Science.gov

Sample records for downstream pressure perturbations

  1. Dynamic response of ramjet inlets to downstream perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajben, M.; Bogar, T. J.; Kroutil, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    An external-compression inlet with high-aspect-ratio, rectangular cross sections was investigated in a semi-freejet arrangement at M(infinity) = 1.84 and zero incidence, over a wide range of super- and subcritical conditions. The response of the inlet flows to periodic perturbations imposed at the downstream end was determined. The perturbations were created by mechanical modulation of the choked exhaust area at frequencies from 20 to 360 Hz. The amplitude of the pressure fluctuations induced at the downstream end of the inlet was varied up to 8% of the time-mean static pressure at the same location. The observed oscillations were categorized according to position ranges associated with the shock motion. In supercritical oscillations, the pressure fluctuation amplitudes within the inlet were found to be linearly proportional to the fluctuation intensity at the exit station, establishing the latter as the appropriate quantity for normalization. In subcritical conditions, the inlet displays a large-amplitude natural oscillation (buzz). Superimposed excitation may couple with the natural oscillations in two distinctly different ways, both strongly nonlinear. Combinations of mean flow condition, excitation amplitude, and frequency that cause the terminal shock to move upstream of the cowl or the ramp were determined.

  2. Enhanced diamagnetic perturbations and electric currents observed downstream of the high power helicon

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, B. Race; Winglee, Robert; Prager, James

    2011-05-15

    The high power helicon (HPH) is capable of producing a high density plasma (10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and directed ion energies greater than 20 eV that continue to increase tens of centimeters downstream of the thruster. In order to understand the coupling mechanism between the helicon antenna and the plasma outside the immediate source region, measurements were made in the plasma plume downstream from the thruster of the propagating wave magnetic field and the perturbation of the axial bulk field using a type 'R' helicon antenna. This magnetic field perturbation ({Delta}B) peaks at more than 15 G in strength downstream of the plasma source, and is 3-5 times larger than those previously reported from HPH. Taking the curl of this measured magnetic perturbation and assuming azimuthal symmetry suggests that this magnetic field is generated by a (predominantly) azimuthal current ring with a current density on the order of tens of kA m{sup -2}. At this current density the diamagnetic field is intense enough to cancel out the B{sub 0} axial magnetic field near the source region. The presence of the diamagnetic current is important as it demonstrates modification of the vacuum fields well beyond the source region and signifies the presence of a high density, collimated plasma stream. This diamagnetic current also modifies the propagation of the helicon wave, which facilitates a better understanding of coupling between the helicon wave and the resultant plasma acceleration.

  3. Perturbation biology nominates upstream-downstream drug combinations in RAF inhibitor resistant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Anil; Wang, Weiqing; Demir, Emek; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Jing, Xiaohong; Molinelli, Evan J; Babur, Özgün; Bemis, Debra L; Onur Sumer, Selcuk; Solit, David B; Pratilas, Christine A; Sander, Chris

    2015-08-18

    Resistance to targeted cancer therapies is an important clinical problem. The discovery of anti-resistance drug combinations is challenging as resistance can arise by diverse escape mechanisms. To address this challenge, we improved and applied the experimental-computational perturbation biology method. Using statistical inference, we build network models from high-throughput measurements of molecular and phenotypic responses to combinatorial targeted perturbations. The models are computationally executed to predict the effects of thousands of untested perturbations. In RAF-inhibitor resistant melanoma cells, we measured 143 proteomic/phenotypic entities under 89 perturbation conditions and predicted c-Myc as an effective therapeutic co-target with BRAF or MEK. Experiments using the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 affecting the level of c-Myc protein and protein kinase inhibitors targeting the ERK pathway confirmed the prediction. In conclusion, we propose an anti-cancer strategy of co-targeting a specific upstream alteration and a general downstream point of vulnerability to prevent or overcome resistance to targeted drugs.

  4. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  5. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-08-26

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  6. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-08-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  7. Pressure perturbation calorimetry of unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsamaloukas, Alekos D; Pyzocha, Neena K; Makhatadze, George I

    2010-12-16

    We report the application of pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) to study unfolded proteins. Using PPC we have measured the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient, α(T), in the unfolded state of apocytochrome C and reduced BPTI. We have shown that α(T) is a nonlinear function and decreases with increasing temperature. The decrease is most significant in the low (2-55 °C) temperature range. We have also tested an empirical additivity approach to predict α(T) of unfolded state from the amino acid sequence using α(T) values for individual amino acids. A comparison of the experimental and calculated functions shows a very good agreement, both in absolute values of α(T) and in its temperature dependence. Such an agreement suggests the applicability of using empirical calculations to predict α(T) of any unfolded protein.

  8. Plume diagnostics of SRM static firings for pressure perturbation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, J. K.; Alvarado, Alexis; Mathias, Edward C.

    1995-01-01

    During the shuttle launches, the solid rocket motors (SRM) occasionally experience pressure perturbations (8-13 psi) between 65 and 75 seconds into the motor burn time. The magnitudes of these perturbations are very small in comparison with the operating motor chamber pressure, which is over 600 psi during this time frame. These SRM pressure perturbations are believed to be caused primarily by the expulsion of slag (aluminum oxide). Two SRM static tests, TEM-11 and FSM-4, were instrumented extensive]y for the study of the phenomenon associated with pressure perturbations. The test instrumentation used included nonintrusive optical and infrared diagnostics of the plume, such as high-speed photography, radiometers, and thermal image cameras. Results from all these nonintrusive observations strongly support the scenario that the pressure perturbation event in the shuttle SRM is caused primarily by the expulsion of molten slag. The slag was also expelled preferentially near the bottom of the nozzle due to slag accumulation at the bottom of the aft end of the horizontally oriented motor.

  9. Anisotropic Pressure, Transport, and Shielding of Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick and A.H. Boozer

    2008-05-23

    We compute the effect on a tokamak of applying a nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbation δΒ. An equilibrium with scalar pressure p yields zero net radial current, and therefore zero torque. Thus, the usual approach, which assumes scalar pressure, is not self-consistent, and masks the close connection which exists between that radial current and the in-surface currents, which provide shielding or amplification of δΒ. Here, we analytically compute the pressure anisoptropy, anisoptropy, pll, p⊥ ≠ p, and from this, both the radial and in-surface currents. The surface-average of the radial current recovers earlier expressions for ripple transport, while the in-surface currents provide an expression for the amount of self-consistent shielding the plasma provides.

  10. Application of pressure perturbation calorimetry to lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Heerklotz, Heiko; Seelig, Joachim

    2002-03-01

    Pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) is a new method that measures the heat consumed or released by a sample after a sudden pressure jump. The heat change can be used to derive the thermal volume expansion coefficient, alpha(V), as a function of temperature and, in the case of phase transitions, the volume change, DeltaV, occurring at the phase transition. Here we present the first report on the application of PPC to determine these quantities for lipid bilayers. We measure the volume changes of the pretransition and main transition of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), and the thermal expansivity of the fluid phase of DMPC and of two unsaturated lipids, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. The high sensitivity of PPC instrumentation gives accurate data for alpha(V) and DeltaV even upon the application of relatively low pressures of approximately 5 bar.

  11. Effect of a downstream ventilated gas cavity on turbulent boundary layer wall pressure fluctuation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Steven D.; Brungart, Timothy A.; Lauchle, Gerald C.; Howe, Michael S.

    2005-12-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation is made of the effect of a 2-D ventilated gas cavity on the spectrum of turbulent boundary layer wall pressure fluctuations upstream of a gas cavity on a plane rigid surface. The analytical model predicts the ratio of the wall pressure spectrum in the presence of the cavity to the blocked wall pressure spectrum that would exist if the cavity were absent. The ratio is found to oscillate in amplitude with upstream distance (-x) from the edge of the cavity. It approaches unity as -ωx/Uc-->∞, where ω is the radian frequency and Uc is the upstream turbulence convection velocity. To validate these predictions an experiment was performed in a water tunnel over a range of mean flow velocities. Dynamic wall pressure sensors were flush mounted to a flat plate at various distances upstream from a backward facing step. The cavity was formed downstream of the step by injecting carbon dioxide gas. The water tunnel measurements confirm the predicted oscillatory behavior of the spectral ratio, as well as its relaxation to unity as -ωx/Uc-->∞. For -ωx/Uc>7 the cavity has a negligible influence on the upstream wall pressure fluctuations.

  12. The pattern of parallel edge plasma flows due to pressure gradients, recycling, and resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.; Feng, Y.; Reiter, D.

    2015-07-01

    High resolution plasma transport simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code have been performed to address the parallel plasma flow structure in the boundary of a poloidal divertor configuration with non-axisymmetric perturbations at DIII-D. Simulation results show that a checkerboard pattern of flows with alternating direction is generated inside the separatrix. This pattern is aligned with the position of the main resonances (i.e., where the safety factor is equal to rational values q = m / n for a perturbation field with base mode number n): m pairs of alternating forward and backward flow channel exist for each resonance. The poloidal oscillations are aligned with the subharmonic Melnikov function, which indicates that the plasma flow is generated by parallel pressure gradients along perturbed field lines. An additional scrape-off layer-like domain is introduced by the perturbed separatrix which guides field lines from the interior to the divertor targets, resulting in an enhanced outward flow that is consistent with the experimentally observed particle pump-out effect. However, while the lobe structure of the perturbed separatrix is very well reflected in the temperature profile, the same lobes can appear to be smaller in the flow profile due to a competition between high upstream pressure and downstream particle sources driving flows in opposite directions.

  13. Effects of Pressure Fluctuation on Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in the Downstream of Orifice Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouchi, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kugimoto, Mitsuo; Tsujimoto, Koichi; Ando, Toshitake

    In the piping system of power plants, pipe wall thinning caused by flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), liquid droplet impingement (LDI) erosion, and cavitation Erosion (C/E), is a very serious problem because it leads to serious damage and eventual destruction of the piping system [1]-[6]. In this study, pipe wall thinning caused by FAC in the downstream of an orifice nozzle (flow meter) was examined. Experimental Analyses were performed to clarify the characteristics of FAC, its generation mechanism, and the prediction of the thinning and reduction of the pipe wall. The corrosion pattern on the pipe wall was also examined through an experimental simulation. This simulation clarified that the occurrence of thinning mainly depend on the amount of pressure fluctuation p' on the pipe wall. It was also found that the wall thinning rate can be estimated using p' and that the suppression of p' can be realized by replacing the orifice nozzle with a tapered one having an angle to the upstream.

  14. Plume Diagnostics of the RSRM Static Firings for the Pressure Perturbation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathias, Edward C.; Sambamurthi, Jay K.; Alvarado, Alexis

    1995-01-01

    During the STS-54 launch (RSRM-29), the right hand solid rocket motor experienced a 13.9 psi chamber pressure perturbation at 67 seconds into the motor operation. This pressure augmentation equated to a thrust change of 51 klb. Concerns were raised regarding the adverse effects of this thrust imbalance on the shuttle system and the overall thrust into the external tank structural elements. Pressure perturbations have been observed in solid rocket motors due to expulsion of igniter or insulation materials; the motor thrust during such events drop abruptly before rising. However, the RSRM motors do not exhibit such behavior during the large chamber pressure perturbation events. Several scenarios were investigated to explain these pressure perturbations in the RSRM motors based on a fault tree developed after STS-54. Of these, the expulsion of the slag accumulated in the submerged nozzle region appeared to be the most plausible scenario to explain the observations. Slag is a natural combustion product of aluminized solid rocket motors. The RSRM propellant contains 16% by weight of aluminum. Any ejection of this slag mass during nozzle vectoring or other side loads on the motor will result in the chamber pressure perturbation. Two RSRM static firings were instrumented extensively to further understand the slag expulsion phenomenon in the RSRM and the associated pressure perturbations.

