BJ cells in a time and dose dependent manner. In addition the increase in senescence associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity and methylated H3K9-me indicate the induction of premature senescence. A significant increase in phosphorylation of γ-H2AX, a surrogate of DNA double strand breaks, as well as in levels of p53, p21CIP1 and p16INK4A is also detected. Interestingly, at concentrations where resveratrol induced premature senescence we show a significant decrease in SIRT1 and SIRT2 levels by Western Blot and quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Conversely inhibition of SIRT1 and SIRT2 via siRNA or sirtinol treatment also induced senescence in BJ fibroblasts associated with increased SA-β-gal activity, γ-H2AX phosphorylation and p53, p21CIP1 and p16INK4A levels. Interestingly DNA damaging agent doxorubicin

  2. Down-regulation of invasion and angiogenesis-related genes identified by cDNA microarray analysis of PC3 prostate cancer cells treated with genistein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2002-12-05

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in men in the United States and for many years the treatment results for metastatic prostate cancer have been disappointing. Our previous studies have shown that genistein elicits pleiotropic effects on prostate cancer cells; however, its role in invasion and metastasis has not been fully elucidated. In order to better understand the precise molecular mechanism(s) by which genistein exerts its effects on PC3 cells, we have utilized cDNA microarray to interrogate 12558 known genes to determine the gene expression profile altered by genistein treatment. We found a total of 832 genes which showed >2-fold change after genistein treatment. Among these genes, we found down-regulation of 11 genes (MMP-9, protease M, uPAR, VEGF, neuropilin, TSP, BPGF, LPA, TGF-beta2, TSP-1, PAR-2) and up-regulation of two genes (connective tissue growth factor, connective tissue activation peptide), which are related to angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and zymographic analysis were conducted to confirm the data of microarray at the level of mRNA, protein, and biological function. The results were in direct agreement with the microarray data. From these results, we conclude that genistein down-regulates the transcription and translation of genes critically involved in the control of angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion and metastasis, suggesting the possible therapeutic role of genistein for metastatic prostate cancer. Thus, genistein-induced alternations of gene expressions may be exploited for devising chemopreventive or therapeutic strategies, particularly for chemosensitization of metastatic prostate cancer to existing chemotherapeutic agents.

  3. The nature of the transition mismatches with Watson-Crick architecture: the G*·T or G·T* DNA base mispair or both? A QM/QTAIM perspective for the biological problem.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    This study provides the first accurate investigation of the tautomerization of the biologically important guanine*·thymine (G*·T) DNA base mispair with Watson-Crick geometry, involving the enol mutagenic tautomer of the G and the keto tautomer of the T, into the G·T* mispair (∆G = .99 kcal mol(-1), population = 15.8% obtained at the MP2 level of quantum-mechanical theory in the continuum with ε = 4), formed by the keto tautomer of the G and the enol mutagenic tautomer of the T base, using DFT and MP2 methods in vacuum and in the weakly polar medium (ε = 4), characteristic for the hydrophobic interfaces of specific protein-nucleic acid interactions. We were first able to show that the G*·T↔G·T* tautomerization occurs through the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer along two antiparallel O6H···O4 and N1···HN3 H-bonds and is assisted by the third N2H···O2 H-bond, that exists along the entire reaction pathway. The obtained results indicate that the G·T* base mispair is stable from the thermodynamic point of view complex, while it is dynamically unstable structure in vacuum and dynamically stable structure in the continuum with ε = 4 with lifetime of 6.4·10(-12) s, that, on the one side, makes it possible to develop all six low-frequency intermolecular vibrations, but, on the other side, it is by three orders less than the time (several ns) required for the replication machinery to forcibly dissociate a base pair into the monomers during DNA replication. One of the more significant findings to emerge from this study is that the short-lived G·T* base mispair, which electronic interaction energy between the bases (-23.76 kcal mol(-1)) exceeds the analogical value for the G·C Watson-Crick nucleobase pair (-20.38 kcal mol(-1)), "escapes from the hands" of the DNA replication machinery by fast transforming into the G*·T mismatch playing an indirect role of its supplier during the DNA replication. So

  4. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5′-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  5. Aberrant repair initiated by mismatch-specific thymine-DNA glycosylases provides a mechanism for the mutational bias observed in CpG islands

    PubMed Central

    Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Couve, Sophie; Gros, Laurent; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Matkarimov, Bakhyt; Saparbaev, Murat K.

    2014-01-01

    The human thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) initiates the base excision repair (BER) pathway to remove spontaneous and induced DNA base damage. It was first biochemically characterized for its ability to remove T mispaired with G in CpG context. TDG is involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expressions by protecting CpG-rich promoters from de novo DNA methylation. Here we demonstrate that TDG initiates aberrant repair by excising T when it is paired with a damaged adenine residue in DNA duplex. TDG targets the non-damaged DNA strand and efficiently excises T opposite of hypoxanthine (Hx), 1,N6-ethenoadenine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoadenine and abasic site in TpG/CpX context, where X is a modified residue. In vitro reconstitution of BER with duplex DNA containing Hx•T pair and TDG results in incorporation of cytosine across Hx. Furthermore, analysis of the mutation spectra inferred from single nucleotide polymorphisms in human population revealed a highly biased mutation pattern within CpG islands (CGIs), with enhanced mutation rate at CpA and TpG sites. These findings demonstrate that under experimental conditions used TDG catalyzes sequence context-dependent aberrant removal of thymine, which results in TpG, CpA→CpG mutations, thus providing a plausible mechanism for the putative evolutionary origin of the CGIs in mammalian genomes. PMID:24692658

  6. Targeted DNA methylation by a DNA methyltransferase coupled to a triple helix forming oligonucleotide to down-regulate the epithelial cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    van der Gun, Bernardina T F; Maluszynska-Hoffman, Maria; Kiss, Antal; Arendzen, Alice J; Ruiters, Marcel H J; McLaughlin, Pamela M J; Weinhold, Elmar; Rots, Marianne G

    2010-07-21

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a membrane glycoprotein that has been identified as a marker of cancer-initiating cells. EpCAM is highly expressed on most carcinomas, and transient silencing of EpCAM expression leads to reduced oncogenic potential. To silence the EpCAM gene in a persistent manner via targeted DNA methylation, a low activity mutant (C141S) of the CpG-specific DNA methyltransferase M.SssI was coupled to a triple-helix-forming oligonucleotide (TFO-C141S) specifically designed for the EpCAM gene. Reporter plasmids encoding the green fluorescent protein under control of different EpCAM promoter fragments were treated with the TFO-C141S conjugate to determine the specificity of targeted DNA methylation in the context of a functional EpCAM promoter. Treatment of the plasmids with TFO-C141S resulted in efficient and specific methylation of the targeted CpG located directly downstream of the triple helix forming site (TFS). No background DNA methylation was observed neither in a 700 bp region of the EpCAM promoter nor in a 400 bp region of the reporter gene downstream of the TFS. Methylation of the target CpG did not have a detectable effect on promoter activity. This study shows that the combination of a specific TFO and a reduced activity methyltransferase variant can be used to target DNA methylation to predetermined sites with high specificity, allowing determination of crucial CpGs for promoter activity.

  7. Replication infidelity via a mismatch with Watson-Crick geometry.

    PubMed

    Bebenek, Katarzyna; Pedersen, Lars C; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    In describing the DNA double helix, Watson and Crick suggested that "spontaneous mutation may be due to a base occasionally occurring in one of its less likely tautomeric forms." Indeed, among many mispairing possibilities, either tautomerization or ionization of bases might allow a DNA polymerase to insert a mismatch with correct Watson-Crick geometry. However, despite substantial progress in understanding the structural basis of error prevention during polymerization, no DNA polymerase has yet been shown to form a natural base-base mismatch with Watson-Crick-like geometry. Here we provide such evidence, in the form of a crystal structure of a human DNA polymerase λ variant poised to misinsert dGTP opposite a template T. All atoms needed for catalysis are present at the active site and in positions that overlay with those for a correct base pair. The mismatch has Watson-Crick geometry consistent with a tautomeric or ionized base pair, with the pH dependence of misinsertion consistent with the latter. The results support the original idea that a base substitution can originate from a mismatch having Watson-Crick geometry, and they suggest a common catalytic mechanism for inserting a correct and an incorrect nucleotide. A second structure indicates that after misinsertion, the now primer-terminal G • T mismatch is also poised for catalysis but in the wobble conformation seen in other studies, indicating the dynamic nature of the pathway required to create a mismatch in fully duplex DNA.

  8. Taxonomic challenges in freshwater fishes: a mismatch between morphology and DNA barcoding in fish of the north-eastern part of the Congo basin.

    PubMed

    Decru, Eva; Moelants, Tuur; De Gelas, Koen; Vreven, Emmanuel; Verheyen, Erik; Snoeks, Jos

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the utility of DNA barcoding to traditional morphology-based species identifications for the fish fauna of the north-eastern Congo basin. We compared DNA sequences (COI) of 821 samples from 206 morphologically identified species. Best match, best close match and all species barcoding analyses resulted in a rather low identification success of 87.5%, 84.5% and 64.1%, respectively. The ratio 'nearest-neighbour distance/maximum intraspecific divergence' was lower than 1 for 26.1% of the samples, indicating possible taxonomic problems. In ten genera, belonging to six families, the number of species inferred from mtDNA data exceeded the number of species identified using morphological features; and in four cases indications of possible synonymy were detected. Finally, the DNA barcodes confirmed previously known identification problems within certain genera of the Clariidae, Cyprinidae and Mormyridae. Our results underscore the large number of taxonomic problems lingering in the taxonomy of the fish fauna of the Congo basin and illustrate why DNA barcodes will contribute to future efforts to compile a reliable taxonomic inventory of the Congo basin fish fauna. Therefore, the obtained barcodes were deposited in the reference barcode library of the Barcode of Life Initiative.

  9. The E1B19K-deleted oncolytic adenovirus mutant AdΔ19K sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to drug-induced DNA-damage by down-regulating Claspin and Mre11

    PubMed Central

    Pantelidou, Constantia; Cherubini, Gioia; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated sensitization of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs depends on simultaneous interactions of early viral genes with cell death and survival pathways. It is unclear what cellular factors mediate these interactions in the presence of DNA-damaging drugs. We found that adenovirus prevents Chk1-mediated checkpoint activation through inactivation of Mre11 and downregulation of the pChk1 adaptor-protein, Claspin, in cells with high levels of DNA-damage induced by the cytotoxic drugs gemcitabine and irinotecan. The mechanisms for Claspin downregulation involve decreased transcription and increased degradation, further attenuating pChk1-mediated signalling. Live cell imaging demonstrated that low doses of gemcitabine caused multiple mitotic aberrations including multipolar spindles, micro- and multi-nucleation and cytokinesis failure. A mutant virus with the anti-apoptotic E1B19K-gene deleted (AdΔ19K) further enhanced cell killing, Claspin downregulation, and potentiated drug-induced DNA damage and mitotic aberrations. Decreased Claspin expression and inactivation of Mre11 contributed to the enhanced cell killing in combination with DNA-damaging drugs. These results reveal novel mechanisms that are utilised by adenovirus to ensure completion of its life cycle in the presence of cellular DNA damage. Taken together, our findings reveal novel cellular targets that may be exploited when developing improved anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:26872382

  10. Hypermutation in Burkholderia cepacia complex is mediated by DNA mismatch repair inactivation and is highly prevalent in cystic fibrosis chronic respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Martina, Pablo; Feliziani, Sofía; Juan, Carlos; Bettiol, Marisa; Gatti, Blanca; Yantorno, Osvaldo; Smania, Andrea M; Oliver, Antonio; Bosch, Alejandra

    2014-11-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) represents an important group of pathogens involved in long-term lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A positive selection of hypermutators, linked to antimicrobial resistance development, has been previously reported for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in this chronic infection setting. Hypermutability, however, has not yet been systematically evaluated in Bcc species. A total of 125 well characterized Bcc isolates recovered from 48 CF patients, 10 non-CF patients and 15 environmental samples were analyzed. In order to determine the prevalence of mutators their spontaneous mutation rates to rifampicin resistance were determined. In addition, the genetic basis of the mutator phenotypes was investigated by sequencing the mutS and mutL genes, the main components of the mismatch repair system (MRS). The overall prevalence of hypermutators in the collection analyzed was 13.6%, with highest occurrence (40.7%) among the chronically infected CF patients, belonging mainly to B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, B. cepacia, and B. contaminans -the most frequently recovered Bcc species from CF patients worldwide. Thirteen (76.5%) of the hypermutators were defective in mutS and/or mutL. Finally, searching for a possible association between antimicrobial resistance and hypermutability, the resistance-profiles to 17 antimicrobial agents was evaluated. High antimicrobial resistance rates were documented for all the Bcc species recovered from CF patients, but, except for ciprofloxacin, a significant association with hypermutation was not detected. In conclusion, in the present study we demonstrate for the first time that, MRS-deficient Bcc species mutators are highly prevalent and positively selected in CF chronic lung infections. Hypermutation therefore, might be playing a key role in increasing bacterial adaptability to the CF-airway environment, facilitating the persistence of chronic lung infections.

  11. Wobble↔Watson-Crick tautomeric transitions in the homo-purine DNA mismatches: a key to the intimate mechanisms of the spontaneous transversions.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic capability of the homo-purine DNA base mispairs to perform wobble↔Watson-Crick/Topal-Fresco tautomeric transitions via the sequential intrapair double proton transfer was discovered for the first time using QM (MP2/DFT) and QTAIM methodologies that are crucial for understanding the microstructural mechanisms of the spontaneous transversions.

  12. The Escherichia coli mismatch repair protein MutL recruits the Vsr and MutH endonucleases in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Polosina, Yaroslava Y; Mui, Justin; Pitsikas, Photini; Cupples, Claire G

    2009-06-01

    The activities of the Vsr and MutH endonucleases of Escherichia coli are stimulated by MutL. The interaction of MutL with each enzyme is enhanced in vivo by 2-aminopurine treatment and by inactivation of the mutY gene. We hypothesize that MutL recruits the endonucleases to sites of DNA damage.

  13. The Escherichia coli Mismatch Repair Protein MutL Recruits the Vsr and MutH Endonucleases in Response to DNA Damage▿

    PubMed Central

    Polosina, Yaroslava Y.; Mui, Justin; Pitsikas, Photini; Cupples, Claire G.

    2009-01-01

    The activities of the Vsr and MutH endonucleases of Escherichia coli are stimulated by MutL. The interaction of MutL with each enzyme is enhanced in vivo by 2-aminopurine treatment and by inactivation of the mutY gene. We hypothesize that MutL recruits the endonucleases to sites of DNA damage. PMID:19376855

  14. DNA Damage Is a Prerequisite for p53-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation of HIF-1α in Hypoxic Cells and Downregulation of the Hypoxia Marker Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzová, Milota; Kaluz, Stefan; Lerman, Michael I.; Stanbridge, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the tumor suppressor p53 and the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent expression of the hypoxia marker, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). MCF-7 (wt p53) and Saos-2 (p53-null) cells displayed similar induction of CAIX expression and CA9 promoter activity under hypoxic conditions. Activation of p53 by the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C (MC) was accompanied by a potent repression of CAIX expression and the CA9 promoter in MCF-7 but not in Saos-2 cells. The activated p53 mediated increased proteasomal degradation of HIF-1α protein, resulting in considerably lower steady-state levels of HIF-1α protein in hypoxic MCF-7 cells but not in Saos-2 cells. Overexpression of HIF-1α relieved the MC-induced repression in MCF-7 cells, confirming regulation at the HIF-1α level. Similarly, CA9 promoter activity was downregulated by MC in HCT 116 p53+/+ but not the isogenic p53−/− cells. Activated p53 decreased HIF-1α protein levels by accelerated proteasome-dependent degradation without affecting significantly HIF-1α transcription. In summary, our results demonstrate that the presence of wtp53 under hypoxic conditions has an insignificant effect on the stabilization of HIF-1α protein and HIF-1-dependent expression of CAIX. However, upon activation by DNA damage, wt p53 mediates an accelerated degradation of HIF-1α protein, resulting in reduced activation of CA9 transcription and, correspondingly, decreased levels of CAIX protein. A model outlining the quantitative relationship between p53, HIF-1α, and CAIX is presented. PMID:15199132

  15. Antithymocyte globulin combined with cyclosporine A down-regulates T helper 1 cells by modulating T cell immune response cDNA 7 in aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Qiao, Jianlin; Zhong, Xiao-min; Wu, Qing-yun; Chen, Wei; Yao, Yao; Niu, Ming-shan; Fu, Chun-ling; Zeng, Ling-yu; Li, Zhen-yu; Xu, Kai-lin

    2015-07-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) combined with cyclosporine A (CsA) has been widely used as a standard regimen in the treatment of aplastic anemia (AA), especially in severe aplastic anemia (SAA). Abnormally activated T cells might be the immune pathogenesis of AA. T cell immune response cDNA 7 (TIRC7) has been demonstrated its essential role in T cell activation; however, little is known about the role of TIRC7 in AA. In this study, we documented that TIRC7 levels in CsA group were higher than that in ATG + CsA (AC) group only in the follow-up phase (P < 0.05; P < 0.05); nevertheless, TIRC7 levels in SAA group were elevated than non severe aplastic anemia group not only in the treatment phase (P < 0.05; P < 0.05) but also in the follow-up phase (P < 0.05; P < 0.01). The trend of changes of T helper (Th) 1, Th17 and Th22 levels before and after treatment was similar to the changes of TIRC7 levels in either AC group or CsA group. Thus, TIRC7 might be involved in the pathogenesis of AA and AC might down-regulate Th1 cells by modulating the expression of TIRC7 in AA.

  16. Human MutL-complexes monitor homologous recombination independently of mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Siehler, Simone Yasmin; Schrauder, Michael; Gerischer, Ulrike; Cantor, Sharon; Marra, Giancarlo; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2009-02-01

    The role of mismatch repair proteins has been well studied in the context of DNA repair following DNA polymerase errors. Particularly in yeast, MSH2 and MSH6 have also been implicated in the regulation of genetic recombination, whereas MutL homologs appeared to be less important. So far, little is known about the role of the human MutL homolog hMLH1 in recombination, but recently described molecular interactions suggest an involvement. To identify activities of hMLH1 in this process, we applied an EGFP-based assay for the analysis of different mechanisms of DNA repair, initiated by a targeted double-stranded DNA break. We analysed 12 human cellular systems, differing in the hMLH1 and concomitantly in the hPMS1 and hPMS2 status via inducible protein expression, genetic reconstitution, or RNA interference. We demonstrate that hMLH1 and its complex partners hPMS1 and hPMS2 downregulate conservative homologous recombination (HR), particularly when involving DNA sequences with only short stretches of uninterrupted homology. Unexpectedly, hMSH2 is dispensable for this effect. Moreover, the damage-signaling kinase ATM and its substrates BLM and BACH1 are not strictly required, but the combined effect of ATM/ATR-signaling components may mediate the anti-recombinogenic effect. Our data indicate a protective role of hMutL-complexes in a process which may lead to detrimental genome rearrangements, in a manner which does not depend on mismatch repair.

  17. Mismatch repair proteins: key regulators of genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Surtees, J A; Argueso, J L; Alani, E

    2004-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) systems are central to maintaining genome stability in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. MMR proteins play a fundamental role in avoiding mutations, primarily by removing misincorporation errors that occur during DNA replication. MMR proteins also act during genetic recombination in steps that include repairing mismatches in heteroduplex DNA, modulating meiotic crossover control, removing 3' non-homologous tails during double-strand break repair, and preventing recombination between divergent sequences. In this review we will, first, discuss roles for MMR proteins in repairing mismatches that occur during recombination, particularly during meiosis. We will also explore how studying this process has helped to refine models of double-strand break repair, and particularly to our understanding of gene conversion gradients. Second, we will examine the role of MMR proteins in repressing homeologous recombination, i.e. recombination between divergent sequences. We will also compare the requirements for MMR proteins in preventing homeologous recombination to the requirements for these proteins in mismatch repair.

