Science.gov

Sample records for downregulate dna mismatch

  1. Dynamics of DNA Mismatch Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Julie; Lin, Yuyen; Rasnik, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    DNA mismatch repair protects the genome from spontaneous mutations by recognizing errors, excising damage, and re-synthesizing DNA in a pathway that is highly conserved. Mismatch recognition is accomplished by the MutS family of proteins which are weak ATPases that bind specifically to damaged DNA, but the specific molecular mechanisms by which these proteins recognize damage and initiate excision are not known. Previous structural investigations have implied that protein-induced conformational changes are central to mismatch recognition. Because damage detection is a highly dynamic process in which conformational changes of the protein-DNA complexes occur on a time scale of a few seconds, it is difficult to obtain meaningful kinetic information with traditional ensemble techniques. In this work, we use single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study the conformational dynamics of fluorescently labeled DNA substrates in the presence of the mismatch repair protein MutS from E. coli and its human homolog MSH2/MSH6. Our studies allow us to obtain quantitative kinetic information about the rates of binding and dissociation and to determine the conformational states for each protein-DNA complex.

  2. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  3. The structural impact of DNA mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D.; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  4. Osmium complexation of mismatched DNA: effect of the bases adjacent to mismatched 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-03-18

    The efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes is a key point for the design of sequence-specific detection of DNA methylation. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes changed depending on the type of 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine forming a mismatched base pair. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique "side reaction" was observed. However, the nature of the mismatched base pairs in the reaction site did not influence the selectivity of osmium complex formation with methylated DNA.

  5. Eukaryotic Mismatch Repair in Relation to DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Thomas A; Erie, Dorothy A

    2015-01-01

    Three processes act in series to accurately replicate the eukaryotic nuclear genome. The major replicative DNA polymerases strongly prevent mismatch formation, occasional mismatches that do form are proofread during replication, and rare mismatches that escape proofreading are corrected by mismatch repair (MMR). This review focuses on MMR in light of increasing knowledge about nuclear DNA replication enzymology and the rate and specificity with which mismatches are generated during leading- and lagging-strand replication. We consider differences in MMR efficiency in relation to mismatch recognition, signaling to direct MMR to the nascent strand, mismatch removal, and the timing of MMR. These studies are refining our understanding of relationships between generating and repairing replication errors to achieve accurate replication of both DNA strands of the nuclear genome.

  6. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  7. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  8. The Effect of Basepair Mismatch on DNA Strand Displacement.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, D W Bo; Kim, Harold D

    2016-04-12

    DNA strand displacement is a key reaction in DNA homologous recombination and DNA mismatch repair and is also heavily utilized in DNA-based computation and locomotion. Despite its ubiquity in science and engineering, sequence-dependent effects of displacement kinetics have not been extensively characterized. Here, we measured toehold-mediated strand displacement kinetics using single-molecule fluorescence in the presence of a single basepair mismatch. The apparent displacement rate varied significantly when the mismatch was introduced in the invading DNA strand. The rate generally decreased as the mismatch in the invader was encountered earlier in displacement. Our data indicate that a single base pair mismatch in the invader stalls branch migration and displacement occurs via direct dissociation of the destabilized incumbent strand from the substrate strand. We combined both branch migration and direct dissociation into a model, which we term the concurrent displacement model, and used the first passage time approach to quantitatively explain the salient features of the observed relationship. We also introduce the concept of splitting probabilities to justify that the concurrent model can be simplified into a three-step sequential model in the presence of an invader mismatch. We expect our model to become a powerful tool to design DNA-based reaction schemes with broad functionality.

  9. Bubbles and mismatches in DNA melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan

    We obtained the first experimental measurements of the length of the denaturation bubble appearing in the DNA melting transition. This is achieved by working with short oligomers which can form only one bubble per molecule. We used sequences clamped at the ends with GC pairs (strong binding) and possessing AT rich (weaker binding) middle regions in order to have the bubble open in the middle, and sequences with GC pairs at one end and AT pairs at the other end in order to form the bubble at the end. Use a quenching technique to trap the bubble states, we could measure the length of the bubble and the relative weights of the bubble states as a function of temperature. We found that the average bubble size <ℓ> grows for increasing temperature, but reaches a plateau at a length of order B (the length of the AT region). After the plateau, the average bubble length jumps to 1. This jump of the order parameter is a signature of a discontinuous transition, one where the bubble size remains finite up to critical temperature of strand separation. When B increases, the extension of the plateau shrinks. This suggests a continuous transition for a homogenous sequence (e.g. all AT base pairs) in the thermodynamic limit. The presence of the bubble states decreases as B is reduced. By plotting the average statistical weight of the bubble states vs. B, we obtained the first direct measurement of the nucleation size of the bubble. For a bubble flanked by double-stranded regions, the nucleation size is ˜ 3 bases. For bubbles opening at the ends of the molecule there is no nucleation threshold. The measured statistical weights of the bubble states agree with the predictions of the widely used thermodynamic models in the case of unzipping from the ends; however, internal bubble states are not completely described by the model. For the first time we show experimentally that a single mismatch transforms a transition with many intermediates into a nearly two-state transition for

  10. Mismatch repair balances leading and lagging strand DNA replication fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Scott A; Williams, Jessica S; Pursell, Zachary F; Abdulovic-Cui, Amy A; Clark, Alan B; Nick McElhinny, Stephanie A; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    The two DNA strands of the nuclear genome are replicated asymmetrically using three DNA polymerases, α, δ, and ε. Current evidence suggests that DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) is the primary leading strand replicase, whereas Pols α and δ primarily perform lagging strand replication. The fact that these polymerases differ in fidelity and error specificity is interesting in light of the fact that the stability of the nuclear genome depends in part on the ability of mismatch repair (MMR) to correct different mismatches generated in different contexts during replication. Here we provide the first comparison, to our knowledge, of the efficiency of MMR of leading and lagging strand replication errors. We first use the strand-biased ribonucleotide incorporation propensity of a Pol ε mutator variant to confirm that Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We then use polymerase-specific error signatures to show that MMR efficiency in vivo strongly depends on the polymerase, the mismatch composition, and the location of the mismatch. An extreme case of variation by location is a T-T mismatch that is refractory to MMR. This mismatch is flanked by an AT-rich triplet repeat sequence that, when interrupted, restores MMR to > 95% efficiency. Thus this natural DNA sequence suppresses MMR, placing a nearby base pair at high risk of mutation due to leading strand replication infidelity. We find that, overall, MMR most efficiently corrects the most potentially deleterious errors (indels) and then the most common substitution mismatches. In combination with earlier studies, the results suggest that significant differences exist in the generation and repair of Pol α, δ, and ε replication errors, but in a generally complementary manner that results in high-fidelity replication of both DNA strands of the yeast nuclear genome.

  11. New insights into the mechanism of DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Gloria X.; Schmidt, Tobias T.; Kolodner, Richard D.; Hombauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The genome of all organisms is constantly being challenged by endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage. Errors like base:base mismatches or small insertions and deletions, primarily introduced by DNA polymerases during DNA replication are repaired by an evolutionary conserved DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. The MMR system, together with the DNA replication machinery, promote repair by an excision and resynthesis mechanism during or after DNA replication, increasing replication fidelity by upto-three orders of magnitude. Consequently, inactivation of MMR genes results in elevated mutation rates that can lead to increased cancer susceptibility in humans. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of MMR with a focus on the different MMR protein complexes, their function and structure. We also discuss how recent findings have provided new insights in the spatio-temporal regulation and mechanism of MMR. PMID:25862369

  12. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  13. Tolerance of DNA Mismatches in Dmc1 Recombinase-mediated DNA Strand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, María V; Monti, Mariela R; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Argaraña, Carlos E; Pezza, Roberto J

    2016-03-04

    Recombination between homologous chromosomes is required for the faithful meiotic segregation of chromosomes and leads to the generation of genetic diversity. The conserved meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase catalyzes homologous recombination triggered by DNA double strand breaks through the exchange of parental DNA sequences. Although providing an efficient rate of DNA strand exchange between polymorphic alleles, Dmc1 must also guard against recombination between divergent sequences. How DNA mismatches affect Dmc1-mediated DNA strand exchange is not understood. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the mechanism of Dmc1-mediated strand exchange between DNA oligonucleotides with different degrees of heterology. The efficiency of strand exchange is highly sensitive to the location, type, and distribution of mismatches. Mismatches near the 3' end of the initiating DNA strand have a small effect, whereas most mismatches near the 5' end impede strand exchange dramatically. The Hop2-Mnd1 protein complex stimulates Dmc1-catalyzed strand exchange on homologous DNA or containing a single mismatch. We observed that Dmc1 can reject divergent DNA sequences while bypassing a few mismatches in the DNA sequence. Our findings have important implications in understanding meiotic recombination. First, Dmc1 acts as an initial barrier for heterologous recombination, with the mismatch repair system providing a second level of proofreading, to ensure that ectopic sequences are not recombined. Second, Dmc1 stepping over infrequent mismatches is likely critical for allowing recombination between the polymorphic sequences of homologous chromosomes, thus contributing to gene conversion and genetic diversity.

  14. Guanine- 5-carboxylcytosine base pairs mimic mismatches during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Toshihiro; Ito, Shinsuke; Toda, Mariko; Kanao, Rie; Collins, Leonard B; Shibata, Marika; Urabe, Miho; Koseki, Haruhiko; Masuda, Yuji; Swenberg, James A; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2014-06-09

    The genetic information encoded in genomes must be faithfully replicated and transmitted to daughter cells. The recent discovery of consecutive DNA conversions by TET family proteins of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) suggests these modified cytosines act as DNA lesions, which could threaten genome integrity. Here, we have shown that although 5caC pairs with guanine during DNA replication in vitro, G·5caC pairs stimulated DNA polymerase exonuclease activity and were recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Knockdown of thymine DNA glycosylase increased 5caC in genome, affected cell proliferation via MMR, indicating MMR is a novel reader for 5caC. These results suggest the epigenetic modification products of 5caC behave as DNA lesions.

  15. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  16. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-03-22

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3'- or 5'-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5'-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2-HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5' → 3' exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1-HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5'-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2-HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1-HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5' MMR.

  17. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  18. Mismatch Repair Balances Leading and Lagging Strand DNA Replication Fidelity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-11

    the most deleterious mismatches (i.e., indel mismatches). Within classes of similar deleterious potential (base-base mismatches), evolution has...spontaneous mutation rates and the sequencing of URA3 mutants were as previously described [2,13,21], save that MSH2 was deleted from haploid pol2

  19. DnaN clamp zones provide a platform for spatiotemporal coupling of mismatch detection to DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Justin S; Sharma, Anushi; Hingorani, Manju M; Simmons, Lyle A

    2013-02-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) increases the fidelity of DNA replication by identifying and correcting replication errors. Processivity clamps are vital components of DNA replication and MMR, yet the mechanism and extent to which they participate in MMR remains unclear. We investigated the role of the Bacillus subtilis processivity clamp DnaN, and found that it serves as a platform for mismatch detection and coupling of repair to DNA replication. By visualizing functional MutS fluorescent fusions in vivo, we find that MutS forms foci independent of mismatch detection at sites of replication (i.e. the replisome). These MutS foci are directed to the replisome by DnaN clamp zones that aid mismatch detection by targeting the search to nascent DNA. Following mismatch detection, MutS disengages from the replisome, facilitating repair. We tested the functional importance of DnaN-mediated mismatch detection for MMR, and found that it accounts for 90% of repair. This high dependence on DnaN can be bypassed by increasing MutS concentration within the cell, indicating a secondary mode of detection in vivo whereby MutS directly finds mismatches without associating with the replisome. Overall, our results provide new insight into the mechanism by which DnaN couples mismatch recognition to DNA replication in living cells.

  20. Novel DNA mismatch-repair activity involving YB-1 in human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Mason, Penelope A; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Weissman, Lior; Tian, Jingyan; Guay, David; Lebel, Michel; Stevnsner, Tinna V; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2009-06-04

    Maintenance of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is essential for proper cellular function. The accumulation of damage and mutations in the mtDNA leads to diseases, cancer, and aging. Mammalian mitochondria have proficient base excision repair, but the existence of other DNA repair pathways is still unclear. Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), which corrects base mismatches and small loops, are associated with DNA microsatellite instability, accumulation of mutations, and cancer. MMR proteins have been identified in yeast and coral mitochondria; however, MMR proteins and function have not yet been detected in human mitochondria. Here we show that human mitochondria have a robust mismatch-repair activity, which is distinct from nuclear MMR. Key nuclear MMR factors were not detected in mitochondria, and similar mismatch-binding activity was observed in mitochondrial extracts from cells lacking MSH2, suggesting distinctive pathways for nuclear and mitochondrial MMR. We identified the repair factor YB-1 as a key candidate for a mitochondrial mismatch-binding protein. This protein localizes to mitochondria in human cells, and contributes significantly to the mismatch-binding and mismatch-repair activity detected in HeLa mitochondrial extracts, which are significantly decreased when the intracellular levels of YB-1 are diminished. Moreover, YB-1 depletion in cells increases mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis. Our results show that human mitochondria contain a functional MMR repair pathway in which YB-1 participates, likely in the mismatch-binding and recognition steps.

  1. Mouse models of DNA mismatch repair in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeryoung; Tosti, Elena; Edelmann, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are the cause of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome (HNPCC/LS) one of the most common cancer predisposition syndromes, and defects in MMR are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. In the past, the generation and analysis of mouse lines with knockout mutations in all of the known MMR genes has provided insight into how loss of individual MMR genes affects genome stability and contributes to cancer susceptibility. These studies also revealed essential functions for some of the MMR genes in B cell maturation and fertility. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the cancer predisposition phenotypes of recently developed mouse models with targeted mutations in MutS and MutL homologs (Msh and Mlh, respectively) and their utility as preclinical models. The focus will be on mouse lines with conditional MMR mutations that have allowed more accurate modeling of human cancer syndromes in mice and that together with new technologies in gene targeting, hold great promise for the analysis of MMR-deficient intestinal tumors and other cancers which will drive the development of preventive and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:26708047

  2. Mouse models of DNA mismatch repair in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeryoung; Tosti, Elena; Edelmann, Winfried

    2016-02-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are the cause of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome (HNPCC/LS) one of the most common cancer predisposition syndromes, and defects in MMR are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. In the past, the generation and analysis of mouse lines with knockout mutations in all of the known MMR genes has provided insight into how loss of individual MMR genes affects genome stability and contributes to cancer susceptibility. These studies also revealed essential functions for some of the MMR genes in B cell maturation and fertility. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the cancer predisposition phenotypes of recently developed mouse models with targeted mutations in MutS and MutL homologs (Msh and Mlh, respectively) and their utility as preclinical models. The focus will be on mouse lines with conditional MMR mutations that have allowed more accurate modeling of human cancer syndromes in mice and that together with new technologies in gene targeting, hold great promise for the analysis of MMR-deficient intestinal tumors and other cancers which will drive the development of preventive and therapeutic treatment strategies.

  3. Human DNA Polymerase Kappa Encircles DNA: Implicatins for Mismatch Extension and Lesion Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Lone,S.; Townson, S.; Uljon, S.; Johnson, R.; Brahma, A.; Nair, D.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.; Aggarwal, A.

    2007-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase (Pol ) is a proficient extender of mispaired primer termini on undamaged DNAs and is implicated in the extension step of lesion bypass. We present here the structure of Pol catalytic core in ternary complex with DNA and an incoming nucleotide. The structure reveals encirclement of the DNA by a unique 'N-clasp' at the N terminus of Pol , which augments the conventional right-handed grip on the DNA by the palm, fingers, and thumb domains and the PAD and provides additional thermodynamic stability. The structure also reveals an active-site cleft that is constrained by the close apposition of the N-clasp and the fingers domain, and therefore can accommodate only a single Watson-Crick base pair. Together, DNA encirclement and other structural features help explain Pol 's ability to extend mismatches and to promote replication through various minor groove DNA lesions, by extending from the nucleotide incorporated opposite the lesion by another polymerase.

  4. Mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA intermediates of extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W P; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    Previous work indicated that extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells could be explained by the single-strand annealing (SSA) model. This model predicts that extrachromosomal recombination leads to nonconservative crossover products and that heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) is formed by annealing of complementary single strands. Mismatched bases in hDNA may subsequently be repaired to wild-type or mutant sequences, or they may remain unrepaired and segregate following DNA replication. We describe a system to examine the formation and mismatch repair of hDNA in recombination intermediates. Our results are consistent with extrachromosomal recombination occurring via SSA and producing crossover recombinant products. As predicted by the SSA model, hDNA was present in double-strand break-induced recombination intermediates. By placing either silent or frameshift mutations in the predicted hDNA region, we have shown that mismatches are efficiently repaired prior to DNA replication. Images PMID:8264607

  5. Single-molecule views of MutS on mismatched DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Bong; Cho, Won-Ki; Park, Jonghyun; Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Fishel, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Base-pair mismatches that occur during DNA replication or recombination can reduce genetic stability or conversely increase genetic diversity. The genetics and biophysical mechanism of mismatch repair (MMR) has been extensively studied since its discovery nearly 50 years ago. MMR is a strand-specific excision-resynthesis reaction that is initiated by MutS homolog (MSH) binding to the mismatched nucleotides. The MSH mismatch-binding signal is then transmitted to the immediate downstream MutL homolog (MLH/PMS) MMR components and ultimately to a distant strand scission site where excision begins. The mechanism of signal transmission has been controversial for decades. We have utilized single molecule Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET), Fluorescence Tracking (smFT) and Polarization Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (smP-TIRF) to examine the interactions and dynamic behaviors of single Thermus aquaticus MutS (TaqMutS) particles on mismatched DNA. We determined that Taq-MutS forms an incipient clamp to search for a mismatch in ∼1 s intervals by 1-dimensional (1D) thermal fluctuation-driven rotational diffusion while in continuous contact with the helical duplex DNA. When MutS encounters a mismatch it lingers for ∼3 s to exchange bound ADP for ATP (ADP → ATP exchange). ATP binding by TaqMutS induces an extremely stable clamp conformation (∼10 min) that slides off the mismatch and moves along the adjacent duplex DNA driven simply by 1D thermal diffusion. The ATP-bound sliding clamps rotate freely while in discontinuous contact with the DNA. The visualization of a train of MSH proteins suggests that dissociation of ATP-bound sliding clamps from the mismatch permits multiple mismatch-dependent loading events. These direct observations have provided critical clues into understanding the molecular mechanism of MSH proteins during MMR. PMID:24629484

  6. Is thymidine glycol containing DNA a substrate of E. coli DNA mismatch repair system?

    PubMed

    Perevozchikova, Svetlana A; Trikin, Roman M; Heinze, Roger J; Romanova, Elena A; Oretskaya, Tatiana S; Friedhoff, Peter; Kubareva, Elena A

    2014-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a crucial role in the prevention of replication errors and in the correction of some oxidative damages of DNA bases. In the present work the most abundant oxidized pyrimidine lesion, 5,6-dihydro-5,6-dihydroxythymidine (thymidine glycol, Tg) was tested for being recognized and processed by the E. coli MMR system, namely complex of MutS, MutL and MutH proteins. In a partially reconstituted MMR system with MutS-MutL-MutH proteins, G/Tg and A/Tg containing plasmids failed to provoke the incision of DNA. Tg residue in the 30-mer DNA duplex destabilized double helix due to stacking disruption with neighboring bases. However, such local structural changes are not important for E. coli MMR system to recognize this lesion. A lack of repair of Tg containing DNA could be due to a failure of MutS (a first acting protein of MMR system) to interact with modified DNA in a proper way. It was shown that Tg in DNA does not affect on ATPase activity of MutS. On the other hand, MutS binding affinities to DNA containing Tg in G/Tg and A/Tg pairs are lower than to DNA with a G/T mismatch and similar to canonical DNA. Peculiarities of MutS interaction with DNA was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence anisotropy. Binding of MutS to Tg containing DNAs did not result in the formation of characteristic DNA kink. Nevertheless, MutS homodimer orientation on Tg-DNA is similar to that in the case of G/T-DNA. In contrast to G/T-DNA, neither G/Tg- nor A/Tg-DNA was able to stimulate ADP release from MutS better than canonical DNA. Thus, Tg residue in DNA is unlikely to be recognized or processed by the E. coli MMR system. Probably, the MutS transformation to active "sliding clamp" conformation on Tg-DNA is problematic.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection modulates the expression of miRNAs associated with DNA mismatch repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana C; Brianti, Mitsue T; Almeida, Victor R; Ortega, Manoela M; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer; Matheu, Ander; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2017-04-01

    Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes might lead to modifications in cancer-related gene expression and cancer development. Recently, it has been shown that the infection by Helicobacter pylori, the major causative agent of gastric cancer, induces DNA damage and inhibits MMR DNA repair. Also, it has been reported that microRNAs (miRs) have an important role in regulating genomic stability and MMR DNA repair. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify miRs regulating MMR pathway in H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. To address this question, a gastric epithelial cell line and AGS cancer gastric cells were infected with several H. pylori strains. MMR gene expression and miRs correlating with H. pylori strain infection were evaluated. The results showed that H. pylori infection significantly down-regulated the expression of all selected MMR genes. Also, H. pylori infection modulated the expression of several miRs (including miR-150-5p, miR-155-5p, and miR-3163), after 4, 8, and 12 h of infection. Computational prediction of candidate miRs and their predicted MMR targeting sites were obtained from TargetScan, mirDB, and MetaCore. The generated data indicated that the selected miRs (miR-150-5p, miR-155-5p, and miR-3163) could possibly target and modulate MMR genes (POLD3, MSH2, and MSH3, respectively). The target validation was performed using mimics and luciferase gene reporter assays. Briefly, this study shows that H. pylori impairs MMR DNA repair pathway and identifies miRs that regulate MMR gene expression in gastric cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Exonuclease processivity of archaeal replicative DNA polymerase in association with PCNA is expedited by mismatches in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Takuya; Tanabe, Maiko; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yoda, Takao; Ishino, Sonoko; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Takeyama, Haruko; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2017-01-01

    Family B DNA polymerases comprise polymerase and 3′ −>5′ exonuclease domains, and detect a mismatch in a newly synthesized strand to remove it in cooperation with Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which encircles the DNA to provide a molecular platform for efficient protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions during DNA replication and repair. Once the repair is completed, the enzyme must stop the exonucleolytic process and switch to the polymerase mode. However, the cue to stop the degradation is unclear. We constructed several PCNA mutants and found that the exonuclease reaction was enhanced in the mutants lacking the conserved basic patch, located on the inside surface of PCNA. These mutants may mimic the Pol/PCNA complex processing the mismatched DNA, in which PCNA cannot interact rigidly with the irregularly distributed phosphate groups outside the dsDNA. Indeed, the exonuclease reaction with the wild type PCNA was facilitated by mismatched DNA substrates. PCNA may suppress the exonuclease reaction after the removal of the mismatched nucleotide. PCNA seems to act as a “brake” that stops the exonuclease mode of the DNA polymerase after the removal of a mismatched nucleotide from the substrate DNA, for the prompt switch to the DNA polymerase mode. PMID:28300173

  9. Functional role of DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Chang, Inik; Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Lau, Yun-Fai C; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-06-30

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintains genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. MMR has also been shown to influence cell signaling and the regulation of tumor development. MMR consists of various genes and includes post-meiotic segregation (PMS) 2 which is a vital component of mutL-alpha. In prostate, the functional role of this gene has never been reported and in this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of PMS2 on growth properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Previous studies have shown PMS2 to be deficient in DU145 cells and this lack of expression was confirmed by Western blotting whereas normal prostatic PWR-1E and RWPE-1 cells expressed this gene. PMS2 effects on various growth properties of DU145 were then determined by creating stable gene transfectants. Interestingly, PMS2 caused decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vivo growth; and increased apoptosis as compared to vector control. We further analyzed genes affected by PMS2 expression and observe the apoptosis-related TMS1 gene to be significantly upregulated whereas anti-apoptotic BCL2A1 was downregulated. These results demonstrate a functional role for PMS2 to protect against PCa progression by enhancing apoptosis of PCa cells.

  10. Native mass spectrometry provides direct evidence for DNA mismatch-induced regulation of asymmetric nucleotide binding in mismatch repair protein MutS.

    PubMed

    Monti, Maria Chiara; Cohen, Serge X; Fish, Alexander; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Barendregt, Arjan; Friedhoff, Peter; Perrakis, Anastassis; Heck, Albert J R; Sixma, Titia K; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Lebbink, Joyce H G

    2011-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair protein MutS recognizes mispaired bases in DNA and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. Understanding of the allosteric coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and two asymmetric nucleotide binding sites at opposing sides of the MutS dimer requires identification of the relevant MutS.mmDNA.nucleotide species. Here, we use native mass spectrometry to detect simultaneous DNA mismatch binding and asymmetric nucleotide binding to Escherichia coli MutS. To resolve the small differences between macromolecular species bound to different nucleotides, we developed a likelihood based algorithm capable to deconvolute the observed spectra into individual peaks. The obtained mass resolution resolves simultaneous binding of ADP and AMP.PNP to this ABC ATPase in the absence of DNA. Mismatched DNA regulates the asymmetry in the ATPase sites; we observe a stable DNA-bound state containing a single AMP.PNP cofactor. This is the first direct evidence for such a postulated mismatch repair intermediate, and showcases the potential of native MS analysis in detecting mechanistically relevant reaction intermediates.

  11. The DNA mismatch repair protein MutS forms a one-dimensional Tonks gas on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf; Klajner, Piotr; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M.; Liu, Jianquan; Park, Jonghyun; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2014-03-01

    MutS is a protein involved in DNA mismatch repair. It recognizes the mismatch, forms a sliding clamp around the DNA, and displaces other proteins bound to the DNA prior to the actual repair process. Here, we present a quantitative model of an ensemble of MutS molecules on a short strand of DNA with one mismatch. We model the ensemble as a Tonks gas of passively diffusing one-dimensional particles of finite extension and include clamp formation at the mismatch and random detachment. The distributions of MutS number bound to the DNA for different mismatch positions and different MutS concentrations in solution fit very well with distributions determined by single molecule experiments, thereby establishing the Tonks gas as an excellent model of MutS action on DNA. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 01105458 (RB), the National Institutes of Health under Grant No. CA67007 (RF), and the National Research Foundation of Korea under Grant No. 2011-0013901 (JBL).

  12. Mismatch Repair Proteins Are Activators of Toxic Responses to Chromium-DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Mindy; Quievryn, George; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2005-01-01

    Chromium(VI) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal that causes the formation of DNA phosphate-based adducts. Cr-DNA adducts are genotoxic in human cells, although they do not block replication in vitro. Here, we report that induction of cytotoxicity in Cr(VI)-treated human colon cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts requires the presence of all major mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Cr-DNA adducts lost their ability to block replication of Cr-modified plasmids in human colon cells lacking MLH1 protein. The presence of functional mismatch repair caused induction of p53-independent apoptosis associated with activation of caspases 2 and 7. Processing of Cr-DNA damage by mismatch repair resulted in the extensive formation of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase, indicating generation of double-stranded breaks as secondary toxic lesions. Induction of γ-H2AX foci was observed at 6 to 12 h postexposure, which was followed by activation of apoptosis in the absence of significant G2 arrest. Our results demonstrate that mismatch repair system triggers toxic responses to Cr-DNA backbone modifications through stress mechanisms that are significantly different from those for other forms of DNA damage. Selection for Cr(VI) resistant, MMR-deficient cells may explain the very high frequency of lung cancers with microsatellite instability among chromate workers. PMID:15831465

  13. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green’s function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  14. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S N

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green's function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  15. Unique magnetic signatures of mismatched base pairs in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apalkov, Vadim; Berashevich, Julia; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic properties of DNA containing mispairs, such as different conformations of the GṡA mispair, or a GṡT mispair inserted into the DNA chain, have been theoretically investigated. The essential ingredients for these studies, the charge transfer integrals, were evaluated from the DNA sequences containing the mispair and optimized in the solvent. We find that the magnetic susceptibilities of the host DNA chain containing a large number of Watson-Crick base pairs are significantly altered in the presence of the mispairs, and the effects depend on the choice of mispairs. In particular, insertion of even a single GṡA mispair changes the nature of magnetization (sign of the susceptibility) of the host DNA. We propose that measurement of the magnetic properties of DNA might provide a direct route to detection and identification of those mispairs.

  16. Structure of the EndoMS-DNA Complex as Mismatch Restriction Endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Setsu; Hijikata, Atsushi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Kouki; Kouyama, Ken-Ichi; Mayanagi, Kouta; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Archaeal NucS nuclease was thought to degrade the single-stranded region of branched DNA, which contains flapped and splayed DNA. However, recent findings indicated that EndoMS, the orthologous enzyme of NucS, specifically cleaves double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing mismatched bases. In this study, we determined the structure of the EndoMS-DNA complex. The complex structure of the EndoMS dimer with dsDNA unexpectedly revealed that the mismatched bases were flipped out into binding sites, and the overall architecture most resembled that of restriction enzymes. The structure of the apo form was similar to the reported structure of Pyrococcus abyssi NucS, indicating that movement of the C-terminal domain from the resting state was required for activity. In addition, a model of the EndoMS-PCNA-DNA complex was preliminarily verified with electron microscopy. The structures strongly support the idea that EndoMS acts in a mismatch repair pathway.

  17. MSH-MLH complexes formed at a DNA mismatch are disrupted by the PCNA sliding clamp.

    PubMed

    Bowers, J; Tran, P T; Joshi, A; Liskay, R M; Alani, E

    2001-03-09

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mismatch repair (MMR) is initiated by the binding of heterodimeric MutS homolog (MSH) complexes to mismatches that include single nucleotide and loop insertion/deletion mispairs. In in vitro experiments, the mismatch binding specificity of the MSH2-MSH6 heterodimer is eliminated if ATP is present. However, addition of the MutL homolog complex MLH1-PMS1 to binding reactions containing MSH2-MSH6, ATP, and mismatched substrate results in the formation of a stable ternary complex. The stability of this complex suggests that it represents an intermediate in MMR that is subsequently acted upon by other MMR factors. In support of this idea, we found that the replication processivity factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which plays a critical role in MMR at step(s) prior to DNA resynthesis, disrupted preformed ternary complexes. These observations, in conjunction with experiments performed with streptavidin end-blocked mismatch substrates, suggested that PCNA interacts with an MSH-MLH complex formed on DNA mispairs.

  18. Mismatched DNTP Incorporation By DNA Polymerase Beta Does Not Proceed Via Globally Different Conformational Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.-H.; Niebuhr, M.; Tung, C.-S.; Chan, H.-c.; Chou, C.-C.; Tsai, M.-D.

    2009-05-26

    Understanding how DNA polymerases control fidelity requires elucidation of the mechanisms of matched and mismatched dNTP incorporations. Little is known about the latter because mismatched complexes do not crystallize readily. In this report, we employed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and structural modeling to probe the conformations of different intermediate states of mammalian DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) in its wild-type and an error-prone variant, I260Q. Our structural results indicate that the mismatched ternary complex lies in-between the open and the closed forms, but more closely resembles the open form for WT and the closed form for I260Q. On the basis of molecular modeling, this over-stabilization of mismatched ternary complex of I260Q is likely caused by formation of a hydrogen bonding network between the side chains of Gln{sup 260}, Tyr{sup 296}, Glu{sup 295} and Arg{sup 258}, freeing up Asp{sup 192} to coordinate MgdNTP. These results argue against recent reports suggesting that mismatched dNTP incorporations follow a conformational path distinctly different from that of matched dNTP incorporation, or that its conformational closing is a major contributor to fidelity.

  19. Saturation of DNA mismatch repair and error catastrophe by a base analogue in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Kazuo; Loakes, David; Schaaper, Roel M

    2002-01-01

    Deoxyribosyl-dihydropyrimido[4,5-c][1,2]oxazin-7-one (dP) is a potent mutagenic deoxycytidine-derived base analogue capable of pairing with both A and G, thereby causing G. C --> A. T and A. T --> G. C transition mutations. We have found that the Escherichia coli DNA mismatch-repair system can protect cells against this mutagenic action. At a low dose, dP is much more mutagenic in mismatch-repair-defective mutH, mutL, and mutS strains than in a wild-type strain. At higher doses, the difference between the wild-type and the mutator strains becomes small, indicative of saturation of mismatch repair. Introduction of a plasmid containing the E. coli mutL(+) gene significantly reduces dP-induced mutagenesis. Together, the results indicate that the mismatch-repair system can remove dP-induced replication errors, but that its capacity to remove dP-containing mismatches can readily be saturated. When cells are cultured at high dP concentration, mutant frequencies reach exceptionally high levels and viable cell counts are reduced. The observations are consistent with a hypothesis in which dP-induced cell killing and growth impairment result from excess mutations (error catastrophe), as previously observed spontaneously in proofreading-deficient mutD (dnaQ) strains. PMID:12196386

  20. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  1. Poorly repaired mismatches in heteroduplex DNA are hyper-recombinagenic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Manivasakam, P.; Hastings, P.J.; Rosenberg, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    In yeast meiotic recombination, alleles used as genetic markers fall into two classes as regards their fate when incorporated into heteroduplex DNA. Normal alleles are those that form heteroduplexes that are nearly always recognized and corrected by the mismatch repair system operating in meiosis. High PMS (postmeiotic segregation) alleles form heteroduplexes that are inefficiently mismatch repaired. We propose that this hyperrecombination is caused by the high PMS allele blocking a mismatch repair tract initiated from the normal allele, thus preventing corepair of the two alleles, which would prevent formation of recombinants. The results of three point crosses involving two PMS alleles and a normal allele suggest that high PMS alleles placed between two alleles that are normally corepaired block that corepair. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection and expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Vahid; Molaei, Mahsa; Shalmani, Hamid Mohaghegh; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of DNA (MMR) proteins, including hMLH1 and hMSH2, in gastric epithelial cells in the patients with or without Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-infected gastritis. METHODS: Fifty H pylori-positive patients and 50 H pylori-negative patients were enrolled in the study. During endoscopy of patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia, two antral and two corpus biopsies were taken for histological examination (Giemsa stain) and for immunohistochemical staining of hMLH1 and hMSH2. RESULTS: The percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMLH1 staining was 84.14 ± 7.32% in H pylori-negative patients, while it was 73.34 ± 10.10% in H pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was seen between the two groups regarding the percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMSH2 staining (81.16 ± 8.32% in H pylori-negative versus 78.24 ± 8.71% in H pylori-positive patients; P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: This study indicates that H pylori might promote development of gastric carcinoma at least in part through its ability to affect the DNA MMR system. PMID:19034977

  3. p53 downregulates the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Sara; Toufektchan, Eléonore; Lejour, Vincent; Bardot, Boris; Toledo, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations affecting telomere maintenance or DNA repair may, respectively, cause dyskeratosis congenita or Fanconi anaemia, two clinically related bone marrow failure syndromes. Mice expressing p53Δ31, a mutant p53 lacking the C terminus, model dyskeratosis congenita. Accordingly, the increased p53 activity in p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts correlated with a decreased expression of 4 genes implicated in telomere syndromes. Here we show that these cells exhibit decreased mRNA levels for additional genes contributing to telomere metabolism, but also, surprisingly, for 12 genes mutated in Fanconi anaemia. Furthermore, p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts exhibit a reduced capacity to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks, a typical feature of Fanconi anaemia cells. Importantly, the p53-dependent downregulation of Fanc genes is largely conserved in human cells. Defective DNA repair is known to activate p53, but our results indicate that, conversely, an increased p53 activity may attenuate the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway, defining a positive regulatory feedback loop. PMID:27033104

  4. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  5. A monofunctional platinum complex coordinated to a rhodium metalloinsertor selectively binds mismatched DNA in the minor groove.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Alyson G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-10-05

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh-O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA nonclassically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and it triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors.

  6. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  7. A Monofunctional Platinum Complex Coordinated to a Rhodium Metalloinsertor Selectively Binds Mismatched DNA in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, Alyson G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh—O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA non-classically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors. PMID:26397309

  8. Cyclin E and histone H3 levels are regulated by 5-fluorouracil in a DNA mismatch repair-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Heekyung; Chaudhry, Joy; Lopez, Claudia G

    2010-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system may trigger cytotoxicity upon 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) recognition, but signaling pathways regulated by MMR in response to 5-FU are unknown. We hypothesize that recognition of 5-FU in DNA by MMR proteins trigger specific signaling cascades that results in slowing of the cell cycle and cell death. Whole human genome cDNA microarrays were used to examine relative signaling responses induced in MMR-proficient cells after 5-FU (5 µM) treatment for 24 hours. Analysis revealed 43 pathways differentially affected by 5-FU compared to control (p < 0.05), including cyclin and cell cycle regulation involving G1-S cell cycle transition, activation of Src, MAP K, p53 and base excision repair. In particular, 5-FU upregulated cyclins E1 and E2 (≥1.4-fold) and downregulated cdc25C, cyclins B1 and B2, histone H2A, H2B and H3 (≤-1.4-fold) over control. Cell cycle analysis revealed a G1/S arrest by 5-FU that was congruent with increased cyclin E and decreased cdc25C protein expression. Importantly, with knockdown of hMLH1 and hMSH2, we observed that decreased histone H3 expression by 5-FU was dependent on hMLH1. Additionally, 5-FU treatment dramatically decreased levels of several histone H3 modifications. Our data suggest that 5-FU induces a G1/S arrest by regulating cyclin E and cdc25C expression and MMR recognition of 5-FU in DNA may modulate cyclin E to affect the cell cycle. Furthermore, MMR recognition of 5-FU reduces histone H3 levels that could be related to DNA access by proteins and/or cell death during the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. PMID:20930505

  9. Cascading MutS and MutL sliding clamps control DNA diffusion to activate mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaquan; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M; Bennett, Jared; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2016-11-24

    Mismatched nucleotides arise from polymerase misincorporation errors, recombination between heteroallelic parents and chemical or physical DNA damage. Highly conserved MutS (MSH) and MutL (MLH/PMS) homologues initiate mismatch repair and, in higher eukaryotes, act as DNA damage sensors that can trigger apoptosis. Defects in human mismatch repair genes cause Lynch syndrome or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and 10-40% of related sporadic tumours. However, the collaborative mechanics of MSH and MLH/PMS proteins have not been resolved in any organism. We visualized Escherichia coli (Ec) ensemble mismatch repair and confirmed that EcMutS mismatch recognition results in the formation of stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that randomly diffuse along the DNA with intermittent backbone contact. The EcMutS sliding clamps act as a platform to recruit EcMutL onto the mismatched DNA, forming an EcMutS-EcMutL search complex that then closely follows the DNA backbone. ATP binding by EcMutL establishes a second long-lived DNA clamp that oscillates between the principal EcMutS-EcMutL search complex and unrestricted EcMutS and EcMutL sliding clamps. The EcMutH endonuclease that targets mismatch repair excision only binds clamped EcMutL, increasing its DNA association kinetics by more than 1,000-fold. The assembly of an EcMutS-EcMutL-EcMutH search complex illustrates how sequential stable sliding clamps can modulate one-dimensional diffusion mechanics along the DNA to direct mismatch repair.

  10. Structural and thermodynamic studies on the adenine.guanine mismatch in B-DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, G A; Booth, E D; Brown, T

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the synthetic dodecamer d(CGCAAATTGGCG) has been shown by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods to be that of a B-DNA helix containing two A(anti).G(syn) base pairs. The refinement, based on data to a resolution of 2.25 A shows that the mismatch base pairs are held together by two hydrogen bonds. The syn-conformation of the guanine base of the mismatch is stabilised by hydrogen bonding to a network of solvent molecules in both the major and minor grooves. A pH-dependent ultraviolet melting study indicates that the duplex is stabilised by protonation, suggesting that the bases of the A.G mispair are present in their most common tautomeric forms and that the N(1)-atom of adenine is protonated. The structure refinement shows that there is some disorder in the sugar-phosphate backbone. PMID:2216754

  11. Femtomolar detection of single mismatches by discriminant analysis of DNA hybridization events using gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingyi; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-03-21

    Even though DNA-based nanosensors have been demonstrated for quantitative detection of analytes and diseases, hybridization events have never been numerically investigated for further understanding of DNA mediated interactions. Here, we developed a nanoscale platform with well-designed capture and detection gold nanoprobes to precisely evaluate the hybridization events. The capture gold nanoprobes were mono-laid on glass and the detection probes were fabricated via a novel competitive conjugation method. The two kinds of probes combined in a suitable orientation following the hybridization with the target. We found that hybridization efficiency was markedly dependent on electrostatic interactions between DNA strands, which can be tailored by adjusting the salt concentration of the incubation solution. Due to the much lower stability of the double helix formed by mismatches, the hybridization efficiencies of single mismatched (MMT) and perfectly matched DNA (PMT) were different. Therefore, we obtained an optimized salt concentration that allowed for discrimination of MMT from PMT without stringent control of temperature or pH. The results indicated this to be an ultrasensitive and precise nanosensor for the diagnosis of genetic diseases.

  12. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  13. Stability of DNA duplexes containing GG, CC, AA, and TT mismatches.

    PubMed

    Tikhomirova, Anna; Beletskaya, Irina V; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2006-09-05

    We employed salt-dependent differential scanning calorimetric measurements to characterize the stability of six oligomeric DNA duplexes (5'-GCCGGAXTGCCGG-3'/5'-CCGGCAYTCCGGC-3') that contain in the central XY position the GC, AT, GG, CC, AA, or TT base pair. The heat-induced helix-to-coil transitions of all the duplexes are associated with positive changes in heat capacity, DeltaC(p), ranging from 0.43 to 0.53 kcal/mol. Positive values of DeltaC(p) result in strong temperature dependences of changes in enthalpy, DeltaH degrees, and entropy, DeltaS degrees , accompanying duplex melting and cause melting free energies, DeltaG degrees, to exhibit characteristically curved shapes. These observations suggest that DeltaC(p) needs to be carefully taken into account when the parameters of duplex stability are extrapolated to temperatures distant from the transition temperature, T(M). Comparison of the calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpies revealed that none of the duplexes studied in this work exhibits two-state melting. Within the context of the central AXT/TYA triplet, the thermal and thermodynamic stabilities of the duplexes in question change in the following order: GC > AT > GG > AA approximately TT > CC. Our estimates revealed that the thermodynamic impact of the GG, AA, and TT mismatches is confined within the central triplet. In contrast, the thermodynamic impact of the CC mismatch propagates into the adjacent helix domains and may involve 7-9 bp. We discuss implications of our results for understanding the origins of initial recognition of mismatched DNA sites by enzymes of the DNA repair machinery.

  14. Loss of DNA mismatch repair facilitates reactivation of a reporter plasmid damaged by cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, B; Kim, H-K; Bubley, G J; Aebi, S; Fink, D; Teicher, B A; Howell, S B; Christen, R D

    1999-01-01

    In addition to recognizing and repairing mismatched bases in DNA, the mismatch repair (MMR) system also detects cisplatin DNA adducts and loss of MMR results in resistance to cisplatin. A comparison was made of the ability of MMR-proficient and -deficient cells to remove cisplatin adducts from their genome and to reactivate a transiently transfected plasmid that had previously been inactivated by cisplatin to express the firefly luciferase enzyme. MMR deficiency due to loss of hMLH1 function did not change the extent of platinum (Pt) accumulation or kinetics of removal from total cellular DNA. However, MMR-deficient cells, lacking either hMLH1 or hMSH2, generated twofold more luciferase activity from a cisplatin-damaged reporter plasmid than their MMR-proficient counterparts. Thus, detection of the cisplatin adducts by the MMR system reduced the efficiency of reactivation of the damaged luciferase gene compared to cells lacking this detector. The twofold reduction in reactivation efficiency was of the same order of magnitude as the difference in cisplatin sensitivity between the MMR-proficient and -deficient cells. We conclude that although MMR-proficient and -deficient cells remove Pt from their genome at equal rates, the loss of a functional MMR system facilitates the reactivation of a cisplatin-damaged reporter gene. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360646

  15. Impact of DNA mismatch repair system alterations on human fertility and related treatments*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Min-hao; Liu, Shu-yuan; Wang, Ning; Wu, Yan; Jin, Fan

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the biological pathways, which plays a critical role in DNA homeostasis, primarily by repairing base-pair mismatches and insertion/deletion loops that occur during DNA replication. MMR also takes part in other metabolic pathways and regulates cell cycle arrest. Defects in MMR are associated with genomic instability, predisposition to certain types of cancers and resistance to certain therapeutic drugs. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the MMR system demonstrate a significant relationship with human fertility and related treatments, which helps us to understand the etiology and susceptibility of human infertility. Alterations in the MMR system may also influence the health of offspring conceived by assisted reproductive technology in humans. However, further studies are needed to explore the specific mechanisms by which the MMR system may affect human infertility. This review addresses the physiological mechanisms of the MMR system and associations between alterations of the MMR system and human fertility and related treatments, and potential effects on the next generation. PMID:26739522

  16. Loss of DNA mismatch repair function and cancer predisposition in the mouse: animal models for human hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Lisa; Edelmann, Winfried

    2004-08-15

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes underlie one of the most common hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes known in humans, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Defects of the DNA mismatch repair system are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. The generation of mice with targeted inactivating mutations in the mismatch repair genes has facilitated the in vivo study of how these genes function and how their individual loss contributes to tumorigenesis. Although there are notable limitations when using murine models to study the molecular basis of human cancer, there is remarkable similarity between the two species with respect to the contribution of individual members of the mismatch repair system to cancer susceptibility, and mouse mutants have greatly enhanced our understanding of the normal role of these genes in mutation avoidance and suppression of tumorigenesis.

  17. DNA mismatch repair proteins are required for efficient herpes simplex virus 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Mohni, Kareem N; Mastrocola, Adam S; Bai, Ping; Weller, Sandra K; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that replicates in the nucleus of its human host cell and is known to interact with many cellular DNA repair proteins. In this study, we examined the role of cellular mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in the virus life cycle. Both MSH2 and MLH1 are required for efficient replication of HSV-1 in normal human cells and are localized to viral replication compartments. In addition, a previously reported interaction between MSH6 and ICP8 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and extended to show that UL12 is also present in this complex. We also report for the first time that MLH1 associates with ND10 nuclear bodies and that like other ND10 proteins, MLH1 is recruited to the incoming genome. Knockdown of MLH1 inhibits immediate-early viral gene expression. MSH2, on the other hand, which is generally thought to play a role in mismatch repair at a step prior to that of MLH1, is not recruited to incoming genomes and appears to act at a later step in the viral life cycle. Silencing of MSH2 appears to inhibit early gene expression. Thus, both MLH1 and MSH2 are required but appear to participate in distinct events in the virus life cycle. The observation that MLH1 plays an earlier role in HSV-1 infection than does MSH2 is surprising and may indicate a novel function for MLH1 distinct from its known MSH2-dependent role in mismatch repair.

  18. DNA Mismatch Repair System: Repercussions in Cellular Homeostasis and Relationship with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Pérezprina, Juan Cristóbal; León-Galván, Miguel Ángel; Konigsberg, Mina

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that concern DNA repair have been studied in the last years due to their consequences in cellular homeostasis. The diverse and damaging stimuli that affect DNA integrity, such as changes in the genetic sequence and modifications in gene expression, can disrupt the steady state of the cell and have serious repercussions to pathways that regulate apoptosis, senescence, and cancer. These altered pathways not only modify cellular and organism longevity, but quality of life (“health-span”). The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) is highly conserved between species; its role is paramount in the preservation of DNA integrity, placing it as a necessary focal point in the study of pathways that prolong lifespan, aging, and disease. Here, we review different insights concerning the malfunction or absence of the DNA-MMR and its impact on cellular homeostasis. In particular, we will focus on DNA-MMR mechanisms regulated by known repair proteins MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and MHL1, among others. PMID:23213348

  19. Evidence that the DNA mismatch repair system removes 1-nucleotide Okazaki fragment flaps.

    PubMed

    Kadyrova, Lyudmila Y; Dahal, Basanta K; Kadyrov, Farid A

    2015-10-02

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a major role in promoting genome stability and suppressing carcinogenesis. In this work, we investigated whether the MMR system is involved in Okazaki fragment maturation. We found that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MMR system and the flap endonuclease Rad27 act in overlapping pathways that protect the nuclear genome from 1-bp insertions. In addition, we determined that purified yeast and human MutSα proteins recognize 1-nucleotide DNA and RNA flaps. In reconstituted human systems, MutSα, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and replication factor C activate MutLα endonuclease to remove the flaps. ATPase and endonuclease mutants of MutLα are defective in the flap removal. These results suggest that the MMR system contributes to the removal of 1-nucleotide Okazaki fragment flaps.

  20. Loss of DNA mismatch repair imparts a selective advantage in planarian adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Resch, Alissa M; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Graveley, Brenton R; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) leads to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal and other types of cancer and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Loss of MMR function results in a mutator phenotype that likely underlies its role in tumorigenesis. However, loss of MMR also results in the elimination of a DNA damage-induced checkpoint/apoptosis activation barrier that may allow damaged cells to grow unchecked. A fundamental question is whether loss of MMR provides pre-cancerous stem cells an immediate selective advantage in addition to establishing a mutator phenotype. To test this hypothesis in an in vivo system, we utilized the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea which contains a significant population of identifiable adult stem cells. We identified a planarian homolog of human MSH2, a MMR gene which is mutated in 38% of LS cases. The planarian Smed-msh2 is expressed in stem cells and some progeny. We depleted Smed-msh2 mRNA levels by RNA-interference and found a striking survival advantage in these animals treated with a cytotoxic DNA alkylating agent compared to control animals. We demonstrated that this tolerance to DNA damage is due to the survival of mitotically active, MMR-deficient stem cells. Our results suggest that loss of MMR provides an in vivo survival advantage to the stem cell population in the presence of DNA damage that may have implications for tumorigenesis.

  1. Probing the interactions of the solvated electron with DNA by molecular dynamics simulations: II. bromodeoxyuridine-thymidine mismatched DNA.

    PubMed

    Gantchev, Tsvetan G; Hunting, Darel J

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of solvated electrons (e(-)(aq)) with DNA results in various types of DNA lesions. The in vitro and in vivo sensitisation of DNA to (e(-)(aq))-induced damage is achieved by incorporation of the electron-affinity radiosensitiser bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) in place of thymidine. However, in DNA duplexes containing single-stranded regions (bulged BUdR-DNA), the type of lesion is different and the efficiency of damage is enhanced. In particular, DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL) form at high efficiency in bulged DNA but are not detectable in completely duplex DNA. Knowledge about the processes and interactions leading to these differences is obscure. Previously, we addressed the problem by applying molecular modelling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to a system of normal (BUdR.A)-DNA and a hydrated electron, where the excess electron was modelled as a localised e(-)(H2O6) anionic cluster. The goal of the present study was to apply the same MD simulation to a wobble DNA-e(-)(aq) system, containing a pyrimidine-pyrimidine mismatched base pair, BUdR.T. The results show an overall dynamic pattern similar to that of the e(-)(aq) motion around normal DNA. However, the number of configuration states when e(-)(aq)) was particularly close to DNA is different. Moreover, in the (BUdR.T)-wobble DNA system, the electron frequently approaches the brominated strand, including BUdR, which was not observed with the normal (BUdR.A)-DNA. The structure and exchange of water at the sites of e(-)(aq) immobilisation near DNA were also characterised. The structural dynamics of the wobble DNA is prone to more extensive perturbations, including frequent formation of cross-strand (cs) interatomic contacts. The structural deviations correlated with e(-)(aq) approaching DNA from the major groove side, with sodium ions trapped deep in the minor groove. Altogether, the obtained results confirm and/or throw light on dynamic-structure determinants possibly responsible for the

  2. Effect of bis(beta-chloroethyl)sulfide (BCES) on base mismatch repair of DNA in monkey kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, L J; Bernstein, I A

    1991-11-01

    Sulfur mustard, bis(beta-chloroethyl)sulfide (BCES), a bifunctional alkylating agent, is a vesicant whose mode of action involves interference with the integrity of cellular DNA. Alkylation of DNA is responsible for some of the biological effects of BCES in tissue. Another possible mechanism by which BCES could exert its toxic effect is interference with high fidelity repair of damaged DNA. This study evaluated the possible effects of BCES on the repair of specific errors, i.e., mismatched bases, in the DNA. Heteroduplex (ht) DNA, formed between two temperature-sensitive mutants of SV40 virus, tsA239 and tsA255, each having a different point mutation in the gene for large T antigen, was used to study the effect of BCES on mismatched base repair in African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells. AGMK cells were exposed to dilute solutions of BCES in methylene chloride (MC) prior to cationic lipofection with ht DNA. In order for the cells to produce wild type (wt) SV40 DNA at a nonpermissive temperature (41 degrees C), repair of at least one of the two mismatches in the DNA had to occur. It was observed that (a) as the concentration of BCES was increased, a proportionally longer delay in the appearance of wt DNA at 41 degrees C was observed in treated cells transfected with ht DNA as compared with cultures exposed to MC alone and then transfected with ht DNA, (b) there was no such effect in exposed AGMK cells transfected with wt DNA, (c) wt and ht DNA were transfected at similar rates in unexposed cells, and (d) BCES did not affect the rate of transfection of wt cells. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that BCES affects mismatched base repair.

  3. Effects of suppressing the DNA mismatch repair system on homeologous recombination in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tam, Sheh May; Hays, John B; Chetelat, Roger T

    2011-12-01

    In plant breeding, the ability to manipulate genetic (meiotic) recombination would be beneficial for facilitating gene transfer from wild relatives of crop plants. The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system helps maintain genetic integrity by correcting base mismatches that arise via DNA synthesis or damage, and antagonizes recombination between homeologous (divergent) DNA sequences. Previous studies have established that the genomes of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and the wild relative S. lycopersicoides are substantially diverged (homeologous) such that recombination between their chromosomes is strongly reduced. Here, we report the effects on homeologous recombination of suppressing endogenous MMR genes in S. lycopersicum via RNAi-induced silencing of SlMSH2 and SlMSH7 or overexpressing dominant negatives of Arabidopsis MSH2 (AtMSH2-DN) in an alien substitution line (SL-8) of S. lycopersicoides in tomato. We show that certain inhibitions of MMR (RNAi of SlMSH7, AtMSH2-DN) are associated with modest increases in homeologous recombination, ranging from 3.8 to 29.2% (average rate of 17.8%) compared to controls. Unexpectedly, only the AtMSH2-DN proteins but not RNAi-induced silencing of MSH2 was found to increase homeologous recombination. The ratio of single to double crossovers (SCO:DCO ratio) decreased by approximately 50% in progeny of the AtMSH2-DN parents. An increase in the frequency of heterozygous SL-8 plants was also observed in the progeny of the SlMSH7-RNAi parents. Our findings may contribute to acceleration of introgression in cultivated tomato.

  4. Molecular recognition of T:G mismatched base pairs in DNA as studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riccardi Sirtori, Federico; Aldini, Giancarlo; Colombo, Maristella; Colombo, Nicoletta; Malyszko, Jan; Vistoli, Giulio; D'Alessio, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Postreplicative mismatch repair (MMR) is a cellular system involved in the recognition and correction of DNA polymerase errors that escape detection in proofreading. Of the various mismatched bases, T:G pairing in DNA is one of the more common mutations leading to the formation of tumors in humans. In addition, the absence of the MMR system can generate resistance to several chemotherapeutic agents, particularly DNA-damaging substances. The main purpose of this study was the setup and validation of an electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry method for the identification of small molecules that are able to recognize T:G mismatches in DNA targets. These findings could be useful for the discovery of new antitumor drugs. The analytical method is based on the ability of electrospray to preserve the noncovalent adducts present in solution and transfer them to the gas phase. Lexitropsin derivatives (polyimidazole compounds) have been previously described as selective for T:G mismatch binding by NMR and ITC studies. We synthesized and tested various polyimidazole derivatives, one of which in particular (NMS-057) showed a higher affinity for an oligonucleotide DNA sequence containing a T:G mismatched base pair. To rationalize these findings, molecular docking studies were performed using available NMR structures. Moreover, ESI-MS experiments, performed on an orbitrap mass spectrometer, highlighted the formation of heterodimeric complexes between DNA sequences, distamycin A, and polyimidazole compounds. Our results confirm that this ESI method could be a valuable tool for the identification of new molecules able to specifically recognize T:G mismatched base pairs.

  5. The impact of sequence divergence and DNA mismatch repair on homeologous recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François

    2006-03-01

    We examined the effects of substrate divergence and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) on recombination in Arabidopsis thaliana. Relative to the frequency observed in plants with a homologous construct (0% divergence), recombination was decreased 4.1-, 9.6-, 11.7- or 20.3-fold, respectively, in lines with constructs containing 0.5%, 2%, 4% or 9% divergence between the recombination substrates. To evaluate the contribution of the MMR system in this decrease, 12 independent reporter lines (two or three lines per reporter construct) were crossed to an AtMSH2 T-DNA insertional mutant. We examined the recombination frequency in progeny homozygous for a reporter T-DNA and homozygous either for the wild type or the mutant allele of AtMSH2. The loss of MMR activity led to a two- to ninefold increase in homeologous recombination and the size of the increase did not seem to correlate with the amount of divergence. Inversely, complementation of the insertional mutant with a wild-type cDNA of AtMSH2 reduced recombination. Our results demonstrate clearly that sequence divergence can dramatically reduce the recombination frequency in plants and that the MMR system plays a part in this decrease.

  6. DNA methylation by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea: methylation pattern changes in single- and double-stranded DNA, and in DNA with mismatched or bulged guanines.