  15. Second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids: Relativistic effects of pressure, multicomponent, curvature, and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2007-11-15

    We present general relativistic correction terms appearing in Newton's gravity to the second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids. In our previous work we have shown that to the second-order perturbations, the density and velocity perturbation equations of general relativistic zero-pressure, irrotational, single-component fluid in a spatially flat background coincide exactly with the ones known in Newton's theory without using the gravitational potential. We also have shown the effect of gravitational waves to the second order, and pure general relativistic correction terms appearing in the third-order perturbations. Here, we present results of second-order perturbations relaxing all the assumptions made in our previous works. We derive the general relativistic correction terms arising due to (i) pressure, (ii) multicomponent, (iii) background spatial curvature, and (iv) rotation. In the case of multicomponent zero-pressure, irrotational fluids under the flat background, we effectively do not have relativistic correction terms, thus the relativistic equations expressed in terms of density and velocity perturbations again coincide with the Newtonian ones. In the other three cases we generally have pure general relativistic correction terms. In the case of pressure, the relativistic corrections appear even in the level of background and linear perturbation equations. In the presence of background spatial curvature, or rotation, pure relativistic correction terms directly appear in the Newtonian equations of motion of density and velocity perturbations to the second order; to the linear order, without using the gravitational potential (or metric perturbations), we have relativistic/Newtonian correspondences for density and velocity perturbations of a single-component fluid including the rotation even in the presence of background spatial curvature. In the small-scale limit (far inside the horizon), to the second-order, relativistic equations of density and

  16. Cross spectra between temperature and pressure in a constant area duct downstream of a combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Wasserbauer, C. A.; Krejsa, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring pressure temperature cross spectra and coherence and temperature-temperature cross spectra and coherence at spatially separated points along with pressure and temperature auto-spectra in a combustion rig was investigated. The measurements were made near the inlet and exit of a 6.44 m long duct attached to a J-47 combustor. The fuel used was Jet A. The cross spectra and coherence measurements show the pressure and temperature fluctuations correlate best at low frequencies. At the inlet the phenomena controlling the phase relationship between pressure and temperature could not be identified. However, at the duct exit the phase angle of the pressure is related to the phase angle of the temperature by the convected flow time delay.

  17. Simulation study of breast tissue hemodynamics during pressure perturbation.

    PubMed

    Nioka, Shoko; Wen, Simon; Zhang, Jun; Du, Juan; Intes, Xavior; Zhao, Zhongyao; Chance, Britton

    2005-01-01

    We simulated the effects of compression of the breast on blood volume and tissue oxygenation. We sought to answer the question: how does the compression during breast examination impact on the circulatory systems of the breast tissue, namely blood flow, blood pooling, and oxygen concentration? We assumed that the blood was distributed in two compartments, arterial and venous. All the parameters were expressed with oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin quantities and were measured with a non-invasive method, Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS). The simulated data showed that the blood volume pool in the breast decreased due to lower arterial flow and higher venous outflow, as the breast was squeezed under 100 cm H2O with a 10 cm diameter probe (or 78 cm2). The blood volume was reversed when the pressure was released. The breast venous oxygen saturation dropped, but overall tissue saturation (presenting NIRS signal, volume weighted average saturation) was increased. The results showed that simulation can be used to obtain venous and average oxygen saturation as well as blood flow in compressed breast tissues.

  18. Comparison of Radiation Pressure Perturbations on Rocket Bodies and Debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    1 Comparison of Radiation Pressure Perturbations on Rocket Bodies and Debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Charles J. Wetterer and Keric Hill...has highlighted the need for physically consistent radiation pressure and Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models. This paper...seeks to evaluate the impact of BRDF-consistent radiation pres- sure models compared to changes in the other BRDF parameters. The differences in

  19. Comparison of Radiation Pressure Perturbations on Rocket Bodies and Debris at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterer, C.; Hill, K.; Jah, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent research has highlighted the need for physically consistent radiation pressure and Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models. This paper seeks to evaluate the impact of BRDF-consistent radiation pressure models compared to changes in the other BRDF parameters. The differences in orbital position arising because of changes in the shape, attitude, angular rates, BRDF parameters, and radiation pressure model are plotted as a function of time for simulated rocket bodies and debris at geo-synchronous orbit (GEO). The initial position and velocity of the space object is kept fixed, and the orbital position difference between a baseline or-bit and the perturbed orbit are plotted as a function of time. This is similar to how the effects of perturbations have been visualized in the past in commonly used astrodynamics references.

  20. Atomic oxygen behavior at downstream of AC excited atmospheric pressure He plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Applications of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ) have been investigated in the plasma medical fields such as cancer therapy, blood coagulation, etc. Reactive species generated by the plasma jet interacts with the biological surface. Therefore, the issue attracts much attentions to investigate the plasma effects on targets. In our group, a spot-size AC excited He APPJ have been used for the plasma medicine. From diagnostics of the APPJ using optical emission spectroscopy, the gas temperature and the electron density was estimated to be 299 K and 3.4 ×1015 cm-3. The AC excited He APPJ which affords high density plasma at room temperature is considered to be a powerful tool for the medical applications. In this study, by using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, the density of atomic oxygen on a floating copper as a target irradiated by the He APPJ was measured as a function of the distance between the plasma source and the copper wire. The measured density became a maximum value around 8 ×1013 cm-3 at 12 mm distance, and then decreased over the distance. It is considered that the behavior was due to the changes in the plasma density on the copper wire and influence of ambient air.

  1. Observations of height-dependent pressure-perturbation structure of a strong mesoscale gravity wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O'C.; Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Weng, Chi Y.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne observations using a downward-looking, dual-frequency, near-infrared, differential absorption lidar system provide the first measurements of the height-dependent pressure-perturbation field associated with a strong mesoscale gravity wave. A pressure-perturbation amplitude of 3.5 mb was measured within the lowest 1.6 km of the atmosphere over a 52-km flight line. Corresponding vertical displacements of 250-500 m were inferred from lidar-observed displacement of aerosol layers. Accounting for probable wave orientation, a horizontal wavelength of about 40 km was estimated. Satellite observations reveal wave structure of a comparable scale in concurrent cirrus cloud fields over an extended area. Smaller-scale waves were also observed. Local meteorological soundings are analyzed to confirm the existence of a suitable wave duct. Potential wave-generation mechanisms are examined and discussed. The large pressure-perturbation wave is attributed to rapid amplification or possible wave breaking of a gravity wave as it propagated offshore and interacted with a very stable marine boundary layer capped by a strong shear layer.

  2. Pressure perturbations from geologic carbon sequestration: Area-of-review boundaries and borehole leakage driving forces

    SciTech Connect

    Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Bryant, S.L.; Hovorka, S.D.

    2009-07-01

    We investigate the possibility that brine could be displaced upward into potable water through wells. Because of the large volumes of CO2 to be injected, the influence of the zone of elevated pressure on potential conduits such as well boreholes could extend many kilometers from the injection site-farther than the CO2 plume itself. The traditional approach to address potential brine leakage related to fluid injection is to set an area of fixed radius around the injection well/zone and to examine wells and other potentially open pathways located in the ''Area-of-Review'' (AoR). This suggests that the AoR eeds to be defined in terms of the potential for a given pressure perturbation to drive upward fluid flow in any given system rather than on some arbitrary pressure rise. We present an analysis that focuses on the changes in density/salinity of the fluids in the potentially leaking wellbore.

  3. Conformational Mobility in Cytochrome P450 3A4 Explored by Pressure-Perturbation EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davydov, Dmitri R; Yang, Zhongyu; Davydova, Nadezhda; Halpert, James R; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2016-04-12

    We used high hydrostatic pressure as a tool for exploring the conformational landscape of human cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) by electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy. Site-directed incorporation of a luminescence resonance energy transfer donor-acceptor pair allowed us to identify a pressure-dependent equilibrium between two states of the enzyme, where an increase in pressure increased the spatial separation between the two distantly located fluorophores. This transition is characterized by volume change (ΔV°) and P1/2 values of -36.8 ± 5.0 mL/mol and 1.45 ± 0.33 kbar, respectively, which corresponds to a Keq° of 0.13 ± 0.06, so that only 15% of the enzyme adopts the pressure-promoted conformation at ambient pressure. This pressure-promoted displacement of the equilibrium is eliminated by the addition of testosterone, an allosteric activator. Using site-directed spin labeling, we demonstrated that the pressure- and testosterone-sensitive transition is also revealed by pressure-induced changes in the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of a nitroxide side chain placed at position 85 or 409 of the enzyme. Furthermore, we observed a pressure-induced displacement of the emission maxima of a solvatochromic fluorophore (7-diethylamino-3-((((2-maleimidyl)ethyl)amino)carbonyl) coumarin) placed at the same positions, which suggests a relocation to a more polar environment. Taken together, the results reveal an effector-dependent conformational equilibrium between open and closed states of CYP3A4 that involves a pronounced change at the interface between the region of α-helices A/A' and the meander loop of the enzyme, where residues 85 and 409 are located. Our study demonstrates the high potential of pressure-perturbation strategies for studying protein conformational landscapes.

  4. Oyster Creek RETRAN model benchmark to pressure and level perturbation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Alammar, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    As part of GPU Nuclear's program to establish an in-house reload capability for Oyster Creek, the RETRAN-02 MOD4 SPL Computer Code has been chosen to analyze Chapter 15 Final Safety Analysis Report transients. To qualify Oyster Creek RETRAN model, a series of startup tests has been chosen to benchmark the model. Two of those tests, involved water level and vessel pressure perturbations at 100% power. Both tests were analyzed using point kinetics and one-dimensional kinetics with no noticeable impact on level or pressure. A small impact was noticed on power but was thought to be of minor significance. This is because for such mild transients the neutron flux shape function does not change appreciably throughout the transient.

  5. Pressure perturbation calorimetry, heat capacity and the role of water in protein stability and interactions.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A; Cameron, D; Jakus, J; Pettigrew, G W

    2007-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged, and usually self-evident, that solvent water plays a crucial role in the overall thermodynamics of protein stabilization and biomolecular interactions. Yet we lack experimental techniques that can probe unambiguously the nature of protein-water or ligand-water interactions and how they might change during protein folding or ligand binding. PPC (pressure perturbation calorimetry) is a relatively new technique based on detection of the heat effects arising from application of relatively small pressure perturbations (+/-5 atm; 1 atm=101.325 kPa) to dilute aqueous solutions of proteins or other biomolecules. We show here how this can be related to changes in solvation/hydration during protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. Measurements of 'anomalous' heat capacity effects in a wide variety of biomolecular interactions can also be related to solvation effects as part of a quite fundamental principle that is emerging, showing how the apparently unusual thermodynamics of interactions in water can be rationalized as an inevitable consequence of processes involving the co-operative interaction of multiple weak interactions. This leads to a generic picture of the thermodynamics of protein folding stabilization in which hydrogen-bonding plays a much more prominent role than has been hitherto supposed.

  6. Stability of very-high pressure arc discharges against perturbations of the electron temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, M. S.; Hechtfischer, U.

    2012-04-01

    We study the stability of the energy balance of the electron gas in very high-pressure plasmas against longitudinal perturbations, using a local dispersion analysis. After deriving a dispersion equation, we apply the model to a very high-pressure (100 bar) xenon plasma and find instability for electron temperatures, T{sub e}, in a window between 2400 K and 5500-7000 K x 10{sup 3} K, depending on the current density (10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} A/m{sup 2}). The instability can be traced back to the Joule heating of the electron gas being a growing function of T{sub e}, which is due to a rising dependence of the electron-atom collision frequency on T{sub e}. We then analyze the T{sub e} range occurring in very high-pressure xenon lamps and conclude that only the near-anode region exhibits T{sub e} sufficiently low for this instability to occur. Indeed, previous experiments have revealed that such lamps develop, under certain conditions, voltage oscillations accompanied by electromagnetic interference, and this instability has been pinned down to the plasma-anode interaction. A relation between the mechanisms of the considered instability and multiple anodic attachments of high-pressure arcs is discussed.

  7. ELECTRIC CURRENT FILAMENTATION AT A NON-POTENTIAL MAGNETIC NULL-POINT DUE TO PRESSURE PERTURBATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, M.; Murawski, K.

    2015-10-20

    An increase of electric current densities due to filamentation is an important process in any flare. We show that the pressure perturbation, followed by an entropy wave, triggers such a filamentation in the non-potential magnetic null-point. In the two-dimensional (2D), non-potential magnetic null-point, we generate the entropy wave by a negative or positive pressure pulse that is launched initially. Then, we study its evolution under the influence of the gravity field. We solve the full set of 2D time dependent, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically, making use of the FLASH code. The negative pulse leads to an entropy wave with a plasma density greater than in the ambient atmosphere and thus this wave falls down in the solar atmosphere, attracted by the gravity force. In the case of the positive pressure pulse, the plasma becomes evacuated and the entropy wave propagates upward. However, in both cases, owing to the Rayleigh–Taylor instability, the electric current in a non-potential magnetic null-point is rapidly filamented and at some locations the electric current density is strongly enhanced in comparison to its initial value. Using numerical simulations, we find that entropy waves initiated either by positive or negative pulses result in an increase of electric current densities close to the magnetic null-point and thus the energy accumulated here can be released as nanoflares or even flares.