  18. HBD-2 is downregulated in oral carcinoma cells by DNA hypermethylation, and increased expression of hBD-2 by DNA demethylation and gene transfection inhibits cell proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yoshitaka; Kurashige, Yoshihito; Uehara, Osamu; Sato, Jun; Nishimura, Michiko; Yoshida, Koki; Arakawa, Toshiya; Nagayasu, Hiroki; Saitoh, Masato; Abiko, Yoshihiro

    2014-08-01

    Human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is a type of epithelial antimicrobial peptide. The expression level of hBD-2 mRNA is lower in oral carcinoma cells (OCCs) than in healthy oral epithelium. Yet, it is still unknown how hBD-2 expression is downregulated in OCCs. The present study investigated DNA hypermethylation of hBD-2 in OCCs and the effect of the demethylation and increased expression of hBD-2 on cell proliferation and invasion. Six different types of oral carcinoma cell lines (OSC-19, BSC-OF, SAS, HSC-2, HSC-4 and HSY) and normal oral keratinocytes (NOKs) were used. The expression levels of hBD-2 in all OCCs were significantly lower than that in the NOKs. Treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-dC, at the concentration of 50 µM significantly induced upregulation of expression of hBD-2 in the OCCs. Using methylation-specific PCR, DNA hypermethylation was observed in all OCCs. These results suggest that DNA hypermethylation is, at least in part, involved in the decreased expression of hBD-2 in OCCs. We examined the effect of 5-aza-dC on the cell proliferation and invasive ability of OCCs. The cell invasion assays showed that the number of OCCs treated with 5-aza-dC on the filters was significantly lower than that of the controls. We examined whether increased expression of hBD-2 generated by gene transfection inhibited the proliferation and invasion of SAS cells. The number of SAS cells exhibiting increased expression of hBD-2 on the filters in the invasion assay were significantly lower on day 7 when compared with the control. hBD-2 may function as a tumor suppressor. Increased expression of hBD-2 induced by demethylation or increased expression generated by gene transfection may be useful therapeutic methods for oral carcinoma.

  19. TRAIL sensitize MDR cells to MDR-related drugs by down-regulation of P-glycoprotein through inhibition of DNA-PKcs/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and activation of caspases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of new modulator possessing high efficacy, low toxicity and high selectivity is a pivotal approach to overcome P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer treatment. In this study, we suggest a new molecular mechanism that TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) down-regulates P-glycoprotein (P-gp) through inhibition of DNA-PKcs/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and activation of caspases and thereby sensitize MDR cells to MDR-related drugs. Results MDR variants, CEM/VLB10-2, CEM/VLB55-8 and CEM/VLB100 cells, with gradually increased levels of P-gp derived from human lymphoblastic leukemia CEM cells, were gradually more susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity than parental CEM cells. The P-gp level of MDR variants was positively correlated with the levels of DNA-PKcs, pAkt, pGSK-3β and c-Myc as well as DR5 and negatively correlated with the level of c-FLIPs. Hypersensitivity of CEM/VLB100 cells to TRAIL was accompanied by the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as well as the activation of initiator caspases. In addition, TRAIL-induced down-regulation of DNA-PKcs/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and c-FLIP and up-regulation of cell surface expression of death receptors were associated with the increased susceptibility to TRAIL of MDR cells. Moreover, TRAIL inhibited P-gp efflux function via caspase-3-dependent degradation of P-gp as well as DNA-PKcs and subsequently sensitized MDR cells to MDR-related drugs such as vinblastine and doxorubicin. We also found that suppression of DNA-PKcs by siRNA enhanced the susceptibility of MDR cells to vincristine as well as TRAIL via down-regulation of c-FLIP and P-gp expression and up-regulation of DR5. Conclusion This study showed for the first time that the MDR variant of CEM cells was hypersensitive to TRAIL due to up-regulation of DR5 and concomitant down-regulation of c-FLIP, and degradation of P-gp and DNA-PKcs by activation of caspase-3 might be

  20. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  1. hMYH and hMTH1 cooperate for survival in mismatch repair defective T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eshtad, S; Mavajian, Z; Rudd, S G; Visnes, T; Boström, J; Altun, M; Helleday, T

    2016-01-01

    hMTH1 is an 8-oxodGTPase that prevents mis-incorporation of free oxidized nucleotides into genomic DNA. Base excision and mismatch repair pathways also restrict the accumulation of oxidized lesions in DNA by removing the mis-inserted 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosines (8-oxodGs). In this study, we aimed to investigate the interplay between hMYH DNA glycosylase and hMTH1 for cancer cell survival by using mismatch repair defective T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. To this end, MYH and MTH1 were silenced individually or simultaneously using small hairpin RNAs. Increased sub-G1 population and apoptotic cells were observed upon concurrent depletion of both enzymes. Elevated cell death was consistent with cleaved caspase 3 accumulation in double knockdown cells. Importantly, overexpression of the nuclear isoform of hMYH could remove the G1 arrest and partially rescue the toxicity observed in hMTH1-depleted cells. In addition, expression profiles of human DNA glycosylases were generated using quantitative reverse transcriptase–PCR in MTH1 and/or MYH knockdown cells. NEIL1 DNA glycosylase, involved in repair of oxidized nucleosides, was found to be significantly downregulated as a cellular response to MTH1–MYH co-suppression. Overall, the results suggest that hMYH and hMTH1 functionally cooperate for effective repair and survival in mismatch repair defective T-ALL Jurkat A3 cells. PMID:27918552

  2. The physicochemical essence of the purine·pyrimidine transition mismatches with Watson-Crick geometry in DNA: A·C* versa A*·C. A QM and QTAIM atomistic understanding.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    It was established for the first time by DFT and MP2 quantum-mechanical (QM) methods either in vacuum, so in the continuum with a low dielectric constant (ε = 4), typical for hydrophobic interfaces of specific protein-nucleic acid interactions, that the repertoire for the tautomerisation of the biologically important adenine · cytosine* (A · C*) mismatched DNA base pair, formed by the amino tautomer of the A and the imino mutagenic tautomer of the C, into the A*·C base mispair (∆G = 2.72 kcal mol(-1) obtained at the MP2 level of QM theory in the continuum with ε = 4), formed by the imino mutagenic tautomer of the A and the amino tautomer of the C, proceeds via the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer along two antiparallel H-bonds through the transition state (TSA · C* ↔ A* · C). The limiting stage of the A · C* → A* · C tautomerisation is the final proton transfer along the intermolecular N6H · · · N4 H-bond. It was found that the A · C*/A* · C DNA base mispairs with Watson-Crick geometry are associated by the N6H · · · N4/N4H · · · N6, N3H · · · N1/N1H · · · N3 and C2H · · · O2 H-bonds, respectively, while the TSA · C*↔ A* · C is joined by the N6-H-N4 covalent bridge and the N1H · · · N3 and C2H · · · O2 H-bonds. It was revealed that the A · C* ↔ A* · C tautomerisation is assisted by the true C2H · · · O2 H-bond, that in contrast to the two others conventional H-bonds exists along the entire intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) range herewith becoming stronger at the transition from vacuum to the continuum with ε = 4. To better understand the behavior of the intermolecular H-bonds and base mispairs along the IRC of the A · C* ↔ A* · C tautomerisation, the profiles of their electron-topological, energetical, geometrical, polar and charge characteristics are reported in this study. It was established based on the profiles of the H-bond energies that all three H-bonds are cooperative, mutually

  3. Rad51-mediated double-strand break repair and mismatch correction of divergent substrates

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ranjith; Beach, Annette; Li, Kevin; Haber, James

    2017-01-01

    The RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases execute the critical step in homologous recombination (HR): the search for homologous DNA to serve as the template during DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair1–7. Although budding yeast Rad51 has been extensively characterized in vitro3,4,6–9, the stringency of its search and sensitivity to mismatched sequences in vivo remain poorly defined. We analyzed Rad51-dependent break-induced replication (BIR) where the invading DSB end and its donor template share 108 bp homology and the donor carries different densities of single-bp mismatches (Fig. 1a). With every 8th bp mismatched, repair was ~14% compared to completely homologous sequences. With every 6th bp mismatched, repair was >5%. Thus completing BIR in vivo overcomes the apparent requirement for at least 6–8 consecutive paired bases inferred from in vitro studies6,8. When recombination occurs without a protruding nonhomologous 3′ tail, mismatch repair protein Msh2 does not discourage homeologous recombination. However, when the DSB end contains a 3′ protruding nonhomologous tail, Msh2 promotes rejection of mismatched substrates. Mismatch correction of strand invasion heteroduplex DNA is strongly polar, favoring correction close to the DSB end. Nearly all mismatch correction depends on the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase δ, although Msh2-Mlh1 and Exo1 influence the extent of correction. PMID:28405019

  4. Rad51-mediated double-strand break repair and mismatch correction of divergent substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ranjith; Beach, Annette; Li, Kevin; Haber, James

    2017-04-20

    The Rad51 (also known as RecA) family of recombinases executes the critical step in homologous recombination: the search for homologous DNA to serve as a template during the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although budding yeast Rad51 has been extensively characterized in vitro, the stringency of its search and sensitivity to mismatched sequences in vivo remain poorly defined. Here, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we analysed Rad51-dependent break-induced replication in which the invading DSB end and its donor template share a 108-base-pair homology region and the donor carries different densities of single-base-pair mismatches. With every eighth base pair mismatched, repair was about 14% of that of completely homologous sequences. With every sixth base pair mismatched, repair was still more than 5%. Thus, completing break-induced replication in vivo overcomes the apparent requirement for at least 6-8 consecutive paired bases that has been inferred from in vitro studies. When recombination occurs without a protruding nonhomologous 3' tail, the mismatch repair protein Msh2 does not discourage homeologous recombination. However, when the DSB end contains a 3' protruding nonhomologous tail, Msh2 promotes the rejection of mismatched substrates. Mismatch correction of strand invasion heteroduplex DNA is strongly polar, favouring correction close to the DSB end. Nearly all mismatch correction depends on the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase-δ, although the repair proteins Msh2, Mlh1 and Exo1 influence the extent of correction.

  5. Biophysics of Artificially Expanded Genetic Information Systems. Thermodynamics of DNA Duplexes Containing Matches and Mismatches Involving 2-Amino-3-nitropyridin-6-one (Z) and Imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)one (P).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Hoshika, Shuichi; Peterson, Raymond J; Kim, Myong-Jung; Benner, Steven A; Kahn, Jason D

    2017-05-19

    Synthetic nucleobases presenting non-Watson-Crick arrangements of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups can form additional nucleotide pairs that stabilize duplex DNA independent of the standard A:T and G:C pairs. The pair between 2-amino-3-nitropyridin-6-one 2'-deoxyriboside (presenting a {donor-donor-acceptor} hydrogen bonding pattern on the Watson-Crick face of the small component, trivially designated Z) and imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)one 2'-deoxyriboside (presenting an {acceptor-acceptor-donor} hydrogen bonding pattern on the large component, trivially designated P) is one of these extra pairs for which a substantial amount of molecular biology has been developed. Here, we report the results of UV absorbance melting measurements and determine the energetics of binding of DNA strands containing Z and P to give short duplexes containing Z:P pairs as well as various mismatches comprising Z and P. All measurements were done at 1 M NaCl in buffer (10 mM Na cacodylate, 0.5 mM EDTA, pH 7.0). Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔG°37) for oligonucleotide hybridization were extracted. Consistent with the Watson-Crick model that considers both geometric and hydrogen bonding complementarity, the Z:P pair was found to contribute more to duplex stability than any mismatches involving either nonstandard nucleotide. Further, the Z:P pair is more stable than a C:G pair. The Z:G pair was found to be the most stable mismatch, forming either a deprotonated mismatched pair or a wobble base pair analogous to the stable T:G mismatch. The C:P pair is less stable, perhaps analogous to the wobble pair observed for C:O(6)-methyl-G, in which the pyrimidine is displaced into the minor groove. The Z:A and T:P mismatches are much less stable. Parameters for predicting the thermodynamics of oligonucleotides containing Z and P bases are provided. This represents the first case where this has been done for a synthetic genetic system.

  6. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors.

  7. Detection of single base mismatches of thymine and cytosine residues by potassium permanganate and hydroxylamine in the presence of tetralkylammonium salts.

    PubMed Central

    Gogos, J A; Karayiorgou, M; Aburatani, H; Kafatos, F C

    1990-01-01

    In the presence of tetramethylammonium chloride, potassium permanganate specifically modifies mismatched thymines. Similarly, the modification of mismatched cytosines by hydroxylamine was enhanced by tetraethylammonium chloride. Modification followed by piperidine cleavage permits specific identification of the T and C mismatches and by extension, when the opposite DNA strand is analyzed, of A and G mismatches as well. These reactions can be performed conveniently with DNA immobilized on Hybond M-G paper. We describe conditions that exploit these reactions to detect mismatches, e.g. point mutations or genetic polymorphisms, using either synthetic oligonucleotide probes or PCR amplification of specific genomic DNA sequences. Images PMID:2263445

  8. Reactivity of cytosine and thymine in single-base-pair mismatches with hydroxylamine and osmium tetroxide and its application to the study of mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, R G; Rodrigues, N R; Campbell, R D

    1988-01-01

    The chemical reactivity of thymine (T), when mismatched with the bases cytosine, guanine, and thymine, and of cytosine (C), when mismatched with thymine, adenine, and cytosine, has been examined. Heteroduplex DNAs containing such mismatched base pairs were first incubated with osmium tetroxide (for T and C mismatches) or hydroxylamine (for C mismatches) and then incubated with piperidine to cleave the DNA at the modified mismatched base. This cleavage was studied with an internally labeled strand containing the mismatched T or C, such that DNA cleavage and thus reactivity could be detected by gel electrophoresis. Cleavage at a total of 13 T and 21 C mismatches isolated (by at least three properly paired bases on both sides) single-base-pair mismatches was identified. All T or C mismatches studied were cleaved. By using end-labeled DNA probes containing T or C single-base-pair mismatches and conditions for limited cleavage, we were able to show that cleavage was at the base predicted by sequence analysis and that mismatches in a length of DNA could be readily detected by such an approach. This procedure may enable detection of all single-base-pair mismatches by use of sense and antisense probes and thus may be used to identify the mutated base and its position in a heteroduplex. Images PMID:3260032

  9. Reactivity of cytosine and thymine in single-base-pair mismatches with hydroxylamine and osmium tetroxide and its application to the study of mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, R.G.H.; Rodrigues, N.R.; Campbell, R.D. )

    1988-06-01

    The chemical reactivity of thymine (T), when mismatched with the bases cytosine, guanine, and thymine, and of cytosine (C), when mismatched with thymine, adenine, and cytosine, has been examined. Heteroduplex DNAs containing such mismatched base pairs were first incubated with osmium tetroxide (for T and C mismatches) or hydroxylamine (for C mismatches) and then incubated with piperidine to cleave the DNA at the modified mismatched base. This cleavage was studied with an internally labeled strand containing the mismatched T or C, such that DNA cleavage and thus reactivity could be detected by gel electrophoresis. Cleavage at a total of 13 T and 21 C mismatches isolated (by at least three properly paired bases on both sides) single-base-pair mismatches was identified. All T or C mismatches studied were cleaved. By using end-labeled DNA probes containing T or C single-base-pair mismatches and conditions for limited cleavage, the authors were able to show that cleavage was at the base predicted by sequence analysis and that mismatches in a length of DNA could be readily detected by such an approach. This procedure may enable detection of all single-base-pair mismatches by use of sense and antisense probes and thus may be used by identify the mutated base and its position in a heteroduplex.

  10. Down-regulation of BRMS1 by DNA hypermethylation and its association with metastatic progression in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bin; Lv, Zhi-Dong; Wang, Yu; Jin, Li-Ying; Ding, Lei; Yang, Zhao-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) is a metastasis suppressor gene in several solid tumors. However, the expression and function of BRMS1 in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have not been reported. In this study, we found that BRMS1 was down-regulation in breast cancer cell lines and primary TNBC, while decreased expression of BRMS1 mRNA was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. And this down-regulation was found to be in accordance with aberrant methylation of the gene. Hypermethylation of the gene was observed in 53.4% (62/116) of the TNBC primary breast carcinomas, while it was found in only 24.1% (28/116) of the corresponding nonmalignant tissues. In addition, BRMS1 expression was restored in MDA-MB-231 after treatment with the demethylating agent, 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC), and demethylation of the highly metastatic cells MDA-MB-231 induced invasion suppression of the cells. Furthermore, the suppression of BRMS1 by siRNA transfection enhanced cancer cells invasion. Collectively, our results suggest that the aberrant methylation of BRMS1 frequently occurs in the down-regulation of BRMS1 in TNBC and that it may play a role in the metastasis of breast cancer.

  11. Epigenetic downregulation of RUNX3 by DNA methylation induces docetaxel chemoresistance in human lung adenocarcinoma cells by activation of the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun; Wang, Rui; Song, Hai-Zhu; Pan, Ban-Zhou; Zhang, You-Wei; Chen, Long-Bang

    2013-11-01

    The RUNX3 gene has been shown to function as a tumor suppressor gene implicated in various cancers, but its association with tumor chemoresistance has not been fully understood. Here, we investigated the effect of epigenetic downregulation of RUNX3 in docetaxel resistance of human lung adenocarcinoma and its possible molecular mechanisms. RUNX3 was found to be downregulated by hypermethylation in docetaxel-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells. Its overexpression could resensitize cells to docetaxel both in vitro and in vivo by growth inhibition, enhancement of apoptosis and G1 phase arrest. Conversely, knockdown of RUNX3 could lead to the decreased sensitivity of parental human lung adenocarcinoma cells to docetaxel by enhancing proliferative capacity. Furthermore, we showed that overexpression of RUNX3 could inactivate the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway in the docetaxel-resistant cells. Importantly, co-transfection of RUNX3 and constitutively active Akt1 could reverse the effects of RUNX3 overexpression, while treatment with the MK-2206 (AKT inhibitor) mimicked the effects of RUNX3 overexpression in docetaxel-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that decreased RUNX3 expression was correlated with high expression of Akt1 and decreased sensitivity of patients to docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Taken together, our results suggest that epigenetic downregulation of RUNX3 can induce docetaxel resistance in human lung adenocarcinoma cells by activating AKT signaling and increasing expression of RUNX3 may represent a promising strategy for reversing docetaxel resistance in the future.

  12. Size mismatch in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fukazawa, Kyota; Nishida, Seigo

    2016-08-01

    Size mismatch is an unique and inevitable but critical issue in live donor liver transplantation. Unmatched metabolic demand of recipient as well as physiologic mismatch aggravates the damage to liver graft, inevitably leading to graft failure on recipient. Also, an excessive resection of liver graft for better recipient outcome in live donor liver transplant may jeopardize the healthy donor well-being and even put donor life in danger. There is a fine balance between resected graft volume required to meet the recipient's metabolic demand and residual graft volume required for donor safety. The obvious clinical necessity of finding that balance has prompted a clinical need and promoted the improvement of knowledge and development of management strategies for size-mismatched transplants. The development of the size-matching methodology has significantly improved graft outcome and recipient survival in live donor liver transplants. On the other hand, the effect of size mismatch in cadaveric transplants has never been observed as being so pronounced. The importance of matching of the donor recipient size has been unrecognized in cadaveric liver transplant. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current most updated knowledge on the subject, particularly addressing the definition and complications of size-mismatched cadaveric liver transplant, as well as management strategies. © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  13. Luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ Bound to RNA Mismatches

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Anna J.; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    The luminescence of rac-[Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine) was explored in the presence of RNA oligonucleotides containing a single RNA mismatch (CA and GG) in order to develop a probe for RNA mismatches. While there is minimal luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ in the presence of matched RNA due to weak binding, the luminescence is significantly enhanced in the presence of a single CA mismatch. The luminescence differential between CA mismatched and matched RNA is substantially higher compared to the DNA analogue, and therefore, [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ appears to be also a sensitive light switch probe for a CA mismatch in duplex RNA. Although the luminescence intensity is lower in the presence of RNA than DNA, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor ruthenium complex and FRET acceptor SYTO 61 is successfully exploited to amplify the luminescence in the presence of the mismatch. Luminescence and quenching studies with sodium iodide suggest that [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ binds to these mismatches via metalloinsertion from the minor groove. This work provides further evidence that metalloinsertion is a general binding mode of octahedral metal complexes to thermodynamically destabilized mismatches not only in DNA, but also in RNA. PMID:23968195

  14. Luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ bound to RNA mismatches.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Anna J; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2013-09-03

    The luminescence of rac-[Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) was explored in the presence of RNA oligonucleotides containing a single RNA mismatch (CA and GG) in order to develop a probe for RNA mismatches. While there is minimal luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) in the presence of matched RNA due to weak binding, the luminescence is significantly enhanced in the presence of a single CA mismatch. The luminescence differential between CA mismatched and matched RNA is substantially higher compared to the DNA analogue, and therefore, [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) appears to be also a sensitive light switch probe for a CA mismatch in duplex RNA. Although the luminescence intensity is lower in the presence of RNA than DNA, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor ruthenium complex and FRET acceptor SYTO 61 is successfully exploited to amplify the luminescence in the presence of the mismatch. Luminescence and quenching studies with sodium iodide suggest that [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) binds to these mismatches via metalloinsertion from the minor groove. This work provides further evidence that metalloinsertion is a general binding mode of octahedral metal complexes to thermodynamically destabilized mismatches not only in DNA but also in RNA.