    PubMed Central

    Wurdeman, R L; Douskey, M C; Gold, B

    1993-01-01

    The detection of abnormal DNA base pairing arrangements and conformations is chemically probed in synthetic 32P-end-labeled deoxyribonucleotide oligomers using N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and 2,12,-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetraazabicyclo-[11.3.1]heptadeca-1 -[17],2,11,13,15 pentaene-Ni (II) (Ni-complex) with KHSO5. The DNA targets studied are single-stranded (s-s) DNA, double-stranded (d-s) DNA, d-s DNA with G-G, G-A and G-T mismatches, d-s DNA with a single bulged G and d-s DNA with two bulged G's. The effect of the non-Watson--Crick structures on the formation of N7-methylguanine (N7-MeG) by MNU and the oxidation of G by Ni-complex is reported along with the Tm's and circular dichroism spectra of the different duplex oligomers. The results for MNU and Ni-complex show that the qualitative and quantitative character of the cleavage patterns at a G3 run change with the nature of the abnormal base pairing motif. Based on the DNA substrates studied, the results indicate that a combination of reagents which report electronic and steric perturbations can be a useful approach to monitor DNA mismatches and bulges. Images PMID:8177747

  7. Slow conformational changes in MutS and DNA direct ordered transitions between mismatch search, recognition and signaling of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anushi; Doucette, Christopher; Biro, F Noah; Hingorani, Manju M

    2013-11-15

    MutS functions in mismatch repair (MMR) to scan DNA for errors, identify a target site and trigger subsequent events in the pathway leading to error removal and DNA re-synthesis. These actions, enabled by the ATPase activity of MutS, are now beginning to be analyzed from the perspective of the protein itself. This study provides the first ensemble transient kinetic data on MutS conformational dynamics as it works with DNA and ATP in MMR. Using a combination of fluorescence probes (on Thermus aquaticus MutS and DNA) and signals (intensity, anisotropy and resonance energy transfer), we have monitored the timing of key conformational changes in MutS that are coupled to mismatch binding and recognition, ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as sliding clamp formation and signaling of repair. Significant findings include (a) a slow step that follows weak initial interaction between MutS and DNA, in which concerted conformational changes in both macromolecules control mismatch recognition, and (b) rapid, binary switching of MutS conformations that is concerted with ATP binding and hydrolysis and (c) is stalled after mismatch recognition to control formation of the ATP-bound MutS sliding clamp. These rate-limiting pre- and post-mismatch recognition events outline the mechanism of action of MutS on DNA during initiation of MMR.

  8. Characterization of a Thermostable 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Specific for GO/N Mismatches from the Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Thermoplasma volcanium

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Miki; Hata, Chieri; Ukita, Munetada; Fukushima, Chie; Matsuura, Chihiro; Kawashima-Ohya, Yoshie; Tomobe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of guanine (G) to 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (GO) forms one of the major DNA lesions generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The GO can be corrected by GO DNA glycosylases (Ogg), enzymes involved in base excision repair (BER). Unrepaired GO induces mismatched base pairing with adenine (A); as a result, the mismatch causes a point mutation, from G paired with cytosine (C) to thymine (T) paired with adenine (A), during DNA replication. Here, we report the characterization of a putative Ogg from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma volcanium. The 204-amino acid sequence of the putative Ogg (TVG_RS00315) shares significant sequence homology with the DNA glycosylases of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MjaOgg) and Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsoOgg). The six histidine-tagged recombinant TVG_RS00315 protein gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The Ogg protein is thermostable, with optimal activity near a pH of 7.5 and a temperature of 60°C. The enzyme displays DNA glycosylase, and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) lyase activities on GO/N (where N is A, T, G, or C) mismatch; yet it cannot eliminate U from U/G or T from T/G, as mismatch glycosylase (MIG) can. These results indicate that TvoOgg-encoding TVG_RS00315 is a member of the Ogg2 family of T. volcanium. PMID:27799846

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction and increased sensitivity to excitotoxicity in mice deficient in DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Francisconi, Simona; Codenotti, Mara; Ferrari Toninelli, Giulia; Uberti, Daniela; Memo, Maurizio

    2006-07-01

    The expression profile in the hippocampus of mice lacking one allele of the MutS homologue (Msh2), gene, which is one of the most representative components of the DNA mismatch repair system, was analysed to understand whether defects in the repair or in response to DNA damage could impact significantly on brain function. The overall results suggested a reduction in mitochondrial function as indicated by gene expression analysis, biochemical and behavioural studies. In the hippocampus of Msh2+/- mice, array data, validated by RT-PCR and western blot analysis, showed reduced expression levels of genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (CoxII), ATP synthase subunit beta and superoxide dismutase 1. Biochemically, mitochondria from the hippocampus and cortex of these mice show reduced CoxII and increased aconitase activity. Behaviourally, these alterations resulted in mice with increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures and hippocampal neuronal loss. These data suggest that lack of an efficient system involved in recognizing and repairing DNA damage may generate a brain mitochondriopathy.

  10. The MutSα-Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Interaction in Human DNA Mismatch Repair*S⃞♦

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pohlhaus, Timothy J.; Chen, Sihong; Hura, Gregory L.; Dzantiev, Leonid; Beese, Lorena S.; Modrich, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the interaction parameters, conformation, and functional significance of the human MutSα· proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) complex in mismatch repair. The two proteins associate with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a KD of 0.7 μm in the absence or presence of heteroduplex DNA. PCNA does not influence the affinity of MutSα for a mismatch, and mismatch-bound MutSα binds PCNA. Small angle x-ray scattering studies have established the molecular parameters of the complex, which are consistent with an elongated conformation in which the two proteins associate in an end-to-end fashion in a manner that does not involve an extended unstructured tether, as has been proposed for yeast MutSα and PCNA (Shell, S. S., Putnam, C. D., and Kolodner, R. D. (2007) Mol. Cell26 ,565 -57817531814). MutSα variants lacking the PCNA interaction motif are functional in 3′- or 5′-directed mismatch-provoked excision, but display a partial defect in 5′-directed mismatch repair. This finding is consistent with the modest mutability conferred by inactivation of the MutSα PCNA interaction motif and suggests that interaction of the replication clamp with other repair protein(s) accounts for the essential role of PCNA in MutSα-dependent mismatch repair. PMID:18326858

  11. Spontaneous frameshift mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: accumulation during DNA replication and removal by proofreading and mismatch repair activities.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, C N; Jinks-Robertson, S

    2001-01-01

    The accumulation of frameshift mutations during DNA synthesis is determined by the rate at which frameshift intermediates are generated during DNA polymerization and the efficiency with which frameshift intermediates are removed by DNA polymerase-associated exonucleolytic proofreading activity and/or the postreplicative mismatch repair machinery. To examine the relative contributions of these factors to replication fidelity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we determined the reversion rates and spectra of the lys2 Delta Bgl +1 frameshift allele. Wild-type and homozygous mutant diploid strains with all possible combinations of defects in the exonuclease activities of DNA polymerases delta and epsilon (conferred by the pol3-01 and pol2-4 alleles, respectively) and in mismatch repair (deletion of MSH2) were analyzed. Although there was no direct correlation between homopolymer run length and frameshift accumulation in the wild-type strain, such a correlation was evident in the triple mutant strain lacking all repair capacity. Furthermore, examination of strains defective in one or two repair activities revealed distinct biases in the removal of the corresponding frameshift intermediates by exonucleolytic proofreading and/or mismatch repair. Finally, these analyses suggest that the mismatch repair machinery may be important for generating some classes of frameshift mutations in yeast. PMID:11560887

  12. Quantifying the contributions of base selectivity, proofreading and mismatch repair to nuclear DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    St Charles, Jordan A; Liberti, Sascha E; Williams, Jessica S; Lujan, Scott A; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-07-01

    Mismatches generated during eukaryotic nuclear DNA replication are removed by two evolutionarily conserved error correction mechanisms acting in series, proofreading and mismatch repair (MMR). Defects in both processes are associated with increased susceptibility to cancer. To better understand these processes, we have quantified base selectivity, proofreading and MMR during nuclear DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the absence of proofreading and MMR, the primary leading and lagging strand replicases, polymerase ɛ and polymerase δ respectively, synthesize DNA in vivo with somewhat different error rates and specificity, and with apparent base selectivity that is more than 100 times higher than measured in vitro. Moreover, leading and lagging strand replication fidelity rely on a different balance between proofreading and MMR. On average, proofreading contributes more to replication fidelity than does MMR, but their relative contributions vary from nearly all proofreading of some mismatches to mostly MMR of other mismatches. Thus accurate replication of the two DNA strands results from a non-uniform and variable balance between error prevention, proofreading and MMR.

  13. Short Hairpin RNA Suppression of Thymidylate Synthase Produces DNA Mismatches and Results in Excellent Radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Sheryl A.; Cooper, Kristin S.; Mannava, Sudha; Nikiforov, Mikhail A.; Shewach, Donna S.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA)-mediated suppression of thymidylate synthase (TS) on cytotoxicity and radiosensitization and the mechanism by which these events occur. Methods and Materials: shRNA suppression of TS was compared with 5-fluoro-2 Prime -deoxyuridine (FdUrd) inactivation of TS with or without ionizing radiation in HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were measured by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle effects were measured by flow cytometry. The effects of FdUrd or shRNA suppression of TS on dNTP deoxynucleotide triphosphate imbalances and consequent nucleotide misincorporations into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and as pSP189 plasmid mutations, respectively. Results: TS shRNA produced profound ({>=}90%) and prolonged ({>=}8 days) suppression of TS in HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas FdUrd increased TS expression. TS shRNA also produced more specific and prolonged effects on dNTPs deoxynucleotide triphosphates compared with FdUrd. TS shRNA suppression allowed accumulation of cells in S-phase, although its effects were not as long-lasting as those of FdUrd. Both treatments resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1. TS shRNA alone was less cytotoxic than FdUrd but was equally effective as FdUrd in eliciting radiosensitization (radiation enhancement ratio: TS shRNA, 1.5-1.7; FdUrd, 1.4-1.6). TS shRNA and FdUrd produced a similar increase in the number and type of pSP189 mutations. Conclusions: TS shRNA produced less cytotoxicity than FdUrd but was equally effective at radiosensitizing tumor cells. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FdUrd on TS alone is sufficient to elicit radiosensitization with FdUrd, but it only partially explains FdUrd-mediated cytotoxicity and cell cycle inhibition. The increase in DNA mismatches after TS shRNA or FdUrd supports a causal and sufficient role for the depletion of dTTP thymidine triphosphate and consequent DNA

  14. Thermodynamic properties of the specific binding between Ag+ ions and C:C mismatched base pairs in duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Miyakawa, Yukako; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2011-02-01

    Metal-mediated base pairs formed by the interaction between metal ions and artificial bases in oligonucleotides have been developed for potential applications in nanotechnology. We recently found that a natural C:C mismatched base pair bound to an Ag(+) ion to generate a novel metal-mediated base pair in duplex DNA. Preparation of the novel C-Ag-C base pair involving natural bases is more convenient than that of metal-mediated base pairs involving artificial bases because time-consuming base synthesis is not required. Here, we examined the thermodynamic properties of the binding between the Ag(+) ion and each of single and double C:C mismatched base pair in duplex DNA by isothermal titration calorimetry. The Ag(+) ion specifically bound to the C:C mismatched base pair at a 1:1 molar ratio with 10(6) M(-1) binding constant, which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion-DNA interactions. The specific binding between the Ag(+) ion and the single C:C mismatched base pair was mainly driven by the positive dehydration entropy change and the negative binding enthalpy change. In the interaction between the Ag(+) ion and each of the consecutive and interrupted double C:C mismatched base pairs, stoichiometric binding at a 1:1 molar ratio was achieved in each step of the first and second Ag(+) binding. The binding affinity for the second Ag(+) binding was similar to that for the first Ag(+) binding. Stoichiometric binding without interference and negative cooperativity may be favorable for aligning multiple Ag(+) ions in duplex DNA for applications of the metal-mediated base pairs in nanotechnology.

  15. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  16. Crystal Structure of Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Bound to DNA Elucidates Sequence-Specific Mismatch Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Morgan, M.T.; Pozharski, E.; Drohat, A.C.

    2009-05-19

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides produces m{sup 5}CpG, an epigenetic modification that is important for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability in vertebrate cells. However, m{sup 5}C deamination yields mutagenic G{center_dot}T mispairs, which are implicated in genetic disease, cancer, and aging. Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) removes T from G{center_dot}T mispairs, producing an abasic (or AP) site, and follow-on base excision repair proteins restore the G{center_dot}C pair. hTDG is inactive against normal A{center_dot}T pairs, and is most effective for G{center_dot}T mispairs and other damage located in a CpG context. The molecular basis of these important catalytic properties has remained unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure of hTDG (catalytic domain, hTDG{sup cat}) in complex with abasic DNA, at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme crystallized in a 2:1 complex with DNA, one subunit bound at the abasic site, as anticipated, and the other at an undamaged (nonspecific) site. Isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility-shift experiments indicate that hTDG and hTDG{sup cat} can bind abasic DNA with 1:1 or 2:1 stoichiometry. Kinetics experiments show that the 1:1 complex is sufficient for full catalytic (base excision) activity, suggesting that the 2:1 complex, if adopted in vivo, might be important for some other activity of hTDG, perhaps binding interactions with other proteins. Our structure reveals interactions that promote the stringent specificity for guanine versus adenine as the pairing partner of the target base and interactions that likely confer CpG sequence specificity. We find striking differences between hTDG and its prokaryotic ortholog (MUG), despite the relatively high (32%) sequence identity.

  17. Relationship between DNA mismatch repair genes expression, Ku-genes expression and ploidy-related parameters in the progression of pigmented lesions of the skin.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Tscherny, Michael; Stachura, Jerzy; Ruschenburg, Ilka; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Defects of DNA repair systems in cutaneous tumours are related to DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, PMS1, PMS2) and Ku70/80 genes involved in double- strand repair. In this study we investigated the statistical relationship between these systems and DNA-ploidy-related parameters in 19 naevus cell naevi, 23 lentigos maligna, 76 primary melanomas and 31 melanoma metastases, applying the correlation coefficient according to Spearman. In naevi significant correlations were found between Ku70/80 gene expression and some ploidy-related parameters. In lentigos, additionally, some significant correlations between the expression of DNA mismatch repair genes were found. Similar results were demonstrated for primary melanomas. In metastases no one significant correlation between DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku-genes was present. We postulate that DNA mismatch repair genes and Ku70/80 genes are functionally independent and that some of them are able to influence ploidy-related parameters.

  18. DNA mismatch repair gene MSH6 implicated in determining age at natural menopause

    PubMed Central

    Perry, John R.B.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Chasman, Daniel I.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Elks, Cathy; Albrecht, Eva; Andrulis, Irene L.; Beesley, Jonathan; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bergmann, Sven; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Brown, Judith; Buring, Julie E.; Campbell, Harry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Corre, Tanguy; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davies, Gail; Deary, Ian J.; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Esko, Tõnu; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flyger, Henrik; Fraser, Abigail; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Giles, Graham; Guenel, Pascal; Hägg, Sara; Hall, Per; Hayward, Caroline; Hopper, John; Ingelsson, Erik; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kasiman, Katherine; Knight, Julia A.; Lahti, Jari; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Margolin, Sara; Marsh, Julie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Olson, Janet E.; Pennell, Craig E.; Polasek, Ozren; Rahman, Iffat; Ridker, Paul M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Salumets, Andres; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Smith, Erin N.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Southey, Melissa; Stöckl, Doris; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Truong, Therese; Ulivi, Sheila; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Qin; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F.; Zgaga, Lina; Ong, Ken K.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Karasik, David; Murray, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The length of female reproductive lifespan is associated with multiple adverse outcomes, including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and infertility. The biological processes that govern the timing of the beginning and end of reproductive life are not well understood. Genetic variants are known to contribute to ∼50% of the variation in both age at menarche and menopause, but to date the known genes explain <15% of the genetic component. We have used genome-wide association in a bivariate meta-analysis of both traits to identify genes involved in determining reproductive lifespan. We observed significant genetic correlation between the two traits using genome-wide complex trait analysis. However, we found no robust statistical evidence for individual variants with an effect on both traits. A novel association with age at menopause was detected for a variant rs1800932 in the mismatch repair gene MSH6 (P = 1.9 × 10−9), which was also associated with altered expression levels of MSH6 mRNA in multiple tissues. This study contributes to the growing evidence that DNA repair processes play a key role in ovarian ageing and could be an important therapeutic target for infertility. PMID:24357391

  19. The Arabidopsis DNA mismatch repair gene PMS1 restricts somatic recombination between homeologous sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Dion, Eric; Richard, Gabriel; Domingue, Olivier; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François J

    2009-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system contributes to maintaining the fidelity of genetic information by correcting replication errors and preventing illegitimate recombination events. This study aimed to examine the function(s) of the Arabidopsis thaliana PMS1 gene (AtPMS1), one of three homologs of the bacterial MutL gene in plants. Two independent mutant alleles (Atpms1-1 and Atpms1-2) were obtained and one of these (Atpms1-1) was studied in detail. The mutant exhibited a reduction in seed set and a bias against the transmission of the mutant allele. Somatic recombination, both homologous and homeologous, was examined using a set of reporter constructs. Homologous recombination remained unchanged in the mutant while homeologous recombination was between 1.7- and 4.8-fold higher than in the wild type. This increase in homeologous recombination frequency was not correlated with the degree of sequence divergence. In RNAi lines, a range of increases in homeologous recombination were observed with two lines showing a 3.3-fold and a 3.6-fold increase. These results indicate that the AtPMS1 gene contributes to an antirecombination activity aimed at restricting recombination between diverged sequences.

  20. A novel conception for spontaneous transversions caused by homo-pyrimidine DNA mismatches: a QM/QTAIM highlight.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-09-07

    We have firstly shown that the T·T(w) and C·C(w) DNA mismatches with wobble (w) geometry stay in slow tautomeric equilibrium with short T·T*(WC) and C·C*(WC) Watson-Crick (WC) mispairs. These non-dissociative tautomeric rearrangements are controlled by the plane-symmetric, highly stable, highly polar and zwitterionic transition states. The obtained results allow us to understand in what way the T·T(w) and C·C(w) mismatches acquire enzymatically competent T·T*(WC) and C·C*(WC) conformations directly in the hydrophobic recognition pocket of a high-fidelity DNA-polymerase, thereby producing thermodynamically non-equilibrium spontaneous transversions. The simplest numerical estimation of the frequency ratio of the TT to CC spontaneous transversions satisfactorily agrees with experimental data.

  1. DNA Binding and Recognition of a CC Mismatch in a DNA Duplex by Water-Soluble Peptidocalix[4]arenes: Synthesis and Applications.

    PubMed

    Alavijeh, Nahid S; Zadmard, Reza; Balalaie, Saeed; Alavijeh, Mohammad S; Soltani, Nima

    2016-10-07

    Water-soluble peptidocalix[4]arenes were synthesized by the introduction of arginine-rich narrow groove-binding residues at lower rims through solid-phase synthesis. The study of binding of these water-soluble bidentate ligands to well-matched and mismatched DNA duplexes by fluorescent titrations, ethidium bromide (EB) displacement assays, DNA-melting experiments, and circular dichroism (CD) analysis revealed a sequence-dependent groove-binding mechanism.

  2. Altered expression and new mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 in melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; König, Fatima; Verheggen, Raphaela; Schlott, Thilo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Romeike, Bernd; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    Brain metastases, including those of malignant melanoma (known for its high genomic instability), are the most common intracranial tumors. The main objective of this study was to investigate expression and mutation in the DNA mismatch repair system in melanoma brain metastases. Expression of MLH1, MSH2, PMS1 and PMS2 was investigated immunohistochemically in 31 melanoma metastatic tumors. Mutational analysis of MLH1 and MSH2 was performed in 17 melanoma brain metastases. Loss of MLH1 and MSH2 expression was found in 10/31 and 12/31 tumors. PMS1 (27/31) and PMS2 (28/31) expression was preserved in the majority of lesions. Potential missense mutation was found in MSH2 (exon 13) in 2/17 melanomas. Mutation in the intron sequence between exon 14 and 15 of MLH1 (exon 15) was observed in 4/17 cases. Our results indicate that the two major DNA mismatch repair genes, MLH1 and MSH2, are more frequently affected by alterations in the DNA mismatch repair system than the helper genes PMS1 and PMS2. The presence of mutations of MSH2 and MLH1 in melanoma brain metastases, which has not been found in primary melanomas, indicates the high genomic instability of melanoma brain metastases.

  3. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells.

    PubMed

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J; Te Riele, Hein P J

    2016-04-12

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype.

  4. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells

    PubMed Central

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W.; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K.; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J.; te Riele, Hein P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype. PMID:26951689

  5. HNA and ANA high-affinity arrays for detections of DNA and RNA single-base mismatches.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Mikhail; Schepers, Guy; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Van Hummelen, Paul; Herdewijn, Piet

    2008-06-15

    DNA microarrays and sensors have become essential tools in the functional analysis of sequence information. Recently we reported that chimeric hexitol (HNA) and altritol (ANA) nucleotide monomers with an anhydrohexitol sugar moiety are easily available and proved their chemistry to be compatible with DNA and RNA synthesis. In this communication we describe a novel analytical platform based on HNA and ANA units to be used as synthetic oligonucleotide arrays on a glass solid support for match/mismatch detection of DNA and RNA targets. Arrays were fabricated by immobilization of diene-modified oligonucleotides on maleimido-activated glass slides. To demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the HNA/ANA arrays and to compare their properties with regular DNA arrays, sequences in the reverse transcriptase gene (codon 74) and the protease gene of HIV-1 (codon 10) were selected. Both, the relative intensity of the signal and match/mismatch discrimination increased up to fivefold for DNA targets and up to 3-3.5-fold for RNA targets applying HNA or ANA arrays (ANA>HNA>DNA). Certainly in the new field of miRNA detection, ANA arrays could prove very beneficial and their properties should be investigated in more detail.

  6. Evolving approach and clinical significance of detecting DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Jinru

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen significant advancement in our understanding of colorectal tumors with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. The ever-emerging revelations of new molecular and genetic alterations in various clinical conditions have necessitated constant refinement of disease terminology and classification. Thus, a case with the clinical condition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer as defined by the Amsterdam criteria may be one of Lynch syndrome characterized by a germline defect in one of the several MMR genes, one of the yet-to-be-defined “Lynch-like syndrome” if there is evidence of MMR deficiency in the tumor but no detectable germline MMR defect or tumor MLH1 promoter methylation, or “familial colorectal cancer type X” if there is no evidence of MMR deficiency. The detection of these conditions carries significant clinical implications. The detection tools and strategies are constantly evolving. The Bethesda guidelines symbolize a selective approach that uses clinical information and tumor histology as the basis to select high-risk individuals. Such a selective approach has subsequently been found to have limited sensitivity, and is thus gradually giving way to the alternative universal approach that tests all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers. Notably, the universal approach also has its own limitations; its cost-effectiveness in real practice, in particular, remains to be determined. Meanwhile, technological advances such as the next-generation sequencing are offering the promise of direct genetic testing for MMR deficiency at an affordable cost probably in the near future. This article reviews the up-to-date molecular definitions of the various conditions related to MMR deficiency, and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolving nature and the clinical importance of the disease definitions and the detection strategies. PMID:25716099

  7. Mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Fishel, Richard

    2015-10-30

    Highly conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS) are the fundamental components of mismatch repair (MMR). After decades of debate, it appears clear that the MSH proteins initiate MMR by recognizing a mismatch and forming multiple extremely stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that diffuse without hydrolysis along the adjacent DNA. The function(s) of MLH/PMS proteins is less clear, although they too bind ATP and are targeted to MMR by MSH sliding clamps. Structural analysis combined with recent real-time single molecule and cellular imaging technologies are providing new and detailed insight into the thermal-driven motions that animate the complete MMR mechanism.

  8. Dynamic basis for one-dimensional DNA scanning by the mismatch repair complex Msh2-Msh6.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jason; Chowdhury, Arindam; Surtees, Jennifer A; Shimada, Jun; Reichman, David R; Alani, Eric; Greene, Eric C

    2007-11-09

    The ability of proteins to locate specific sites or structures among a vast excess of nonspecific DNA is a fundamental theme in biology. Yet the basic principles that govern these mechanisms remain poorly understood. For example, mismatch repair proteins must scan millions of base pairs to find rare biosynthetic errors, and they then must probe the surrounding region to identify the strand discrimination signals necessary to distinguish the parental and daughter strands. To determine how these proteins might function we used single-molecule optical microscopy to answer the following question: how does the mismatch repair complex Msh2-Msh6 interrogate undamaged DNA? Here we show that Msh2-Msh6 slides along DNA via one-dimensional diffusion. These findings indicate that interactions between Msh2-Msh6 and DNA are dominated by lateral movement of the protein along the helical axis and have implications for how MutS family members travel along DNA at different stages of the repair reaction.

  9. Mutation detection by mismatch binding protein, MutS, in amplified DNA: Application to the cystic fibrosis gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lishanski, A.; Ostrander, E.A.; Rine, J. |

    1994-03-29

    An experimental strategy for detecting heterozygosity in genomic DNA has been developed based on preferential binding of Escherichia coli MutS protein to DNA molecules containing mismatched bases. The binding was detected by a gel mobility-shift assay. This approach was tested by using as a model the most commonly occurring mutations within the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) gene. Genomic DNA samples were amplified with 5{prime}-end-labeled primers that bracket the site of the {Delta}F508 3-bp deletion in exon 10 of the CFTR gene. The renatured PCR products from homozygotes produced homoduplexes; the PCR products from heterozygotes produced heteroduplexes and homoduplexes (1:1). MutS protein bound more strongly to heteroduplexes that correspond to heterozygous carriers of {Delta}F508 and contain a CTT or a GAA loop in one of the strands than to homoduplexes corresponding to homozygotes. The ability of MutS protein to detect heteroduplexes in PCR-amplified DNA extended to fragments {approximately} 500 bp long. The method was also able to detect carriers of the point mutations in exon 11 of the CFTR gene by a preferential binding of MutS to single-base mismatches in PCR-amplified DNA.

  10. The unstructured linker arms of Mlh1-Pms1 are important for interactions with DNA during mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Plys, Aaron J; Rogacheva, Maria V; Greene, Eric C; Alani, Eric

    2012-09-14

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) models have proposed that MSH (MutS homolog) proteins identify DNA polymerase errors while interacting with the DNA replication fork. MLH (MutL homolog) proteins (primarily Mlh1-Pms1 in baker's yeast) then survey the genome for lesion-bound MSH proteins. The resulting MSH-MLH complex formed at a DNA lesion initiates downstream steps in repair. MLH proteins act as dimers and contain long (20-30 nm) unstructured arms that connect two terminal globular domains. These arms can vary between 100 and 300 amino acids in length, are highly divergent between organisms, and are resistant to amino acid substitutions. To test the roles of the linker arms in MMR, we engineered a protease cleavage site into the Mlh1 linker arm domain of baker's yeast Mlh1-Pms1. Cleavage of the Mlh1 linker arm in vitro resulted in a defect in Mlh1-Pms1 DNA binding activity, and in vivo proteolytic cleavage resulted in a complete defect in MMR. We then generated a series of truncation mutants bearing Mlh1 and Pms1 linker arms of varying lengths. This work revealed that MMR is greatly compromised when portions of the Mlh1 linker are removed, whereas repair is less sensitive to truncation of the Pms1 linker arm. Purified complexes containing truncations in Mlh1 and Pms1 linker arms were analyzed and found to have differential defects in DNA binding that also correlated with the ability to form a ternary complex with Msh2-Msh6 and mismatch DNA. These observations are consistent with the unstructured linker domains of MLH proteins providing distinct interactions with DNA during MMR.

  11. Crosstalk between BRCA-Fanconi anemia and mismatch repair pathways prevents MSH2-dependent aberrant DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Peng, Min; Xie, Jenny; Ucher, Anna; Stavnezer, Janet; Cantor, Sharon B

    2014-08-01

    Several proteins in the BRCA-Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, such as FANCJ, BRCA1, and FANCD2, interact with mismatch repair (MMR) pathway factors, but the significance of this link remains unknown. Unlike the BRCA-FA pathway, the MMR pathway is not essential for cells to survive toxic DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), although MMR proteins bind ICLs and other DNA structures that form at stalled replication forks. We hypothesized that MMR proteins corrupt ICL repair in cells that lack crosstalk between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways. Here, we show that ICL sensitivity of cells lacking the interaction between FANCJ and the MMR protein MLH1 is suppressed by depletion of the upstream mismatch recognition factor MSH2. MSH2 depletion suppresses an aberrant DNA damage response, restores cell cycle progression, and promotes ICL resistance through a Rad18-dependent mechanism. MSH2 depletion also suppresses ICL sensitivity in cells deficient for BRCA1 or FANCD2, but not FANCA. Rescue by Msh2 loss was confirmed in Fancd2-null primary mouse cells. Thus, we propose that regulation of MSH2-dependent DNA damage response underlies the importance of interactions between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways.

  12. Evolutionary Covariance Combined with Molecular Dynamics Predicts a Framework for Allostery in the MutS DNA Mismatch Repair Protein

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is an essential, evolutionarily conserved pathway that maintains genome stability by correcting base-pairing errors in DNA. Here we examine the sequence and structure of MutS MMR protein to decipher the amino acid framework underlying its two key activities—recognizing mismatches in DNA and using ATP to initiate repair. Statistical coupling analysis (SCA) identified a network (sector) of coevolved amino acids in the MutS protein family. The potential functional significance of this SCA sector was assessed by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for alanine mutants of the top 5% of 160 residues in the distribution, and control nonsector residues. The effects on three independent metrics were monitored: (i) MutS domain conformational dynamics, (ii) hydrogen bonding between MutS and DNA/ATP, and (iii) relative ATP binding free energy. Each measure revealed that sector residues contribute more substantively to MutS structure–function than nonsector residues. Notably, sector mutations disrupted MutS contacts with DNA and/or ATP from a distance via contiguous pathways and correlated motions, supporting the idea that SCA can identify amino acid networks underlying allosteric communication. The combined SCA/MD approach yielded novel, experimentally testable hypotheses for unknown roles of many residues distributed across MutS, including some implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. PMID:28135092

  13. Relevance of GC content to the conservation of DNA polymerase III/mismatch repair system in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Motohiro; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of DNA replication is one of the driving forces of genome evolution. Bacterial DNA polymerase III, the primary complex of DNA replication, consists of PolC and DnaE. PolC is conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, especially in the Firmicutes with low GC content, whereas DnaE is widely conserved in most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PolC contains two domains, the 3′-5′exonuclease domain and the polymerase domain, while DnaE only possesses the polymerase domain. Accordingly, DnaE does not have the proofreading function; in Escherichia coli, another enzyme DnaQ performs this function. In most bacteria, the fidelity of DNA replication is maintained by 3′-5′ exonuclease and a mismatch repair (MMR) system. However, we found that most Actinobacteria (a group of Gram-positive bacteria with high GC content) appear to have lost the MMR system and chromosomes may be replicated by DnaE-type DNA polymerase III with DnaQ-like 3′-5′ exonuclease. We tested the mutation bias of Bacillus subtilis, which belongs to the Firmicutes and found that the wild type strain is AT-biased while the mutS-deletant strain is remarkably GC-biased. If we presume that DnaE tends to make mistakes that increase GC content, these results can be explained by the mutS deletion (i.e., deletion of the MMR system). Thus, we propose that GC content is regulated by DNA polymerase and MMR system, and the absence of polC genes, which participate in the MMR system, may be the reason for the increase of GC content in Gram-positive bacteria such as Actinobacteria. PMID:24062730

  14. Label-free detection of DNA single-base mismatches using a simple reflectance-based optical technique.

    PubMed

    Nava, G; Ceccarello, E; Giavazzi, F; Salina, M; Damin, F; Chiari, M; Buscaglia, M; Bellini, T; Zanchetta, G

    2016-05-21

    Rapid and quantitative detection of the binding of nucleic acids to surface-immobilized probes remains a challenge in many biomedical applications. We investigated the hybridization of a set of fully complementary and defected 12-base long DNA oligomers by using the Reflective Phantom Interface (RPI), a recently developed multiplexed label-free detection technique. Based on the simple measurement of reflected light intensity, this technology enables to quantify the hybridization directly as it occurs on the surface with a sensitivity of 10 pg mm(-2). We found a strong effect of single-base mismatches and of their location on hybridization kinetics and equilibrium binding. In line with previous studies, we found that DNA-DNA binding is weaker on a surface than in the bulk. Our data indicate that this effect is a consequence of weak nonspecific binding of the probes to the surface.

  15. Universal and blocking primer mismatches limit the use of high-throughput DNA sequencing for the quantitative metabarcoding of arthropods.

    PubMed

    Piñol, J; Mir, G; Gomez-Polo, P; Agustí, N

    2015-07-01

    The quantification of the biological diversity in environmental samples using high-throughput DNA sequencing is hindered by the PCR bias caused by variable primer-template mismatches of the individual species. In some dietary studies, there is the added problem that samples are enriched with predator DNA, so often a predator-specific blocking oligonucleotide is used to alleviate the problem. However, specific blocking oligonucleotides could coblock nontarget species to some degree. Here, we accurately estimate the extent of the PCR biases induced by universal and blocking primers on a mock community prepared with DNA of twelve species of terrestrial arthropods. We also compare universal and blocking primer biases with those induced by variable annealing temperature and number of PCR cycles. The results show that reads of all species were recovered after PCR enrichment at our control conditions (no blocking oligonucleotide, 45 °C annealing temperature and 40 cycles) and high-throughput sequencing. They also show that the four factors considered biased the final proportions of the species to some degree. Among these factors, the number of primer-template mismatches of each species had a disproportionate effect (up to five orders of magnitude) on the amplification efficiency. In particular, the number of primer-template mismatches explained most of the variation (~3/4) in the amplification efficiency of the species. The effect of blocking oligonucleotide concentration on nontarget species relative abundance was also significant, but less important (below one order of magnitude). Considering the results reported here, the quantitative potential of the technique is limited, and only qualitative results (the species list) are reliable, at least when targeting the barcoding COI region.

  16. HEREDITARY, SPORADIC AND METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER ARE COMMONLY DRIVEN BY SPECIFIC SPECTRUMS OF DEFECTIVE DNA MISMATCH REPAIR COMPONENTS

    PubMed Central

    CARETHERS, JOHN M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of several human cell mechanisms utilized to repair mutable mistakes within DNA, particularly after DNA is replicated. MMR function is dependent upon heterodimerization of specific MMR proteins that can recognize base-base mispairs as well as frameshifts at microsatellite sequences, followed by the triggering of other complementary proteins that execute excision and repair or initiate cell demise if repair is futile. MMR function is compromised in specific disease states, all of which can be biochemically recognized by faulty repair of microsatellite sequences, causing microsatellite instability. Germline mutation of an MMR gene causes Lynch syndrome, the most common inherited form of colorectal cancer (CRC), and biallelic germline mutations cause the rare constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome. Somatic inactivation of MMR through epigenetic mechanisms is observed in 15% of sporadic CRC, and a smaller portion of CRCs possess biallelic somatic mutations. A novel inflammation-driven nuclear-to-cytoplasmic shift of the specific MMR protein hMSH3 is seen in up to 60% of sporadic CRCs that associates with metastasis and poor patient prognosis, unlike improved outcome when MMR is genetically inactivated. The mechanism for MMR inactication as well as the component affected dictates the clinical spectrum and clinical response for patients. PMID:28066040

  17. DNA promoter and histone H3 methylation downregulate NGX6 in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Zhu, Xinjiang; Xu, Xiaoyang; Dai, Dongqiu

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma-associated gene 6 (NGX6) is a novel candidate tumor metastasis suppressor gene. Our study was to determine whether DNA hypermethylation and histone modification at the NGX6 gene promoter play important roles in silencing NGX6 expression in gastric cancer. NGX6 expression was downregulated in all gastric cancer cells and 76.19 % tissues. In three GC cell lines, hypermethylated NGX6 loci were characterized by histone H3-K9 hypoacetylation and hypermethylation. Trichostatin A treatment could moderately increase H3-K9 acetylation at the silenced loci; however, it had no effect on DNA and H3-K9 methylation and minimal effects on NGX6 expression. In contrast, 5'aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment could rapidly decrease DNA and H3-K9 methylation at the silenced loci, leading to the reexpression of NGX6. Combined treatment with 5'aza-2'-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A had synergistic effects on the reexpression of NGX6 at the hypermethylation loci. Our current study shows that NGX6 expression is downregulated in GC cancer cells and tissues due to NGX6 promoter methylation and H3-K9 methylation, but not H3-K9 acetylation. Our findings indicate that the downregulation of NGX6 expression contributes to the development and progression of gastric cancer. More studies are needed to determine the precise mechanism of NGX6 in the progression of gastric cancer.

  18. The mismatched nucleotides in the 5'-terminal hairpin of minute virus of mice are required for efficient viral DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, E; Sahli, R; Hirt, B; Beard, P

    1995-01-01

    The 5'-terminal sequence in the DNA of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) is a palindrome. It can form a hairpin, the stem of which is entirely base-paired except for three consecutive unpaired nucleotides which form a bubble. Since this structure is well conserved among different parvoviruses, we examined its importance for viral replication by generating MVM mutants with alterations in this region. A clone of MVMp DNA which contained the entire 3' end and more than half of the 5' palindrome was made. Although it lacked the sequence information to form a wild-type bubble, this DNA was infectious. On transfection into A9 fibroblasts, it gave rise to a virus (MVMs) which had a bubble in its 5' palindrome. The bubble consisted of four mismatched nucleotides in the same location as the unpaired nucleotides of the wild-type palindrome. Apparently, neighboring plasmid sequences were incorporated into the viral DNA, enabling formation of the mismatch. This observation suggested that a bubble is critical for growth of MVM but that its sequence is not. To find out whether MVM lacking a bubble in the 5' palindrome is viable, we made a second clone in which the plasmid sequences incorporated in MVMs were removed. Transfection of this DNA gave rise to a virus (MVMx) in which the nucleotides unpaired in the wild-type hairpin are now fully base-paired. Although MVMx can be propagated, it is defective in comparison with wild-type MVMp; it exhibited about a 50-fold-lower ratio of plaque-forming units to DNA content. In mixed infections, MVMp consistently outgrew the bubbleless MVMx. The rate of accumulation of DNA replication intermediates was lower for MVMx than for the wild-type virus. Quantitative analysis of the 5' termini of replicative form DNA suggested that the ability of MVMx to convert hairpin 5' termini to extended termini is impaired. In contrast, the virus with the altered bubble, MVMs, behaved like the wild-type MVMp in all the assays. We conclude that MVM

  19. Enhancement of RecA-mediated self-assembly in DNA nanostructures through basepair mismatches and single-strand nicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Sybilla Louise; Sharma, Rajan; Davies, Alexander Giles; Wälti, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The use of DNA as a structural material for nanometre-scale construction has grown extensively over the last decades. The development of more advanced DNA-based materials would benefit from a modular approach enabling the direct assembly of additional elements onto nanostructures after fabrication. RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments encapsulating short ssDNA have been demonstrated as a tool for highly efficient and fully programmable post-hoc patterning of duplex DNA scaffold. However, the underlying assembly process is not fully understood, in particular when patterning complex DNA topologies. Here, we report the effect of basepair-mismatched regions and single-strand nicks in the double-stranded DNA scaffold on the yield of RecA-based assembly. Significant increases in assembly yield are observed upon the introduction of unpaired basepairs directly adjacent to the assembly region. However, when the unpaired regions were introduced further from the assembly site the assembly yield initially decreased as the length of the unpaired region was increased. These results suggest that an unpaired region acts as a kinetic trap for RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments, impeding the assembly mechanism. Conversely, when the unpaired region is located directly adjacent to the assembly site, it leads to an increase in efficiency of RecA patterning owing to increased breathing of the assembly site.

  20. Enhancement of RecA-mediated self-assembly in DNA nanostructures through basepair mismatches and single-strand nicks

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Sybilla Louise; Sharma, Rajan; Davies, Alexander Giles; Wälti, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The use of DNA as a structural material for nanometre-scale construction has grown extensively over the last decades. The development of more advanced DNA-based materials would benefit from a modular approach enabling the direct assembly of additional elements onto nanostructures after fabrication. RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments encapsulating short ssDNA have been demonstrated as a tool for highly efficient and fully programmable post-hoc patterning of duplex DNA scaffold. However, the underlying assembly process is not fully understood, in particular when patterning complex DNA topologies. Here, we report the effect of basepair-mismatched regions and single-strand nicks in the double-stranded DNA scaffold on the yield of RecA-based assembly. Significant increases in assembly yield are observed upon the introduction of unpaired basepairs directly adjacent to the assembly region. However, when the unpaired regions were introduced further from the assembly site the assembly yield initially decreased as the length of the unpaired region was increased. These results suggest that an unpaired region acts as a kinetic trap for RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments, impeding the assembly mechanism. Conversely, when the unpaired region is located directly adjacent to the assembly site, it leads to an increase in efficiency of RecA patterning owing to increased breathing of the assembly site. PMID:28112216

  1. Enhancement of RecA-mediated self-assembly in DNA nanostructures through basepair mismatches and single-strand nicks.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Sybilla Louise; Sharma, Rajan; Davies, Alexander Giles; Wälti, Christoph

    2017-01-23

    The use of DNA as a structural material for nanometre-scale construction has grown extensively over the last decades. The development of more advanced DNA-based materials would benefit from a modular approach enabling the direct assembly of additional elements onto nanostructures after fabrication. RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments encapsulating short ssDNA have been demonstrated as a tool for highly efficient and fully programmable post-hoc patterning of duplex DNA scaffold. However, the underlying assembly process is not fully understood, in particular when patterning complex DNA topologies. Here, we report the effect of basepair-mismatched regions and single-strand nicks in the double-stranded DNA scaffold on the yield of RecA-based assembly. Significant increases in assembly yield are observed upon the introduction of unpaired basepairs directly adjacent to the assembly region. However, when the unpaired regions were introduced further from the assembly site the assembly yield initially decreased as the length of the unpaired region was increased. These results suggest that an unpaired region acts as a kinetic trap for RecA-based nucleoprotein filaments, impeding the assembly mechanism. Conversely, when the unpaired region is located directly adjacent to the assembly site, it leads to an increase in efficiency of RecA patterning owing to increased breathing of the assembly site.

  2. Mutant IDH1 downregulates ATM and alters DNA repair and sensitivity to DNA damage independent of TET2

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Satoshi; Li, Wanda Y.; Tseng, Alan; Beerman, Isabel; Elia, Andrew J.; Bendall, Sean C.; Lemonnier, François; Kron, Ken J.; Cescon, David W.; Hao, Zhenyue; Lind, Evan F.; Takayama, Naoya; Planello, Aline C.; Shen, Shu Yi; Shih, Alan H.; Larsen, Dana M.; Li, Qinxi; Snow, Bryan E.; Wakeham, Andrew; Haight, Jillian; Gorrini, Chiara; Bassi, Christian; Thu, Kelsie L.; Murakami, Kiichi; Elford, Alisha R.; Ueda, Takeshi; Straley, Kimberly; Yen, Katharine E.; Melino, Gerry; Cimmino, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; Levine, Ross L.; De Carvalho, Daniel D.; Lupien, Mathieu; Rossi, Derrick J.; Nolan, Garry P.; Cairns, Rob A.; Mak, Tak W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 gene (IDH1) are common drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but their mechanism is not fully understood. It is thought that IDH1 mutants act by inhibiting TET2 to alter DNA methylation, but there are significant unexplained clinical differences between IDH1- and TET2-mutant diseases. We have discovered that mice expressing endogenous mutant IDH1 have reduced numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), in contrast to Tet2 knockout (TET2-KO) mice. Mutant IDH1 downregulates the DNA damage (DD) sensor ATM by altering histone methylation, leading to impaired DNA repair, increased sensitivity to DD, and reduced HSC self-renewal, independent of TET2. ATM expression is also decreased in human IDH1-mutated AML. These findings may have implications for treatment of IDH-mutant leukemia. PMID:27424808

  3. Comparative study of affinity and selectivity of ligands targeting abasic and mismatch sites in DNA using a fluorescence-melting assay.

    PubMed

    Kotera, Naoko; Granzhan, Anton; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several families of small-molecule ligands have been developed to selectively target DNA pairing defects, such as abasic sites and mismatched base pairs, with the aim to interfere with the DNA repair and the template function of the DNA. However, the affinity and selectivity (with respect to well-matched DNA) of these ligands has barely been evaluated in a systematic way. Herein, we report a comparative study of binding affinity and selectivity of a representative panel of 16 ligands targeting abasic sites and a T-T mismatch in DNA, using a fluorescence-monitored melting assay. We demonstrate that bisintercalator-type macrocyclic ligands are characterized by moderate affinity but exceptionally high selectivity with respect to well-matched DNA, whereas other reported ligands show either modest selectivity or rather low affinity in identical conditions.

  4. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA. Progress report, March 1, 1990--February 28, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  5. A Modified Protocol with Improved Detection Rate for Mis-Matched Donor HLA from Low Quantities of DNA in Urine Samples from Kidney Graft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Janette; Choi, Leo C. W.; Ho, Jenny C. Y.; Chan, Gavin S. W.; Mok, Maggie M. Y.; Lam, Man-Fei; Chak, Wai-Leung; Cheuk, Au; Chau, Ka-Foon; Tong, Matthew; Chan, Kwok-Wah; Chan, Tak-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Background Urine from kidney transplant recipient has proven to be a viable source for donor DNA. However, an optimized protocol would be required to determine mis-matched donor HLA specificities in view of the scarcity of DNA obtained in some cases. Methods In this study, fresh early morning urine specimens were obtained from 155 kidney transplant recipients with known donor HLA phenotype. DNA was extracted and typing of HLA-A, B and DRB1 loci by polymerase chain reaction-specific sequence primers was performed using tailor-made condition according to the concentration of extracted DNA. Results HLA typing of DNA extracted from urine revealed both recipient and donor HLA phenotypes, allowing the deduction of the unknown donor HLA and hence the degree of HLA mis-match. By adopting the modified procedures, mis-matched donor HLA phenotypes were successfully deduced in all of 35 tested urine samples at DNA quantities spanning the range of 620–24,000 ng. Conclusions This urine-based method offers a promising and reliable non-invasive means for the identification of mis-matched donor HLA antigens in kidney transplant recipients with unknown donor HLA phenotype or otherwise inadequate donor information. PMID:27861530

  6. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system consists of a number of proteins that play important roles in repair of base pair mismatch mutations and in maintenance of genomic integrity. A defect in this system can cause genetic instability, which can lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair proteins, especially MLH1 or MSH2, is responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. These MMR proteins also play an important role in the induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, altered expression of or a defect in MLH1 or MSH2 may confer resistance to anti-cancer drugs used in chemotherapy. We hypothesized that the ability of these two MMR proteins to regulate apoptosis are interdependent. Moreover, a defect in either one may confer resistance to chemotherapy by an inability to trigger apoptosis. To this end, we studied three cell lines-SW480, LoVo, and HTC116. These cell lines were selected based on their differential expression of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. SW480 expresses both MLH1 and MSH2; LoVo expresses only MLH1 but not MSH2; HCT116 expresses only MSH2 but not MLH1 protein. MTT assays, a measure of cytotoxicity, showed that there were different cytotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, on these cell lines, effects that were correlated with the MMR status of the cells. Cells that are deficient in MLH1 protein (HCT116 cells) were resistant to the drug. Cells that express both MLH1 and MSH2 proteins (SW480 cells) showed caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptosis. Cells that lack MLH1 (HCT116 cells) did not show any caspase-3 cleavage. Expression of full-length MLH1 protein was decreased in MMR proficient (SW480) cells during apoptosis; it remained unchanged in cells that lack MSH2 (LoVo cells). The expression of MSH2 protein remained unchanged during apoptosis both in MMR proficient (SW480) and deficient (HCT116) cells. Studies on translocation of MLH1 protein from nucleus to cytosolic fraction, an

  7. Label-free DNA hybridization detection and single base-mismatch discrimination using CE-ICP-MS assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Sun, Shao-kai; Yang, Jia-lin; Jiang, Yan

    2011-12-07

    Detecting a specific DNA sequence and discriminating single base-mismatch is critical to clinical diagnosis, paternity testing, forensic sciences, food and drug industry, pathology, genetics, environmental monitoring, and anti-bioterrorism. To this end, capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method is developed using the displacing interaction between the target ssDNA and the competitor Hg(2+) for the first time. The thymine-rich capture ssDNA 1 is interacted with the competitor Hg(2+), forming an assembled complex in a hairpin-structure between the thymine bases arrangement at both sides of the capture ssDNA 1. In the presence of a target ssDNA with stronger affinity than that of the competitor Hg(2+), the energetically favorable hybridization between capture ssDNA 1 and the target ssDNA destroys the hairpin-structure and releases the competitor as free Hg(2+), which was then read out and accurately quantified by CE-ICP-MS assay. Under the optimal CE separation conditions, free Hg(2+) ions and its capture ssDNA 1 adduct were baseline separated and detected on-line by ICP-MS; the increased peak intensity of free Hg(2+) against the concentration of perfectly complementary target ssDNA was linear over the concentration range of 30-600 nmol L(-1) with a limit of detection of 8 nmol L(-1) (3s, n = 11) in the pre-incubated mixture containing 1 μmol L(-1) Hg(2+) and 0.2 μmol L(-1) capture ssDNA 1. This new assay method is simple in design since any target ssDNA binding can in principle result in free Hg(2+) release by 6-fold Hg(2+) signal amplification, avoiding oligonucleotide labeling or assistance by excess signal transducer and signal reporter to read out the target. Due to element-specific detection of ICP-MS in our assay procedure, the interference from the autofluorescence of substrata was eliminated.

  8. New Therapeutic Opportunities Based on DNA Mismatch Repair and BRAF Status in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Romain; Svrcek, Magali; Dreyer, Chantal; Cervera, Pascale; Duval, Alex; Pocard, Marc; Fléjou, Jean-François; de Gramont, Aimery; André, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Recently, colorectal cancer (CRC) subtyping consortium identified four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS1-4). CMS1 is enriched for deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) and BRAF (V600E) tumors. Intriguingly, this subtype has better relapse-free survival but worse overall survival after relapse compared with the other subtypes. Growing evidence is accumulating on the benefit of specific therapeutic strategies such as immune checkpoint inhibition therapy in dMMR tumors and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway targeted therapy in tumors harboring BRAF (V600E) mutation. After reviewing dMMR prognostic value, immune checkpoints as major targets for dMMR carcinomas will be highlighted. Following, BRAF (V600E) prognostic impact will be reviewed and therapeutic strategies with the combination of cytotoxic agents and especially the combinations of BRAF and MAPK inhibitors will be discussed.

  9. DPT tautomerisation of the G·A(syn) and A*·G*(syn) DNA mismatches: a QM/QTAIM combined atomistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-05-21

    By applying a combined QM and QTAIM atomistic computational approach we have established for the first time that the G·A(syn) and A*·G*(syn) DNA mismatches (rare tautomers are marked with an asterisk), causing spontaneous transversions with substantially various probabilities, radically differ from each other in their ability to tautomerise through the double proton transfer (DPT). The A*·G*(syn) mismatch tautomerises quite easily (ΔΔG(TS) ≈ 4·kT at room temperature) into the A·G*(syn) mismatch through the asynchronous concerted mechanism, whereas the G·A(syn) base mispair does not tautomerise via the DPT at all, since there is no local minimum corresponding to the tautomerised G*·A*(syn) mismatch on the potential energy surface. It was established that the A·G*(syn) base mispair is a dynamically unstable H-bonded complex with an extremely short lifetime of 2.17 × 10(-13) s. Consequently, the obtained results allow us to believe that spontaneous or forced dissociation of both the G·A(syn) and A*·G*(syn) DNA mismatches by the DNA-polymerase occurs with the preservation of the tautomeric status of the bases.

  10. Kinetics of Mismatch Formation opposite Lesions by the Replicative DNA Polymerase from Bacteriophage RB69

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, Matthew; Rudnicki, Jean; Midkiff, John; Reha-Krantz, Linda; Doubli, Sylvie; Wallace, Susan S.

    2010-04-12

    The fidelity of DNA replication is under constant threat from the formation of lesions within the genome. Oxidation of DNA bases leads to the formation of altered DNA bases such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, commonly called 8-oxoG, and 2-hydroxyadenenine, or 2-OHA. In this work we have examined the incorporation kinetics opposite these two oxidatively derived lesions as well as an abasic site analogue by the replicative DNA polymerase from bacteriophage RB69. We compared the kinetic parameters for both wild type and the low fidelity L561A variant. While nucleotide incorporation rates (k{sub pol}) were generally higher for the variant, the presence of a lesion in the templating position reduced the ability of both the wild-type and variant DNA polymerases to form ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes. Thus, the L561A substitution does not significantly affect the ability of the RB69 DNA polymerase to recognize damaged DNA; instead, the mutation increases the probability that nucleotide incorporation will occur. We have also solved the crystal structure of the L561A variant forming an 8-oxoG {center_dot} dATP mispair and show that the propensity for forming this mispair depends on an enlarged polymerase active site.

  11. Diabetes causes multiple genetic alterations and downregulates expression of DNA repair genes in the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yuying; Cai, Mengyin; Zhu, Baoyi; Mu, Panwei; Xia, Xuan; Zhao, Yi; Weng, Jianping; Gao, Xin; Wen, Xingqiao

    2011-09-01

    The molecular impact of diabetes mellitus on prostate gland has not been elucidated. In this study, we performed a whole-genome cDNA microarray analysis using a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model to identify the effects of diabetes on the gene expression profiles in prostate. Our study shows that diabetes causes changes in the expression of multiple genes, particularly those related to cell proliferation and differentiation, oxidative stress, DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoints, angiogenesis and apoptosis. These findings were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining using rat and human prostate tissue. We also used a cell culture model (human normal prostatic RWPE-1 cell line) to study the direct effect of high glucose. We found that high glucose caused increased intracellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as downregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and DNA damage repair genes MRE11 and XRCC3. Our findings provide important insights into understanding the pathogenesis of the diabetes-induced changes in prostate as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets for future studies.

  12. Selenium compounds activate ATM-dependent DNA damage responses via the mismatch repair protein hMLH1 in colorectal cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that selenium supplementation suppresses risk of colorectal and other cancers. The majority of colorectal cancers are characterized by a defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) process. Here, we have employed the MMR-deficient HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells ...

  13. Enhanced thermal stability and mismatch discrimination of mutation-carrying DNA duplexes and their kinetic and thermodynamic properties in microchannel laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Maria Portia B; Yamashita, Kenichi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    This article reports the enhancement of thermal stability involving normal duplex and mutation-carrying DNA duplexes in microchannel laminar flow. The application of an in-house temperature-controllable microchannel-type flow cell is demonstrated for improved discrimination of mismatch base pairs such as A-G and T-G that are difficult to distinguish due to the rather small thermal destabilizations. Enhancement in thermal stability is reflected by an increased thermal melting temperature achieved in microchannel laminar flow as compared with batch reactions. To examine the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex-coil equilibrium of DNA oligomers, denaturation-renaturation hysteresis curves were measured. The influence of microchannel laminar flow on DNA base mismatch analysis was described from the kinetic and thermodynamic perspectives. An increasing trend was observed for association rate constant as flow rate increased. In contrast, an apparent decrease in dissociation rate constant was observed with increasing flow rate. The magnitudes of the activation energies of dissociation were nearly constant for both the batch and microchannel laminar flow systems at all flow rates. In contrast, the magnitudes of activation energies of association decreased as flow rate increased. These results clearly show how microchannel laminar flow induces change in reaction rate by effecting change in activation energy. We anticipate, therefore, that this approach based on microchannel laminar flow system holds great promise for improved mismatch discrimination in DNA analyses, particularly on single-base-pair mismatch, by pronouncedly enhancing thermal stability.

  14. How reliable is immunohistochemical staining for DNA mismatch repair proteins performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiation?

    PubMed

    Vilkin, Alex; Halpern, Marisa; Morgenstern, Sara; Brazovski, Eli; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Boltin, Doron; Purim, Ofer; Kundel, Yulia; Welinsky, Sara; Brenner, Baruch; Niv, Yaron; Levi, Zohar

    2014-10-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing for mismatch repair proteins (MMRP) is currently being used primarily in colorectal cancer resection specimens. We aimed to compare the results of IHC staining performed on biopsy specimens obtained at endoscopy with that performed on surgical specimens after neoadjuvant therapy. Thirty-two rectal cancer subjects had paired preneoadjuvant and postneoadjuvant tissue available for IHC staining (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2), whereas 39 rectosigmoid cancer patients who did not receive neoadjuvant treatment served as controls. Each slide received a qualitative (absent, focal, and strong) and quantitative score (immunoreactivity [0-3] × percent positivity [0-4]). The quantitative scores of MMRP from the operative material were significantly lower in the neoadjuvant group than in the control (P < .05 for all).The scores of all MMRP from endoscopic biopsies were not significantly different between the neoadjuvant and the control groups. Disagreement between the endoscopic biopsy and the operative material was evident in 23 of 128 stains (18.5%) in the neoadjuvant group and in 12 of 156 stains (7.7%) in the control group (P = .009). In the neoadjuvant group, a disagreement pattern of "endoscopic strong operative focal" was observed in 28.1% for PMS2, 12.5% for MSH6, 12.5% for MLH1, and 6.3% for MSH2, and in the control group, this same disagreement pattern was found in 12.8% for PMS2, 7.7% for MSH6, 7.7% for MLH1, and 0% for MSH2. Based on our findings, we suggest that for rectal cancer, the endoscopic material rather than the operative material should serve as the primary material for IHC staining.

  15. Sequence and stress-response analyses of the DNA mismatch repair gene hexA in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Ren, J; Park, J H; Dunn, N W; Kim, W S

    2001-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair gene hexA was identified in Lactococcus lactis by PCR amplification by using a pair of primers homologous to the DNA-binding Dps protein. The gene in its entirety, including the regulatory regions, was sequenced, by using a strategy of chromosomal walking based on two PCR protocols. The open reading frame of 2526 bp was preceded by a strong ribosome-binding site (AGGAAG) and was followed by a potential transcription terminator (hairpin loop structure). The 5' terminus of the hexA mRNA was located 135 bp upstream of the start codon, and putative -10 and -35 regions were identified. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed two motifs, the ATP/GTP-binding site (P-loop) and the "MutS family signature". The hexA promoter was cloned into pMU1327, which contained a promoter-less CAT reporter gene, and the promoter activity was examined under oxidative-stress conditions. It appears that the promoter activity is down-shifted by H2O2 at 4 mM.

  16. The mismatch repair system modulates curcumin sensitivity through induction of DNA strand breaks and activation of G2-M checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihua; Jin, ShunQian; Yalowich, Jack C; Brown, Kevin D; Rajasekaran, Baskaran

    2010-03-01

    The highly conserved mismatch (MMR) repair system corrects postreplicative errors and modulates cellular responses to genotoxic agents. Here, we show that the MMR system strongly influences cellular sensitivity to curcumin. Compared with MMR-proficient cells, isogenically matched MMR-deficient cells displayed enhanced sensitivity to curcumin. Similarly, cells suppressed for MLH1 or MSH2 expression by RNA interference displayed increased curcumin sensitivity. Curcumin treatment generated comparable levels of reactive oxygen species and the mutagenic adduct 8-oxo-guanine in MMR-proficient and MMR-deficient cells; however, accumulation of gammaH2AX foci, a marker for DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), occurred only in MMR-positive cells in response to curcumin treatment. Additionally, MMR-positive cells showed activation of Chk1 and induction of G(2)-M cell cycle checkpoint following curcumin treatment and inhibition of Chk1 by UCN-01 abrogated Chk1 activation and heightened apoptosis in MMR-proficient cells. These results indicate that curcumin triggers the accumulation of DNA DSB and induction of a checkpoint response through a MMR-dependent mechanism. Conversely, in MMR-compromised cells, curcumin-induced DSB is significantly blunted, and as a result, cells fail to undergo cell cycle arrest, enter mitosis, and die through mitotic catastrophe. The results have potential therapeutic value, especially in the treatment of tumors with compromised MMR function.