  8. Perturbed Newtonian description of the Lemaître model with non-negligible pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Marra, Valerio; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-03-01

    We study the validity of the Newtonian description of cosmological perturbations using the Lemaître model, an exact spherically symmetric solution of Einstein's equation. This problem has been investigated in the past for the case of a dust fluid. Here, we extend the previous analysis to the more general case of a fluid with non-negligible pressure, and, for the numerical examples, we consider the case of radiation (P=ρ/3). We find that, even when the density contrast has a nonlinear amplitude, the Newtonian description of the cosmological perturbations using the gravitational potential ψ and the curvature potential phi is valid as long as we consider sub-horizon inhomogeneities. However, the relation ψ+phi=Script O(phi2)—which holds for the case of a dust fluid—is not valid for a relativistic fluid, and an effective anisotropic stress is generated. This demonstrates the usefulness of the Lemaître model which allows us to study in an exact nonlinear fashion the onset of anisotropic stress in fluids with non-negligible pressure. We show that this happens when the characteristic scale of the inhomogeneity is smaller than the sound horizon and that the deviation is caused by the nonlinear effect of the fluid's fast motion. We also find that ψ+phi= [Script O(phi2),Script O(cs2phi δ)] for an inhomogeneity with density contrast δ whose characteristic scale is smaller than the sound horizon, unless w is close to -1, where w and cs are the equation of state parameter and the sound speed of the fluid, respectively. On the other hand, we expect ψ+phi=Script O(phi2) to hold for an inhomogeneity whose characteristic scale is larger than the sound horizon, unless the amplitude of the inhomogeneity is large and w is close to -1.

  9. Perturbed Newtonian description of the Lemaître model with non-negligible pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Marra, Valerio; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav; Sasaki, Misao E-mail: valerio.marra@me.com E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2016-03-01

    We study the validity of the Newtonian description of cosmological perturbations using the Lemaître model, an exact spherically symmetric solution of Einstein's equation. This problem has been investigated in the past for the case of a dust fluid. Here, we extend the previous analysis to the more general case of a fluid with non-negligible pressure, and, for the numerical examples, we consider the case of radiation (P=ρ/3). We find that, even when the density contrast has a nonlinear amplitude, the Newtonian description of the cosmological perturbations using the gravitational potential ψ and the curvature potential φ is valid as long as we consider sub-horizon inhomogeneities. However, the relation ψ+φ=O(φ{sup 2})—which holds for the case of a dust fluid—is not valid for a relativistic fluid, and an effective anisotropic stress is generated. This demonstrates the usefulness of the Lemaître model which allows us to study in an exact nonlinear fashion the onset of anisotropic stress in fluids with non-negligible pressure. We show that this happens when the characteristic scale of the inhomogeneity is smaller than the sound horizon and that the deviation is caused by the nonlinear effect of the fluid's fast motion. We also find that ψ+φ= [O(φ{sup 2}),O(c{sub s}{sup 2φ} δ)] for an inhomogeneity with density contrast δ whose characteristic scale is smaller than the sound horizon, unless w is close to −1, where w and c{sub s} are the equation of state parameter and the sound speed of the fluid, respectively. On the other hand, we expect ψ+φ=O(φ{sup 2}) to hold for an inhomogeneity whose characteristic scale is larger than the sound horizon, unless the amplitude of the inhomogeneity is large and w is close to −1.

  10. Volume and expansivity changes of micelle formation measured by pressure perturbation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Fan, Helen Y; Nazari, Mozhgan; Chowdhury, Saria; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2011-03-01

    We present the application of pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) as a new method for the volumetric characterization of the micelle formation of surfactants. The evaluation is realized by a global fit of PPC curves at different surfactant concentration ranging, if possible, from below to far above the CMC. It is based on the knowledge of the temperature dependence of the CMC, which can for example be characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry. We demonstrate the new approach for decyl-β-maltopyranoside (DM). It shows a strong volume increase upon micelle formation of 16 ± 2.5 mL/mol (+4%) at 25 °C, and changes with temperature by -0.1 mL/(mol K). The apparent molar expansivity (E(S)) decreases upon micelle formation from 0.44 to 0.31 mL/(mol K) at 25 °C. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the expansivity of DM in solution (as compared with that of maltose) does not agree with the principal behavior described for polar (E(S)(T) decreasing) and hydrophobic (E(S)(T) increasing) solutes or moieties before. The results are discussed in terms of changes in hydration of the molecules and internal packing of the micelles and compared with the volumetric effects of transitions of proteins, DNA, lipids, and polymers.

  11. Thermal expansivities of peptides, polypeptides and proteins as measured by pressure perturbation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pandharipande, Pranav P; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this work was to provide direct experimental evidence that the expansivity of peptides, polypeptides and proteins as measured by pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC), can serve as a proxy to characterize relative compactness of proteins, especially the denatured state ensemble. This is very important as currently only small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), intrinsic viscosity and, to a lesser degree, fluorescence resonance transfer (FRET) experiments are capable of reporting on the compactness of denatured state ensembles. We combined the expansivity measurements with other biophysical methods (far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and small angle X-ray scattering). Three case studies of the effects of conformational changes on the expansivity of polypeptides in solution are presented. We have shown that expansivity appears to be insensitive to the helix-coil transition, and appears to reflect the changes in hydration of the side-chains. We also observed that the expansivity is sensitive to the global conformation of the polypeptide chain and thus can be potentially used to probe hydration of different collapsed states of denatured or even intrinsically disordered proteins.

  12. Jet Perturbation by HE target

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P; Kuklo, R M

    2001-03-01

    We have previously reported the degree of attenuation and perturbation by a Cu jet passing through Comp B explosive. Similar tests have now been performed with high explosive (HE) targets having CJ pressures higher than and lower than the CJ pressure of Comp B. The explosives were LX-14 and TNT, respectively. We found that the measured exit velocity of the jet where it transitions from perturbed to solid did not vary significantly as a function of HE type for each HE thickness. The radial momentum imparted to the perturbed jet segment did vary as a function of HE type, however, and we report the radial spreading of the jet and the penetration of a downstream target as a function of HE type and thickness.

  13. Downstream Hepatic Arterial Blood Pressure Changes Caused by Deployment of the Surefire AntiReflux Expandable Tip

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Steven C. Kikolski, Steven G.; Chomas, James E.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate blood pressure changes caused by deployment of the Surefire antireflux expandable tip. The pressure measurements are relevant because they imply changes in hepatoenteric arterial blood flow within this liver compartment during hepatic artery delivery of cytotoxic agents. Methods: After positioning the Surefire antireflux system in the targeted hepatic artery, blood pressure was obtained initially with the tip collapsed (or through a femoral artery sheath), then again after the tip was expanded before chemoembolization or yttrium 90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization. Results: Eighteen patients with liver malignancy underwent 29 procedures in 29 hepatic arteries (3 common hepatic, 22 lobar, 4 segmental). Systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure were all decreased by a mean of 29 mm Hg (p = 0.000004), 14 mm Hg (p = 0.0000004), and 22 mm Hg (p = 0.00000001), respectively. Conclusion: When the Surefire expandable tip is deployed to prevent retrograde reflux of agents, it also results in a significant decrease in blood pressure in the antegrade distribution, potentially resulting in hepatopedal blood flow in vessels that are difficult to embolize, such as the supraduodenal arteries.

  14. The influence of a high pressure gradient on unsteady velocity perturbations in the case of a turbulent supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dussauge, J. P.; Debieve, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The amplification or reduction of unsteady velocity perturbations under the influence of strong flow acceleration or deceleration was studied. Supersonic flows with large velocity, pressure gradients, and the conditions in which the velocity fluctuations depend on the action of the average gradients of pressure and velocity rather than turbulence, are described. Results are analyzed statistically and interpreted as a return to laminar process. It is shown that this return to laminar implies negative values in the turbulence production terms for kinetic energy. A simple geometrical representation of the Reynolds stress production is given.

  15. Structural basis for the dissociation of α-synuclein fibrils triggered by pressure perturbation of the hydrophobic core.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Marques, Mayra de A; Cruzeiro-Silva, Carolina; Cordeiro, Yraima; Schuabb, Caroline; Moraes, Adolfo H; Winter, Roland; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Foguel, Debora; Freitas, Mônica S; Silva, Jerson L

    2016-11-30

    Parkinson's disease is a neurological disease in which aggregated forms of the α-synuclein (α-syn) protein are found. We used high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) coupled with NMR spectroscopy to study the dissociation of α-syn fibril into monomers and evaluate their structural and dynamic properties. Different dynamic properties in the non-amyloid-β component (NAC), which constitutes the Greek-key hydrophobic core, and in the acidic C-terminal region of the protein were identified by HHP NMR spectroscopy. In addition, solid-state NMR revealed subtle differences in the HHP-disturbed fibril core, providing clues to how these species contribute to seeding α-syn aggregation. These findings show how pressure can populate so far undetected α-syn species, and they lay out a roadmap for fibril dissociation via pathways not previously observed using other approaches. Pressure perturbs the cavity-prone hydrophobic core of the fibrils by pushing water inward, thereby inducing the dissociation into monomers. Our study offers the molecular details of how hydrophobic interaction and the formation of water-excluded cavities jointly contribute to the assembly and stabilization of the fibrils. Understanding the molecular forces behind the formation of pathogenic fibrils uncovered by pressure perturbation will aid in the development of new therapeutics against Parkinson's disease.

  16. Structural basis for the dissociation of α-synuclein fibrils triggered by pressure perturbation of the hydrophobic core

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Marques, Mayra de A.; Cruzeiro-Silva, Carolina; Cordeiro, Yraima; Schuabb, Caroline; Moraes, Adolfo H.; Winter, Roland; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Foguel, Debora; Freitas, Mônica S.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a neurological disease in which aggregated forms of the α-synuclein (α-syn) protein are found. We used high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) coupled with NMR spectroscopy to study the dissociation of α-syn fibril into monomers and evaluate their structural and dynamic properties. Different dynamic properties in the non-amyloid-β component (NAC), which constitutes the Greek-key hydrophobic core, and in the acidic C-terminal region of the protein were identified by HHP NMR spectroscopy. In addition, solid-state NMR revealed subtle differences in the HHP-disturbed fibril core, providing clues to how these species contribute to seeding α-syn aggregation. These findings show how pressure can populate so far undetected α-syn species, and they lay out a roadmap for fibril dissociation via pathways not previously observed using other approaches. Pressure perturbs the cavity-prone hydrophobic core of the fibrils by pushing water inward, thereby inducing the dissociation into monomers. Our study offers the molecular details of how hydrophobic interaction and the formation of water-excluded cavities jointly contribute to the assembly and stabilization of the fibrils. Understanding the molecular forces behind the formation of pathogenic fibrils uncovered by pressure perturbation will aid in the development of new therapeutics against Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27901101

  17. Station coordinates in the standard earth 3 system and radiation-pressure perturbations from ISAGEX camera data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.; Latimer, J.; Mendes, G.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous and individual camera observations of GEOS 1, GEOS 2, Pageos, and Midas 4 obtained during the International Satellite Geodesy Experiment are utilized to determine station coordinates. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Standard Earth III system of coordinates is used to tie the geometrical network to a geocentric system and as a reference for calculating satellite orbits. A solution for coordinates combining geometrical and dynamical methods is obtained, and a comparison between the solutions and terrestrial data is made. The radiation-pressure and earth-albedo perturbations for Pageos are very large, and Pageos' orbits are used to evaluate the analytical treatment of these perturbations. Residual effects, which are probably of interest to aeronomists, remain in the Pageos orbits.

  18. Evaluation of the pressure tensor and surface tension for molecular fluids with discontinuous potentials using the volume perturbation method.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Serratos, Guadalupe; Vega, Carlos; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro

    2012-11-28

    In this article we apply the volume-perturbation method to systems of particles interacting via discontinuous potentials. We have found that an accurate Monte Carlo simulation protocol can be used in order to study properties of very general non-spherical systems with discontinuous potentials, such as chain molecules and spherocylinders with square-well interactions, and chain molecules with square-well and square-shoulder interactions. From the simulation results obtained for these systems we verify that: (1) the method reproduces the pressure as used in NPT simulations; (2) discontinuous infinite repulsive interactions give asymmetric contributions to the pressure when compression and expansion movements are used; however for finite interactions these contributions are symmetric; and (3) the pressure contributions preserve the additivity of the potential interactions. Density profiles and surface tension for subcritical conditions are accurately predicted.

  19. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

  20. Calculation of the surface tension and pressure components from a non-exponential perturbation method of the thermodynamic route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoufi, A.; Malfreyt, P.