  15. A dihydroindolizino indole derivative selectively stabilizes G-quadruplex DNA and down-regulates c-MYC expression in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Narayana; Raju, G; Srinivas, R; Ramesh, P; Reddy, M Damoder; Reddy, Ch Raji

    2015-01-01

    Telomeric and NHE III1, a c-MYC promoter region is abundant in guanine content and readily form G-quadruplex structures. Small molecules that stabilize G-quadruplex DNA were shown to reduce oncoprotein expression, initiate apoptosis and they may function as anticancer molecules. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, Taq DNA polymerase stop assay, real time PCR and luciferase reporter assay. Cell migration assay to find out the effect of derivatives on normal as well as cancer cell proliferation. Among three different dihydroindolizino indole derivatives, 4-cyanophenyl group attached derivative has shown maximum affinity, selective interaction and higher stability towards G-quadruplex DNA over dsDNA. Further, as a potential G-quadruplex DNA stabilizer, 4-cyanophenyl linked dihydroindolizino indole derivative was found to be more efficient in inhibiting in vitro DNA synthesis, c-MYC expression and cancer cell proliferation among human cancer cells. The present study reveals that dihydroindolizino indole derivative having 4-cyanophenyl group has potential to stabilize G-quadruplex DNA and exhibit anticancer activity. These studies are useful in the identification and synthesis of lead derivatives that will selectively stabilize G-quadruplex DNA and function as anticancer agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Deciphering the mismatch recognition cycle in MutS and MSH2-MSH6 using normal-mode analysis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shayantani; Law, Sean M; Feig, Michael

    2009-03-04

    Postreplication DNA mismatch repair is essential for maintaining the integrity of genomic information in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The first step in mismatch repair is the recognition of base-base mismatches and insertions/deletions by bacterial MutS or eukaryotic MSH2-MSH6. Crystal structures of both proteins bound to mismatch DNA reveal a similar molecular architecture but provide limited insight into the detailed molecular mechanism of long-range allostery involved in mismatch recognition and repair initiation. This study describes normal-mode calculations of MutS and MSH2-MSH6 with and without DNA. The results reveal similar protein flexibilities and suggest common dynamic and functional characteristics. A strongly correlated motion is present between the lever domain and ATPase domains, which suggests a pathway for long-range allostery from the N-terminal DNA binding domain to the C-terminal ATPase domains, as indicated by experimental studies. A detailed analysis of individual low-frequency modes of both MutS and MSH2-MSH6 shows changes in the DNA-binding domains coupled to the ATPase sites, which are interpreted in the context of experimental data to arrive at a complete molecular-level mismatch recognition cycle. Distinct conformational states are proposed for DNA scanning, mismatch recognition, repair initiation, and sliding along DNA after mismatch recognition. Hypotheses based on the results presented here form the basis for further experimental and computational studies.

  17. HER-2/neu mediated down-regulation of MHC class I antigen processing prevents CTL-mediated tumor recognition upon DNA vaccination in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Vertuani, Simona; Triulzi, Chiara; Roos, Anna Karin; Charo, Jehad; Norell, Håkan; Lemonnier, François; Pisa, Pavel; Seliger, Barbara; Kiessling, Rolf

    2009-05-01

    To study DNA vaccination directed against human HER-2 in the HHD mouse Tg strain, we created a novel HER-2-expressing syngeneic tumor transplantation model. We found that a DNA vaccine encoding the full length HER-2 DNA protected HHD mice from HER-2(+) tumor challenge by a CTL independent mechanism. A more efficient approach to induce HLA-A2 restricted CTLs, through immunization with a multi-epitope DNA vaccine expressing the HLA-A2 restricted HER-2 369-377, 435-443 and 689-697 epitopes, resulted in high numbers of peptide specific T cells but failed to induce tumor protection. Subsequently we discovered that HER-2 transfected tumor cells down-regulated MHC class I antigen expression and exhibited a series of defects in the antigen processing pathway which impaired the capacity to produce and display MHC class I peptide-ligands to specific CTLs. Our data demonstrate that HER-2 transfection is associated with defects in the MHC class I presentation pathway, which may be the underlying mechanism behind the inability of CTLs to recognize tumors in this HLA-A2 transgenic model. As defective MHC class I presentation may be a common characteristic of HER-2 expressing tumors, vaccines targeting HER-2 should aim at inducing an integrated immune response where also CD4(+) T cells and antibodies are important components.

  18. DNA demethylation mediated by down-regulated TETs in the testes of rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus under bisphenol A exposure.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cong; Zhang, Yingying; Liu, Yan; Wang, Song; Wang, Zaizhao

    2017-03-01

    Inevitable BPA exposure resulted in disturbance of DNA methylation status and our published study suspected that BPA has the potentiality to disturb DNA demethylation and GSH production in Gobiocypris rarus testes. To confirm this conjecture, several experiments were carried out in the present study. Adult male G. rarus was exposed to 1, 15 and 225 μg L(-1) (nominal concentration) BPA for two weeks. The levels of 5-methylcytosine (5mC), 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), glutathione (GSH), and enzyme levels for DNA methylation and GSH synthesis in the testes were detected. Meanwhile, the contents of substrates for GSH synthesis were measured. Furthermore, the transcriptional changes of the studied genes were examined. Results indicated that 1-225 μg L(-1) BPA caused decrease of testicular ten-eleven translocation proteins (TETs) with more obvious effects at low concentrations. Moreover, all concentrations of BPA resulted in decrease of 5hmC levels while only 225 μg L(-1) BPA resulted in significant increase of 5mC. In addition, all treatments resulted in significant decrease of GSH and the replenishment of GSH might be mainly accomplished by circular synthesis. These results indicated that BPA exposure inhibited TETs-mediated DNA demethylation and the declined DNA demethylation mediated by TETs may result in DNA hypermethylation at 225 μg L(-1) BPA. In addition, the changes of DNA methylation status were irrelevant with GSH levels.

  19. A quantitative model of bacterial mismatch repair as applied to studying induced mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, O. V.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Kapralov, M. I.; Sweilam, N. H.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model of the DNA mismatch repair system in Escherichia coli bacterial cells. The key pathways of this repair mechanism were simulated on the basis of modern experimental data. We have modelled in detail five main pathways of DNA misincorporation removal with different DNA exonucleases. Here we demonstrate an application of the model to problems of radiation-induced mutagenesis.

  20. Structure-based design of platinum(II) complexes as c-myc oncogene down-regulators and luminescent probes for G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Yan, Siu-Cheong; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-06-18

    A series of platinum(II) complexes with tridentate ligands was synthesized and their interactions with G-quadruplex DNA within the c-myc gene promoter were evaluated. Complex 1, which has a flat planar 2,6-bis(benzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine (bzimpy) scaffold, was found to stabilize the c-myc G-quadruplex structure in a cell-free system. An in silico G-quadruplex DNA model has been constructed for structure-based virtual screening to develop new Pt(II)-based complexes with superior inhibitory activities. By using complex 1 as the initial structure for hit-to-lead optimization, bzimpy and related 2,6-bis(pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine (dPzPy) scaffolds containing amine side-chains emerge as the top candidates. Six of the top-scoring complexes were synthesized and their interactions with c-myc G-quadruplex DNA have been investigated. The results revealed that all of the complexes have the ability to stabilize the c-myc G-quadruplex. Complex 3 a ([Pt(II)L2R](+); L2=2,6-bis[1-(3-piperidinepropyl)-1H-enzo[d]imidazol-2-yl]pyridine, R=Cl) displayed the strongest inhibition in a cell-free system (IC(50)=2.2 microM) and was 3.3-fold more potent than that of 1. Complexes 3 a and 4 a ([Pt(II)L3R](+); L3=2,6-bis[1-(3-morpholinopropyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]pyridine, R=Cl) were found to effectively inhibit c-myc gene expression in human hepatocarcinoma cells with IC(50) values of approximately 17 microM, whereas initial hit 1 displayed no significant effect on gene expression at concentrations up to 50 microM. Complexes 3 a and 4 a have a strong preference for G-quadruplex DNA over duplex DNA, as revealed by competition dialysis experiments and absorption titration; 3 a and 4 a bind G-quadruplex DNA with binding constants (K) of approximately 10(6)-10(7) dm(3) mol(-1), which are at least an order of magnitude higher than the K values for duplex DNA. NMR spectroscopic titration experiments and molecular modeling showed that 4 a binds c-myc G-quadruplex DNA through an external end-stacking mode at

  1. Alpha-Lipoic Acid Downregulates IL-1β and IL-6 by DNA Hypermethylation in SK-N-BE Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Dinicola, Simona; Proietti, Sara; Cucina, Alessandra; Bizzarri, Mariano; Fuso, Andrea

    2017-09-26

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is a pleiotropic molecule with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, of which the effects are exerted through the modulation of NF-kB. This nuclear factor, in fact, modulates different inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1b and IL-6, in different tissues and cell types. We recently showed that IL-1b and IL-6 DNA methylation is modulated in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients, and that IL-1b expression is associated to DNA methylation in the brain of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. These results prompted us to ask whether ALA-induced repression of IL-1b and IL-6 was dependent on DNA methylation. Therefore, we profiled DNA methylation in the 5'-flanking region of the two aforementioned genes in SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cells cultured in presence of ALA 0.5 mM. Our experimental data pointed out that the two promoters are hypermethylated in cells supplemented with ALA, both at CpG and non-CpG sites. Moreover, the observed hypermethylation is associated with decreased mRNA expression and decreased cytokine release. These results reinforce previous findings indicating that IL-1b and IL-6 undergo DNA methylation-dependent modulation in neural models and pave the road to study the epigenetic mechanisms triggered by ALA.

  2. Inducement of G-quadruplex DNA forming and down-regulation of oncogene c-myc by bile acid-amino acid conjugate-BAA.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingyue; Zhang, Xiufeng; Li, Yan; Ju, Yong; Xiang, Junfeng; Zhao, Changqi; Tang, Yalin

    2010-03-01

    Human c-myc gene is a central regulator of cellular proliferation and cell growth, and G-quadruplexes have been proven to be the transcriptional controller of this gene. In this study, the interaction of bile acid-amino acid conjugate (BAA) with G-quadruplexes in c-myc was investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The experimental results indicated that BAA has the ability to selectively induce the formation of parallel G-quadruplexes in c-myc, which leads to down-regulation of c-myc transcription in the human breast cancer cell MCF-7.

  3. Oxidative mutagenesis, mismatch repair, and aging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Amy M; Turker, Mitchell S

    2005-03-02

    A PubMed search for the term "oxidative stress" yields over 29,000 articles published on the subject over the past 10 years; more than 2000 of these articles also include the term "aging" in their title or abstract. Many theories of aging predict causal roles for oxidative stress in the myriad of pathological changes that occur as a function of age, including an increasing propensity to develop cancer. A possible link between aging and cancer is the induction and accumulation of somatic mutations caused by oxidative stress. This Review focuses on small mutational events that are induced by oxidative stress and the role of mismatch repair (MMR) in preventing their formation. It also discusses a possible inhibitory effect of oxidative stress on MMR. We speculate that a synergistic interaction between oxidative damage to DNA and reduced MMR levels will, in part, account for an accumulation of small mutational events, and hence cancer, with aging.

  4. Cadmium delays non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair via inhibition of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation and downregulation of XRCC4 and Ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Gu, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Kong, Jinxin; Ding, Nan; Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Jufang; Huang, Dejun

    2015-09-01

    Although studies have shown that cadmium (Cd) interfered with DNA damage repair (DDR), whether Cd could affect non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair remains elusive. To further understand the effect of Cd on DDR, we used X-ray irradiation of Hela cells as an in vitro model system, along with γH2AX and 53BP1 as markers for DNA damage. Results showed that X-ray significantly increased γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in Hela cells (p < 0.01), all of which are characteristic of accrued DNA damage. The number of foci declined rapidly over time (1-8h postirradiation), indicating an initiation of NHEJ process. However, the disappearance of γH2AX and 53BP1 foci was remarkably slowed by Cd pretreatment (p < 0.01), suggesting that Cd reduced the efficiency of NHEJ. To further elucidate the mechanisms of Cd toxicity, several markers of NHEJ pathway including Ku70, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and Ligase IV were examined. Our data showed that Cd altered the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, and reduced the expression of both XRCC4 and Ligase IV in irradiated cells. These observations are indicative of the impairment of NHEJ-dependent DNA repair pathways. In addition, zinc (Zn) mitigated the effects of Cd on NHEJ, suggesting that the Cd-induced NHEJ alteration may partly result from the displacement of Zn or from an interference with the normal function of Zn-containing proteins by Cd. Our findings provide a new insight into the toxicity of Cd on NHEJ repair and its underlying mechanisms in human cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute cold exposure-induced down-regulation of CIDEA, cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A, in rat interscapular brown adipose tissue by sympathetically activated beta3-adrenoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2009-09-18

    The thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) largely depends on the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is up-regulated by environmental alterations such as cold. Recently, CIDEA (cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A) has also been shown to be expressed at high levels in the mitochondria of BAT. Here we examined the effect of cold on the mRNA and protein levels of CIDEA in interscapular BAT of conscious rats with regard to the sympathetic nervous system. Cold exposure (4 degrees C for 3h) elevated the plasma norepinephrine level and increased norepinephrine turnover in BAT. Cold exposure resulted in down-regulation of the mRNA and protein levels of CIDEA in BAT, accompanied by up-regulation of mRNA and protein levels of UCP1. The cold exposure-induced changes of CIDEA and UCP1 were attenuated by intraperitoneal pretreatment with propranolol (a non-selective beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist) (2mg/animal) or SR59230A (a selective beta(3)-adrenoreceptor antagonist) (2mg/animal), respectively. These results suggest that acute cold exposure resulted in down-regulation of CIDEA in interscapular BAT by sympathetically activated beta(3)-adrenoreceptor-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  6. Mismatch repair status may predict response to adjuvant chemotherapy in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Riazy, Maziar; Kalloger, Steve E; Sheffield, Brandon S; Peixoto, Renata D; Li-Chang, Hector H; Scudamore, Charles H; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F

    2015-10-01

    Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair have been associated with inferior response to 5-FU in colorectal cancer. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is similarly treated with pyrimidine analogs, yet the predictive value of mismatch repair status for response to these agents has not been examined in this malignancy. A tissue microarray with associated clinical outcome, comprising 254 resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was stained for four mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). Mismatch repair deficiency and proficiency was determined by the absence or presence of uniform nuclear staining in tumor cells, respectively. Cases identified as mismatch repair deficient on the tissue microarray were confirmed by immunohistochemistry on whole slide sections. Of the 265 cases, 78 (29%) received adjuvant treatment with a pyrimidine analog and 41 (15%) showed a mismatch repair-deficient immunoprofile. Multivariable disease-specific survival in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort demonstrated that adjuvant chemotherapy, regional lymph-node status, gender, and the presence of tumor budding were significant independent prognostic variables (P≤0.04); however, none of the eight clinico-pathologic covariates examined in the mismatch repair-deficient cohort were of independent prognostic significance. Univariable assessment of disease-specific survival revealed an almost identical survival profile for both treated and untreated patients with a mismatch repair-deficient profile, while treatment in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort conferred a greater than 10-month median disease-specific survival advantage over their untreated counterparts (P=0.0018). In this cohort, adjuvant chemotherapy with a pyrimidine analog conferred no survival advantage to mismatch repair-deficient pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. Mismatch repair immunoprofiling is a feasible predictive marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients, and further prospective

  7. Human mismatch repair system balances mutation rates between strands by removing more mismatches from the lagging strand.

    PubMed

    Andrianova, Maria A; Bazykin, Georgii A; Nikolaev, Sergey I; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B

    2017-08-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the main systems maintaining fidelity of replication. Differences in correction of errors produced during replication of the leading and the lagging DNA strands were reported in yeast and in human cancers, but the causes of these differences remain unclear. Here, we analyze data on human cancers with somatic mutations in two of the major DNA polymerases, delta and epsilon, that replicate the genome. We show that these cancers demonstrate a substantial asymmetry of the mutations between the leading and the lagging strands. The direction of this asymmetry is the opposite between cancers with mutated polymerases delta and epsilon, consistent with the role of these polymerases in replication of the lagging and the leading strands in human cells, respectively. Moreover, the direction of strand asymmetry observed in cancers with mutated polymerase delta is similar to that observed in MMR-deficient cancers. Together, these data indicate that polymerase delta (possibly together with polymerase alpha) contributes more mismatches during replication than its leading-strand counterpart, polymerase epsilon; that most of these mismatches are repaired by the MMR system; and that MMR repairs about three times more mismatches produced in cells during lagging strand replication compared with the leading strand. © 2017 Andrianova et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Educational Mismatch and Self-Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Keith A.; Roche, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on educational mismatch concentrates on estimating its labor market consequences but with a focus on wage and salary workers. This paper examines the far less studied influence of mismatch on the self-employed. Using a sample of workers in science and engineering fields, results show larger earnings penalties for mismatch among…

  9. Mismatch repair system proteins in oral benign and malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Silva, Gleyson Kleber do; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2017-04-01

    Different environmental agents may cause DNA mutations by disrupting its double-strand structure; however, even normal DNA polymerase function may synthesize mismatch nucleotide bases, occasionally demonstrating failure in its proofreading activity. To overcome this issue, mismatch repair (MMR) system, a group of proteins specialized in finding mispairing bases and small loops of insertion or deletion, works to avoid the occurrence of mutations that could ultimately lead to innumerous human diseases. In the last decades, the role of MMR proteins in oral carcinogenesis and in the development of other oral cavity neoplasms has grown, but their importance in the pathogenesis and their prognostic potential for patients affected by oral malignancies, especially oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), remain unclear. Therefore, in this manuscript we aimed to review and critically discuss the currently available data on MMR proteins expression in oral potentially malignant lesions, in OSCC, and in other oral neoplasms to better understand their relevance in these lesions.

  10. Cell cycle and mismatch repair genes as potential biomarkers in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan Nair, Prakash M; Chung, Ill-Min

    2014-06-01

    The expression of cell cycle genes and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes were analyzed in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to 0, 0.2, 0.5 and 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles for 24, 48 and 72 h using real-time PCR. Significant up-regulation of AtPCNA1 was observed after 24 h exposure to 0.2 and 0.5 mg/L of silver nanoparticles. AtPCNA2 gene was up-regulated after 24, 48 and 72 h exposure to 0.5 and 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles. AtMLH1 gene was up-regulated after 48 h exposure to 0.5 and 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles and down-regulated after 72 h. Down-regulation of AtMSH2, AtMSH3, AtMSH6 and AtMSH7 mRNA was observed after exposure to all concentrations of silver nanoparticles for different time periods. Exposure to silver ions showed no significant change in the expression levels of AtPCNA and MMR genes. The results show that AtPCNA and MMR genes could be used as potential molecular biomarkers.

  11. Characterization of the Novel DNA-Binding Activity of p270, a hSWI/SNF Protein Frequently Downregulated in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    interacts with the developmental transcription factors BF-I and Lyu,P.C. (2003) Mutagenesis Study on the zebra fish S0X9 and PAX9. J. Biol. Chem., 278... Tissue -specific and developmental stage-specific chromatin remodeling by Swi/Snf complexes. Curr. Opin. Genet. Dev., DNA binding by a mammalian SWI/SNF...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Human SWI/SNF complexes are ATP-dependent chromatin

  12. Long-term cadmium exposure leads to the enhancement of lymphocyte proliferation via down-regulating p16 by DNA hypermethylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dexiao; Ye, Shuang; Pan, Yan; Bao, Yizhong; Chen, Honghong; Shao, Chunlin

    2013-10-09

    Cadmium (Cd) is a well-established carcinogen, however, the underlying mechanism, especially the role of epigenetics in it, is still poorly understood. Our previous work has disclosed that when rats were exposed to 0.5mg CdCl2 (kgd) for 8 and 12 weeks, the growth of peripheral white blood cells (WBC) was obviously stimulated but no over-proliferation of granulocyte-monocyte (GM) progenitor cells was observed in the bone marrow, suggesting that the over-proliferation of lymphocyte was promoted by Cd exposure. Is DNA-methylation involved in this Cd-stimulated cell proliferation? The present study found that when human B lymphoblast HMy2.CIR cells were exposed to Cd with a dose lower than 0.1μM for 3 months, both cell proliferation and mRNA expressions of DNA methyltransferases of DNMT1 and DNMT3b were increased, while the mRNA of tumor suppressor gene p16 was remarkably decreased. Furthermore, the level of genomic DNA methylation was increased and the CpG island in p16 promoter was hypermethylated in the Cd-exposed cells. A DNA demethylating agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), diminished Cd-stimulated cell proliferation associated with p16 overexpression. Our results suggested that the chronic exposure of low dose Cd could induce hypermethylation of p16 promoter and hence suppress p16 expression and then promote cell proliferation, which might contribute to Cd-induced carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-term arsenic exposure induces histone H3 Lys9 dimethylation without altering DNA methylation in the promoter region of p16(INK4a) and down-regulates its expression in the liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takehiro; Nohara, Keiko

    2013-09-01

    Long-term exposure of humans to high concentrations of arsenic is associated with an increased risk of cancer. Previous studies have suggested that arsenic exposure promotes tumorigenesis by inducing changes in the expression of tumor-related genes by dysregulating DNA methylation at tumor-related gene loci. However, the causal relationships between epigenetic changes and both arsenic exposure and tumorigenesis are still unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether arsenic can change the expression of tumor-related genes by inducing epigenetic modifications before tumorigenesis. We did so by investigating the effects of long-term arsenic exposure on representative epigenetic modifications, DNA methylation and histone modifications, in the tumor-free normal liver of C57Bl/6 mice. We focused on the tumor-related genes, p16(INK4a) , RASSF1A, Ha-ras and ER-α as target genes, because their expression and promoter methylation status in mice have been reported to be affected by long-term arsenic exposure. The results showed that long-term arsenic exposure induced a significant decrease in expression of p16(INK4a) associated with an increase in level of dimethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9), a transcription-suppressive histone modification, in the promoter region, but that DNA methylation of the promoter region was unaffected. The results also showed a significant increase in recruitment of H3K9 histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoter after arsenic exposure. These findings suggest that long-term arsenic exposure may induce down-regulation of p16(INK4a) by targeting recruitment of G9a and H3K9 dimethylation without altering DNA methylation before tumorigenesis in the liver. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Role of mismatch repair in the Escherichia coli UVM response.