  17. Solution structure of DAPI selectively bound in the minor groove of a DNA T.T mismatch-containing site: NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, E; Paci, M

    1998-01-01

    The solution structure of the complex between 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and DNA oligomer [d(GCGATTCGC)]2, containing a central T.T mismatch, has been characterized by combined use of proton one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics computations including relaxation matrix refinement. The results show that the DAPI molecule binds in the minor groove of the central region 5'-ATT-3' of the DNA oligomer, which predominantly adopts a duplex structure with a global right-handed B-like conformation. In the final models of the complex, the DAPI molecule is located nearly isohelical with its NH indole proton oriented towards the DNA helix axis and forming a bifurcated hydrogen bond with the carbonyl O2 groups of a mismatched T5 and the T6 residue of the opposite strand. Mismatched thymines adopt a wobble base pair conformation and are found stacked between the flanking base pairs, inducing only minor local conformational changes in global duplex structure. In addition, no other binding mechanisms were observed, showing that minor groove binding of DAPI to the mismatch-containing site is favoured in comparison with any other previously reported interaction with G.C sequences. PMID:9753740

  18. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries.

    PubMed

    Trebitz, Anett S; Hoffman, Joel C; Grant, George W; Billehus, Tyler M; Pilgrim, Erik M

    2015-07-22

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections.

  19. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trebitz, Anett S.; Hoffman, Joel C.; Grant, George W.; Billehus, Tyler M.; Pilgrim, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections. PMID:26199185

  20. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebitz, Anett S.; Hoffman, Joel C.; Grant, George W.; Billehus, Tyler M.; Pilgrim, Erik M.

    2015-07-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections.

  1. The cumulative effects of polymorphisms in the DNA mismatch repair genes and tobacco smoking in oesophageal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Matjaz; Wang, Yabing; Veber, Nika; Mwapagha, Lamech M; Parker, M Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes repair errors in DNA that occur during normal DNA metabolism or are induced by certain cancer-contributing exposures. We assessed the association between 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 5 MMR genes and oesophageal cancer risk in South Africans. Prior to genotyping, SNPs were selected from the HapMap database, based on their significantly different genotypic distributions between European ancestry populations and four HapMap populations of African origin. In the Mixed Ancestry group, the MSH3 rs26279 G/G versus A/A or A/G genotype was positively associated with cancer (OR = 2.71; 95% CI: 1.34-5.50). Similar associations were observed for PMS1 rs5742938 (GG versus AA or AG: OR = 1.73; 95% CI: 1.07-2.79) and MLH3 rs28756991 (AA or GA versus GG: OR = 2.07; 95% IC: 1.04-4.12). In Black individuals, however, no association between MMR polymorhisms and cancer risk was observed in individual SNP analysis. The interactions between MMR genes were evaluated using the model-based multifactor-dimensionality reduction approach, which showed a significant genetic interaction between SNPs in MSH2, MSH3 and PMS1 genes in Black and Mixed Ancestry subjects, respectively. The data also implies that pathogenesis of common polymorphisms in MMR genes is influenced by exposure to tobacco smoke. In conclusion, our findings suggest that common polymorphisms in MMR genes and/or their combined effects might be involved in the aetiology of oesophageal cancer.

  2. MonoSeq Variant Caller Reveals Novel Mononucleotide Run Indel Mutations in Tumors with Defective DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher J.; Miranda, Mario A.; O’Hern, Matthew J.; Blachly, James S.; Moyer, Cassandra L.; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Kroll, Karl W.; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Sapp, Caroline E.; Mutch, David G.; Cohn, David E.; Bundschuh, Ralf; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized cancer genetics, but accurately detecting mutations in repetitive DNA sequences, especially mononucleotide runs, remains a challenge. This is a particular concern for tumors with defective mismatch repair (MMR) that accumulate strand-slippage mutations. We developed MonoSeq to improve indel mutation detection in mononucleotide runs, and used MonoSeq to investigate strand-slippage mutations in endometrial cancers, a tumor type that has frequent loss of MMR. We performed extensive Sanger sequencing to validate both clonal and sub-clonal MonoSeq mutation calls. Eighty-one regions containing mononucleotide runs were sequenced in 542 primary endometrial cancers (223 with defective MMR). Our analyses revealed that the overall mutation rate in MMR-deficient tumors was 20–30-fold higher than in MMR normal tumors. MonoSeq analysis identified several previously unreported mutations, including a novel hotspot in an A7 run in the terminal exon of ARID5B.The ARID5B indel mutations were seen in both MMR-deficient and MMR normal tumors, suggesting biologic selection. Analysis of tumor mRNAs revealed the presence of mutant transcripts that could result in translation of neopeptides. Improved detection of mononucleotide run strand-slippage mutations has clear implications for comprehensive mutation detection in tumors with defective MMR. Indel frameshift mutations and the resultant antigenic peptides could help guide immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27346418

  3. MonoSeq Variant Caller Reveals Novel Mononucleotide Run Indel Mutations in Tumors with Defective DNA Mismatch Repair.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher J; Miranda, Mario A; O'Hern, Matthew J; Blachly, James S; Moyer, Cassandra L; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Kroll, Karl W; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Sapp, Caroline E; Mutch, David G; Cohn, David E; Bundschuh, Ralf; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing has revolutionized cancer genetics, but accurately detecting mutations in repetitive DNA sequences, especially mononucleotide runs, remains a challenge. This is a particular concern for tumors with defective mismatch repair (MMR) that accumulate strand-slippage mutations. We developed MonoSeq to improve indel mutation detection in mononucleotide runs, and used MonoSeq to investigate strand-slippage mutations in endometrial cancers, a tumor type that has frequent loss of MMR. We performed extensive Sanger sequencing to validate both clonal and subclonal MonoSeq mutation calls. Eighty-one regions containing mononucleotide runs were sequenced in 540 primary endometrial cancers (223 with defective MMR). Our analyses revealed that the overall mutation rate in MMR-deficient tumors was 20-30-fold higher than in MMR-normal tumors. MonoSeq analysis identified several previously unreported mutations, including a novel hotspot in an A7 run in the terminal exon of ARID5B.The ARID5B indel mutations were seen in both MMR-deficient and MMR-normal tumors, suggesting biologic selection. The analysis of tumor mRNAs revealed the presence of mutant transcripts that could result in translation of neopeptides. Improved detection of mononucleotide run strand-slippage mutations has clear implications for comprehensive mutation detection in tumors with defective MMR. Indel frameshift mutations and the resultant antigenic peptides could help guide immunotherapy strategies.

  4. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: Match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to biotic condition assessment and non-native species early-detection monitoring. However, the abi...

  5. A novel DNA damage response mediated by DNA mismatch repair in Caenorhabditis elegans: induction of programmed autophagic cell death in non-dividing cells

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Takahito; Kato, Yuichi; Nakamura, Chihiro; Ishikawa, Satoru; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) contributes to genome integrity by correcting errors of DNA polymerase and inducing cell death in response to DNA damage. Dysfunction of MMR results in increased mutation frequency and cancer risk. Clinical researches revealed that MMR abnormalities induce cancers of non-dividing tissues, such as kidney and liver. However, how MMR suppresses cancer in non-dividing tissues is not understood. To address that mechanism, we analyzed the roles of MMR in non-dividing cells using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), in which all somatic cells are non-dividing in the adult stage. In this study, we used stable MMR-mutant lines with a balancer chromosome. First, we confirmed that deficiency of MMR leads to resistance to various mutagens in C. elegans dividing cells. Next, we performed drug resistance assays, and found that MMR-deficient adult worms were resistant to SN1-type alkylating and oxidizing agents. In addition, dead cell staining and reporter assays of an autophagy-related gene demonstrated that the cell death was autophagic cell death. Interestingly, this autophagic cell death was not suppressed by caffeine, implying that MMR induces death of non-dividing cells in an atl-1-independent manner. Hence, we propose the hypothesis that MMR prevents cancers in non-dividing tissues by directly inducing cell death. PMID:26413217

  6. Applying and testing the conveniently optimized enzyme mismatch cleavage method to clinical DNA diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Niida, Yo; Kuroda, Mondo; Mitani, Yusuke; Okumura, Akiko; Yokoi, Ayano

    2012-11-01

    Establishing a simple and effective mutation screening method is one of the most compelling problems with applying genetic diagnosis to clinical use. Because there is no reliable and inexpensive screening system, amplifying by PCR and performing direct sequencing of every coding exon is the gold standard strategy even today. However, this approach is expensive and time consuming, especially when gene size or sample number is large. Previously, we developed CEL nuclease mediated heteroduplex incision with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining (CHIPS) as an ideal simple mutation screening system constructed with only conventional apparatuses and commercially available reagents. In this study, we evaluated the utility of CHIPS technology for genetic diagnosis in clinical practice by applying this system to screening for the COL2A1, WRN and RPS6KA3 mutations in newly diagnosed patients with Stickler syndrome (autosomal dominant inheritance), Werner syndrome (autosomal recessive inheritance) and Coffin-Lowry syndrome (X-linked inheritance), respectively. In all three genes, CHIPS detected all DNA variations including disease causative mutations within a day. Direct sequencing of all coding exons of these genes confirmed 100% sensitivity and specificity. We demonstrate high sensitivity, high cost performance and reliability of this simple system, with compatibility to all inheritance modes. Because of its low technology, CHIPS is ready to use and potentially disseminate to any laboratories in the world.

  7. 5-Methylcytosine DNA glycosylase activity is also present in the human MBD4 (G/T mismatch glycosylase) and in a related avian sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B; Zheng, Y; Angliker, H; Schwarz, S; Thiry, S; Siegmann, M; Jost, J P

    2000-11-01

    A 1468 bp cDNA coding for the chicken homolog of the human MBD4 G/T mismatch DNA glycosylase was isolated and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence (416 amino acids) shows 46% identity with the human MBD4 and the conserved catalytic region at the C-terminal end (170 amino acids) has 90% identity. The non-conserved region of the avian protein has no consensus sequence for the methylated DNA binding domain. The recombinant proteins from human and chicken have G/T mismatch as well as 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) DNA glycosylase activities. When tested by gel shift assays, human recombinant protein with or without the methylated DNA binding domain binds equally well to symmetrically, hemimethylated DNA and non-methylated DNA. However, the enzyme has only 5-MeC DNA glycosylase activity with the hemimethylated DNA. Footprinting of human MBD4 and of an N-terminal deletion mutant with partially depurinated and depyrimidinated substrate reveal a selective binding of the proteins to the modified substrate around the CpG. As for 5-MeC DNA glycosylase purified from chicken embryos, MBD4 does not use oligonucleotides containing mCpA, mCpT or mCpC as substrates. An mCpG within an A+T-rich oligonucleotide is a much better substrate than an A+T-poor sequence. The K:(m) of human MBD4 for hemimethylated DNA is approximately 10(-7) M with a V:(max) of approximately 10(-11) mol/h/microgram protein. Deletion mutations show that G/T mismatch and 5-MeC DNA glycosylase are located in the C-terminal conserved region. In sharp contrast to the 5-MeC DNA glycosylase isolated from the chicken embryo DNA demethylation complex, the two enzymatic activities of MBD4 are strongly inhibited by RNA. In situ hybridization with antisense RNA indicate that MBD4 is only located in dividing cells of differentiating embryonic tissues.

  8. Cdt1 downregulation by proteolysis and geminin inhibition prevents DNA re-replication in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Li, Anatoliy; Blow, J Julian

    2005-01-26

    In late mitosis and G1, Mcm2-7 are assembled onto replication origins to 'license' them for initiation. At other cell cycle stages, licensing is inhibited, thus ensuring that origins fire only once per cell cycle. Three additional factors--the origin recognition complex, Cdc6 and Cdt1--are required for origin licensing. We examine here how licensing is regulated in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that Cdt1 is downregulated late in the cell cycle by two different mechanisms: proteolysis, which occurs in part due to the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C), and inhibition by a protein called geminin. If both these regulatory mechanisms are abrogated, extracts undergo uncontrolled re-licensing and re-replication. The extent of re-replication is limited by checkpoint kinases that are activated as a consequence of re-replication itself. These results allow us to build a comprehensive model of how re-replication of DNA is prevented in Xenopus, with Cdt1 regulation being the key feature. The results also explain the original experiments that led to the proposal of a replication licensing factor.

  9. PTEN downregulates p75NTR expression by decreasing DNA-binding activity of Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Sherri L.; Guy, Clifford S.; Mearow, Karen M.

    2009-02-13

    p75NTR is expressed throughout the nervous system and its dysregulation is associated with pathological conditions. We have recently demonstrated a signalling cascade initiated by laminin (LN), which upregulates PTEN and downregulates p75NTR. Here we investigate the mechanism by which PTEN modulates p75NTR. Studies using PTEN mutants show that its protein phosphatase activity directly modulates p75NTR protein expression. Nuclear relocalization of PTEN subsequent to LN stimulation suggests transcriptional control of p75NTR expression, which was confirmed following EMSA and ChIP analysis of Sp1 transcription factor binding activity. LN and PTEN independently decrease the DNA-binding ability of PTEN to the p75NTR promoter. Sp1 regulation of p75NTR occurs via dephosphorylation of Sp1, thus reducing p75NTR transcription and protein expression. This mechanism represents a novel regulatory pathway which controls the expression level of a receptor with broad implications not only for the development of the nervous system but also for progression of pathological conditions.

  10. DNA Methylation-Mediated Downregulation of DEFB1 in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaehyouk; Han, Jun Hyun; Jang, Ara; Kim, Jin Wook; Hong, Soon Auck; Myung, Soon Chul

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic aberrations play crucial roles in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. The DEFB1 gene, which encodes human ß-defensin-1 (HBD-1), contributes to innate immune responses and functions as a potential tumor suppressor in urological cancers. We investigated whether differential DNA methylation at the low CpG-content promoter (LCP) of DEFB1 was associated with transcriptional regulation of DEFB1 in PCa cells. To identify distinct CpG loci within the DEFB1 LCP related to the epigenetic regulation of DEFB1, we performed an in vitro methylated reporter assay followed by bisulfite sequencing of the DEFB1 promoter fragment. The methylation status of two adjacent CpG loci in the DEFB1 LCP was found to be important for DEFB1 expression in PCa cells. Paired epithelial specimens of PCa patients (n = 60), which were distinguished as non-tumor and tumor tissues by microdissection, were analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing of site-specific CpG dinucleotide units in the DEFB1 LCP. CpG methylation frequencies in the DEFB1 LCP were significantly higher in malignant tissues than in adjacent benign tissues across almost all PCa patients. These results suggested that methylation status of each CpG site in the DEFB1 promoter could mediate downregulation of DEFB1 in PCa cells. PMID:27835705

  11. Expression of hMSH2 protein of the human DNA mismatch repair system in oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous disease of inflammatory nature and unknown etiology. It is characterized by a cell-mediated immunological response to induced antigenic change in skin and/or mucosa. The possible malignant transformation of lichen planus remains a subject of controversial discussions in the literature. hMSH2 is one of the human DNA mismatch repair (hMMR) genes and it plays an important role in reducing mutation and maintaining genomic stability. hMSH2 alterations have been reported in oral squamous cell carcinoma and there are evidences suggesting the association between oral lichen planus and squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we aim to investigate the immunolocalization of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus compared to oral normal mucosa epithelium. We examined the expression of hMSH2 protein by immunohistochemistry in twenty-six cases of oral lichen planus. Clinically, 12 of them were categorized into reticular subtype and 14 were atrophic/erosive. Ten cases of normal mucosa were added to the control group. Results showed that the percentage of positive cells to hMSH2 was smaller in reticular (46.54%; p=0,006) and atrophic/erosive (48.79%; p=0,028) subtypes of oral lichen planus compared to normal mucosa (61.29%). The reduced expression of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus suggests that this lesion is more susceptible to mutation and therefore facilitate the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:15912193

  12. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene.

    PubMed

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P; Cleary, Sean P; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G; MacInnis, Robert J; Tucker, Katherine M; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understandin g the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.19-50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95% CI 0.63-5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative.

  13. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    PubMed Central

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95 % CI 0.63–5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  14. Reduction of DNA mismatch repair protein expression in airway epithelial cells of premenopausal women chronically exposed to biomass smoke.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bidisha; Dutta, Anindita; Chowdhury, Saswati; Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of indoor air pollution in rural India. This study examined whether chronic inhalation of biomass smoke causes change in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway in the airway cells. For this, airway cells exfoliated in sputum were collected from 72 premenopausal nonsmoking rural women (median age 34 years) who cooked with biomass (wood, dung, crop residues) and 68 control women who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for the past 5 years or more. The levels of particulate matters with diameters less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5) in indoor air were measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Benzene exposure was monitored by measuring trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in airway cells were measured by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Immunocytochemical assay revealed lower percentage of airway epithelial cells expressing MMR proteins mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2) in biomass-using women compared to LPG-using controls. Women who cooked with biomass had 6.7 times higher level of urinary t,t-MA, twofold increase in ROS generation, and 31 % depletion of SOD. Indoor air of biomass-using households had three times more particulate matters than that of controls. ROS, urinary t,t-MA, and particulate pollution in biomass-using kitchen had negative correlation, while SOD showed positive correlation with MSH2 and MLH1 expression. It appears that chronic exposure to biomass smoke reduces MMR response in airway epithelial cells, and oxidative stress plays an important role in the process.

  15. SPATIAL MISMATCH OR RACIAL MISMATCH?*

    PubMed Central

    Hellerstein, Judith K.; Neumark, David; McInerney, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    We contrast the spatial mismatch hypothesis with what we term the racial mismatch hypothesis – that the problem is not a lack of jobs, per se, where blacks live, but a lack of jobs where blacks live into which blacks are hired. We first report new evidence on the spatial mismatch hypothesis, using data from Census Long-Form respondents. We construct direct measures of the presence of jobs in detailed geographic areas, and find that these job density measures are related to employment of black male residents in ways that would be predicted by the spatial mismatch hypothesis – in particular that spatial mismatch is primarily an issue for low-skilled black male workers. We then look at mismatch along not only spatial lines but racial lines as well, by estimating the effects of job density measures that are disaggregated by race. We find that it is primarily black job density that influences black male employment, whereas white job density has little if any influence on their employment. The evidence implies that space alone plays a relatively minor role in low black male employment rates. PMID:19727422

  16. Atomistic understanding of the C·T mismatched DNA base pair tautomerization via the DPT: QM and QTAIM computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2013-11-15

    It was established that the cytosine·thymine (C·T) mismatched DNA base pair with cis-oriented N1H glycosidic bonds has propeller-like structure (|N3C4C4N3| = 38.4°), which is stabilized by three specific intermolecular interactions-two antiparallel N4H…O4 (5.19 kcal mol(-1)) and N3H…N3 (6.33 kcal mol(-1)) H-bonds and a van der Waals (vdW) contact O2…O2 (0.32 kcal mol(-1)). The C·T base mispair is thermodynamically stable structure (ΔG(int) = -1.54 kcal mol(-1) ) and even slightly more stable than the A·T Watson-Crick DNA base pair (ΔG(int) = -1.43 kcal mol(-1)) at the room temperature. It was shown that the C·T ↔ C*·T* tautomerization via the double proton transfer (DPT) is assisted by the O2…O2 vdW contact along the entire range of the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC). The positive value of the Grunenberg's compliance constants (31.186, 30.265, and 22.166 Å/mdyn for the C·T, C*·T*, and TS(C·T ↔ C*·T*), respectively) proves that the O2…O2 vdW contact is a stabilizing interaction. Based on the sweeps of the H-bond energies, it was found that the N4H…O4/O4H…N4, and N3H…N3 H-bonds in the C·T and C*·T* base pairs are anticooperative and weaken each other, whereas the middle N3H…N3 H-bond and the O2…O2 vdW contact are cooperative and mutually reinforce each other. It was found that the tautomerization of the C·T base mispair through the DPT is concerted and asynchronous reaction that proceeds via the TS(C·T ↔ C*·T*) stabilized by the loosened N4-H-O4 covalent bridge, N3H…N3 H-bond (9.67 kcal mol(-1) ) and O2…O2 vdW contact (0.41 kcal mol(-1) ). The nine key points, describing the evolution of the C·T ↔ C*·T* tautomerization via the DPT, were detected and completely investigated along the IRC. The C*·T* mispair was revealed to be the dynamically unstable structure with a lifetime 2.13·× 10(-13) s. In this case, as for the A·T Watson-Crick DNA base pair, activates the mechanism of the quantum protection of the C

  17. Methylation Analysis of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes Using DNA Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Endometrial Cancer: Epimutation in Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Takashi; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Adachi, Masataka; Iijima, Moito; Kunitomi, Haruko; Nakamura, Kanako; Iida, Miho; Nogami, Yuya; Umene, Kiyoko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamagami, Wataru; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes is a cause of Lynch syndrome. Methylation of MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) has been detected in peripheral blood cells of patients with colorectal cancer. This methylation is referred to as epimutation. Methylation of these genes has not been studied in an unselected series of endometrial cancer cases. Therefore, we examined methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 promoter regions of peripheral blood cells in 206 patients with endometrial cancer using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). Germline mutation of MMR genes, microsatellite instability (MSI), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were also analyzed in each case with epimutation. MLH1 epimutation was detected in a single patient out of a total of 206 (0.49%)—1 out of 58 (1.72%) with an onset age of less than 50 years. The patient with MLH1 epimutation showed high level MSI (MSI-H), loss of MLH1 expression and had developed endometrial cancer at 46 years old, complicated with colorectal cancer. No case had epimutation of MSH2 or MSH6. The MLH1 epimutation detected in a patient with endometrial cancer may be a cause of endometrial carcinogenesis. This result indicates that it is important to check epimutation in patients with endometrial cancer without a germline mutation of MMR genes. PMID:27754426

  18. Methylation Analysis of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes Using DNA Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Endometrial Cancer: Epimutation in Endometrial Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Takashi; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Adachi, Masataka; Iijima, Moito; Kunitomi, Haruko; Nakamura, Kanako; Iida, Miho; Nogami, Yuya; Umene, Kiyoko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamagami, Wataru; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2016-10-14

    Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes is a cause of Lynch syndrome. Methylation of MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) has been detected in peripheral blood cells of patients with colorectal cancer. This methylation is referred to as epimutation. Methylation of these genes has not been studied in an unselected series of endometrial cancer cases. Therefore, we examined methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 promoter regions of peripheral blood cells in 206 patients with endometrial cancer using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). Germline mutation of MMR genes, microsatellite instability (MSI), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were also analyzed in each case with epimutation. MLH1 epimutation was detected in a single patient out of a total of 206 (0.49%)-1 out of 58 (1.72%) with an onset age of less than 50 years. The patient with MLH1 epimutation showed high level MSI (MSI-H), loss of MLH1 expression and had developed endometrial cancer at 46 years old, complicated with colorectal cancer. No case had epimutation of MSH2 or MSH6. The MLH1 epimutation detected in a patient with endometrial cancer may be a cause of endometrial carcinogenesis. This result indicates that it is important to check epimutation in patients with endometrial cancer without a germline mutation of MMR genes.

  19. Down-regulation of histone H2B by DNA-dependent protein kinase in response to DNA damage through modulation of octamer transcription factor 1.

    PubMed

    Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Shih, Amy; Yarymowich, Nicholas C; Haché, Robert J G

    2003-11-01

    Cells respond to double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) by pausing cell cycle progression to allow the repair machinery to restore genomic integrity. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), comprising a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(cs)) and the Ku antigen regulatory subunit (Ku70/Ku80), is activated in response to DSBs and is required for DNA repair through the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Here we provide evidence that DNA-PK participates in altering specific gene expression in response to DNA damage by modulating the stability and transcriptional regulatory potential of the essential transcription factor octamer transcription factor 1 (Oct-1). Histone H2B and U2 RNA, whose expression are highly dependent on Oct-1, were strongly decreased in response to ionizing radiation in a DNA-PK-dependent manner, and Oct-1-dependent reporter gene transcription was repressed. Furthermore, Oct-1 phosphorylation in response to ionizing radiation increased in a DNA-PK-dependent manner. Paradoxically, down-regulation of transactivation correlated with the rapid DNA-PK-dependent stabilization of Oct-1. Stabilization of Oct-1 was dependent on the NH(2)-terminal region of Oct-1, which contains a transcriptional activation domain and which was phosphorylated by DNA-PK in vitro. These results suggest a mechanism for the regulation of Oct-1 in response to DNA damage through specific phosphorylation within the NH(2)-terminal transcriptional regulatory domain.

  20. Mechanism of the Glycosidic Bond Cleavage of Mismatched Thymine in Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Revealed by Classical Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Natalia; Crehuet, Ramon; Imhof, Petra

    2015-09-24

    Base excision of mismatched or damaged nucleotides catalyzed by glycosylase enzymes is the first step of the base excision repair system, a machinery preserving the integrity of DNA. Thymine DNA glycosylase recognizes and removes mismatched thymine by cleaving the C1'-N1 bond between the base and the sugar ring. Our quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of this reaction in human thymine DNA glycosylase reveal a requirement for a positive charge in the active site to facilitate C1'-N1 bond scission: protonation of His151 significantly lowers the free energy barrier for C1'-N1 bond dissociation compared to the situation with neutral His151. Shuttling a proton from His151 to the thymine base further reduces the activation free energy for glycosidic bond cleavage. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of the H151A mutant suggest that the mutation to the smaller, neutral, residue increases the water accessibility of the thymine base, rendering direct proton transfer from the bulk feasible. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of the glycosidic bond cleavage reaction in the H151A mutant show that the activation free energy is slightly lower than in the wild-type enzyme, explaining the experimentally observed higher reaction rates in this mutant.

  1. Single-turnover and pre-steady-state kinetics of the reaction of the adenine glycosylase MutY with mismatch-containing DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Porello, S L; Leyes, A E; David, S S

    1998-10-20

    The DNA repair enzyme MutY plays an important role in the prevention of DNA mutations resulting from the presence of the oxidatively damaged lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (OG) in DNA by the removal of misincorporated adenine residues in OG:A mispairs. MutY also exhibits adenine glycosylase activity toward adenine in G:A and C:A mismatches, although the importance of this activity in vivo has not been established. We have investigated the kinetic properties of MutY's glycosylase activity with OG:A and G:A containing DNA duplexes. Our results indicate that MutY's processing of these two substrates is distinctly different. By using single-turnover experiments, the intrinsic rate for adenine removal by MutY from an OG:A substrate was found to be at least 6-fold faster than that from the corresponding G:A substrate. However, under conditions where [MutY] < [DNA], OG:A substrates are not quantitatively converted to product due to the inefficient turnover resulting from slow product release. In contrast, with a G:A substrate MutY's dissociation from the corresponding product is more facile, such that complete conversion of the substrate to product can be achieved under similar conditions. The kinetic results illustrate that the glycosylase reaction catalyzed by MutY has significant differences depending on the characteristics of the substrate. The lingering of MutY with the product of its reaction with OG:A mispairs may be biologically significant to prevent premature removal of OG. Thus, this approach is providing insight into factors that may be influencing the repair of damaged and mismatched DNA in vivo by base-excision repair glycosylases.

  2. DNA methylation-mediated down-regulation of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) is coincident with, but not essential for, global hypomethylation in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Boris; Wong, Nick C; Sibson, Mandy; Ng, Hong-Kiat; Morley, Ruth; Manuelpillai, Ursula; Down, Thomas; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Beck, Stephan; Hiendleder, Stefan; Roberts, Claire T; Craig, Jeffrey M; Saffery, Richard

    2010-03-26

    The genome of extraembryonic tissue, such as the placenta, is hypomethylated relative to that in somatic tissues. However, the origin and role of this hypomethylation remains unclear. The DNA methyltransferases DNMT1, -3A, and -3B are the primary mediators of the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation in mammals. In this study, we investigated promoter methylation-mediated epigenetic down-regulation of DNMT genes as a potential regulator of global methylation levels in placental tissue. Although DNMT3A and -3B promoters lack methylation in all somatic and extraembryonic tissues tested, we found specific hypermethylation of the maintenance DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) gene and found hypomethylation of the DNMT3L gene in full term and first trimester placental tissues. Bisulfite DNA sequencing revealed monoallelic methylation of DNMT1, with no evidence of imprinting (parent of origin effect). In vitro reporter experiments confirmed that DNMT1 promoter methylation attenuates transcriptional activity in trophoblast cells. However, global hypomethylation in the absence of DNMT1 down-regulation is apparent in non-primate placentas and in vitro derived human cytotrophoblast stem cells, suggesting that DNMT1 down-regulation is not an absolute requirement for genomic hypomethylation in all instances. These data represent the first demonstration of methylation-mediated regulation of the DNMT1 gene in any system and demonstrate that the unique epigenome of the human placenta includes down-regulation of DNMT1 with concomitant hypomethylation of the DNMT3L gene. This strongly implicates epigenetic regulation of the DNMT gene family in the establishment of the unique epigenetic profile of extraembryonic tissue in humans.

  3. Preliminary Studies on Base Substitutions and Repair of DNA Mismatch Damage Stimulated by Low Energy N+ Ion Beam Implantation in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chuan-xiao; Guo, Jin-hua; Cheng, Bei-jiu; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2003-02-01

    Ever since the low energy N+ ion beam has been accepted that the mutation effects of ionizing radiation are attributed mainly to direct or indirect damage to DNA. Evidences based on naked DNA irradiation in support of a mutation spectrum appears to be consistent, but direct proof of such results in vivo are limited. Using mutS, dam and/or dcm defective Eschericha coli mutator strains, an preliminary experimental system on induction of in vivo mutation spectra of low energy N+ ion beam has been established in this study. It was observed that the mutation rates of rifampicin resistance induced by N+ implantation were quite high, ranging from 9.2 × 10-8 to 4.9 × 10-5 at the dosage of 5.2 × 1014 ions/cm2. Strains all had more than 90-fold higher mutation rate than its spontaneous mutation rate determined by this method. It reveals that base substitutions involve in induction of mutation of low energy nitrogen ion beam implantation. The mutation rates of mutator strains were nearly 500-fold (GM2929), 400-fold (GM5864) and 6-fold larger than that of AB1157. The GM2929 and GM5864 both lose the ability of repair DNA mismatch damage by virtue of both dam and dcm pathways defective (GM2929) or failing to assemble the repair complex (GM5864) respectively. It may explain the both strains had a similar higher mutation rate than GM124 did. It indicated that DNA cytosine methylase might play an important role in mismatch repair of DNA damage induced by N+ implantation. The further related research were also discussed.

  4. Structural, energetic and tautomeric properties of the T·T∗/T∗·T DNA mismatch involving mutagenic tautomer of thymine: A QM and QTAIM insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Zhurakivsky, Roman O.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2014-01-01

    It was revealed by thorough study of the T·T∗ (C1) ↔ T∗·T (C1) tautomerisation via the synchronous concerted double proton transfer (DPT) through the TS (C2v) that the T·T∗/T∗·T H-bonded mismatch is dynamically stable non-planar complex with a lifetime 1.6 × 10-10 s. The 5 key points were firstly detected and completely investigated along the intrinsic reaction coordinate of the DPT tautomerisation. The reported data allow us to suggest that the T∗ mutagenic tautomer of the thymine (T) is shared with approximately equal probability between two DNA strands during the dissociation of the mispair by DNA polymerase.

  5. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, John K.; Okely, Ewa A.; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K.; Leach, David R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  6. Downregulation of Aedes aegypti chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7/Kismet by Wolbachia and its effect on dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Asad, Sultan; Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; Asgari, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus imposing a significant burden on human health around the world. Since current control strategies are not sufficient, there is an urgent need to find alternative methods to control DENV transmission. It has been demonstrated that introduction of Wolbachia pipientis in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes can impede DENV transmission with the mechanism(s) not fully understood. Recently, a number of studies have found the involvement of chromodomain DNA binding helicases in case of Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Influenza A virus infection. In this study, we have identified three chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein (CHD) genes in Ae. aegypti and looked at their response in the case of Wolbachia and DENV infections. Foremost amongst them we have found that AeCHD7/Kismet is significantly downregulated in the presence of Wolbachia infection only in female mosquitoes. Furthermore, AeCHD7 levels showed significant increase during DENV infection, and AeCHD7 depletion led to severe reduction in the replication of DENV. Our data have identified AeCHD7 as a novel Ae. aegypti host factor that is important for DENV replication, and Wolbachia downregulates it, which may contribute towards the mechanism(s) of limiting DENV replication. PMID:27827425

  7. Does the G.G*syn DNA mismatch containing canonical and rare tautomers of the guanine tautomerise through the DPT? A QM/QTAIM microstructural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2014-12-01

    We have established that the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer (DPT), moving with a time gap and without stable intermediates, is the underlying mechanism for the tautomerisation of the G.G*syn DNA base mispair (C1 symmetry), formed by the keto and enol tautomers of the guanine in the anti- and syn-configurations, into the G*.G*syn base mispair (C1), formed by the enol and imino tautomers of the G base, using quantum-mechanical calculations and Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules. By constructing the sweeps of the geometric, electron-topological, energetic, polar and natural bond orbital properties along the intrinsic reaction coordinate of the G.G*syn↔G*.G*syn DPT tautomerisation, the nine key points, that are critical for the atomistic understanding of the tautomerisation reaction, were set and comprehensively analysed. It was found that the G.G*syn mismatch possesses pairing scheme with the formation of the O6...HO6 (7.01) and N1H...N7 (6.77) H-bonds, whereas the G*.G*syn mismatch - of the O6H...O6 (10.68) and N1...HN7 (9.59 kcal mol-1) H-bonds. Our results highlight that these H-bonds are significantly cooperative and mutually reinforce each other in both mismatches. The deformation energy necessary to apply for the G.G*syn base mispair to acquire the Watson-Crick sizes has been calculated. We have shown that the thermodynamically stable G*.G*syn base mispair is dynamically unstable structure with a lifetime of 4.1 × 10-15 s and any of its six low-lying intermolecular vibrations can develop during this period of time. These data exclude the possibility to change the tautomeric status of the bases under the dissociation of the G.G*syn mispair into the monomers during DNA replication. Finally, it has been made an attempt to draw from the physico-chemical properties of all four incorrect purine-purine DNA base pairs a general conclusion, which claims the role of the transversions in spontaneous point mutagenesis.

  8. Epigenetic Enhancement of the Post-replicative DNA Mismatch Repair of Mammalian Genomes by a Hemi-mCpG-Np95-Dnmt1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Keh-Yang; Chen, Chun-Chang; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Shen, Che-Kun James

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation at C of CpG dyads (mCpG) in vertebrate genomes is essential for gene regulation, genome stability and development. We show in this study that proper functioning of post-replicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in mammalian cells relies on the presence of genomic mCpG, as well as on the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1 independently of its catalytic activity. More importantly, high efficiency of mammalian MMR surveillance is achieved through a hemi-mCpG-Np95(Uhrf1)-Dnmt1 axis, in which the MMR surveillance complex(es) is recruited to post-replicative DNA by Dnmt1, requiring its interactions with MutSα, as well as with Np95 bound at the hemi-methylated CpG sites. Thus, efficiency of MMR surveillance over the mammalian genome in vivo is enhanced at the epigenetic level. This synergy endows vertebrate CpG methylation with a new biological significance and, consequently, an additional mechanism for the maintenance of vertebrate genome stability. PMID:27886214

  9. The Structure of a High Fidelity DNA Polymerase Bound to a Mismatched Nucleotide Reveals an ;Ajar; Intermediate Conformation in the Nucleotide Selection Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Eugene Y.; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-10-10

    To achieve accurate DNA synthesis, DNA polymerases must rapidly sample and discriminate against incorrect nucleotides. Here we report the crystal structure of a high fidelity DNA polymerase I bound to DNA primer-template caught in the act of binding a mismatched (dG:dTTP) nucleoside triphosphate. The polymerase adopts a conformation in between the previously established 'open' and 'closed' states. In this 'ajar' conformation, the template base has moved into the insertion site but misaligns an incorrect nucleotide relative to the primer terminus. The displacement of a conserved active site tyrosine in the insertion site by the template base is accommodated by a distinctive kink in the polymerase O helix, resulting in a partially open ternary complex. We suggest that the ajar conformation allows the template to probe incoming nucleotides for complementarity before closure of the enzyme around the substrate. Based on solution fluorescence, kinetics, and crystallographic analyses of wild-type and mutant polymerases reported here, we present a three-state reaction pathway in which nucleotides either pass through this intermediate conformation to the closed conformation and catalysis or are misaligned within the intermediate, leading to destabilization of the closed conformation.

  10. 'Escherichia Coli' MutS Tetramerization Domain Structure Reveals That Stable Dimers But Not Tetramers are Essential for DNA Mismatch Repair in Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Mendillo, M.L.; Putnam, C.D.; Kolodner, R.D.; /UC, San Diego

    2007-07-10

    The E. coli mispair binding protein MutS forms dimers and tetramers in vitro, although the functional form in vivo is under debate. Here we demonstrate that the MutS tetramer is extended in solution using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and the crystal structure of the C-terminal 34 amino acids of MutS containing the tetramer-forming domain fused to maltose binding protein (MBP). Wild-type C-terminal MBP fusions formed tetramers and could bind MutS and MutS-MutL-DNA complexes. In contrast, Asp835Arg and Arg840Glu mutations predicted to disrupt tetrameric interactions only allowed dimerization of MBP. A chromosomal MutS truncation mutation eliminating the dimerization/tetramerization domain eliminated mismatch repair, whereas the tetramer-disrupting MutS Asp835Arg and Arg840Glu mutations only modestly affected MutS function. These results demonstrate that dimerization but not tetramerization of the MutS C- terminus is essential for mismatch repair.

  11. Melatonin sensitizes human breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation by downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, Carolina; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Gómez-Arozamena, José; Cos, Samuel

    2015-03-01

    Radiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy are nowadays considered a standard treatment option after surgery in breast cancer. Melatonin exerts oncostatic actions on human breast cancer cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of a combination of radiotherapy and melatonin on human breast cancer cells. Melatonin (1 mm, 10 μm and 1 nm) significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Radiation alone inhibited the MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of breast cancer cells with melatonin 1 wk before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease of MCF-7 cell proliferation compared with radiation alone. Melatonin pretreatment before radiation also decreased G2 -M phase arrest compared with irradiation alone, with a higher percentage of cells in the G0 -G1 phase and a lower percentage of cells in S phase. Radiation alone diminished RAD51 and DNA-protein kinase (PKcs) mRNA expression, two main proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. Treatment with melatonin for 7 days before radiation led to a significantly greater decrease in RAD51 and DNA-PKcs mRNA expression compared with radiation alone. Our findings suggest that melatonin pretreatment before radiation sensitizes breast cancer cells to the ionizing effects of radiation by decreasing cell proliferation, inducing cell cycle arrest and downregulating proteins involved in double-strand DNA break repair. These findings may have implications for designing clinical trials using melatonin and radiotherapy.

  12. Thymosin beta-4 knockdown in IEC-6 normal intestinal epithelial cells induces DNA re-replication via downregulating Emi1.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ta-Chung; Chen, Ke-Jay; Tang, Mei-Chuan; Chan, Li-Chuan; Chen, Po-Min; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Su, Yeu

    2014-11-01

    Thymosin β4 (Tβ4 ) is a multifunctional protein already used clinically to treat various diseases; however, the promoting effect of this protein on tumor malignancy should not be neglected. Here, we assessed whether Tβ4 alteration influences normal intestinal epithelial cells because Tβ4 is deemed a novel target for treating colorectal cancer (CRC). For this purpose, we examined the consequences of shRNA-mediated knockdown of Tβ4 in IEC-6 normal rat small intestinal cells and found that inhibiting Tβ4 expression significantly suppressed their growth and induced apoptosis in some cells. Flow cytometric analysis further revealed a marked decrease of G0/G1 population but a drastic increase of polyploid ones in these cells. The increase of polyploidy likely resulted from DNA re-replication because not only the de novo DNA synthesis was greatly increased but also the expression levels of Cdc6 (a replication-licensing factor), cyclin A, and phosphorylated-checkpoint kinase 1 were all dramatically elevated. Moreover, marked reductions in both RNA and protein levels of Emi1 (early mitotic inhibitor 1) were also detected in Tβ4 -downregulated IEC-6 cells which might be accounted by the downregulation of E2F1, a transcription factor capable of inducing Emi1 expression, mediated by glycogen synthase-3β (GSK-3β). To our best knowledge, this is the first report showing that inhibiting Tβ4 expression triggers DNA re-replication in normal intestinal epithelial cells, suggesting that this G-actin sequester may play a crucial role in maintaining genome stability in these cells. More importantly, clinical oncologists should take this novel activity into consideration when design CRC therapy based on targeting Tβ4 .

  13. Downregulation of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Genes by HDAC Inhibition in Prostate Cancer Is Mediated through the E2F1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kachhap, Sushant K.; Rosmus, Nadine; Collis, Spencer J.; Kortenhorst, Madeleine S. Q.; Wissing, Michel D.; Hedayati, Mohammad; Shabbeer, Shabana; Mendonca, Janet; Deangelis, Justin; Marchionni, Luigi; Lin, Jianqing; Höti, Naseruddin; Nortier, Johan W. R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Hammers, Hans; Carducci, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) re-express silenced tumor suppressor genes and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Although HDACis have been known to induce gene expression, an equal number of genes are downregulated upon HDAC inhibition. The mechanism behind this downregulation remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that several DNA repair genes are downregulated by HDAC inhibition and provide a mechanism involving the E2F1 transcription factor in the process. Methodology/Principal Findings Applying Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA) on microarray data of prostate cancer cells treated with HDACis, we found a number of genes of the DNA damage response and repair pathways are downregulated by HDACis. AFA revealed enrichment of homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair genes of the BRCA1 pathway, as well as genes regulated by the E2F1 transcription factor. Prostate cancer cells demonstrated a decreased DNA repair capacity and an increased sensitization to chemical- and radio-DNA damaging agents upon HDAC inhibition. Recruitment of key HR repair proteins to the site of DNA damage, as well as HR repair capacity was compromised upon HDACi treatment. Based on our AFA data, we hypothesized that the E2F transcription factors may play a role in the downregulation of key repair genes upon HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer cells. ChIP analysis and luciferase assays reveal that the downregulation of key repair genes is mediated through decreased recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor and not through active repression by repressive E2Fs. Conclusions/Significance Our study indicates that several genes in the DNA repair pathway are affected upon HDAC inhibition. Downregulation of the repair genes is on account of a decrease in amount and promoter recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor. Since HDAC inhibition affects several pathways that could potentially have an impact on DNA repair, compromised DNA repair upon HDAC inhibition could

  14. Truncation of the MSH2 C-terminal 60 amino acids disrupts effective DNA mismatch repair and is causative for Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wielders, Eva; Delzenne-Goette, Elly; Dekker, Rob; van der Valk, Martin; Te Riele, Hein

    2017-04-01

    Missense variants of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes pose a problem in clinical genetics as long as they cannot unambiguously be assigned as the cause of Lynch syndrome (LS). To study such variants of uncertain clinical significance, we have developed a functional assay based on direct measurement of MMR activity in mouse embryonic stem cells expressing mutant protein from the endogenous alleles. We have applied this protocol to a specific truncation mutant of MSH2 that removes 60 C-terminal amino acids and has been found in suspected LS families. We show that the stability of the MSH2/MSH6 heterodimer is severely perturbed, causing attenuated MMR in in vitro assays and cancer predisposition in mice. This mutation can therefore unambiguously be considered as deleterious and causative for LS.

  15. Tautomeric transition between wobble A·C DNA base mispair and Watson-Crick-like A·C* mismatch: microstructural mechanism and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-06-21

    Here, we use MP2/DFT quantum-chemical methods combined with Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules to study the tautomeric transition between wobble A·C(w) mismatch and Watson-Crick-like A·C*(WC) base mispair, proceeding non-dissociatively via sequential proton transfer between bases through the planar, highly stable and zwitterionic TS(A∙C-)(A∙C(W)<-->A∙C&(WC)) transition state joined by the participation of (A)N6(+)H∙∙∙N4(-)(C), (A)N1(+)H∙∙∙N4(-)(C) and (A)C2(+)H∙∙∙N3(-)(C) H-bonds. Notably, the A·C(w) ↔ A·C*(WC) tautomerization reaction is accompanied by 10 unique patterns of the specific intermolecular interactions that consistently replace each other. Our data suggest that biologically significant A·C(w) → A·C*(WC) tautomerization is a kinetically controlled pathway for formation of the enzymatically competent Watson-Crick-like A·C*(WC) DNA base mispair in the essentially hydrophobic recognition pocket of the high-fidelity DNA-polymerase, responsible for the occurrence of spontaneous point AC/CA incorporation errors during DNA biosynthesis.

  16. Intragenic DNA methylation status down-regulates bovine IGF2 gene expression in different developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhan, Zhao-Yang; Sun, Yu-Jia; Cao, Xiu-Kai; Li, Ming-Xun; Wang, Jing; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-25

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic modification in mammals and has an essential and important role in muscle development. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a fetal growth and differentiation factor that plays an important role in muscle growth and in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of IGF2 and the methylation pattern on the differentially methylated region (DMR) of the last exon of IGF2 in six tissues with two different developmental stages. The DNA methylation pattern was compared using bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (BSP) and combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA). The quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis indicated that IGF2 has a broad tissue distribution and the adult bovine group showed significant lower mRNA expression levels than that in the fetal bovine group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Moreover, the DNA methylation level analysis showed that the adult bovine group exhibited a significantly higher DNA methylation levels than that in the fetal bovine group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). These results indicate that IGF2 expression levels were negatively associated with the methylation status of the IGF2 DMR during the two developmental stages. Our results suggest that the methylation pattern in this DMR may be a useful parameter to investigate as a marker-assisted selection for muscle developmental in beef cattle breeding program and as a model for studies in other species.

  17. Osmium complex binding to mismatched methylcytosine: effect of adjacent bases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes depended on the 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique side reaction was observed. However, the mismatched base pairs did not influence the selectivity of osmium complexation with methylated DNA.

  18. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Bovine Papillomavirus E1 Helicase Downregulates Viral DNA Replication in S Phase▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chiung-Yueh; Mechali, Francisca; Bonne-Andrea, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 protein is essential for the initiation of viral replication. We previously showed that the bovine papillomavirus E1 protein is unstable and becomes resistant to ubiquitin-mediated degradation when tightly bound to cyclin E-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) before the start of DNA synthesis. However, neither the protection nor the targeted degradation of E1 appears to depend on its phosphorylation by Cdk. Here, we report that Cdk phosphorylation of E1 is also not a prerequisite for the initiation of viral DNA replication either in vitro or in vivo. Nevertheless, we found that phosphorylation of one Cdk site, Ser283, abrogates E1 replicative activity only in a cellular context. We show that this site-specific phosphorylation of E1 drives its export from the nucleus and promotes its continuous nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. In addition, we find that E1 shuttling occurs in S phase, when cyclin A-Cdk2 is activated. E1 interacts with the active cyclin A-Cdk2 complex and is phosphorylated on Ser283 by this kinase. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of E1 on Ser283 is a negative regulatory event that is involved in preventing the amplification of viral DNA during S phase. This finding reveals a novel facet of E1 regulation that could account for the variations of the viral replication capacity during different cell cycle phases, as well as in different stages of the viral cycle. PMID:17035309

  19. Solution structure of an oncogenic DNA duplex, the K-ras gene and the sequence containing a central C.A or A.G mismatch as a function of pH: nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Boulard, Y; Cognet, J A; Gabarro-Arpa, J; Le Bret, M; Carbonnaux, C; Fazakerley, G V

    1995-02-10

    The DNA duplex 5' d(GCCACCAGCTC)-d(GAGCTGGTGGC) corresponds to the sequence 29 to 39 of the K-ras gene, which contains a hot spot for mutations. This has been studied by one and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance, energy minimization and molecular dynamics. The results show that it adopts a globally B-DNA type structure. We have introduced, at the central base-pair, the mismatches C.A and A.G. The mismatch position is that of the first base of the Gly12 codon, the hot spot. For the C.A mismatch we observe a structural change as a function of pH with an apparent pKa of 7.2. At low pH, the mismatch pair adopts a structure close to a classic wobble conformation with the cytidine residue displaced into the major groove. It is stabilised by two hydrogen bonds in which the adenosine residue is protonated and the cytidine residue has a significant C3'-endo population. At high pH, the mispair structure is in equilibrium between wobble and reverse wobble conformations. Similar studies are reported on the A.G mismatch, which also undergoes a transition as a function of pH. 31P spectra have been recorded on all systems and as a function of pH. No evidence for BII phosphodiester backbone conformations was found. The NMR results are well corroborated by molecular dynamics calculations performed with or without distance constraints. The dynamics at the mismatch sites have been examined. Although the overall structures are close to B-DNA, helical parameters fluctuate differently at these sites. Different hydrogen bonding alternatives in dynamic equilibrium that can involve three-centred hydrogen bonds are observed.

  20. Introduction of specific point mutations into RNA polymerase II by gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells: evidence for a DNA mismatch repair mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Steeg, C M; Ellis, J; Bernstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We have introduced two specific point mutations, located 20 base pairs apart, into the endogenous murine gene that encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPII215). The first mutation conferred resistance to the mushroom toxin alpha-amanitin (amar), and the second mutation generated a restriction fragment length polymorphism without altering the protein sequence. Targeted amar clones were generated at a frequency of 1 in 30 totipotent embryonic stem cells that expressed stably integrated DNA vectors after electroporation. Thirty to 40% of these clones had acquired both mutations, whereas, surprisingly, the remaining clones had acquired the specific amar point mutation but lacked the restriction fragment length polymorphism. We suggest that the latter clones were generated by independent DNA mismatch repair rather than by double crossover or gene conversion. These results demonstrate that it is possible to introduce specific point mutations into an endogenous gene in embryonic stem cells. Thus it should be possible to introduce single base substitutions into other cellular genes, including nonselectable genes, by optimizing the efficiency of gene transfer and/or the sensitivity of screening for targeted clones. Images PMID:1972278

  1. [Phenylhexyl isothiocyanate induces gene p15 demethylation by down-regulating DNA methyltransferases in Molt-4 cells].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shao-hong; Ma, Xu-dong; Huang, Yi-qun; Xu, Yun-lu; Zheng, Rui-ji

    2009-04-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of phenylhexyl isothiocyanate (PHI), which has been proved to be a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) recently, on gene p15 de novo expression in acute leukemia cell line Molt-4, and to further study its potential mechanism. Modified methylation specific PCR (MSP) was used to screen p15-M and p15-U mRNA. DNA methyltransferasel (DNMT1), 3A (DNMT3A), 3B (DNMT3B) and p15 mRNA were measured by RT-PCR. P15 protein was detected by Western blotting. Hypermethylation of gene p15 was reversed and activation transcription of gene p15 in Molt-4 was de novo after 5 days exposure to PHI in a concentration dependent manner. DNMT1 and DNMT3B were inhibited by exposure to PHI for 5 days (P < 0.05). Alteration of DNMT3A was not significant. It is showed that PHI could reverse hypermethylation of gene p15 and transcriptional activation of gene p15 is de novo by PHI. It may result from down-regulating DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3B, or up-regulating the histone acetylation that allows chromatin unfolding and the accessibility of regulators for transcriptional activation in the p15 promoter.

  2. SET overexpression decreases cell detoxification efficiency: ALDH2 and GSTP1 are downregulated, DDR is impaired and DNA damage accumulates.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciana O; Goto, Renata N; Pestana, Cezar R; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Gutkind, Silvio; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2012-12-01

    Alcohol and tobacco consumption are risk factors for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1) are important enzymes for cellular detoxification and low efficiencies are implicated in cancer. We assessed the potential role of SET protein overexpression, a histone acetylation modulator accumulated in HNSCC, in gene regulation and protein activity of ALDH2 and GSTP1. SET was knocked down in HN13, HN12 and Cal27, and overexpressed in HEK293 cells; ethanol and cisplatin were the chemical agents. Cells with SET overexpression (HEK293/SET, HN13 and HN12) showed lower ALDH2 and GSTP1 mRNA levels and trichostatin A increased them (real-time PCR). Ethanol upregulated GSTP1 and ALDH2 mRNAs, whereas cisplatin upregulated GSTP1 in HEK293 cells. SET-chromatin binding revealed SET interaction with ALDH2 and GSTP1 promoters, specifically via SET NAP domain; ethanol and cisplatin abolished SET binding. ALDH2 and GSTP1 efficiency was assessed by enzymatic and comet assay. A lower ALDH2 activity was associated with greater DNA damage (tail intensity) in HEK293/SET compared with HEK293 cells, whereas HN13/siSET showed ALDH2 activity higher than HN13 cells. HN13/siSET cells showed increased tail intensity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage response showed negative relationship between SET overexpression and BRCA2 recruitment. SET downregulated repair genes ATM, BRCA1 and CHEK2 and upregulated TP53. Cisplatin-induced cell-cycle arrest occurred in G(0) /G(1) and S in HEK293 cells, whereas HEK293/SET showed G(2) /M stalling. Overall, cisplatin was more cytotoxic for HN13 than HN13/siSET cells. Our data suggest a role for SET in cellular detoxification, DNA damage response and genome integrity.

  3. ATP binding and hydrolysis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh3 are differentially modulated by mismatch and double-strand break repair DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Charanya; Eichmiller, Robin; Wang, Bangchen; Williams, Gregory M; Bianco, Piero R; Surtees, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Msh2-Msh3-mediated mismatch repair (MMR) recognizes and targets insertion/deletion loops for repair. Msh2-Msh3 is also required for 3' non-homologous tail removal (3'NHTR) in double-strand break repair. In both pathways, Msh2-Msh3 binds double-strand/single-strand junctions and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. However, we recently demonstrated that the two pathways have distinct requirements with respect to Msh2-Msh3 activities. We identified a set of aromatic residues in the nucleotide binding pocket (FLY motif) of Msh3 that, when mutated, disrupted MMR, but left 3'NHTR largely intact. One of these mutations, msh3Y942A, was predicted to disrupt the nucleotide sandwich and allow altered positioning of ATP within the pocket. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the differential requirements for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in the two pathways, we characterized Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-msh3Y942A ATP binding and hydrolysis activities in the presence of MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates. We observed distinct, substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover by Msh2-Msh3, indicating that the MMR and 3'NHTR DNA substrates differentially modify the ATP binding/hydrolysis activities of Msh2-Msh3. Msh2-msh3Y942A retained the ability to bind DNA and ATP but exhibited altered ATP hydrolysis and nucleotide turnover. We propose that both ATP and structure-specific repair substrates cooperate to direct Msh2-Msh3-mediated repair and suggest an explanation for the msh3Y942A separation-of-function phenotype.

  4. How many tautomerization pathways connect Watson-Crick-like G*·T DNA base mispair and wobble mismatches?

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have theoretically demonstrated the intrinsic ability of the wobble G·T(w)/G*·T*(w)/G·T(w1)/G·T(w2) and Watson-Crick-like G*·T(WC) DNA base mispairs to interconvert into each other via the DPT tautomerization. We have established that among all these transitions, only one single G·T(w) ↔ G*·T(WC) pathway is eligible from a biological perspective. It involves short-lived intermediate - the G·T*(WC) base mispair - and is governed by the planar, highly stable, and zwitterionic [Formula: see text] transition state stabilized by the participation of the unique pattern of the five intermolecular O6(+)H⋯O4(-), O6(+)H⋯N3(-), N1(+)H⋯N3(-), N1(+)H⋯O2(-), and N2(+)H⋯O2(-) H-bonds. This non-dissociative G·T(w) ↔ G*·T(WC) tautomerization occurs without opening of the pair: Bases within mispair remain connected by 14 different patterns of the specific intermolecular interactions that successively change each other along the IRC. Novel kinetically controlled mechanism of the thermodynamically non-equilibrium spontaneous point GT/TG incorporation errors has been suggested. The mutagenic effect of the analogues of the nucleotide bases, in particular 5-bromouracil, can be attributed to the decreasing of the barrier of the acquisition by the wobble pair containing these compounds of the enzymatically competent Watson-Crick's geometry via the intrapair mutagenic tautomerization directly in the essentially hydrophobic recognition pocket of the replication DNA-polymerase machinery. Proposed approaches are able to explain experimental data, namely growth of the rate of the spontaneous point incorporation errors during DNA biosynthesis with increasing temperature.

  5. Potential of the Akt inhibitor LY294005 to antagonize the efficacy of Cisplatin against HCT116 tumor cells in a DNA mismatch repair-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fedier, Andre; Erdmann, Ruediger; Boulikas, Teni; Fink, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    Human colorectal adenocarcinoma sublines either deficient (HCT116+ch2) or proficient (HCT116+ch3) in the function of MLH1, one of five proteins crucial to DNA mismatch repair (MMR), were used to investigate whether the Akt-specific inhibitor LY294005 could not only increase the efficacy of platinum drugs in HCT116 cells in general but also increase the efficacy of the cisplatinum compounds Cisplatin and Lipoplatin specifically in MLH1-deficient, Cisplatin- and Lipoplatin-resistant HCT116 cells. We report that, under the conditions it increased the efficacy of Docetaxel and did not affect that of 6-thioguanine, LY294005 decreased the sensitivity of both sublines to Cisplatin, Lipoplatin, Oxaliplatin, and Lipoxal. Notably, the LY294005-imposed decrease was significantly higher in the MLH1-proficient than in the MLH1-deficient subline with Cisplatin and Lipoplatin, whereas it was nearly the same in both sublines with Oxaliplatin and Lipoxal. These LY294005-imposed changes in drug sensitivity, i.e. increase with Docetaxel and decreases with platinum compounds, were not associated with the concomitant abrogation in the levels of phospho-Aktser473. Analogous changes in drug sensitivity were also observed with the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, but these changes were associated with complete abrogation of phospho-Aktser473. These observations suggest a possible relationship between MMR-mediated cisplatinum DNA damage signaling and the Akt signaling pathway, e.g. a common target for both pathways. A possibly novel property of Akt in aggravating drug sensitivity may also be proposed.