    2012-01-01

    Surface tension is probably the most important interfacial property and a large number of techniques have been devoted to its calculation. Usually, this calculation is carried out using mechanical or thermodynamic definitions. The mechanical route uses an arbitrary choice to affect the contribution of the pairwise force. To overcome this arbitrariness, a thermodynamic route based on the area perturbation (test-area (TA) method) has been developed for the calculation of surface tension. The volume perturbation (VP) method provides an original route to compute the components of the pressure tensor. These two routes are developed from the perturbation theory leading to working expressions using exponential averages of energy. The use of exponential averages makes the calculation strongly dependent on the occurrence of low values of ΔU. Additionally, the decomposition of the energy to obtain local surface tension is nontrivial. From the explicit derivation of the partition function the exponential average is avoided providing an interesting alternative to TA, VP, and mechanical methods. To make a consistent comparison, we study the profiles of the surface tension along the direction normal to the surface for the different definitions and techniques in the cases of liquid-vapor interfaces of acids gases, binary, and apolar systems.

  1. Subtleties in the calculation of the pressure and pressure tensor of anisotropic particles from volume-perturbation methods and the apparent asymmetry of the compressive and expansive contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumby, Paul E.; Haslam, Andrew J.; de Miguel, Enrique; Jackson, George

    2011-01-01

    An efficient and versatile method to calculate the components of the pressure tensor for hard-body fluids of generic shape from the perspective of molecular simulation is presented. After due consideration of all the possible repulsive contributions exerted by molecules upon their surroundings during an anisotropic system expansion, it is observed that such a volume change can, for non-spherical molecules, give rise to configurations where overlaps occur. This feature of anisotropic molecules has to be taken into account rigorously as it can lead to discrepancies in the calculation of tensorial contributions to the pressure. Using the condition of detailed balance as a basis, a perturbation method developed for spherical molecules has been extended so that it is applicable to non-spherical and non-convex molecules. From a series of 'ghost' anisotropic volume perturbations the residual contribution to the components of the pressure tensor may be accurately calculated. Comparisons are made with prior methods and, where relevant, results are evaluated against existing data. For inhomogeneous systems this method provides a particularly convenient route to the calculation of the interfacial tension (surface free energy) from molecular simulations.

  2. Statistical mechanics of light elements at high pressure. VII - A perturbative free energy for arbitrary mixtures of H and He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Dewitt, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    A model free energy is presented which accurately represents results from 45 high-precision Monte Carlo calculations of the thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at pressures of astrophysical and planetophysical interest. The free energy is calculated using free-electron perturbation theory (dielectric function theory), and is an extension of the expression given in an earlier paper in this series. However, it fits the Monte Carlo results more accurately, and is valid for the full range of compositions from pure hydrogen to pure helium. Using the new free energy, the phase diagram of mixtures of liquid metallic hydrogen and helium is calculated and compared with earlier results. Sample results for mixing volumes are also presented, and the new free energy expression is used to compute a theoretical Jovian adiabat and compare the adiabat with results from three-dimensional Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory. The present theory gives slightly higher densities at pressures of about 10 megabars.

  3. Probing volumetric properties of biomolecular systems by pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC)--the effects of hydration, cosolvents and crowding.

    PubMed

    Suladze, Saba; Kahse, Marie; Erwin, Nelli; Tomazic, Daniel; Winter, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) is an efficient technique to study the volumetric properties of biomolecules in solution. In PPC, the coefficient of thermal expansion of the partial volume of the biomolecule is deduced from the heat consumed or produced after small isothermal pressure-jumps. The expansion coefficient strongly depends on the interaction of the biomolecule with the solvent or cosolvent as well as on its packing and internal dynamic properties. This technique, complemented with molecular acoustics and densimetry, provides valuable insights into the basic thermodynamic properties of solvation and volume effects accompanying interactions, reactions and phase transitions of biomolecular systems. After outlining the principles of the technique, we present representative examples on protein folding, including effects of cosolvents and crowding, together with a discussion of the interpretation, and further applications.

  4. RELAP5-3D Analysis of Pressure Perturbation at the Peach Bottom BWR During Low-Flow Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi Costa, Antonella; Petruzzi, Alessandro; D'Auria, Francesco

    2006-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies about the BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) stability have been performed to design a stable core configuration. BWR instabilities can be caused by inter-dependencies between thermal-hydraulic and reactivity feedback parameters such as the void-coefficient, for example, during a pressure perturbation event. In the present work, the pressure perturbation is considered in order to study in detail this type of transient. To simulate this event, including the strong feedback effects between core neutronic and reactor thermal-hydraulics, and to verify core behavior and evaluate parameters related to safety, RELAP5-3D code has been used in the analyses. The simulation was performed making use of Peach Bottom-2 BWR data to predict the dynamics of a real reactor during this type of event. Stability tests were conducted in the Peach Bottom 2 BWR, in 1977, and were done along the low-flow end of the rated power-flow line, and along the power-flow line corresponding to minimum recirculation pump speed. The calculated results are herein compared against the available experimental data. (authors)

  5. Pressure-induced perturbation on the active site of beta-amylase monitored from the sulfhydryl reaction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Mitani, D; Kunugi, S

    2001-05-22

    We investigated the pressure effect on the conformation of beta-amylase by monitoring the chemical reaction of the unpaired cysteine. Sweet potato beta-amylase is composed of four identical subunits, each of which contains six cysteine residues. These residues are inert to 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) in the native state due to steric hindrance. With the increase of the pressure from 0.1 to 400 MPa, the reactivity of one cysteine out of six residues was enhanced. We have identified that the reacted cysteine residue was Cys345 by the chemical cleavage at the reacted site. The reaction kinetics of Cys345 were pseudo-first-order, and the apparent rate constant was increased from 0.001 to 0.05 min(-)(1) with the increase of pressure from 100 to 400 MPa. The activation volume of the reaction rate was calculated as -24 +/- 2 mL/mol from the slope of the logarithmic plot of the pressure dependence of the rate constant. Hysteresis was not evident in the change of intrinsic fluorescence during the cycle of compression and decompression between 0.1 and 400 MPa, indicating that the tetramer does not dissociate under high pressure. This indicates that the enhancement of the reactivity of Cys345 was caused by the perturbation of local conformation under high pressure. The reaction of Cys345 was also enhanced by low concentrations of GuHCl, suggesting the significant role of hydration-driven fluctuation in the pressure-induced enhancement of the reactivity.

  6. A coupled cluster and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory study of the pressure induced phase transition in the LiH crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Grüneis, Andreas

    2015-09-14

    We employ Hartree–Fock, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation, coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) as well as CCSD plus perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) theory to study the pressure induced transition from the rocksalt to the cesium chloride crystal structure in LiH. We show that the calculated transition pressure converges rapidly in this series of increasingly accurate many-electron wave function based theories. Using CCSD(T) theory, we predict a transition pressure for the structural phase transition in the LiH crystal of 340 GPa. Furthermore, we investigate the potential energy surface for this transition in the parameter space of the Buerger path.

  7. Exospheric perturbations by radiation pressure. 2: Solution for orbits in the ecliptic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    The instantaneous rates of change for the orbital elements eccentricity, longitude of perigee from the Sun, and longitude from the Sun of the ascending node are integrated simultaneously for the case of the inclination i = 0. The results confirm the validity of using mean rates when the orbits are tightly bound to the planet and serve as examples to be reproduced by the complicated numerical solutions required for arbitrary inclination. Strongly bound hydrogen atoms escaping from Earth due to radiation pressure do not seem a likely cause of the geotail extending in the anti-sun direction. Instead, radiation pressure will cause those particles' orbits to deteriorate into the Earth's atmosphere.

  8. Shock-induced deformation of Shergottites: Shock-pressures and perturbations of magmatic ages on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Goresy, Ahmed; Gillet, Ph.; Miyahara, M.; Ohtani, E.; Ozawa, S.; Beck, P.; Montagnac, G.

    2013-01-01

    Shergottites and Chassignites practiced major deformation effects whose nature, magnitude and relevance were controversially evaluated and disputatively debated. Our studies of many shocked shergottites present, contrary to numerous previous reports, ample evidence for pervasive shock-induced melting amounting of at least 23 vol.% of the shergottite consisting of maskelynite and pyrrhotite, partial melting of pyroxene, titanomagnetite, ilmenite and finding of several high-pressure polymorphs and pressure-induced dissociation reactions. Our results cast considerable doubt on using the refractive index (RI) or cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of maskelynite, in estimating the magnitudes of peak-shock pressure in both shergottites and ordinary chondrites. RI of maskelynite was set after quenching of the feldspar liquid before decompression to maskelynite glass followed by glass relaxation after decompression at the closure temperature of relaxation. The RI procedure widely practiced in the past 38 years revealed unrealistic very high-pressure estimates discrepant with the high-pressure mineral inventory in shocked shergottites and ordinary chondrites and with results obtained by robust laboratory static experiments. Shergottites contain the silica high-pressure polymorphs: the scrutinyite-structured polymorph seifertite, a monoclinic ultra dense polymorph of silica with ZrO2-structure, stishovite, a dense liquidus assemblage consisting of stishovite + Na-hexa-aluminosilicate (Na-CAS) and both K-lingunite and Ca-lingunite. Applying individual high-pressure silica polymorphs alone like stishovite, to estimate the equilibrium shock pressure, is inadequate due to the considerable shift of their nominal upper pressure bounds intrinsically induced by spatially variable absorptions of minor oxides like Al2O3, Na2O, FeO, MgO and TiO2. This practice revealed variable pressure estimates even within the same shergottite subjected to the same peak-shock pressure. Occurrence of Na

  9. An unsteady microfluidic T-form mixer perturbed by hydrodynamic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanbao; Sun, Chien-Pin; Fields, Michael; Li, Yang; Haake, David A; Churchill, Bernard M; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2009-01-01

    An unsteady microfluidic T-form mixer driven by pressure disturbances was designed and investigated. The performance of the mixer was examined both through numerical simulation and experimentation. Linear Stokes equations were used for these low Reynolds number flows. Unsteady mixing in a micro-channel of two aqueous solutions differing in concentrations of chemical species was described using a convection-dominated diffusion equation. The task was greatly simplified by employing linear superimposition of a velocity field for solving a scalar species concentration equation. Low-order-based numerical codes were found not to be suitable for simulation of a convection-dominated mixing process due to erroneous computational dissipation. The convection-dominated diffusion problem was addressed by designing a numerical algorithm with high numerical accuracy and computational-cost effectiveness. This numerical scheme was validated by examining a test case prior to being applied to the mixing simulation. Parametric analysis was performed using this newly developed numerical algorithm to determine the best mixing conditions. Numerical simulation identified the best mixing condition to have a Strouhal number (St)of 0.42. For a T-junction mixer (with channel width = 196 μm), about 75% mixing can be finished within a mixing distance of less than 3 mm (i.e. 15 channel width) at St = 0.42 for flow with a Reynolds number less than 0.24. Numerical results were validated experimentally by mixing two aqueous solutions containing yellow and blue dyes. Visualization of the flow field under the microscope revealed a high level of agreement between numerical simulation and experimental results. PMID:19177174

  10. Physical properties of archaeal tetraether lipid membranes as revealed by differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry, molecular acoustics, and neutron reflectometry: effects of pressure and cell growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yong; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Taylor, Leeandrew Jacques-Asa; Erlkamp, Mirko; Grobelny, Sebastian; Czeslik, Claus; Watkins, Erik; Winter, Roland

    2012-03-20

    The polar lipid fraction E (PLFE) is a major tetraether lipid component in the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Using differential scanning and pressure perturbation calorimetry as well as ultrasound velocity and density measurements, we have determined the compressibilities and volume fluctuations of PLFE liposomes derived from different cell growth temperatures (T(g) = 68, 76, and 81 °C). The compressibility and volume fluctuation values of PLFE liposomes, which are substantially less than those detected from diester lipid membranes (e.g., DPPC), exhibit small but significant differences with T(g). Among the three T(g)s employed, 76 °C leads to the least compressible and most tightly packed PLFE membranes. This temperature is within the range for optimal cell growth (75-80 °C). It is known that a decrease in T(g) decreases the number of cyclopentane rings in archael tetraether lipids. Thus, our data enable us to present the new view that membrane packing in PLFE liposomes varies with the number of cyclopentane rings in a nonlinear manner, reaching maximal tightness when the tetraether lipids are derived from cells grown at optimal T(g)s. In addition, we have studied the effects of pressure on total layer thickness, d, and neutron scattering length density, ρ(n), of a silicon-D(2)O interface that is covered with a PLFE membrane using neutron reflectometry (NR). At 55 °C, d and ρ(n) are found to be rather insensitive to pressure up to 1800 bar, suggesting minor changes of the thickness of the membrane's hydrophobic core and headgroup orientation upon compression only.