    PubMed

    Murphy, H S; Palejwala, V A; Rahman, M S; Dunman, P M; Wang, G; Humayun, M Z

    1996-12-01

    Mutagenesis at 3,N4-ethenocytosine (epsilonC), a nonpairing mutagenic lesion, is significantly enhanced in Escherichia coli cells pretreated with UV, alkylating agents, or H2O2. This effect, termed UVM (for UV modulation of mutagenesis), is distinct from known DNA damage-inducible responses, such as the SOS response, the adaptive response to alkylating agents, or the oxyR-mediated response to oxidative agents. Here, we have addressed the hypothesis that UVM results from transient depletion of a mismatch repair activity that normally acts to reduce mutagenesis. To test whether the loss of mismatch repair activities results in the predicted constitutive UVM phenotype, E. coli cells defective for methyl-directed mismatch repair, for very-short-patch repair, or for the N-glycosylase activities MutY and MutM were treated with the UVM-inducing agent 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine, with subsequent transfection of M13 viral single-stranded DNA bearing a site-specific epsilonC lesion. Survival of the M13 DNA was measured as transfection efficiency, and mutation fixation at the lesion was characterized by multiplex sequencing technology. The results showed normal UVM induction patterns in all the repair-defective strains tested. In addition, normal UVM induction was observed in cells overexpressing MutH, MutL, or MutS. All strains displayed UVM reactivation, the term used to describe the increased survival of epsilonC-containing DNA in UVM-induced cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the UVM response is independent of known mismatch repair systems in E. coli and may thus represent a previously unrecognized misrepair or misreplication pathway.

  15. cDNA sequence of rat liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and evidence for down-regulation of its mRNA by insulin.

    PubMed Central

    el-Maghrabi, M R; Pilkis, J; Marker, A J; Colosia, A D; D'Angelo, G; Fraser, B A; Pilkis, S J

    1988-01-01

    A coding-length clone of rat liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) was isolated by immunological screening of a cDNA library in lambda gt11. Its identity was verified by comparing the deduced amino acid sequence with that obtained by direct sequencing of a complete set of CNBr and proteolytic peptides from the purified protein. The enzyme subunit is composed of 362 amino acids and has N-acetylvaline as the amino-terminal residue. The cDNA, 1255 base pairs (bp) long, consisted of 1086 bp of coding region, 15 bp of 5' untranslated sequence, and 154 bp at the 3' untranslated end. The 3' untranslated sequence contained a polyadenylylation signal (AATAAA) followed after 30 bp by a stretch of 7 adenines at the end of the clone. The deduced amino acid sequence was identical to the primary sequence of the protein and confirmed the alignment of five nonoverlapping peptides. It also confirmed the 27-residue extension, unique to the rat liver subunit, ending with a carboxyl-terminal phenylalanine. RNA blot analyses using the radiolabeled liver cDNA as a probe revealed a single band of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mRNA, 1.4 kilobases long, in liver and kidney but not in nongluconeogenic tissues. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mRNA was increased 10-fold in livers from diabetic rats and was reduced to control levels after 24 hr of insulin treatment, suggesting that the changes in enzyme activity observed in diabetes and after insulin treatment are due to alterations in mRNA abundance. Images PMID:2847161

  16. Lack of Casein Kinase 1 Delta Promotes Genomic Instability - The Accumulation of DNA Damage and Down-Regulation of Checkpoint Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Yoshimi Endo; Gao, Bo; Yang, Yingzi; Nussenzweig, Andre; Rubin, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1δ) is a conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that regulates diverse cellular processes. Mice lacking CK1δ have a perinatal lethal phenotype and typically weigh 30% less than their wild type littermates. However, the causes of death and small size are unknown. We observed cells with abnormally large nuclei in tissue from Csnk1d null embryos, and multiple centrosomes in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient in CK1δ (MEFCsnk1d null). Results from γ-H2AX staining and the comet assay demonstrated significant DNA damage in MEFCsnk1d null cells. These cells often contain micronuclei, an indicator of genomic instability. Similarly, abrogation of CK1δ expression in control MEFs stimulated micronuclei formation after doxorubicin treatment, suggesting that CK1δ loss increases vulnerability to genotoxic stress. Cellular levels of total and activated checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), which functions in the DNA damage response and mitotic checkpoints, and its downstream effector, Cdc2/CDK1 kinase, were often decreased in MEFCsnk1d null cells as well as in control MEFs transfected with CK1δ siRNA. Hydroxyurea-induced Chk1 activation, as measured by Ser345 phosphorylation, and nuclear localization also were impaired in MEF cells following siRNA knockdown of CK1δ. Similar results were observed in the MCF7 human breast cancer cell line. The decreases in phosphorylated Chk1 were rescued by concomitant expression of siRNA-resistant CK1δ. Experiments with cycloheximide demonstrated that the stability of Chk1 protein was diminished in cells subjected to CK1δ knockdown. Together, these findings suggest that CK1δ contributes to the efficient repair of DNA damage and the proper functioning of mitotic checkpoints by maintaining appropriate levels of Chk1. PMID:28125685

  17. Mismatch Repair Proficiency and In Vitro Response to 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    CARETHERS, JOHN M.; CHAUHAN, DHARAM P.; FINK, DANIEL; NEBEL, SIBYLLE; BRESALIER, ROBERT S.; HOWELL, STEPHEN B.; BOLAND, C. RICHARD

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system recognizes certain DNA adducts caused by alkylation damage in addition to its role in recognizing and directing repair of interstrand nucleotide mismatches and slippage mistakes at microsatellite sequences. Because defects in the MMR system can confer tolerance to acquired DNA damage and, by inference, the toxic effects of certain chemotherapeutic agents, we investigated the effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on colon cancer cell lines. Methods We determined growth selection by cell enrichment assay and cloning efficiency after treatment with 5 μmol/L 5-FU, assayed nucleic 3H–5-FU incorporation, and analyzed the cell cycle by flow cytometry. Results 5-FU treatment provided a growth advantage for MMR-deficient cell lines, indicating a relative degree of tolerance to 5-FU by the MMR-deficient cell lines. Enhanced survival was statistically significant after 5 days of growth, and a 28-fold reduction in survival was noted in the MMR-proficient cells by clonagenic assays after 10 days of growth. Differences in nucleotide uptake of 5-FU did not account for the observed growth differences, and specific cell cycle checkpoint arrest was not detected. Conclusions Intact DNA MMR seems to recognize 5-FU incorporated into DNA but may do so in a different manner than other types of alkylation damage. Defective DNA MMR might be one mechanism for tumor resistance to 5-FU. PMID:10381918

  18. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  19. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  20. Crosstalk between mismatch repair and base excision repair in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Valeria; Leuzzi, Giuseppe; Basile, Giorgia; D'Errico, Mariarosaria; Fortini, Paola; Franchitto, Annapaola; Viti, Valentina; Brown, Ashley R; Parlanti, Eleonora; Pascucci, Barbara; Palli, Domenico; Giuliani, Alessandro; Palombo, Fabio; Sobol, Robert W; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2016-06-20

    DNA repair gene expression in a set of gastric cancers suggested an inverse association between the expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 and that of the base excision repair (BER) gene DNA polymerase β (Polβ). To gain insight into possible crosstalk of these two repair pathways in cancer, we analysed human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells over-expressing Polβ or Polβ active site mutants, alone or in combination with MLH1 silencing. Next, we investigated the cellular response to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the purine analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG), agents that induce lesions that are substrates for BER and/or MMR. AGS cells over-expressing Polβ were resistant to 6-TG to a similar extent as when MLH1 was inactivated while inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was required to detect resistance to MMS. Upon either treatment, the association with MLH1 down-regulation further amplified the resistant phenotype. Moreover, AGS cells mutated in Polβ were hypersensitive to both 6-TG and MMS killing and their sensitivity was partially rescued by MLH1 silencing. We provide evidence that the critical lethal lesions in this new pathway are double strand breaks that are exacerbated when Polβ is defective and relieved when MLH1 is silenced. In conclusion, we provide evidence of crosstalk between MLH1 and Polβ that modulates the response to alkylation damage. These studies suggest that the Polβ/MLH1 status should be taken into consideration when designing chemotherapeutic approaches for gastric cancer.

  1. Computing highly specific and mismatch tolerant oligomers efficiently.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Morishita, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    The sequencing of the genomes of a variety of species and the growing databases containing expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and complementary DNAs (cDNAs) facilitate the design of highly specific oligomers for use as genomic markers, PCR primers, or DNA oligo microarrays. The first step in evaluating the specificity of short oligomers of about twenty units in length is to determine the frequencies at which the oligomers occur. However, for oligomers longer than about fifty units this is not efficient, as they usually have a frequency of only 1. A more suitable procedure is to consider the mismatch tolerance of an oligomer, that is, the minimum number of mismatches that allows a given oligomer to match a sub-sequence other than the target sequence anywhere in the genome or the EST database. However, calculating the exact value of mismatch tolerance is computationally costly and impractical. Therefore, we studied the problem of checking whether an oligomer meets the constraint that its mismatch tolerance is no less than a given threshold. Here, we present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm solution that utilizes suffix and height arrays. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this algorithm by efficiently computing a dense list of oligo-markers applicable to the human genome. Experimental results show that the algorithm runs faster than well-known Abrahamson's algorithm by orders of magnitude and is able to enumerate 63% to approximately 79% of qualified oligomers.

  2. Diarctigenin, a lignan constituent from Arctium lappa, down-regulated zymosan-induced transcription of inflammatory genes through suppression of DNA binding ability of nuclear factor-kappaB in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hak; Hong, Seong Su; Kwon, Soon Woo; Lee, Hwa Young; Sung, Hyeran; Lee, In-Jeong; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Song, Sukgil; Lee, Chong-Kil; Chung, Daehyun; Ahn, Byeongwoo; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2008-11-01

    Diarctigenin was previously isolated as an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages from the seeds of Arctium lappa used as an alternative medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the molecular basis of these effects. Here, we demonstrated that diarctigenin inhibited the production of NO, prostaglandin E(2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 with IC(50) values of 6 to 12 miciroM in zymosan- or lipopolysaccharide-(LPS) activated macrophages. Diarctigenin attenuated zymosan-induced mRNA synthesis of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and also inhibited promoter activities of iNOS and cytokine genes in the cells. Because nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB plays a pivotal role in inflammatory gene transcription, we next investigated the effect of diarctigenin on NF-kappaB activation. Diarctigenin inhibited the transcriptional activity and DNA binding ability of NF-kappaB in zymosan-activated macrophages but did not affect the degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitory kappaB (IkappaB) proteins. Moreover, diarctigenin suppressed expression vector NF-kappaB p65-elicited NF-kappaB activation and also iNOS promoter activity, indicating that the compound could directly target an NF-kappa-activating signal cascade downstream of IkappaB degradation and inhibit NF-kappaB-regulated iNOS expression. Diarctigenin also inhibited the in vitro DNA binding ability of NF-kappaB but did not affect the nuclear import of NF-kappaB p65 in the cells. Taken together, diarctigenin down-regulated zymosan- or LPS-induced inflammatory gene transcription in macrophages, which was due to direct inhibition of the DNA binding ability of NF-kappaB. Finally, this study provides a pharmacological potential of diarctigenin in the NF-kappaB-associated inflammatory disorders.

  3. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  4. Pine (Pinus morrisonicola Hayata) needle extracts sensitize GBM8901 human glioblastoma cells to temozolomide by downregulating autophagy and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase expression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Leng; Chen, Chien-Min; Chang, Yan-Zin; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih; Hsieh, Tung-Ying; Lin, Chih-Li

    2014-10-29

    Pine needle extracts of Pinus morrisonicola (Hayata) are commonly used as a functional health beverage. However, it remains unclear what the mechanism is underlying the antitumor activity of pine needle extract. The aims of present study were to investigate the anti-glioblastoma effects of pine needle extracts as well as its bioactive compounds. From three different solvent extracts of pine needles, the water extract displayed the strongest cytotoxicity effects on GBM8901 glioblastoma cells. The isolated compounds were identified as pinocembrin, chrysin, and tiliroside. Chrysin was the most active ingredient of pine needle extract for the induction of apoptosis and suppression of migration and invasion. It also markedly inhibited temozolomide (TMZ)-induced autophagy and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression. Because both autophagy and MGMT overexpression have been implicated to TMZ-induced drug resistance in glioblastoma, our results showed that pine needle extract and chrysin may serve as a potential anticancer agent against glioblastoma, especially with regard to sensitizing glioblastoma cells resistant to TMZ.

  5. Downregulation of OsPK1, a cytosolic pyruvate kinase, by T-DNA insertion causes dwarfism and panicle enclosure in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Wenkai; Luo, Lijuan; Pang, Jinhuan; Rong, Wei; He, Chaozu

    2012-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) catalyzes the final step of glycolysis. There are few reports on the role of PK in rice. Here, we identified a novel rice dwarf mutant, designated as ospk1, showing dwarfism, panicle enclosure, reduced seed set, and outgrowth of axillary buds from culm nodes. Sequence analyses of 5'-RACE indicated that a single T-DNA was inserted in the transcriptional regulatory region of OsPK1 in ospk1. Quantitative RT-PCR result showed that OsPK1 expression was decreased by approximately 90% in ospk1 compared with that in WT. Enzyme assay and transient expression in protoplasts indicated that OsPK1 encodes a cytosolic PK (PK(c)). Complementation with OsPK1 demonstrated that OsPK1 is responsible for the phenotype of ospk1. Quantitative RT-PCR and GUS staining analyses exhibited that OsPK1 was expressed mainly in leaf mesophyll cells, phloem companion cells in stems, and cortical parenchyma cells in roots. The transcriptions of four other putative enzymes involved in the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway were altered in ospk1. The amount of pyruvate is decreased in ospk1. We propose that OsPK1 plays an important role through affecting the glycolytic pathway. The contents of glucose and fructose were markedly accumulated in flag leaf blade and panicle of ospk1. The sucrose level in panicle of ospk1 was decreased by approximately 84%. These findings indicated that both monosaccharide metabolism and sugar transport are altered due to the decreased expression of OsPK1. Together, these results provide new insights into the role of PK(c) in plant morphological development, especially plant height.

  6. Oligodeoxynucleotides Can Transiently Up- and Downregulate CHS Gene Expression in Flax by Changing DNA Methylation in a Sequence-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dzialo, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan; Czuj, Tadeusz; Zuk, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) has been recognized as an essential enzyme in the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway. Apart from the leading role in the production of phenolic compounds with many valuable biological activities beneficial to biomedicine, CHS is well appreciated in science. Genetic engineering greatly facilitates expanding knowledge on the function and genetics of CHS in plants. The CHS gene is one of the most intensively studied genes in flax. In our study, we investigated engineering of the CHS gene through genetic and epigenetic approaches. Considering the numerous restrictions concerning the application of genetically modified (GM) crops, the main purpose of this research was optimization of the plant's modulation via epigenetics. In our study, plants modified through two methods were compared: a widely popular agrotransformation and a relatively recent oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) strategy. It was recently highlighted that the ODN technique can be a rapid and time-serving antecedent in quick analysis of gene function before taking vector-mediated transformation. In order to understand the molecular background of epigenetic variation in more detail and evaluate the use of ODNs as a tool for predictable and stable gene engineering, we concentrated on the integration of gene expression and gene-body methylation. The treatment of flax with a series of short oligonucleotides homologous to a different part of CHS gene isoforms revealed that those directed to regulatory gene regions (5′- and 3′-UTR) activated gene expression, directed to non-coding region (introns) caused gen activity reduction, while those homologous to a coding region may have a variable influence on its activity. Gene expression changes were accompanied by changes in its methylation status. However, only certain (CCGG) motifs along the gene sequence were affected. The analyzed DNA motifs of the CHS flax gene are more accessible for methylation when located within a CpG island. The

  7. Aloe emodin inhibits colon cancer cell migration/angiogenesis by downregulating MMP-2/9, RhoB and VEGF via reduced DNA binding activity of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Suboj, Priya; Babykutty, Suboj; Valiyaparambil Gopi, Deepak Roshan; Nair, Rakesh S; Srinivas, Priya; Gopala, Srinivas

    2012-04-11

    Aloe emodin (AE), a natural anthraquinone, is reported to have antiproliferative activity in various cancer cell lines. In this study we analyzed molecular mechanisms involved in the antimigratory and antiangiogenic activity of this hydroxy anthraquinone in colon cancer cell, WiDr. Our results show that a relatively non toxic concentration of AE suppressed the phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate (PMA) induced migration and invasion of tumor cells. On analysis for the molecules involved in the migration/invasion, we found AE downregulated mRNA expression and promoter/gelatinolytic activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9, as well as the RhoB expression at gene and protein level. It was also a strong inhibitor of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) expression, promoter activity and endothelial cell migration/invasion and in vitro angiogenesis. AE suppressed the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB, which is an important transcription factor for controlling MMP-2/9 and VEGF gene expression. Taken together these data indicate that AE target multiple molecules responsible for cellular invasion, migration and angiogenesis. Inhibitory effect on angiogenic and metastatic regulatory processes make AE a sensible candidate as a specific blocker of tumor associated events.

  8. Selective nanoscale growth of lattice mismatched materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Seung-Chang; Brueck, Steven R. J.

    2017-06-20

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods of forming high-quality semiconductor devices using lattice-mismatched materials. In one embodiment, a composite film including one or more substantially-single-particle-thick nanoparticle layers can be deposited over a substrate as a nanoscale selective growth mask for epitaxially growing lattice-mismatched materials over the substrate.

  9. Mismatch repair regulates homologous recombination, but has little influence on antigenic variation, in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joanna S; McCulloch, Richard

    2003-11-14

    Antigenic variation is critical in the life of the African trypanosome, as it allows the parasite to survive in the face of host immunity and enhance its transmission to other hosts. Much of trypanosome antigenic variation uses homologous recombination of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG)-encoding genes into specialized transcription sites, but little is known about the processes that regulate it. Here we describe the effects on VSG switching when two central mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1, are mutated. We show that disruption of the parasite mismatch repair system causes an increased frequency of homologous recombination, both between perfectly matched DNA molecules and between DNA molecules with divergent sequences. Mismatch repair therefore provides an important regulatory role in homologous recombination in this ancient eukaryote. Despite this, the mismatch repair system has no detectable role in regulating antigenic variation, meaning that VSG switching is either immune to mismatch selection or that mismatch repair acts in a subtle manner, undetectable by current assays.

  10. Mismatch Receptive Fields in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zmarz, Pawel; Keller, Georg B

    2016-11-23

    In primary visual cortex, a subset of neurons responds when a particular stimulus is encountered in a certain location in visual space. This activity can be modeled using a visual receptive field. In addition to visually driven activity, there are neurons in visual cortex that integrate visual and motor-related input to signal a mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow. Here we show that these mismatch neurons have receptive fields and signal a local mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow in restricted regions of visual space. These mismatch receptive fields are aligned to the retinotopic map of visual cortex and are similar in size to visual receptive fields. Thus, neurons with mismatch receptive fields signal local deviations of actual visual flow from visual flow predicted based on self-motion and could therefore underlie the detection of objects moving relative to the visual flow caused by self-motion. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  11. Entanglement verification with detection efficiency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanbao; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    Entanglement is a necessary condition for secure quantum key distribution (QKD). When there is an efficiency mismatch between various detectors used in the QKD system, it is still an open problem how to verify entanglement. Here we present a method to address this problem, given that the detection efficiency mismatch is characterized and known. The method works without assuming an upper bound on the number of photons going to each threshold detector. Our results suggest that the efficiency mismatch affects the ability to verify entanglement: the larger the efficiency mismatch is, the smaller the set of entangled states that can be verified becomes. When there is no mismatch, our method can verify entanglement even if the method based on squashing maps [PRL 101, 093601 (2008)] fails.