  6. Nucleotide sequence of the hexA gene for DNA mismatch repair in Streptococcus pneumoniae and homology of hexA to mutS of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Priebe, S.D.; Hadi, S.M.; Greenberg, B.; Lacks, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Hex system of heteroduplex DNA base mismatch repair operates in Streptococcus pneumoniae after transformation and replication to correct donor and nascent DNA strands, respectively. A functionally similar system, called Mut, operates in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The nucleotide sequence of a 3.8-kilobase segment from the S. pneumoniae chromosome that includes the 2.7-kilobase hexA gene was determined. Chromosomal DNA used as donor to measure Hex phenotype was irradiated with UV light. An open reading frame that could encode a 17-kilodalton polypeptide (OrfC) was located just upstream of the gene encoding a polypeptide of 95 kilodaltons corresponding to HexA. Shine-Dalgarno sequences and putative promoters were identified upstream of each protein start site. Insertion mutations showed that only HexA functioned in mismatch repair and that the promoter for hexA transcription was located within the OrfC-coding region. The HexA polypeptide contains a consensus sequence for ATP- or GTP-binding sites in proteins. Comparison of the entire HexA protein sequence to that of MutS of S. typhimurium, showed the proteins to be homologous, inasmuch as 36% of their amino acid residues were identical. This homology indicates that the Hex and Mut systems of mismatch repair evolved from an ancestor common to the gram-positive streptococci and the gram-negative enterobacteria. It is the first direct evidence linking the two systems.

  7. PI3K/AKT Mediated P53 Down-Regulation Participates in CpG DNA Inhibition of Spontaneous B Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yongxin; Zhen, Huiling; Mei, Yunqing; Wang, Yongwu; Feng, Jing; Xu, Shuchang; Fu, Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    The unmethylated CpG DNA can prevent spontaneous apoptosis of B cells. However, the precise mechanisms by which CpG DNA blocks apoptosis remain unclear. In this study, we showed B cell apoptosis was significantly inhibited by addition of CpG DNA. Treatment of CpG DNA could reduce the expression of caspase 3, increase IAP and Bcl-xL expressions, and inhibit p53 protein expression which level was increased in B cell spontaneous apoptosis at 24 h. AKT kinase activity was increased with the incubation of CpG DNA. The wortmannin and Ly294002 could abrogate the protection of B cell from apoptosis by CpG DNA. The up-regulations of Bcl-xL and IAP by CpG DNA were not inhibited when blocking PI3K by specific inhibitor Ly294002, while the inhibition of p53 by CpG DNA could be blocked by Ly294002. These results demonstrated that the inhibition of spontaneous B cell apoptosis by CpG DNA was correlated to up-regulation of Bcl-xL, IAP and down-regulation of p53 and caspase 3. CpG DNA inhibition of p53 is mediated through PI3K/AKT signaling. PMID:19567200

  8. PI3K/AKT mediated p53 down-regulation participates in CpG DNA inhibition of spontaneous B cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongxin; Zhen, Huiling; Mei, Yunqing; Wang, Yongwu; Feng, Jing; Xu, Shuchang; Fu, Xiaoying

    2009-06-01

    The unmethylated CpG DNA can prevent spontaneous apoptosis of B cells. However, the precise mechanisms by which CpG DNA blocks apoptosis remain unclear. In this study, we showed B cell apoptosis was significantly inhibited by addition of CpG DNA. Treatment of CpG DNA could reduce the expression of caspase 3, increase IAP and Bcl-xL expressions, and inhibit p53 protein expression which level was increased in B cell spontaneous apoptosis at 24 h. AKT kinase activity was increased with the incubation of CpG DNA. The wortmannin and Ly294002 could abrogate the protection of B cell from apoptosis by CpG DNA. The up-regulations of Bcl-xL and IAP by CpG DNA were not inhibited when blocking PI3K by specific inhibitor Ly294002, while the inhibition of p53 by CpG DNA could be blocked by Ly294002. These results demonstrated that the inhibition of spontaneous B cell apoptosis by CpG DNA was correlated to up-regulation of Bcl-xL, IAP and down-regulation of p53 and caspase 3. CpG DNA inhibition of p53 is mediated through PI3K/AKT signaling.

  9. Development of DNA mismatch repair gene, MutS, as a diagnostic marker for detection and phylogenetic analysis of algal Megaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William H; Gilg, Ilana C; Duarte, Amy; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-01

    Megaviruses are generically defined as giant viruses with genomes up to 1.26Mb that infect eukaryotic unicellular protists; they are clearly delineated in DNA polymerase B phylogenetic trees; in addition, common features often include an associated virophage observed during infection; the presence of an amino acyl tRNA synthetase gene; and a nucleic acid mismatch repair protein, MutS gene. The archetypal representative of this evolving putative family is Mimivirus, an opportunistic pathogen of Acanthamoeba spp. originally thought to be a bacterium until its genome sequence was published in 2004. Subsequent analysis of marine metagenomic data revealed Megaviruses are likely ubiquitous on the surface ocean. Analysis of genome sequences of giant viruses isolated from naturally occurring marine protists such as microalgae and a microflagellate grazer, started the expansion of the Megaviridae. Here, we explored the possibility of developing Megavirus specific markers for mutS that could be used in virus molecular ecology studies. MutS is split into 15 different clades representing a wide range of cellular life, and two that contain Megaviruses, clade MutS7 and clade MutS8. We developed specific PCR primers that recognized Megavirus clade MutS8, a clade that we propose discriminates most of the algal Megaviruses. Analysis of seawater off the coast of Maine, US, revealed novel groups of algal Megaviruses that were present in all samples tested. The Megavirus clade MutS8 marker should be considered as a tool to reveal new diversity and distribution of this enigmatic group of viruses.

  10. Non-canonical actions of mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Crouse, Gray F.

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of the mismatch repair (MMR) system are proteins that recognize mismatches in DNA. Such mismatches can be mispairs involving normal or damaged bases or insertion/deletion loops due to strand misalignment. When such mispairs are generated during replication or recombination, MMR will direct removal of an incorrectly paired base or block recombination between nonidentical sequences. However, when mispairs are recognized outside the context of replication, proper strand discrimination between old and new DNA is lost, and MMR can act randomly and mutagenically on mispaired DNA. Such non-canonical actions of MMR are important in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, expansion of triplet repeats, and potentially in mutations arising in nondividing cells. MMR involvement in damage recognition and signaling is complex, with the end result likely dependent on the amount of DNA damage in a cell. PMID:26698648

  11. Human cytomegalovirus miR-US33-5p inhibits viral DNA synthesis and viral replication by down-regulating expression of the host Syntaxin3.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Ma, Yanping; Shao, Yaozhong; Jiang, Shujuan; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-02-13

    During infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), overexpression of hcmv-miR-US33 can inhibit the lytic viral replication and down-regulate US29 mRNA. However, it remains unknown whether inhibition of viral replication by miR-US33 is mediated by down-regulation of expression of US29 or another host gene. Here, we identified the host gene Syntaxin3 (STX3) to be a direct target of hcmv-miR-US33-5p using Hybrid-PCR and luciferase-reporter assays. It was further demonstrated that the levels of STX3 protein were down-regulated in hcmv-miR-US33-5p-overexpressing cells. Experiments with STX3-specific siRNA, or with an inhibitor of hcmv-miR-US33-5p confirmed that hcmv-miR-US33-5p-mediated inhibition of HCMV DNA synthesis and of viral replication are specifically mediated by down-regulation of STX3 expression.

  12. Thermodynamic and structural properties of the specific binding between Ag⁺ ion and C:C mismatched base pair in duplex DNA to form C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Okamoto, Itaru; Dairaku, Takenori; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    Metal ion-nucleic acid interactions have attracted considerable interest for their involvement in structure formation and catalytic activity of nucleic acids. Although interactions between metal ion and mismatched base pair duplex are important to understand mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions, they have not been well-characterized. We recently found that the Ag(+) ion stabilized a C:C mismatched base pair duplex DNA. A C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair was supposed to be formed by the binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C mismatched base pair to stabilize the duplex. Here, we examined specificity, thermodynamics and structure of possible C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair. UV melting indicated that only the duplex with the C:C mismatched base pair, and not of the duplexes with the perfectly matched and other mismatched base pairs, was specifically stabilized on adding the Ag(+) ion. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that the Ag(+) ion specifically bound with the C:C base pair at 1:1 molar ratio with a binding constant of 10(6) M(-1), which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion-DNA interactions. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also supported the specific 1:1 binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C base pair. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and NMR revealed that the Ag(+) ion may bind with the N3 positions of the C:C base pair without distorting the higher-order structure of the duplex. We conclude that the specific formation of C-Ag-C base pair with large binding affinity would provide a binding mode of metal ion-DNA interactions, similar to that of the previously reported T-Hg-T base pair. The C-Ag-C base pair may be useful not only for understanding of molecular mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions but also for wide variety of potential applications of metal-mediated base pairs in various fields, such as material, life and environmental sciences.

  13. Mismatch repair during homologous and homeologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans.

  14. Mismatch Repair during Homologous and Homeologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans. PMID:25731766

  15. Decreased cell survival and DNA repair capacity after UVC irradiation in association with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP in human RSa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Ling; Kita, Kazuko . E-mail: kita@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Wano, Chieko; Wu Yuping; Sugaya, Shigeru; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-05-01

    In contrast to extensive studies on the roles of molecular chaperones, such as heat shock proteins, there are only a few reports about the roles of GRP78/BiP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced molecular chaperone, in mammalian cell responses to DNA-damaging stresses. To investigate whether GRP78/BiP is involved in resistance to a DNA-damaging agent, UVC (principally 254 nm in wavelength), we established human cells with down-regulation of GRP78/BiP by transfection of human RSa cells with antisense cDNA for GRP78/BiP. We found that the transfected cells showed higher sensitivity to UVC-induced cell death than control cells transfected with the vector alone. In the antisense-cDNA transfected cells, the removal capacities of the two major types of UVC-damaged DNA (thymine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts) in vivo and DNA synthesis activity of whole cell extracts to repair UVC-irradiated plasmids in vitro were remarkably decreased compared with those in the control cells. Furthermore, the antisense-cDNA transfected cells also showed slightly higher sensitivity to cisplatin-induced cell death than the control cells. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage is primarily repaired by nucleotide excision repair, like UVC-induced DNA damage. The present results suggest that GRP78/BiP plays a protective role against UVC-induced cell death possibly via nucleotide excision repair, at least in the human RSa cells tested.

  16. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  17. Testicular Dnmt3 expression and global DNA methylation are down-regulated by gonadotropin releasing hormones in the ricefield eel Monopterus albus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yize; Sun, Xin; Zhang, Lihong; Zhang, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    In vertebrates, DNA methyltransferase 3 (Dnmt3) homologues are responsible for de novo DNA methylation and play important roles in germ cell development. In the present study, four dnmt3 genes, dnmt3aa, dnmt3ab, dnmt3ba and dnmt3bb.1, were identified in ricefield eels. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that all four dnmt3 mRNAs were detected broadly in tissues examined, with testicular expression at relatively high levels. In the testis, immunostaining for all four Dnmt3 forms was mainly localized to spermatocytes, which also contained highly methylated DNA. All three forms of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) in the ricefield eel were shown to decrease the expression of dnmt3 genes in the in vitro incubated testicular fragments through cAMP and IP3/Ca2+ pathways. Moreover, in vivo treatment of male fish with three forms of Gnrh decreased significantly the testicular Dnmt3 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, and the global DNA methylation levels. These results suggest that the expression of Dnmt3 and global DNA methylation in the testis of ricefield eels are potentially down-regulated by Gnrh, and reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of testicular Dnmt3 expression in vertebrates. PMID:28225069

  18. Involvement of DNA hypermethylation in down-regulation of the zinc transporter ZIP8 in cadmium-resistant metallothionein-null cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujishiro, Hitomi; Okugaki, Satomi; Yasumitsu, Saori; Enomoto, Shuichi; Himeno, Seiichiro

    2009-12-01

    The Zrt/Irt-related protein 8 (ZIP8) encoded by slc39a8 is now emerging as an important zinc transporter involved in cellular cadmium incorporation. We have previously shown that mRNA and protein levels of ZIP8 were decreased in cadmium-resistant metallothionein-null (A7) cells, leading to a decrease in cadmium accumulation. However, the mechanism by which ZIP8 expression is suppressed in these cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the possibility that epigenetic silencing of the slc39a8 gene by DNA hypermethylation is involved in the down-regulation of ZIP8 expression. A7 cells showed a higher mRNA level of DNA methyltransferase 3b than parental cells. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the slc39a8 gene was detected in A7 cells. Treatment of A7 cells with 5-aza-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase, caused demethylation of the CpG island of the slc39a8 gene and enhancement of mRNA and protein levels of ZIP8. In response to the recovery of ZIP8 expression, A7 cells treated with 5-aza-deoxycytidine showed an increase in cadmium accumulation and consequently an increase in sensitivity to cadmium. These results suggest that epigenetic silencing of the slc39a8 gene by DNA hypermethylation plays an important role in the down-regulation of ZIP8 in cadmium-resistant metallothionein-null cells.

  19. Does the tautomeric status of the adenine bases change upon the dissociation of the A*·A(syn) Topal-Fresco DNA mismatch? A combined QM and QTAIM atomistic insight.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Zhurakivsky, Roman O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-02-28

    We have scrupulously explored the tautomerisation mechanism via the double proton transfer of the A*·A(syn) Topal-Fresco base mispair (C(s) symmetry), formed by the imino and amino tautomers of the adenine DNA base in the anti- and syn-conformations, respectively, bridging quantum-mechanical calculations with Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules. It was found that the A*·A(syn) ↔ A·A*(syn) tautomerisation is the asynchronous concerted process. It was established that the A*·A(syn) DNA mismatch is stabilized by the N6H···N6 (6.35) and N1H···N7 (6.17) hydrogen (H) bonds, whereas the A·A*(syn) base mispair (Cs) by the N6H···N6 (8.82) and N7H···N1 (9.78) H-bonds and the C8H···HC2 HH-bond (0.30 kcal mol(-1)). Using the sweeps of the energies of the intermolecular H-bonds, it was observed that the N6H···N6 and N1H···N7/N7H···N1 H-bonds are anti-cooperative and mutually weaken each other in the A*·A(syn) and A·A*(syn) mispairs. It was revealed that the A·A*(syn) DNA mismatch is a dynamically unstable structure with a short lifetime of 1.12 × 10(-13) s and any of its 6 low-frequency intermolecular vibrations can develop during this period of time. This observation makes it impossible to change the tautomeric status of the A bases upon the dissociation of the A*·A(syn) base mispair into the monomers during DNA replication.

  20. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA by down-regulation of deoxyguanosine kinase expression in non-proliferating HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Maribel; Johansson, Magnus . E-mail: magnus.johansson@ki.se; Karlsson, Anna

    2007-07-15

    Purine deoxyribonucleotides required for mitochondrial DNA replication are either imported from the cytosol or derived from phosphorylation of deoxyadenosine or deoxyguanosine catalyzed by mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK). DGUOK deficiency has been linked to mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes suggesting an important role for this enzyme in dNTP supply. We have generated HeLa cell lines with 20-30% decreased levels of DGUOK mRNA by the expression of small interfering RNAs directed towards the DGUOK mRNA. The cells with decreased expression of the enzyme showed similar levels of mtDNA as control cells when grown exponentially in culture. However, mtDNA levels rapidly decreased in the cells when cell cycle arrest was induced by serum starvation. DNA incorporation of 9-{beta}-D-arabino-furanosylguanine (araG) was lower in the cells with decreased deoxyguanosine kinase expression, but the total rate of araG phosphorylation was increased in the cells. The increase in araG phosphorylation was shown to be due to increased expression of deoxycytidine kinase. In summary, our findings show that DGUOK is required for mitochondrial DNA replication in resting cells and that small changes in expression of this enzyme may cause mitochondrial DNA depletion. Our data also suggest that alterations in the expression level of DGUOK may induce compensatory changes in the expression of other nucleoside kinases.

  1. Short-term magnesium deficiency downregulates telomerase, upregulates neutral sphingomyelinase and induces oxidative DNA damage in cardiovascular tissues: relevance to atherogenesis, cardiovascular diseases and aging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilank C; Shah, Gatha J; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2014-01-01

    The present work tested the hypotheses that: 1) short-term dietary deficiency of magnesium (Mg; 21 days) in rats (MgD) would result in a downregulation of telomerase in cardiac and aortic smooth muscle cells, 2) low levels of Mg2+ added to drinking water (DW) would either prevent or greatly reduce the downregulation of telomerase in MgD, 3) MgD in rats would cause an upregulation of neutral-sphingomyelinase (N-SMAse) and p53, 4) short-term MgD would result in oxidation of DNA in diverse cardiac muscle and aortic smooth muscle cells as exemplified by measurement of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), and 5) cross-talk between telomerase, N-SMase, p53, and 8-OH-dG would be evident in left ventricular (LV), right ventricular (RV), atrial and aortic smooth muscle obtained from rats subjected to short-term MgD. The data indicated that short-term MgD (10% normal dietary intake) resulted in downregulation of telomerase in LV, RV, atrial and aortic muscle cells; even very low levels of water-bourne Mg2+ (e.g., 15-40 mg/lday) either prevented or ameliorated the downregulation of telomerase. Our experiments also showed that MgD resulted in a 7-10 fold increased formation of 8-OH-dG in the cardiac and aortic muscle cells. The experiments also confirmed that short-term dietary deficiency of Mg resulted in greatly increased upregulation of N-SMAse and p53 in the cardiac and aortic muscle tissues. These new experiments point to a sizeable cross-talk among telomerase, N-SMAse, and p53 in rat cardiac and peripheral vascular muscle exposed to a short-term MgD. These studies would be compatible with the idea that even short-term MgD could cause alterations of the genome in diverse cell types leading to mutations of cardiac, vascular, and endothelial cells seen in aging and atherogenesis. Since we have shown, previously, that activation of N-SMAse in MgD leads to synthesis and release of ceramide in cardiovascular tissues and cells, we believe this pathway, most likely, helps to

  2. Doxycycline down-regulates DNA-PK and radiosensitizes tumor initiating cells: Implications for more effective radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Rebecca; Fiorillo, Marco; Chadwick, Amy; Ozsvari, Bela; Reeves, Kimberly J; Smith, Duncan L; Clarke, Robert B; Howell, Sacha J; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-06-10

    DNA-PK is an enzyme that is required for proper DNA-repair and is thought to confer radio-resistance in cancer cells. As a consequence, it is a high-profile validated target for new pharmaceutical development. However, no FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitors have emerged, despite many years of drug discovery and lead optimization. This is largely because existing DNA-PK inhibitors suffer from poor pharmacokinetics. They are not well absorbed and/or are unstable, with a short plasma half-life. Here, we identified the first FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitor by "chemical proteomics". In an effort to understand how doxycycline targets cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), we serendipitously discovered that doxycycline reduces DNA-PK protein expression by nearly 15-fold (> 90%). In accordance with these observations, we show that doxycycline functionally radio-sensitizes breast CSCs, by up to 4.5-fold. Moreover, we demonstrate that DNA-PK is highly over-expressed in both MCF7- and T47D-derived mammospheres. Interestingly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK in MCF7 cells is sufficient to functionally block mammosphere formation. Thus, it appears that active DNA-repair is required for the clonal expansion of CSCs. Mechanistically, doxycycline treatment dramatically reduced the oxidative mitochondrial capacity and the glycolytic activity of cancer cells, consistent with previous studies linking DNA-PK expression to the proper maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity and copy number. Using a luciferase-based assay, we observed that doxycycline treatment quantitatively reduces the anti-oxidant response (NRF1/2) and effectively blocks signaling along multiple independent pathways normally associated with stem cells, including STAT1/3, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), Notch, WNT and TGF-beta signaling. In conclusion, we propose that the efficacy of doxycycline as a DNA-PK inhibitor should be tested in Phase-II clinical trials, in combination with radio-therapy. Doxycycline has excellent

  3. Doxycycline down-regulates DNA-PK and radiosensitizes tumor initiating cells: Implications for more effective radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Rebecca; Fiorillo, Marco; Chadwick, Amy; Ozsvari, Bela; Reeves, Kimberly J.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clarke, Robert B.; Howell, Sacha J.; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-PK is an enzyme that is required for proper DNA-repair and is thought to confer radio-resistance in cancer cells. As a consequence, it is a high-profile validated target for new pharmaceutical development. However, no FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitors have emerged, despite many years of drug discovery and lead optimization. This is largely because existing DNA-PK inhibitors suffer from poor pharmacokinetics. They are not well absorbed and/or are unstable, with a short plasma half-life. Here, we identified the first FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitor by “chemical proteomics”. In an effort to understand how doxycycline targets cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), we serendipitously discovered that doxycycline reduces DNA-PK protein expression by nearly 15-fold (> 90%). In accordance with these observations, we show that doxycycline functionally radio-sensitizes breast CSCs, by up to 4.5-fold. Moreover, we demonstrate that DNA-PK is highly over-expressed in both MCF7- and T47D-derived mammospheres. Interestingly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK in MCF7 cells is sufficient to functionally block mammosphere formation. Thus, it appears that active DNA-repair is required for the clonal expansion of CSCs. Mechanistically, doxycycline treatment dramatically reduced the oxidative mitochondrial capacity and the glycolytic activity of cancer cells, consistent with previous studies linking DNA-PK expression to the proper maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity and copy number. Using a luciferase-based assay, we observed that doxycycline treatment quantitatively reduces the anti-oxidant response (NRF1/2) and effectively blocks signaling along multiple independent pathways normally associated with stem cells, including STAT1/3, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), Notch, WNT and TGF-beta signaling. In conclusion, we propose that the efficacy of doxycycline as a DNA-PK inhibitor should be tested in Phase-II clinical trials, in combination with radio-therapy. Doxycycline has

  4. Café-au-lait macules and pediatric malignancy caused by biallelic mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene PMS2.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carl-Christian; Holter, Spring; Pollett, Aaron; Clendenning, Mark; Chou, Shirley; Senter, Leigha; Ramphal, Raveena; Gallinger, Steven; Boycott, Kym

    2008-06-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with a T4 sigmoid adenocarcinoma, <10 colonic adenomas and multiple café-au-lait macules. Family history was not suggestive of a dominant hereditary form of colorectal cancer. Evaluation of the tumor revealed abnormal immunohistochemical staining of the PMS2 protein and high frequency microsatellite instability. Germline analysis identified biallelic PMS2 missense mutations. A new cancer syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in the mismatch repair genes, including PMS2, is now emerging and is characterized by café-au-lait macules, colonic polyps and a distinctive tumor spectrum.

  5. A polymorphism in the MSH3 mismatch repair gene is associated with the levels of somatic instability of the expanded CTG repeat in the blood DNA of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients.

    PubMed

    Morales, Fernando; Vásquez, Melissa; Santamaría, Carolina; Cuenca, Patricia; Corrales, Eyleen; Monckton, Darren G

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism of the expanded CTG repeat in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is age-dependent, tissue-specific and expansion-biased, contributing toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the symptoms. Previously, using regression modelling of repeat instability we showed that variation in the rate of somatic expansion in blood DNA contributes toward variation in age of onset, directly implicating somatic expansion in the disease pathway. Here, we confirm these results using a larger more genetically homogenous Costa Rican DM1 cohort (p<0.001). Interestingly, we also provide evidence that supports subtle sex-dependent differences in repeat length-dependent age at onset and somatic mutational dynamics. Previously, we demonstrated that variation in the rate of somatic expansion was a heritable quantitative trait. Given the important role that DNA mismatch repair genes play in mediating expansions in mouse models, we tested for modifier gene effects with 13 DNA mismatch gene polymorphisms (one each in MSH2, PMS2, MSH6 and MLH1; and nine in MSH3). After correcting for allele length and age effects, we identified three polymorphisms in MSH3 that were associated with variation in somatic instability: Rs26279 (p=0.003); Rs1677658 (p=0.009); and Rs10168 (p=0.031). However, only the association with Rs26279 remained significant after multiple testing correction. Although we revealed a statistically significant association between Rs26279 and somatic instability, we did not detect an association with the age at onset. Individuals with the A/A genotype for Rs26279 tended to show a greater propensity to expand the CTG repeat than other genotypes. Interestingly, this SNP results in an amino acid change in the critical ATPase domain of MSH3 and is potentially functionally dimorphic. These data suggest that MSH3 is a key player in generating somatic variation in DM1 patients and further highlight MSH3 as a potential therapeutic target.

  6. Down-regulation of c-myc gene expression with induction of high molecular weight DNA fragments by fluorodeoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Li, Z R; Yin, M B; Arredondo, M A; Schöber, C; Rustum, Y M

    1994-07-19

    5-Fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FdUrd), a potent inhibitor of thymidylate synthase, induces extensive bulk DNA damage at drug concentrations that produce significant in vitro growth inhibition of human ileocecal carcinoma (HCT-8) cells. Constant- and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE and PFGE), to detect size distribution of DNA double-strand breaks and repair kinetics, in parallel with northern and western blot analyses, to quantitate c-myc gene and protein expression, were utilized to analyze drug effects. At 24-hr post in vitro drug treatment, when maximum bulk DNA damage was detected, FdUrd produced a broad range of high molecular weight DNA fragments, clustering between 0.1 and 5.7 megabases in size, and resulted in a decrease in the level of c-myc transcripts and protein with no significant effect on the level of v-myc and H-ras. These effects preceded the observed cellular growth inhibition. Addition of the reduced folate leucovorin potentiated the effects induced by FdUrd, indicating that thymidylate synthase inhibition is an important initial step in drug effect followed by DNA fragmentation and suppression of c-myc expression. Changes in the integrity of the genetic materials and regulatory genes occurred prior to the observed cell growth inhibition by FdUrd, suggesting that these molecular alterations by FdUrd may be associated with subsequent FdUrd-induced cell growth inhibition.

  7. Potential effect of smoking on semen quality through DNA damage and the downregulation of Chk1 in sperm

    PubMed Central

    CUI, XIANGRONG; JING, XUAN; WU, XUEQING; WANG, ZHENQIANG; LI, QIANG

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that smoking is associated with decreased male fertility via altering the quality of semen. However, the mechanism by which cigarette smoking affects semen quality remains to be fully elucidated. Heavy smoking-induced DNA damage has been reported to correlate with abnormal spermatozoa and male infertility. It has been reported that, in response to DNA damage, activation of the checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) facilitates S and G2 checkpoint arrest. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of Chk1 in sperm cells of smoking and non-smoking men, and to further examine the correlation between DNA fragmentation rates and the expression levels of Chk1 with smoking. The present study was performed on a cohort of 841 smoking men and 287 non-smoking men. In the investigation, sperm concentration, motility, viability, seminal plasma zinc concentration, acrosin activity and sperm DNA fragmentation were examined. The gene and protein expression levels of Chk1 were detected using reverse transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, respectively. It was observed that the progressive motility of the sperm was significantly decreased in the moderate and heavy smoking groups, whereas no significant changes were observed in the mild smoking group. The sperm in the medium-term smoking group had significantly decreased progressive motility, and the semen concentration, sperm count and progressive motility vitality were markedly decreased in the long-term smoking group. Compared with the non-smoking group, the abnormal head rates in the heavy smoking group and long-term smoking group were significantly increased. The sperm viability and seminal plasma zinc concentration were markedly increased in the smoking group. Increased DNA fragmentation rates were found in the smoking group. The expression of Chk1 was significantly decreased in the smoking group, compared with the non-smoking group. Progressive

  8. Homologous and homeologous intermolecular gene conversion are not differentially affected by mutations in the DNA damage or the mismatch repair genes RAD1, RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, PMS1 and MSH2

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.; Westmoreland, J.; Priebe, S.

    1996-06-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes or genes involved in both DNA damage repair and homologous recombination might affect homeologous vs. homologous recombination differentially. Spontaneous mitotic gene conversion between a chromosome and a homologous or homeologous donor sequence (14% diverged) on a single copy plasmid was examined in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and in MMR or DNA damage repair mutants. Homologous recombination in rad51, rad52 and rad54 mutants was considerably reduced, while there was little effect of rad1, rad50, pms1 and msh2 null mutations. DNA divergence resulted in no differential effect on recombination rates in the wild type or the mutants; there was only a five- to 10-fold reduction in homeologous relative to homologous recombination regardless of background. Since DNA divergence is known to affect recombination in some systems, we propose that differences in the role of MMR depends on the mode of recombination and/or the level of divergence. Based on analysis of the recombination breakpoints, there is a minimum of three homologous bases required at a recombination junction. A comparison of Rad{sup +} vs. rad52 strains revealed that while all conversion tracts are continuous, elimination of RAD52 leads to the appearance of a novel class of very short conversion tracts. 67 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Homologous and Homeologous Intermolecular Gene Conversion Are Not Differentially Affected by Mutations in the DNA Damage or the Mismatch Repair Genes Rad1, Rad50, Rad51, Rad52, Rad54, Pms1 and Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Porter, G.; Westmoreland, J.; Priebe, S.; Resnick, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes or genes involved in both DNA damage repair and homologous recombination might affect homeologous vs. homologous recombination differentially. Spontaneous mitotic gene conversion between a chromosome and a homologous or homeologous donor sequence (14% diverged) on a single copy plasmid was examined in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and in MMR or DNA damage repair mutants. Homologous recombination in rad51, rad52 and rad54 mutants was considerably reduced, while there was little effect of rad1, rad50, pms1 and msh2 null mutations. DNA divergence resulted in no differential effect on recombination rates in the wild type or the mutants; there was only a five- to 10-fold reduction in homeologous relative to homologous recombination regardless of background. Since DNA divergence is known to affect recombination in some systems, we propose that differences in the role of MMR depends on the mode of recombination and/or the level of divergence. Based on analysis of the recombination breakpoints, there is a minimum of three homologous bases required at a recombination junction. A comparison of Rad(+) vs. rad52 strains revealed that while all conversion tracts are continuous, elimination of RAD52 leads to the appearance of a novel class of very short conversion tracts. PMID:8725224

  10. Mismatch binding, ADP-ATP exchange and intramolecular signaling during mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Manju M.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the DNA binding and ATPase activities of the mismatch repair (MMR) protein, MutS—our current understanding of how this protein uses ATP to fuel its actions on DNA and initiate repair via interactions with MutL, the next protein in the pathway. Structure-function and kinetic studies have yielded detailed views of the MutS mechanism of action in MMR. How MutS and MutL work together after mismatch recognition to enable strand-specific nicking, which leads to strand excision and synthesis, is less clear and remains an active area of investigation. PMID:26704427

  11. Down-regulation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 expression in the airway epithelium ameliorates allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bacsi, Attila; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Szczesny, Bartosz; Radak, Zsolt; Hazra, Tapas K; Sur, Sanjiv; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Allergic airway inflammation is characterized by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, inflammatory cell infiltration, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness, in parallel with oxidative DNA base and strand damage, whose etiological role is not understood. Our goal was to establish the role of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common oxidatively damaged base, and its repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) in allergic airway inflammatory processes. Airway inflammation was induced by intranasally administered ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grain extract (RWPE) in sensitized BALB/c mice. We utilized siRNA technology to deplete Ogg1 from airway epithelium; 8-oxoG and DNA strand break levels were quantified by Comet assays. Inflammatory cell infiltration and epithelial methaplasia were determined histologically, mucus and cytokines levels biochemically and enhanced pause was used as the main index of airway hyperresponsiveness. Decreased Ogg1 expression and thereby 8-oxoG repair in the airway epithelium conveyed a lower inflammatory response after RWPE challenge of sensitized mice, as determined by expression of Th2 cytokines, eosinophilia, epithelial methaplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, 8-oxoG repair in Ogg1-proficient airway epithelium was coupled to an increase in DNA single-strand break (SSB) levels and exacerbation of allergen challenge-dependent inflammation. Decreased expression of the Nei-like glycosylases Neil1 and Neil2 that preferentially excise ring-opened purines and 5-hydroxyuracil, respectively, did not alter the above parameters of allergic immune responses to RWPE. These results show that DNA SSBs formed during Ogg1-mediated repair of 8-oxoG augment antigen-driven allergic immune responses. A transient modulation of OGG1 expression/activity in airway epithelial cells could have clinical benefits.

  12. Downregulated ECRG4 is associated with poor prognosis in renal cell cancer and is regulated by promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liya; Wu, Jianting; Xie, Jun; Xia, Lingling; Qian, Xuemin; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Zesong

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer-related gene 4 (ECRG4) has been proposed as a putative tumor suppressor gene in several tumors. However, the role and regulation of ECRG4 in the pathogenesis of human renal cancer remain largely unknown. Our current study revealed that expression of ECRG4 is downregulated in renal cell lines and renal cancer tissues. ECRG4 expression was significantly associated with histological grade of tumors (p < 0.001), primary tumor stage (p = 0.017), and distant metastasis (p = 0.017). Low expression of ECRG4 was an independent prognostic indicator for survival of renal cancer patients. Silencing of ECRG4 expression in renal cell lines was associated with its promoter methylation. Moreover, ectopic expression of ECRG4 markedly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion in renal cancer cell lines. These results indicated that ECRG4 is frequently silenced by the methylation of promoter in renal cell cancers. ECRG4 may be a tumor suppressor in renal cancer and serve as a prognostic marker.

  13. Increased DNA double-strand break was associated with downregulation of repair and upregulation of apoptotic factors in rat hippocampus after alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; N'Gouemo, Prosper; Datta, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Binge drinking is known to cause damage in critical areas of the brain, including the hippocampus, which is important for relational memory and is reported to be sensitive to alcohol toxicity. However, the roles of DNA double-strand break (DSB) and its repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in alcohol-induced hippocampal injury remain to be elucidated. The purpose of this first study was to assess alcohol-induced DNA DSB and the mechanism by which alcohol affects DSB repair pathways in rat hippocampus. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (8-10 weeks old) were put on a 4-day binge ethanol treatment regimen. Control animals were maintained under similar conditions but were given the vehicle without ethanol. All animals were humanely euthanized 24 h after the last dose of ethanol administration and the hippocampi were dissected for immunoblot and immunohistochemistry analysis. Ethanol exposure caused increased 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) staining as well as elevated γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in hippocampal cells. Immunoblot analysis showed decreased Mre11, Rad51, Rad50, and Ku86 as well as increased Bax and p21 in samples from ethanol-treated rats. Additionally, we also observed increased activated caspase3 staining in hippocampal cells 24 h after ethanol withdrawal. Taken together, our data demonstrated that ethanol concurrently induced DNA DSB, downregulated DSB repair pathway proteins, and increased apoptotic factors in hippocampal cells. We believe these findings will provide the impetus for further research on DNA DSB and its repair pathways in relation to alcohol toxicity in brain.

  14. Myosin 16 levels fluctuate during the cell cycle and are downregulated in response to DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Richard S; Liu, Changdan; Pihkala, Jeanene P S

    2013-06-01

    Myosins comprise a highly conserved superfamily of eukaryotic actin-dependent motor proteins implicated in a large repertoire of functions in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Class XVI myosin, MYO16, reveals expression in most somatic as well as meiotic cells with prominent localization in the nucleus, excepting the nucleolus; however, the role(s) of Myo16 in the nucleus remain unknown. In this report, we investigated Myo16 abundance during transit through the cell cycle. Immunolocalization, immunoblot, flow cytometric and quantitative RT-PCR studies performed in Rat2 cells indicate that Myo16 mRNA and protein abundance are cell cycle regulated: in the unperturbed cell cycle, each rises to peak levels in late G1 and thereon through S-phase and each decays as cells enter M-phase. Notably, RNA interference-induced Myo16 depletion results in altered cell cycle distribution as well as in large-scale cell death. In response to DNA replication stress (impaired replication fork progression as a consequence of DNA damage, lack of sufficient deoxynucleotides, or inhibition of DNA polymerases), Myo16 protein shows substantial loss. Attenuation of replication stress (aphidicolin or hydroxyurea) is followed by a recovery of Myo16 expression and resumption of S-phase progression. Collectively, these observations suggest that Myo16 may play a regulatory role in cell cycle progression.

  15. Vitamin C down-regulate apo(a) expression via Tet2-dependent DNA demethylation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Kai; Ma, Xiao-Feng; Li, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Hai; Liu, Ya-Mi; Zhang, Kai; Zeng, Jun-Fa; Lei, Jian-Jun; Wei, Dang-Heng; Wang, Zuo

    2017-05-01

    Lipoprotein(a)[Lp(a)] is a risk factor for coronary heart diseases. However, the metabolism of this protein remains poorly understood. Efficient and specific drugs that can decrease high plasma levels of Lp(a) have not been developed yet. Vitamin C is responsible for maintaining the catalytic activity of a group of iron and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent dioxygenases and induces the generation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) via Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases. In addition, It has been reported vitamin C deficiency induces atherosclerosis and increases Lp(a) and apo(a) plasma levels in Lp(a)+ mice. However, the mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of vitamin C on apo(a) expression and the possible molecular mechanism of vitamin C that influences apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] biosynthesis in HepG2 cells. Results showed that vitamin C significantly inhibited the expression and secretion levels of apo(a). Vitamin C can also increase ELK1 expression and hydroxymethylation of ELK1 promoter and the globle DNA in HepG2 cells. In addition, the effects of vitamin C inhibiting the apo(a) expression were attenuated by ELK1siRNA and Tet2siRNA. These results suggested vitamin C down-regulate apo(a) expression via Tet2-dependent DNA demethylation in HepG2 cells.

  16. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5′-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  17. The nature of the transition mismatches with Watson-Crick architecture: the G*·T or G·T* DNA base mispair or both? A QM/QTAIM perspective for the biological problem.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    This study provides the first accurate investigation of the tautomerization of the biologically important guanine*·thymine (G*·T) DNA base mispair with Watson-Crick geometry, involving the enol mutagenic tautomer of the G and the keto tautomer of the T, into the G·T* mispair (∆G = .99 kcal mol(-1), population = 15.8% obtained at the MP2 level of quantum-mechanical theory in the continuum with ε = 4), formed by the keto tautomer of the G and the enol mutagenic tautomer of the T base, using DFT and MP2 methods in vacuum and in the weakly polar medium (ε = 4), characteristic for the hydrophobic interfaces of specific protein-nucleic acid interactions. We were first able to show that the G*·T↔G·T* tautomerization occurs through the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer along two antiparallel O6H···O4 and N1···HN3 H-bonds and is assisted by the third N2H···O2 H-bond, that exists along the entire reaction pathway. The obtained results indicate that the G·T* base mispair is stable from the thermodynamic point of view complex, while it is dynamically unstable structure in vacuum and dynamically stable structure in the continuum with ε = 4 with lifetime of 6.4·10(-12) s, that, on the one side, makes it possible to develop all six low-frequency intermolecular vibrations, but, on the other side, it is by three orders less than the time (several ns) required for the replication machinery to forcibly dissociate a base pair into the monomers during DNA replication. One of the more significant findings to emerge from this study is that the short-lived G·T* base mispair, which electronic interaction energy between the bases (-23.76 kcal mol(-1)) exceeds the analogical value for the G·C Watson-Crick nucleobase pair (-20.38 kcal mol(-1)), "escapes from the hands" of the DNA replication machinery by fast transforming into the G*·T mismatch playing an indirect role of its supplier during the DNA replication. So

  18. Aberrant repair initiated by mismatch-specific thymine-DNA glycosylases provides a mechanism for the mutational bias observed in CpG islands

    PubMed Central

    Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Couve, Sophie; Gros, Laurent; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Matkarimov, Bakhyt; Saparbaev, Murat K.

    2014-01-01

    The human thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) initiates the base excision repair (BER) pathway to remove spontaneous and induced DNA base damage. It was first biochemically characterized for its ability to remove T mispaired with G in CpG context. TDG is involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expressions by protecting CpG-rich promoters from de novo DNA methylation. Here we demonstrate that TDG initiates aberrant repair by excising T when it is paired with a damaged adenine residue in DNA duplex. TDG targets the non-damaged DNA strand and efficiently excises T opposite of hypoxanthine (Hx), 1,N6-ethenoadenine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoadenine and abasic site in TpG/CpX context, where X is a modified residue. In vitro reconstitution of BER with duplex DNA containing Hx•T pair and TDG results in incorporation of cytosine across Hx. Furthermore, analysis of the mutation spectra inferred from single nucleotide polymorphisms in human population revealed a highly biased mutation pattern within CpG islands (CGIs), with enhanced mutation rate at CpA and TpG sites. These findings demonstrate that under experimental conditions used TDG catalyzes sequence context-dependent aberrant removal of thymine, which results in TpG, CpA→CpG mutations, thus providing a plausible mechanism for the putative evolutionary origin of the CGIs in mammalian genomes. PMID:24692658

  19. Replication infidelity via a mismatch with Watson-Crick geometry.

    PubMed

    Bebenek, Katarzyna; Pedersen, Lars C; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    In describing the DNA double helix, Watson and Crick suggested that "spontaneous mutation may be due to a base occasionally occurring in one of its less likely tautomeric forms." Indeed, among many mispairing possibilities, either tautomerization or ionization of bases might allow a DNA polymerase to insert a mismatch with correct Watson-Crick geometry. However, despite substantial progress in understanding the structural basis of error prevention during polymerization, no DNA polymerase has yet been shown to form a natural base-base mismatch with Watson-Crick-like geometry. Here we provide such evidence, in the form of a crystal structure of a human DNA polymerase λ variant poised to misinsert dGTP opposite a template T. All atoms needed for catalysis are present at the active site and in positions that overlay with those for a correct base pair. The mismatch has Watson-Crick geometry consistent with a tautomeric or ionized base pair, with the pH dependence of misinsertion consistent with the latter. The results support the original idea that a base substitution can originate from a mismatch having Watson-Crick geometry, and they suggest a common catalytic mechanism for inserting a correct and an incorrect nucleotide. A second structure indicates that after misinsertion, the now primer-terminal G • T mismatch is also poised for catalysis but in the wobble conformation seen in other studies, indicating the dynamic nature of the pathway required to create a mismatch in fully duplex DNA.

  20. Taxonomic challenges in freshwater fishes: a mismatch between morphology and DNA barcoding in fish of the north-eastern part of the Congo basin.

    PubMed

    Decru, Eva; Moelants, Tuur; De Gelas, Koen; Vreven, Emmanuel; Verheyen, Erik; Snoeks, Jos

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the utility of DNA barcoding to traditional morphology-based species identifications for the fish fauna of the north-eastern Congo basin. We compared DNA sequences (COI) of 821 samples from 206 morphologically identified species. Best match, best close match and all species barcoding analyses resulted in a rather low identification success of 87.5%, 84.5% and 64.1%, respectively. The ratio 'nearest-neighbour distance/maximum intraspecific divergence' was lower than 1 for 26.1% of the samples, indicating possible taxonomic problems. In ten genera, belonging to six families, the number of species inferred from mtDNA data exceeded the number of species identified using morphological features; and in four cases indications of possible synonymy were detected. Finally, the DNA barcodes confirmed previously known identification problems within certain genera of the Clariidae, Cyprinidae and Mormyridae. Our results underscore the large number of taxonomic problems lingering in the taxonomy of the fish fauna of the Congo basin and illustrate why DNA barcodes will contribute to future efforts to compile a reliable taxonomic inventory of the Congo basin fish fauna. Therefore, the obtained barcodes were deposited in the reference barcode library of the Barcode of Life Initiative.

  1. Hypermutation in Burkholderia cepacia complex is mediated by DNA mismatch repair inactivation and is highly prevalent in cystic fibrosis chronic respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Martina, Pablo; Feliziani, Sofía; Juan, Carlos; Bettiol, Marisa; Gatti, Blanca; Yantorno, Osvaldo; Smania, Andrea M; Oliver, Antonio; Bosch, Alejandra

    2014-11-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) represents an important group of pathogens involved in long-term lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A positive selection of hypermutators, linked to antimicrobial resistance development, has been previously reported for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in this chronic infection setting. Hypermutability, however, has not yet been systematically evaluated in Bcc species. A total of 125 well characterized Bcc isolates recovered from 48 CF patients, 10 non-CF patients and 15 environmental samples were analyzed. In order to determine the prevalence of mutators their spontaneous mutation rates to rifampicin resistance were determined. In addition, the genetic basis of the mutator phenotypes was investigated by sequencing the mutS and mutL genes, the main components of the mismatch repair system (MRS). The overall prevalence of hypermutators in the collection analyzed was 13.6%, with highest occurrence (40.7%) among the chronically infected CF patients, belonging mainly to B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, B. cepacia, and B. contaminans -the most frequently recovered Bcc species from CF patients worldwide. Thirteen (76.5%) of the hypermutators were defective in mutS and/or mutL. Finally, searching for a possible association between antimicrobial resistance and hypermutability, the resistance-profiles to 17 antimicrobial agents was evaluated. High antimicrobial resistance rates were documented for all the Bcc species recovered from CF patients, but, except for ciprofloxacin, a significant association with hypermutation was not detected. In conclusion, in the present study we demonstrate for the first time that, MRS-deficient Bcc species mutators are highly prevalent and positively selected in CF chronic lung infections. Hypermutation therefore, might be playing a key role in increasing bacterial adaptability to the CF-airway environment, facilitating the persistence of chronic lung infections.

  2. Wobble↔Watson-Crick tautomeric transitions in the homo-purine DNA mismatches: a key to the intimate mechanisms of the spontaneous transversions.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic capability of the homo-purine DNA base mispairs to perform wobble↔Watson-Crick/Topal-Fresco tautomeric transitions via the sequential intrapair double proton transfer was discovered for the first time using QM (MP2/DFT) and QTAIM methodologies that are crucial for understanding the microstructural mechanisms of the spontaneous transversions.

  3. DNA Damage Is a Prerequisite for p53-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation of HIF-1α in Hypoxic Cells and Downregulation of the Hypoxia Marker Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzová, Milota; Kaluz, Stefan; Lerman, Michael I.; Stanbridge, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the tumor suppressor p53 and the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent expression of the hypoxia marker, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). MCF-7 (wt p53) and Saos-2 (p53-null) cells displayed similar induction of CAIX expression and CA9 promoter activity under hypoxic conditions. Activation of p53 by the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C (MC) was accompanied by a potent repression of CAIX expression and the CA9 promoter in MCF-7 but not in Saos-2 cells. The activated p53 mediated increased proteasomal degradation of HIF-1α protein, resulting in considerably lower steady-state levels of HIF-1α protein in hypoxic MCF-7 cells but not in Saos-2 cells. Overexpression of HIF-1α relieved the MC-induced repression in MCF-7 cells, confirming regulation at the HIF-1α level. Similarly, CA9 promoter activity was downregulated by MC in HCT 116 p53+/+ but not the isogenic p53−/− cells. Activated p53 decreased HIF-1α protein levels by accelerated proteasome-dependent degradation without affecting significantly HIF-1α transcription. In summary, our results demonstrate that the presence of wtp53 under hypoxic conditions has an insignificant effect on the stabilization of HIF-1α protein and HIF-1-dependent expression of CAIX. However, upon activation by DNA damage, wt p53 mediates an accelerated degradation of HIF-1α protein, resulting in reduced activation of CA9 transcription and, correspondingly, decreased levels of CAIX protein. A model outlining the quantitative relationship between p53, HIF-1α, and CAIX is presented. PMID:15199132

  4. Antithymocyte globulin combined with cyclosporine A down-regulates T helper 1 cells by modulating T cell immune response cDNA 7 in aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Qiao, Jianlin; Zhong, Xiao-min; Wu, Qing-yun; Chen, Wei; Yao, Yao; Niu, Ming-shan; Fu, Chun-ling; Zeng, Ling-yu; Li, Zhen-yu; Xu, Kai-lin

    2015-07-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) combined with cyclosporine A (CsA) has been widely used as a standard regimen in the treatment of aplastic anemia (AA), especially in severe aplastic anemia (SAA). Abnormally activated T cells might be the immune pathogenesis of AA. T cell immune response cDNA 7 (TIRC7) has been demonstrated its essential role in T cell activation; however, little is known about the role of TIRC7 in AA. In this study, we documented that TIRC7 levels in CsA group were higher than that in ATG + CsA (AC) group only in the follow-up phase (P < 0.05; P < 0.05); nevertheless, TIRC7 levels in SAA group were elevated than non severe aplastic anemia group not only in the treatment phase (P < 0.05; P < 0.05) but also in the follow-up phase (P < 0.05; P < 0.01). The trend of changes of T helper (Th) 1, Th17 and Th22 levels before and after treatment was similar to the changes of TIRC7 levels in either AC group or CsA group. Thus, TIRC7 might be involved in the pathogenesis of AA and AC might down-regulate Th1 cells by modulating the expression of TIRC7 in AA.

  5. Human MutL-complexes monitor homologous recombination independently of mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Siehler, Simone Yasmin; Schrauder, Michael; Gerischer, Ulrike; Cantor, Sharon; Marra, Giancarlo; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2009-02-01

    The role of mismatch repair proteins has been well studied in the context of DNA repair following DNA polymerase errors. Particularly in yeast, MSH2 and MSH6 have also been implicated in the regulation of genetic recombination, whereas MutL homologs appeared to be less important. So far, little is known about the role of the human MutL homolog hMLH1 in recombination, but recently described molecular interactions suggest an involvement. To identify activities of hMLH1 in this process, we applied an EGFP-based assay for the analysis of different mechanisms of DNA repair, initiated by a targeted double-stranded DNA break. We analysed 12 human cellular systems, differing in the hMLH1 and concomitantly in the hPMS1 and hPMS2 status via inducible protein expression, genetic reconstitution, or RNA interference. We demonstrate that hMLH1 and its complex partners hPMS1 and hPMS2 downregulate conservative homologous recombination (HR), particularly when involving DNA sequences with only short stretches of uninterrupted homology. Unexpectedly, hMSH2 is dispensable for this effect. Moreover, the damage-signaling kinase ATM and its substrates BLM and BACH1 are not strictly required, but the combined effect of ATM/ATR-signaling components may mediate the anti-recombinogenic effect. Our data indicate a protective role of hMutL-complexes in a process which may lead to detrimental genome rearrangements, in a manner which does not depend on mismatch repair.

  6. Mismatch repair proteins: key regulators of genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Surtees, J A; Argueso, J L; Alani, E

    2004-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) systems are central to maintaining genome stability in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. MMR proteins play a fundamental role in avoiding mutations, primarily by removing misincorporation errors that occur during DNA replication. MMR proteins also act during genetic recombination in steps that include repairing mismatches in heteroduplex DNA, modulating meiotic crossover control, removing 3' non-homologous tails during double-strand break repair, and preventing recombination between divergent sequences. In this review we will, first, discuss roles for MMR proteins in repairing mismatches that occur during recombination, particularly during meiosis. We will also explore how studying this process has helped to refine models of double-strand break repair, and particularly to our understanding of gene conversion gradients. Second, we will examine the role of MMR proteins in repressing homeologous recombination, i.e. recombination between divergent sequences. We will also compare the requirements for MMR proteins in preventing homeologous recombination to the requirements for these proteins in mismatch repair.

  7. HBD-2 is downregulated in oral carcinoma cells by DNA hypermethylation, and increased expression of hBD-2 by DNA demethylation and gene transfection inhibits cell proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yoshitaka; Kurashige, Yoshihito; Uehara, Osamu; Sato, Jun; Nishimura, Michiko; Yoshida, Koki; Arakawa, Toshiya; Nagayasu, Hiroki; Saitoh, Masato; Abiko, Yoshihiro

    2014-08-01

    Human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is a type of epithelial antimicrobial peptide. The expression level of hBD-2 mRNA is lower in oral carcinoma cells (OCCs) than in healthy oral epithelium. Yet, it is still unknown how hBD-2 expression is downregulated in OCCs. The present study investigated DNA hypermethylation of hBD-2 in OCCs and the effect of the demethylation and increased expression of hBD-2 on cell proliferation and invasion. Six different types of oral carcinoma cell lines (OSC-19, BSC-OF, SAS, HSC-2, HSC-4 and HSY) and normal oral keratinocytes (NOKs) were used. The expression levels of hBD-2 in all OCCs were significantly lower than that in the NOKs. Treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-dC, at the concentration of 50 µM significantly induced upregulation of expression of hBD-2 in the OCCs. Using methylation-specific PCR, DNA hypermethylation was observed in all OCCs. These results suggest that DNA hypermethylation is, at least in part, involved in the decreased expression of hBD-2 in OCCs. We examined the effect of 5-aza-dC on the cell proliferation and invasive ability of OCCs. The cell invasion assays showed that the number of OCCs treated with 5-aza-dC on the filters was significantly lower than that of the controls. We examined whether increased expression of hBD-2 generated by gene transfection inhibited the proliferation and invasion of SAS cells. The number of SAS cells exhibiting increased expression of hBD-2 on the filters in the invasion assay were significantly lower on day 7 when compared with the control. hBD-2 may function as a tumor suppressor. Increased expression of hBD-2 induced by demethylation or increased expression generated by gene transfection may be useful therapeutic methods for oral carcinoma.

  8. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  9. hMYH and hMTH1 cooperate for survival in mismatch repair defective T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eshtad, S; Mavajian, Z; Rudd, S G; Visnes, T; Boström, J; Altun, M; Helleday, T

    2016-01-01

    hMTH1 is an 8-oxodGTPase that prevents mis-incorporation of free oxidized nucleotides into genomic DNA. Base excision and mismatch repair pathways also restrict the accumulation of oxidized lesions in DNA by removing the mis-inserted 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosines (8-oxodGs). In this study, we aimed to investigate the interplay between hMYH DNA glycosylase and hMTH1 for cancer cell survival by using mismatch repair defective T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. To this end, MYH and MTH1 were silenced individually or simultaneously using small hairpin RNAs. Increased sub-G1 population and apoptotic cells were observed upon concurrent depletion of both enzymes. Elevated cell death was consistent with cleaved caspase 3 accumulation in double knockdown cells. Importantly, overexpression of the nuclear isoform of hMYH could remove the G1 arrest and partially rescue the toxicity observed in hMTH1-depleted cells. In addition, expression profiles of human DNA glycosylases were generated using quantitative reverse transcriptase–PCR in MTH1 and/or MYH knockdown cells. NEIL1 DNA glycosylase, involved in repair of oxidized nucleosides, was found to be significantly downregulated as a cellular response to MTH1–MYH co-suppression. Overall, the results suggest that hMYH and hMTH1 functionally cooperate for effective repair and survival in mismatch repair defective T-ALL Jurkat A3 cells. PMID:27918552

  10. The physicochemical essence of the purine·pyrimidine transition mismatches with Watson-Crick geometry in DNA: A·C* versa A*·C. A QM and QTAIM atomistic understanding.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    It was established for the first time by DFT and MP2 quantum-mechanical (QM) methods either in vacuum, so in the continuum with a low dielectric constant (ε = 4), typical for hydrophobic interfaces of specific protein-nucleic acid interactions, that the repertoire for the tautomerisation of the biologically important adenine · cytosine* (A · C*) mismatched DNA base pair, formed by the amino tautomer of the A and the imino mutagenic tautomer of the C, into the A*·C base mispair (∆G = 2.72 kcal mol(-1) obtained at the MP2 level of QM theory in the continuum with ε = 4), formed by the imino mutagenic tautomer of the A and the amino tautomer of the C, proceeds via the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer along two antiparallel H-bonds through the transition state (TSA · C* ↔ A* · C). The limiting stage of the A · C* → A* · C tautomerisation is the final proton transfer along the intermolecular N6H · · · N4 H-bond. It was found that the A · C*/A* · C DNA base mispairs with Watson-Crick geometry are associated by the N6H · · · N4/N4H · · · N6, N3H · · · N1/N1H · · · N3 and C2H · · · O2 H-bonds, respectively, while the TSA · C*↔ A* · C is joined by the N6-H-N4 covalent bridge and the N1H · · · N3 and C2H · · · O2 H-bonds. It was revealed that the A · C* ↔ A* · C tautomerisation is assisted by the true C2H · · · O2 H-bond, that in contrast to the two others conventional H-bonds exists along the entire intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) range herewith becoming stronger at the transition from vacuum to the continuum with ε = 4. To better understand the behavior of the intermolecular H-bonds and base mispairs along the IRC of the A · C* ↔ A* · C tautomerisation, the profiles of their electron-topological, energetical, geometrical, polar and charge characteristics are reported in this study. It was established based on the profiles of the H-bond energies that all three H-bonds are cooperative, mutually

  11. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors.

  12. Epigenetic downregulation of RUNX3 by DNA methylation induces docetaxel chemoresistance in human lung adenocarcinoma cells by activation of the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun; Wang, Rui; Song, Hai-Zhu; Pan, Ban-Zhou; Zhang, You-Wei; Chen, Long-Bang

    2013-11-01

    The RUNX3 gene has been shown to function as a tumor suppressor gene implicated in various cancers, but its association with tumor chemoresistance has not been fully understood. Here, we investigated the effect of epigenetic downregulation of RUNX3 in docetaxel resistance of human lung adenocarcinoma and its possible molecular mechanisms. RUNX3 was found to be downregulated by hypermethylation in docetaxel-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells. Its overexpression could resensitize cells to docetaxel both in vitro and in vivo by growth inhibition, enhancement of apoptosis and G1 phase arrest. Conversely, knockdown of RUNX3 could lead to the decreased sensitivity of parental human lung adenocarcinoma cells to docetaxel by enhancing proliferative capacity. Furthermore, we showed that overexpression of RUNX3 could inactivate the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway in the docetaxel-resistant cells. Importantly, co-transfection of RUNX3 and constitutively active Akt1 could reverse the effects of RUNX3 overexpression, while treatment with the MK-2206 (AKT inhibitor) mimicked the effects of RUNX3 overexpression in docetaxel-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that decreased RUNX3 expression was correlated with high expression of Akt1 and decreased sensitivity of patients to docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Taken together, our results suggest that epigenetic downregulation of RUNX3 can induce docetaxel resistance in human lung adenocarcinoma cells by activating AKT signaling and increasing expression of RUNX3 may represent a promising strategy for reversing docetaxel resistance in the future.