  11. Analysis of Mesoscopic Structured 2-Propanol/Water Mixtures Using Pressure Perturbation Calorimetry and Molecular Dynamic Simulation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Jordan W; Freeman, Colin L; Howard, John D; Herz, Gregor; McGregor, James; Falconer, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the application of pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) to the characterization of 2-propanol/water mixtures. PPC of different 2-propanol/water mixtures provides two useful measurements: (i) the change in heat (ΔQ); and (ii) the [Formula: see text] value. The results demonstrate that the ΔQ values of the mixtures deviate from that expected for a random mixture, with a maximum at ~20-25 mol% 2-propanol. This coincides with the concentration at which molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show a maximum deviation from random distribution, and also the point at which alcohol-alcohol hydrogen bonds become dominant over alcohol-water hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, the [Formula: see text] value showed transitions at 2.5 mol% 2-propanol and at approximately 14 mol% 2-propanol. Below 2.5 mol% 2-propanol the values of [Formula: see text] are negative; this is indicative of the presence of isolated 2-propanol molecules surrounded by water molecules. Above 2.5 mol% 2-propanol [Formula: see text] rises, reaching a maximum at ~14 mol% corresponding to a point where mixed alcohol-water networks are thought to dominate. The values and trends identified by PPC show excellent agreement not only with those obtained from MD simulations but also with results in the literature derived using viscometry, THz spectroscopy, NMR and neutron diffraction.

  12. A study of the relationship between water and anions of the Hofmeister series using pressure perturbation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Bye, Jordan W; Falconer, Robert J

    2015-06-07

    Pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) was used to study the relationship between water and sodium salts with a range of different anions. At temperatures around 25 °C the heat on pressurisation (ΔQ) from 1 to 5 bar was negative for all solutions relative to pure water. The raw data showed that as the temperature rose, the gradient was positive relative to pure water and the transition temperature where ΔQ was zero was related to anion surface charge density and was more pronounced for the low-charge density anions. A three component model was developed comprising bulk water, the hydration layer and the solute to calculate the molar expansivity of the hydration layer around the ions in solution. The calculated molar expansivities of water in the hydration layer around the ions were consistently less than pure water. ΔQ at different disodium hydrogen phosphate concentrations showed that the change in molar enthalpy relative to pure water was not linear even as it approached infinite dilution suggesting that while hydration layers can be allocated to the water around ions this does not rule out interactions between water and ions extending beyond the immediate hydration layer.

  13. Boundary Layer Instabilities Generated by Freestream Laser Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    A controlled, laser-generated, freestream perturbation was created in the freestream of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT). The freestream perturbation convected downstream in the Mach-6 wind tunnel to interact with a flared cone model. The geometry of the flared cone is a body of revolution bounded by a circular arc with a 3-meter radius. Fourteen PCB 132A31 pressure transducers were used to measure a wave packet generated in the cone boundary layer by the freestream perturbation. This wave packet grew large and became nonlinear before experiencing natural transition in quiet flow. Breakdown of this wave packet occurred when the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations was approximately 10% of the surface pressure for a nominally sharp nosetip. The initial amplitude of the second mode instability on the blunt flared cone is estimated to be on the order of 10 -6 times the freestream static pressure. The freestream laser-generated perturbation was positioned upstream of the model in three different configurations: on the centerline, offset from the centerline by 1.5 mm, and offset from the centerline by 3.0 mm. When the perturbation was offset from the centerline of a blunt flared cone, a larger wave packet was generated on the side toward which the perturbation was offset. The offset perturbation did not show as much of an effect on the wave packet on a sharp flared cone as it did on a blunt flared cone.

  14. A normal-mode formula for the derivative of a waveguide pressure field with respect to an arbitrary three-dimensional sound speed perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, Aaron

    2003-10-01

    Semi-analytic expressions are derived for the first order derivative of a pressure field in a laterally homogeneous depth waveguide, with respect to an arbitrary three-dimensional refractive index perturbation in either the water column or ocean bottom. These expressions for the environmental derivative, derived using an adjoint method, require a three-dimensional spatial correlation between two Greens functions, weighted by an environmental parameter basis function, with the Greens functions expressed in terms of normal modes. When a particular set of orthogonal spatial basis functions is chosen, the three-dimensional spatial integral can be converted into a set of one-dimensional integrations over depth and azimuth. The use of the orthogonal basis permits environmental derivatives to be computed for any arbitrary sound-speed perturbation. To illustrate the formulas, a sensitivity study is presented that explores the impact of three-dimensional plane wave and cylindrical perturbations on the environmental derivative. Under certain circumstances it is found that perturbation components outside the vertical plane connecting the source and receiver have non-negligible effects on the pressure derivative. Potential applications of these formulas include benchmarking three-dimensional propagation codes, computing Cramer-Rao bounds for three-dimensional environmental parameter estimates, and potentially inverting for small three-dimensional refractive index distributions.

  15. Local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method in the Lennard-Jones system

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2014-07-21

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a system composed of fluid molecules between two planar solid surfaces, and whose interactions are described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones form. This paper presents a general description of the pressure components and interfacial tension at a fluid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics, proposes a method to consider the pressure components tangential to an interface which are affected by interactions with solid atoms, and applies this method to the calculation system. The description of the perturbative method is extended to subsystems, and the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface are obtained and examined in one- and two-dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained by two alternative methods: (a) an evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane, and (b) the conventional method based on the virial expression. The accuracy of the numerical results is examined through the comparison of the results obtained by each method. The calculated local pressure components and interfacial tension of the fluid at a liquid-solid interface agreed well with the results of the two alternative methods at each local position in one dimension. In two dimensions, the results showed a characteristic profile of the tangential pressure component which depended on the direction tangential to the liquid-solid interface, which agreed with that obtained by the evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane in the present study. Such good agreement suggests that the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics used in this study is valid to obtain the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface.

  16. Local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method in the Lennard-Jones system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2014-07-01

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a system composed of fluid molecules between two planar solid surfaces, and whose interactions are described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones form. This paper presents a general description of the pressure components and interfacial tension at a fluid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics, proposes a method to consider the pressure components tangential to an interface which are affected by interactions with solid atoms, and applies this method to the calculation system. The description of the perturbative method is extended to subsystems, and the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface are obtained and examined in one- and two-dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained by two alternative methods: (a) an evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane, and (b) the conventional method based on the virial expression. The accuracy of the numerical results is examined through the comparison of the results obtained by each method. The calculated local pressure components and interfacial tension of the fluid at a liquid-solid interface agreed well with the results of the two alternative methods at each local position in one dimension. In two dimensions, the results showed a characteristic profile of the tangential pressure component which depended on the direction tangential to the liquid-solid interface, which agreed with that obtained by the evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane in the present study. Such good agreement suggests that the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics used in this study is valid to obtain the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface.

  17. Local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method in the Lennard-Jones system.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K; Shibahara, M

    2014-07-21

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a system composed of fluid molecules between two planar solid surfaces, and whose interactions are described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones form. This paper presents a general description of the pressure components and interfacial tension at a fluid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics, proposes a method to consider the pressure components tangential to an interface which are affected by interactions with solid atoms, and applies this method to the calculation system. The description of the perturbative method is extended to subsystems, and the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface are obtained and examined in one- and two-dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained by two alternative methods: (a) an evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane, and (b) the conventional method based on the virial expression. The accuracy of the numerical results is examined through the comparison of the results obtained by each method. The calculated local pressure components and interfacial tension of the fluid at a liquid-solid interface agreed well with the results of the two alternative methods at each local position in one dimension. In two dimensions, the results showed a characteristic profile of the tangential pressure component which depended on the direction tangential to the liquid-solid interface, which agreed with that obtained by the evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane in the present study. Such good agreement suggests that the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics used in this study is valid to obtain the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface.

  18. Pressure perturbation and differential scanning calorimetric studies of bipolar tetraether liposomes derived from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Ravindra, Revanur; Khurana, Monika; English, Verrica; Winter, Roland

    2005-09-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) were used to characterize thermal phase transitions, membrane packing, and volumetric properties in multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) composed of the polar lipid fraction E (PLFE) isolated from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius grown at different temperatures. For PLFE MLVs derived from cells grown at 78 degrees C, the first DSC heating scan exhibits an endothermic transition at 46.7 degrees C, a small hump near 60 degrees C, and a broad exothermic transition at 78.5 degrees C, whereas the PPC scan reveals two transitions at approximately 45 degrees C and 60 degrees C. The endothermic peak at 46.7 degrees C is attributed to a lamellar-to-lamellar phase transition and has an unusually low DeltaH (3.5 kJ/mol) and DeltaV/V (0.1%) value, as compared to those for the main phase transitions of saturated diacyl monopolar diester lipids. This result may arise from the restricted trans-gauche conformational changes in the dibiphytanyl chain due to the presence of cyclopentane rings and branched methyl groups and due to the spanning of the lipid molecules over the whole membrane. The exothermic peak at 78.5 degrees C probably corresponds to a lamellar-to-cubic phase transition and exhibits a large and negative DeltaH value (-23.2 kJ/mol), which is uncommon for normal lamellar-to-cubic phospholipid phase transformations. This exothermic transition disappears in the subsequent heating scans and thus may involve a metastable phase, which is irreversible at the scan rate used. Further, there is no distinct peak in the plot of the thermal expansion coefficient alpha versus temperature near 78.5 degrees C, indicating that this lamellar-to-cubic phase transition is not accompanied by any significant volume change. For PLFE MLVs derived from cells grown at 65 degrees C, similar DSC and PPC profiles and thermal history responses were obtained. However, the lower growth temperature

  19. Charting a course downstream

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    In the petroleum industry, the term downstream refers to those business operations that take place after the search for and the production of crude oil. The actual purchase of crude oil, its transportation to refineries, its refining and the subsequent marketing and distribution of the refined products take place, in industry parlance, downstream. No other industry is required to coordinate the movement of so large a volume of liquids to so many destinations. And few other industries contend with raw material and end-product uncertainties so profound. Both the mixture of available world crude oil supplies and the demand patterns for petroleum products are subject to change. The downstream operations of Marathon Petroleum Company are discussed. The objective is to maximize profitability in the context of constantly changing prices for a variety of products.

  20. Disposables in downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Disposable equipment has been used for many years in the downstream processing industry, but mainly for filtration and buffer/media storage. Over the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the use of disposable concepts for chromatography, replacing steel and glass fixed systems with disposable plastic modules that can be discarded once exhausted, fouled or contaminated. These modules save on cleaning and validation costs, and their reduce footprints reduce buffer consumption, water for injection, labor and facility space, contributing to an overall reduction in expenditure that lowers the cost of goods. This chapter examines the practical and economic benefits of disposable modules in downstream processing.

  1. Ultra-sensitive pressure dependence of bandgap of rutile-GeO{sub 2} revealed by many body perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Atanu; Singh, Abhishek K.; Jain, Manish

    2015-08-14

    The reported values of bandgap of rutile GeO{sub 2} calculated by the standard density functional theory within local-density approximation (LDA)/generalized gradient approximation (GGA) show a wide variation (∼2 eV), whose origin remains unresolved. Here, we investigate the reasons for this variation by studying the electronic structure of rutile-GeO{sub 2} using many-body perturbation theory within the GW framework. The bandgap as well as valence bandwidth at Γ-point of rutile phase shows a strong dependence on volume change, which is independent of bandgap underestimation problem of LDA/GGA. This strong dependence originates from a change in hybridization among O-p and Ge-(s and p) orbitals. Furthermore, the parabolic nature of first conduction band along X-Γ-M direction changes towards a linear dispersion with volume expansion.

  2. The membrane lateral pressure-perturbing capacity of parabens and their effects on the mechanosensitive channel directly correlate with hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Kamaraju, Kishore; Sukharev, Sergei

    2008-10-07

    Lipid bilayers provide a natural anisotropic environment for membrane proteins and can serve as apolar reservoirs for lipid-derived second messengers or lipophilic drugs. Partitioning of lipophilic agents changes the lateral pressure distribution in the bilayer, affecting integral proteins. p-Hydroxybenzoic acid esters (parabens) are amphipathic compounds widely used as food and cosmetics preservatives, but the mechanisms of their broad antibacterial action are unknown. Here we describe effects of ethyl, propyl, and butyl parabens on the gating of the bacterial mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS) and compare them with the surface activity and lateral pressure changes measured in lipid monolayers in the presence of these substances. Near the bilayer-monolayer equivalence pressure of 35 mN/m, ethyl, propyl, or butyl paraben present in the subphase at 1 mM increased the surface pressure of the monolayer by 5, 12.5, or 20%, respectively. No spontaneous activation of MscS channels was observed in patch-clamp experiments with parabens added from either the cytoplasmic or periplasmic side. Increasing concentrations of parabens on the cytoplasmic side of excised patches shifted activation curves of MscS toward higher tensions. A good correlation between the pressure increases in monolayers and shifts in activation midpoints in patch-clamp experiments suggested that the more hydrophobic parabens partition more strongly into the lipid and exert larger effects on channel gating through changes in lateral pressure. We show that cytoplasmically presented ethyl or butyl parabens both hasten the process of desensitization of MscS and influence inactivation differently. The higher rate of desensitization is likely due to increased lateral pressure in the cytoplasmic leaflet surrounding the gate. Neither of the parabens strongly affects the rate of recovery and does not seem to penetrate the TM2-TM3 interhelical clefts in MscS. We conclude that the bacterial

  3. Brine Flow Up a Borehole Caused by Pressure Perturbation From CO2 Storage: Static and Dynamic Evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial-scale storage of CO2 in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO2 plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards al...