  12. Dimer of 2,7-diamino-1,8-naphthyridine for the detection of mismatches formed by pyrimidine nucleotide bases.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Akio; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2008-12-15

    Discrimination of base mismatches from normal Watson-Crick base pairs in duplex DNA constitutes a key approach to the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We have developed a sensor for a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay system to detect G-G, A-A, and C-C mismatch duplexes by employing a surface upon which mismatch-binding ligands (MBLs) are immobilized. We synthesized a new MBL consisting of 2,7-diamino-1,8-naphthyridine (damND) and immobilized it onto a CM5 sensor chip to carry out the SPR assay of DNA duplexes containing a single-base mismatch. The SPR sensor with damND revealed strong responses to all C-C mismatches, and sequence-dependent C-T and T-T mismatches. Compared to ND- and naphthyridine-azaquinolone hybrid (NA)-immobilized sensor surfaces, with affinity to mismatches composed of purine nucleotide bases, the damND-immobilized surface was useful for the detection of the mismatches composed of pyrimidine nucleotide bases.

  13. Honokiol radiosensitizes colorectal cancer cells: enhanced activity in cells with mismatch repair defects

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiyun; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ramalingam, Satish; Dhar, Animesh; Postier, Russell G.; Umar, Shahid; Zhang, Youcheng

    2011-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is required for correcting any mismatches that are created during replication and recombination, and a defective mismatch repair system contributes to DNA damage-induced growth arrest. The colorectal cancer cell line HCT116 is known to have a mutation in the hMLH1 mismatch repair gene resulting in microsatellite instability and defective mismatch repair. Honokiol is a biphenolic compound that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating various ailments including cancer. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that honokiol enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells with mismatch repair defect (HCT116) compared with those that are mismatch repair proficient (HCT116-CH3). We first determined that the combination of honokiol and γ-irradiation treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation and colony formation in both cell lines. However, the effects were more pronounced in HCT116 cells. Similarly, the combination induced higher levels of apoptosis (caspase 3 activation, Bax to Bcl2 ratio) in the HCT116 cells compared with HCT116-CH3 cells. Cell cycle analyses revealed higher levels of dead cells in HCT116 cells. The combination treatment reduced expression of cyclin A1 and D1 and increased phosphorylated p53 in both cell lines, although there were significantly lower amounts of phosphorylated p53 in the HCT116-CH3 cells, suggesting that high levels of hMLH1 reduce radiosensitivity. These data demonstrate that honokiol is highly effective in radiosensitizing colorectal cancer cells, especially those with a mismatch repair defect. PMID:21836060

  14. Honokiol radiosensitizes colorectal cancer cells: enhanced activity in cells with mismatch repair defects.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyun; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ramalingam, Satish; Dhar, Animesh; Postier, Russell G; Umar, Shahid; Zhang, Youcheng; Anant, Shrikant

    2011-11-01

    DNA mismatch repair is required for correcting any mismatches that are created during replication and recombination, and a defective mismatch repair system contributes to DNA damage-induced growth arrest. The colorectal cancer cell line HCT116 is known to have a mutation in the hMLH1 mismatch repair gene resulting in microsatellite instability and defective mismatch repair. Honokiol is a biphenolic compound that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating various ailments including cancer. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that honokiol enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells with mismatch repair defect (HCT116) compared with those that are mismatch repair proficient (HCT116-CH3). We first determined that the combination of honokiol and γ-irradiation treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation and colony formation in both cell lines. However, the effects were more pronounced in HCT116 cells. Similarly, the combination induced higher levels of apoptosis (caspase 3 activation, Bax to Bcl2 ratio) in the HCT116 cells compared with HCT116-CH3 cells. Cell cycle analyses revealed higher levels of dead cells in HCT116 cells. The combination treatment reduced expression of cyclin A1 and D1 and increased phosphorylated p53 in both cell lines, although there were significantly lower amounts of phosphorylated p53 in the HCT116-CH3 cells, suggesting that high levels of hMLH1 reduce radiosensitivity. These data demonstrate that honokiol is highly effective in radiosensitizing colorectal cancer cells, especially those with a mismatch repair defect.

  15. The Association Between Broad Antigen HLA Mismatches, Eplet HLA Mismatches and Acute Rejection After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Do Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Wong, Germaine; Chapman, Jeremy R.; McDonald, Stephen P.; Coates, Patrick T.; Watson, Narelle; Russ, Graeme R.; D'Orsogna, Lloyd; Lim, Wai Hon

    2016-01-01

    Background Epitope matching, which evaluates mismatched amino acids within antigen-antibody interaction sites (eplets), may better predict acute rejection than broad antigen matching alone. We aimed to determine the association between eplet mismatches and acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Methods The association between eplet mismatches, broad antigen mismatches and acute rejection was assessed using adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression. Model discrimination for acute rejection was evaluated using the area under receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Of the 3,499 kidney transplant recipients from 2006 to 2011, the average (SD) number of broad antigen and eplet mismatches were 3.4 (1.7) and 22.8 (12.2), respectively. Compared with 0 to 2 eplet mismatches, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for acute rejection among those with 20 or greater eplet mismatches was 2.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-3.52; P = 0.001). The adjusted area under the curve for broad antigen mismatches was 0.58 (95% CI, 0.56-0.61), similar to that for eplet mismatches (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.56-0.61; P = 0.365). In recipients who were considered as low immunological risk (0-2 broad antigen HLA-ABDR mismatch), those with 20 or greater eplet mismatches experienced an increased risk of rejection compared to those with less than 20 mismatches (adjusted HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.11-3.08; P = 0.019). Conclusions Increasing number of eplet mismatches is associated with acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Consideration of eplet HLA mismatches may improve risk stratification for acute rejection in a selected group of kidney transplant candidates. PMID:27990485

  16. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene.

  17. Transcription of eucaryotic tRNA1met and 5SRNA genes by RNA polymerase III is blocked by base mismatches in the intragenic control regions.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M A; Folk, W R

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed duplex DNAs containing single G-T or A-C mismatches in the X. laevis tRNA1met gene. Mismatches within regions of this gene which are bound by transcription factor TFIIIC prevent transcription by RNA polymerase III. Homoduplexes with G-C----A-T mutations at some of the same sites, however, are transcribed efficiently in oocytes. Mismatches outside of the tRNA1met gene have no effect upon transcription. A survey of several point mutants in the Syrian hamster 5SRNA gene indicates that mismatches outside the internal control region somewhat reduce transcription, but a mismatch within the internal control region blocks transcription. Thus, the presence of mismatched bases in the region of DNA which interacts with RNA polymerase III transcription factors blocks transcription, perhaps by interfering with DNA renaturation following transit of the RNA polymerase. Images PMID:3645544

  18. Downregulation of DNA Methyltransferase 1 in Zona-Free Cloned Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Embryos by Small Interefering RNA Improves In Vitro Development But Does Not Alter DNA Methylation Level

    PubMed Central

    Selokar, Naresh L.; Saini, Monika; Agrawal, Himanshu; Palta, Prabhat; Chauhan, Manmohan S.; Manik, Radheysham

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aberrant epigenetic reprogramming, especially genomic hypermethylation, is implicated as the primary reason behind the failure of the cloning process during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We transfected one-cell-stage zona-free buffalo embryos produced by handmade cloning with 50 nM DNMT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA), using lipofectamine, to knockdown the DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) gene. siRNA treatment decreased (p<0.001) the expression level of DNMT1 mRNA and DNMT1 protein in the one-cell-stage embryos and increased (p<0.05) the blastocyst rate (52.3±1.3% vs. 45.3±2.5%) compared to that in the controls, but did not reduce the DNA methylation level similar to the in vitro–fertilized (IVF) embryos. It also increased (p<0.05) the relative mRNA abundance of P53 and CASPASE 3, but not that of HDAC1, DNMT1, and DNMT3a, in the blastocysts of the siRNA group compared to the controls. The global level of H3K18ac was higher (p<0.05) in the blastocysts of the siRNA group than in the controls, whereas that of H3K9ac and H3K27me3 was not significantly different between the two groups. In conclusion, lipofection can be successfully used for transfection of DNMT1 siRNA into one-cell-stage zona-free cloned buffalo embryos. It results in a concomitant decrease in the DNMT1 mRNA and protein levels in the one-cell-stage embryos. siRNA-mediated knockdown increases the blastocyst rate but does not alter the DNA methylation level. PMID:25826721

  19. The Human ARF Cell Cycle Regulatory Gene Promoter Is a CpG Island Which Can Be Silenced by DNA Methylation and Down-Regulated by Wild-Type p53

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Keith D.; Jones, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The INK4a/ARF locus encodes two proteins involved in tumor suppression in a manner virtually unique in mammalian cells. Distinct first exons, driven from separate promoters, splice onto a common exon 2 and 3 but utilize different reading frames to produce two completely distinct proteins, both of which play roles in cell cycle control. INK4a, a critical element of the retinoblastoma gene pathway, binds to and inhibits the activities of CDK4 and CDK6, while ARF, a critical element of the p53 pathway, increases the level of functional p53 via interaction with MDM2. Here we clone and characterize the promoter of the human ARF gene and show that it is a CpG island characteristic of a housekeeping gene which contains numerous Sp1 sites. Both ARF and INK4a are coordinately expressed in cells except when their promoter regions become de novo methylated. In one of these situations, ARF transcription could be reactivated by treatment with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, and the reactivation kinetics of ARF and INK4a were found to differ slightly in a cell line in which both genes were silenced by methylation. The ARF promoter was also found to be highly responsive to E2F1 expression, in keeping with previous results at the RNA level. Lastly, transcription from the ARF promoter was down-regulated by wild-type p53 expression, and the magnitude of the effect correlated with the status of the endogenous p53 gene. This finding points to the existence of an autoregulatory feedback loop between p53, MDM2, and ARF, aimed at keeping p53 levels in check. PMID:9774662

  20. Lattice QCD with mismatched fermi surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2014-04-25

    We study two flavor fermions with mismatched chemical potentials in quenched lattice QCD. We first consider a large isospin chemical potential, where a charged pion is condensed, and then introduce a small mismatch between the chemical potentials of the up quark and the down antiquark. We find that the homogeneous pion condensate is destroyed by the mismatch of the chemical potentials. We also find that the two-point correlation function shows spatial oscillation, which indicates an inhomogeneous ground state, although it is not massless but massive in the present simulation setup.

  1. Structural basis of transcription: mismatch-specific fidelity mechanisms and paused RNA polymerase II with frayed RNA.

    PubMed

    Sydow, Jasmin F; Brueckner, Florian; Cheung, Alan C M; Damsma, Gerke E; Dengl, Stefan; Lehmann, Elisabeth; Vassylyev, Dmitry; Cramer, Patrick

    2009-06-26

    We show that RNA polymerase (Pol) II prevents erroneous transcription in vitro with different strategies that depend on the type of DNARNA base mismatch. Certain mismatches are efficiently formed but impair RNA extension. Other mismatches allow for RNA extension but are inefficiently formed and efficiently proofread by RNA cleavage. X-ray analysis reveals that a TU mismatch impairs RNA extension by forming a wobble base pair at the Pol II active center that dissociates the catalytic metal ion and misaligns the RNA 3' end. The mismatch can also stabilize a paused state of Pol II with a frayed RNA 3' nucleotide. The frayed nucleotide binds in the Pol II pore either parallel or perpendicular to the DNA-RNA hybrid axis (fraying sites I and II, respectively) and overlaps the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) site, explaining how it halts transcription during proofreading, before backtracking and RNA cleavage.

  2. Down-regulation of the DNA-repair endonuclease 8-oxo-guanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) by sodium dichromate in cultured human A549 lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hodges, N J; Chipman, J K

    2002-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a genotoxic human pulmonary carcinogen that elevates DNA oxidation, apparently through the generation of reactive DNA-damaging intermediates including Cr(V), Cr(IV) and reactive oxygen species. We tested the hypothesis that elevation of DNA oxidation may also be through inhibition of the expression of the repair glycosylase for 8-oxo deoxyguanine (hOGG1) in cultured A549 human lung epithelial cells. Treatment with sodium dichromate (0-100 microM, 16 h) resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the levels of OGG1 mRNA as measured by both RT-PCR and RNase protection assay. Sodium dichromate at 25 microM and above gave a marked reduction of OGG1 mRNA expression which was not seen at 1 microM and below. No effect on the expression of the apurinic endonuclease hAPE or the house-keeping gene GAPDH was observed at any of the concentrations of sodium dichromate investigated. Treatment of cells with the pro-oxidant H(2)O(2) (0-200 microM) for 16 h had no detectable effect on the levels of OGG1 mRNA or protein expression suggesting that the effect of sodium dichromate is not mediated by H(2)O(2). Western blotting demonstrated that sodium dichromate (100 microM; 16 h and >25 microM; 28 h) markedly reduced levels of OGG1 protein in nuclear cell extracts. Additionally, treatment of cells with sodium dichromate (>25 microM, 28 h) resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the ability of nuclear extracts to nick a synthetic oligonucleotide containing 8-oxo deoxyguanine (8-oxo dG). We conclude that the elevation of 8-oxo dG levels observed in A549 cells treated with sodium dichromate may be, at least in part, due to a reduced capacity to repair endogenous and hexavalent chromium-induced 8-oxo dG.

  3. A teleofunctional account of evolutionary mismatch.

    PubMed

    Cofnas, Nathan

    When the environment in which an organism lives deviates in some essential way from that to which it is adapted, this is described as "evolutionary mismatch," or "evolutionary novelty." The notion of mismatch plays an important role, explicitly or implicitly, in evolution-informed cognitive psychology, clinical psychology, and medicine. The evolutionary novelty of our contemporary environment is thought to have significant implications for our health and well-being. However, scientists have generally been working without a clear definition of mismatch. This paper defines mismatch as deviations in the environment that render biological traits unable, or impaired in their ability, to produce their selected effects (i.e., to perform their proper functions in Neander's sense). The machinery developed by Millikan in connection with her account of proper function, and with her related teleosemantic account of representation, is used to identify four major types, and several subtypes, of evolutionary mismatch. While the taxonomy offered here does not in itself resolve any scientific debates, the hope is that it can be used to better formulate empirical hypotheses concerning the effects of mismatch. To illustrate, it is used to show that the controversial hypothesis that general intelligence evolved as an adaptation to handle evolutionary novelty can, contra some critics, be formulated in a conceptually coherent way.

  4. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  5. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  6. Assessment of primer/template mismatch effects on real-time PCR amplification of target taxa for GMO quantification.

    PubMed

    Ghedira, Rim; Papazova, Nina; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Ruttink, Tom; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2009-10-28

    GMO quantification, based on real-time PCR, relies on the amplification of an event-specific transgene assay and a species-specific reference assay. The uniformity of the nucleotide sequences targeted by both assays across various transgenic varieties is an important prerequisite for correct quantification. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) frequently occur in the maize genome and might lead to nucleotide variation in regions used to design primers and probes for reference assays. Further, they may affect the annealing of the primer to the template and reduce the efficiency of DNA amplification. We assessed the effect of a minor DNA template modification, such as a single base pair mismatch in the primer attachment site, on real-time PCR quantification. A model system was used based on the introduction of artificial mismatches between the forward primer and the DNA template in the reference assay targeting the maize starch synthase (SSIIb) gene. The results show that the presence of a mismatch between the primer and the DNA template causes partial to complete failure of the amplification of the initial DNA template depending on the type and location of the nucleotide mismatch. With this study, we show that the presence of a primer/template mismatch affects the estimated total DNA quantity to a varying degree.

  7. The poor homology stringency in the heteroduplex allows strand exchange to incorporate desirable mismatches without sacrificing recognition in vivo.

    PubMed

    Danilowicz, Claudia; Yang, Darren; Kelley, Craig; Prévost, Chantal; Prentiss, Mara

    2015-07-27

    RecA family proteins are responsible for homology search and strand exchange. In bacteria, homology search begins after RecA binds an initiating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the primary DNA-binding site, forming the presynaptic filament. Once the filament is formed, it interrogates double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). During the interrogation, bases in the dsDNA attempt to form Watson-Crick bonds with the corresponding bases in the initiating strand. Mismatch dependent instability in the base pairing in the heteroduplex strand exchange product could provide stringent recognition; however, we present experimental and theoretical results suggesting that the heteroduplex stability is insensitive to mismatches. We also present data suggesting that an initial homology test of 8 contiguous bases rejects most interactions containing more than 1/8 mismatches without forming a detectable 20 bp product. We propose that, in vivo, the sparsity of accidental sequence matches allows an initial 8 bp test to rapidly reject almost all non-homologous sequences. We speculate that once the initial test is passed, the mismatch insensitive binding in the heteroduplex allows short mismatched regions to be incorporated in otherwise homologous strand exchange products even though sequences with less homology are eventually rejected. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. The poor homology stringency in the heteroduplex allows strand exchange to incorporate desirable mismatches without sacrificing recognition in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Danilowicz, Claudia; Yang, Darren; Kelley, Craig; Prévost, Chantal; Prentiss, Mara

    2015-01-01

    RecA family proteins are responsible for homology search and strand exchange. In bacteria, homology search begins after RecA binds an initiating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the primary DNA-binding site, forming the presynaptic filament. Once the filament is formed, it interrogates double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). During the interrogation, bases in the dsDNA attempt to form Watson–Crick bonds with the corresponding bases in the initiating strand. Mismatch dependent instability in the base pairing in the heteroduplex strand exchange product could provide stringent recognition; however, we present experimental and theoretical results suggesting that the heteroduplex stability is insensitive to mismatches. We also present data suggesting that an initial homology test of 8 contiguous bases rejects most interactions containing more than 1/8 mismatches without forming a detectable 20 bp product. We propose that, in vivo, the sparsity of accidental sequence matches allows an initial 8 bp test to rapidly reject almost all non-homologous sequences. We speculate that once the initial test is passed, the mismatch insensitive binding in the heteroduplex allows short mismatched regions to be incorporated in otherwise homologous strand exchange products even though sequences with less homology are eventually rejected. PMID:26089391

  9. Thermostable Mismatch-Recognizing Protein MutS Suppresses Nonspecific Amplification during Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Kenji; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Atsuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kuramitsu, Seiki

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-related technologies are hampered mainly by two types of error: nonspecific amplification and DNA polymerase-generated mutations. Here, we report that both errors can be suppressed by the addition of a DNA mismatch-recognizing protein, MutS, from a thermophilic bacterium. Although it had been expected that MutS has a potential to suppress polymerase-generated mutations, we unexpectedly found that it also reduced nonspecific amplification. On the basis of this finding, we propose that MutS binds a mismatched primer-template complex, thereby preventing the approach of DNA polymerase to the 3′ end of the primer. Our simple methodology improves the efficiency and accuracy of DNA amplification and should therefore benefit various PCR-based applications, ranging from basic biological research to applied medical science. PMID:23519109

  10. Removal of N-6-methyladenine by the nucleotide excision repair pathway triggers the repair of mismatches in yeast gap-repair intermediates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Gap-repair assays have been an important tool for studying the genetic control of homologous recombination in yeast. Sequence analysis of recombination products derived when a gapped plasmid is diverged relative to the chromosomal repair template additionally has been used to infer structures of strand-exchange intermediates. In the absence of the canonical mismatch repair pathway, mismatches present in these intermediates are expected to persist and segregate at the next round of DNA replication. In a mismatch repair defective (mlh1Δ) background, however, we have observed that recombination-generated mismatches are often corrected to generate gene conversion or restoration events. In the analyses reported here, the source of the aberrant mismatch removal during gap repair was examined. We find that most mismatch removal is linked to the methylation status of the plasmid used in the gap-repair assay. Whereas more than half of Dam-methylated plasmids had patches of gene conversion and/or restoration interspersed with unrepaired mismatches, mismatch removal was observed in less than 10% of products obtained when un-methylated plasmids were used in transformation experiments. The methylation-linked removal of mismatches in recombination intermediates was due specifically to the nucleotide excision repair pathway, with such mismatch removal being partially counteracted by glycosylases of the base excision repair pathway. These data demonstrate that nucleotide excision repair activity is not limited to bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions, but also targets removal of very modest perturbations in DNA structure. In addition to its effects on mismatch removal, methylation reduced the overall gap-repair efficiency, but this reduction was not affected by the status of excision repair pathways. Finally, gel purification of DNA prior to transformation reduced gap-repair efficiency four-fold in a nucleotide excision repair-defective background, indicating that the collateral