  13. Luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ bound to RNA mismatches.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Anna J; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2013-09-03

    The luminescence of rac-[Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) was explored in the presence of RNA oligonucleotides containing a single RNA mismatch (CA and GG) in order to develop a probe for RNA mismatches. While there is minimal luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) in the presence of matched RNA due to weak binding, the luminescence is significantly enhanced in the presence of a single CA mismatch. The luminescence differential between CA mismatched and matched RNA is substantially higher compared to the DNA analogue, and therefore, [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) appears to be also a sensitive light switch probe for a CA mismatch in duplex RNA. Although the luminescence intensity is lower in the presence of RNA than DNA, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor ruthenium complex and FRET acceptor SYTO 61 is successfully exploited to amplify the luminescence in the presence of the mismatch. Luminescence and quenching studies with sodium iodide suggest that [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) binds to these mismatches via metalloinsertion from the minor groove. This work provides further evidence that metalloinsertion is a general binding mode of octahedral metal complexes to thermodynamically destabilized mismatches not only in DNA but also in RNA.

  14. A quantitative model of bacterial mismatch repair as applied to studying induced mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, O. V.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Kapralov, M. I.; Sweilam, N. H.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model of the DNA mismatch repair system in Escherichia coli bacterial cells. The key pathways of this repair mechanism were simulated on the basis of modern experimental data. We have modelled in detail five main pathways of DNA misincorporation removal with different DNA exonucleases. Here we demonstrate an application of the model to problems of radiation-induced mutagenesis.

  15. Characterization of the Novel DNA-Binding Activity of p270, a hSWI/SNF Protein Frequently Downregulated in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    therefore concentrated on the ARID-dependent DNA-binding properties of p270. Through a combination of structural, biochemical and mutational approaches...applied for this fellowship, few biochemical studies had addressed the DNA-binding properties attributed to the ARID region, and no detailed mutational ...of the ARID region of p270 through a combination of structural, biochemical, and mutational approaches. In this final report, I show a summary of the

  16. Mismatch repair status may predict response to adjuvant chemotherapy in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Riazy, Maziar; Kalloger, Steve E; Sheffield, Brandon S; Peixoto, Renata D; Li-Chang, Hector H; Scudamore, Charles H; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F

    2015-10-01

    Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair have been associated with inferior response to 5-FU in colorectal cancer. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is similarly treated with pyrimidine analogs, yet the predictive value of mismatch repair status for response to these agents has not been examined in this malignancy. A tissue microarray with associated clinical outcome, comprising 254 resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was stained for four mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). Mismatch repair deficiency and proficiency was determined by the absence or presence of uniform nuclear staining in tumor cells, respectively. Cases identified as mismatch repair deficient on the tissue microarray were confirmed by immunohistochemistry on whole slide sections. Of the 265 cases, 78 (29%) received adjuvant treatment with a pyrimidine analog and 41 (15%) showed a mismatch repair-deficient immunoprofile. Multivariable disease-specific survival in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort demonstrated that adjuvant chemotherapy, regional lymph-node status, gender, and the presence of tumor budding were significant independent prognostic variables (P≤0.04); however, none of the eight clinico-pathologic covariates examined in the mismatch repair-deficient cohort were of independent prognostic significance. Univariable assessment of disease-specific survival revealed an almost identical survival profile for both treated and untreated patients with a mismatch repair-deficient profile, while treatment in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort conferred a greater than 10-month median disease-specific survival advantage over their untreated counterparts (P=0.0018). In this cohort, adjuvant chemotherapy with a pyrimidine analog conferred no survival advantage to mismatch repair-deficient pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. Mismatch repair immunoprofiling is a feasible predictive marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients, and further prospective

  17. Educational Mismatch and Self-Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Keith A.; Roche, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on educational mismatch concentrates on estimating its labor market consequences but with a focus on wage and salary workers. This paper examines the far less studied influence of mismatch on the self-employed. Using a sample of workers in science and engineering fields, results show larger earnings penalties for mismatch among…

  18. Inducement of G-quadruplex DNA forming and down-regulation of oncogene c-myc by bile acid-amino acid conjugate-BAA.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingyue; Zhang, Xiufeng; Li, Yan; Ju, Yong; Xiang, Junfeng; Zhao, Changqi; Tang, Yalin

    2010-03-01

    Human c-myc gene is a central regulator of cellular proliferation and cell growth, and G-quadruplexes have been proven to be the transcriptional controller of this gene. In this study, the interaction of bile acid-amino acid conjugate (BAA) with G-quadruplexes in c-myc was investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The experimental results indicated that BAA has the ability to selectively induce the formation of parallel G-quadruplexes in c-myc, which leads to down-regulation of c-myc transcription in the human breast cancer cell MCF-7.

  19. Structure-based design of platinum(II) complexes as c-myc oncogene down-regulators and luminescent probes for G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Yan, Siu-Cheong; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-06-18

    A series of platinum(II) complexes with tridentate ligands was synthesized and their interactions with G-quadruplex DNA within the c-myc gene promoter were evaluated. Complex 1, which has a flat planar 2,6-bis(benzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine (bzimpy) scaffold, was found to stabilize the c-myc G-quadruplex structure in a cell-free system. An in silico G-quadruplex DNA model has been constructed for structure-based virtual screening to develop new Pt(II)-based complexes with superior inhibitory activities. By using complex 1 as the initial structure for hit-to-lead optimization, bzimpy and related 2,6-bis(pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine (dPzPy) scaffolds containing amine side-chains emerge as the top candidates. Six of the top-scoring complexes were synthesized and their interactions with c-myc G-quadruplex DNA have been investigated. The results revealed that all of the complexes have the ability to stabilize the c-myc G-quadruplex. Complex 3 a ([Pt(II)L2R](+); L2=2,6-bis[1-(3-piperidinepropyl)-1H-enzo[d]imidazol-2-yl]pyridine, R=Cl) displayed the strongest inhibition in a cell-free system (IC(50)=2.2 microM) and was 3.3-fold more potent than that of 1. Complexes 3 a and 4 a ([Pt(II)L3R](+); L3=2,6-bis[1-(3-morpholinopropyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]pyridine, R=Cl) were found to effectively inhibit c-myc gene expression in human hepatocarcinoma cells with IC(50) values of approximately 17 microM, whereas initial hit 1 displayed no significant effect on gene expression at concentrations up to 50 microM. Complexes 3 a and 4 a have a strong preference for G-quadruplex DNA over duplex DNA, as revealed by competition dialysis experiments and absorption titration; 3 a and 4 a bind G-quadruplex DNA with binding constants (K) of approximately 10(6)-10(7) dm(3) mol(-1), which are at least an order of magnitude higher than the K values for duplex DNA. NMR spectroscopic titration experiments and molecular modeling showed that 4 a binds c-myc G-quadruplex DNA through an external end-stacking mode at

  20. Mismatch repair system proteins in oral benign and malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Silva, Gleyson Kleber do; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2017-04-01

    Different environmental agents may cause DNA mutations by disrupting its double-strand structure; however, even normal DNA polymerase function may synthesize mismatch nucleotide bases, occasionally demonstrating failure in its proofreading activity. To overcome this issue, mismatch repair (MMR) system, a group of proteins specialized in finding mispairing bases and small loops of insertion or deletion, works to avoid the occurrence of mutations that could ultimately lead to innumerous human diseases. In the last decades, the role of MMR proteins in oral carcinogenesis and in the development of other oral cavity neoplasms has grown, but their importance in the pathogenesis and their prognostic potential for patients affected by oral malignancies, especially oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), remain unclear. Therefore, in this manuscript we aimed to review and critically discuss the currently available data on MMR proteins expression in oral potentially malignant lesions, in OSCC, and in other oral neoplasms to better understand their relevance in these lesions.

  1. Cell cycle and mismatch repair genes as potential biomarkers in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan Nair, Prakash M; Chung, Ill-Min

    2014-06-01

    The expression of cell cycle genes and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes were analyzed in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to 0, 0.2, 0.5 and 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles for 24, 48 and 72 h using real-time PCR. Significant up-regulation of AtPCNA1 was observed after 24 h exposure to 0.2 and 0.5 mg/L of silver nanoparticles. AtPCNA2 gene was up-regulated after 24, 48 and 72 h exposure to 0.5 and 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles. AtMLH1 gene was up-regulated after 48 h exposure to 0.5 and 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles and down-regulated after 72 h. Down-regulation of AtMSH2, AtMSH3, AtMSH6 and AtMSH7 mRNA was observed after exposure to all concentrations of silver nanoparticles for different time periods. Exposure to silver ions showed no significant change in the expression levels of AtPCNA and MMR genes. The results show that AtPCNA and MMR genes could be used as potential molecular biomarkers.

  2. Role of mismatch repair in the Escherichia coli UVM response.

    PubMed

    Murphy, H S; Palejwala, V A; Rahman, M S; Dunman, P M; Wang, G; Humayun, M Z

    1996-12-01

    Mutagenesis at 3,N4-ethenocytosine (epsilonC), a nonpairing mutagenic lesion, is significantly enhanced in Escherichia coli cells pretreated with UV, alkylating agents, or H2O2. This effect, termed UVM (for UV modulation of mutagenesis), is distinct from known DNA damage-inducible responses, such as the SOS response, the adaptive response to alkylating agents, or the oxyR-mediated response to oxidative agents. Here, we have addressed the hypothesis that UVM results from transient depletion of a mismatch repair activity that normally acts to reduce mutagenesis. To test whether the loss of mismatch repair activities results in the predicted constitutive UVM phenotype, E. coli cells defective for methyl-directed mismatch repair, for very-short-patch repair, or for the N-glycosylase activities MutY and MutM were treated with the UVM-inducing agent 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine, with subsequent transfection of M13 viral single-stranded DNA bearing a site-specific epsilonC lesion. Survival of the M13 DNA was measured as transfection efficiency, and mutation fixation at the lesion was characterized by multiplex sequencing technology. The results showed normal UVM induction patterns in all the repair-defective strains tested. In addition, normal UVM induction was observed in cells overexpressing MutH, MutL, or MutS. All strains displayed UVM reactivation, the term used to describe the increased survival of epsilonC-containing DNA in UVM-induced cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the UVM response is independent of known mismatch repair systems in E. coli and may thus represent a previously unrecognized misrepair or misreplication pathway.

  3. Mismatch Repair Proficiency and In Vitro Response to 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    CARETHERS, JOHN M.; CHAUHAN, DHARAM P.; FINK, DANIEL; NEBEL, SIBYLLE; BRESALIER, ROBERT S.; HOWELL, STEPHEN B.; BOLAND, C. RICHARD

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system recognizes certain DNA adducts caused by alkylation damage in addition to its role in recognizing and directing repair of interstrand nucleotide mismatches and slippage mistakes at microsatellite sequences. Because defects in the MMR system can confer tolerance to acquired DNA damage and, by inference, the toxic effects of certain chemotherapeutic agents, we investigated the effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on colon cancer cell lines. Methods We determined growth selection by cell enrichment assay and cloning efficiency after treatment with 5 μmol/L 5-FU, assayed nucleic 3H–5-FU incorporation, and analyzed the cell cycle by flow cytometry. Results 5-FU treatment provided a growth advantage for MMR-deficient cell lines, indicating a relative degree of tolerance to 5-FU by the MMR-deficient cell lines. Enhanced survival was statistically significant after 5 days of growth, and a 28-fold reduction in survival was noted in the MMR-proficient cells by clonagenic assays after 10 days of growth. Differences in nucleotide uptake of 5-FU did not account for the observed growth differences, and specific cell cycle checkpoint arrest was not detected. Conclusions Intact DNA MMR seems to recognize 5-FU incorporated into DNA but may do so in a different manner than other types of alkylation damage. Defective DNA MMR might be one mechanism for tumor resistance to 5-FU. PMID:10381918

  4. Crosstalk between mismatch repair and base excision repair in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Valeria; Leuzzi, Giuseppe; Basile, Giorgia; D'Errico, Mariarosaria; Fortini, Paola; Franchitto, Annapaola; Viti, Valentina; Brown, Ashley R; Parlanti, Eleonora; Pascucci, Barbara; Palli, Domenico; Giuliani, Alessandro; Palombo, Fabio; Sobol, Robert W; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2016-06-20

    DNA repair gene expression in a set of gastric cancers suggested an inverse association between the expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 and that of the base excision repair (BER) gene DNA polymerase β (Polβ). To gain insight into possible crosstalk of these two repair pathways in cancer, we analysed human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells over-expressing Polβ or Polβ active site mutants, alone or in combination with MLH1 silencing. Next, we investigated the cellular response to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the purine analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG), agents that induce lesions that are substrates for BER and/or MMR. AGS cells over-expressing Polβ were resistant to 6-TG to a similar extent as when MLH1 was inactivated while inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was required to detect resistance to MMS. Upon either treatment, the association with MLH1 down-regulation further amplified the resistant phenotype. Moreover, AGS cells mutated in Polβ were hypersensitive to both 6-TG and MMS killing and their sensitivity was partially rescued by MLH1 silencing. We provide evidence that the critical lethal lesions in this new pathway are double strand breaks that are exacerbated when Polβ is defective and relieved when MLH1 is silenced. In conclusion, we provide evidence of crosstalk between MLH1 and Polβ that modulates the response to alkylation damage. These studies suggest that the Polβ/MLH1 status should be taken into consideration when designing chemotherapeutic approaches for gastric cancer.

  5. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  6. Computing highly specific and mismatch tolerant oligomers efficiently.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Morishita, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    The sequencing of the genomes of a variety of species and the growing databases containing expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and complementary DNAs (cDNAs) facilitate the design of highly specific oligomers for use as genomic markers, PCR primers, or DNA oligo microarrays. The first step in evaluating the specificity of short oligomers of about twenty units in length is to determine the frequencies at which the oligomers occur. However, for oligomers longer than about fifty units this is not efficient, as they usually have a frequency of only 1. A more suitable procedure is to consider the mismatch tolerance of an oligomer, that is, the minimum number of mismatches that allows a given oligomer to match a sub-sequence other than the target sequence anywhere in the genome or the EST database. However, calculating the exact value of mismatch tolerance is computationally costly and impractical. Therefore, we studied the problem of checking whether an oligomer meets the constraint that its mismatch tolerance is no less than a given threshold. Here, we present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm solution that utilizes suffix and height arrays. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this algorithm by efficiently computing a dense list of oligo-markers applicable to the human genome. Experimental results show that the algorithm runs faster than well-known Abrahamson's algorithm by orders of magnitude and is able to enumerate 63% to approximately 79% of qualified oligomers.

  7. cDNA sequence of rat liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and evidence for down-regulation of its mRNA by insulin.

    PubMed Central

    el-Maghrabi, M R; Pilkis, J; Marker, A J; Colosia, A D; D'Angelo, G; Fraser, B A; Pilkis, S J

    1988-01-01

    A coding-length clone of rat liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) was isolated by immunological screening of a cDNA library in lambda gt11. Its identity was verified by comparing the deduced amino acid sequence with that obtained by direct sequencing of a complete set of CNBr and proteolytic peptides from the purified protein. The enzyme subunit is composed of 362 amino acids and has N-acetylvaline as the amino-terminal residue. The cDNA, 1255 base pairs (bp) long, consisted of 1086 bp of coding region, 15 bp of 5' untranslated sequence, and 154 bp at the 3' untranslated end. The 3' untranslated sequence contained a polyadenylylation signal (AATAAA) followed after 30 bp by a stretch of 7 adenines at the end of the clone. The deduced amino acid sequence was identical to the primary sequence of the protein and confirmed the alignment of five nonoverlapping peptides. It also confirmed the 27-residue extension, unique to the rat liver subunit, ending with a carboxyl-terminal phenylalanine. RNA blot analyses using the radiolabeled liver cDNA as a probe revealed a single band of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mRNA, 1.4 kilobases long, in liver and kidney but not in nongluconeogenic tissues. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mRNA was increased 10-fold in livers from diabetic rats and was reduced to control levels after 24 hr of insulin treatment, suggesting that the changes in enzyme activity observed in diabetes and after insulin treatment are due to alterations in mRNA abundance. Images PMID:2847161

  8. Lack of Casein Kinase 1 Delta Promotes Genomic Instability - The Accumulation of DNA Damage and Down-Regulation of Checkpoint Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Yoshimi Endo; Gao, Bo; Yang, Yingzi; Nussenzweig, Andre; Rubin, Jeffrey S.

    2017-01-01

    Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1δ) is a conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that regulates diverse cellular processes. Mice lacking CK1δ have a perinatal lethal phenotype and typically weigh 30% less than their wild type littermates. However, the causes of death and small size are unknown. We observed cells with abnormally large nuclei in tissue from Csnk1d null embryos, and multiple centrosomes in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient in CK1δ (MEFCsnk1d null). Results from γ-H2AX staining and the comet assay demonstrated significant DNA damage in MEFCsnk1d null cells. These cells often contain micronuclei, an indicator of genomic instability. Similarly, abrogation of CK1δ expression in control MEFs stimulated micronuclei formation after doxorubicin treatment, suggesting that CK1δ loss increases vulnerability to genotoxic stress. Cellular levels of total and activated checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), which functions in the DNA damage response and mitotic checkpoints, and its downstream effector, Cdc2/CDK1 kinase, were often decreased in MEFCsnk1d null cells as well as in control MEFs transfected with CK1δ siRNA. Hydroxyurea-induced Chk1 activation, as measured by Ser345 phosphorylation, and nuclear localization also were impaired in MEF cells following siRNA knockdown of CK1δ. Similar results were observed in the MCF7 human breast cancer cell line. The decreases in phosphorylated Chk1 were rescued by concomitant expression of siRNA-resistant CK1δ. Experiments with cycloheximide demonstrated that the stability of Chk1 protein was diminished in cells subjected to CK1δ knockdown. Together, these findings suggest that CK1δ contributes to the efficient repair of DNA damage and the proper functioning of mitotic checkpoints by maintaining appropriate levels of Chk1. PMID:28125685

  9. Diarctigenin, a lignan constituent from Arctium lappa, down-regulated zymosan-induced transcription of inflammatory genes through suppression of DNA binding ability of nuclear factor-kappaB in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hak; Hong, Seong Su; Kwon, Soon Woo; Lee, Hwa Young; Sung, Hyeran; Lee, In-Jeong; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Song, Sukgil; Lee, Chong-Kil; Chung, Daehyun; Ahn, Byeongwoo; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2008-11-01

    Diarctigenin was previously isolated as an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages from the seeds of Arctium lappa used as an alternative medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the molecular basis of these effects. Here, we demonstrated that diarctigenin inhibited the production of NO, prostaglandin E(2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 with IC(50) values of 6 to 12 miciroM in zymosan- or lipopolysaccharide-(LPS) activated macrophages. Diarctigenin attenuated zymosan-induced mRNA synthesis of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and also inhibited promoter activities of iNOS and cytokine genes in the cells. Because nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB plays a pivotal role in inflammatory gene transcription, we next investigated the effect of diarctigenin on NF-kappaB activation. Diarctigenin inhibited the transcriptional activity and DNA binding ability of NF-kappaB in zymosan-activated macrophages but did not affect the degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitory kappaB (IkappaB) proteins. Moreover, diarctigenin suppressed expression vector NF-kappaB p65-elicited NF-kappaB activation and also iNOS promoter activity, indicating that the compound could directly target an NF-kappa-activating signal cascade downstream of IkappaB degradation and inhibit NF-kappaB-regulated iNOS expression. Diarctigenin also inhibited the in vitro DNA binding ability of NF-kappaB but did not affect the nuclear import of NF-kappaB p65 in the cells. Taken together, diarctigenin down-regulated zymosan- or LPS-induced inflammatory gene transcription in macrophages, which was due to direct inhibition of the DNA binding ability of NF-kappaB. Finally, this study provides a pharmacological potential of diarctigenin in the NF-kappaB-associated inflammatory disorders.

  10. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  11. Entanglement verification with detection efficiency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanbao; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    Entanglement is a necessary condition for secure quantum key distribution (QKD). When there is an efficiency mismatch between various detectors used in the QKD system, it is still an open problem how to verify entanglement. Here we present a method to address this problem, given that the detection efficiency mismatch is characterized and known. The method works without assuming an upper bound on the number of photons going to each threshold detector. Our results suggest that the efficiency mismatch affects the ability to verify entanglement: the larger the efficiency mismatch is, the smaller the set of entangled states that can be verified becomes. When there is no mismatch, our method can verify entanglement even if the method based on squashing maps [PRL 101, 093601 (2008)] fails.

  12. Mismatch Receptive Fields in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zmarz, Pawel; Keller, Georg B

    2016-11-23

    In primary visual cortex, a subset of neurons responds when a particular stimulus is encountered in a certain location in visual space. This activity can be modeled using a visual receptive field. In addition to visually driven activity, there are neurons in visual cortex that integrate visual and motor-related input to signal a mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow. Here we show that these mismatch neurons have receptive fields and signal a local mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow in restricted regions of visual space. These mismatch receptive fields are aligned to the retinotopic map of visual cortex and are similar in size to visual receptive fields. Thus, neurons with mismatch receptive fields signal local deviations of actual visual flow from visual flow predicted based on self-motion and could therefore underlie the detection of objects moving relative to the visual flow caused by self-motion. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. Aloe emodin inhibits colon cancer cell migration/angiogenesis by downregulating MMP-2/9, RhoB and VEGF via reduced DNA binding activity of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Suboj, Priya; Babykutty, Suboj; Valiyaparambil Gopi, Deepak Roshan; Nair, Rakesh S; Srinivas, Priya; Gopala, Srinivas

    2012-04-11

    Aloe emodin (AE), a natural anthraquinone, is reported to have antiproliferative activity in various cancer cell lines. In this study we analyzed molecular mechanisms involved in the antimigratory and antiangiogenic activity of this hydroxy anthraquinone in colon cancer cell, WiDr. Our results show that a relatively non toxic concentration of AE suppressed the phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate (PMA) induced migration and invasion of tumor cells. On analysis for the molecules involved in the migration/invasion, we found AE downregulated mRNA expression and promoter/gelatinolytic activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9, as well as the RhoB expression at gene and protein level. It was also a strong inhibitor of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) expression, promoter activity and endothelial cell migration/invasion and in vitro angiogenesis. AE suppressed the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB, which is an important transcription factor for controlling MMP-2/9 and VEGF gene expression. Taken together these data indicate that AE target multiple molecules responsible for cellular invasion, migration and angiogenesis. Inhibitory effect on angiogenic and metastatic regulatory processes make AE a sensible candidate as a specific blocker of tumor associated events.

  14. Mismatch repair regulates homologous recombination, but has little influence on antigenic variation, in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joanna S; McCulloch, Richard

    2003-11-14

    Antigenic variation is critical in the life of the African trypanosome, as it allows the parasite to survive in the face of host immunity and enhance its transmission to other hosts. Much of trypanosome antigenic variation uses homologous recombination of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG)-encoding genes into specialized transcription sites, but little is known about the processes that regulate it. Here we describe the effects on VSG switching when two central mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1, are mutated. We show that disruption of the parasite mismatch repair system causes an increased frequency of homologous recombination, both between perfectly matched DNA molecules and between DNA molecules with divergent sequences. Mismatch repair therefore provides an important regulatory role in homologous recombination in this ancient eukaryote. Despite this, the mismatch repair system has no detectable role in regulating antigenic variation, meaning that VSG switching is either immune to mismatch selection or that mismatch repair acts in a subtle manner, undetectable by current assays.

  15. The Association Between Broad Antigen HLA Mismatches, Eplet HLA Mismatches and Acute Rejection After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Do Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Wong, Germaine; Chapman, Jeremy R.; McDonald, Stephen P.; Coates, Patrick T.; Watson, Narelle; Russ, Graeme R.; D'Orsogna, Lloyd; Lim, Wai Hon

    2016-01-01

    Background Epitope matching, which evaluates mismatched amino acids within antigen-antibody interaction sites (eplets), may better predict acute rejection than broad antigen matching alone. We aimed to determine the association between eplet mismatches and acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Methods The association between eplet mismatches, broad antigen mismatches and acute rejection was assessed using adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression. Model discrimination for acute rejection was evaluated using the area under receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Of the 3,499 kidney transplant recipients from 2006 to 2011, the average (SD) number of broad antigen and eplet mismatches were 3.4 (1.7) and 22.8 (12.2), respectively. Compared with 0 to 2 eplet mismatches, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for acute rejection among those with 20 or greater eplet mismatches was 2.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-3.52; P = 0.001). The adjusted area under the curve for broad antigen mismatches was 0.58 (95% CI, 0.56-0.61), similar to that for eplet mismatches (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.56-0.61; P = 0.365). In recipients who were considered as low immunological risk (0-2 broad antigen HLA-ABDR mismatch), those with 20 or greater eplet mismatches experienced an increased risk of rejection compared to those with less than 20 mismatches (adjusted HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.11-3.08; P = 0.019). Conclusions Increasing number of eplet mismatches is associated with acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Consideration of eplet HLA mismatches may improve risk stratification for acute rejection in a selected group of kidney transplant candidates. PMID:27990485

  16. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene.

  17. Lattice QCD with mismatched fermi surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2014-04-25

    We study two flavor fermions with mismatched chemical potentials in quenched lattice QCD. We first consider a large isospin chemical potential, where a charged pion is condensed, and then introduce a small mismatch between the chemical potentials of the up quark and the down antiquark. We find that the homogeneous pion condensate is destroyed by the mismatch of the chemical potentials. We also find that the two-point correlation function shows spatial oscillation, which indicates an inhomogeneous ground state, although it is not massless but massive in the present simulation setup.

  18. The Human ARF Cell Cycle Regulatory Gene Promoter Is a CpG Island Which Can Be Silenced by DNA Methylation and Down-Regulated by Wild-Type p53

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Keith D.; Jones, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The INK4a/ARF locus encodes two proteins involved in tumor suppression in a manner virtually unique in mammalian cells. Distinct first exons, driven from separate promoters, splice onto a common exon 2 and 3 but utilize different reading frames to produce two completely distinct proteins, both of which play roles in cell cycle control. INK4a, a critical element of the retinoblastoma gene pathway, binds to and inhibits the activities of CDK4 and CDK6, while ARF, a critical element of the p53 pathway, increases the level of functional p53 via interaction with MDM2. Here we clone and characterize the promoter of the human ARF gene and show that it is a CpG island characteristic of a housekeeping gene which contains numerous Sp1 sites. Both ARF and INK4a are coordinately expressed in cells except when their promoter regions become de novo methylated. In one of these situations, ARF transcription could be reactivated by treatment with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, and the reactivation kinetics of ARF and INK4a were found to differ slightly in a cell line in which both genes were silenced by methylation. The ARF promoter was also found to be highly responsive to E2F1 expression, in keeping with previous results at the RNA level. Lastly, transcription from the ARF promoter was down-regulated by wild-type p53 expression, and the magnitude of the effect correlated with the status of the endogenous p53 gene. This finding points to the existence of an autoregulatory feedback loop between p53, MDM2, and ARF, aimed at keeping p53 levels in check. PMID:9774662

  19. Down-regulation of the DNA-repair endonuclease 8-oxo-guanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) by sodium dichromate in cultured human A549 lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hodges, N J; Chipman, J K

    2002-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a genotoxic human pulmonary carcinogen that elevates DNA oxidation, apparently through the generation of reactive DNA-damaging intermediates including Cr(V), Cr(IV) and reactive oxygen species. We tested the hypothesis that elevation of DNA oxidation may also be through inhibition of the expression of the repair glycosylase for 8-oxo deoxyguanine (hOGG1) in cultured A549 human lung epithelial cells. Treatment with sodium dichromate (0-100 microM, 16 h) resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the levels of OGG1 mRNA as measured by both RT-PCR and RNase protection assay. Sodium dichromate at 25 microM and above gave a marked reduction of OGG1 mRNA expression which was not seen at 1 microM and below. No effect on the expression of the apurinic endonuclease hAPE or the house-keeping gene GAPDH was observed at any of the concentrations of sodium dichromate investigated. Treatment of cells with the pro-oxidant H(2)O(2) (0-200 microM) for 16 h had no detectable effect on the levels of OGG1 mRNA or protein expression suggesting that the effect of sodium dichromate is not mediated by H(2)O(2). Western blotting demonstrated that sodium dichromate (100 microM; 16 h and >25 microM; 28 h) markedly reduced levels of OGG1 protein in nuclear cell extracts. Additionally, treatment of cells with sodium dichromate (>25 microM, 28 h) resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the ability of nuclear extracts to nick a synthetic oligonucleotide containing 8-oxo deoxyguanine (8-oxo dG). We conclude that the elevation of 8-oxo dG levels observed in A549 cells treated with sodium dichromate may be, at least in part, due to a reduced capacity to repair endogenous and hexavalent chromium-induced 8-oxo dG.

  20. Assessment of primer/template mismatch effects on real-time PCR amplification of target taxa for GMO quantification.

    PubMed

    Ghedira, Rim; Papazova, Nina; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Ruttink, Tom; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2009-10-28

    GMO quantification, based on real-time PCR, relies on the amplification of an event-specific transgene assay and a species-specific reference assay. The uniformity of the nucleotide sequences targeted by both assays across various transgenic varieties is an important prerequisite for correct quantification. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) frequently occur in the maize genome and might lead to nucleotide variation in regions used to design primers and probes for reference assays. Further, they may affect the annealing of the primer to the template and reduce the efficiency of DNA amplification. We assessed the effect of a minor DNA template modification, such as a single base pair mismatch in the primer attachment site, on real-time PCR quantification. A model system was used based on the introduction of artificial mismatches between the forward primer and the DNA template in the reference assay targeting the maize starch synthase (SSIIb) gene. The results show that the presence of a mismatch between the primer and the DNA template causes partial to complete failure of the amplification of the initial DNA template depending on the type and location of the nucleotide mismatch. With this study, we show that the presence of a primer/template mismatch affects the estimated total DNA quantity to a varying degree.

  1. Removal of N-6-methyladenine by the nucleotide excision repair pathway triggers the repair of mismatches in yeast gap-repair intermediates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Gap-repair assays have been an important tool for studying the genetic control of homologous recombination in yeast. Sequence analysis of recombination products derived when a gapped plasmid is diverged relative to the chromosomal repair template additionally has been used to infer structures of strand-exchange intermediates. In the absence of the canonical mismatch repair pathway, mismatches present in these intermediates are expected to persist and segregate at the next round of DNA replication. In a mismatch repair defective (mlh1Δ) background, however, we have observed that recombination-generated mismatches are often corrected to generate gene conversion or restoration events. In the analyses reported here, the source of the aberrant mismatch removal during gap repair was examined. We find that most mismatch removal is linked to the methylation status of the plasmid used in the gap-repair assay. Whereas more than half of Dam-methylated plasmids had patches of gene conversion and/or restoration interspersed with unrepaired mismatches, mismatch removal was observed in less than 10% of products obtained when un-methylated plasmids were used in transformation experiments. The methylation-linked removal of mismatches in recombination intermediates was due specifically to the nucleotide excision repair pathway, with such mismatch removal being partially counteracted by glycosylases of the base excision repair pathway. These data demonstrate that nucleotide excision repair activity is not limited to bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions, but also targets removal of very modest perturbations in DNA structure. In addition to its effects on mismatch removal, methylation reduced the overall gap-repair efficiency, but this reduction was not affected by the status of excision repair pathways. Finally, gel purification of DNA prior to transformation reduced gap-repair efficiency four-fold in a nucleotide excision repair-defective background, indicating that the collateral

  2. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  3. ZEB1 overexpression associated with E-cadherin and microRNA-200 downregulation is characteristic of undifferentiated endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pérez, Laura; López-García, M Ángeles; Díaz-Martín, Juan; Biscuola, Michele; Castilla, M Ángeles; Tafe, Laura J; Garg, Karuna; Oliva, Esther; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Soslow, Robert A; Palacios, José

    2013-11-01

    Undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas are very aggressive high-grade endometrial carcinomas that are frequently under-recognized. This study aimed to analyze the molecular alterations underlying the development of these endometrial carcinomas, focusing on those related to dedifferentiation. We assessed a series of 120 tumors: 57 grade 1 and 2 endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, 15 grade 3 endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, 27 endometrial serous carcinomas, and 21 undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas. We found a high frequency of DNA mismatch repair deficiency (38%) and moderate rate of p53 overexpression (∼33%) in undifferentiated carcinomas. In contrast to the characteristic endometrioid phenotype, there was a dramatic downregulation of E-cadherin expression in the undifferentiated subtype. Quantitative methylation studies dismissed CDH1 promoter hypermethylation as the mechanism responsible for this change in gene expression, while immunohistochemistry revealed that the E-cadherin repressor ZEB1 was frequently overexpressed (62%) in undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas. This finding was accompanied by a sharp downregulation in the expression of the miR-200 family of microRNAs, well-known targets of ZEB1. Furthermore, there was enhanced expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers in undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas, such as N-cadherin, cytoplasmic p120, and osteonectin. In addition, HMGA2, a regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition that is expressed in aggressive endometrial tumors, such as endometrial serous carcinomas and carcinosarcomas, was expressed in >20% of undifferentiated carcinomas. These results suggest that ZEB1 overexpression, associated with E-cadherin and miR-200s downregulation, and the expression of mesenchymal markers might enhance the metastatic potential of undifferentiated endometrial carcinomas, leading to a poor prognosis. In addition, our observations suggest that the immnohistochemical analysis

  4. Production and characterization of the celery mismatch endonuclease CEL II using baculovirus/silkworm expression system.

    PubMed

    Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jaeman; Fukushima, Mai; Nagata, Yudai; Fujii, Mie; Xu, Jian; Nishi, Oumi; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-08-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection by nucleases has become a more important tool in clinical and biological researches. There are several kinds of single-stranded nucleases for detecting mismatched DNAs. One of them, CEL II, was isolated from Apium graveolens and cleaves DNA with high specificity at sites of mismatch. High-throughput mutation scanning requires large quantity of CEL II endonuclease. Here, we demonstrate high-level expression of CEL II using silkworm-baculovirus system. The recombinant CEL II secreted in silkworm hemolymph was glycosylated and susceptible to N-glycosidase F. Additionally, larger metal ions such as Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) were able to replace Mg(2+) and enhanced mismatch cleavage activity of CEL II. These results indicate that the silkworm-baculovirus platform is a good alternative system to obtain the functional CEL II.

  5. Proteasome inhibition rescues clinically significant unstable variants of the mismatch repair protein Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Arlow, Tim; Scott, Kristan; Wagenseller, Aubrey; Gammie, Alison

    2013-01-01

    MSH2 is required for DNA mismatch repair recognition in eukaryotes. Deleterious mutations in human MSH2 account for approximately half of the alleles associated with a common hereditary cancer syndrome. Previously, we characterized clinically identified MSH2 missense mutations, using yeast as a model system, and found that the most common cause of defective DNA mismatch repair was low levels of the variant Msh2 proteins. Here, we show that increased protein turnover is responsible for the reduced cellular levels. Increasing gene dosage of more than half of the missense alleles fully restored function. A titration experiment revealed that raising the expression level of one variant to less than wild-type levels restored mismatch repair, suggesting that overexpression is not always required to regain function. We found that the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation pathway is the major mechanism for increased turnover of the Msh2 variants and identified the primary ubiquitin ligase as San1. Deletion of San1 restored protein levels for all but one variant, but did not elevate wild-type Msh2 levels. The unstable variants interacted with San1, whereas wild-type Msh2 did not. Additionally, san1Δ suppressed the mismatch repair defect of unstable variants. Of medical significance, the clinically approved drug Bortezomib partially restored protein levels and mismatch repair function for low-level variants and reversed the resistance to cisplatin, a common chemotherapeutic. Our results provide the foundation for an innovative therapeutic regime for certain mismatch-repair-defective cancers that are refractory to conventional chemotherapies. PMID:23248292

  6. Aortic mismatch in heart transplantation: readaptation.

    PubMed

    Miralles, A

    1997-10-01

    Great vessel mismatch between donor and recipient is very usual in heart transplantation. Different procedures have been used to manage this situation. A tailoring aortoplasty is described, as a technical alternative, in cases of considerable size incongruence between donor and recipient aortic diameters.

  7. Downregulation of tumor suppressing STF cDNA 3 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor metastasis of osteosarcoma by the Wnt/GSK-3β/β-catenin/Snail signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang-fan; Dai, Huanzi; Yan, Guang-ning; Meng, Gang; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Qiao-nan

    2016-04-10

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has received considerable attention as a conceptual paradigm for explaining the invasive and metastatic behavior of cells during cancer progression. Our previous study showed that loss of expression of TSSC3 is positively associated with osteosarcoma malignancy and progression. However, whether TSSC3 mediates EMT in osteosarcoma is poorly understood. In the present study, we determined that TSSC3 downregulation induced cell migration and invasion ability and promoted mesenchymal transition of osteosarcoma cells by upregulating mesenchymal markers and inhibiting the epithelial markers. Furthermore, TSSC3 downregulation elicited a signaling cascade that included increased levels of Wnt3a and LRP5, inactivation of GSK-3β, accumulation of nuclear β-catenin and Snail, the augmented binding of β-catenin to TCF-4, and accordingly increased the expression of Wnt target genes (CD44, MMP7). The gene knockdown of these signaling proteins could inhibit TSSC3 downregulation-promoted EMT, migration, and invasion in osteosarcoma. Finally, TSSC3 overexpression obviously inhibited cell migration, invasion, and repressed mesenchymal phenotypes, reducing lung metastasis through GSK-3β activation. Collectively, TSSC3 downregulation promotes the EMT of osteosarcoma cells by regulating EMT markers via a signal transduction pathway that involves Snail, Wnt-β-catenin/TCF, and GSK-3β.

  8. Morbillivirus downregulation of CD46.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, S E; Tiwari, A; Baron, M D; Lund, B T; Barrett, T; Cosby, S L

    1998-12-01

    There is evidence that CD46 (membrane cofactor protein) is a cellular receptor for vaccine and laboratory-passaged strains of measles virus (MV). Following infection with these MV strains, CD46 is downregulated from the cell surface, and consequent complement-mediated lysis has been shown to occur upon infection of a human monocytic cell line. The MV hemagglutinin (H) protein alone is capable of inducing this downregulation. Some wild-type strains of MV fail to downregulate CD46, despite infection being prevented by anti-CD46 antibodies. In this study we show that CD46 is also downregulated to the same extent by wild-type, vaccine, and laboratory-passaged strains of rinderpest virus (RPV), although CD46 did not appear to be the receptor for RPV. Expression of the RPV H protein by a nonreplicating adenovirus vector was also found to cause this downregulation. A vaccine strain of peste des petits ruminants virus caused slight downregulation of CD46 in infected Vero cells, while wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus and a wild-type strain of dolphin morbillivirus failed to downregulate CD46. Downregulation of CD46 can, therefore, be a function independent of the use of this protein as a virus receptor.

  9. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  10. A Mutation in a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Gene (Rad3) Required for Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription Increases the Efficiency of Mismatch Correction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Johnson, A. L.; Johnston, L. H.; Siede, W.; Friedberg, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Kunz, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    RAD3 functions in DNA repair and transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and particular rad3 alleles confer a mutator phenotype, possibly as a consequence of defective mismatch correction. We assessed the potential involvement of the Rad3 protein in mismatch correction by comparing heteroduplex repair in isogenic rad3-1 and wild-type strains. The rad3-1 allele increased the spontaneous mutation rate but did not prevent heteroduplex repair or bias its directionality. Instead, the efficiency of mismatch correction was enhanced in the rad3-1 strain. This surprising result prompted us to examine expression of yeast mismatch repair genes. We determined that MSH2, but not MLH1, is transcriptionally regulated during the cell-cycle like PMS1, and that rad3-1 does not increase the transcript levels for these genes in log phase cells. These observations suggest that the rad3-1 mutation gives rise to an enhanced efficiency of mismatch correction via a process that does not involve transcriptional regulation of mismatch repair. Interestingly, mismatch repair also was more efficient when error-editing by yeast DNA polymerase δ was eliminated. We discuss our results in relation to possible mechanisms that may link the rad3-1 mutation to mismatch correction efficiency. PMID:8889512

  11. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  12. The Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex interacts with the mismatch repair system and contributes to temozolomide-induced G2 arrest and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mirzoeva, Olga K; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Pieper, Russell O

    2006-11-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide produces O(6)-methylguanine (O6MG) in DNA, which triggers futile DNA mismatch repair, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), G(2) arrest, and ultimately cell death. Because the protein complex consisting of Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN complex) plays a key role in DNA damage detection and signaling, we asked if this complex also played a role in the cellular response to temozolomide. Temozolomide exposure triggered the assembly of MRN complex into chromatin-associated nuclear foci. MRN foci formed significantly earlier than gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci that assembled in response to temozolomide-induced DNA DSBs. MRN foci formation was suppressed in cells that incurred lower levels of temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions and/or had decreased mismatch repair capabilities, suggesting that the MRN foci formed not in response to temozolomide-induced DSB but rather in response to mismatch repair processing of mispaired temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions. Consistent with this idea, the MRN foci colocalized with those of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (a component of the mismatch repair complex), and the MRN complex component Nbs1 coimmunoprecipitated with the mismatch repair protein Mlh1 specifically in response to temozolomide treatment. Furthermore, small inhibitory RNA-mediated suppression of Mre11 levels decreased temozolomide-induced G(2) arrest and cytotoxicity in a manner comparable to that achieved by suppression of mismatch repair. These data show that temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions, acted upon by the mismatch repair system, drive formation of the MRN complex foci and the interaction of this complex with the mismatch repair machinery. The MRN complex in turn contributes to the control of temozolomide-induced G(2) arrest and cytotoxicity, and as such is an additional determining factor in glioma sensitivity to DNA methylating chemotherapeutic drugs such as temozolomide.

  13. Trophic mismatch requires seasonal heterogeneity of warming.

    PubMed

    Straile, Dietmar; Kerimoglu, Onur; Peeters, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Climate warming has been shown to advance the phenology of species. Asynchronous changes in phenology between interacting species may disrupt feeding interactions (phenological mismatch), which could have tremendous consequences for ecosystem functioning. Long-term field observations have suggested asynchronous shifts in phenology with warming, whereas experimental studies have not been conclusive. Using proxy-based modeling of three trophic levels (algae, herbivores, and fish), we .show that asynchronous changes in phenology only occur if warming is seasonally heterogeneous, but not if warming is constant throughout the year. If warming is seasonally heterogeneous, the degree and even direction of asynchrony depends on the specific seasonality of the warming. Conclusions about phenological mismatches in food web interactions may therefore produce controversial results if the analyses do not distinguish between seasonally constant and seasonal specific warming. Furthermore, our results suggest that predicting asynchrony between interacting species requires reliable warming predictions that resolve sub-seasonal time scales.

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  15. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  16. Infrequent identity mismatches are frequently undetected

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to quickly and accurately match faces to photographs bears critically on many domains, from controlling purchase of age-restricted goods to law enforcement and airport security. Despite its pervasiveness and importance, research has shown that face matching is surprisingly error prone. The majority of face-matching research is conducted under idealized conditions (e.g., using photographs of individuals taken on the same day) and with equal proportions of match and mismatch trials, a rate that is likely not observed in everyday face matching. In four experiments, we presented observers with photographs of faces taken an average of 1.5 years apart and tested whether face-matching performance is affected by the prevalence of identity mismatches, comparing conditions of low (10 %) and high (50 %) mismatch prevalence. Like the low-prevalence effect in visual search, we observed inflated miss rates under low-prevalence conditions. This effect persisted when participants were allowed to correct their initial responses (Experiment 2), when they had to verify every decision with a certainty judgment (Experiment 3) and when they were permitted “second looks” at face pairs (Experiment 4). These results suggest that, under realistic viewing conditions, the low-prevalence effect in face matching is a large, persistent source of errors. PMID:24500751

  17. Insights into protein -- DNA interactions, stability and allosteric communications: A computational study of MutS-DNA recognition complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Salsbury, Freddie

    2012-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair proteins (MMR) maintain genetic stability by recognizing and repairing mismatched bases and insertion/deletion loops mistakenly incorporated during DNA replication, and initiate cellular response to certain types of DNA damage. The most abundant MMR mismatch-binding factor in eukaryotes, MutS, recognizes and initiates the repair of base-base mismatches and small insertion/deletions. We performed molecular dynamics simulations on mismatched and damaged MutS-DNA complexes. A comprehensive DNA binding site analysis of relevant conformations shows that MutS proteins recognize the mismatched and platinum cross-linked DNA substrates in significantly different modes. Distinctive conformational changes associated with MutS binding to mismatched and damaged DNA have been identified and they provide insight into the involvement of MMR proteins in DNA-repair and DNA-damage pathways. Stability and allosteric interactions at the heterodimer interface associated with the mismatch and damage recognition step allow for prediction of key residues in MMR cancer-causing mutations. A rigorous hydrogen bonding analysis for ADP molecules at the ATPase binding sites is also presented. A large number of known MMR cancer causing mutations among the residues were found.

  18. Deconstructing the polymerase chain reaction: understanding and correcting bias associated with primer degeneracies and primer-template mismatches.

    PubMed

    Green, Stefan J; Venkatramanan, Raghavee; Naqib, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive to mismatches between primer and template, and mismatches can lead to inefficient amplification of targeted regions of DNA template. In PCRs in which a degenerate primer pool is employed, each primer can behave differently. Therefore, inefficiencies due to different primer melting temperatures within a degenerate primer pool, in addition to mismatches between primer binding sites and primers, can lead to a distortion of the true relative abundance of targets in the original DNA pool. A theoretical analysis indicated that a combination of primer-template and primer-amplicon interactions during PCR cycles 3-12 is potentially responsible for this distortion. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel amplification strategy, entitled "Polymerase-exonuclease (PEX) PCR", in which primer-template interactions and primer-amplicon interactions are separated. The PEX PCR method substantially and significantly improved the evenness of recovery of sequences from a mock community of known composition, and allowed for amplification of templates with introduced mismatches near the 3' end of the primer annealing sites. When the PEX PCR method was applied to genomic DNA extracted from complex environmental samples, a significant shift in the observed microbial community was detected. Furthermore, the PEX PCR method provides a mechanism to identify which primers in a primer pool are annealing to target gDNA. Primer utilization patterns revealed that at high annealing temperatures in the PEX PCR method, perfect match annealing predominates, while at lower annealing temperatures, primers with up to four mismatches with templates can contribute substantially to amplification. The PEX PCR method is simple to perform, is limited to PCR mixes and a single exonuclease step which can be performed without reaction cleanup, and is recommended for reactions in which degenerate primer pools are used or when mismatches between primers and

  19. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El Fantroussi, Said; Smidt, Hauke; Smoot, James C.; Tribou, Erik H.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of Staphylococcus epidermidis (38 nucleotides) and Nitrosomonas eutropha (39 nucleotides) were hybridized to perfect-match probes (18-mer and 19-mer) and to a set of probes having all possible single-base-pair mismatches. The melting profiles of all probe-target duplexes were determined in parallel by using an imposed temperature step gradient. We derived an optimum wash temperature for each probe and target by using a simple formula to calculate a discrimination index for each temperature of the step gradient. This optimum corresponded to the output of an independent analysis using a customized neural network program. These results together provide an experimental and analytical framework for optimizing mismatch discrimination among all probes on a DNA microarray.

  20. Production of Extrachromosomal MicroDNAs Is Linked to Mismatch Repair Pathways and Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Laura W; Kumar, Pankaj; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D; Pommier, Yves; Takeda, Shunichi; Dutta, Anindya

    2015-06-23

    MicroDNAs are <400-base extrachromosomal circles found in mammalian cells. Tens of thousands of microDNAs have been found in all tissue types, including sperm. MicroDNAs arise preferentially from areas with high gene density, GC content, and exon density from promoters with activating chromatin modifications and in sperm from the 5'-UTR of full-length LINE-1 elements, but are depleted from lamin-associated heterochromatin. Analysis of microDNAs from a set of human cancer cell lines revealed lineage-specific patterns of microDNA origins. A survey of microDNAs from chicken cells defective in various DNA repair proteins reveals that homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining repair pathways are not required for microDNA production. Deletion of the MSH3 DNA mismatch repair protein results in a significant decrease in microDNA abundance, specifically from non-CpG genomic regions. Thus, microDNAs arise as part of normal cellular physiology—either from DNA breaks associated with RNA metabolism or from replication slippage followed by mismatch repair.

  1. Antagonism of ultraviolet-light mutagenesis by the methyl-directed mismatch-repair system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Hewitt, S R; Hays, J B

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the Escherichia coli MutHLS mismatch-repair system can process UV-irradiated DNA in vivo and that the human MSH2.MSH6 mismatch-repair protein binds more strongly in vitro to photoproduct/base mismatches than to "matched" photoproducts in DNA. We tested the hypothesis that mismatch repair directed against incorrect bases opposite photoproducts might reduce UV mutagenesis, using two alleles at E. coli lacZ codon 461, which revert, respectively, via CCC --> CTC and CTT --> CTC transitions. F' lacZ targets were mated from mut(+) donors into mutH, mutL, or mutS recipients, once cells were at substantial densities, to minimize spontaneous mutation prior to irradiation. In umu(+) mut(+) recipients, a range of UV fluences induced lac(+) revertant frequencies of 4-25 x 10(-8); these frequencies were consistently 2-fold higher in mutH, mutL, or mutS recipients. Since this effect on mutation frequency was unaltered by an Mfd(-) defect, it appears not to involve transcription-coupled excision repair. In mut(+) umuC122::Tn5 bacteria, UV mutagenesis (at 60 J/m(2)) was very low, but mutH or mutL or mutS mutations increased reversion of both lacZ alleles roughly 25-fold, to 5-10 x 10(-8). Thus, at UV doses too low to induce SOS functions, such as Umu(2)'D, most incorrect bases opposite occasional photoproducts may be removed by mismatch repair, whereas in heavily irradiated (SOS-induced) cells, mismatch repair may only correct some photoproduct/base mismatches, so UV mutagenesis remains substantial. PMID:10655206

  2. A simple ABO genotyping by PCR using sequence-specific primers with mismatched nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Taki, Takashi; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    In forensics, the specific ABO blood group is often determined by analyzing the ABO gene. Among various methods used, PCR employing sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) is simpler than other methods for ABO typing. When performing the PCR-SSP, the pseudo-positive signals often lead to errors in ABO typing. We introduced mismatched nucleotides at the second and the third positions from the 3'-end of the primers for the PCR-SSP method and examined whether reliable typing could be achieved by suppressing pseudo-positive signals. Genomic DNA was extracted from nail clippings of 27 volunteers, and the ABO gene was examined with PCR-SSP employing primers with and without mismatched nucleotides. The ABO blood group of the nail clippings was also analyzed serologically, and these results were compared with those obtained using PCR-SSP. When mismatched primers were employed for amplification, the results of the ABO typing matched with those obtained by the serological method. When primers without mismatched nucleotides were used for PCR-SSP, pseudo-positive signals were observed. Thus our method may be used for achieving more reliable ABO typing.

  3. Hypoxia downregulates Ku70/80 expression in cervical carcinoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Lara, Pedro Carlos; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa Maria; Bordón, Elisa; Rey, Agustin; Falcón, Orlando; Alonso, Ana Ruiz; Belka, Claus

    2008-11-01

    Hypoxia may inhibits the NHEJ DNA repair through downregulating Ku70/80 expression and combined with an increased angiogenesis and altered p53 expression would be responsible for tumor progression in cervical carcinoma.

  4. Visual mismatch negativity: a predictive coding view

    PubMed Central

    Stefanics, Gábor; Kremláček, Jan; Czigler, István

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies investigate the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) or use the vMMN as a tool to probe various aspects of human cognition. This paper reviews the theoretical underpinnings of vMMN in the light of methodological considerations and provides recommendations for measuring and interpreting the vMMN. The following key issues are discussed from the experimentalist's point of view in a predictive coding framework: (1) experimental protocols and procedures to control “refractoriness” effects; (2) methods to control attention; (3) vMMN and veridical perception. PMID:25278859

  5. Temperature-dependent spectral mismatch corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Campanelli, Mark; Moriarty, Tom; ...

    2015-11-01

    This study develops the mathematical foundation for a translation of solar cell short-circuit current from one thermal and spectral irradiance operating condition to another without the use of ill-defined and error-prone temperature coefficients typically employed in solar cell metrology. Using the partial derivative of quantum efficiency with respect to temperature, the conventional isothermal expression for spectral mismatch corrections is modified to account for changes of current due to temperature; this modification completely eliminates the need for short-circuit-current temperature coefficients. An example calculation is provided to demonstrate use of the new translation.

  6. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  7. ABO blood group mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tekgündüz, Sibel Akpınar; Özbek, Namık

    2016-02-01

    Apart from solid organ transplantations, use of ABO-blood group mismatched (ABO-mismatched) donors is acceptable in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. About 20-40% of allogeneic HSCT recipients will receive grafts from ABO-mismatched donors. ABO incompatible HSCT procedures are associated with immediate and late consequences, including but not restricted to acute or delayed hemolytic reactions, delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and graft-versus-host disease. This review summarizes the current knowledge about consequences of ABO-mismatched HSCT in terms of associated complications and will evaluate its impact on important outcome parameters of HSCT.

  8. [Cognitive evoked potentials. Perspectives for mismatch negativity].

    PubMed

    Gurtubay, I G

    2009-01-01

    The techniques of cognitive evoked potentials are considered long and technically complex, which is why their use in clinical practice is not very widespread in spite of their potential utility. Recent advances in registering and analysis, together with improvement of the software managing these signals, have appreciably reduced these problems. Mismatch negativity stands out as the most promising of all the cognitive potentials due to its special characteristics regarding its generation requisites and its proven clinical utility. The fact that it can be generated without care requirements makes it especially useful for evaluating subjects with a low level of consciousness; it serves for predicting when they will emerge from a coma, amongst other uses. The incorporation of this technique into the arsenal of neurophysiological techniques for evaluating the state of these subjects will bring a substantial improvement in the evaluation of cases whose management in clinical practice is extremely complex.

  9. Alignment to natural and imposed mismatches between the senses.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, K; Brenner, E; van Beers, R J; Schot, W D; Smeets, J B J

    2013-04-01

    Does the nervous system continuously realign the senses so that objects are seen and felt in the same place? Conflicting answers to this question have been given. Research imposing a sensory mismatch has provided evidence that the nervous system realigns the senses to reduce the mismatch. Other studies have shown that when subjects point with the unseen hand to visual targets, their end points show visual-proprioceptive biases that do not disappear after episodes of visual feedback. These biases are indicative of intersensory mismatches that the nervous system does not align for. Here, we directly compare how the nervous system deals with natural and imposed mismatches. Subjects moved a hand-held cube to virtual cubes appearing at pseudorandom locations in three-dimensional space. We alternated blocks in which subjects moved without visual feedback of the hand with feedback blocks in which we rendered a cube representing the hand-held cube. In feedback blocks, we rotated the visual feedback by 5° relative to the subject's head, creating an imposed mismatch between vision and proprioception on top of any natural mismatches. Realignment occurred quickly but was incomplete. We found more realignment to imposed mismatches than to natural mismatches. We propose that this difference is related to the way in which the visual information changed when subjects entered the experiment: the imposed mismatches were different from the mismatch in daily life, so alignment started from scratch, whereas the natural mismatches were not imposed by the experimenter, so subjects are likely to have entered the experiment partly aligned.

  10. Valence band anticrossing in highly mismatched alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberi, Kirstin Mclean

    Semiconductor alloys offer the ability to tune certain material parameters such as the band gap or carrier effective mass through precise control of the alloy composition, allowing them to be optimized for specific device requirements. While many alloys demonstrate near linear composition dependencies in these properties, those containing isoelectronic anion species that are significantly mismatched in electronegativity or ionization energy, known as highly mismatched alloys (HMA), exhibit substantial deviation from this trend. Here, the optical and electrical properties of HMAs containing dilute concentrations of large metallic anions are investigated in the context of a valence band anticrossing (VBAC) theory. Minority species with low ionization energies often introduce localized p-states near the valence band edge of the host semiconductor. Hybridization of these localized states with the extended p-states of the host may be described by a 12 x 12 Hamiltonian and produces a splitting of the alloy valence band into E+ and E - states. Photomodulated reflectance studies coupled with the VBAC theory confirm that the band gap bowing observed in GaSbxAs1-x and GaBixAs1-x is caused by an upward movement of the valence band edge as a result of the anticrossing interaction between the E+ and E- states. The valence band restructuring also adversely affects hole transport in these alloys through an increase in the heavy hole effective mass and the addition of an alloy disorder scattering mechanism. Finally, the VBAC theory has been extended to group IV HMAs as well as to the dilute magnetic semiconductor Ga1-x MnxAs, both of which exhibit strong hole localization at the minority species sites.

  11. The structural and hydrodynamic properties of damaged, mismatched and dA-tract DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerkovich, Bozidar

    Deoxyribonucleic acid is a molecule that exists on the margin of two worlds: one that obeys the regulations of the classical mechanics and one that is governed by the laws of quantum physics. As such, DNA has to find a way to satisfy both, which at times means "bending" rules. In this thesis emphasis is on the characterization of structural and hydrodynamic properties of DNA and how its geometry accommodates deviations from its chemically native structure. Various damages and sequence specific features such as urea base, mismatches and dA-tracts were examined to elucidate how these unusual building blocks affect DNA structure and motion. Methods employed included NMR solution structure determination, molecular simulations, diffusion coefficient measurements, enzymatic assays, chromatographic procedures, and chemical modifications. A shape function method for monitoring the flexibility and curvature of DNA has been developed that is based on the measurements of diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, an attempt to assess the effects of such structural elements on the biology of DNA has been made in the context of replication and cleavage of RNA-DNA hybrids by RNase H. Results of these experiments showed that structure of DNA containing urea residue is largely B-DNA, with limited and localized structural distortion, but perturbed electrostatics around the damaged base, which was reflected in increased flexibility of DNA containing this particular residue. It was found that DNA containing dA tract possesses a curvature that is a function of temperature and is highly sensitive to the concentration of magnesium cations. DNA is functionally a very active molecule. We have shown that the same notion applies when it comes to looking at DNA in a structural sense. Hence, we have to leave the notion of DNA as a rigid, rod-like molecule behind, and accept the new reality in which the structure of DNA is reflected in its function and activity.