  4. Thermoelastic analysis of non-uniform pressurized functionally graded cylinder with variable thickness using first order shear deformation theory(FSDT) and perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshgoftar, M. J.; Mirzaali, M. J.; Rahimi, G. H.

    2015-11-01

    Recently application of functionally graded materials(FGMs) have attracted a great deal of interest. These materials are composed of various materials with different micro-structures which can vary spatially in FGMs. Such composites with varying thickness and non-uniform pressure can be used in the aerospace engineering. Therefore, analysis of such composite is of high importance in engineering problems. Thermoelastic analysis of functionally graded cylinder with variable thickness under non-uniform pressure is considered. First order shear deformation theory and total potential energy approach is applied to obtain the governing equations of non-homogeneous cylinder. Considering the inner and outer solutions, perturbation series are applied to solve the governing equations. Outer solution for out of boundaries and more sensitive variable in inner solution at the boundaries are considered. Combining of inner and outer solution for near and far points from boundaries leads to high accurate displacement field distribution. The main aim of this paper is to show the capability of matched asymptotic solution for different non-homogeneous cylinders with different shapes and different non-uniform pressures. The results can be used to design the optimum thickness of the cylinder and also some properties such as high temperature residence by applying non-homogeneous material.

  5. A Semi-Analytical Solution for Large-Scale Injection-Induced PressurePerturbation and Leakage in a Laterally Bounded Aquifer-AquitardSystem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-07-15

    A number of (semi-)analytical solutions are available to drawdown analysis and leakage estimation of shallow aquifer-aquitard systems. These solutions assume that the systems are laterally infinite. When a large-scale pumping from (or injection into) an aquifer-aquitard system of lower specific storativity occurs, induced pressure perturbation (or hydraulic head drawdown/rise) may reach the lateral boundary of the aquifer. We developed semi-analytical solutions to address the induced pressure perturbation and vertical leakage in a 'laterally bounded' system consisting of an aquifer and an overlying/underlying aquitard. A one-dimensional radial flow equation for the aquifer was coupled with a one-dimensional vertical flow equation for the aquitard, with a no-flow condition imposed on the outer radial boundary. Analytical solutions were obtained for (1) the Laplace-transform hydraulic head drawdown/rise in the aquifer and in the aquitard, (2) the Laplace-transform rate and volume of leakage through the aquifer-aquitard interface integrated up to an arbitrary radial distance, (3) the transformed total leakage rate and volume for the entire interface, and (4) the transformed horizontal flux at any radius. The total leakage rate and volume depend only on the hydrogeologic properties and thicknesses of the aquifer and aquitard, as well as the duration of pumping or injection. It was proven that the total leakage rate and volume are independent of the aquifer's radial extent and wellbore radius. The derived analytical solutions for bounded systems are the generalized solutions of infinite systems. Laplace-transform solutions were numerically inverted to obtain the hydraulic head drawdown/rise, leakage rate, leakage volume, and horizontal flux for given hydrogeologic and geometric conditions of the aquifer-aquitard system, as well as injection/pumping scenarios. Application to a large-scale injection-and-storage problem in a bounded system was demonstrated.

  6. Perturbing turbulence beyond collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Scarselli, Davide; Hof, Björn; Nonlinear Dynamics; Turbulence Group Team

    2016-11-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows are considered to be in principle stable against perturbations and persist as long as the Reynolds number is sufficiently high. We show for the example of pipe flow that a specific perturbation of the turbulent flow field disrupts the genesis of new turbulence at the wall. This leads to an immediate collapse of the turbulent flow and causes complete relaminarisation further downstream. The annihilation of turbulence is effected by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component only, greatly simplifying control efforts which usually require knowledge of the highly complex three dimensional and time dependent velocity fields. We present several different control schemes from laboratory experiments which achieve the required perturbation of the flow for total relaminarisation. Transient growth, a linear amplification mechanism measuring the efficiency of eddies in redistributing shear that quantifies the maximum perturbation energy amplification achievable over a finite time in a linearized framework, is shown to set a clear-cut threshold below which turbulence is impeded in its formation and thus permanently annihilated.

  7. Downstream Development of a Laminar Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Naoki; Matsumoto, Akira

    It was well-known that a disturbance, introduced artificially into a supercritical laminar boundary layer along a flat plate, is still laminar in the initial stage of its downstream development. Thus, we named it a "laminar spot" because it resembles a turbulent spot though its velocity perturbation remains laminar. From velocity measurements using a rake-type 16-channel hot-wire probe, we found that in the first stage of the downstream development of a laminar spot, its maximum width was at 0.2δ (what is called the critical layer) and one-half of its lateral growth angle was about 5°, which is almost one-half that of a turbulent spot. We call this region a "laminar spot region". In the present study, we measured in detail the velocity field of a laminar spot using a new hot-wire probe in the laminar spot region. The results showed that a laminar spot consists of some hairpin vortices and some induced U-shaped vortices under the hairpin vortices. Because of the interaction of the velocities induced by the respective vortex legs, the legs of the U-shaped vortices were located at the outermost part of the spot. Moreover, the new vortex legs extended spanwise at about 4° as the spot traveled downstream. Consequently, we concluded that the laminar spot grew spanwise in accordance with the span of these vortex legs.

  8. A novel approach for the isolation of the sound and pseudo-sound contributions from near-field pressure fluctuation measurements: analysis of the hydroacoustic and hydrodynamic perturbation in a propeller-rudder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felli, Mario; Grizzi, Silvano; Falchi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The main scope of the present work is to investigate the mechanisms underlying the hydroacoustic and hydrodynamic perturbations in a rudder operating in the wake of a free running marine propeller. The study consisted of detailed near-field pressure fluctuation measurements which were acquired on the face and back surfaces of the rudder, at different deflection angles. To this aim, a novel wavelet-filtering procedure was applied to separate and analyze distinctly the acoustic and hydrodynamic components of the recorded near-field pressure signals. The filtering procedure undertakes the separation of intermittent pressure peaks induced by the passage of eddy structures, interpreted as pseudo-sound, from homogenous background fluctuations, interpreted as sound. The use of wavelet in the filtering procedure allows to overcome the limitations of the earlier attempts based on frequency (wave number) band-pass filtering, retrieving the overall frequency content of both the acoustic and the hydrodynamic components and returning them as independent signals in the time domain. Acoustic and hydrodynamic pressure distributions were decomposed harmonically and compared to the corresponding topologies of the vorticity field, derived from earlier LDV measurements performed by Felli and Falchi (Exp Fluids 51(5):1385-1402, 2011). The study highlighted that the acoustic perturbation is mainly correlated with the unsteady load variations of the rudder and to the shear layer fluctuations of the propeller streamtube. Conversely, the dynamics of the propeller tip and hub vortices underlies the hydrodynamic perturbation.

  9. Local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of a solid surface with a nanometer-scale slit pore obtained by the perturbative method

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2015-03-07

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a liquid-solid interfacial system with a nanometer-scale slit pore in order to reveal local thermodynamic states: local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of the slit. The simulation also examined the transition mechanism between the two states of the liquid film: (a) liquid film on the slit and (b) liquid film in the slit, based on the local thermodynamic quantities from a molecular point of view. An instantaneous expression of the local pressure components and interfacial tensions, which is based on a volume perturbation, was presented to investigate time-dependent phenomena in molecular dynamics simulations. The interactions between the particles were described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential, and effects of the fluid-solid interaction intensity on the local pressure components and interfacial tensions of the fluid in the vicinity of the slit were examined in detail by the presented perturbative method. The results revealed that the local pressure components tangential to the solid surface in the vicinity of the 1st fluid layer from the solid surface are different in a two dimensional plane, and the difference became pronounced in the vicinity of the corner of the slit, for cases where the fluid-solid interaction intensities are relatively strong. The results for the local interfacial tensions of the fluid inside the slit suggested that the local interfacial tensions in the vicinity of the 2nd and 3rd layers of the solid atoms from the entrance of the slit act as a trigger for the transition between the two states under the influence of a varying fluid-solid interaction.

  10. Chemical downstream etching of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Simonson, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The downstream etching of tungsten and tungsten oxide has been investigated. Etching of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and e-beam deposited tungsten oxide samples was performed using atomic fluorine generated by a microwave discharge of argon and NF{sub 3}. Etching was found to be highly activated with activation energies approximated to be 6.0{plus_minus}0.5thinspkcal/mol and 5.4{plus_minus}0.4thinspkcal/mol for W and WO{sub 3}, respectively. In the case of F etching of tungsten, the addition of undischarged nitric oxide (NO) directly into the reaction chamber results in the competing effects of catalytic etch rate enhancement and the formation of a nearly stoichiometric WO{sub 3} passivating tungsten oxide film, which ultimately stops the etching process. For F etching of tungsten oxide, the introduction of downstream NO reduces the etch rate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  11. Downstream processing in marine biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Muffler, Kai; Ulber, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Downstream processing is one of the most underestimated steps in bioprocesses and this is not only the case in marine biotechnology. However, it is well known, especially in the pharmaceutical industry, that downstreaming is the most expensive and unfortunately the most ineffective part of a bioprocess. Thus, one might assume that new developments are widely described in the literature. Unfortunately this is not the case. Only a few working groups focus on new and more effective procedures to separate products from marine organisms. A major characteristic of marine biotechnology is the wide variety of products. Due to this variety a broad spectrum of separation techniques must be applied. In this chapter we will give an overview of existing general techniques for downstream processing which are suitable for marine bioprocesses, with some examples focussing on special products such as proteins (enzymes), polysaccharides, polyunsaturated fatty acids and other low molecular weight products. The application of a new membrane adsorber is described as well as the use of solvent extraction in marine biotechnology.

  12. Perturbed Radius of Geosynchronous-Satellite Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Sei-Ichiro

    We analyze theoretically how the radius of geosynchronous orbits would vary owing to the perturbations due to the sun/moon gravity, solar radiation pressure, and the oblate earth. The analysis is simple, as it uses a diagrammatic method to solve near-circular orbital motions. Results are obtained in seven terms of corrections to the radius of non-perturbed ideal orbits. Each correction term is derived, with clear physical meaning, from each component of the perturbing forces.

  13. Simple Theory of Geosynchronous-Orbit Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Sei-Ichiro

    A simple perturbation theory is introduced for modeling geosynchronous orbits. The theory uses diagrammatic representations of orbits, and derives the perturbations in a direct manner without using differential equations. Perturbations of major importance are derived, including satellite-longitude changes due to the earth’s asymmetric shape, orbital eccentricity increase due to the sun-radiation pressure, and orbital plane inclination due to the sun/moon attraction. The theory clarifies the physical/geometrical meaning of the perturbations while using minimal mathematical analysis.

  14. Experimental and analytical investigation of fan flow interaction with downstream struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, T. L.; Ng, W. F.; Obrien, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation which was designed to provide insight into the fundamental aspects of fan rotor-downstream strut interaction was undertaken. High response, miniature pressure transducers were embedded in the rotor blades of an experimental fan rig. Five downstream struts were placed at several downstream locations in the discharge flow annulus of the single-stage machine. Significant interaction of the rotor blade surface pressures with the flow disturbance produced by the downstream struts was measured. Several numerical procedures for calculating the quasi-steady rotor response due to downstream flow obstructions were developed. A preliminary comparison of experimental and calculated fluctuating blade pressures on the rotor blades shows general agreement between the experimental and calculated values.