  11. Mechanism for verification of mismatched and homoduplex DNAs by nucleotides-bound MutS analyzed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    In order to understand how MutS recognizes mismatched DNA and induces the reaction of DNA repair using ATP, the dynamics of the complexes of MutS (bound to the ADP and ATP nucleotides, or not) and DNA (with mismatched and matched base-pairs) were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. As for DNA, the structure of the base-pairs of the homoduplex DNA which interacted with the DNA recognition site of MutS was intermittently disturbed, indicating that the homoduplex DNA was unstable. As for MutS, the disordered loops in the ATPase domains, which are considered to be necessary for the induction of DNA repair, were close to (away from) the nucleotide-binding sites in the ATPase domains when the nucleotides were (not) bound to MutS. This indicates that the ATPase domains changed their structural stability upon ATP binding using the disordered loop. Conformational analysis by principal component analysis showed that the nucleotide binding changed modes which have structurally solid ATPase domains and the large bending motion of the DNA from higher to lower frequencies. In the MutS-mismatched DNA complex bound to two nucleotides, the bending motion of the DNA at low frequency modes may play a role in triggering the formation of the sliding clamp for the following DNA-repair reaction step. Moreover, MM-PBSA/GBSA showed that the MutS-homoduplex DNA complex bound to two nucleotides was unstable because of the unfavorable interactions between MutS and DNA. This would trigger the ATP hydrolysis or separation of MutS and DNA to continue searching for mismatch base-pairs. Proteins 2016; 84:1287-1303. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Educational Mismatches and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Both Vertical and Horizontal Mismatches in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pholphirul, Piriya

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Educational mismatches constitute negative impacts on labor markets in most countries, Thailand is no exception. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the degree of educational mismatch in Thailand and its impacts on labor market outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: This study analyzes data obtained from Thailand's Labor Force Survey…

  13. ZEB1 overexpression associated with E-cadherin and microRNA-200 downregulation is characteristic of undifferentiated endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pérez, Laura; López-García, M Ángeles; Díaz-Martín, Juan; Biscuola, Michele; Castilla, M Ángeles; Tafe, Laura J; Garg, Karuna; Oliva, Esther; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Soslow, Robert A; Palacios, José

    2013-11-01

    Undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas are very aggressive high-grade endometrial carcinomas that are frequently under-recognized. This study aimed to analyze the molecular alterations underlying the development of these endometrial carcinomas, focusing on those related to dedifferentiation. We assessed a series of 120 tumors: 57 grade 1 and 2 endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, 15 grade 3 endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, 27 endometrial serous carcinomas, and 21 undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas. We found a high frequency of DNA mismatch repair deficiency (38%) and moderate rate of p53 overexpression (∼33%) in undifferentiated carcinomas. In contrast to the characteristic endometrioid phenotype, there was a dramatic downregulation of E-cadherin expression in the undifferentiated subtype. Quantitative methylation studies dismissed CDH1 promoter hypermethylation as the mechanism responsible for this change in gene expression, while immunohistochemistry revealed that the E-cadherin repressor ZEB1 was frequently overexpressed (62%) in undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas. This finding was accompanied by a sharp downregulation in the expression of the miR-200 family of microRNAs, well-known targets of ZEB1. Furthermore, there was enhanced expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers in undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas, such as N-cadherin, cytoplasmic p120, and osteonectin. In addition, HMGA2, a regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition that is expressed in aggressive endometrial tumors, such as endometrial serous carcinomas and carcinosarcomas, was expressed in >20% of undifferentiated carcinomas. These results suggest that ZEB1 overexpression, associated with E-cadherin and miR-200s downregulation, and the expression of mesenchymal markers might enhance the metastatic potential of undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas, leading to a poor prognosis. In addition, our observations suggest that the immnohistochemical analysis

  14. Homozygous germ-line mutation of the PMS2 mismatch repair gene: a unique case report of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD).

    PubMed

    Ramchander, N C; Ryan, N A J; Crosbie, E J; Evans, D G

    2017-04-05

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome results from bi-allelic inheritance of mutations affecting the key DNA mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Individuals with bi-allelic mutations have a dysfunctional mismatch repair system from birth; as a result, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome is characterised by early onset malignancies. Fewer than 150 cases have been reported in the literature over the past 20 years. This is the first report of the founder PMS2 mutation - NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11 and its associated cancers in this family. The proband is 30 years old and is alive today. She is of Pakistani ethnic origin and a product of consanguinity. She initially presented aged 24 with painless bleeding per-rectum from colorectal polyps and was referred to clinical genetics. Clinical examination revealed two café-au-lait lesions, lichen planus, and a dermoid cyst. Her sister had been diagnosed in childhood with an aggressive brain tumour followed by colorectal cancer. During follow up, the proband developed 37 colorectal adenomatous polyps, synchronous ovarian and endometrial adenocarcinomas, and ultimately a metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma. DNA sequencing of peripheral lymphocytes revealed a bi-allelic inheritance of the PMS2 mutation NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11. Ovarian tumour tissue demonstrated low microsatellite instability. To date, she has had a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and a total gastrectomy. Aspirin and oestrogen-only hormone replacement therapy provide some chemoprophylaxis and manage postmenopausal symptoms, respectively. An 18-monthly colonoscopy surveillance programme has led to the excision of three high-grade dysplastic colorectal tubular adenomatous polyps. The proband's family pedigree displays multiple relatives with cancers including a likely case of 'true' Turcot syndrome. Constitutional mismatch repair

  15. Production and characterization of the celery mismatch endonuclease CEL II using baculovirus/silkworm expression system.

    PubMed

    Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jaeman; Fukushima, Mai; Nagata, Yudai; Fujii, Mie; Xu, Jian; Nishi, Oumi; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-08-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection by nucleases has become a more important tool in clinical and biological researches. There are several kinds of single-stranded nucleases for detecting mismatched DNAs. One of them, CEL II, was isolated from Apium graveolens and cleaves DNA with high specificity at sites of mismatch. High-throughput mutation scanning requires large quantity of CEL II endonuclease. Here, we demonstrate high-level expression of CEL II using silkworm-baculovirus system. The recombinant CEL II secreted in silkworm hemolymph was glycosylated and susceptible to N-glycosidase F. Additionally, larger metal ions such as Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) were able to replace Mg(2+) and enhanced mismatch cleavage activity of CEL II. These results indicate that the silkworm-baculovirus platform is a good alternative system to obtain the functional CEL II.

  16. The role of the bacterial mismatch repair system in SOS-induced mutagenesis: a theoretical background.

    PubMed

    Belov, Oleg V; Chuluunbaatar, Ochbadrakh; Kapralov, Mikhail I; Sweilam, Nasser H

    2013-09-07

    A theoretical study is performed of the possible role of the methyl-directed mismatch repair system in the ultraviolet-induced mutagenesis of Escherichia coli bacterial cells. For this purpose, mathematical models of the SOS network, translesion synthesis and mismatch repair are developed. Within the proposed models, the key pathways of these repair systems were simulated on the basis of modern experimental data related to their mechanisms. Our model approach shows a possible mechanistic explanation of the hypothesis that the bacterial mismatch repair system is responsible for attenuation of mutation frequency during ultraviolet-induced SOS response via removal of the nucleotides misincorporated by DNA polymerase V (the UmuD'2C complex). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  18. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  19. Mismatch repair proteins collaborate with methyltransferases in the repair of O6-methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Rye, Peter T.; Delaney, James C.; Netirojjanakul, Chawita; Sun, Dana X.; Liu, Jenny Z.; Essigmann, John M.

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair is essential for combatting the adverse effects of damage to the genome. One example of base damage is O6-methylguanine (O6mG), which stably pairs with thymine during replication and thereby creates a promutagenic O6mG:T mismatch. This mismatch has also been linked with cellular toxicity. Therefore, in the absence of repair, O6mG:T mismatches can lead to cell death or result in G:C→A:T transition mutations upon the next round of replication. Cysteine thiolate residues on the Ada and Ogt methyltransferase (MTase) proteins directly reverse the O6mG base damage to yield guanine. When a cytosine is opposite the lesion, MTase repair restores a normal G:C pairing. However, if replication past the lesion has produced an O6mG:T mismatch, MTase conversion to a G:T mispair must still undergo correction to avoid mutation. Two mismatch repair pathways in E. coli that convert G:T mispairs to native G:C pairings are methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) and very short patch repair (VSPR). This work examined the possible roles that proteins in these pathways play in coordination with the canonical MTase repair of O6mG:T mismatches. The possibility of this repair network was analyzed by probing the efficiency of MTase repair of a single O6mG residue in cells deficient in individual mismatch repair proteins (Dam, MutH, MutS, MutL, or Vsr). We found that MTase repair in cells deficient in Dam or MutH showed wild-type levels of MTase repair. In contrast, cells lacking any of the VSPR proteins MutS, MutL, or Vsr showed a decrease in repair of O6mG by the Ada and Ogt MTases. Evidence is presented that the VSPR pathway positively influences MTase repair of O6mG:T mismatches, and assists the efficiency of restoring these mismatches to native G:C base pairs. PMID:17951114

  20. Downregulation of tumor suppressing STF cDNA 3 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor metastasis of osteosarcoma by the Wnt/GSK-3β/β-catenin/Snail signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang-fan; Dai, Huanzi; Yan, Guang-ning; Meng, Gang; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Qiao-nan

    2016-04-10

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has received considerable attention as a conceptual paradigm for explaining the invasive and metastatic behavior of cells during cancer progression. Our previous study showed that loss of expression of TSSC3 is positively associated with osteosarcoma malignancy and progression. However, whether TSSC3 mediates EMT in osteosarcoma is poorly understood. In the present study, we determined that TSSC3 downregulation induced cell migration and invasion ability and promoted mesenchymal transition of osteosarcoma cells by upregulating mesenchymal markers and inhibiting the epithelial markers. Furthermore, TSSC3 downregulation elicited a signaling cascade that included increased levels of Wnt3a and LRP5, inactivation of GSK-3β, accumulation of nuclear β-catenin and Snail, the augmented binding of β-catenin to TCF-4, and accordingly increased the expression of Wnt target genes (CD44, MMP7). The gene knockdown of these signaling proteins could inhibit TSSC3 downregulation-promoted EMT, migration, and invasion in osteosarcoma. Finally, TSSC3 overexpression obviously inhibited cell migration, invasion, and repressed mesenchymal phenotypes, reducing lung metastasis through GSK-3β activation. Collectively, TSSC3 downregulation promotes the EMT of osteosarcoma cells by regulating EMT markers via a signal transduction pathway that involves Snail, Wnt-β-catenin/TCF, and GSK-3β. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Resolution of Mismatched Overlap Holliday Junction Intermediates by the Tyrosine Recombinase IntDOT.

    PubMed

    Ringwald, Kenneth; Yoneji, Sumiko; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2017-05-15

    CTnDOT is an integrated conjugative element found in Bacteroides species. CTnDOT contains and transfers antibiotic resistance genes. The element integrates into and excises from the host chromosome via a Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate as part of a site-specific recombination mechanism. The CTnDOT integrase, IntDOT, is a tyrosine recombinase with core-binding, catalytic, and amino-terminal (N) domains. Unlike well-studied tyrosine recombinases, such as lambda integrase (Int), IntDOT is able to resolve Holliday junctions containing heterology (mismatched bases) between the sites of strand exchange. All known natural isolates of CTnDOT contain mismatches in the overlap region between the sites of strand exchange. Previous work showed that IntDOT was unable to resolve synthetic Holliday junctions containing mismatched bases to products in the absence of the arm-type sites and a DNA-bending protein. We constructed synthetic HJs with the arm-type sites and tested them with the Bacteroides host factor (BHFa). We found that the addition of BHFa stimulated resolution of HJ intermediates with mismatched overlap regions to products. In addition, the L1 site is required for directionality of the reaction, particularly when the HJ contains mismatches. BHFa is required for product formation when the overlap region contains mismatches, and it stimulates resolution to products when the overlap region is identical. Without this DNA bending, the N domain of IntDOT is likely unable to bind the L1 arm-type site. These findings suggest that BHFa bends DNA into the necessary conformation for the higher-order complexes, including the L1 site, that are required for product formation.IMPORTANCE CTnDOT is a mobile element that carries antibiotic resistance genes and moves by site-selective recombination and subsequent conjugation. The recombination reaction is catalyzed by an integrase IntDOT that is a member of the tyrosine recombinase family. The reaction proceeds through ordered

  2. Proteasome inhibition rescues clinically significant unstable variants of the mismatch repair protein Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Arlow, Tim; Scott, Kristan; Wagenseller, Aubrey; Gammie, Alison

    2013-01-01

    MSH2 is required for DNA mismatch repair recognition in eukaryotes. Deleterious mutations in human MSH2 account for approximately half of the alleles associated with a common hereditary cancer syndrome. Previously, we characterized clinically identified MSH2 missense mutations, using yeast as a model system, and found that the most common cause of defective DNA mismatch repair was low levels of the variant Msh2 proteins. Here, we show that increased protein turnover is responsible for the reduced cellular levels. Increasing gene dosage of more than half of the missense alleles fully restored function. A titration experiment revealed that raising the expression level of one variant to less than wild-type levels restored mismatch repair, suggesting that overexpression is not always required to regain function. We found that the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation pathway is the major mechanism for increased turnover of the Msh2 variants and identified the primary ubiquitin ligase as San1. Deletion of San1 restored protein levels for all but one variant, but did not elevate wild-type Msh2 levels. The unstable variants interacted with San1, whereas wild-type Msh2 did not. Additionally, san1Δ suppressed the mismatch repair defect of unstable variants. Of medical significance, the clinically approved drug Bortezomib partially restored protein levels and mismatch repair function for low-level variants and reversed the resistance to cisplatin, a common chemotherapeutic. Our results provide the foundation for an innovative therapeutic regime for certain mismatch-repair-defective cancers that are refractory to conventional chemotherapies. PMID:23248292

  3. Morbillivirus downregulation of CD46.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, S E; Tiwari, A; Baron, M D; Lund, B T; Barrett, T; Cosby, S L

    1998-12-01

    There is evidence that CD46 (membrane cofactor protein) is a cellular receptor for vaccine and laboratory-passaged strains of measles virus (MV). Following infection with these MV strains, CD46 is downregulated from the cell surface, and consequent complement-mediated lysis has been shown to occur upon infection of a human monocytic cell line. The MV hemagglutinin (H) protein alone is capable of inducing this downregulation. Some wild-type strains of MV fail to downregulate CD46, despite infection being prevented by anti-CD46 antibodies. In this study we show that CD46 is also downregulated to the same extent by wild-type, vaccine, and laboratory-passaged strains of rinderpest virus (RPV), although CD46 did not appear to be the receptor for RPV. Expression of the RPV H protein by a nonreplicating adenovirus vector was also found to cause this downregulation. A vaccine strain of peste des petits ruminants virus caused slight downregulation of CD46 in infected Vero cells, while wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus and a wild-type strain of dolphin morbillivirus failed to downregulate CD46. Downregulation of CD46 can, therefore, be a function independent of the use of this protein as a virus receptor.

  4. Game, set, match for factor VIII mismatch?

    PubMed

    Miller, Connie H

    2015-08-13

    In this issue of Blood, Gunasekera et al provide evidence that the high rate of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors seen in black hemophilia A (HA) patients is not due to a mismatch between the structure of treatment products and FVIII genotypes common in blacks.

  5. Aortic mismatch in heart transplantation: readaptation.

    PubMed

    Miralles, A

    1997-10-01

    Great vessel mismatch between donor and recipient is very usual in heart transplantation. Different procedures have been used to manage this situation. A tailoring aortoplasty is described, as a technical alternative, in cases of considerable size incongruence between donor and recipient aortic diameters.

  6. A Mutation in a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Gene (Rad3) Required for Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription Increases the Efficiency of Mismatch Correction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Johnson, A. L.; Johnston, L. H.; Siede, W.; Friedberg, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Kunz, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    RAD3 functions in DNA repair and transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and particular rad3 alleles confer a mutator phenotype, possibly as a consequence of defective mismatch correction. We assessed the potential involvement of the Rad3 protein in mismatch correction by comparing heteroduplex repair in isogenic rad3-1 and wild-type strains. The rad3-1 allele increased the spontaneous mutation rate but did not prevent heteroduplex repair or bias its directionality. Instead, the efficiency of mismatch correction was enhanced in the rad3-1 strain. This surprising result prompted us to examine expression of yeast mismatch repair genes. We determined that MSH2, but not MLH1, is transcriptionally regulated during the cell-cycle like PMS1, and that rad3-1 does not increase the transcript levels for these genes in log phase cells. These observations suggest that the rad3-1 mutation gives rise to an enhanced efficiency of mismatch correction via a process that does not involve transcriptional regulation of mismatch repair. Interestingly, mismatch repair also was more efficient when error-editing by yeast DNA polymerase δ was eliminated. We discuss our results in relation to possible mechanisms that may link the rad3-1 mutation to mismatch correction efficiency. PMID:8889512

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  8. The effect of primer-template mismatches on the detection and quantification of nucleic acids using the 5' nuclease assay.

    PubMed

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Pas, Suzan D; Anber, Jeer; Voermans, Jolanda; Mes, Ted H M; Schutten, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the current method of choice for detection and quantification of nucleic acids, especially for molecular diagnostics. Complementarity between primers and template is often crucial for PCR applications, as mismatches can severely reduce priming efficiency. However, little quantitative data on the effect of these mismatches is available. We quantitatively investigated the effects of primer-template mismatches within the 3'-end primer region on real-time PCR using the 5'-nuclease assay. Our results show that single mismatches instigate a broad variety of effects, ranging from minor (<1.5 cycle threshold, eg, A-C, C-A, T-G, G-T) to severe impact (>7.0 cycle threshold, eg, A-A, G-A, A-G, C-C) on PCR amplification. A clear relationship between specific mismatch types, position, and impact was found, which remained consistent for DNA versus RNA amplifications and Taq/Moloney murine leukemia virus versus rTth based amplifications. The overall size of the impact among the various master mixes used differed substantially (up to sevenfold), and for certain master mixes a reverse or forward primer-specific impact was observed, emphasizing the importance of the experimental conditions used. Taken together these data suggest that mismatch impact follows a consistent pattern and enabled us to formulate several guidelines for predicting primer-template mismatch behavior when using specific 5-nuclease assay master mixes. Our study provides novel insight into mismatch behavior and should allow for more optimized development of real-time PCR assays involving primer-template mismatches.

  9. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  10. The Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex interacts with the mismatch repair system and contributes to temozolomide-induced G2 arrest and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mirzoeva, Olga K; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Pieper, Russell O

    2006-11-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide produces O(6)-methylguanine (O6MG) in DNA, which triggers futile DNA mismatch repair, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), G(2) arrest, and ultimately cell death. Because the protein complex consisting of Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN complex) plays a key role in DNA damage detection and signaling, we asked if this complex also played a role in the cellular response to temozolomide. Temozolomide exposure triggered the assembly of MRN complex into chromatin-associated nuclear foci. MRN foci formed significantly earlier than gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci that assembled in response to temozolomide-induced DNA DSBs. MRN foci formation was suppressed in cells that incurred lower levels of temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions and/or had decreased mismatch repair capabilities, suggesting that the MRN foci formed not in response to temozolomide-induced DSB but rather in response to mismatch repair processing of mispaired temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions. Consistent with this idea, the MRN foci colocalized with those of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (a component of the mismatch repair complex), and the MRN complex component Nbs1 coimmunoprecipitated with the mismatch repair protein Mlh1 specifically in response to temozolomide treatment. Furthermore, small inhibitory RNA-mediated suppression of Mre11 levels decreased temozolomide-induced G(2) arrest and cytotoxicity in a manner comparable to that achieved by suppression of mismatch repair. These data show that temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions, acted upon by the mismatch repair system, drive formation of the MRN complex foci and the interaction of this complex with the mismatch repair machinery. The MRN complex in turn contributes to the control of temozolomide-induced G(2) arrest and cytotoxicity, and as such is an additional determining factor in glioma sensitivity to DNA methylating chemotherapeutic drugs such as temozolomide.