  12. Transient suppression of MLH1 allows effective single-nucleotide substitution by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Marleen; de Vries, Sandra; Aarts, Marieke; Dekker, Robert; Brouwers, Conny; Wiebenga, Oliver; de Wind, Niels; Cantelli, Erika; Tonelli, Roberto; Te Riele, Hein

    2011-10-01

    Short synthetic single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to introduce subtle modifications into the genome of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We have previously shown that effective application of ssODN-mediated gene targeting in ESC requires (transient) suppression of DNA mismatch repair (MMR). However, whereas transient down-regulation of the mismatch recognition protein MSH2 allowed substitution of 3 or 4 nucleotides, 1 or 2 nucleotide substitutions were still suppressed. We now demonstrate that single- or dinucleotide substitution can effectively be achieved by transient down-regulation of the downstream MMR protein MLH1. By exploiting highly specific real-time PCR, we demonstrate the feasibility of substituting a single basepair in a non-selectable gene. However, disabling the MMR machinery may lead to inadvertent mutations. To obtain insight into the mutation rate associated with transient MMR suppression, we have compared the impact of transient and constitutive MMR deficiency on the repair of frameshift intermediates at mono- and dinucleotide repeats. Repair at these repeats relied on the substrate specificity and functional redundancy of the MSH2/MSH6 and MSH2/MSH3 MMR complexes. MLH1 knockdown increased the level of spontaneous mutagenesis, but modified ESCs remained germ line competent. Thus, transient MLH1 suppression provides a valuable extension of the MSH2 knockdown strategy, allowing rapid generation of mice carrying single basepair alterations in their genome.

  13. Downregulation of miR-150 Expression by DNA Hypermethylation Is Associated with High 2-Hydroxy-(4-methylthio)butanoic Acid-Induced Hepatic Cholesterol Accumulation in Nursery Piglets.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yimin; Ling, Mingfa; Zhang, Luchu; Jiang, Shuxia; Sha, Yusheng; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-10-12

    Excess 2-hydroxy-(4-methylthio)butanoic acid (HMB) supplementation induces hyperhomocysteinemia, which contributes to hepatic cholesterol accumulation. However, it is unclear whether and how high levels of HMB break hepatic cholesterol homeostasis in nursery piglets. In this study, HMB oversupplementation suppressed food intake and decreased body weight in nursery piglets. Hyperhomocysteinemia and higher hepatic cholesterol accumulation were observed in HMB groups. Accordingly, HMB significantly increased the protein content of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) and glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) but decreased that of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1). Significant downregulation of miR-150, miR-181d-5p, and miR-296-3p targeting the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of GNMT and HMGCR was detected in the liver of HMB-treated piglets, and their functional validation was confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, hypermethylation of miR-150 promoter was detected in association with suppressed miR-150 expression in the livers of HMB-treated piglets. This study indicated a new mechanism of hepatic cholesterol unhomeostasis by dietary methyl donor supplementation.

  14. An ssDNA aptamer against mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan enhances anti-tuberculosis activity of macrophages through downregulation of lipid-sensing nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qin; Yan, Jiamin; Liu, Qi; Yuan, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiao-Lian

    2017-02-16

    Mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) is an immunomodulatory epitope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously generated an aptamer (ZXL1) that specifically binds to ManLAM from the virulent Mtb H37Rv strain and reported that ZXL1 functioned as an antagonist, inhibiting the ManLAM-induced immunosuppression of dendritic cells (DCs). In the present study, we found that ZXL1 inhibited Mtb entry into murine macrophages. ZXL1 enhanced IL-1β and IL-12 mRNA expression and cytokine production in ManLAM-treated macrophages but decreased IL-10 production. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in the macrophages was upregulated in the presence of ZXL1 after stimulation with ManLAM. ZXL1 also inhibited the expression of the lipid-sensing nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). These results suggest that ZXL1 promotes anti-tuberculosis activity through the downregulation of PPAR γ expression, which may contribute to M1 macrophage polarization and Mtb killing by macrophages.

  15. Deficient mismatch repair: Read all about it (Review)

    PubMed Central

    RICHMAN, SUSAN

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, result in a phenotype called microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in up to 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers. Approximately one quarter of colon cancers with deficient MMR (dMMR) develop as a result of an inherited predisposition syndrome, Lynch syndrome (formerly known as HNPCC). It is essential to identify patients who potentially have Lynch syndrome, as not only they, but also family members, may require screening and monitoring. Diagnostic criteria have been developed, based primarily on Western populations, and several methodologies are available to identify dMMR tumours, including immunohistochemistry and microsatellite testing. These criteria have provided evidence supporting the introduction of reflex testing. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that tests have a limited sensitivity and specificity and may yet be superseded by next generation sequencing. In this review, the limitations of diagnostic criteria are discussed, and current and emerging screening technologies explained. There is now useful evidence supporting the prognostic and predictive value of dMMR status in colorectal tumours, but much less is known about their value in extracolonic tumours, that may also feature in Lynch syndrome. This review assesses current literature relating to dMMR in endometrial, ovarian, gastric and melanoma cancers, which it would seem, may benefit from large-scale clinical trials in order to further close the gap in knowledge between colorectal and extracolonic tumours. PMID:26315971

  16. Speaking Self-Assessment: Mismatches between Learners' and Teachers' Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babaii, Esmat; Taghaddomi, Shahin; Pashmforoosh, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual (mis)matches between teachers and learners are said to affect learning success or failure. Self-assessment, as a formative assessment tool, may, inter alia, be considered a means to minimize such mismatches. Therefore, the present study investigated the extent to which learners' assessment of their own speaking performance, before and…

  17. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  18. Educational Mismatch of Graduates: A Multidimensional and Fuzzy Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betti, Gianni; D'Agostino, Antonella; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to measure the educational mismatch, seen as a problem of overeducation, using a multidimensional and fuzzy methodology. Educational mismatch can be difficult to measure because many factors can converge to its definition and the traditional unidimensional indicators presented in literature can offer a restricted view of…

  19. Synergism of Dam, MutH, and MutS in methylation-directed mismatch repair in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hu, Changkun; Zhao, Yunqi; Sun, Huiyun; Yang, Yixin

    2017-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a critical mutation surveillance system for recognizing and repairing erroneous insertion, deletion, and disincorporation of base. Major components of mismatch repair system consist of MutH, MutL, and MutS. Dam methylates adenine to distinguish newly synthesized daughter strands from the parent strands. Employing a tyrosine-auxotrophic E. coli FX-11 strain, the mutation frequency can be determined by the number of tyrosine revertants and the cell viability of FX-11 with deficiencies in dam and mismatch repair proteins. This study showed that mutS defect produced a higher mutation frequency than mutH did. Interestingly, double defects in dam and mutS synergistically produced a dramatically higher spontaneous mutation frequency than the summation of mutation frequencies of FX-11 strains with individual deficiency of dam or mutS, suggesting that Dam may work with MutHL to partially accomplish the task of recognizing the mismatch sites to retain partial mismatch repair capacity.

  20. PD-1 Blockade in Tumors with Mismatch-Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Le, D.T.; Uram, J.N.; Wang, H.; Bartlett, B.R.; Kemberling, H.; Eyring, A.D.; Skora, A.D.; Luber, B.S.; Azad, N.S.; Laheru, D.; Biedrzycki, B.; Donehower, R.C.; Zaheer, A.; Fisher, G.A.; Crocenzi, T.S.; Lee, J.J.; Duffy, S.M.; Goldberg, R.M.; de la Chapelle, A.; Koshiji, M.; Bhaijee, F.; Huebner, T.; Hruban, R.H.; Wood, L.D.; Cuka, N.; Pardoll, D.M.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K.W.; Zhou, S.; Cornish, T.C.; Taube, J.M.; Anders, R.A.; Eshleman, J.R.; Vogelstein, B.; Diaz, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations have the potential to encode “non-self” immunogenic antigens. We hypothesized that tumors with a large number of somatic mutations due to mismatch-repair defects may be susceptible to immune checkpoint blockade. METHODS We conducted a phase 2 study to evaluate the clinical activity of pembrolizumab, an anti–programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, in 41 patients with progressive metastatic carcinoma with or without mismatch-repair deficiency. Pembrolizumab was administered intravenously at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram of body weight every 14 days in patients with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancers, patients with mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancers, and patients with mismatch repair–deficient cancers that were not colorectal. The coprimary end points were the immune-related objective response rate and the 20-week immune-related progression-free survival rate. RESULTS The immune-related objective response rate and immune-related progression-free survival rate were 40% (4 of 10 patients) and 78% (7 of 9 patients), respectively, for mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancers and 0% (0 of 18 patients) and 11% (2 of 18 patients) for mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancers. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were not reached in the cohort with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancer but were 2.2 and 5.0 months, respectively, in the cohort with mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancer (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.10 [P<0.001], and hazard ratio for death, 0.22 [P = 0.05]). Patients with mismatch repair–deficient noncolorectal cancer had responses similar to those of patients with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancer (immune-related objective response rate, 71% [5 of 7 patients]; immune-related progression-free survival rate, 67% [4 of 6 patients]). Whole-exome sequencing revealed a mean of 1782 somatic mutations per tumor in

  1. A periodic table of symmetric tandem mismatches in RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; McDowell, J A; Turner, D H

    1995-03-14

    The stabilities and structures of a series of RNA octamers containing symmetric tandem mismatches were studied by UV melting and imino proton NMR. The free energy increments for tandem mismatch formation are found to depend upon both mismatch sequence and adjacent base pairs. The observed sequence dependence of tandem mismatch stability is UGGU > GUUG > GAAG > or = AGGA > UUUU > CAAC > or = CUUC approximately UCCU approximately CCCC approximately ACCA approximately AAAA, and the closing base pair dependence is 5'G3'C > 5'C3'G > 5'U3'A approximately 5'A3'U. These results differ from expectations based on models used in RNA folding algorithms and from the sequence dependence observed for folding of RNA hairpins. Imino proton NMR results indicate the sequence dependence is partially due to hydrogen bonding within mismatches.

  2. Protective effects of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon: removal of O(6)-methylguanine DNA adducts, p53 expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase downregulation and apoptotic induction.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Shaonly; Swamy, Viswanath; Suresh, D; Rajkumar, M; Rana, Basabi; Rana, Ajay; Chatterjee, Malay

    2008-02-29

    Previous studies have shown that dietary micronutrient vanadium can protect neoplastic development induced by chemical carcinogens. Current investigation is an attempt to evaluate the role of vanadium (4.27 micro mol/l) in inhibiting 1,2 dimethyhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg body weight) induced rat colon carcinogenesis. We investigated the effect of vanadium against the formation of DMH-induced O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-Meg) DNA adduct, a potent cytotoxic and mutagenic agent for colon cancer. Supplementation of vanadium significantly reduced the hepatic (P<0.05), and colonic (at three sequential time points; ANOVA, F=4.96, P<0.05) O(6)-Meg DNA adduct levels in rats, indicating vanadium's potency in limiting the initiation event of colon carcinogenesis. Removal of initiated and damaged precancerous cells by apoptosis can prevent tumorigenesis and further malignancy. DNA fragmentation study revealed the vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction in colon tumors. The increased value of apoptotic index (AI) (62.27%; P<0.01) in subsequent TUNEL assay further confirmed the apoptosis induction by vanadium. This paralleled the nuclear immunoexpression of p53. A significant positive correlation between p53 immunoexpression and AI (P=0.0026, r=0.83, r(2)=0.69) links its association with vanadium-mediated apoptotic induction. Vanadium treatment also abated the mRNA expression of iNOS (54.03%), reflecting its protective effect against nitric oxide-mediated genotoxicity and colon tumorigenesis. These studies cumulatively provide strong evidence for the inhibitory actions of vanadium against DMH-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenesis in rat colon.

  3. Transfection of a human glioblastoma cell line with liver-type glutaminase (LGA) down-regulates the expression of DNA-repair gene MGMT and sensitizes the cells to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Szeliga, Monika; Zgrzywa, Agata; Obara-Michlewska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan

    2012-11-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a DNA-repair protein promoting resistance of tumor cells to alkylating chemotherapeutic agents. Glioma cells are particularly resistant to this class of drugs which include temozolomide (TMZ) and carmustine (BCNU). A previous study using the RNA microarray technique showed that decrease of MGMT mRNA stands out among the alterations in gene expression caused by the cell growth-depressing transfection of a T98G glioma cell line with liver-type glutaminase (LGA) [Szeliga et al. (2009) Glia, 57, 1014]. Here, we show that stably LGA-transfected cells (TLGA) exhibit decreased MGMT protein expression and activity as compared with non-transfected or mock transfected cells (controls). However, the decrease of expression occurs in the absence of changes in the methylation of the promoter region, indicating that LGA circumvents, by an as yet unknown route, the most common mechanism of MGMT silencing. TLGA turned out to be significantly more sensitive to treatment with 100-1000 μM of TMZ and BCNU in the acute cell growth inhibition assay (MTT). In the clonogenic survival assay, TLGA cells displayed increased sensitivity even to 10 μM TMZ and BCNU. Our results indicate that enrichment with LGA, in addition to inhibiting glioma growth, may facilitate chemotherapeutic intervention.

  4. The effects of phenological mismatches on demography

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Høye, Toke Thomas; Inouye, David W.; Post, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is altering the phenology of species across the world, but what are the consequences of these phenological changes for the demography and population dynamics of species? Time-sensitive relationships, such as migration, breeding and predation, may be disrupted or altered, which may in turn alter the rates of reproduction and survival, leading some populations to decline and others to increase in abundance. However, finding evidence for disrupted relationships, or lack thereof, and their demographic effects, is difficult because the necessary detailed observational data are rare. Moreover, we do not know how sensitive species will generally be to phenological mismatches when they occur. Existing long-term studies provide preliminary data for analysing the phenology and demography of species in several locations. In many instances, though, observational protocols may need to be optimized to characterize timing-based multi-trophic interactions. As a basis for future research, we outline some of the key questions and approaches to improving our understanding of the relationships among phenology, demography and climate in a multi-trophic context. There are many challenges associated with this line of research, not the least of which is the need for detailed, long-term data on many organisms in a single system. However, we identify key questions that can be addressed with data that already exist and propose approaches that could guide future research. PMID:20819811

  5. Does ergonomic mismatch at school impact pain in school children?

    PubMed

    Brewer, J M; Davis, K G; Dunning, K K; Succop, P A

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain in school-aged children is highly prevalent. While there are many potential factors relating to this discomfort, one unexplored factor is the ergonomic mismatch. The objective of this study was to determine whether the degree of mismatch between the body dimensions and the classroom furniture was associated with body discomfort. One hundred and thirty-nine children in a Midwestern U.S. school district participated in the study where demographic information, anthropometric measurements, self-reported regional body discomfort, and furniture measurements were collected. The results indicate an extremely high prevalence of ergonomic mismatch. Contrary to what was hypothesized, the ergonomic mismatch was not associated with body discomfort. The lack of association may have been a result of the extremely high prevalence of ergonomic mismatch as well as potential adaptations by the students. Although almost every student was found to not fit their desk and chairs, ergonomic mismatch had limited impact on the body discomfort. It appears that other factors such as backpack weight and time carrying may contribute more to the discomfort of students. However, caution is stress with regard to dismissing ergonomic mismatch factor as a potential risk factor since the extremely high prevalence may have washed out any effect.

  6. Mismatch discrimination in fluorescent in situ hybridization using different types of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Silvia; Silvia, Fontenete; Barros, Joana; Joana, Barros; Madureira, Pedro; Pedro, Madureira; Figueiredo, Céu; Céu, Figueiredo; Wengel, Jesper; Jesper, Wengel; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Filipe, Azevedo Nuno

    2015-05-01

    In the past few years, several researchers have focused their attention on nucleic acid mimics due to the increasing necessity of developing a more robust recognition of DNA or RNA sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an example of a method where the use of these novel nucleic acid monomers might be crucial to the success of the analysis. To achieve the expected accuracy in detection, FISH probes should have high binding affinity towards their complementary strands and discriminate effectively the noncomplementary strands. In this study, we investigate the effect of different chemical modifications in fluorescent probes on their ability to successfully detect the complementary target and discriminate the mismatched base pairs by FISH. To our knowledge, this paper presents the first study where this analysis is performed with different types of FISH probes directly in biological targets, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter acinonychis. This is also the first study where unlocked nucleic acids (UNA) were used as chemistry modification in oligonucleotides for FISH methodologies. The effectiveness in detecting the specific target and in mismatch discrimination appears to be improved using locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-O-methyl RNA (2'OMe) or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in comparison to LNA/DNA, LNA/UNA, or DNA probes. Further, the use of LNA modifications together with 2'OMe monomers allowed the use of shorter fluorescent probes and increased the range of hybridization temperatures at which FISH would work.

  7. Mismatch repair genes in renal cortical neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Baiyee, Daniel; Banner, Barbara

    2006-02-01

    Mutation of human mutL homolog 1 (MLH-1) and human mutS homolog 2 (MSH-2) has been linked with the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome and other carcinomas. Mutations of these genes in renal cell carcinomas were recently described. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of MLH-1 and MSH-2 in renal cortical neoplasms of various histological types by immunohistochemistry. Thirty-eight (n = 38) resected renal tumors were obtained from the surgical pathology files of the UMass Memorial Healthcare, including clear cell carcinomas (CLEARs, n = 20), papillary carcinomas (PAPs, n = 8), chromophobe carcinomas (CHRs, n = 4), and oncocytomas (ONCs, n = 6). Positive immunostaining for MLH-1 and MSH-2 was graded by the number of positive tumor cell nuclei, as follows: 0, negative; 1, up to one third of positive nuclei; 2, one to two thirds positive; and 3, greater than two thirds positive. Loss of MLH-1 or MSH-2 was defined as a tumor with grade 0 or 1, compared with the normal tubules. Normal tubules and intercalated ducts contained cells positive for MLH-1 and MSH-2 in all cases. For both antibodies, positive staining in tumors ranged from grade 1 to 3 in the CLEAR and PAP but was only grade 2 to 3 in the CHR and ONC. Loss of MLH-1 and/or MSH-2 occurred in malignant tumors but not in ONC. Loss of MLH-1 was present in 8 (40%) of 20 CLEARs and 4 (50%) of 8 PAPs, compared with loss of MSH-2 in 4 (20%) of 20 CLEARs and 1 (25%) of 4 CHRs. Our results suggest that loss of mismatch repair genes is involved in the malignant transformation in some renal carcinomas, particularly those derived from the proximal tubules.

  8. [Avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2006-04-01

    To minimize the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), we have routinely adopted aortic root enlargement to avoid PPM for patients with small aortic annulus. The aim of this study was to review our strategy of avoiding PPM. The Carpentier-Edwards Perimount (CEP) valves were implanted in 53 patients who were mostly aged over 65 and the St. Jude Medical (SJM) mechanical valves were used in 128 patients aged under 65. A standard 21-mm SJM valve was used in only 3 patients and no 19-mm valves were employed. However, 19-mm CEP valves were used in 12 patients with a small body surface area (1.43 +/- 0.14 m2). Of these, 26 patients (14.4%) who had a small aortic annulus and 24 patients aged under 65 underwent aortic root enlargement. No patient receiving an SJM valve had an projected indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) < or = 0.85 cm2/m2 because of performing aortic valve replacement (AVR) with annular enlargement and only 2 (3.8%) out of 53 patients receiving CEP valves developed PPM. Consequently, the prevalence of PPM was 1.1% in this series. The prevalence of PPM was low in patients over 65 years old with a relatively small body size who received bioprosthetic valves. A pericardial bioprosthesis was considered to be an appropriate valve in older population with regard to avoiding PPM. In patients under 65 years old with a small annulus, the first choice for avoiding PPM is aortic annular enlargement, which may be avoided by high performance mechanical valves with larger EOA.

  9. Communication in the Home and Classroom: Match or Mismatch?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iglesias, Aquiles

    1985-01-01

    The article examines variations in communication of cultural-linguistic minority children at home and in school and describes a communicative match/mismatch model. Implications of educational policy and program development are noted. (CL)

  10. [Moving sound source discrimination in humans (mismatch negativity and psychophysics)].

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, Iu A; Shestopalova, L B

    2010-01-01

    Ability to discriminate the moving sound sources with different dynamic properties was studied in humans. The auditory motion was simulated by introducing variable interaural time differences into the deviant stimuli. The electrophysiological experiment explored mismatch negativity elicited by the abrupt sound shift taken as deviant against gradual sound motion taken as standard. The psychoacoustic procedure revealed that these stimuli were not differentiated behaviorally. Nevertheless, the significant mismatch negativities were obtained. It was also established that the mismatch negativity was not influenced by the direction of sound motion. The results obtained are discussed from the point of view of actual theories of moving sound localization. The findings are in line with the hypothesis that mismatch negativity should not be considered as a direct index of behavioral discrimination accuracy.

  11. Identifying Mismatches in Alignments of Large Anatomical Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songmao; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to propose a model of matching errors for identifying mismatches in alignments of large anatomical ontologies. Methods: Three approaches to identifying mismatches are utilized: 1) lexical, based on the presence of modifiers in the names of the concepts aligned; 2) structural, identifying conflicting relations resulting from the alignment; and 3) semantic, based on disjoint top-level categories across ontologies. Results: 83% of the potential mismatches identified by the HMatch system are identified by at least one of the approaches. Conclusions: Although not a substitute for a careful validation of the matches, these approaches significantly reduce the need for manual validation by effectively characterizing most mismatches. PMID:18693957

  12. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of strength-mismatching

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Approximate solutions to stress-fields are provided for a strength-mismatched interface crack in small-scale yielding (SSY) for non-hardening and low hardening materials. Variations of local deformation intensities, characterized by a J-type contour integral, are proposed. The softer material experiences a higher deformation intensity level, J{sub S}, while the harder material sees a much lower deformation intensity level, J{sub H}, compared to that obtained from the applied J near the respective homogeneous crack-tips. For a low hardening material, the stress fields are obtained by scaling from an elastic/perfectly-plastic problem, based on an effective mismatch, M{sub eff}, which is a function of mismatch, M, and the hardening exponent, n. Triaxial stress build-up is discussed quantitatively in terms of M. The influence of strength-mismatch on cleavage fracture is discussed using Weibull statistics.

  13. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  14. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction based on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongzhou; Li, Guoqiang; Yang, Ruofu; Yang, Chunping; Ao, Mingwu

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  15. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction base on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongzhou, Dong; Guoqiang, Li; Ruofu, Yang; Chunping, Yang; Mingwu, Ao

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  16. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  17. Control of DNA hybridization by photoswitchable molecular glue.

    PubMed

    Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2011-12-01

    Hybridization of DNA is one of the most intriguing events in molecular recognition and is essential for living matter to inherit life beyond generations. In addition to the function of DNA as genetic material, DNA hybridization is a key to control the function of DNA-based materials in nanoscience. Since the hybridization of two single stranded DNAs is a thermodynamically favorable process, dissociation of the once formed DNA duplex is normally unattainable under isothermal conditions. As the progress of DNA-based nanoscience, methodology to control the DNA hybridization process has become increasingly important. Besides many reports using the chemically modified DNA for the regulation of hybridization, we focused our attention on the use of a small ligand as the molecular glue for the DNA. In 2001, we reported the first designed molecule that strongly and specifically bound to the mismatched base pairs in double stranded DNA. Further studies on the mismatch binding molecules provided us a key discovery of a novel mode of the binding of a mismatch binding ligand that induced the base flipping. With these findings we proposed the concept of molecular glue for DNA for the unidirectional control of DNA hybridization and, eventually photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, which enabled the bidirectional control of hybridization under photoirradiation. In this tutorial review, we describe in detail how we integrated the mismatch binding ligand into photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, and the application and perspective in DNA-based nanoscience.

  18. Screening for mutations in kidney-related genes using SURVEYOR nuclease for cleavage at heteroduplex mismatches.

    PubMed

    Voskarides, Konstantinos; Deltas, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    SURVEYOR is a new mismatch-specific plant DNA endonuclease that is very efficient for mutation scanning in heteroduplex DNA. It is much faster, cheaper, more sensitive, and easier to perform than other "traditional" mutation detection methods such as single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, heteroduplex analysis, and phage resolvases. This is the first comprehensive report on the use of SURVEYOR for screening genes implicated in a spectrum of inherited renal diseases. Of the 48.2 kb screened, 44 variations were identified, accounting for one variation per 1.1 kb. The re-sequencing of multiple samples did not reveal any variation that had not been identified by SURVEYOR, attesting to its high fidelity. Additionally, we tested this enzyme against 15 known variants, 14 of which it identified, thus showing a sensitivity of 93%. We showed that the genetic heterogeneity of renal diseases can be easily overcome using this enzyme with a high degree of confidence and no bias for any specific variations. We also showed for the first time that SURVEYOR does not demonstrate any preference regarding mismatch cleavage at specific positions. Disadvantages of using SURVEYOR include enhanced exonucleolytic activity for some polymerase chain reaction products and less than 100% sensitivity. We report that SURVEYOR can be used as a mutation detection method with a high degree of confidence, offering an excellent alternative for low-budget laboratories and for the rapid manipulation of multiple genes.

  19. Mutations affecting a putative MutLα endonuclease motif impact multiple mismatch repair functions

    PubMed Central

    Erdeniz, Naz; Nguyen, Megan; Deschênes, Suzanne M.; Liskay, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) lead to increased mutation rates and higher recombination between similar, but not identical sequences, as well as resistance to certain DNA methylating agents. Recently, a component of human MMR machinery, MutLα, has been shown to display a latent endonuclease activity. The endonuclease active site appears to include a conserved motif, DQHA(X)2E(X)4E, within the COOH-terminus of human PMS2. Substitution of the glutamic acid residue (E705) abolished the endonuclease activity and mismatch-dependent excision in vitro. Previously, we showed that the PMS2-E705K mutation and the corresponding mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were both recessive loss of function alleles for mutation avoidance in vivo. Here, we show that mutations impacting this endonuclease motif also significantly affect MMR-dependent suppression of homeologous recombination in yeast and responses to Sn1-type methylating agents in both yeast and mammalian cells. Thus, our in vivo results suggest that the endonuclease activity of MutLα is important not only in MMR-dependent mutation avoidance but also for recombination and damage response functions. PMID:17567544

  20. Alleles of the yeast Pms1 mismatch-repair gene that differentially affect recombination- and replication-related processes.

    PubMed Central

    Welz-Voegele, Caroline; Stone, Jana E; Tran, Phuoc T; Kearney, Hutton M; Liskay, R Michael; Petes, Thomas D; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Mismatch-repair (MMR) systems promote eukaryotic genome stability by removing errors introduced during DNA replication and by inhibiting recombination between nonidentical sequences (spellchecker and antirecombination activities, respectively). Following a common mismatch-recognition step effected by MutS-homologous Msh proteins, homologs of the bacterial MutL ATPase (predominantly the Mlh1p-Pms1p heterodimer in yeast) couple mismatch recognition to the appropriate downstream processing steps. To examine whether the processing steps in the spellchecker and antirecombination pathways might differ, we mutagenized the yeast PMS1 gene and screened for mitotic separation-of-function alleles. Two alleles affecting only the antirecombination function of Pms1p were identified, one of which changed an amino acid within the highly conserved ATPase domain. To more specifically address the role of ATP binding/hydrolysis in MMR-related processes, we examined mutations known to compromise the ATPase activity of Pms1p or Mlh1p with respect to the mitotic spellchecker and antirecombination activities and with respect to the repair of mismatches present in meiotic recombination intermediates. The results of these analyses confirm a differential requirement for the Pms1p ATPase activity in replication vs. recombination processes, while demonstrating that the Mlh1p ATPase activity is important for all examined MMR-related functions. PMID:12454061

  1. Unnatural substrates reveal the importance of 8-oxoguanine for in vivo mismatch repair by MutY

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Alison L.; O’Shea, Valerie L.; Kim, Taewoo; Kool, Eric T.; David, Sheila S.

    2009-01-01

    Escherchia coli MutY plays an important role in preventing mutations associated with the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (OG) in DNA by excising adenines from OG:A mismatches as the first step of base excision repair. To determine the importance of specific steps in the base pair recognition and base removal process of MutY, we have evaluated the effects of modifications of the OG:A substrate on the kinetics of base removal, mismatch affinity and repair to G:C in an Escherchia coli-based assay. Surprisingly, adenine modification was tolerated in the cellular assay, while modification of OG results in minimal cellular repair. High affinity for the mismatch and efficient base removal require the presence of OG. Taken together, these results suggest that the presence of OG is a critical feature for MutY to locate OG:A mismatches and select the appropriate adenines for excision to initiate repair in vivo prior to replication. PMID:18026095

  2. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  3. Visualization of uncorrelated, tandem symmetry mismatches in the internal genome packaging apparatus of bacteriophage T7.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Liu, Zheng; Vago, Frank; Ren, Yue; Wu, Weimin; Wright, Elena T; Serwer, Philip; Jiang, Wen

    2013-04-23

    Motor-driven packaging of a dsDNA genome into a preformed protein capsid through a unique portal vertex is essential in the life cycle of a large number of dsDNA viruses. We have used single-particle electron cryomicroscopy to study the multilayer structure of the portal vertex of the bacteriophage T7 procapsid, the recipient of T7 DNA in packaging. A focused asymmetric reconstruction method was developed and applied to selectively resolve neighboring pairs of symmetry-mismatched layers of the portal vertex. However, structural features in all layers of the multilayer portal vertex could not be resolved simultaneously. Our results imply that layers with mismatched symmetries can join together in several different relative orientations, and that orientations at different interfaces assort independently to produce structural isomers, a process that we call combinatorial assembly isomerism. This isomerism explains rotational smearing in previously reported asymmetric reconstructions of the portal vertex of T7 and other bacteriophages. Combinatorial assembly isomerism may represent a new regime of structural biology in which globally varying structures assemble from a common set of components. Our reconstructions collectively validate previously proposed symmetries, compositions, and sequential order of T7 portal vertex layers, resolving in tandem the 5-fold gene product 10 (gp10) shell, 12-fold gp8 portal ring, and an internal core stack consisting of 12-fold gp14 adaptor ring, 8-fold bowl-shaped gp15, and 4-fold gp16 tip. We also found a small tilt of the core stack relative to the icosahedral fivefold axis and propose that this tilt assists DNA spooling without tangling during packaging.

  4. Expression, purification and biochemical characterization of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Wang, You; Xie, Juan-Juan; Han, Zhong; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xi-Peng

    2013-02-01

    We describe the biochemical characterization of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M. jannaschii) DNA ligase and its potential application in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The recombinant M. jannaschii DNA ligase is an ATP-dependent ligase. The ligase activity was dependent on metal ions of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+). The optimal concentrations of ATP cofactor and Mg(2+) ion were 0.01-2 and 10 mM, respectively. The optimal pH value for DNA ligation was 8.5. High concentrations of NaCl inhibited DNA ligation. The effects of mismatches on joining short oligonucleotides by M. jannaschii DNA ligase were fully characterized. The mismatches at the first position 5' to the nick inhibited ligation more than those at the first position 3' to the nick. The mismatches at other positions 5' to the nick (3rd to 7th sites) exhibited less inhibition on ligation. However, the introduction of a C/C mismatch at the third position 5' to the nick could completely inhibit the ligation of the terminal-mismatched nick of an oligonucleotide duplex by M. jannaschii DNA ligase. Therefore, introducing an additional mismatch at the third position 5' to the SNP site is a more effective approach in genotyping by M. jannaschii DNA ligase.

  5. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dinglin; Chen, Danfeng; Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui; Cheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5' ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer.

  6. Mismatch Repair in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe Requires the Mutl Homologous Gene Pms1: Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schar, P.; Baur, M.; Schneider, C.; Kohli, J.

    1997-01-01

    Homologues of the bacterial mutS and mutL genes involved in DNA mismatch repair have been found in organisms from bacteria to humans. Here, we describe the structure and function of a newly identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene that encodes a predicted amino acid sequence of 794 residues with a high degree of homology to MutL related proteins. On the basis of its closer relationship to the eukaryotic ``PMS'' genes than to the ``MLH'' genes, we have designated the S. pombe homologue pms1. Disruption of the pms1 gene causes a significant increase of spontaneous mutagenesis as documented by reversion rate measurements. Tetrad analyses of crosses homozygous for the pms1 mutation reveal a reduction of spore viability from >92% to 80% associated with a low proportion (~50%) of meioses producing four viable spores and a significant, allele-dependent increase of the level of post-meiotic segregation of genetic marker allele pairs. The mutant phenotypes are consistent with a general function of pms1 in correction of mismatched base pairs arising as a consequence of DNA polymerase errors during DNA synthesis, or of hybrid DNA formation between homologous but not perfectly complementary DNA strands during meiotic recombination. PMID:9258673

  7. High fitness costs of climate change-induced camouflage mismatch.

    PubMed

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L Scott; Nowak, J Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has created myriad stressors that threaten to cause local extinctions if wild populations fail to adapt to novel conditions. We studied individual and population-level fitness costs of a climate change-induced stressor: camouflage mismatch in seasonally colour molting species confronting decreasing snow cover duration. Based on field measurements of radiocollared snowshoe hares, we found strong selection on coat colour molt phenology, such that animals mismatched with the colour of their background experienced weekly survival decreases up to 7%. In the absence of adaptive response, we show that these mortality costs would result in strong population-level declines by the end of the century. However, natural selection acting on wide individual variation in molt phenology might enable evolutionary adaptation to camouflage mismatch. We conclude that evolutionary rescue will be critical for hares and other colour molting species to keep up with climate change.

  8. Forecasting photovoltaic array power production subject to mismatch losses

    SciTech Connect

    Picault, D.; Raison, B.; Bacha, S.; de la Casa, J.; Aguilera, J.

    2010-07-15

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) energy throughout the world this last decade has brought to light the presence of module mismatch losses in most PV applications. Such power losses, mainly occasioned by partial shading of arrays and differences in PV modules, can be reduced by changing module interconnections of a solar array. This paper presents a novel method to forecast existing PV array production in diverse environmental conditions. In this approach, field measurement data is used to identify module parameters once and for all. The proposed method simulates PV arrays with adaptable module interconnection schemes in order to reduce mismatch losses. The model has been validated by experimental results taken on a 2.2 kW{sub p} plant, with three different interconnection schemes, which show reliable power production forecast precision in both partially shaded and normal operating conditions. Field measurements show interest in using alternative plant configurations in PV systems for decreasing module mismatch losses. (author)

  9. Mismatches in genetic markers in a large family study.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, G C

    1980-01-01

    The Hawaii Family Study of Cognition provided an opportunity to investigate the frequency and implications of non-agreement, or mismatches, between observed and expected genetic marker phenotypes of husbands, wives, and children. Mismatch data from 68 families in which one or both spouses were known not to be a biological parent were used to determine the rate of undeclared nonparentage in 1,748 families in which conventional relationships were claimed. Two independent approaches gave consistent estimates, suggesting that approximately 2.3% of the 2,839 tested children from these families were probably the result of infidelity, concealed adoption, or another event. About two-thirds of the mismatches detected were probably due to properties of the techniques employed. PMID:6930820

  10. Expression of Mismatch Repair Proteins in Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Ławniczak, Małgorzata; Białek, Andrzej; Urasińska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in DNA of mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in failure to repair errors that occur during DNA replication in microsatellites, resulting in accumulation of frameshift mutations in these genes and leading to DNA mismatch replication errors and microsatellite instability. Gastric cancers (GCs) with high MSI (MSI-H) are a well-defined subset of carcinomas showing distinctive clinicopathological features. In this study we investigated the rate of MSI and the correlation between MSI status and clinicopathological features of GC. Material/Methods The study included 107 patients with GCs: 61 with advanced gastric cancers (AGC) and 46 with early gastric cancer (EGC). MSI deficiency in GCs was assessed by the immunohistochemical analysis of expression of MMR proteins – MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 – using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. Results A total of 6 (5.6%) MSI-H were observed. The loss of MMR proteins expression was associated with the intestinal type of GC in Lauren classification, and tubular and papillary architecture in WHO classification. There was no statistically significant association between negative MMR expression and other selected clinical parameters: age, sex, tumor location, depth of invasion (EGC and AGC), lymph nodes status, presence of the ulceration, and lymphocytic infiltrate. Conclusions In the present era of personalized medicine, the histological type of GC and MMR proteins status in cancer cells are very important for the proper surveillance of patients with familial GC and sporadic GCs, as well as for selecting the proper follow-up and treatment. Larger collaborative studies are needed to verify the features of MSI-H GCs in Poland. PMID:27527654

  11. DNA-mediated charge transport for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Elizabeth M.; Livingston, Alison L.; Chmiel, Nikolas H.; David, Sheila S.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2003-01-01

    MutY, like many DNA base excision repair enzymes, contains a [4Fe4S]2+ cluster of undetermined function. Electrochemical studies of MutY bound to a DNA-modified gold electrode demonstrate that the [4Fe4S] cluster of MutY can be accessed in a DNA-mediated redox reaction. Although not detectable without DNA, the redox potential of DNA-bound MutY is ≈275 mV versus NHE, which is characteristic of HiPiP iron proteins. Binding to DNA is thus associated with a change in [4Fe4S]3+/2+ potential, activating the cluster toward oxidation. Given that DNA charge transport chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to perturbations in base pair structure, such as mismatches, we propose that this redox process of MutY bound to DNA exploits DNA charge transport and provides a DNA signaling mechanism to scan for mismatches and lesions in vivo. PMID:14559969

  12. Down-regulation of PERK enhances resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oommen, Deepu Prise, Kevin M.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •PERK enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to ionizing radiation. •Down-regulation of PERK results in enhanced DNA repair. •Ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is inhibited in PERK-down regulated cancer cells. -- Abstract: Although, ionizing radiation (IR) has been implicated to cause stress in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), how ER stress signaling and major ER stress sensors modulate cellular response to IR is unclear. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER transmembrane protein which initiates unfolded protein response (UPR) or ER stress signaling when ER homeostasis is disturbed. Here, we report that down-regulation of PERK resulted in increased clonogenic survival, enhanced DNA repair and reduced apoptosis in irradiated cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that PERK has a role in sensitizing cancer cells to IR.

  13. MutSα maintains the mismatch repair capability by inhibiting PCNA unloading

    PubMed Central

    Kawasoe, Yoshitaka; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Takuro; Masukata, Hisao; Takahashi, Tatsuro S

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mismatch repair (MMR) utilizes single-strand breaks as signals to target the strand to be repaired. DNA-bound PCNA is also presumed to direct MMR. The MMR capability must be limited to a post-replicative temporal window during which the signals are available. However, both identity of the signal(s) involved in the retention of this temporal window and the mechanism that maintains the MMR capability after DNA synthesis remain unclear. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we discovered a mechanism that ensures long-term retention of the MMR capability. We show that DNA-bound PCNA induces strand-specific MMR in the absence of strand discontinuities. Strikingly, MutSα inhibited PCNA unloading through its PCNA-interacting motif, thereby extending significantly the temporal window permissive to strand-specific MMR. Our data identify DNA-bound PCNA as the signal that enables strand discrimination after the disappearance of strand discontinuities, and uncover a novel role of MutSα in the retention of the post-replicative MMR capability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15155.001 PMID:27402201

  14. Assessing Dissimilarity of Genes by Comparing Their Rnase a Mismatch Cleavage Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Rzhetsky, A.; Dopazo, J.; Snyder, E.; Dangler, C. A.; Ayala, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a simple algorithm for estimating the number of nucleotide differences between a pair of RNA or DNA sequences through comparison of their RNAse A mismatch cleavage patterns. In the RNAse A mismatch cleavage technique two or more sample sequences are hybridized to the same RNA probe, the hybrids are partially digested with RNAse A, and the digestion products are compared on an electrophoretic gel. Here we provide an algorithm for converting the numbers of unique and matching electrophoretic bands into an estimate of the number of nucleotide differences between the sequences. Computer simulation indicates that the proposed method yields a robust estimate of the genetic distance despite stochastic errors and occasional violation of certain assumptions. Our study suggests that the method performs best when the distance between the sequences is <15 differences. When the sequences under analysis are likely to have larger distances, we advise to substitute one long riboprobe with a set of shorter nonoverlapping probes. The new algorithm is applied to infer the proximity of several strains of pseudorabies virus. PMID:8978080

  15. Mismatch repair genes identified using genetic screens in Blm-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ge; Wang, Wei; Bradley, Allan

    2004-06-24

    Phenotype-driven recessive genetic screens in diploid organisms require a strategy to render the mutation homozygous. Although homozygous mutant mice can be generated by breeding, a reliable method to make homozygous mutations in cultured cells has not been available, limiting recessive screens in culture. Cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells provide access to all of the genes required to elaborate the fundamental components and physiological systems of a mammalian cell. Here we have exploited the high rate of mitotic recombination in Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm)-deficient ES cells to generate a genome-wide library of homozygous mutant cells from heterozygous mutations induced with a revertible gene trap retrovirus. We have screened this library for cells with defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), a system that detects and repairs base-base mismatches. We demonstrate the recovery of cells with homozygous mutations in known and novel MMR genes. We identified Dnmt1(ref. 5) as a novel MMR gene and confirmed that Dnmt1-deficient ES cells exhibit micro-satellite instability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the role of Dnmt1 in cancer. The combination of insertional mutagenesis in Blm-deficient ES cells establishes a new approach for phenotype-based recessive genetic screens in ES cells.

  16. Downregulation of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor subunits modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Kahali, Bhaskar; Reisman, David; Patrick, Steve M.

    2012-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF plays important roles in many cellular processes including transcription, proliferation, differentiation and DNA repair. In this report, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF catalytic subunits Brg1 and Brm in the cellular response to cisplatin in lung cancer and head/neck cancer cells. Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhanced cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Repair kinetics of cisplatin DNA adducts revealed that downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impeded the repair of both intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Cisplatin ICL-induced DNA double strand break repair was also decreased in Brg1 and Brm depleted cells. Altered checkpoint activation with enhanced apoptosis as well as impaired chromatin relaxation was observed in Brg1 and Brm deficient cells. Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm did not affect the recruitment of DNA damage recognition factor XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions, but affected ERCC1 recruitment, which is involved in the later stages of DNA repair. Based on these results, we propose that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity by facilitating efficient repair of the cisplatin DNA lesions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhances cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impedes the repair of cisplatin intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brg1 and Brm deficiency results in impaired chromatin relaxation, altered checkpoint activation as well as enhanced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm affects recruitment of ERCC1, but not XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions.

  17. Minority Students and Research Universities: How to Overcome the "Mismatch"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A controversial theory much in the news lately claims that affirmative action is often unfair to the very students it is intended to help. Called the "mismatch" theory, it suggests that underrepresented minority students are more likely to leave science, math, and engineering when, because of affirmative action, they attend colleges for which they…

  18. Educational Mismatch and Spatial Flexibility in Italian Local Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, Giuseppe; Ghignoni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent literature, this paper highlights the relevance of spatial mobility as an explanatory factor of the individual risk of job-education mismatch. To investigate this causal link, we use individual information about daily home-to-work commuting time and choices to relocate in a different local area to get a job. Our model takes…

  19. ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Worel, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative option for a variety of malignant and non-malignant hematological and congenital diseases. Due to the fact that the human leukocyte antigen system is inherited independently of the blood group system, approximately 40-50% of all HSCTs are performed across the ABO blood group barrier. The expected immune-hematological consequences after transplantation of an ABO-mismatched stem cell graft are immediate and delayed hemolytic complications due to presence of isohemagglutinins or passenger lymphocyte syndrome. The risks of these complications can partially be prevented by graft manipulation and appropriate transfusion support. Dependent on the kind of ABO mismatch, different effects on engraftment have been observed, e.g. delayed red blood cell recovery and pure red cell aplasia. Data on incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality, relapse, and overall survival are inconsistent as most studies include limited patient numbers, various graft sources, and different conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis regimens. This makes it difficult to detect a consistent effect of ABO-mismatched transplantation in the literature. However, knowledge of expectable complications and close monitoring of patients helps to detect problems early and to treat patients efficiently, thus reducing the number of fatal or life-threatening events caused by ABO-mismatched HSCT. PMID:27022317

  20. A mishmash of methods for mitigating the model mismatch mess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, Andrew D.; Pevný, Tomáš

    2014-02-01

    The model mismatch problem occurs in steganalysis when a binary classifier is trained on objects from one cover source and tested on another: an example of domain adaptation. It is highly realistic because a steganalyst would rarely have access to much or any training data from their opponent, and its consequences can be devastating to classifier accuracy. This paper presents an in-depth study of one particular instance of model mismatch, in a set of images from Flickr using one fixed steganography and steganalysis method, attempting to separate different effects of mismatch in feature space and find methods of mitigation where possible. We also propose new benchmarks for accuracy, which are more appropriate than mean error rates when there are multiple actors and multiple images, and consider the case of 3-valued detectors which also output `don't know'. This pilot study demonstrates that some simple feature-centering and ensemble methods can reduce the mismatch penalty considerably, but not completely remove it.

  1. Job Sprawl, Spatial Mismatch, and Black Employment Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between job sprawl and the spatial mismatch between blacks and jobs. Using data from a variety of sources, including the 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census and U.S. Department of Commerce's ZIP Code Business Patterns, I control extensively for metropolitan area characteristics and other factors. In addition, I use…

  2. Supply and Demand Mismatches in Training: Can Anything Be Done?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Claudio de Moura; de Andrade, Antonio Cabral

    1990-01-01

    Vocational training often fails to provide what employers need and students want. To correct supply/demand mismatches requires improving feedback from employers, increasing the flow of information, bringing schools closer to businesses, rewarding institutions for successful employment of graduates, and providing incentives for entrepreneurs. (SK)

  3. Skills Mismatch among University Graduates in the Nigeria Labor Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitan, Oluyomi S.; Adedeji, S. O.

    2012-01-01

    University graduates in Nigeria have been reported to be poorly prepared for work in recent years. This has implications on the relevance of university education, the employability and productivity of university graduates. One of the reasons suggested for this condition by previous studies was skill mismatch--a situation where there is a disparity…

  4. Mismatch Negativity in Children with Autism and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Michelle A.; Gomes, Hilary; Gravel, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Children with autism are often characterized as having abnormalities in auditory processing. This study examined automatic and active processing of simple auditory stimuli in children using a component of event related potentials, the mismatch negativity (MMN). Amplitude of MMN in children with autism was significantly smaller than in children…

  5. Mismatch of Vocational Graduates: What Penalty on French Labour Market?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beduwe, Catherine; Giret, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study explores individual effects of educational mismatch on wages, job satisfaction and on-the-job-search on French labour market. We distinguish between horizontal matches (job matches with field of studies) and vertical matches (job matches the level of qualification) on the one hand and skills matches (worker's assessment) on the other…

  6. Combined analysis of DNA methylome and transcriptome reveal novel candidate genes with susceptibility to bovine Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minyan; He, Yanghua; Zhou, Huangkai; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xizhi; Yu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical mastitis is a widely spread disease of lactating cows. Its major pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). In this study, we performed genome-wide integrative analysis of DNA methylation and transcriptional expression to identify candidate genes and pathways relevant to bovine S. aureus subclinical mastitis. The genome-scale DNA methylation profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes in cows with S. aureus subclinical mastitis (SA group) and healthy controls (CK) were generated by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with microarrays. We identified 1078 differentially methylated genes in SA cows compared with the controls. By integrating DNA methylation and transcriptome data, 58 differentially methylated genes were shared with differently expressed genes, in which 20.7% distinctly hypermethylated genes showed down-regulated expression in SA versus CK, whereas 14.3% dramatically hypomethylated genes showed up-regulated expression. Integrated pathway analysis suggested that these genes were related to inflammation, ErbB signalling pathway and mismatch repair. Further functional analysis revealed that three genes, NRG1, MST1 and NAT9, were strongly correlated with the progression of S. aureus subclinical mastitis and could be used as powerful biomarkers for the improvement of bovine mastitis resistance. Our studies lay the groundwork for epigenetic modification and mechanistic studies on susceptibility of bovine mastitis. PMID:27411928

  7. Meniscus regeneration by syngeneic, minor mismatched, and major mismatched transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Makiko; Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Ozeki, Nobutake; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2014-07-01

    We compared the effect of syngeneic and allogeneic transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for meniscus regeneration in a rat model. Synovium was harvested from the knee joints of three strains of rats. The anterior half of the medial meniscus in both knees of F344 rats was removed and 5 million synovial MSCs derived from F344 (syngeneic transplantation), Lewis (minor mismatched transplantation), and ACI (major mismatched transplantation) were injected into the knee of the F344 rats. At 4 weeks, the area of the regenerated meniscus in the F344 group was significantly larger than that in the ACI group. Histological score was significantly better in the F344 and Lewis groups than in the ACI group at 8 weeks. DiI labeled cells could be observed in the knee joint in the F344 group, but were hardly detected in the ACI group at 1 week. The number of macrophages and CD8 T cells at synovium around the meniscus defect was significantly lower in the F344 group than in the ACI group at 1 week. Syngeneic and minor mismatched transplantation of synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration better than major mismatched transplantation in a rat meniscectmized model.

  8. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptor downregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tietz, E.I.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Chiu, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    Regional differences in downregulation of brain benzodiazepine receptors were studied using a quantitative autoradiographic method. Rats were given a 4-week flurazepam treatment known to cause tolerance and receptor downregulation. A second group of rats was given a similar treatment, but for only 1 week. A third group was given a single acute dose of diazepam to produce a brain benzodiazepine-like activity equivalent to that found after the chronic treatment. Areas studied included hippocampal formation, cerebral cortex, superior colliculus, substantia nigra, dorsal geniculate nucleus, lateral amygdala and lateral hypothalamus. There was a regional variation in the degree of downregulation after 1 week of flurazepam treatment, ranging from 12% to 25%. Extending the flurazepam treatment to 4 weeks caused little further downregulation in those areas studied, except for the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, which showed a 13% reduction in (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding after 1 week and a 40% reduction after 4 weeks of treatment. In a few areas, such as the lateral hypothalamus, no significant change in binding was found after 4 weeks. Acute diazepam treatment caused no change in binding. This latter finding as well as results obtained during the development of the methodology show that downregulation was not an artifact due to residual drug content of brain slices. The regional variations in degree and rate of downregulation suggest areas that may be most important for benzodiazepine tolerance and dependence and may be related to the varying time courses for tolerance to different benzodiazepine actions.

  9. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy with a Unique 99mTc-MIBI/123I-BMIPP Mismatch Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Ryosuke; Onoue, Noriko; Rikimaru, Hiroya; Tsukita, Kenichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Nobuhiro; Ishizuka, Takeshi; Suzuki, Yasushi; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    A 42-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to chest pain, diabetes mellitus, and sensorineural hearing loss. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed diffuse left ventricular hypokinesis. He was diagnosed with mitochondrial disease and a c.A3243G mutation was identified in his mitochondrial DNA. This case of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy demonstrated a low uptake of 123I-BMIPP, while the uptake of 99mTc-MIBI was preserved. In contrast, previous reports have noted the increased uptake of123I-BMIPP and the decreased uptake of 99mTc-MIBI. This is the first study to show this unique 99mTc-MIBI/123I-BMIPP mismatch pattern. We also discuss the relationships among the cardiac scintigraphy, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and histopathology findings. PMID:28154277

  10. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR.

  11. Biomarkers for immune therapy in colorectal cancer: mismatch-repair deficiency and others

    PubMed Central

    Bupathi, Manojkumar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease for which the treatment backbone has primarily been cytotoxic chemotherapy. With better understanding of the involved molecular mechanisms, it is now known that there are a number of epigenetic and genetic events, which are involved in CRC pathogenesis. Specific biomarkers have been identified which can be used to determine the clinical outcome of patients beyond tumor staging and predict for treatment efficacy. Molecular testing is now routinely performed to select for patients that will benefit the most from targeted agents and immunotherapy. In addition to KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutation (MT), analysis of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and checkpoint protein expression may be helpful to determine whether patients are eligible for certain therapies. The focus of this article is to discuss present and upcoming biomarkers for immunotherapy in CRC. PMID:27747085

  12. Mismatch Responses to Lexical Tone, Initial Consonant, and Vowel in Mandarin-Speaking Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chia-Ying; Yen, Huei-ling; Yeh, Pei-wen; Lin, Wan-Hsuan; Cheng, Ying-Ying; Tzeng, Yu-Lin; Wu, Hsin-Chi

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates how age, phonological saliency, and deviance size affect the presence of mismatch negativity (MMN) and positive mismatch response (P-MMR). This work measured the auditory mismatch responses to Mandarin lexical tones, initial consonants, and vowels in 4- to 6-year-old preschoolers using the multiple-deviant oddball…

  13. Formal Education, Mismatch and Wages after Transition: Assessing the Impact of Unobserved Heterogeneity Using Matching Estimators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamo, Ana; Messina, Julian

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the incidence and consequences of the mismatch between formal education and the educational requirements of jobs in Estonia during the years 1997-2003. We find large wage penalties associated with the phenomenon of educational mismatch. Moreover, the incidence and wage penalty of mismatches increase with age. This suggests that…

  14. A new acoustic mismatch theory for Kapitsa resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2010-10-01

    This paper generalizes the well-known acoustic mismatch theory of Kapitsa interface thermal resistance by taking into consideration a broad class of thermal vibrations that were excluded from that theory by the imposition of the Sommerfeld radiation condition, which is required for the theory of sound but is not relevant for the analysis of heat transport. This extension preserves the main ideas of the acoustic mismatch theory but provides much more reasonable estimates for the interface resistance. The predictions of the new theory are compared with various published experimental results for the thermal resistance between liquid helium at low temperatures and several different metals (Ag, Au, Cu, Pb and Pt). The computations are straightforward and require only well-known material parameters. The predictions agree with the experiments to within their stated range of accuracy.

  15. Mismatch between classroom furniture and anthropometric measures in Chilean schools.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, H I; Arezes, P M; Viviani, C A

    2010-07-01

    Children spend about five hours per day sitting down while doing their school work. Considering this as well as the potential inadequate use of school furniture, it is likely that some anatomical-functional changes and problems in the learning process may occur. The aim of this study was to compare furniture sizes within three different schools with the anthropometric characteristics of Chilean students in the Valparaíso region, in order to evaluate the potential mismatch between them. The sample consisted of 195 volunteer students (94 male, 101 female) of the 8th grade, ranging from 12.5 to 14.5 years of age from 3 different schools. Regarding the methodology, 6 anthropometric measures (Stature, Popliteal height, Buttock-popliteal length, Elbow height while sitting, Hip width, Thigh thickness and Subscapular height) were gathered, as well as 8 dimensions from the school furniture. For the evaluation of classroom furniture a match criterion equation was defined. After considering the existing classroom furniture dimensions in each match criterion equation, the anthropometric characteristics of the considered population were compared in order to determine the mismatch between them. Results indicated that seat height, which should be considered as the starting point for the design of classroom furniture, was appropriate for students' popliteal height in only 14% of the 2 out of the 3 schools, and 28% in the third. Seat to desk height was too high and mismatched 99% of the students in one school and 100% in the others. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that the classroom's furniture was inadequate in almost all the analyzed cases and subjects. It is possible that the high mismatch percentage found between furniture and students' anthropometry can be associated to the fact that the acquisition and selection of the furniture was made without any ergonomic concern or criteria.

  16. Quantifying the Displacement of Mismatches in Multiple Sequence Alignment Benchmarks

    PubMed Central

    Bawono, Punto; van der Velde, Arjan; Abeln, Sanne; Heringa, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) methods are typically benchmarked on sets of reference alignments. The quality of the alignment can then be represented by the sum-of-pairs (SP) or column (CS) scores, which measure the agreement between a reference and corresponding query alignment. Both the SP and CS scores treat mismatches between a query and reference alignment as equally bad, and do not take the separation into account between two amino acids in the query alignment, that should have been matched according to the reference alignment. This is significant since the magnitude of alignment shifts is often of relevance in biological analyses, including homology modeling and MSA refinement/manual alignment editing. In this study we develop a new alignment benchmark scoring scheme, SPdist, that takes the degree of discordance of mismatches into account by measuring the sequence distance between mismatched residue pairs in the query alignment. Using this new score along with the standard SP score, we investigate the discriminatory behavior of the new score by assessing how well six different MSA methods perform with respect to BAliBASE reference alignments. The SP score and the SPdist score yield very similar outcomes when the reference and query alignments are close. However, for more divergent reference alignments the SPdist score is able to distinguish between methods that keep alignments approximately close to the reference and those exhibiting larger shifts. We observed that by using SPdist together with SP scoring we were able to better delineate the alignment quality difference between alternative MSA methods. With a case study we exemplify why it is important, from a biological perspective, to consider the separation of mismatches. The SPdist scoring scheme has been implemented in the VerAlign web server (http://www.ibi.vu.nl/programs/veralignwww/). The code for calculating SPdist score is also available upon request. PMID:25993129

  17. Phenotypic Mismatches Reveal Escape from Arms-Race Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2008-01-01

    Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts) and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes) to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were “ahead” of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race. PMID:18336073

  18. The developmental mismatch in structural brain maturation during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kathryn L; Goddings, Anne-Lise; Clasen, Liv S; Giedd, Jay N; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Regions of the human brain develop at different rates across the first two decades of life, with some maturing before others. It has been hypothesized that a mismatch in the timing of maturation between subcortical regions (involved in affect and reward processing) and prefrontal regions (involved in cognitive control) underlies the increase in risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors observed during adolescence. Most support for this 'dual systems' hypothesis relies on cross-sectional data, and it is not known whether this pattern is present at an individual level. The current study utilizes longitudinal structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to describe the developmental trajectories of regions associated with risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors, namely, the amygdala, nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Structural trajectories of gray matter volumes were analyzed using FreeSurfer in 33 participants aged 7-30 years, each of whom had at least three high-quality MRI scans spanning three developmental periods: late childhood, adolescence and early adulthood (total 152 scans). The majority of individuals in our sample showed relatively earlier maturation in the amygdala and/or NAcc compared to the PFC, providing evidence for a mismatch in the timing of structural maturation between these structures. We then related individual developmental trajectories to retrospectively assessed self-reported risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors during adolescence in a subsample of 24 participants. Analysis of this smaller sample failed to find a relationship between the presence of a mismatch in brain maturation and risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors during adolescence. Taken together, it appears that the developmental mismatch in structural brain maturation is present in neurotypically developing individuals. This pattern of development did not directly relate to self-reported behaviors at an individual level in our sample

  19. Imaging of DNA and Protein–DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein–DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein–DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein–DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein–DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described. PMID:27278886

  20. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal

    2015-07-01

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO2 laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n0, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  1. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal

    2015-07-31

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n{sub 0}, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  2. Semiblind Hyperspectral Unmixing in the Presence of Spectral Library Mismatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Ma, Wing-Kin; Bioucas-Dias, Jose M.; Chan, Tsung-Han

    2016-09-01

    The dictionary-aided sparse regression (SR) approach has recently emerged as a promising alternative to hyperspectral unmixing (HU) in remote sensing. By using an available spectral library as a dictionary, the SR approach identifies the underlying materials in a given hyperspectral image by selecting a small subset of spectral samples in the dictionary to represent the whole image. A drawback with the current SR developments is that an actual spectral signature in the scene is often assumed to have zero mismatch with its corresponding dictionary sample, and such an assumption is considered too ideal in practice. In this paper, we tackle the spectral signature mismatch problem by proposing a dictionary-adjusted nonconvex sparsity-encouraging regression (DANSER) framework. The main idea is to incorporate dictionary correcting variables in an SR formulation. A simple and low per-iteration complexity algorithm is tailor-designed for practical realization of DANSER. Using the same dictionary correcting idea, we also propose a robust subspace solution for dictionary pruning. Extensive simulations and real-data experiments show that the proposed method is effective in mitigating the undesirable spectral signature mismatch effects.