  15. Gas phase oxidation downstream of a catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.; Anderson, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalytic reactor on the emission of CO and unburned hydrocarbons was investigated. A premixed, prevaporized propane/air feed to a 12/cm/diameter catalytic/reactor test section was used. The catalytic reactor was made of four 2.5 cm long monolithic catalyst elements. Four water cooled gas sampling probes were located at positions between 0 and 22 cm downstream of the catalytic reactor. Measurements of unburned hydrocarbon, CO, and CO2 were made. Tests were performed with an inlet air temperature of 800 K, a reference velocity of 10 m/s, pressures of 3 and 600,000 Pa, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.14 to 0.24. For very lean mixtures, hydrocarbon emissions were high and CO continued to be formed downstream of the catalytic reactor. At the highest equivalence ratios tested, hydrocarbon levels were much lower and CO was oxidized to CO2 in the gas phase downstream. To achieve acceptable emissions, a downstream region several times longer than the catalytic reactor could be required.

  16. A downstream voyage with mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective essay for the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.As I look back on my paper, “Effects of Low Dietary Levels of Methyl Mercury on Mallard Reproduction,” published in 1974 in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a thought sticks in my mind. I realize just how much my mercury research was not unlike a leaf in a stream, carried this way and that, sometimes stalled in an eddy, restarted, and carried downstream at a pace and path that was not completely under my control. I was hired in 1969 by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to study the effects of environmental pollutants on the behavior of wildlife. A colleague was conducting a study on the reproductive effects of methylmercury on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and he offered to give me some of the ducklings. I conducted a pilot study, testing how readily ducklings approached a tape-recorded maternal call. Sample sizes were small, but the results suggested that ducklings from mercury-treated parents behaved differently than controls. That’s how I got into mercury research—pretty much by chance.

  17. Collisionless relaxation of downstream ion distributions in low-Mach number shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gedalin, M.; Friedman, Y.; Balikhin, M.

    2015-07-15

    Collisionlessly formed downstream distributions of ions in low-Mach number shocks are studied. General expressions for the asymptotic value of the ion density and pressure are derived for the directly transmitted ions. An analytical approximation for the overshoot strength is suggested for the low-β case. Spatial damping scale of the downstream magnetic oscillations is estimated.

  18. Basic Equations in Statics and Kinetics of Protein Polymerization and the Mechanism of the Formation and Dissociation of Amyloid Fibrils Revealed by Pressure Perturbation.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the pressure-dissociation of several amyloid or amyloid-like fibrils have shown that the fibril state is considerably voluminous. Quantitative characterization of the protein fibrillation reaction with respect to volumetric parameters is necessary to elucidate mechanisms of amyloid fibrillation in molecular terms such as protein cavity and hydration. Here we discuss, firstly, basic equations in statics and kinetics of protein polymerization as employed to obtain thermodynamic, volumetric, and kinetic parameters. Equilibrium treatment of the reactions with the scheme such as one-step polymerization, linear-association polymerization, or nucleation-dependent polymerization, and kinetic treatment of seeded linear-polymerization or spontaneous nucleation-elongation polymerization are described. In particular we will detail kinetics of the dissociation of fibrils which have been produced under the linear-association mechanism and therefore the length-distribution of which conforms to a geometric sequence in the degree of polymerization with a common ratio r, which is less than, and usually very close to, unity. In this case, an observed macroscopic rate of dissociation is shown to be a product of the microscopic elementary dissociation rate constant and a factor (1-r), extremely reduced compared with the intrinsic elementary rate. Secondly, we discuss protein conformational states in fibrillogenesis with molecular and volumetric observations reported, such as the unfolded state responsible for the association with seeds and the extension of amyloid fibrils, the transition state in which protein cavity formation and dehydration occur to intermediate levels, and the fibril state in which they occur to final respective levels which, in some cases, depend on the maturity of the fibril.

  19. Downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in transonic diffuser flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, T.

    1986-10-01

    Investigation of downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in two-dimensional, separated transonic diffuser flows were conducted numerically by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation with two equation turbulence models. It was found that the flow fields are very sensitive to the location of the downstream boundary. Extension of the diffuser downstream boundary significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of oscillations for pressure, velocity, and shock. The existence of a suction slot in the experimental setpup obscures the physical downstream boundary and therefore presents a difficulty for quantitative comparisons between computation and experiment.

  20. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  1. Non-gravitational perturbations and satellite geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Milani, A.; Nobill, A.M.; Farinella, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the basic ideas of the physics of non-gravitational perturbations and the mathematics required to compute their orbital effects. It conveys the relevance of the different problems that must be solved to achieve a given level of accuracy in orbit determination and in recovery of geophysically significant parameters. Selected Contents are: Orders of Magnitude of the Perturbing Forces, Tides and Apparent Forces, Tools from Celestial Mechanics, Solar Radiation Pressure-Direct Effects: Satellite-Solar Radiation Interaction, Long-Term Effects on Semi-Major Axis, Radiation Pressure-Indirect Effects: Earth-Reflected Radiation Pressure, Anisotropic Thermal Emission, Drag: Orbital Perturbations by a Drag-Like Force, and Charged Particle Drag.

  2. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  3. Density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Challacombe, Matt

    2004-05-14

    An orbital-free quantum perturbation theory is proposed. It gives the response of the density matrix upon variation of the Hamiltonian by quadratically convergent recursions based on perturbed projections. The technique allows treatment of embedded quantum subsystems with a computational cost scaling linearly with the size of the perturbed region, O(N(pert.)), and as O(1) with the total system size. The method allows efficient high order perturbation expansions, as demonstrated with an example involving a 10th order expansion. Density matrix analogs of Wigner's 2n+1 rule are also presented.

  4. Alfvén wings in the lunar wake: The role of pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.; Fatemi, S.; Holmström, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Jia, Y. D.; Wan, W. X.; Liu, L. B.; Chen, Y. D.; Le, H. J.; Shi, Q. Q.; Liu, W. L.

    2016-11-01

    Strongly conducting or magnetized obstacles in a flowing plasma generate structures called Alfvén wings, which mediate momentum transfer between the obstacle and the plasma. Nonconducting obstacles such as airless planetary bodies can generate such structures, which, however, have so far been seen only in sub-Alfvénic regime. A novel statistical analysis of simultaneous measurements made by two ARTEMIS satellites, one in the solar wind upstream of the Moon and one in the downstream wake, and comparison of the data with results of a three-dimensional hybrid model of the interaction reveal that the perturbed plasma downstream of the Moon generates Alfvén wings in super-Alfvénic solar wind. In the wake region, magnetic field lines bulge toward the Moon and the plasma flows are significantly perturbed. We use the simulation to show that some of the observed bends of the field result from field-aligned currents. The perturbations in the wake thus arise from a combination of compressional and Alfvénic perturbations. Because of the super-Alfvénic background flow of the solar wind, the two Alfvén wings fold back to form a small intersection angle. The currents that form the Alfvén wing in the wake are driven by both plasma flow deceleration and a gradient of plasma pressure, positive down the wake from the region just downstream of the Moon. Such Alfvén wing structures, caused by pressure gradients in the wake and the resulting plasma slowdown, should exist downstream of any nonconducting body in a super-Alfvénic plasma flow.

  5. Time-Frequency Analysis of Boundary-Layer Instabilites Generated by Freestream Laser Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    A controlled disturbance is generated in the freestream of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT) by focusing a high-powered Nd:YAG laser to create a laser-induced breakdown plasma. The plasma then cools, creating a freestream thermal disturbance that can be used to study receptivity. The freestream disturbance convects down-stream in the Mach-6 wind tunnel to interact with a flared cone model. The adverse pressure gradient created by the flare of the model is capable of generating second-mode instability waves that grow large and become nonlinear before experiencing natural transition in quiet flow. The freestream laser perturbation generates a wave packet in the boundary layer at the same frequency as the natural second mode, complicating time-independent analyses of the effect of the laser perturbation. The data show that the laser perturbation creates an instability wave packet that is larger than the natural waves on the sharp flared cone. The wave packet is still difficult to distinguish from the natural instabilities on the blunt flared cone.

  6. Downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in transonic diffuser flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, T.; Coakley, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in two-dimensional, separated transonic diffuser flows has been conducted numerically by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation turbulence model. It was found that the unsteady diffuser flowfields are very sensitive to the location of the downstream boundary. Extension of the diffuser downstream boundary significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of oscillations for pressure, velocity and shock. Computational results suggest that the mechanism causing the self-excited oscillation changes from viscous convective wave dominated oscillations to inviscid acoustic wave dominated oscillations when the location of downstream boundary varies from 8.66 to 134.7 throat height. The existence of a suction slot in the experimental setup obscures the physical downstream boundary and, therefore, presents a difficulty for quantitative comparisons between computation and experiment.

  7. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  8. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Dilgard, Lemoyne W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  9. The Perturbed Puma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Shu-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Yu

    2012-04-01

    The puma model on the basis of the Lorentz and CPT violation may bring an economical interpretation to the conventional neutrinos oscillation and part of the anomalous oscillations. We study the effect of the perturbation to the puma model. In the case of the first-order perturbation which keeps the (23) interchange symmetry, the mixing matrix element Ue3 is always zero. The nonzero mixing matrix element Ue3 is obtained in the second-order perturbation that breaks the (23) interchange symmetry.

  10. Meander cutoffs nonlocally accelerate upstream and downstream migration and channel widening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, Jon; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2016-12-01

    The hydrologic and sediment dynamics within and near cutoffs have long been studied, establishing them as effective agents of rapid local geomorphic change. However, the morphodynamic impact of individual cutoffs at the reachwide scale remains unknown, mainly due to insufficient observations of channel adjustments over large areal extents and at high temporal frequency. Here we show via annually resolved, Landsat-derived channel masks of the dynamic meandering Ucayali River in Peru that cutoffs act as perturbations that nonlocally accelerate river migration and drive channel widening both upstream and downstream of the cutoff locations. By tracking planform changes of individual meander bends near cutoffs, we find that the downstream distance of cutoff influence scales linearly with the length of the removed reach. The discovery of nonlocal cutoff influence supports the hypothesis of "avalanche"-type behavior in meander cutoff dynamics and presents new challenges in modeling and prediction of rivers' self-adjusting responses to perturbations.

  11. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    For perturbed nonlinear systems, a norm, other than the supremum norm, is introduced on some spaces of continuous functions. This makes possible the study of new types of behavior. A study is presented on a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas developed are applied to the study of integral manifolds, and examples are given.

  12. Downstream extent of the N Reactor plume

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, D.D.; Ecker, R.M.; Vail, L.W.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    The downstream extent of the N Reactor thermal plume was studied to assess the potential for fisheries impacts downstream of N Reactor. The N Reactor plume, as defined by the 0.5/sup 0/F isotherm, will extend less than 10 miles downstream at river flows greater than or equal to annual average flows (120,000 cfs). Incremental temperature increases at the Oregon-Washington border are expected to be less than 0.5/sup 0/F during all Columbia River flows greater than the minimum regulated flows (36,000 cfs). The major physical factor affecting Columbia River temperatures in the Hanford Reach is solar radiation. Because the estimated temperature increase resulting from N Reactor operations is less than 0.3/sup 0/F under all flow scenarios, it is unlikely that Columbia River fish populations will be adversely impacted.

  13. Results from modeling and simulation of chemical downstream etch systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, E.; Vosen, S.R.; Shon, J.W.; Larson, R.S.; Fox, C.A.; Buchenauer

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes modeling work performed at Sandia in support of Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) benchmark and tool development programs under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with SEMATECH. The Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) Modeling Project supports SEMATECH Joint Development Projects (JDPs) with Matrix Integrated Systems, Applied Materials, and Astex Corporation in the development of new CDE reactors for wafer cleaning and stripping processes. These dry-etch reactors replace wet-etch steps in microelectronics fabrication, enabling compatibility with other process steps and reducing the use of hazardous chemicals. Models were developed at Sandia to simulate the gas flow, chemistry and transport in CDE reactors. These models address the essential components of the CDE system: a microwave source, a transport tube, a showerhead/gas inlet, and a downstream etch chamber. The models have been used in tandem to determine the evolution of reactive species throughout the system, and to make recommendations for process and tool optimization. A significant part of this task has been in the assembly of a reasonable set of chemical rate constants and species data necessary for successful use of the models. Often the kinetic parameters were uncertain or unknown. For this reason, a significant effort was placed on model validation to obtain industry confidence in the model predictions. Data for model validation were obtained from the Sandia Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) experiments, from the literature, from the CDE Benchmark Project (also part of the Sandia/SEMATECH CRADA), and from the JDP partners. The validated models were used to evaluate process behavior as a function of microwave-source operating parameters, transport-tube geometry, system pressure, and downstream chamber geometry. In addition, quantitative correlations were developed between CDE tool performance and operation set points.