  11. Insights into protein -- DNA interactions, stability and allosteric communications: A computational study of MutS-DNA recognition complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Salsbury, Freddie

    2012-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair proteins (MMR) maintain genetic stability by recognizing and repairing mismatched bases and insertion/deletion loops mistakenly incorporated during DNA replication, and initiate cellular response to certain types of DNA damage. The most abundant MMR mismatch-binding factor in eukaryotes, MutS, recognizes and initiates the repair of base-base mismatches and small insertion/deletions. We performed molecular dynamics simulations on mismatched and damaged MutS-DNA complexes. A comprehensive DNA binding site analysis of relevant conformations shows that MutS proteins recognize the mismatched and platinum cross-linked DNA substrates in significantly different modes. Distinctive conformational changes associated with MutS binding to mismatched and damaged DNA have been identified and they provide insight into the involvement of MMR proteins in DNA-repair and DNA-damage pathways. Stability and allosteric interactions at the heterodimer interface associated with the mismatch and damage recognition step allow for prediction of key residues in MMR cancer-causing mutations. A rigorous hydrogen bonding analysis for ADP molecules at the ATPase binding sites is also presented. A large number of known MMR cancer causing mutations among the residues were found.

  12. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  13. Trophic mismatch requires seasonal heterogeneity of warming.

    PubMed

    Straile, Dietmar; Kerimoglu, Onur; Peeters, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Climate warming has been shown to advance the phenology of species. Asynchronous changes in phenology between interacting species may disrupt feeding interactions (phenological mismatch), which could have tremendous consequences for ecosystem functioning. Long-term field observations have suggested asynchronous shifts in phenology with warming, whereas experimental studies have not been conclusive. Using proxy-based modeling of three trophic levels (algae, herbivores, and fish), we .show that asynchronous changes in phenology only occur if warming is seasonally heterogeneous, but not if warming is constant throughout the year. If warming is seasonally heterogeneous, the degree and even direction of asynchrony depends on the specific seasonality of the warming. Conclusions about phenological mismatches in food web interactions may therefore produce controversial results if the analyses do not distinguish between seasonally constant and seasonal specific warming. Furthermore, our results suggest that predicting asynchrony between interacting species requires reliable warming predictions that resolve sub-seasonal time scales.

  14. Topologically clustering: a method for discarding mismatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Dazhi; Gao, Chenqiang; Tian, Jinwen

    2007-11-01

    Wide baseline stereo correspondence has become a challenging and attractive problem in computer vision and its related applications. Getting high correct ratio initial matches is a very important step of general wide baseline stereo correspondence algorithm. Ferrari et al. suggested a voting scheme called topological filter in [3] to discard mismatches from initial matches, but they didn't give theoretical analysis of their method. Furthermore, the parameter of their scheme was uncertain. In this paper, we improved Ferraris' method based on our theoretical analysis, and presented a novel scheme called topologically clustering to discard mismatches. The proposed method has been tested using many famous wide baseline image pairs and the experimental results showed that the developed method can efficiently extract high correct ratio matches from low correct ratio initial matches for wide baseline image pairs.

  15. Acoustic evidence for phonologically mismatched speech errors.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Speech errors are generally said to accommodate to their new phonological context. This accommodation has been validated by several transcription studies. The transcription methodology is not the best choice for detecting errors at this level, however, as this type of error can be difficult to perceive. This paper presents an acoustic analysis of speech errors that uncovers non-accommodated or mismatch errors. A mismatch error is a sub-phonemic error that results in an incorrect surface phonology. This type of error could arise during the processing of phonological rules or they could be made at the motor level of implementation. The results of this work have important implications for both experimental and theoretical research. For experimentalists, it validates the tools used for error induction and the acoustic determination of errors free of the perceptual bias. For theorists, this methodology can be used to test the nature of the processes proposed in language production.

  16. Infrequent identity mismatches are frequently undetected

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to quickly and accurately match faces to photographs bears critically on many domains, from controlling purchase of age-restricted goods to law enforcement and airport security. Despite its pervasiveness and importance, research has shown that face matching is surprisingly error prone. The majority of face-matching research is conducted under idealized conditions (e.g., using photographs of individuals taken on the same day) and with equal proportions of match and mismatch trials, a rate that is likely not observed in everyday face matching. In four experiments, we presented observers with photographs of faces taken an average of 1.5 years apart and tested whether face-matching performance is affected by the prevalence of identity mismatches, comparing conditions of low (10 %) and high (50 %) mismatch prevalence. Like the low-prevalence effect in visual search, we observed inflated miss rates under low-prevalence conditions. This effect persisted when participants were allowed to correct their initial responses (Experiment 2), when they had to verify every decision with a certainty judgment (Experiment 3) and when they were permitted “second looks” at face pairs (Experiment 4). These results suggest that, under realistic viewing conditions, the low-prevalence effect in face matching is a large, persistent source of errors. PMID:24500751

  17. Deconstructing the Polymerase Chain Reaction: Understanding and Correcting Bias Associated with Primer Degeneracies and Primer-Template Mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stefan J.; Venkatramanan, Raghavee; Naqib, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive to mismatches between primer and template, and mismatches can lead to inefficient amplification of targeted regions of DNA template. In PCRs in which a degenerate primer pool is employed, each primer can behave differently. Therefore, inefficiencies due to different primer melting temperatures within a degenerate primer pool, in addition to mismatches between primer binding sites and primers, can lead to a distortion of the true relative abundance of targets in the original DNA pool. A theoretical analysis indicated that a combination of primer-template and primer-amplicon interactions during PCR cycles 3–12 is potentially responsible for this distortion. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel amplification strategy, entitled “Polymerase-exonuclease (PEX) PCR”, in which primer-template interactions and primer-amplicon interactions are separated. The PEX PCR method substantially and significantly improved the evenness of recovery of sequences from a mock community of known composition, and allowed for amplification of templates with introduced mismatches near the 3’ end of the primer annealing sites. When the PEX PCR method was applied to genomic DNA extracted from complex environmental samples, a significant shift in the observed microbial community was detected. Furthermore, the PEX PCR method provides a mechanism to identify which primers in a primer pool are annealing to target gDNA. Primer utilization patterns revealed that at high annealing temperatures in the PEX PCR method, perfect match annealing predominates, while at lower annealing temperatures, primers with up to four mismatches with templates can contribute substantially to amplification. The PEX PCR method is simple to perform, is limited to PCR mixes and a single exonuclease step which can be performed without reaction cleanup, and is recommended for reactions in which degenerate primer pools are used or when mismatches between primers

  18. Deconstructing the polymerase chain reaction: understanding and correcting bias associated with primer degeneracies and primer-template mismatches.

    PubMed

    Green, Stefan J; Venkatramanan, Raghavee; Naqib, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive to mismatches between primer and template, and mismatches can lead to inefficient amplification of targeted regions of DNA template. In PCRs in which a degenerate primer pool is employed, each primer can behave differently. Therefore, inefficiencies due to different primer melting temperatures within a degenerate primer pool, in addition to mismatches between primer binding sites and primers, can lead to a distortion of the true relative abundance of targets in the original DNA pool. A theoretical analysis indicated that a combination of primer-template and primer-amplicon interactions during PCR cycles 3-12 is potentially responsible for this distortion. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel amplification strategy, entitled "Polymerase-exonuclease (PEX) PCR", in which primer-template interactions and primer-amplicon interactions are separated. The PEX PCR method substantially and significantly improved the evenness of recovery of sequences from a mock community of known composition, and allowed for amplification of templates with introduced mismatches near the 3' end of the primer annealing sites. When the PEX PCR method was applied to genomic DNA extracted from complex environmental samples, a significant shift in the observed microbial community was detected. Furthermore, the PEX PCR method provides a mechanism to identify which primers in a primer pool are annealing to target gDNA. Primer utilization patterns revealed that at high annealing temperatures in the PEX PCR method, perfect match annealing predominates, while at lower annealing temperatures, primers with up to four mismatches with templates can contribute substantially to amplification. The PEX PCR method is simple to perform, is limited to PCR mixes and a single exonuclease step which can be performed without reaction cleanup, and is recommended for reactions in which degenerate primer pools are used or when mismatches between primers and

  19. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El Fantroussi, Said; Smidt, Hauke; Smoot, James C.; Tribou, Erik H.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of Staphylococcus epidermidis (38 nucleotides) and Nitrosomonas eutropha (39 nucleotides) were hybridized to perfect-match probes (18-mer and 19-mer) and to a set of probes having all possible single-base-pair mismatches. The melting profiles of all probe-target duplexes were determined in parallel by using an imposed temperature step gradient. We derived an optimum wash temperature for each probe and target by using a simple formula to calculate a discrimination index for each temperature of the step gradient. This optimum corresponded to the output of an independent analysis using a customized neural network program. These results together provide an experimental and analytical framework for optimizing mismatch discrimination among all probes on a DNA microarray.

  20. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El Fantroussi, Said; Smidt, Hauke; Smoot, James C.; Tribou, Erik H.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of Staphylococcus epidermidis (38 nucleotides) and Nitrosomonas eutropha (39 nucleotides) were hybridized to perfect-match probes (18-mer and 19-mer) and to a set of probes having all possible single-base-pair mismatches. The melting profiles of all probe-target duplexes were determined in parallel by using an imposed temperature step gradient. We derived an optimum wash temperature for each probe and target by using a simple formula to calculate a discrimination index for each temperature of the step gradient. This optimum corresponded to the output of an independent analysis using a customized neural network program. These results together provide an experimental and analytical framework for optimizing mismatch discrimination among all probes on a DNA microarray.

  1. Production of extrachromosomal microDNAs is linked to mismatch repair pathways and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Laura W.; Kumar, Pankaj; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D.; Pommier, Yves; Takeda, Shunichi; Dutta, Anindya

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY MicroDNAs are <400-base extrachromosomal circles found in mammalian cells. Tens of thousands of microDNAs have been found in all tissue types, including sperm. MicroDNAs arise preferentially from areas with high gene density, GC content, and exon density, from promoters with activating chromatin modifications and in sperm from the 5'-UTR of full-length LINE-1 elements, but are depleted from lamin-associated heterochromatin. Analysis of microDNAs from a set of human cancer cell lines revealed lineage-specific patterns of microDNA origins. A survey of microDNAs from chicken cells defective in various DNA repair proteins reveal that homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining repair pathways are not required for microDNA production. Deletion of the MSH3 DNA mismatch repair protein results in a significant decrease in microDNA abundance, specifically from non-CpG genomic regions. Thus, microDNAs arise as part of normal cellular physiology; either from DNA breaks associated with RNA metabolism or from replication slippage followed by mismatch repair. PMID:26051933

  2. Production of Extrachromosomal MicroDNAs Is Linked to Mismatch Repair Pathways and Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Laura W; Kumar, Pankaj; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D; Pommier, Yves; Takeda, Shunichi; Dutta, Anindya

    2015-06-23

    MicroDNAs are <400-base extrachromosomal circles found in mammalian cells. Tens of thousands of microDNAs have been found in all tissue types, including sperm. MicroDNAs arise preferentially from areas with high gene density, GC content, and exon density from promoters with activating chromatin modifications and in sperm from the 5'-UTR of full-length LINE-1 elements, but are depleted from lamin-associated heterochromatin. Analysis of microDNAs from a set of human cancer cell lines revealed lineage-specific patterns of microDNA origins. A survey of microDNAs from chicken cells defective in various DNA repair proteins reveals that homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining repair pathways are not required for microDNA production. Deletion of the MSH3 DNA mismatch repair protein results in a significant decrease in microDNA abundance, specifically from non-CpG genomic regions. Thus, microDNAs arise as part of normal cellular physiology—either from DNA breaks associated with RNA metabolism or from replication slippage followed by mismatch repair.

  3. Hypoxia downregulates Ku70/80 expression in cervical carcinoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Lara, Pedro Carlos; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa Maria; Bordón, Elisa; Rey, Agustin; Falcón, Orlando; Alonso, Ana Ruiz; Belka, Claus

    2008-11-01

    Hypoxia may inhibits the NHEJ DNA repair through downregulating Ku70/80 expression and combined with an increased angiogenesis and altered p53 expression would be responsible for tumor progression in cervical carcinoma.

  4. Antagonism of ultraviolet-light mutagenesis by the methyl-directed mismatch-repair system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Hewitt, S R; Hays, J B

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the Escherichia coli MutHLS mismatch-repair system can process UV-irradiated DNA in vivo and that the human MSH2.MSH6 mismatch-repair protein binds more strongly in vitro to photoproduct/base mismatches than to "matched" photoproducts in DNA. We tested the hypothesis that mismatch repair directed against incorrect bases opposite photoproducts might reduce UV mutagenesis, using two alleles at E. coli lacZ codon 461, which revert, respectively, via CCC --> CTC and CTT --> CTC transitions. F' lacZ targets were mated from mut(+) donors into mutH, mutL, or mutS recipients, once cells were at substantial densities, to minimize spontaneous mutation prior to irradiation. In umu(+) mut(+) recipients, a range of UV fluences induced lac(+) revertant frequencies of 4-25 x 10(-8); these frequencies were consistently 2-fold higher in mutH, mutL, or mutS recipients. Since this effect on mutation frequency was unaltered by an Mfd(-) defect, it appears not to involve transcription-coupled excision repair. In mut(+) umuC122::Tn5 bacteria, UV mutagenesis (at 60 J/m(2)) was very low, but mutH or mutL or mutS mutations increased reversion of both lacZ alleles roughly 25-fold, to 5-10 x 10(-8). Thus, at UV doses too low to induce SOS functions, such as Umu(2)'D, most incorrect bases opposite occasional photoproducts may be removed by mismatch repair, whereas in heavily irradiated (SOS-induced) cells, mismatch repair may only correct some photoproduct/base mismatches, so UV mutagenesis remains substantial. PMID:10655206

  5. A simple ABO genotyping by PCR using sequence-specific primers with mismatched nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Taki, Takashi; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    In forensics, the specific ABO blood group is often determined by analyzing the ABO gene. Among various methods used, PCR employing sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) is simpler than other methods for ABO typing. When performing the PCR-SSP, the pseudo-positive signals often lead to errors in ABO typing. We introduced mismatched nucleotides at the second and the third positions from the 3'-end of the primers for the PCR-SSP method and examined whether reliable typing could be achieved by suppressing pseudo-positive signals. Genomic DNA was extracted from nail clippings of 27 volunteers, and the ABO gene was examined with PCR-SSP employing primers with and without mismatched nucleotides. The ABO blood group of the nail clippings was also analyzed serologically, and these results were compared with those obtained using PCR-SSP. When mismatched primers were employed for amplification, the results of the ABO typing matched with those obtained by the serological method. When primers without mismatched nucleotides were used for PCR-SSP, pseudo-positive signals were observed. Thus our method may be used for achieving more reliable ABO typing.

  6. Fluorescence studies with DNA probes: dynamic aspects of DNA structure and DNA-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, David P.; Carver, Theodore E.

    1994-08-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence measurements of optical probes incorporated at specific sites in DNA provides a new approach to studies of DNA structure and DNA:protein interactions. This approach can be used to study complex multi-state behavior, such as the folding of DNA into alternative higher order structures or the transfer of DNA between multiple binding sites on a protein. In this study, fluorescence anisotropy decay of an internal dansyl probe attached to 17/27-mer oligonucleotides was used to monitor the distribution of DNA 3' termini bound at either the polymerase of 3' to 5' exonuclease sites of the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I. Partitioning of the primer terminus between the two active sites of the enzyme resulted in a heterogeneous probe environment, reflected in the associative behavior of the fluorescence anisotropy decay. Analysis of the anisotropy decay with a two state model of solvent-exposed and protein-associated dansyl probes was used to determine the fraction of DNA bound at each site. We examined complexes of Klenow fragment with DNAs containing various base mismatches. Single mismatches at the primer terminus caused a 3-fold increase in the equilibrium partitioning of DNA into the exonuclease site, while two or more consecutive G:G mismatches caused the DNA to bind exclusively at the exonuclease site, with a partitioning constant at least 250- fold greater than that of the corresponding matched DNA sequence. Internal single mismatches located up to four bases from the primer terminus produced larger effects than the same mismatch at the primer terminus. These results provide insight into the recognition mechanisms that enable DNA polymerases to proofread misincorporated bases during DNA replication.

  7. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  8. Temperature-dependent spectral mismatch corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Campanelli, Mark; Moriarty, Tom; Emery, Keith A.; Williams, Rafell

    2015-11-01

    This study develops the mathematical foundation for a translation of solar cell short-circuit current from one thermal and spectral irradiance operating condition to another without the use of ill-defined and error-prone temperature coefficients typically employed in solar cell metrology. Using the partial derivative of quantum efficiency with respect to temperature, the conventional isothermal expression for spectral mismatch corrections is modified to account for changes of current due to temperature; this modification completely eliminates the need for short-circuit-current temperature coefficients. An example calculation is provided to demonstrate use of the new translation.

  9. Visual mismatch negativity: a predictive coding view

    PubMed Central

    Stefanics, Gábor; Kremláček, Jan; Czigler, István

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies investigate the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) or use the vMMN as a tool to probe various aspects of human cognition. This paper reviews the theoretical underpinnings of vMMN in the light of methodological considerations and provides recommendations for measuring and interpreting the vMMN. The following key issues are discussed from the experimentalist's point of view in a predictive coding framework: (1) experimental protocols and procedures to control “refractoriness” effects; (2) methods to control attention; (3) vMMN and veridical perception. PMID:25278859

  10. NMR study of oligonucleotides containing base pair mismatches and a human growth hormone peptide for the determination of solution structures

    SciTech Connect

    Roongta, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Formation of unusual basepairs in DNA for random mutations in DNA was proposed in the sixties. These mismatches arise due to errors in replication, and from deamination of the 5-methylcytosine. The author's interest in studying mismatches and other oligonucleotides has been two fold. One is related to {sup 31}P chemical shifts and the backbone structure of oligonucleotides. He wanted to find out the significance of the dispersion of {sup 31}p chemical shifts in oligonucleotides. He wished to address whether this dispersion in {sup 31}P chemical shifts is related to global structural parameters of oligonucleotides like helix twist and whether he can prove the relationship between {sup 31}P chemical shifts and the backbone torsional angles epsilon and zeta. How does a mismatch affect {sup 31}P chemical shifts and the backbone torsional angle The second interest is related to solving the three dimensional structure of these biopolymers by using NMR data (NOESY distances) and computer simulations. His major study of these mismatches has been in the assignments of the protons resonances and the phosphorus resonances by 2D NMR. He has also tried to answer the question about the relationships between {sup 31}P chemical shifts and global parameters for DNA such as the helix twist. He has made substantial progress in determination of J(H3{prime}-P) coupling constants by 2D NMR and also in determining the relationship between the SIP chemical shifts and the backbone torsional angles by using the mismatch dodecamer sequences and the tetradecamer sequences. The 2D NMR data for the GG and GT mismatch have been used to determine three dimensional structures by using distance restrained molecular dynamics. The second project involved studying a 28 residue synthetic peptide by NMR.

  11. Restriction endonuclease TseI cleaves A:A and T:T mismatches in CAG and CTG repeats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Chen, Kai; Clarke, David J; Nortcliffe, Christopher P; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Edwardson, J Michael; Morton, A Jennifer; Jones, Anita C; Dryden, David T F

    2013-05-01

    The type II restriction endonuclease TseI recognizes the DNA target sequence 5'-G^CWGC-3' (where W = A or T) and cleaves after the first G to produce fragments with three-base 5'-overhangs. We have determined that it is a dimeric protein capable of cleaving not only its target sequence but also one containing A:A or T:T mismatches at the central base pair in the target sequence. The cleavage of targets containing these mismatches is as efficient as cleavage of the correct target sequence containing a central A:T base pair. The cleavage mechanism does not apparently use a base flipping mechanism as found for some other type II restriction endonuclease recognizing similarly degenerate target sequences. The ability of TseI to cleave targets with mismatches means that it can cleave the unusual DNA hairpin structures containing A:A or T:T mismatches formed by the repetitive DNA sequences associated with Huntington's disease (CAG repeats) and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (CTG repeats).

  12. ABO blood group mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tekgündüz, Sibel Akpınar; Özbek, Namık

    2016-02-01

    Apart from solid organ transplantations, use of ABO-blood group mismatched (ABO-mismatched) donors is acceptable in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. About 20-40% of allogeneic HSCT recipients will receive grafts from ABO-mismatched donors. ABO incompatible HSCT procedures are associated with immediate and late consequences, including but not restricted to acute or delayed hemolytic reactions, delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and graft-versus-host disease. This review summarizes the current knowledge about consequences of ABO-mismatched HSCT in terms of associated complications and will evaluate its impact on important outcome parameters of HSCT.