  3. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  4. Current status of the Scandiatransplant acceptable mismatch program.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, I D; Pedersen, F; Grunnet, N

    2013-04-01

    This article describes the Scandiatransplant Acceptable Mismatch Program (STAMP), which was set into action in 2009. The aim of STAMP is to define human leukocyte antigens (HLA) toward which the potential kidney recipient has not developed antibodies, as "acceptable mismatches" in the Scandiatransplant database. In many cases this may improve the probability for a highly immunized recipient to receive a suitable kidney graft from a deceased donor. Using data extracted from the Scandiatransplant database on the outcomes of the program after the first 3 years, 31/115 recipients included in the program have undergone transplantation. From 2008 to 2011 the mean waiting time for highly immunized patients has decreased from 42 to 37 months. Continuous evaluation and follow-up of the program is essential to improve the procedures and outcomes. Calculation of transplantability based on a given set of acceptable mismatches was added to the program in 2011, based on the historical deceased donor pool providing the possibility of a specific patient to receive a kidney through STAMP. It is still a challenge for the tissue typing laboratories to determine which detected HLA antibodies are clinical relevant. We concluded that STAMP has had the intended effects, however adjustments and improvements is an ongoing process. As an improvment of the program HLA-C was added to the STAMP search algorithm in September 2012.

  5. Memory-based mismatch response to frequency changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Astikainen, Piia; Stefanics, Gabor; Nokia, Miriam; Lipponen, Arto; Cong, Fengyu; Penttonen, Markku; Ruusuvirta, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Any occasional changes in the acoustic environment are of potential importance for survival. In humans, the preattentive detection of such changes generates the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of event-related brain potentials. MMN is elicited to rare changes ('deviants') in a series of otherwise regularly repeating stimuli ('standards'). Deviant stimuli are detected on the basis of a neural comparison process between the input from the current stimulus and the sensory memory trace of the standard stimuli. It is, however, unclear to what extent animals show a similar comparison process in response to auditory changes. To resolve this issue, epidural potentials were recorded above the primary auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats. In an oddball condition, tone frequency was used to differentiate deviants interspersed randomly among a standard tone. Mismatch responses were observed at 60-100 ms after stimulus onset for frequency increases of 5% and 12.5% but not for similarly descending deviants. The response diminished when the silent inter-stimulus interval was increased from 375 ms to 600 ms for +5% deviants and from 600 ms to 1000 ms for +12.5% deviants. In comparison to the oddball condition the response also diminished in a control condition in which no repetitive standards were presented (equiprobable condition). These findings suggest that the rat mismatch response is similar to the human MMN and indicate that anesthetized rats provide a valuable model for studies of central auditory processing.

  6. Investigating Interaural Frequency-Place Mismatches via Bimodal Vowel Integration

    PubMed Central

    Santurette, Sébastien; Chalupper, Josef; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    For patients having residual hearing in one ear and a cochlear implant (CI) in the opposite ear, interaural place-pitch mismatches might be partly responsible for the large variability in individual benefit. Behavioral pitch-matching between the two ears has been suggested as a way to individualize the fitting of the frequency-to-electrode map but is rather tedious and unreliable. Here, an alternative method using two-formant vowels was developed and tested. The interaural spectral shift was inferred by comparing vowel spaces, measured by presenting the first formant (F1) to the nonimplanted ear and the second (F2) on either side. The method was first evaluated with eight normal-hearing listeners and vocoder simulations, before being tested with 11 CI users. Average vowel distributions across subjects showed a similar pattern when presenting F2 on either side, suggesting acclimatization to the frequency map. However, individual vowel spaces with F2 presented to the implant did not allow a reliable estimation of the interaural mismatch. These results suggest that interaural frequency-place mismatches can be derived from such vowel spaces. However, the method remains limited by difficulties in bimodal fusion of the two formants. PMID:25421087

  7. Investigation of a Sybr-Green-Based Method to Validate DNA Sequences for DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    stranded DNA . We previously demonstrated that this technique can be exploited to distinguish between stably-hybridized Watson - Crick duplexes and...et al., 2004) we described the difference between the canonical Watson - Crick base pairs of DNA and the usually less stable mismatches that can also...computing, cross-hybridized duplexes represent errors. It is therefore crucial that DNA sequences be designed so that the formation of a Watson - Crick

  8. Structures of DNA Polymerase Mispaired DNA Termini Transitioning to Pre-catalytic Complexes Support an Induced-Fit Fidelity Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Batra, Vinod K; Beard, William A; Pedersen, Lars C; Wilson, Samuel H

    2016-11-01

    High-fidelity DNA synthesis requires that polymerases display a strong preference for right nucleotide insertion. When the wrong nucleotide is inserted, the polymerase deters extension from the mismatched DNA terminus. Twenty-three crystallographic structures of DNA polymerase β with terminal template-primer mismatches were determined as binary DNA and ternary pre-catalytic substrate complexes. These structures indicate that the mismatched termini adopt various distorted conformations that attempt to satisfy stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions. The binary complex structures indicate an induced strain in the mismatched template nucleotide. Addition of a non-hydrolyzable incoming nucleotide stabilizes the templating nucleotide with concomitant strain in the primer terminus. Several dead-end ternary complex structures suggest that DNA synthesis might occur as the enzyme transitions from an open to a closed complex. The structures are consistent with an induced-fit mechanism where a mismatched terminus is misaligned relative to the correct incoming nucleotide to deter or delay further DNA synthesis.

  9. Mismatch repair genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae: HexA confers a mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli by negative complementation.

    PubMed

    Prudhomme, M; Méjean, V; Martin, B; Claverys, J P

    1991-11-01

    DNA repair systems able to correct base pair mismatches within newly replicated DNA or within heteroduplex molecules produced during recombination are widespread among living organisms. Evidence that such generalized mismatch repair systems evolved from a common ancestor is particularly strong for two of them, the Hex system of the gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae and the Mut system of the gram-negative Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The homology existing between HexA and MutS and between HexB and MutL prompted us to investigate the effect of expressing hex genes in E. coli. Complementation of mutS or mutL mutations, which confer a mutator phenotype, was assayed by introducing on a multicopy plasmid the hexA and hexB genes, under the control of an inducible promoter, either individually or together in E. coli strains. No decrease in mutation rate was conferred by either hexA or hexB gene expression. However, a negative complementation effect was observed in wild-type E. coli cells: expression of hexA resulted in a typical Mut- mutator phenotype. hexB gene expression did not increase the mutation rate either individually or in conjunction with hexA. Since expression of hexA did not affect the mutation rate in mutS mutant cells and the hexA-induced mutator effect was recA independent, it is concluded that this effect results from inhibition of the Mut system. We suggest that HexA, like its homolog MutS, binds to mismatches resulting from replication errors, but in doing so it protects them from repair by the Mut system. In agreement with this hypothesis, an increase in mutS gene copy number abolished the hexA-induced mutator phenotype. HexA protein could prevent repair either by being unable to interact with Mut proteins or by producing nonfunctional repair complexes.

  10. Downregulation of a novel human gene, ROGDI, increases radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Cho, Jonathan J.; Huang, Tsai-Hua; Tseng, Chao-Neng; Huang, Eng-Yen; Cho, Chung-Lung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ROGDI is a protein that contains a leucine zipper domain and may be involved in cell proliferation. In addition, ROGDI is associated with genome stability by regulating the activity of a DNA damage marker, γ-H2AX. The role of ROGDI in tumor radiosensitization has not been investigated. Previous studies have indicated that radiosensitivity is associated with DNA repair and the cell cycle. In general, the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint is more sensitive to radiation, whereas the G1/S phase transition is more resistant to radiation. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) can lead to a halt of cell cycle progression and a stay at different phases or checkpoints. Our data show that the downregulation of ROGDI led to a decreased expression of CDK 1, 2, cyclin A, B and resulted in a G2/M phase transition block. In addition, the downregulation of ROGDI increased cell accumulation at the G2 phase as detected using flow cytometry and decreased cell survival as revealed by clonogenic assay in HeLa and C33A cells following irradiation. These findings suggest that the downregulation of ROGDI can mediate radiosensitivity by blocking cells at G2/M, the most radiosensitive phase of the cell cycle, as well as exerting deleterious effects in the form of DNA damage, as shown by increased γ-H2AX activation. PMID:27636029

  11. Single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery by targeted DNA photocleavage.

    PubMed

    Hart, Jonathan R; Johnson, Martin D; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-09-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are the largest source of genetic variation in humans. We report a method for the discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms within genomic DNA. Pooled genomic samples are amplified, denatured, and annealed to generate mismatches at polymorphic DNA sites. Upon photoactivation, these DNA mismatches are then cleaved site-specifically by using a small molecular probe, a bulky metallointercalator, Rhchrysi or Rhphzi. Fluorescent labeling of the cleaved products and separation by capillary electrophoresis permits rapid identification with single-base resolution of the single-nucleotide polymorphism site. This method is remarkably sensitive and minor allele frequencies as low as 5% can be readily detected.

  12. An Optimal Seed Based Compression Algorithm for DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Karunakaran, Muralikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a seed based lossless compression algorithm to compress a DNA sequence which uses a substitution method that is similar to the LempelZiv compression scheme. The proposed method exploits the repetition structures that are inherent in DNA sequences by creating an offline dictionary which contains all such repeats along with the details of mismatches. By ensuring that only promising mismatches are allowed, the method achieves a compression ratio that is at par or better than the existing lossless DNA sequence compression algorithms. PMID:27555868

  13. An amine-functionalized metal-organic framework as a sensing platform for DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Huang, Gang; Du, Zi-Yi; Jiang, Hai-Long

    2014-10-18

    An amine-functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF) has been employed as an effective fluorescent sensing platform for DNA detection and is capable of distinguishing complementary and mismatched target sequences with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  14. The effects of mismatch repair and RAD1 genes on interchromosomal crossover recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Ainsley; Fabbri, Rebecca M; Reeves, Jason W; Crouse, Gray F

    2006-06-01

    We have previously shown that recombination between 400-bp substrates containing only 4-bp differences, when present in an inverted repeat orientation, is suppressed by >20-fold in wild-type strains of S. cerevisiae. Among the genes involved in this suppression were three genes involved in mismatch repair--MSH2, MSH3, and MSH6--and one in nucleotide excision repair, RAD1. We now report the involvement of these genes in interchromosomal recombination occurring via crossovers using these same short substrates. In these experiments, recombination was stimulated by a double-strand break generated by the HO endonuclease and can occur between completely identical (homologous) substrates or between nonidentical (homeologous) substrates. In addition, a unique feature of this system is that recombining DNA strands can be given a choice of either type of substrate. We find that interchromosomal crossover recombination with these short substrates is severely inhibited in the absence of MSH2, MSH3, or RAD1 and is relatively insensitive to the presence of mismatches. We propose that crossover recombination with these short substrates requires the products of MSH2, MSH3, and RAD1 and that these proteins have functions in recombination in addition to the removal of terminal nonhomology. We further propose that the observed insensitivity to homeology is a result of the difference in recombinational mechanism and/or the timing of the observed recombination events. These results are in contrast with those obtained using longer substrates and may be particularly relevant to recombination events between the abundant short repeated sequences that characterize the genomes of higher eukaryotes.

  15. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-12-05

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome.

  16. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-12-01

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome.

  17. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-01-01

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome. PMID:25475788

  18. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Ankita; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC). Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40–60%) for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels. PMID:27276067

  19. A mononucleotide repeat in PRRT2 is an important, frequent target of mismatch repair deficiency in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Inês Teles; Cano, David; Böttcher, René; van der Korput, Hetty; Dinjens, Winand; Jenster, Guido; Trapman, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system corrects DNA replication mismatches thereby contributing to the maintenance of genomic stability. MMR deficiency has been observed in prostate cancer but its impact on the genomic landscape of these tumours is not known. In order to identify MMR associated mutations in prostate cancer we have performed whole genome sequencing of the MMR deficient PC346C prostate cancer cell line. We detected a total of 1196 mutations in PC346C which was 1.5-fold higher compared to a MMR proficient prostate cancer sample (G089). Of all different mutation classes, frameshifts in mononucleotide repeat (MNR) sequences were significantly enriched in the PC346C sample. As a result, a selection of genes with frameshift mutations in MNR was further assessed regarding its mutational status in a comprehensive panel of prostate, ovarian, endometrial and colorectal cancer cell lines. We identified PRRT2 and DAB2IP to be frequently mutated in MMR deficient cell lines, colorectal and endometrial cancer patient samples. Further characterization of PRRT2 revealed an important role of this gene in cancer biology. Both normal prostate cell lines and a colorectal cancer cell line showed increased proliferation, migration and invasion when expressing the mutated form of PRRT2 (ΔPRRT2). The wild-type PRRT2 (PRRT2wt) had an inhibitory effect in proliferation, consistent with the low expression level of PRRT2 in cancer versus normal prostate samples. PMID:27907910

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the human mismatch repair protein MutS[beta

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Quincy; Orans, Jillian; Hast, Michael A.; Iyer, Ravi R.; Changela, Anita; Modrich, Paul L.; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-03-16

    MutS{beta} is a eukaryotic mismatch repair protein that preferentially targets extrahelical unpaired nucleotides and shares partial functional redundancy with MutS{alpha} (MSH2-MSH6). Although mismatch recognition by MutS{alpha} has been shown to involve a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif, little is known about the lesion-binding mechanism of MutS{beta}. Combined MSH3/MSH6 deficiency triggers a strong predisposition to cancer in mice and defects in msh2 and msh6 account for roughly half of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer mutations. These three MutS homologs are also believed to play a role in trinucleotide repeat instability, which is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. The baculovirus overexpression and purification of recombinant human MutS{beta} and three truncation mutants are presented here. Binding assays with heteroduplex DNA were carried out for biochemical characterization. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the protein bound to a heteroduplex DNA substrate are also reported.

  1. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, Josep M.; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S.; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F.; Manak, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  2. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Comeron, Josep M; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F; Manak, J Robert

    2016-04-05

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  3. Climate change can cause spatial mismatch of trophically interacting species.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Oliver; Settele, Josef; Kudrna, Otakar; Klotz, Stefan; Kühn, Ingolf

    2008-12-01

    Climate change is one of the most influential drivers of biodiversity. Species-specific differences in the reaction to climate change can become particularly important when interacting species are considered. Current studies have evidenced temporal mismatching of interacting species at single points in space, and recently two investigations showed that species interactions are relevant for their future ranges. However, so far we are not aware that the ranges of interacting species may become substantially spatially mismatched. We developed separate ecological-niche models for a monophagous butterfly (Boloria titania) and its larval host plant (Polygonum bistorta) based on monthly interpolated climate data, land-cover classes, and soil data at a 10'-grid resolution. We show that all of three chosen global-change scenarios, which cover a broad range of potential developments in demography, socio-economics, and technology during the 21st century from moderate to intermediate to maximum change, will result in a pronounced spatial mismatch between future niche spaces of these species. The butterfly may expand considerably its future range (by 124-258%) if the host plant has unlimited dispersal, but it could lose 52-75% of its current range if the host plant is not able to fill its projected ecological niche space, and 79-88% if the butterfly also is assumed to be highly dispersal limited. These findings strongly suggest that climate change has the potential to disrupt trophic interactions because co-occurring species do not necessarily react in a similar manner to global change, having important consequences at ecological and evolutionary time scales.

  4. Two distinct domains of Bicoid mediate its transcriptional downregulation by the Torso pathway.

    PubMed

    Janody, F; Sturny, R; Schaeffer, V; Azou, Y; Dostatni, N

    2001-06-01

    The transcriptional activity of the Bicoid morphogen is directly downregulated by the Torso signal transduction cascade at the anterior pole of the Drosophila embryo. This regulation does not involve the homeodomain or direct phosphorylation of Bicoid. We analyse the transcriptional regulation of Bicoid in response to the Torso pathway, using Bicoid variants and fusion proteins between the Bicoid domains and the Gal4 DNA-binding domain. We show that Bicoid possesses three autonomous activation domains. Two of these domains, the serine/threonine-rich and the acidic domains, are downregulated by Torso, whereas the third activation domain, which is rich in glutamine, is not. The alanine-rich domain, previously described as an activation domain in vitro, has a repressive activity that is independent of Torso. Thus, Bicoid downregulation by Torso results from a competition between the glutamine-rich domain that is insensitive to Torso and the serine/threonine-rich and acidic activation domains downregulated by Torso. The alanine-rich domain contributes to this process indirectly by reducing the global activity of the protein and in particular the activity of the glutamine-rich domain that might otherwise prevent downregulation by Torso.

  5. Downregulation of the CCK-B receptor in pancreatic cancer cells blocks proliferation and promotes apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Kristin K.; Matters, Gail L.; McGovern, Christopher O.; Gilius, Evan L.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrin stimulates the growth of pancreatic cancer cells through the activation of the cholecystokinin-B receptor (CCK-BR), which has been found to be overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we proposed that the CCK-BR drives growth of pancreatic cancer; hence, interruption of CCK-BR activity could potentially be an ideal target for cancer therapeutics. The effect of CCK-BR downregulation in the human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells was examined by utilizing specific CCK-BR-targeted RNA interference reagents. The CCK-BR receptor expression was both transiently and stably downregulated by transfection with selective CCK-BR small-interfering RNA or short-hairpin RNA, respectively, and the effects on cell growth and apoptosis were assessed. CCK-BR downregulation resulted in reduced cancer cell proliferation, decreased DNA synthesis, and cell cycle arrest as demonstrated by an inhibition of G1 to S phase progression. Furthermore, CCK-BR downregulation increased caspase-3 activity, TUNEL-positive cells, and decreased X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein expression, suggesting apoptotic activity. Pancreatic cancer cell mobility was decreased when the CCK-BR was downregulated, as assessed by a migration assay. These results show the importance of the CCK-BR in regulation of growth and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer. Strategies to decrease the CCK-BR expression and activity may be beneficial for the development of new methods to improve the treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:22442157

  6. Visual-Functional Mismatch Between Coronary Angiography, Fractional Flow Reserve, and Quantitative Coronary Angiography.

    PubMed

    Safi, Morteza; Eslami, Vahid; Namazi, Mohammad Hasan; Vakili, Hossain; Saadat, Habib; Alipourparsa, Saeid; Adibi, Ali; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2016-12-01

    Anatomical and functional mismatches are not uncommon in the assessment of coronary lesions. The aim of this study was to identify clinical and lesion-specific factors affecting angiographic, anatomical, and functional mismatch in intermediate coronary lesions. In patients who underwent coronary angiography for clinical reasons, fractional flow reserve (FFR), and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) analyses for intermediate stenotic lesions were performed simultaneously. Mismatches between the measured values were analyzed. A total of 95 intermediate lesions were assessed simultaneously by visual angiography, FFR, and QCA. The visual-FFR mismatch was found in 40% of the lesions while reverse visual-FFR mismatch was determined in nearly 14% of the lesions. Mismatch and reverse mismatch between FFR and QCA parameters were observed in 10 and 23% of the lesions. FFR value was significant in 32% of the lesions while visually significant stenosis was shown in 61% of the lesions. Among the visual-FFR reverse mismatch group, the prevalence of culprit lesions within the left anterior descending (LAD) was significantly higher than other vessels (p value < 0.02). There were high frequencies of angiographic, QCA, and functional mismatches in analyses of intermediate coronary lesions. LAD lesions showed the highest mismatch. Angiographic or QCA estimation of lesion severity has consistently resulted in inappropriate stenting of functionally nonsignificant lesions or undertreatment of significant lesions based on FFR.

  7. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-ping; Tao, Lu-yang

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  8. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    2001-08-01

    A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571-1582 (1999) and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999), p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  9. Absolute gain measurement by the image method under mismatched condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Baddour, Maurice F.

    1987-01-01

    Purcell's image method for measuring the absolute gain of an antenna is particularly attractive for small test antennas. The method is simple to use and utilizes only one antenna with a reflecting plane to provide an image for the receiving antenna. However, the method provides accurate results only if the antenna is matched to its waveguide. In this paper, a waveguide junction analysis is developed to determine the gain of an antenna under mismatched condition. Absolute gain measurements for two standard gain horn antennas have been carried out. Experimental results agree closely with published data.

  10. Mitochondrial damage contributes to Pseudomonas aeruginosa activation of the inflammasome and is downregulated by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jabir, Majid Sakhi; Hopkins, Lee; Ritchie, Neil D; Ullah, Ihsan; Bayes, Hannah K; Li, Dong; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Lupton, Alison; Puleston, Daniel; Simon, Anna Katharina; Bryant, Clare; Evans, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing family caspase recruitment domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome can be activated by pathogenic bacteria via products translocated through the microbial type III secretion apparatus (T3SS). Recent work has shown that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome is downregulated by autophagy, but the influence of autophagy on NLRC4 activation is unclear. We set out to determine how autophagy might influence this process, using the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which activates the NLRC4 inflammasome via its T3SS. Infection resulted in T3SS-dependent mitochondrial damage with increased production of reactive oxygen intermediates and release of mitochondrial DNA. Inhibiting mitochondrial reactive oxygen release or degrading intracellular mitochondrial DNA abrogated NLRC4 inflammasome activation. Moreover, macrophages lacking mitochondria failed to activate NLRC4 following infection. Removal of damaged mitochondria by autophagy significantly attenuated NLRC4 inflammasome activation. Mitochondrial DNA bound specifically to NLRC4 immunoprecipitates and transfection of mitochondrial DNA directly activated the NLRC4 inflammasome; oxidation of the DNA enhanced this effect. Manipulation of autophagy altered the degree of inflammasome activation and inflammation in an in vivo model of P. aeruginosa infection. Our results reveal a novel mechanism contributing to NLRC4 activation by P. aeruginosa via mitochondrial damage and release of mitochondrial DNA triggered by the bacterial T3SS that is downregulated by autophagy.

  11. Preservation of DNA integrity and neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Francisconi, Simona; Codenotti, Mara; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Uberti, Daniela; Memo, Maurizio

    2005-04-01

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) is an important member of the DNA checkpoint, that includes a number of protein deputed to control genomic stability through cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Here we summarize some recent data from our and other groups underlining the contribution to neurodegeneration of MSH2, perhaps the most relevant component of the MMR system. These data suggest that this protein participates not only in the cancer prevention machinery for the body but also in neurodegenerative processes.

  12. DNA excision repair at telomeres.

    PubMed

    Jia, Pingping; Her, Chengtao; Chai, Weihang

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is caused by either endogenous cellular metabolic processes such as hydrolysis, oxidation, alkylation, and DNA base mismatches, or exogenous sources including ultraviolet (UV) light, ionizing radiation, and chemical agents. Damaged DNA that is not properly repaired can lead to genomic instability, driving tumorigenesis. To protect genomic stability, mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair mechanisms to remove and repair DNA lesions. Telomeres are composed of long tandem TTAGGG repeats located at the ends of chromosomes. Maintenance of functional telomeres is critical for preventing genome instability. The telomeric sequence possesses unique features that predispose telomeres to a variety of DNA damage induced by environmental genotoxins. This review briefly describes the relevance of excision repair pathways in telomere maintenance, with the focus on base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR). By summarizing current knowledge on excision repair of telomere damage and outlining many unanswered questions, it is our hope to stimulate further interest in a better understanding of excision repair processes at telomeres and in how these processes contribute to telomere maintenance.

  13. A non-canonical mismatch repair pathway in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-García, A; Prieto, A I; Rodríguez-Beltrán, J; Alonso, N; Cantillon, D; Costas, C; Pérez-Lago, L; Zegeye, E D; Herranz, M; Plociński, P; Tonjum, T; García de Viedma, D; Paget, M; Waddell, S J; Rojas, A M; Doherty, A J; Blázquez, J

    2017-01-27

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is a near ubiquitous pathway, essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Members of the MutS and MutL protein families perform key steps in mismatch correction. Despite the major importance of this repair pathway, MutS-MutL are absent in almost all Actinobacteria and many Archaea. However, these organisms exhibit rates and spectra of spontaneous mutations similar to MMR-bearing species, suggesting the existence of an alternative to the canonical MutS-MutL-based MMR. Here we report that Mycobacterium smegmatis NucS/EndoMS, a putative endonuclease with no structural homology to known MMR factors, is required for mutation avoidance and anti-recombination, hallmarks of the canonical MMR. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of naturally occurring polymorphic NucS in a M. smegmatis surrogate model, suggests the existence of M. tuberculosis mutator strains. The phylogenetic analysis of NucS indicates a complex evolutionary process leading to a disperse distribution pattern in prokaryotes. Together, these findings indicate that distinct pathways for MMR have evolved at least twice in nature.

  14. Predictable patterns of trait mismatches between interacting plants and insects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few predictions about the directionality or extent of morphological trait (mis)matches between interacting organisms. We review and analyse studies on morphological trait complementarity (e.g. floral tube length versus insect mouthpart length) at the population and species level. Results Plants have consistently more exaggerated morphological traits than insects at high trait magnitudes and in some cases less exaggerated traits than insects at smaller trait magnitudes. This result held at the population level, as well as for phylogenetically adjusted analyses at the species-level and for both pollination and host-parasite interactions, perhaps suggesting a general pattern. Across communities, the degree of trait mismatch between one specialist plant and its more generalized pollinator was related to the level of pollinator specialization at each site; the observed pattern supports the "life-dinner principle" of selection acting more strongly on species with more at stake in the interaction. Similarly, plant mating system also affected the degree of trait correspondence because selfing reduces the reliance on pollinators and is analogous to pollination generalization. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that there are predictable "winners" and "losers" of evolutionary arms races and the results of this study highlight the fact that breeding system and the degree of specialization can influence the outcome. PMID:20604973

  15. Case Report: Prothesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ospina, Luis; Garcia-Morell, Juan; Rodriguez-Monserrate, Carla P; Valentin-Nieves, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Valve replacement is the standard surgical treatment of diseased valves that cannot be repaired. The main goal of replacement is to exchange the diseased valve with one that has the engineering and hemodynamics as close as possible to the disease free native valve. However due to mechanical and fluid dynamic constraints all prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) are smaller than normal and thus are inherently stenotic. This represents a challenge when it comes time to replace a valve. The correct valve with the correct and matching profile has to be selected before the procedure to avoid possible complications. It is well recognized that patients are also prone to patient-prosthesis mismatch at long term which could have consequences in the clinical outcomes (1). The evaluation of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) has not been sufficiently emphasized in common practice. Failure to recognize this fact may lead to significant hemodynamic impairment and worsening of the clinical status over the time. Making efforts to identifying patients at risk may decrease the prevalence of PPM, the economic impact to our health system, the morbidity and mortality involved in these cases as well as creates efforts to standardized pre-operative protocols to minimized risk of PPM. We present a case of a 78 years old male patient who underwent aortic valve replacement due severe aortic stenosis, afterwards his clinical course got complicated with several admissions for shortness of breath and decompensated congestive heart failure (CHF).

  16. Predicting χ for polymers with stiffness mismatch from simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuch, Daniel; Zhang, Wenlin; Gomez, Enrique; Milner, Scott

    The Flory-Huggins χ parameter describes the excess free energy of mixing and governs phase behavior for polymer blends and block copolymers. For chemically distinct polymers, the value of χ is dominated by the mismatch in cohesive energy densities of the monomers. For blends of chemically similar polymers, the entropic portion of χ, arising from non-ideal local packing, becomes more significant. Using polymer field theory, Fredrickson, Liu, and Bates predict that a difference in backbone stiffness can result in a positive χ for chains consisting of chemically identical monomers. To quantitatively investigate this phenomenon, we perform molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for bead-spring chains which differ only in stiffness. From the simulations, we apply a novel thermodynamic integration to extract χ as low as 10-3 per monomer for blends with mild stiffness mismatch. By introducing a standardized effective monomer, we map real polymers to our bead-spring chains and show that the predicted entropic portion of χ are consistent with experimental data.

  17. Toward a phenological mismatch in estuarine pelagic food web?

    PubMed Central

    Chevillot, Xavier; Drouineau, Hilaire; Lambert, Patrick; Carassou, Laure; Sautour, Benoit; Lobry, Jérémy

    2017-01-01

    Alterations of species phenology in response to climate change are now unquestionable. Until now, most studies have reported precocious occurrence of life cycle events as a major phenological response. Desynchronizations of biotic interactions, in particular predator-prey relationships, are however assumed to strongly impact ecosystems’ functioning, as formalized by the Match-Mismatch Hypothesis (MMH). Temporal synchronicity between juvenile fish and zooplankton in estuaries is therefore of essential interest since estuaries are major nursery grounds for many commercial fish species. The Gironde estuary (SW France) has suffered significant alterations over the last three decades, including two Abrupt Ecosystem Shifts (AES), and three contrasted intershift periods. The main objective of this study was to depict modifications in fish and zooplankton phenology among inter-shift periods and discuss the potential effects of the resulting mismatches at a community scale. A flexible Bayesian method was used to estimate and compare yearly patterns of species abundance in the estuary among the three pre-defined periods. Results highlighted (1) an earlier peak of zooplankton production and entrance of fish species in the estuary and (2) a decrease in residence time of both groups in the estuary. Such species-specific phenological changes led to changes in temporal overlap between juvenile fish and their zooplanktonic prey. This situation questions the efficiency and potentially the viability of nursery function of the Gironde estuary, with potential implications for coastal marine fisheries of the Bay of Biscay. PMID:28355281

  18. A non-canonical mismatch repair pathway in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-García, A.; Prieto, A. I.; Rodríguez-Beltrán, J.; Alonso, N.; Cantillon, D.; Costas, C.; Pérez-Lago, L.; Zegeye, E. D.; Herranz, M.; Plociński, P.; Tonjum, T.; García de Viedma, D.; Paget, M.; Waddell, S. J.; Rojas, A. M.; Doherty, A. J.; Blázquez, J.

    2017-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is a near ubiquitous pathway, essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Members of the MutS and MutL protein families perform key steps in mismatch correction. Despite the major importance of this repair pathway, MutS–MutL are absent in almost all Actinobacteria and many Archaea. However, these organisms exhibit rates and spectra of spontaneous mutations similar to MMR-bearing species, suggesting the existence of an alternative to the canonical MutS–MutL-based MMR. Here we report that Mycobacterium smegmatis NucS/EndoMS, a putative endonuclease with no structural homology to known MMR factors, is required for mutation avoidance and anti-recombination, hallmarks of the canonical MMR. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of naturally occurring polymorphic NucS in a M. smegmatis surrogate model, suggests the existence of M. tuberculosis mutator strains. The phylogenetic analysis of NucS indicates a complex evolutionary process leading to a disperse distribution pattern in prokaryotes. Together, these findings indicate that distinct pathways for MMR have evolved at least twice in nature. PMID:28128207

  19. Toward a phenological mismatch in estuarine pelagic food web?

    PubMed

    Chevillot, Xavier; Drouineau, Hilaire; Lambert, Patrick; Carassou, Laure; Sautour, Benoit; Lobry, Jérémy

    2017-01-01

    Alterations of species phenology in response to climate change are now unquestionable. Until now, most studies have reported precocious occurrence of life cycle events as a major phenological response. Desynchronizations of biotic interactions, in particular predator-prey relationships, are however assumed to strongly impact ecosystems' functioning, as formalized by the Match-Mismatch Hypothesis (MMH). Temporal synchronicity between juvenile fish and zooplankton in estuaries is therefore of essential interest since estuaries are major nursery grounds for many commercial fish species. The Gironde estuary (SW France) has suffered significant alterations over the last three decades, including two Abrupt Ecosystem Shifts (AES), and three contrasted intershift periods. The main objective of this study was to depict modifications in fish and zooplankton phenology among inter-shift periods and discuss the potential effects of the resulting mismatches at a community scale. A flexible Bayesian method was used to estimate and compare yearly patterns of species abundance in the estuary among the three pre-defined periods. Results highlighted (1) an earlier peak of zooplankton production and entrance of fish species in the estuary and (2) a decrease in residence time of both groups in the estuary. Such species-specific phenological changes led to changes in temporal overlap between juvenile fish and their zooplanktonic prey. This situation questions the efficiency and potentially the viability of nursery function of the Gironde estuary, with potential implications for coastal marine fisheries of the Bay of Biscay.

  20. Heteroduplex formation, mismatch resolution, and genetic sectoring during homologous recombination in the hyperthermophilic archaeon sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dominic; Grogan, Dennis W

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaea exhibit certain molecular-genetic features not seen in bacteria or eukaryotes, and their systems of homologous recombination (HR) remain largely unexplored in vivo. We transformed a Sulfolobus acidocaldariuspyrE mutant with short DNAs that contained multiple non-selected genetic markers within the pyrE gene. From 20 to 40% of the resulting colonies were found to contain two Pyr(+) clones with distinct sets of the non-selected markers. The dual-genotype colonies could not be attributed to multiple DNAs entering the cells, or to conjugation between transformed and non-transformed cells. These colonies thus appear to represent genetic sectoring in which regions of heteroduplex DNA formed and then segregated after partial resolution of inter-strand differences. Surprisingly, sectoring was also frequent in cells transformed with single-stranded DNAs. Oligonucleotides produced more sectored transformants when electroporated as single strands than as a duplex, although all forms of donor DNA (positive-strand, negative-strand, and duplex) produced a diversity of genotypes, despite the limited number of markers. The marker patterns in the recombinants indicate that S. acidocaldarius resolves individual mismatches through un-coordinated short-patch excision followed by re-filling of the resulting gap. The conversion events that occur during transformation by single-stranded DNA do not show the strand bias necessary for a system that corrects replication errors effectively; similar events also occur in pre-formed heteroduplex electroporated into the cells. Although numerous mechanistic details remain obscure, the results demonstrate that the HR system of S. acidocaldarius can generate remarkable genetic diversity from short intervals of moderately diverged DNAs.

  1. Effect of strength mismatch on fracture toughness of HSLA steel weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Gubeljak, N.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this experimental work is to present the results of measured toughness and strength on mismatched weld joints made on HSLA steel grade HT 80. In the determined over and undermatched weld joints the local mismatching in the through thickness direction was found by hardness measurement. It seems that local mismatch because of WM low toughness has controlled the fracture behavior of weld metal and HAZ in both cases instead of the global one. Direct local CTOD({delta}{sub 5}) technique is found to be particular useful for the determination of fracture toughness values on mismatched weld joints.

  2. Decentralized Adaptive Control of Systems with Uncertain Interconnections, Plant-Model Mismatch and Actuator Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Decentralized adaptive control is considered for systems consisting of multiple interconnected subsystems. It is assumed that each subsystem s parameters are uncertain and the interconnection parameters are not known. In addition, mismatch can exist between each subsystem and its reference model. A strictly decentralized adaptive control scheme is developed, wherein each subsystem has access only to its own state but has the knowledge of all reference model states. The mismatch is estimated online for each subsystem and the mismatch estimates are used to adaptively modify the corresponding reference models. The adaptive control scheme is extended to the case with actuator failures in addition to mismatch.

  3. Fibroblast growth factor-1 stimulation of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells increases G/T mismatch-binding protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, P J; Feng, S L; Alberts, G F; Guo, Y; Peifley, K A; Hsu, D K; Winkles, J A

    1996-01-01

    Polypeptide growth factors promote cell-cycle progression in part by the transcriptional activation of a diverse group of specific genes. We have used an mRNA differential-display approach to identify several fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 (acidic FGF)-inducible genes in NIH 3T3 cells. Here we report that one of these genes, called FGF-regulated (FR)-3, is predicted to encode G/T mismatch-binding protein (GTBP), a component of the mammalian DNA mismatch correction system. The murine GTBP gene is transiently expressed after FGF-1 or calf serum treatment, with maximal mRNA levels detected at 12 and 18 h post-stimulation. FGF-1-stimulated NIH 3T3 cells also express an increased amount of GTBP as determined by immunoblot analysis. These results indicate that elevated levels of GTBP may be required during the DNA synthesis phase of the cell cycle for efficient G/T mismatch recognition and repair. PMID:8870641

  4. Anodized aluminum oxide-based capacitance sensors for the direct detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bongkeun; Yeo, Unjin; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2010-03-15

    We fabricated a capacitance sensor based on an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous structure to detect DNA hybridization. We utilized Au film deposited on the surface of the AAO membrane and Au nanowires infiltrating the nanopores as the top and bottom electrodes, respectively. When completely complementary target DNA molecules were added to the sensor-immobilized DNA molecule probes, the capacitance was reduced; with a concentration of 1pM, the capacitance decreased by approximately 10%. We measured the capacitance change for different concentrations of the target DNA solution. A linear relationship was found between the capacitance change and DNA concentration on a semi-logarithmic scale. We also investigated the possibility of detecting DNA molecules with a single-base mismatch to the probe DNA molecule. In contrast to complementary target DNA molecules, the addition of one-base mismatch DNA molecules caused no significant change in capacitance, demonstrating that DNA hybridization was detected with single nucleotide polymorphism sensitivity.

  5. Zidovudine induces downregulation of mitochondrial deoxynucleoside kinases: implications for mitochondrial toxicity of antiviral nucleoside analogs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ren; Eriksson, Staffan; Wang, Liya

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) and deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK) catalyze the initial phosphorylation of deoxynucleosides in the synthesis of the DNA precursors required for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and are essential for mitochondrial function. Antiviral nucleosides are known to cause toxic mitochondrial side effects. Here, we examined the effects of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) (zidovudine) on mitochondrial TK2 and dGK levels and found that AZT treatment led to downregulation of mitochondrial TK2 and dGK in U2OS cells, whereas cytosolic deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) levels were not affected. The AZT effects on mitochondrial TK2 and dGK were similar to those of oxidants (e.g., hydrogen peroxide); therefore, we examined the oxidative effects of AZT. We found a modest increase in cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in the AZT-treated cells. The addition of uridine to AZT-treated cells reduced ROS levels and protein oxidation and prevented the degradation of mitochondrial TK2 and dGK. In organello studies indicated that the degradation of mitochondrial TK2 and dGK is a mitochondrial event. These results suggest that downregulation of mitochondrial TK2 and dGK may lead to decreased mitochondrial DNA precursor pools and eventually mtDNA depletion, which has significant implications for the regulation of mitochondrial nucleotide biosynthesis and for antiviral therapy using nucleoside analogs.

  6. HLA-Mismatched Renal Transplantation without Maintenance Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Saidman, Susan L.; Shaffer, Juanita; Preffer, Frederic I.; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay; Fishman, Jay A.; Dey, Bimalangshu; Ko, Dicken S.C.; Hertl, Martin; Goes, Nelson B.; Wong, Waichi; Williams, Winfred W.; Colvin, Robert B.; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Five patients with end-stage renal disease received combined bone marrow and kidney transplants from HLA single-haplotype mismatched living related donors, with the use of a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen. Transient chimerism and reversible capillary leak syndrome developed in all recipients. Irreversible humoral rejection occurred in one patient. In the other four recipients, it was possible to discontinue all immunosuppressive therapy 9 to 14 months after the transplantation, and renal function has remained stable for 2.0 to 5.3 years since transplantation. The T cells from these four recipients, tested in vitro, showed donor-specific unresponsiveness and in specimens from allograft biopsies, obtained after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, there were high levels of P3 (FOXP3) messenger RNA (mRNA) but not granzyme B mRNA. PMID:18216355

  7. Performance of mismatched Viterbi receiver on satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Omura, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a satellite communication system using a Viterbi receiver. Here we have a bandlimited nonlinear channel where both uplink and downlink are taken into account as well as the effect of Intersymbol Interference, phase and time synchronization errors. In order that ISI can be combatted effectively, we use a Viterbi demodulator which is designed for the satellite channel when there is no uplink noise. The Viterbi demodulator for the channels with large memory is too complex to be implemented. To reduce the complexity, a Viterbi demodulator with memory shorter than the true channel memory is used. The objective of this paper is to analyze the performance degradation of this 'Mismatched Viterbi Receiver' due to the uplink noise and memory truncation, and to understand how the time and phase synchronization errors influence the performance.

  8. Automated effective band structures for defective and mismatched supercells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David

    2014-12-01

    In plane-wave density functional theory codes, defects and incommensurate structures are usually represented in supercells. However, interpretation of E versus k band structures is most effective within the primitive cell, where comparison to ideal structures and spectroscopy experiments are most natural. Popescu and Zunger recently described a method to derive effective band structures (EBS) from supercell calculations in the context of random alloys. In this paper, we present bs_sc2pc, an implementation of this method in the CASTEP code, which generates an EBS using the structural data of the supercell and the underlying primitive cell with symmetry considerations handled automatically. We demonstrate the functionality of our implementation in three test cases illustrating the efficacy of this scheme for capturing the effect of vacancies, substitutions and lattice mismatch on effective primitive cell band structures.

  9. Automated effective band structures for defective and mismatched supercells.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David

    2014-12-03

    In plane-wave density functional theory codes, defects and incommensurate structures are usually represented in supercells. However, interpretation of E versus k band structures is most effective within the primitive cell, where comparison to ideal structures and spectroscopy experiments are most natural. Popescu and Zunger recently described a method to derive effective band structures (EBS) from supercell calculations in the context of random alloys. In this paper, we present bs_sc2pc, an implementation of this method in the CASTEP code, which generates an EBS using the structural data of the supercell and the underlying primitive cell with symmetry considerations handled automatically. We demonstrate the functionality of our implementation in three test cases illustrating the efficacy of this scheme for capturing the effect of vacancies, substitutions and lattice mismatch on effective primitive cell band structures.

  10. Three perspectives on the mismatch between measures of material poverty.

    PubMed

    Hick, Rod

    2015-03-01

    The two most prominent measures of material poverty within contemporary European poverty analysis are low income and material deprivation. However, it is by now well-known that these measures identify substantially different people as being poor. In this research note, I seek to demonstrate that there are at least three ways to understand the mismatch between low income and material deprivation, relating to three different forms of identification: identifying poor households, identifying groups at risk of poverty and identifying trends in material poverty over time. Drawing on data from the British Household Panel Survey, I show that while low income and material deprivation identify very different households as being poor, and display distinct trends over time, in many cases they identify the same groups at being at risk of material poverty.

  11. Is it time to move mismatch negativity into the clinic?

    PubMed

    Schall, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in the 1970s, the mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potential has improved our understanding of pre-attentive detection of rule violations, which is a fundamental cognitive process considered by some a form of "primitive intelligence". The body of research to date ranges from animal studies (i.e. when investigating the neural mechanisms and pharmacological properties of MMN generation) to researching the psychophysiological nature of human consciousness. MMN therefore offers the possibility to detect abnormal functioning in the neural system involved in MMN generation, such as it occurs in some neurodevelopmental disorders or patients in vegetative state. While the clinical research data holds considerable promise for translation into clinical practice, standardization and normative data of an optimized (i.e. disorder-specific) MMN recording algorithm is needed in order for MMN to become a valuable clinical investigation tool.

  12. Indexing a sequence for mapping reads with a single mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Crochemore, Maxime; Langiu, Alessio; Rahman, M. Sohel

    2014-01-01

    Mapping reads against a genome sequence is an interesting and useful problem in computational molecular biology and bioinformatics. In this paper, we focus on the problem of indexing a sequence for mapping reads with a single mismatch. We first focus on a simpler problem where the length of the pattern is given beforehand during the data structure construction. This version of the problem is interesting in its own right in the context of the next generation sequencing. In the sequel, we show how to solve the more general problem. In both cases, our algorithm can construct an efficient data structure in time and space and can answer subsequent queries in time. Here, n is the length of the sequence, m is the length of the read, 0<ε<1 and is the optimal output size. PMID:24751874

  13. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty complicated by mismatched implant components

    PubMed Central

    Calistri, Alessandro; Campbell, Patricia; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Smet, Koen Aimè

    2017-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has gained popularity as a feasible treatment option for young and active patients with hip osteoarthritis and high functional expectations. This procedure should only be performed by surgeons who have trained specifically in this technique. Preoperative planning is essential for hip resurfacing in order to execute a successful operation and preview any technical problems. The authors present a case of a man who underwent a resurfacing arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the left hip that was complicated by mismatched implant components that were revised three days afterwards for severe pain and leg length discrepancy. Such mistakes, although rare, can be prevented by educating operating room staff in the size and colour code tables provided by the companies on their prostheses or implant boxes. PMID:28361022

  14. Radiation of cylindrical duct acoustic modes with flow mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savkar, S. D.; Edelfelt, I. H.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations for the radiation of spinning acoustic modes, with or without a centerbody, and with or without flow temperature and velocity discontinuity, are presented. Solutions to the appropriate convected wave equations devised around Fourier transforms and Wiener-Hopf technique are presented. The decomposition of the asymmetric kernel, resulting from a flow and temperature mismatch, is carried out in part exactly and partially using the so-called Carrier-Koiter approximation procedure. The resulting solutions offer a good approximation to the radiation of both symmetric and asymmetric modes through a flow discontinuity represented as a plug flow jet issuing from a cylindrical duct. Besides the Koiter approximation, the major limitation on the calculation program is the difficulty of calculating the high order Bessel functions with sufficient accuracy.

  15. Identification of a permissible HLA mismatch in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo A.; Wang, Tao; Lee, Stephanie J.; Haagenson, Michael; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Battiwalla, Minoo; Baxter-Lowe, Lee-Ann; Gajewski, James; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Marino, Susana; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Schultz, Kirk; Turner, E. Victoria; Waller, Edmund K.; Woolfrey, Ann; Umejiego, John; Spellman, Stephen R.; Setterholm, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    In subjects mismatched in the HLA alleles C*03:03/C*03:04 no allogeneic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses are detected in vitro. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with unrelated donors (UDs) showed no association between the HLA-C allele mismatches (CAMMs) and adverse outcomes; antigen mismatches at this and mismatches other HLA loci are deleterious. The absence of effect of the CAMM may have resulted from the predominance of the mismatch C*03:03/C*03:04. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving UD HSCT matched in 8/8 and 7/8 HLA alleles were examined. Transplants mismatched in HLA-C antigens or mismatched in HLA-A, -B, or -DRB1 presented significant differences (P < .0001) in mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37, 1.30), disease-free survival (HR = 1.33, 1.27), treatment-related mortality (HR = 1.54, 1.54), and grade 3-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (HR = 1.49, 1.77) compared with the 8/8 group; transplants mismatched in other CAMMs had similar outcomes with HR ranging from 1.34 to 172 for these endpoints. The C*03:03/C*03:04 mismatched and the 8/8 matched groups had identical outcomes (HR ranging from 0.96-1.05). The previous finding that CAMMs do not associate with adverse outcomes is explained by the predominance (69%) of the mismatch C*03:03/03:04 in this group that is better tolerated than other HLA mismatches. PMID:24408320

  16. Role of frequency mismatch in neuronal communication through coherence.

    PubMed

    Sancristóbal, Belén; Vicente, Raul; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    Neuronal gamma oscillations have been described in local field potentials of different brain regions of multiple species. Gamma oscillations are thought to reflect rhythmic synaptic activity organized by inhibitory interneurons. While several aspects of gamma rhythmogenesis are relatively well understood, we have much less solid evidence about how gamma oscillations contribute to information processing in neuronal circuits. One popular hypothesis states that a flexible routing of information between distant populations occurs via the control of the phase or coherence between their respective oscillations. Here, we investigate how a mismatch between the frequencies of gamma oscillations from two populations affects their interaction. In particular, we explore a biophysical model of the reciprocal interaction between two cortical areas displaying gamma oscillations at different frequencies, and quantify their phase coherence and communication efficiency. We observed that a moderate excitatory coupling between the two areas leads to a decrease in their frequency detuning, up to ∼6 Hz, with no frequency locking arising between the gamma peaks. Importantly, for similar gamma peak frequencies a zero phase difference emerges for both LFP and MUA despite small axonal delays. For increasing frequency detunings we found a significant decrease in the phase coherence (at non-zero phase lag) between the MUAs but not the LFPs of the two areas. Such difference between LFPs and MUAs behavior is due to the misalignment between the arrival of afferent synaptic currents and the local excitability windows. To test the efficiency of communication we evaluated the success of transferring rate-modulations between the two areas. Our results indicate that once two populations lock their peak frequencies, an optimal phase relation for communication appears. However, the sensitivity of locking to frequency mismatch suggests that only a precise and active control of gamma frequency could

  17. Phenological mismatch and the effectiveness of assisted gene flow.

    PubMed

    Wadgymar, Susana M; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-12-10

    The persistence of narrowly adapted species under climate change will depend on their ability to migrate apace with their historical climatic envelope or to adapt in place to maintain fitness. This second path to persistence can only occur if there is sufficient genetic variance for response to new selection regimes. Inadequate levels of genetic variation can be remedied through assisted gene flow (AGF), that is the intentional introduction of individuals genetically adapted to localities with historic climates similar to the current or future climate experienced by the resident population. However, the timing of reproduction is frequently adapted to local conditions. Phenological mismatch between residents and migrants can reduce resident × migrant mating frequencies, slowing the introgression of migrant alleles into the resident genetic background and impeding evolutionary rescue efforts. Focusing on plants, we devised a method to estimate the frequency of resident × migrant matings based on flowering schedules and applied it in an experiment that mimicked the first generation of an AGF program with Chamaecrista fasciculata, a prairie annual, under current and expected future temperature regimes. Phenological mismatch reduced the potential for resident × migrant matings by 40-90%, regardless of thermal treatment. The most successful migrant sires were the most resident like in their flowering time, further biasing the genetic admixture between resident and migrant populations. Other loci contributing to local adaptation-heat-tolerance genes, for instance-may be in linkage disequilibrium with phenology when residents and migrants are combined into a single mating pool. Thus, introgression of potentially adaptive migrant alleles into the resident genetic background is slowed when selection acts against migrant phenology. Successful AGF programs may require sustained high immigration rates or preliminary breeding programs when phenologically matched migrant

  18. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  19. Protection of hydroquinone-induced apoptosis by downregulation of Fau is mediated by NQO1.

    PubMed

    Siew, E L; Chan, K M; Williams, G T; Ross, D; Inayat-Hussain, S H

    2012-10-15

    The Fau gene (Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV)-associated ubiquitously expressed gene) was identified as a potential tumor suppressor gene using a forward genetics approach. Downregulation of Fau by overexpression of its reverse sequence has been shown to inhibit apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents. To address a potential role of Fau in benzene toxicity, we investigated the apoptotic effects of hydroquinone (HQ), a major benzene metabolite, in W7.2 mouse thymoma cells transfected with either a plasmid construct expressing the antisense sequence of Fau (rfau) or the empty vector (pcDNA3.1) as a control. HQ induced apoptosis via increased production of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage, measured using dihydroethidine (HE) staining and alkaline Comet assay, respectively, in W7.2 pcDNA3.1 cells. In contrast, when Fau was downregulated by the antisense sequence in W7.2 rfau cells, HQ treatment did not cause DNA damage and oxidative stress and these cells were markedly more resistant to HQ-induced apoptosis. Further investigation revealed that there was an upregulation of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), a detoxification enzyme for benzene-derived quinones, in W7.2 rfau cells. Compromising cellular NQO1 by use of a specific mechanism-based inhibitor (MAC 220) and NQO1 siRNA resensitized W7.2 rfau cells to HQ-induced apoptosis. Silencing of Fau in W7.2 wild-type cells resulted in increased levels of NQO1, confirming that downregulation of Fau results in NQO1 upregulation which protects against HQ-induced apoptosis.

  20. High affinity γPNA sandwich hybridization assay for rapid detection of short nucleic acid targets with single mismatch discrimination.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Johnathan M; Zhang, Li Ang; Manna, Arunava; Armitage, Bruce A; Ly, Danith H; Schneider, James W

    2013-07-08

    Hybridization analysis of short DNA and RNA targets presents many challenges for detection. The commonly employed sandwich hybridization approach cannot be implemented for these short targets due to insufficient probe-target binding strengths for unmodified DNA probes. Here, we present a method capable of rapid and stable sandwich hybridization detection for 22 nucleotide DNA and RNA targets. Stable hybridization is achieved using an n-alkylated, polyethylene glycol γ-carbon modified peptide nucleic acid (γPNA) amphiphile. The γPNA's exceptionally high affinity enables stable hybridization of a second DNA-based probe to the remaining bases of the short target. Upon hybridization of both probes, an electrophoretic mobility shift is measured via interaction of the n-alkane modification on the γPNA with capillary electrophoresis running buffer containing nonionic surfactant micelles. We find that sandwich hybridization of both probes is stable under multiple binding configurations and demonstrate single base mismatch discrimination. The binding strength of both probes is also stabilized via coaxial stacking on adjacent hybridization to targets. We conclude with a discussion on the implementation of the proposed sandwich hybridization assay as a high-throughput microRNA detection method.

  1. DNA Electrochemistry with Tethered Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Pheeney, Catrina G.

    2012-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB′), covalently attached to DNA through a flexible C12 alkyl linker, provides a sensitive redox reporter in DNA electrochemistry measurements. Tethered, intercalated MB′ is reduced through DNA-mediated charge transport; the incorporation of a single base mismatch at position 3, 10, or 14 of a 17-mer causes an attenuation of the signal to 62 ± 3% of the well-matched DNA, irrespective of position in the duplex. The redox signal intensity for MB′–DNA is found to be least 3-fold larger than that of Nile blue (NB)–DNA, indicating that MB′ is even more strongly coupled to the π-stack. The signal attenuation due to an intervening mismatch does, however, depend on DNA film density and the backfilling agent used to passivate the surface. These results highlight two mechanisms for reduction of MB′ on the DNA-modified electrode: reduction mediated by the DNA base pair stack and direct surface reduction of MB′ at the electrode. These two mechanisms are distinguished by their rates of electron transfer that differ by 20-fold. The extent of direct reduction at the surface can be controlled by assembly and buffer conditions. PMID:22512327

  2. Mitochondrial DNA maintenance: an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Alexander T; Marín-García, José

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and Ca(2+) handling to stress responses, cell survival, and death. Malfunction of the organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders, cancer, premature aging, and cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial ischemia, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Mitochondria are unique as they contain their own genome organized into DNA-protein complexes, so-called mitochondrial nucleoids, along with multiprotein machineries, which promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription, and repair. Although the organelle possesses almost all known nuclear DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and recombinational repair, the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of ROS production and the lack of protective histones may result in increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and other types of mtDNA damage. Defects in the components of these highly organized machineries, which mediate mtDNA maintenance (replication and repair), may result in accumulation of point mutations and/or deletions in mtDNA and decreased mtDNA copy number impairing mitochondrial function. This review will focus on the mechanisms of mtDNA maintenance with emphasis on the proteins implicated in these processes and their functional role in various disease conditions and aging.

  3. Association Between IHC and MSI Testing to Identify Mismatch Repair–Deficient Patients with Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cragun, Deborah; Thompson, Zachary; Coppola, Domenico; Nicosia, Santo V.; Akbari, Mohammad; Zhang, Shiyu; McLaughlin, John; Narod, Steven; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In epithelial ovarian cancer, concordance between results of microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemical (IHC) testing has not been demonstrated. This study evaluated the association of MSI-high (MSI-H) status with loss of expression (LoE) of mismatch repair (MMR) proteins on IHC and assessed for potential factors affecting the strength of the association. Methods: Tumor specimens from three population-based studies of epithelial ovarian cancer were stained for MMR proteins through manual or automated methods, and results were interpreted by one of two pathologists. Tumor and germline DNA was extracted and MSI testing performed. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to predict loss of IHC expression based on MSI status after adjusting for staining method and reading pathologist. Results: Of 834 cases, 564 (67.6%) were concordant; 41 were classified as MSI-H with LoE and 523 as microsatellite stable (MSS) with no LoE. Of the 270 discordant cases, 83 were MSI-H with no LoE and 187 were MSS with LoE. Both IHC staining method and reading pathologist were strongly associated with discordant results. Conclusions: Lack of concordance in the current study may be related to inconsistencies in IHC testing methods and interpretation. Results support the need for validation studies before routine screening of ovarian tumors is implemented in clinical practice for the purpose of identifying Lynch syndrome. PMID:24592941

  4. Introduction of Mismatches in a Random shRNA-Encoding Library Improves Potency for Phenotypic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongping; Speier, Jacqueline S.; Engram-Pearl, Jessica; Wilson, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism for interfering with gene expression through the action of small, non-coding RNAs. We previously constructed a short-hairpin-loop RNA (shRNA) encoding library that is random at the nucleotide level [1]. In this library, the stems of the hairpin are completely complementary. To improve the potency of initial hits, and therefore signal-to-noise ratios in library screening, as well as to simplify hit-sequence retrieval by PCR, we constructed a second-generation library in which we introduced random mismatches between the two halves of the stem of each hairpin, on a random template background. In a screen for shRNAs that protect an interleukin-3 (IL3) dependent cell line from IL3 withdrawal, our second-generation library yielded hit sequences with significantly higher potencies than those from the first-generation library in the same screen. Our method of random mutagenesis was effective for a random template and is likely suitable, therefore, for any DNA template of interest. The improved potency of our second-generation library expands the range of possible unbiased screens for small-RNA therapeutics and biologic tools. PMID:24498319

  5. Comparison of T7E1 and surveyor mismatch cleavage assays to detect mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-07

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops formed by single or multiple nucleotides. Bacteriophage resolvases and single-stranded nucleases are used commonly in the assay but have not been compared side-by-side on mutations obtained by engineered nucleases. We present the first comparison of the sensitivity of T7E1 and Surveyor EMC assays on deletions and point mutations obtained by zinc finger nuclease targeting in frog embryos. We report the mutation detection limits and efficiencies of T7E1 and Surveyor. In addition, we find that T7E1 outperforms the Surveyor nuclease in terms of sensitivity with deletion substrates, whereas Surveyor is better for detecting single nucleotide changes. We conclude that T7E1 is the preferred enzyme to scan mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

  6. Comparison of T7E1 and Surveyor Mismatch Cleavage Assays to Detect Mutations Triggered by Engineered Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops formed by single or multiple nucleotides. Bacteriophage resolvases and single-stranded nucleases are used commonly in the assay but have not been compared side-by-side on mutations obtained by engineered nucleases. We present the first comparison of the sensitivity of T7E1 and Surveyor EMC assays on deletions and point mutations obtained by zinc finger nuclease targeting in frog embryos. We report the mutation detection limits and efficiencies of T7E1 and Surveyor. In addition, we find that T7E1 outperforms the Surveyor nuclease in terms of sensitivity with deletion substrates, whereas Surveyor is better for detecting single nucleotide changes. We conclude that T7E1 is the preferred enzyme to scan mutations triggered by engineered nucleases. PMID:25566793

  7. The Impact of Major-Job Mismatch on College Graduates' Early Career Earnings: Evidence from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of the mismatch between a college major and job on college graduates' early career earnings using a sample from China. On average, a major-job mismatched college graduate is found to suffer from an income loss that is much lower than the penalty documented in previous studies. The income losses are also found to be…

  8. On the Mismatch between Multicultural Education and Its Subjects in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizrachi, Nissim

    2012-01-01

    This article draws attention to the growing evidence of a mismatch between sociological categorization and actors' worlds of meaning as expressed in the classroom. The mismatch is especially blatant in cases where students from disadvantaged groups are introduced to what educators and theorists presume to be the liberating discourse of…

  9. A mismatch characterization and simulation environment for weak-to-strong inversion CMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde-Ramirez, J.; Vicente-Sanchez, G.; Serrano-Gotarredona, T.; Linares-Barranco, B.