  13. Continuous cadmium exposure from weaning to maturity induces downregulation of ovarian follicle development-related SCF/c-kit gene expression and the corresponding changes of DNA methylation/microRNA pattern.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shaozheng; Wang, Wenxiang; Li, Yuchen; Li, Hong; Lu, Xiaoli; Xiao, Shihua; Wu, Tingting; Xie, Meimei; Zhang, Wenchang

    2014-03-21

    Cadmium (Cd) impairs ovary structure and function in mature animals. However, the influence of Cd on follicle development from weaning to maturity is obscure. In the current study, 21-day-old Wistar rats were administered Cd chloride at doses of 0, 0.5, 2.0 and 8.0 mg/kg body weight once a day for eight weeks by gavage. After administration, a significant decrease in ovarian wet weight, ovarian/body weight ratios, and primordial follicles, in addition to an increase in atresic follicles, were observed. Transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay confirmed the increase of follicle apoptosis as Cd concentration increased. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting showed a significantly decreased expression of follicle development-related factors, stem cell factor (SCF) and c-kit. Bisulfite sequencing suggested that the total methylation percentages of SCF/c-kit promoter region were not obvious change after Cd exposure. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed a significantly increased expression of miR-193, miR-221 and miR-222, which regulate c-kit, in the 2.0 mg/kg and 8.0 mg/kg treatment groups. Overall, this study proved that Cd administration from weaning to maturity could damage follicle development, suggesting that SCF/c-kit might play an important role in this effect. In addition, microRNAs might play a role in c-kit protein downregulation.

  14. An ssDNA aptamer against mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan enhances anti-tuberculosis activity of macrophages through downregulation of lipid-sensing nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qin; Yan, Jiamin; Liu, Qi; Yuan, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiao-Lian

    2017-02-16

    Mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) is an immunomodulatory epitope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously generated an aptamer (ZXL1) that specifically binds to ManLAM from the virulent Mtb H37Rv strain and reported that ZXL1 functioned as an antagonist, inhibiting the ManLAM-induced immunosuppression of dendritic cells (DCs). In the present study, we found that ZXL1 inhibited Mtb entry into murine macrophages. ZXL1 enhanced IL-1β and IL-12 mRNA expression and cytokine production in ManLAM-treated macrophages but decreased IL-10 production. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in the macrophages was upregulated in the presence of ZXL1 after stimulation with ManLAM. ZXL1 also inhibited the expression of the lipid-sensing nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). These results suggest that ZXL1 promotes anti-tuberculosis activity through the downregulation of PPAR γ expression, which may contribute to M1 macrophage polarization and Mtb killing by macrophages.

  15. Downregulation of miR-150 Expression by DNA Hypermethylation Is Associated with High 2-Hydroxy-(4-methylthio)butanoic Acid-Induced Hepatic Cholesterol Accumulation in Nursery Piglets.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yimin; Ling, Mingfa; Zhang, Luchu; Jiang, Shuxia; Sha, Yusheng; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-10-12

    Excess 2-hydroxy-(4-methylthio)butanoic acid (HMB) supplementation induces hyperhomocysteinemia, which contributes to hepatic cholesterol accumulation. However, it is unclear whether and how high levels of HMB break hepatic cholesterol homeostasis in nursery piglets. In this study, HMB oversupplementation suppressed food intake and decreased body weight in nursery piglets. Hyperhomocysteinemia and higher hepatic cholesterol accumulation were observed in HMB groups. Accordingly, HMB significantly increased the protein content of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) and glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) but decreased that of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1). Significant downregulation of miR-150, miR-181d-5p, and miR-296-3p targeting the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of GNMT and HMGCR was detected in the liver of HMB-treated piglets, and their functional validation was confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, hypermethylation of miR-150 promoter was detected in association with suppressed miR-150 expression in the livers of HMB-treated piglets. This study indicated a new mechanism of hepatic cholesterol unhomeostasis by dietary methyl donor supplementation.

  16. Transient suppression of MLH1 allows effective single-nucleotide substitution by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Marleen; de Vries, Sandra; Aarts, Marieke; Dekker, Robert; Brouwers, Conny; Wiebenga, Oliver; de Wind, Niels; Cantelli, Erika; Tonelli, Roberto; Te Riele, Hein

    2011-10-01

    Short synthetic single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to introduce subtle modifications into the genome of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We have previously shown that effective application of ssODN-mediated gene targeting in ESC requires (transient) suppression of DNA mismatch repair (MMR). However, whereas transient down-regulation of the mismatch recognition protein MSH2 allowed substitution of 3 or 4 nucleotides, 1 or 2 nucleotide substitutions were still suppressed. We now demonstrate that single- or dinucleotide substitution can effectively be achieved by transient down-regulation of the downstream MMR protein MLH1. By exploiting highly specific real-time PCR, we demonstrate the feasibility of substituting a single basepair in a non-selectable gene. However, disabling the MMR machinery may lead to inadvertent mutations. To obtain insight into the mutation rate associated with transient MMR suppression, we have compared the impact of transient and constitutive MMR deficiency on the repair of frameshift intermediates at mono- and dinucleotide repeats. Repair at these repeats relied on the substrate specificity and functional redundancy of the MSH2/MSH6 and MSH2/MSH3 MMR complexes. MLH1 knockdown increased the level of spontaneous mutagenesis, but modified ESCs remained germ line competent. Thus, transient MLH1 suppression provides a valuable extension of the MSH2 knockdown strategy, allowing rapid generation of mice carrying single basepair alterations in their genome.

  17. Down-regulation of increased TRAF6 expression in the peripheral mononuclear cells of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome by an EBV-EBER1-specific synthetic single-stranded complementary DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Sipka, Sándor; Zilahi, Erika; Papp, Gábor; Chen, Ji-Qing; Nagy, Andrea; Hegyi, Katalin; Kónya, József; Zeher, Margit

    2017-05-01

    We described earlier a simultaneously increased that the increased expression of miRNA-146a/b was accompanied by an increase in the expression of and TRAF6 and a decrease in the expression of IRAK1 genes in the peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) patients. Recently, the expression of EBV encoded. RNA (EBER) was published in the B cells of salivary glands of in pSS. In the present study, we applied an EBV-EBER1 specific synthetic single stranded complementary DNA molecule (EBV-EBER1-cDNA) to test whether any EBER1 related effect exists also in PBMCs of pSS patients. In the PBMCs of pSS patients and healthy controls, we investigated in vitro the effects of a synthetic single stranded EBV-EBER1-cDNA molecule, synthetic double-stranded (ds)RNA polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly (I:C)] and polyadenylic acid potassium salt poly-adenylic acid [poly-(A)] on the expression of TRAF6 gene tested by qRTPCR. The release of interferon -α was detected by ELISA. EBV-EBER1-cDNA resulted in a significant reduction in the expression of TRAF6 in the cells of patients, but in the healthy controls not, whereas the treatments with poly (I:C) and poly-(A) could not reduce the TRAF6 over-expression. No release of EBER1 could be observed in the culture supernatants of patients with pSS. Only the treatment with poly (I:C) resulted in a significant increase of interferon -α release, and only in the heathy controls. No release of EBER1 molecules took place during the culturing of cells. EBV-EBER- cDNA acted functionally on the cells of patients only. These findings give a further evidence of the linkage between EBV and pSS, furthermore, they show the possible role of EBV-EBER1 in the induction of increased TRAF6 expression in the peripheral B cells of Sjögren's patients. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. HLA-DQ Mismatches and Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jeremy R.; Coates, Patrick T.; Lewis, Joshua R.; Russ, Graeme R.; Watson, Narelle; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Wong, Germaine

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The current allocation algorithm for deceased donor kidney transplantation takes into consideration HLA mismatches at the ABDR loci but not HLA mismatches at other loci, including HLA-DQ. However, the independent effects of incompatibilities for the closely linked HLA-DQ antigens in the context of HLA-DR antigen matched and mismatched allografts are uncertain. We aimed to determine the effect of HLA-DQ mismatches on renal allograft outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, we examined the association between HLA-DQ mismatches and acute rejections in primary live and deceased donor kidney transplant recipients between 2004 and 2012 using adjusted Cox regression models. Results Of the 788 recipients followed for a median of 2.8 years (resulting in 2891 person-years), 321 (40.7%) and 467 (59.3%) received zero and one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, respectively. Compared with recipients who have received zero HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, those who have received one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys experienced greater numbers of any rejection (50 of 321 versus 117 of 467; P<0.01), late rejections (occurring >6 months post-transplant; 8 of 321 versus 27 of 467; P=0.03), and antibody-mediated rejections (AMRs; 12 of 321 versus 38 of 467; P=0.01). Compared with recipients of zero HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, the adjusted hazard ratios for any and late rejections in recipients who had received one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys were 1.54 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08 to 2.19) and 2.85 (95% CI, 1.05 to 7.75), respectively. HLA-DR was an effect modifier between HLA-DQ mismatches and AMR (P value for interaction =0.02), such that the association between HLA-DQ mismatches and AMR was statistically significant in those who have received one or two HLA-DR mismatched kidneys, with adjusted hazard ratio of 2.50 (95% CI, 1.05 to 5.94). Conclusions HLA

  19. Alignment to natural and imposed mismatches between the senses.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, K; Brenner, E; van Beers, R J; Schot, W D; Smeets, J B J

    2013-04-01

    Does the nervous system continuously realign the senses so that objects are seen and felt in the same place? Conflicting answers to this question have been given. Research imposing a sensory mismatch has provided evidence that the nervous system realigns the senses to reduce the mismatch. Other studies have shown that when subjects point with the unseen hand to visual targets, their end points show visual-proprioceptive biases that do not disappear after episodes of visual feedback. These biases are indicative of intersensory mismatches that the nervous system does not align for. Here, we directly compare how the nervous system deals with natural and imposed mismatches. Subjects moved a hand-held cube to virtual cubes appearing at pseudorandom locations in three-dimensional space. We alternated blocks in which subjects moved without visual feedback of the hand with feedback blocks in which we rendered a cube representing the hand-held cube. In feedback blocks, we rotated the visual feedback by 5° relative to the subject's head, creating an imposed mismatch between vision and proprioception on top of any natural mismatches. Realignment occurred quickly but was incomplete. We found more realignment to imposed mismatches than to natural mismatches. We propose that this difference is related to the way in which the visual information changed when subjects entered the experiment: the imposed mismatches were different from the mismatch in daily life, so alignment started from scratch, whereas the natural mismatches were not imposed by the experimenter, so subjects are likely to have entered the experiment partly aligned.

  20. [Cognitive evoked potentials. Perspectives for mismatch negativity].

    PubMed

    Gurtubay, I G

    2009-01-01

    The techniques of cognitive evoked potentials are considered long and technically complex, which is why their use in clinical practice is not very widespread in spite of their potential utility. Recent advances in registering and analysis, together with improvement of the software managing these signals, have appreciably reduced these problems. Mismatch negativity stands out as the most promising of all the cognitive potentials due to its special characteristics regarding its generation requisites and its proven clinical utility. The fact that it can be generated without care requirements makes it especially useful for evaluating subjects with a low level of consciousness; it serves for predicting when they will emerge from a coma, amongst other uses. The incorporation of this technique into the arsenal of neurophysiological techniques for evaluating the state of these subjects will bring a substantial improvement in the evaluation of cases whose management in clinical practice is extremely complex.

  1. The structural and hydrodynamic properties of damaged, mismatched and dA-tract DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerkovich, Bozidar

    Deoxyribonucleic acid is a molecule that exists on the margin of two worlds: one that obeys the regulations of the classical mechanics and one that is governed by the laws of quantum physics. As such, DNA has to find a way to satisfy both, which at times means "bending" rules. In this thesis emphasis is on the characterization of structural and hydrodynamic properties of DNA and how its geometry accommodates deviations from its chemically native structure. Various damages and sequence specific features such as urea base, mismatches and dA-tracts were examined to elucidate how these unusual building blocks affect DNA structure and motion. Methods employed included NMR solution structure determination, molecular simulations, diffusion coefficient measurements, enzymatic assays, chromatographic procedures, and chemical modifications. A shape function method for monitoring the flexibility and curvature of DNA has been developed that is based on the measurements of diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, an attempt to assess the effects of such structural elements on the biology of DNA has been made in the context of replication and cleavage of RNA-DNA hybrids by RNase H. Results of these experiments showed that structure of DNA containing urea residue is largely B-DNA, with limited and localized structural distortion, but perturbed electrostatics around the damaged base, which was reflected in increased flexibility of DNA containing this particular residue. It was found that DNA containing dA tract possesses a curvature that is a function of temperature and is highly sensitive to the concentration of magnesium cations. DNA is functionally a very active molecule. We have shown that the same notion applies when it comes to looking at DNA in a structural sense. Hence, we have to leave the notion of DNA as a rigid, rod-like molecule behind, and accept the new reality in which the structure of DNA is reflected in its function and activity.

  2. Valence band anticrossing in highly mismatched alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberi, Kirstin Mclean

    Semiconductor alloys offer the ability to tune certain material parameters such as the band gap or carrier effective mass through precise control of the alloy composition, allowing them to be optimized for specific device requirements. While many alloys demonstrate near linear composition dependencies in these properties, those containing isoelectronic anion species that are significantly mismatched in electronegativity or ionization energy, known as highly mismatched alloys (HMA), exhibit substantial deviation from this trend. Here, the optical and electrical properties of HMAs containing dilute concentrations of large metallic anions are investigated in the context of a valence band anticrossing (VBAC) theory. Minority species with low ionization energies often introduce localized p-states near the valence band edge of the host semiconductor. Hybridization of these localized states with the extended p-states of the host may be described by a 12 x 12 Hamiltonian and produces a splitting of the alloy valence band into E+ and E - states. Photomodulated reflectance studies coupled with the VBAC theory confirm that the band gap bowing observed in GaSbxAs1-x and GaBixAs1-x is caused by an upward movement of the valence band edge as a result of the anticrossing interaction between the E+ and E- states. The valence band restructuring also adversely affects hole transport in these alloys through an increase in the heavy hole effective mass and the addition of an alloy disorder scattering mechanism. Finally, the VBAC theory has been extended to group IV HMAs as well as to the dilute magnetic semiconductor Ga1-x MnxAs, both of which exhibit strong hole localization at the minority species sites.

  3. Transplant size mismatch in restrictive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ganapathi, Asvin M; Mulvihill, Michael S; Englum, Brian R; Speicher, Paul J; Gulack, Brian C; Osho, Asishana A; Yerokun, Babatunde A; Snyder, Laurie R; Davis, Duane; Hartwig, Matthew G

    2017-04-01

    To maximize the benefit of lung transplantation, the effect of size mismatch on survival in lung transplant recipients with restrictive lung disease (RLD) was examined. All single and bilateral RLD lung transplants from 1987 to 2011 in the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) Database were identified. Donor predicted total lung capacity (pTLC):Recipient pTLC ratio (pTLCr) quantified mismatch. pTLCr was segregated into five strata. A Cox proportional hazards model evaluated the association of pTLCr with mortality hazard. To identify a critical pTLCr, a Cox model using a restricted cubic spline for pTLCr was used. A total of 6656 transplants for RLD were identified. Median pTLCr for single orthotopic lung transplant (SOLT) and bilateral orthotopic lung transplant (BOLT) was 1.0 (0.69-1.47) and 0.98 (0.66-1.45). Examination of pTLCr as a categorical variable revealed that undersizing (pTLCr <0.8) for SOLT and moderate oversizing (pTLCr = 1.1-1.2) for SOLT and BOLT had a harmful survival effect [for SOLT pTLC <0.8: HR 1.711 (95% CI 1.146-2.557), P = 0.01 and for BOLT pTLC 1.1-1.2: HR 1.717 (95% CI 1.112-2.651), P = 0.02]. Spline analysis revealed significant changes in SOLT mortality by variation of pTLCr between 0.8-0.9 and 1.1-1.2. RLD patients undergoing SOLT are susceptible to detriments of an undersized lung. RLD patients undergoing BOLT have higher risk of mortality when pTLCr falls between 1.1 and 1.2. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  4. Synergism of Dam, MutH, and MutS in methylation-directed mismatch repair in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hu, Changkun; Zhao, Yunqi; Sun, Huiyun; Yang, Yixin

    2017-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a critical mutation surveillance system for recognizing and repairing erroneous insertion, deletion, and disincorporation of base. Major components of mismatch repair system consist of MutH, MutL, and MutS. Dam methylates adenine to distinguish newly synthesized daughter strands from the parent strands. Employing a tyrosine-auxotrophic E. coli FX-11 strain, the mutation frequency can be determined by the number of tyrosine revertants and the cell viability of FX-11 with deficiencies in dam and mismatch repair proteins. This study showed that mutS defect produced a higher mutation frequency than mutH did. Interestingly, double defects in dam and mutS synergistically produced a dramatically higher spontaneous mutation frequency than the summation of mutation frequencies of FX-11 strains with individual deficiency of dam or mutS, suggesting that Dam may work with MutHL to partially accomplish the task of recognizing the mismatch sites to retain partial mismatch repair capacity.

  5. Deficient mismatch repair: Read all about it (Review)

    PubMed Central

    RICHMAN, SUSAN

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, result in a phenotype called microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in up to 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers. Approximately one quarter of colon cancers with deficient MMR (dMMR) develop as a result of an inherited predisposition syndrome, Lynch syndrome (formerly known as HNPCC). It is essential to identify patients who potentially have Lynch syndrome, as not only they, but also family members, may require screening and monitoring. Diagnostic criteria have been developed, based primarily on Western populations, and several methodologies are available to identify dMMR tumours, including immunohistochemistry and microsatellite testing. These criteria have provided evidence supporting the introduction of reflex testing. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that tests have a limited sensitivity and specificity and may yet be superseded by next generation sequencing. In this review, the limitations of diagnostic criteria are discussed, and current and emerging screening technologies explained. There is now useful evidence supporting the prognostic and predictive value of dMMR status in colorectal tumours, but much less is known about their value in extracolonic tumours, that may also feature in Lynch syndrome. This review assesses current literature relating to dMMR in endometrial, ovarian, gastric and melanoma cancers, which it would seem, may benefit from large-scale clinical trials in order to further close the gap in knowledge between colorectal and extracolonic tumours. PMID:26315971

  6. Protective effects of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon: removal of O(6)-methylguanine DNA adducts, p53 expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase downregulation and apoptotic induction.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Shaonly; Swamy, Viswanath; Suresh, D; Rajkumar, M; Rana, Basabi; Rana, Ajay; Chatterjee, Malay

    2008-02-29

    Previous studies have shown that dietary micronutrient vanadium can protect neoplastic development induced by chemical carcinogens. Current investigation is an attempt to evaluate the role of vanadium (4.27 micro mol/l) in inhibiting 1,2 dimethyhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg body weight) induced rat colon carcinogenesis. We investigated the effect of vanadium against the formation of DMH-induced O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-Meg) DNA adduct, a potent cytotoxic and mutagenic agent for colon cancer. Supplementation of vanadium significantly reduced the hepatic (P<0.05), and colonic (at three sequential time points; ANOVA, F=4.96, P<0.05) O(6)-Meg DNA adduct levels in rats, indicating vanadium's potency in limiting the initiation event of colon carcinogenesis. Removal of initiated and damaged precancerous cells by apoptosis can prevent tumorigenesis and further malignancy. DNA fragmentation study revealed the vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction in colon tumors. The increased value of apoptotic index (AI) (62.27%; P<0.01) in subsequent TUNEL assay further confirmed the apoptosis induction by vanadium. This paralleled the nuclear immunoexpression of p53. A significant positive correlation between p53 immunoexpression and AI (P=0.0026, r=0.83, r(2)=0.69) links its association with vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction. Vanadium treatment also abated the mRNA expression of iNOS (54.03%), reflecting its protective effect against nitric oxide-mediated genotoxicity and colon tumorigenesis. These studies cumulatively provide strong evidence for the inhibitory actions of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon.

  7. Speaking Self-Assessment: Mismatches between Learners' and Teachers' Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babaii, Esmat; Taghaddomi, Shahin; Pashmforoosh, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual (mis)matches between teachers and learners are said to affect learning success or failure. Self-assessment, as a formative assessment tool, may, inter alia, be considered a means to minimize such mismatches. Therefore, the present study investigated the extent to which learners' assessment of their own speaking performance, before and…

  8. Educational Mismatch of Graduates: A Multidimensional and Fuzzy Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betti, Gianni; D'Agostino, Antonella; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to measure the educational mismatch, seen as a problem of overeducation, using a multidimensional and fuzzy methodology. Educational mismatch can be difficult to measure because many factors can converge to its definition and the traditional unidimensional indicators presented in literature can offer a restricted view of…

  9. Speaking Self-Assessment: Mismatches between Learners' and Teachers' Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babaii, Esmat; Taghaddomi, Shahin; Pashmforoosh, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual (mis)matches between teachers and learners are said to affect learning success or failure. Self-assessment, as a formative assessment tool, may, inter alia, be considered a means to minimize such mismatches. Therefore, the present study investigated the extent to which learners' assessment of their own speaking performance, before and…

  10. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM prob