    2005-06-01

    Mismatch analysis and simulation is crucial for modern analog design with submicron technologies, where transistors tend to be biased in weak and moderate inversion regions because of the down shrinking of power supply voltage. For optimum analog design where speed, power consumption, area, noise, and accuracy need to be carefully traded off, it is crucial to have available a precise estimation of transistor mismatch in order to avoid overdesign and consequently sacrify unnecessarily speed, power consumption, and area. In this paper we will provide experimental mismatch measurements of different 0.35um CMOS technologies. Each technology has been characterized for a large number of transistor sizes (25-30), by sweeping different width and length values. A large number of transistor curves are measured ranging over different possible biasing conditions. A recent mismatch model will be used to fit the data, and extract electrical parameters. Some of those parameters will be used to adjust the measured mismatch. As a result, a set of standard deviations and correlation coefficients result for the statistical characterization of the mismatch responsible parameters. The resulting electrical parameters, and statistical mismatch parameters are then used in the Spectre simulator of Cadence design environment, to implement the mismatch models using the AHDL behavioral level Spectre description language. The paper shows good agreement between measured data, predicted data, and simulated data.

  10. Educational Mismatch between Graduates' Possessed Skills and Market Demands in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzair-ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Noreen, Zahida

    2013-01-01

    Educational mismatch in skills that graduates possess and market requires creates barriers for organizations as well as for job seekers. The study was conducted to find out the educational mismatch between graduates possessed skills and market demands. Convenient sampling was carried out and data were collected from 200 graduates of economics…

  11. Are Educational Mismatches Responsible for the "Inequality Increasing Effect" of Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budria, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    This paper asks whether educational mismatches can account for the positive association between education and wage inequality found in the data. We use two different data sources, the European Community Household Panel and the Portuguese Labour Force Survey, and consider several types of mismatch, including overqualification, underqualification…

  12. Downregulation of chicken interleukin-17 receptor A during Eimeria infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo H; Jeong, Jipseol; Park, Ae R; Yim, Dongjean; Kim, Suk; Chang, Hong H; Yang, Seung-Hak; Kim, Dong-Hee; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Min, Wongi

    2014-09-01

    Both interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and IL-17F are proinflammatory cytokines that have an important role in intestinal homeostasis via receptor signaling. These cytokines have been characterized in chickens, but very little is known about their receptors and their functional activity. We provide here the first description of the sequence analysis, bioactivity, and comparative expression analysis of chicken IL-17RA (chIL-17RA) in chickens infected with Salmonella and Eimeria, two major infectious agents of gastrointestinal diseases of poultry of economic importance. A full-length chIL-17RA cDNA with a 2,568-bp coding region was identified from chicken thymus cDNA. chIL-17RA shares ca. 46% identity with mammalian homologues and 29.2 to 31.5% identity with its piscine counterparts. chIL-17RA transcript expression was relatively high in the thymus and in the chicken macrophage cell line HD11. The chIL-17RA-specific small interfering RNA inhibits interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and IL-1β mRNA expression in chicken embryo fibroblast cells (but not in DF-1 cells) stimulated with chIL-17A or chIL-17F. Interaction between chIL-17RA and chIL-17A was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. Downregulation of chIL-17RA occurred in concanavalin A- or lipopolysaccharide-activated splenic lymphocytes but not in poly(I·C)-activated splenic lymphocytes. In Salmonella- and Eimeria-infected chickens, the expression levels of the chIL-17RA transcript were downregulated in intestinal tissues from chickens infected with two Eimeria species, E. tenella or E. maxima, that preferentially infect the cecum and jejunum, respectively. However, chIL-17RA expression was generally unchanged in Salmonella infection. These results suggest that chIL-17RA has an important role in mucosal immunity to intestinal intracellular parasite infections such as Eimeria infection.

  13. CDK14 expression is down-regulated by cigarette smoke in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Daniel; Xiao, Yuxuan; Shrivasatava, Vibha; Levy, Avi; Andrusier, Miriam; D’Armiento, Jeanine; Holz, Marina K.; Vigodner, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    In this study, DNA arrays have been employed to monitor gene expression patterns in testis of mice exposed to tobacco smoke for 24 weeks and compared to control animals. The results of the analysis revealed significant changes in expression of several genes that may have a role in spermatogenesis. Cdk14 was chosen for further characterization because of a suggested role in the testis and in regulation of Wnt signaling. RT-PCR analysis confirmed down regulation of Cdk14 in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS). Cdk14 is expressed in all testicular cells; spermatogonia- and Sertoli-derived cell lines treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in vitro showed down-regulation of CDK14 mRNA and protein levels as well as down-regulation of β-catenin levels. CS-induced down-regulation of CDK14 mRNA and protein levels was also observed in several lung epithelium-derived cell lines including primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE), suggesting that the effect is not restricted to the testis. Similar to testicular cells, CS-induced down-regulation of CDK14 in lung cells correlated with decreased levels of β-catenin, a finding suggesting impaired Wnt signaling. In the lungs, CDK14 was localized to the alveolar and bronchial epithelium. PMID:25680692

  14. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediate hypoxic down-regulation of hERG channel protein.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Wang, Ning; Bergson, Pamela; Yuan, Guoxiang; Ficker, Eckhard; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2008-08-22

    Previous studies suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in physiological responses to hypoxia. In the present study, we examined the effects of hypoxia on human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) channel protein expression and assessed the role of ROS. Hypoxia, in a stimulus- and time-dependent manner, decreased hERG protein with marked reduction in hERG K+ conductance in human embryonic kidney cells stably expressing the hERG alpha subunit. Down-regulation of hERG by hypoxia was not due to increased proteasomal degradation or decreased transcription but due to decreased synthesis of the protein. Hypoxia increased ROS in a time-dependent manner. Antioxidants prevented hypoxia-evoked down-regulation of hERG protein and exogenous oxidants mimicked the effects of hypoxia. Hypoxia-evoked down-regulation of hERG protein and elevation in ROS were absent in p(O) cells, which are devoid of mitochondrial DNA. Inhibitors of NADPH oxidase failed to prevent the effects of hypoxia. These results demonstrate that hypoxia enhances the production of ROS in the mitochondria, resulting in down-regulation of hERG translation and decreased hERG-mediated K+ conductance.

  15. The Shape Interaction Matrix-Based Affine Invariant Mismatch Removal for Partial-Duplicate Image Search.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang; Lin, Zhouchen; Zha, Hongbin

    2017-02-01

    Mismatch removal is a key step in many computer vision problems. In this paper, we handle the mismatch removal problem by adopting shape interaction matrix (SIM). Given the homogeneous coordinates of the two corresponding point sets, we first compute the SIMs of the two point sets. Then, we detect the mismatches by picking out the most different entries between the two SIMs. Even under strong affine transformations, outliers, noises, and burstiness, our method can still work well. Actually, this paper is the first non-iterative mismatch removal method that achieves affine invariance. Extensive results on synthetic 2D points matching data sets and real image matching data sets verify the effectiveness, efficiency, and robustness of our method in removing mismatches. Moreover, when applied to partial-duplicate image search, our method reaches higher retrieval precisions with shorter time cost compared with the state-of-the-art geometric verification methods.

  16. Final report [DNA Repair and Mutagenesis - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Graham C.

    2001-05-30

    The meeting, titled ''DNA Repair and Mutagenesis: Mechanism, Control, and Biological Consequences'', was designed to bring together the various sub-disciplines that collectively comprise the field of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis. The keynote address was titled ''Mutability Doth Play Her Cruel Sports to Many Men's Decay: Variations on the Theme of Translesion Synthesis.'' Sessions were held on the following themes: Excision repair of DNA damage; Transcription and DNA excision repair; UmuC/DinB/Rev1/Rad30 superfamily of DNA polymerases; Cellular responses to DNA damage, checkpoints, and damage tolerance; Repair of mismatched bases, mutation; Genome-instability, and hypermutation; Repair of strand breaks; Replicational fidelity, and Late-breaking developments; Repair and mutation in challenging environments; and Defects in DNA repair: consequences for human disease and aging.

  17. Pleiotrophin is downregulated in human keloids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Jin, Cheng Long; Kim, Yeji; Shin, Mi Hee; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Minji; Lee, Min Jung; Cho, Soyun

    2016-10-01

    Keloid is an abnormal hyperproliferative scarring process with involvement of complex genetic and triggering environmental factors. Previously published dysregulated gene expression profile of keloids includes genes involved in tumor formation. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted, heparin-binding growth factor which is involved in various biological functions such as cell growth, differentiation, and tumor progression. Although PTN expression was reported to be increased in hypertrophic scars, there is no study on PTN expression in keloids, and previous microarray results are controversial. To clarify differential expression of PTN in keloids, we investigated the expression of PTN and its interacting molecules in keloid and control fibroblasts, and performed immunohistochemical staining of PTN using tissue arrays. The expressions of PTN, its upstream regulator platelet-derived growth factor subunit B (PDGF-B) and corresponding PDGF receptors were significantly downregulated in keloid fibroblasts compared to normal human fibroblasts, and the decreased PTN protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry as well as Western blot. Moreover, functional downstream receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β/ζ was significantly upregulated in keloid fibroblasts, supporting overall downregulation of PTN signaling pathway. The lowered PTN expression in keloids suggests a different pathomechanism from that of hypertrophic scars.

  18. Emotion-Related Visual Mismatch Responses in Schizophrenia: Impairments and Correlations with Emotion Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Csukly, Gábor; Stefanics, Gábor; Komlósi, Sarolta; Czigler, István; Czobor, Pál

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related potential (ERP) measure of preattentional sensory processing. While deficits in the auditory MMN are robust electrophysiological findings in schizophrenia, little is known about visual mismatch response and its association with social cognitive functions such as emotion recognition in schizophrenia. Our aim was to study the potential deficit in the visual mismatch response to unexpected facial emotions in schizophrenia and its association with emotion recognition impairments, and to localize the sources of the mismatch signals. Experimental Design The sample comprised 24 patients with schizophrenia and 24 healthy control subjects. Controls were matched individually to patients by gender, age, and education. ERPs were recorded using a high-density 128-channel BioSemi amplifier. Mismatch responses to happy and fearful faces were determined in 2 time windows over six regions of interest (ROIs). Emotion recognition performance and its association with the mismatch response were also investigated. Principal Observations Mismatch signals to both emotional conditions were significantly attenuated in patients compared to controls in central and temporal ROIs. Controls recognized emotions significantly better than patients. The association between overall emotion recognition performance and mismatch response to the happy condition was significant in the 250–360 ms time window in the central ROI. The estimated sources of the mismatch responses for both emotional conditions were localized in frontal regions, where patients showed significantly lower activity. Conclusions Impaired generation of mismatch signals indicate insufficient automatic processing of emotions in patients with schizophrenia, which correlates strongly with decreased emotion recognition. PMID:24116046

  19. Hypoxic Stress Facilitates Acute Activation and Chronic Down-Regulation of Fanconi Anemia Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Susan E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia induces genomic instability through replication stress and dysregulation of vital DNA repair pathways. The Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI, are key members of a DNA repair pathway that responds to replicative stress, suggesting that they undergo regulation by hypoxic conditions. Here acute hypoxic stress activates the FA pathway via ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI in an ATR-dependent manner. In addition, the presence of an intact FA pathway is required for preventing hypoxia-induced DNA damage measurable by the comet assay, limiting the accumulation of γH2AX (a marker of DNA damage or stalled replication), and protecting cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia induces transcriptional repression of FANCD2 in a manner analogous to the hypoxic down-regulation of BRCA1 and RAD51. Thus, hypoxia-induced FA pathway activation plays a key role in maintaining genome integrity and cell survival, while FA protein down-regulation with prolonged hypoxia contributes to genomic instability. PMID:24688021

  20. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  1. Repetitive DNA in three Gramineae species with low DNA content.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, V G; Ranjekar, P K

    1980-08-01

    The genomes of three Gramineae species, namely finger millet (Eleusine coracana), pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum) and rice (Oryza sativa) are characterized by studying their DNA denaturation-reassociation properties. The reassociation kinetics measurement of the sonicated DNA (500--700 nucleotide pairs) indicate the presence of a heterogeneous, repetitive DNA fraction accounting for 49--54% of the total DNA in all three species. From the cot 1/2 value of the slow reassociating DNA, the genome size is estimated as 3.0 X 10(8) np in finger millet, 7.8 X 10(8) np in pearl millet and 9.0 X 10(8) np in rice. The melting patterns of the total DNAs reveal Tm value of 88.6 degrees C in the case of pearl millet and 85.0 degrees C in the case of finger millet and rice. Total repetitive and cot 1.0 DNA fractions in all the three species are isolated and their melting properties are compared with those of respective sonicated DNAs. In finger millet, the Tm values of cot 25 and cot 1 fractions are lower by 10.8 degrees C and 12.8 degrees C, respectively, than that of sonicated DNA and thus exhibit the presence of a base pair mismatch in the range of 10.8--12.8%. In rice, the Tm values of the fractions cot 50 and cot 1 are slightly lower than that of sonicated DNA and reveal a nucleotide mismatching of only 1.8--3.8%. In the case of pearl millet cot 10 DNA fraction a high-melting DNA component (Tm = 92 degrees C) representing 12% of the total cot 10 DNA and a low-melting component with a Tm of 78 degrees C are present. In cot 1 DNA fraction of pearl millet the proportion of the high-melting component is 35% and it has a Tm or 94.8 degrees C. Optical reassociation studies of cot 1.0 DNA fractions have revealed the presence of two kinetically distinct components, namely minor fast-reassociating and major slow-reassociating, having complexities in the range of 330--390 np and 1.28 X 10(5)--6.0 X 10(5) np, respectively in pearl millet and rice and only one DNA fraction with an

  2. DNA Charge Transport within the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Grodick, Michael A.; Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    The unique characteristics of DNA charge transport (CT) have prompted an examination of roles for this chemistry within a biological context. Not only can DNA CT facilitate long range oxidative damage of DNA, but redox-active proteins can couple to the DNA base stack and participate in long range redox reactions using DNA CT. DNA transcription factors with redox-active moieties such as SoxR and p53 can use DNA CT as a form of redox sensing. DNA CT chemistry also provides a means to monitor the integrity of the DNA, given the sensitivity of DNA CT to perturbations in base stacking as arise with mismatches and lesions. Enzymes that utilize this chemistry include an interesting and ever-growing class of DNA-processing enzymes involved in DNA repair, replication, and transcription that have been found to contain 4Fe-4S clusters. DNA repair enzymes containing 4Fe-4S clusters, that include Endonuclease III (EndoIII), MutY, and DinG from bacteria, as well as XPD from archaea, have been shown to be redox-active when bound to DNA, share a DNA-bound redox potential, and can be reduced and oxidized at long range via DNA CT. Interactions between DNA and these proteins in solution, in addition to genetics experiments within E. coli, suggest that DNA-mediated CT can be used as a means of cooperative signaling among DNA repair proteins that contain 4Fe-4S clusters as a first step in finding DNA damage, even within cells. Based on these data, we can consider also how DNA-mediated CT may be used as a means of signaling to coordinate DNA processing across the genome. PMID:25606780

  3. Programmable energy landscapes for kinetic control of DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Machinek, Robert R F; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Haley, Natalie E C; Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2014-11-10

    DNA is used to construct synthetic systems that sense, actuate, move and compute. The operation of many dynamic DNA devices depends on toehold-mediated strand displacement, by which one DNA strand displaces another from a duplex. Kinetic control of strand displacement is particularly important in autonomous molecular machinery and molecular computation, in which non-equilibrium systems are controlled through rates of competing processes. Here, we introduce a new method based on the creation of mismatched base pairs as kinetic barriers to strand displacement. Reaction rate constants can be tuned across three orders of magnitude by altering the position of such a defect without significantly changing the stabilities of reactants or products. By modelling reaction free-energy landscapes, we explore the mechanistic basis of this control mechanism. We also demonstrate that oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of DNA, is capable of accurately predicting and explaining the impact of mismatches on displacement kinetics.

  4. Towards the Batch Synthesis of Long DNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    MISMATCHES In a series of papers,136 the SantaLucia NN model137 of Watson - Crick paired DNA thermodynamics was successfully extended to incorporate...generally indicate a- helix coding or structural motifs for DNA incorporation into chromatin. Trifonov, E. N., “3-,!10.5-, 200- and 400-base...double-stranded DNA , is well-described by Hearst’s “weakly bending rod” model with 3.4 Å rise/bp and 13 Å radius for the helix ; its persistence length39

  5. SLX4-SLX1 Protein-independent Down-regulation of MUS81-EME1 Protein by HIV-1 Viral Protein R (Vpr).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaohong; DeLucia, Maria; Ahn, Jinwoo

    2016-08-12

    Evolutionarily conserved structure-selective endonuclease MUS81 forms a complex with EME1 and further associates with another endonuclease SLX4-SLX1 to form a four-subunit complex of MUS81-EME1-SLX4-SLX1, coordinating distinctive biochemical activities of both endonucleases in DNA repair. Viral protein R (Vpr), a highly conserved accessory protein in primate lentiviruses, was previously reported to bind SLX4 to mediate down-regulation of MUS81. However, the detailed mechanism underlying MUS81 down-regulation is unclear. Here, we report that HIV-1 Vpr down-regulates both MUS81 and its cofactor EME1 by hijacking the host CRL4-DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase. Multiple Vpr variants, from HIV-1 and SIV, down-regulate both MUS81 and EME1. Furthermore, a C-terminally truncated Vpr mutant and point mutants R80A and Q65R, all of which lack G2 arrest activity, are able to down-regulate MUS81-EME1, suggesting that Vpr-induced G2 arrest is not correlated with MUS81-EME1 down-regulation. We also show that neither the interaction of MUS81-EME1 with Vpr nor their down-regulation is dependent on SLX4-SLX1. Together, these data provide new insight on a conserved function of Vpr in a host endonuclease down-regulation.

  6. Electrostatic surface plasmon resonance: Direct electric field-induced hybridization and denaturation in monolayer nucleic acid films and label-free discrimination of base mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Richard J.; Peterson, Alexander W.; Georgiadis, Rosina M.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that in situ optical surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy can be used to monitor hybridization kinetics for unlabeled DNA in tethered monolayer nucleic acid films on gold in the presence of an applied electrostatic field. The dc field can enhance or retard hybridization and can also denature surface-immobilized DNA duplexes. Discrimination between matched and mismatched hybrids is achieved by simple adjustment of the electrode potential. Although the electric field at the interface is extremely large, the tethered single-stranded DNA thiol probes remain bound and can be reused for subsequent hybridization reactions without loss of efficiency. Only capacitive charging currents are drawn; redox reactions are avoided by maintaining the gold electrode potential within the ideally polarizable region. Because of potential-induced changes in the shape of the surface plasmon resonance curve, we account for the full curve rather than simply the shift in the resonance minimum. PMID:11259682

  7. A microfluidic chip-based fluorescent biosensor for the sensitive and specific detection of label-free single-base mismatch via magnetic beads-based "sandwich" hybridization strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZongWen; Fan, YingWei; Chen, JinFa; Guo, Ying; Wu, WeiHua; He, Ye; Xu, LiangJun; Fu, FengFu

    2013-08-01

    A novel microfluidic chip-based fluorescent DNA biosensor, which utilized the electrophoretic driving mode and magnetic beads-based "sandwich" hybridization strategy, was developed for the sensitive and ultra-specific detection of single-base mismatch DNA in this study. In comparison with previous biosensors, the proposed DNA biosensor has much more robust resistibility to the complex matrix of real saliva and serum samples, shorter analysis time, and much higher discrimination ability for the detection of single-base mismatch. These features, as well as its easiness of fabrication, operation convenience, stability, better reusability, and low cost, make it a promising alternative to the SNPs genotyping/detection in clinical diagnosis. By using the biosensor, we have successfully determined oral cancer-related DNA in saliva and serum samples without sample labeling and any preseparation or dilution with a detection limit of 5.6 × 10(-11) M, a RSD (n = 5) < 5% and a discrimination factor of 3.58-4.54 for one-base mismatch.

  8. Effect of contralateral white noise masking on the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Salo, S K; Lang, A H; Salmivalli, A J

    1995-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditive event-related potential (ERP) component, evoked by deviant stimuli in a homogeneous stream of standard stimuli was studied in a unilateral stimulation and contralateral white noise masking condition. Eleven subjects (Ss) with normal hearing (aged 20-35 years) were examined using sine tone stimuli (70 dB HL, interstimulus interval 300 ms, duration 40 ms with 5 ms rise and fall times). Three blocks of standard (std)/deviant (dev) series of stimuli were used: std 500/dev 600 Hz, std 2000/dev 1900 Hz, and std 2000/dev 1600 Hz. The first block was repeated for another group of 11 Ss with normal hearing (aged 17-27 years). The MMN was analysed from the difference curves recorded at Fz, Cz and Pz. The stimuli were delivered unilaterally, either with or without 50 dB effective masking level white noise to the contralateral ear. The MMN amplitude attenuated significantly when contralateral masking was used. In addition, there was interaction between noise masking and the stimulated ear. The MMN latencies were not affected by white noise masking.

  9. Modeling cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. M.; Speck, J. S.; Romanov, A. E.; Bobeth, M.; Pompe, W.

    2002-02-01

    We propose and investigate a model for the development of cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers. The model incorporates two important elements: (i) strain relaxation due to dislocation glide in the layer (film) interior that is also associated with misfit dislocation formation at the film/substrate interface and (ii) lateral surface transport that eliminates surface steps that originated from dislocation glide. A combination of dislocation-assisted strain relaxation and surface step flow leads to the appearance of surface height undulations during layer growth. A Monte Carlo simulation technique was applied to model dislocation nucleation events in the course of strain relaxation. The simulation was used to model the influence of dislocations on film surface height profiles. The surface height displacement was calculated from the analytic elasticity solutions for edge dislocations near a free surface. The results of the modeling predict that the average amplitude of the surface undulations and their apparent wavelength both increase with increasing film relaxation and film thickness. The developed cross-hatch pattern is characterized by an atomically smooth but mesoscopically (lateral dimensions ˜0.1-10 μm) rough surface morphology. The conclusions of the model are in agreement with atomic force microscopy observations of cross-hatch surface relief in In0.25Ga0.75As/GaAs samples grown well beyond the critical thickness for misfit dislocation formation.

  10. Systematic misestimation in a vernier task arising from contrast mismatch.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Lee, Barry B; Baraas, Rigmor C

    2008-01-01

    Luminance signals mediated by the magnocellular (MC) pathway play an important role in vernier tasks. MC ganglion cells show a phase advance in their responses to sinusoidal stimuli with increasing contrast due to contrast gain control mechanisms. If the phase information in MC ganglion cell responses were utilized by central mechanisms in vernier tasks, one might expect systematic errors caused by the phase advance. This systematic error may contribute to the contrast paradox phenomenon, where vernier performance deteriorates, rather than improves, when only one of the target pair increases in contrast. Vernier psychometric functions for a pair of gratings of mismatched contrast were measured to seek such misestimation. In associated electrophysiological experiments, MC and parvocellular (PC) ganglion cells' responses to similar stimuli were measured to provide a physiological reference. The psychophysical experiments show that a high-contrast grating is perceived as phase advanced in the drift direction compared to a low-contrast grating, especially at a high drift rate (8 Hz). The size of the phase advance was comparable to that seen in MC cells under similar stimulus conditions. These results are consistent with the MC pathway supporting vernier performance with achromatic gratings. The shifts in vernier psychometric functions were negligible for pairs of chromatic gratings under the conditions tested here, consistent with the lack of phase advance both in responses of PC ganglion cells and in frequency-doubled chromatic responses of MC ganglion cells.

  11. Modelling Trial-by-Trial Changes in the Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Lieder, Falk; Daunizeau, Jean; Garrido, Marta I.; Friston, Karl J.; Stephan, Klaas E.

    2013-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) is a differential brain response to violations of learned regularities. It has been used to demonstrate that the brain learns the statistical structure of its environment and predicts future sensory inputs. However, the algorithmic nature of these computations and the underlying neurobiological implementation remain controversial. This article introduces a mathematical framework with which competing ideas about the computational quantities indexed by MMN responses can be formalized and tested against single-trial EEG data. This framework was applied to five major theories of the MMN, comparing their ability to explain trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude. Three of these theories (predictive coding, model adjustment, and novelty detection) were formalized by linking the MMN to different manifestations of the same computational mechanism: approximate Bayesian inference according to the free-energy principle. We thereby propose a unifying view on three distinct theories of the MMN. The relative plausibility of each theory was assessed against empirical single-trial MMN amplitudes acquired from eight healthy volunteers in a roving oddball experiment. Models based on the free-energy principle provided more plausible explanations of trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude than models representing the two more traditional theories (change detection and adaptation). Our results suggest that the MMN reflects approximate Bayesian learning of sensory regularities, and that the MMN-generating process adjusts a probabilistic model of the environment according to prediction errors. PMID:23436989

  12. Meniscus replacement: Influence of geometrical mismatches on chondroprotective capabilities.

    PubMed

    Párraga Quiroga, J M; Ito, K; van Donkelaar, C C

    2015-06-01

    The chondroprotective success of meniscal transplantation is variable. Poorly controlled factors such as a geometrical mismatch of the implant may be partly responsible. Clinical data, animal studies and cadaver experiments suggest that smaller transplants perform better than oversized, but clear evidence is lacking. The hypothesis of this study is that smaller menisci outperform larger ones because they distribute stresses more effectively at those particular locations that receive the highest loads. Consequently, collagen in the adjacent cartilage is protected from damage due to overstraining. Experimentally it is not possible to measure load distribution and collagen strain inside articular cartilage (AC). Therefore, a numerical model was used to determine the mechanical conditions throughout the depth of the AC. Meniscus implants with different sizes and mechanical properties were evaluated. These were compared with healthy and with meniscectomized joints. To account for the time-dependent behavior 600s of loading was simulated; results were visualized after 1s and 600s. Simulations showed that AC's strains strongly depended on implant size and loading duration. They depended less on the stiffness of the implant material. With an oversized implant, collagen strains were particularly large in the femoral AC initially and further increased upon sustained loading. The severest compressive strains occurred after sustained loading in the meniscectomized joint. Strains with an undersized meniscus were comparable to a perfectly sized implant. In conclusion, these results support the hypothesis that an undersized implant may outperform an oversized one because it distributes stresses better in the most intensely loaded joint area.

  13. Rubberband Effect in Temporal Control of Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Lin, Xiaoxiong; Zhou, Bin; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a difference event-related potential (ERP) wave reflecting the brain’s automatic reaction to deviant sensory stimuli, and it has been proven to be a useful tool in research on cognitive functions or clinical disorders. In most MMN studies, amplitude, peak latency, or the integral of the responses, in rare cases also the slopes of the responses, have been employed as parameters of the ERP responses for quantitative analyses. However, little is known about correlations between these parameters. To better understand the relations between different ERP parameters, we extracted and correlated several different parameters characterizing the MMN waves. We found an unexpected correlation which gives new insight into the temporal control of MMN: response amplitudes are positively correlated with downside slopes, whereas barely correlated with upside slopes. This result suggests an efficient feedback mechanism for the MMN to return to the baseline within a predefined time window, contradicting an exponential decay function as one might expect. As a metaphor we suggest a rubberband effect for the MMN responses, i.e., the larger the distance of the response from neural equilibrium, the stronger the return force to equilibrium. PMID:27642285

  14. Mammalian mismatches in nucleotide metabolism: implications for xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Khalpey, Zain; Yuen, Ada H Y; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; McGregor, Christopher G A; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Yacoub, Magdi H; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2007-10-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) limits the clinical application of animal organs for xenotransplantation. Mammalian disparities in nucleotide metabolism may contribute significantly to the microvascular component in AHR; these, however remain ill-defined. We evaluated the extent of species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism. HPLC analysis was performed on venous blood samples (nucleotide metabolites) and heart biopsies (purine enzymes) from wild type mice, rats, pigs, baboons, and human donors.Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (E5'N) activities were 4-fold lower in pigs and baboon hearts compared to human and mice hearts while rat activity was highest. Similar differences between pigs and humans were also observed with kidneys and endothelial cells. More than 10-fold differences were observed with other purine enzymes. AMP deaminase (AMPD) activity was exceptionally high in mice but very low in pig and baboon hearts. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was highest in baboons. Adenosine kinase (AK) activity was more consistent across different species. Pig blood had the highest levels of hypoxanthine, inosine and adenine. Human blood uric acid concentration was almost 100 times higher than in other species studied. We conclude that species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism may affect compatibility of pig organs within a human metabolic environment. Furthermore, nucleotide metabolic mismatches may affect clinical relevance of animal organ transplant models. Supplementation of deficient precursors or application of inhibitors of nucleotide metabolism (e.g., allopurinol) or transgenic upregulation of E5'N may overcome some of these differences.

  15. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J.; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J.; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy—projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace. PMID:26584870

  16. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    PubMed Central

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour. PMID:24619446

  17. Repair of Single- and Multiple-Substitution Mismatches during Recombination in Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gasc, A. M.; Sicard, A. M.; Claverys, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    The use as genetic markers, during transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae, of 19 sequences differing from wild type, located throughout the amiA locus, enabled us to examine the fate of 24 single- and 11 multiple-mismatches during recombination. Tentative mismatch ranking as a function of decreasing repair efficiency by the Hex mismatch repair system is G/T = A/C = G/G (maximum repair: 90-95%) > C/T (mostly 75 to 90% repair) > A/A (from 50 to 90% repair) > T/T (50-65% repair) > A/G (from 0 to 20% repair) > C/C. No indication of correction of the latter has been obtained. Over the limited number of samples examined, we observed no influence of the base composition of the surrounding sequence on correction efficiency for both transition mismatches and for G/G and C/C. Variations in the surrounding sequence affect repair of A/G and C/T, and, even more strongly, of A/A and T/T. No simple correlation to the G:C content of the surrounding sequence is apparent from our results, in contrast to the conclusion drawn for the Mut mismatch repair system of Escherichia coli. Examination of the fate of multiple mismatches suggests that C/C may sometimes impede recognition of otherwise corrected mismatches. PMID:2645195

  18. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  19. Impact of ABO blood group mismatch in alemtuzumab-based reduced-intensity conditioned haematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Brierley, C K; Littlewood, T J; Peniket, A J; Gregg, R; Ward, J; Clark, A; Parker, A; Malladi, R; Medd, P

    2015-07-01

    The impact of ABO incompatibility on clinical outcomes following haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) remains controversial. This retrospective study assessed the effect of ABO mismatch on transplant outcomes and transfusion requirements in 594 patients undergoing reduced-intensity conditioned (RIC) HSCT with alemtuzumab in three UK transplant centres. We found no significant effects of minor, major or bidirectional ABO mismatch on overall survival, relapse-free survival, nonrelapse mortality or relapse incidence. Although the rate of acute GVHD was unaffected by ABO mismatch, the incidence of extensive chronic GVHD was higher in patients with minor and major mismatch compared with those who were ABO matched (hazard ratio (HR) 1.74, P=0.032 for minor, HR 1.69 P=0.0036 for major mismatch). Red cell and platelet transfusion requirements in the first 100 days post transplant did not differ by ABO mismatch. In this large UK series, ABO mismatch in RIC HSCT has no clinically significant effect on survival outcomes but appears to modify susceptibility to extensive chronic GVHD.

  20. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex drives hippocampal theta oscillations induced by mismatch computations.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Marta I; Barnes, Gareth R; Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-10-15

    Detecting environmental change is fundamental for adaptive behavior in an uncertain world. Previous work indicates the hippocampus supports the generation of novelty signals via implementation of a match-mismatch detector that signals when an incoming sensory input violates expectations based on past experience. While existing work has emphasized the particular contribution of the hippocampus, here we ask which other brain structures also contribute to match-mismatch detection. Furthermore, we leverage the fine-grained temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate whether mismatch computations are spectrally confined to the theta range, based on the prominence of this range of oscillations in models of hippocampal function. By recording MEG activity while human subjects perform a task that incorporates conditions of match-mismatch novelty we show that mismatch signals are confined to the theta band and are expressed in both the hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Effective connectivity analyses (dynamic causal modeling) show that the hippocampus and vmPFC work as a functional circuit during mismatch detection. Surprisingly, our results suggest that the vmPFC drives the hippocampus during the generation and processing of mismatch signals. Our findings provide new evidence that the hippocampal-vmPFC circuit is engaged during novelty processing, which has implications for emerging theories regarding the role of vmPFC in memory.

  1. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage.

    PubMed

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L Scott; Lukacs, Paul M; Mitchell, Michael S

    2014-05-07

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  2. Social, Spatial, and Skill Mismatch among Immigrants and Native-Born Workers in Los Angeles. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastor, Manuel, Jr.; Marcelli, Enrico A.

    Racially different economic outcomes stem from multiple causes, including various "mismatches" between minority employees and available jobs. A skill mismatch occurs when individuals' education and job skills do not qualify them for existing jobs. A spatial mismatch means that people live far from the work for which they qualify. A…

  3. Mismatch repair defects and Lynch syndrome: The role of the basic scientist in the battle against cancer.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Christopher D

    2016-02-01

    We have currently entered a genomic era of cancer research which may soon lead to a genomic era of cancer treatment. Patient DNA sequencing information may lead to a personalized approach to managing an individual's cancer as well as future cancer risk. The success of this approach, however, begins not necessarily in the clinician's office, but rather at the laboratory bench of the basic scientist. The basic scientist plays a critical role since the DNA sequencing information is of limited use unless one knows the function of the gene that is altered and the manner by which a sequence alteration affects that function. The role of basic science research in aiding the clinical management of a disease is perhaps best exemplified by considering the case of Lynch syndrome, a hereditary disease that predisposes patients to colorectal and other cancers. This review will examine how the diagnosis, treatment and even prevention of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers has benefitted from extensive basic science research on the DNA mismatch repair genes whose alteration underlies this condition.

  4. Competency in mismatch repair prohibits clonal expansion of cancer cells treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine.

    PubMed Central

    Carethers, J M; Hawn, M T; Chauhan, D P; Luce, M C; Marra, G; Koi, M; Boland, C R

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenon of alkylation tolerance has been observed in cells that are deficient in some component of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. An alkylation-induced cell cycle arrest had been reported previously in one MMR-proficient cell line, whereas a MMR-defective clone derived from this line escapes from this arrest. We examined human cancer cell lines to determine if the cell cycle arrest were dependent upon the MMR system. Growth characteristics and cell cycle analysis after MNNG treatment were ascertained in seven MMR-deficient and proficient cell lines, with and without confirmed mutations in hMLH1 or hMSH2 by an in vitro transcription/translation assay. MMR-proficient cells underwent growth arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle after the first S phase, whereas MMR-deficient cells escaped an initial G2 delay and resumed a normal growth pattern. In the HCT116 line corrected for defective MMR by chromosome 3 transfer, the G2 phase arrest lasted more than five days. In another MMR-proficient colon cancer cell line, SW480, cell death occurred five days after MNNG treatment. A competent MMR system appears to be necessary for G2 arrest or cell death after alkylation damage, and this cell cycle checkpoint may allow the cell to repair damaged DNA, or prevent the replication of mutated DNA by prohibiting clonal expansion. PMID:8690794

  5. Re-Examining Risk of Repeated HLA Mismatch in Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tinckam, Kathryn J; Rose, Caren; Hariharan, Sundaram; Gill, John

    2016-09-01

    Kidney retransplantation is a risk factor for decreased allograft survival. Repeated mismatched HLA antigens between first and second transplant may be a stimulus for immune memory responses and increased risk of alloimmune damage to the second allograft. Historical data identified a role of repeated HLA mismatches in allograft loss. However, evolution of HLA testing methods and a modern transplant era necessitate re-examination of this role to more accurately risk-stratify recipients. We conducted a contemporary registry analysis of data from 13,789 patients who received a second kidney transplant from 1995 to 2011, of which 3868 had one or more repeated mismatches. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling revealed no effect of repeated mismatches on all-cause or death-censored graft loss. Analysis of predefined subgroups, however, showed that any class 2 repeated mismatch increased the hazard of death-censored graft loss, particularly in patients with detectable panel-reactive antibody before second transplant (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.02 to 1.29). Furthermore, in those who had nephrectomy of the first allograft, class 2 repeated mismatches specifically associated with all-cause (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.58) and death-censored graft loss (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.78). These updated data redefine the effect of repeated mismatches in retransplantation and challenge the paradigm that repeated mismatches in isolation confer increased immunologic risk. We also defined clear recipient categories for which repeated mismatches may be of greater concern in a contemporary cohort. Additional studies are needed to determine appropriate interventions for these recipients.

  6. DNA Vaccination Techniques.

    PubMed

    Fissolo, Nicolás; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory, demyelinating, and neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans. Although the etiology of MS remains unknown, several lines of evidence support the notion that autoimmunity against components of the myelin sheath plays a major role in susceptibility to and development of the disease. At present, there are no approved MS therapies aimed specifically toward downregulating antigen-specific autoreactive immune cells. One antigen-specific approach that appears promising for the treatment of MS is DNA vaccination. This technique has demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials while maintaining safety.Here, we describe the generation of DNA vaccines containing immunologically relevant antigens of MS. Moreover, we present a detailed protocol for the prophylactic and therapeutic administration of DNA vaccines via intramuscular injection targeting on the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model resembling MS.

  7. DNA Charge Transport over 34 nm

    PubMed Central

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. DNA of precise length, by contrast, is easily synthesized, but its conductivity has not been explored over the distances required for nanoscale devices. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation that is accessible to protein binding. Similar electron transfer rates are measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers, consistent with rate-limiting electron tunneling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses most reports of molecular wires. PMID:21336329

  8. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  9. DNA-quantum dot sensing platform with combined Förster resonance energy transfer and photovoltaic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huijie; Wang, Lixiang; Wong, Ka-wai; Du, Zuliang

    2009-04-01

    A special DNA sensing platform based on a network of hybrid DNA-quantum dot system was designed and fabricated. Upon attachment of hybridized complementary DNA sequences, the molecular switch system can exhibit both photoinduced Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and photovoltaic (PV) effects simultaneously, but will give much weakened or no effect for the capture of hybridized products from "mismatched" DNA sequences. This dual sensing scheme based on combined FRET and PV effects can safeguard the accuracy of sensing, as FRET and PV can be singly induced even in the case of mismatch.

  10. Band anticrossing effects in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junqiao

    2002-01-01

    The first five chapters of this thesis focus on studies of band anticrossing (BAC) effects in highly electronegativity- mismatched semiconductor alloys. The concept of bandgap bowing has been used to describe the deviation of the alloy bandgap from a linear interpolation. Bowing parameters as large as 2.5 eV (for ZnSTe) and close to zero (for AlGaAs and ZnSSe) have been observed experimentally. Recent advances in thin film deposition techniques have allowed the growth of semiconductor alloys composed of significantly different constituents with ever- improving crystalline quality (e.g., GaAs1-xNx and GaP1-xNx with x ~< 0.05). These alloys exhibit many novel and interesting properties including, in particular, a giant bandgap bowing (bowing parameters > 14 eV). A band anticrossing model has been developed to explain these properties. The model shows that the predominant bowing mechanism in these systems is driven by the anticrossing interaction between the localized level associated with the minority component and the band states of the host. In this thesis I discuss my studies of the BAC effects in these highly mismatched semiconductors. It will be shown that the results of the physically intuitive BAC model can be derived from the Hamiltonian of the many-impurity Anderson model. The band restructuring caused by the BAC interaction is responsible for a series of experimental observations such as a large bandgap reduction, an enhancement of the electron effective mass, and a decrease in the pressure coefficient of the fundamental gap energy. Results of further experimental investigations of the optical properties of quantum wells based on these materials will be also presented. It will be shown that the BAC interaction occurs not only between localized states and conduction band states at the Brillouin zone center, but also exists over all of k-space. Finally, taking ZnSTe and ZnSeTe as examples, I show that BAC also

  11. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(sub x)Te(sub 1-x) and ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, y between 0 and 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the

  12. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Ramdas, A.; Su, Ching-Hua; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(x)V(1-x), alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(x),V(1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(x)Te(l-x) and ZnSe(Y)Te(1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(y)Te(1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, 0 less than or equal to y less than or equal to 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(y)Te(1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the interaction between

  13. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  14. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Petruzielo, Robin S; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kucerka, Norbert; Feigenson, Gerald; Katsaras, John

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  15. Interictal lack of habituation of mismatch negativity in migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Losito, L; Difruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Puca, F M

    2004-08-01

    The aim was to study mismatch negativity features and habituation during the interictal phase of migraine. In migraine patients, a strong negative correlation has been found between the initial amplitude of long latency auditory-evoked potentials and their amplitude increase during subsequent averaging. We studied 12 outpatients with a diagnosis of migraine without aura recorded in a headache-free interval and 10 gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers not suffering from any recurrent headache. The experiment consisted of two sequential blocks of 2000 stimulations, during which 1800 (90%) recordings for standard tones and 200 (10%) for target tones were selected for averaging. The latency of the N1 component was significantly increased in migraine patients in respect of controls in both the first and second repetitions; the MMN latency was increased in the second repetition. In the control group the MMN amplitude decreased on average by 3.2 +/- 1.4 microV in the second trial, whereas in migraine patients it showed a slight increase of 0.21 +/- 0.11 microV in the second repetition. The MMN latency relieved in the second trial was significantly correlated with the duration of illness in the migraine patients (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.69; P < 0.05). The increases in N1 latency and MMN latency and amplitude, the latter correlated with duration of illness, seemed to be due to a reduced anticipatory effect of stimulus repetition in migraine patients. This suggests that such hypo-activity of automatic cortical processes, subtending the discrimination of acoustic stimuli, may be a basic abnormality in migraine, developing in the course of the disease.

  16. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Shan, W.; Scrapulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Becla, P.

    2005-03-21

    It has long been recognized that the introduction of a narrow band of states in a semiconductor band gap could be used to achieve improved power conversion efficiency in semiconductor-based solar cells. The intermediate band would serve as a ''stepping stone'' for photons of different energy to excite electrons from the valence to the conduction band. An important advantage of this design is that it requires formation of only a single p-n junction, which is a crucial simplification in comparison to multijunction solar cells. A detailed balance analysis predicts a limiting efficiency of more than 50% for an optimized, single intermediate band solar cell. This is higher than the efficiency of an optimized two junction solar cell. Using ion beam implantation and pulsed laser melting we have synthesized Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys with x<0.03. These highly mismatched alloys have a unique electronic structure with a narrow oxygen-derived intermediate band. The width and the location of the band is described by the Band Anticrossing model and can be varied by controlling the oxygen content. This provides a unique opportunity to optimize the absorption of solar photons for best solar cell performance. We have carried out systematic studies of the effects of the intermediate band on the optical and electrical properties of Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys. We observe an extension of the photovoltaic response towards lower photon energies, which is a clear indication of optical transitions from the valence to the intermediate band.

  17. MUTYH and the mismatch repair system: partners in crime?

    PubMed

    Niessen, Renée C; Sijmons, Rolf H; Ou, J; Olthof, Sandra G M; Osinga, Jan; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Weiss, Marjan M; Tops, Carli M J; Hes, Frederik J; de Bock, Geertruida H; Buys, Charles H C M; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2006-03-01

    Biallelic germline mutations of MUTYH-a gene encoding a base excision repair protein-are associated with an increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer. Whether monoallelic MUTYH mutations also increase cancer risk is not yet clear, although there is some evidence suggesting a slight increase of risk. As the MUTYH protein interacts with the mismatch repair (MMR) system, we hypothesised that the combination of a monoallelic MUTYH mutation with an MMR gene mutation increases cancer risk. We therefore investigated the prevalence of monoallelic MUTYH mutations in carriers of a germline MMR mutation: 40 carriers of a truncating mutation (group I) and 36 of a missense mutation (group II). These patients had been diagnosed with either colorectal or endometrial cancer. We compared their MUTYH mutation frequencies with those observed in a group of 134 Dutch colorectal and endometrial cancer patients without an MMR gene mutation (0.7%) and those reported for Caucasian controls (1.5%). In group I one monoallelic MUTYH mutation was found (2.5%). In group II five monoallelic germline MUTYH mutations were found (14%), four of them in MSH6 missense mutation carriers (20%). Of all patients with an MMR gene mutation, only those with a missense mutation showed a significantly higher frequency of (monoallelic) MUTYH mutations than the Dutch cancer patients without MMR gene mutations (P = 0.002) and the published controls (P = 0.001). These results warrant further study to test the hypothesis of mutations in MMR genes (in particular MSH6) and MUTYH acting together to increase cancer risk.

  18. Mismatched racial identities, colourism, and health in Toronto and Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Gerry

    2011-10-01

    Using original telephone survey data collected from adult residents of Toronto (n = 685) and Vancouver (n = 814) in 2009, I investigate associations between mental and physical health and variously conceived racial identities. An 'expressed racial identity' is a self-identification with a racial grouping that a person will readily express to others when asked to fit into official racial classifications presented by Census forms, survey researchers, insurance forms, and the like. Distinguishing between Asian, Black, South Asian, and White expressed racial identities, I find that survey respondents expressing Black identity are the most likely to report high blood pressure or hypertension, a risk that is slightly attenuated by socioeconomic status, and that respondents expressing Asian identity are the most likely to report poorer self-rated mental health and self-rated overall health, risks that are not explained by socioeconomic status. I also find that darker-skinned Black respondents are more likely than lighter-skinned Black respondents to report poor health outcomes, indicating that colourism, processes of discrimination which privilege lighter-skinned people of colour over their darker-skinned counterparts, exists and has implications for well-being in Canada as it does in the United States. Finally, 'reflected racial identity' refers to the racial identity that a person believes that others tend to perceive him or her to be. I find that expressed and reflected racial identities differ from one another for large proportions of self-expressed Black and South Asian respondents and relatively few self-expressed White and Asian respondents. I also find that mismatched racial identities correspond with relatively high risks of various poor health outcomes, especially for respondents who consider themselves White but believe that others tend to think they are something else. I conclude by presenting a framework for conceptualizing multifaceted suites of racial

  19. Ventilation/perfusion mismatch during lung aeration at birth.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; te Pas, Arjan B; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Wheeler, Kevin I; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sonobe, Takashi; Hooper, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    At birth, the transition to newborn life is triggered by lung aeration, which stimulates a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF). Current theories predict that the increase in PBF is spatially related to ventilated lung regions as they aerate after birth. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography we investigated the spatial relationships between lung aeration and the increase in PBF after birth. Six near-term (30-day gestation) rabbits were delivered by caesarean section, intubated and an intravenous catheter inserted, before they were positioned for X-ray imaging. During imaging, iodine was injected before ventilation onset, after ventilation of the right lung only, and after ventilation of both lungs. Unilateral ventilation increased iodine levels entering both left and right pulmonary arteries (PAs) and significantly increased heart rate, iodine ejection per beat, diameters of both left and right PAs, and number of visible vessels in both lungs. Within the 6th intercostal space, the mean gray level (relative measure of iodine level) increased from 68.3 ± 11.6 and 70.3 ± 7.5%·s to 136.3 ± 22.6 and 136.3 ± 23.7%·s in the left and right PAs, respectively. No differences were observed between vessels in the left and right lungs, despite the left lung not initially being ventilated. The increase in PBF at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration allowing a large ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or pulmonary shunting, to occur in the partially aerated lung at birth.

  20. Ultrasensitive fluorescence polarization DNA detection by target assisted exonuclease III-catalyzed signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Guan, Yi-Meng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2011-03-28

    Single stranded DNA sequences can be detected by target assisted exonuclease III-catalyzed signal amplification fluorescence polarization (TAECA-FP). The method offers an impressive detection limit of 83 aM within one hour for DNA detection and exhibits high discrimination ability even against a single base mismatch.

  1. Velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters via sampled position data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Huang, Chunli; Lü, Jinhu; Li, Xiong; Chen, Shihua

    2016-02-01

    Power systems are special multi-agent systems with nonlinear coupling function and symmetric structures. This paper extends these systems to a class of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters, linear coupling function, and asymmetric structures and investigates their velocity synchronization via sampled position data. The dynamics of the agents is adopted as that of generators with mismatched parameters, while the system structures are supposed to be complex. Two distributed linear consensus protocols are designed, respectively, for multi-agent systems without or with communication delay. Necessary and sufficient conditions based on the sampling period, the mismatched parameters, the delay, and the nonzero eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix are established. It is shown that velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters can be achieved if the sampled period is chosen appropriately. Simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  2. A Direct Adaptive Control Approach in the Presence of Model Mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Tao, Gang; Khong, Thuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of direct model reference adaptive control when the plant-model matching conditions are violated due to abnormal changes in the plant or incorrect knowledge of the plant's mathematical structure. The approach consists of direct adaptation of state feedback gains for state tracking, and simultaneous estimation of the plant-model mismatch. Because of the mismatch, the plant can no longer track the state of the original reference model, but may be able to track a new reference model that still provides satisfactory performance. The reference model is updated if the estimated plant-model mismatch exceeds a bound that is determined via robust stability and/or performance criteria. The resulting controller is a hybrid direct-indirect adaptive controller that offers asymptotic state tracking in the presence of plant-model mismatch as well as parameter deviations.

  3. Effects of electrode array length on frequency-place mismatch and speech perception with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Venail, Frederic; Mathiolon, Caroline; Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie; Piron, Jean Pierre; Sicard, Marielle; Villemus, Françoise; Vessigaud, Marie Aude; Sterkers-Artieres, Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Uziel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-place mismatch often occurs after cochlear implantation, yet its effect on speech perception outcome remains unclear. In this article, we propose a method, based on cochlea imaging, to determine the cochlear place-frequency map. We evaluated the effect of frequency-place mismatch on speech perception outcome in subjects implanted with 3 different lengths of electrode arrays. A deeper insertion was responsible for a larger frequency-place mismatch and a decreased and delayed speech perception improvement by comparison with a shallower insertion, for which a similar but slighter effect was noticed. Our results support the notion that selecting an electrode array length adapted to each individual's cochlear anatomy may reduce frequency-place mismatch and thus improve speech perception outcome.

  4. New Spectral Method for Halo Particle Definition in Intense Mis-matched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2011-04-27

    An advanced spectral analysis of a mis-matched charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing transport lattice is utilized in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the betatron frequency distribution function of a mismatched space-charge-dominated beam has a bump-on-tail structure attributed to the beam halo particles. Based on this observation, a new spectral method for halo particle definition is proposed that provides the opportunity to carry out a quantitative analysis of halo particle production by a beam mismatch. In addition, it is shown that the spectral analysis of the mismatch relaxation process provides important insights into the emittance growth attributed to the halo formation and the core relaxation processes. Finally, the spectral method is applied to the problem of space-charge transport limits.

  5. Human errors are symptoms of a mismatch between pilots, machines and the operating environment.

    PubMed

    Sarter, N B

    1996-10-01

    The author suggests that errors should be the starting point for analysis of aviation mishaps. The analysis should focus on human, automation, and environment interaction and determine any mismatch among these factors.

  6. A spectral method for halo particle definition in intense mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2011-04-15

    An advanced spectral analysis of a mismatched charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing transport lattice is utilized in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the betatron frequency distribution function of a mismatched space-charge-dominated beam has a bump-on-tail structure attributed to the beam halo particles. Based on this observation, a new spectral method for halo particle definition is proposed that provides the opportunity to carry out a quantitative analysis of halo particle production by a beam mismatch. In addition, it is shown that the spectral analysis of the mismatch relaxation process provides important insights into the emittance growth attributed to the halo formation and the core relaxation processes. Finally, the spectral method is applied to the problem of space-charge transport limits.

  7. Indicator Based and Indicator - Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of genomic material from infectious organisms. Methylene blue (MB) is an aromatic heterocycle that binds strongly to DNA via intercalation. MB...detection of disease- related point mutation in the guanine bases of the cyanobacteria . The resulting biosensors offer great promise for mismatch

  8. Comparison of the Mismatch Repair System between Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancers Using Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jiyoon; Kang, Youngjin; Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Eojin; Ahn, Bokyung; Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Joo Young; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Youngseok; Kim, Chul Hwan; Chae, Yang-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Approximately 10%–15% of the CRC cases have defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Although the high level of microsatellite instability status is a predictor of favorable outcome in primary CRC, little is known about its frequency and importance in secondary CRC. Immunohistochemical staining (IHC) for MMR proteins (e.g., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) has emerged as a useful technique to complement polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Methods In this study, comparison between the MMR system of primary CRCs and paired liver and lung metastatic lesions was done using IHC and the correlation with clinical outcomes was also examined. Results Based on IHC, 7/61 primary tumors (11.4%) showed deficient MMR systems, while 13/61 secondary tumors (21.3%) showed deficiencies. In total, 44 cases showed proficient expression in both the primary and metastatic lesions. Three cases showed deficiencies in both the primary and paired metastatic lesions. In 10 cases, proficient expression was found only in the primary lesions, and not in the corresponding metastatic lesions. In four cases, proficient expression was detected in the secondary tumor, but not in the primary tumor. Conclusions Although each IHC result and the likely defective genes were not exactly matched between the primary and the metastatic tumors, identical results for primary and metastatic lesions were obtained in 77% of the cases (47/61). These data are in agreement with the previous microsatellite detection studies that used PCR and IHC. PMID:28192899

  9. Engineering zinc finger protein transcription factors to downregulate the epithelial glycoprotein-2 promoter as a novel anti-cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Gommans, Willemijn M; McLaughlin, Pamela M J; Lindhout, Beatrice I; Segal, David J; Wiegman, D J; Haisma, Hidde J; van der Zaal, Bert J; Rots, Marianne G

    2007-05-01

    Zinc finger protein transcription factors (ZFP-TFs) are emerging as powerful novel tools for the treatment of many different diseases. ZFPs are DNA-binding motifs and consist of modular zinc finger domains. Each domain can be engineered to recognize a specific DNA triplet, and stitching six domains together results in the recognition of a gene-specific sequence. Inhibition of gene expression can be achieved by fusing a repressor domain to these DNA-binding motifs. In this study, we engineered ZFP-TFs to downregulate the activity of the epithelial glycoprotein-2 (EGP-2) promoter. The protein EGP-2 is overexpressed in a wide variety of cancer types and EGP-2 downregulation has been shown to result in a decreased oncogenic potential of tumor cells. Therefore, downregulation of EGP-2 expression by ZFP-TFs provides a novel anti-cancer therapeutic. Using a straightforward strategy, we engineered a 3-ZFP that could bind a 9 bp sequence within the EGP-2 promoter. After the addition of a repressor domain, this 3-ZFP-TF could efficiently downregulate EGP-2 promoter activity by 60%. To demonstrate the flexibility of this technology, we coupled an activation domain to the engineered ZFP, resulting in a nearly 200% increase in EGP-2 promoter activity. To inhibit the endogenous EGP-2 promoter, we engineered 6-ZFP-TFs. Although none of the constructed ZFP-TFs could convincingly modulate the endogenous promoter, efficient and specific inhibition of the exogenous promoter was observed. Overall, ZFP-TFs are versatile bi-directional modulators of gene expression and downregulation of EGP-2 promoter activity using ZFP-TFs can ultimately result in a novel anti-cancer treatment.

  10. Patient - implant dimension mismatch in total knee arthroplasty: Is it worth worrying? An Indian scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thilak, Jai; George, Melvin J

    2016-01-01

    Background: The correct sizing of the components in both anteroposterior and mediolateral (ML) dimensions is crucial for the success of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The size of the implants selected is based on the intraoperative measurements. The currently used TKA implants available to us are based on morphometric measurements obtained from a Western/Caucasian population. Hence, the risk of component ML mismatch is more common in Asian sub-population, as they are of a smaller built and stature. This study aims to look into the following aspects agnitude of the ML mismatch between the femoral component and the patient's anatomical dimension, evaluation of gender variations in distal femur dimensions, and gender-wise and implant-wise correlation of ML mismatch. Materials and Methods: Intraoperatively, the distal femoral dimensions were measured using sterile calipers after removing the osteophytes and compared with the ML dimension of the implant used. ML mismatch length thus obtained is correlated with the various parameters. Results: Males showed larger distal femoral dimensions when compared to females. Males had larger ML mismatch. None of the implants used perfectly matched the patient's anatomical dimensions. Patients with larger mismatch had lower scorings at 2 years postoperative followup. Conclusion: Implant manufacturers need to design more options of femoral implants for a better fit in our subset of patients. The exact magnitude of mismatch which can cause functional implications need to be made out. The mismatch being one of the important factors for the success of the surgery, we should focus more on this aspect. PMID:27746494

  11. The incidence and etiology of the ventilation/perfusion reverse mismatch defect

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P.; Lavender, J.P. )

    1989-08-01

    Kr-81m ventilation and Tc-99m perfusion images of 392 patients were examined retrospectively for the incidence and etiology of the reverse mismatch defect, which is characterized by a region of lung where the perfusion defect exceeds the ventilation defect. Forty-six patients (11.7%) showed such defects. The most frequent causes were pneumonia (15%), atelactasis (15%), pleural effusions (15%), chronic obstructive airway disease (24%), and bronchial obstruction (31%). The significance of the reverse mismatch defect is discussed.

  12. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch increases