  14. Evolution of dark energy perturbations in scalar-tensor cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno Sanchez, J. C.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2010-05-15

    We solve analytically and numerically the generalized Einstein equations in scalar-tensor cosmologies to obtain the evolution of dark energy and matter linear perturbations. We compare our results with the corresponding results for minimally coupled quintessence perturbations. We find that scalar-tensor dark energy density perturbations are amplified by a factor of about 10{sup 4} compared to minimally coupled quintessence perturbations on scales less than about 1000 h{sup -1} Mpc (sub-Hubble scales). On these scales dark energy perturbations constitute a fraction of about 10% compared to matter density perturbations. Scalar-tensor dark energy density perturbations are anticorrelated with matter linear perturbations on sub-Hubble scales. This anticorrelation of matter with negative pressure perturbations induces a mild amplification of matter perturbations by about 10% on sub-Hubble scales. The evolution of scalar field perturbations on sub-Hubble scales is scale independent and therefore corresponds to a vanishing effective speed of sound (c{sub s{Phi}=}0). We briefly discuss the observational implications of our results, which may include predictions for galaxy and cluster halo profiles that are modified compared to {Lambda}CDM. The observed properties of these profiles are known to be in some tension with the predictions of {Lambda}CDM.

  15. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  16. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  17. Perturbed nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, T. G.

    1972-01-01

    The existence of a solution defined for all t and possessing a type of boundedness property is established for the perturbed nonlinear system y = f(t,y) + F(t,y). The unperturbed system x = f(t,x) has a dichotomy in which some solutions exist and are well behaved as t increases to infinity, and some solution exists and are well behaved as t decreases to minus infinity. A similar study is made for a perturbed nonlinear differential equation defined on a half line, R+, and the existence of a family of solutions with special boundedness properties is established. The ideas are applied to integral manifolds.

  18. Downstream cumulative effects of land use on freshwater communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuglerová, L.; Kielstra, B. W.; Moore, D.; Richardson, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Many streams and rivers are subject to disturbance from intense land use such as urbanization and agriculture, and this is especially obvious for small headwaters. Streams are spatially organized into networks where headwaters represent the tributaries and provide water, nutrients, and organic material to the main stems. Therefore perturbations within the headwaters might be cumulatively carried on downstream. Although we know that the disturbance of headwaters in urban and agricultural landscapes poses threats to downstream river reaches, the magnitude and severity of these changes for ecological communities is less known. We studied stream networks along a gradient of disturbance connected to land use intensity, from urbanized watersheds to watersheds placed in agricultural settings in the Greater Toronto Area. Further, we compared the patterns and processes found in the modified watershed to a control watershed, situated in a forested, less impacted landscape. Preliminary results suggest that hydrological modifications (flash floods), habitat loss (drainage and sewer systems), and water quality issues of small streams in urbanized and agricultural watersheds represent major disturbances and threats for aquatic and riparian biota on local as well as larger spatial scales. For example, communities of riparian plants are dominated by species typical of the land use on adjacent uplands as well as the dominant land use on the upstream contributing area, instead of riparian obligates commonly found in forested watersheds. Further, riparian communities in disturbed environments are dominated by invasive species. The changes in riparian communities are vital for various functions of riparian vegetation. Bank erosion control is suppressed, leading to severe channel transformations and sediment loadings in urbanized watersheds. Food sources for instream biota and thermal regimes are also changed, which further triggers alterations of in-stream biological communities

  19. Perturbation analysis of electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2014-06-15

    Lagrangian displacement and magnetic field perturbation response to the geodesic acoustic mode is analyzed by using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak. δB{sub θ}, the poloidal component of magnetic field perturbation, has poloidal wave number m = 2 created by the poloidal displacement ξ{sub θ}. The parallel perturbation of magnetic field, δB{sub ∥}, has a poloidally asymmetric structure with m = 1 and is on the same order of magnitude with δB{sub θ} to the leading order. The radial displacement ξ{sub r} is of order O(βϵξ{sub θ}) but plays a significant role in determining δB{sub ∥}, where β is the plasma/magnetic pressure ratio and ϵ is the inverse aspect ratio.

  20. Downstream Intensification Effects Associated with CO2 Laser Mitigation of Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M J; Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Widmayer, C C; Ravizza, F L

    2007-10-29

    Mitigation of 351nm laser-induced damage sites on fused silica exit surfaces by selective CO{sub 2} treatment has been shown to effectively arrest the exponential growth responsible for limiting the lifetime of optics in high-fluence laser systems. However, the perturbation to the optical surface profile following the mitigation process introduces phase contrast to the beam, causing some amount of downstream intensification with the potential to damage downstream optics. Control of the laser treatment process and measurement of the associated phase modulation is essential to preventing downstream 'fratricide' in damage-mitigated optical systems. In this work we present measurements of the surface morphology, intensification patterns and damage associated with various CO{sub 2} mitigation treatments on fused silica surfaces. Specifically, two components of intensification pattern, one on-axis and another off-axis can lead to damage of downstream optics and are related to rims around the ablation pit left from the mitigation process. It is shown that control of the rim structure around the edge of typical mitigation sites is crucial in preventing damage to downstream optics.

  1. Cosmological perturbations of a perfect fluid and noncommutative variables

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Gerard, Jean-Marc; Suyama, Teruaki

    2010-03-15

    We describe the linear cosmological perturbations of a perfect fluid at the level of an action, providing thus an alternative to the standard approach based only on the equations of motion. This action is suited not only to perfect fluids with a barotropic equation of state, but also to those for which the pressure depends on two thermodynamical variables. By quantizing the system we find that (1) some perturbation fields exhibit a noncommutativity quite analogous to the one observed for a charged particle moving in a strong magnetic field, (2) local curvature and pressure perturbations cannot be measured simultaneously, (3) ghosts appear if the null energy condition is violated.

  2. Cosmological perturbations in antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Brandenberger, Robert

    2014-10-01

    We compute the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a recently proposed Weyl-symmetric theory of two scalar fields with oppositely signed conformal couplings to Einstein gravity. It is motivated from the minimal conformal extension of the standard model, such that one of these scalar fields is the Higgs while the other is a new particle, the dilaton, introduced to make the Higgs mass conformally symmetric. At the background level, the theory admits novel geodesically complete cyclic cosmological solutions characterized by a brief period of repulsive gravity, or "antigravity," during each successive transition from a big crunch to a big bang. For simplicity, we consider scalar perturbations in the absence of anisotropies, with potential set to zero and without any radiation. We show that despite the necessarily wrong-signed kinetic term of the dilaton in the full action, these perturbations are neither ghostlike nor tachyonic in the limit of strongly repulsive gravity. On this basis, we argue—pending a future analysis of vector and tensor perturbations—that, with respect to perturbative stability, the cosmological solutions of this theory are viable.

  3. Asymmetric Separation and Perturbation Sensitivity in an Annular Diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffman, Jesse; Morris, Scott; Jemcov, Aleksander; Cameron, Joshua

    2013-11-01

    When an annular diffuser stalls, the separation can take many forms. Experiments show that one type of separation appears to be asymmetric and periodic. This asymmetry appears to be influenced by upstream and downstream components and inlet flow conditions. By understanding the changes effected at the exit of the diffuser by the inlet perturbations, the diffuser performance can be more accurately predicted within a system. This work aims to understand the influence of velocity perturbations at the inlet of the diffuser on the overall duct performance. This is done by application of the Euler equations and a RANS simulation for various circumferential wavenumbers.

  4. Perturbations of the Robertson-Walker space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai Chan

    This dissertation contains three parts consisting of thirteen chapters. Each chapter is self-contained, and can be read independently. In chapter 1, we have presented a complete set of cosmological perturbation equations using the covariant equations. We also present an explicit solution for the evolution of large scale cosmological density perturbations assuming a perfect fluid. In chapter 2, two independent gauge-invariant variables are derived which are continuous at any transition where there is a discontinuous change in pressure. In chapter 3, we present a Newtonian counterpart to the general relativistic covariant approach to cosmological perturbations. In chapter 4, we present a simple way of deriving cosmological perturbation equations in generalized gravity theories which accounts for metric perturbations in gauge-invariant way. We apply this approach to the f(phi,R)-omega(phi)phi, cphi;c Lagrangian. In chapter 5, we have derived second order differential equations for cosmological perturbations in a Robertson-Walker space, for each of the following gravity theories: f(R) gravity, generalized scalar-tensor gravity, gravity with non-minimally coupled scalar field, and induced gravity. Asymptotic solutions are derived for the large and small scale limits. In chapter 6, classical evolution of density perturbations in the large scale limit is clarified in the generalized gravity theories. In chapter 7, we apply our method to a theory with the Lagrangian L approximately f(R) + gamma RR;c;c. In chapter 8, T(M)ab;b equals 0 is shown in a general ground. In chapter 9, the origin of the Friedmann-like behavior of the perturbed model in the large scale limit is clarified in a comoving gauge. Thus, when the imperfect fluid contributions are negligible, the large scale perturbations in a nearly flat background evolve like separate Friedmann models. In chapter 10, we generalize the perturbation equations applicable to a class of generalized gravity theories with multi

  5. Enabling technologies: fermentation and downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Weuster-Botz, Dirk; Hekmat, Dariusch; Puskeiler, Robert; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel

    2007-01-01

    Efficient parallel tools for bioprocess design, consequent application of the concepts for metabolic process analysis as well as innovative downstream processing techniques are enabling technologies for new industrial bioprocesses from an engineering point of view. Basic principles, state-of-the-art techniques and cutting-edge technologies are briefly reviewed. Emphasis is on parallel bioreactors for bioprocess design, biochemical systems characterization and metabolic control analysis, as well as on preparative chromatography, affinity filtration and protein crystallization on a process scale.

  6. Development of a perturbation generator for vortex stability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riester, J. E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Theory predicts vortex instability when subjected to certain types of disturbances. It was desired to build a device which could introduce controlled velocity perturbations into a trailing line vortex in order to study the effects on stability. A perturbation generator was designed and manufactured which can be attached to the centerbody of an airfoil type vortex generator. Details of design tests and manufacturing of the perturbation generator are presented. The device produced controlled perturbation with frequencies in excess of 250 Hz. Preliminary testing and evaluation of the perturbation generator performance was conducted in a 4 inch cylindrical pipe. Observations of vortex shedding frequencies from a centerbody were measured. Further evaluation with the perturbation generator attached to the vortex generator in a 2 x 3 foot wind tunnel were also conducted. Hot-wire anemometry was used to confirm the perturbation generator's ability to introduce controlled frequency fluctuations. Comparison of the energy levels of the disturbances in the vortex core was made between locations 42 chord lengths and 15 chord lengths downstream.

  7. Fish reproductive guilds downstream of dams.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, L P; Alves, D C; Gomes, L C

    2014-11-01

    Fish reproductive guilds were used to evaluate the responses of species with different reproductive strategies during two different periods of post-dam construction. The data used for the comparisons were collected in the upper Paraná River floodplain (Brazil), downstream of the Porto Primavera dam, 2 and 10 years after impoundment. The abundance (catch per unit effort, CPUE), species richness, evenness and structure of communities, all within reproductive guilds, were used to test the hypothesis that these metrics vary spatially and temporally. The influence of damming on species structure and the diversity of fish reproductive guilds varied spatiotemporally, and species with opportunistic reproductive strategies tended to be less affected. Conversely, long-distance migratory species responded more markedly to spatiotemporal variations, indicating that the ecosystem dynamics exert greater effects on populations of these species. Thus, the effects of a dam, even if attenuated, may extend over several years, especially downstream. This finding emphasizes the importance of maintaining large undammed tributaries downstream of reservoirs.

  8. Consistent perturbations in an imperfect fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicki, Ignacy; Amendola, Luca; Saltas, Ippocratis D.; Kunz, Martin E-mail: i.saltas@sussex.ac.uk E-mail: martin.kunz@unige.ch

    2013-01-01

    We present a new prescription for analysing cosmological perturbations in a more-general class of scalar-field dark-energy models where the energy-momentum tensor has an imperfect-fluid form. This class includes Brans-Dicke models, f(R) gravity, theories with kinetic gravity braiding and generalised galileons. We employ the intuitive language of fluids, allowing us to explicitly maintain a dependence on physical and potentially measurable properties. We demonstrate that hydrodynamics is not always a valid description for describing cosmological perturbations in general scalar-field theories and present a consistent alternative that nonetheless utilises the fluid language. We apply this approach explicitly to a worked example: k-essence non-minimally coupled to gravity. This is the simplest case which captures the essential new features of these imperfect-fluid models. We demonstrate the generic existence of a new scale separating regimes where the fluid is perfect and imperfect. We obtain the equations for the evolution of dark-energy density perturbations in both these regimes. The model also features two other known scales: the Compton scale related to the breaking of shift symmetry and the Jeans scale which we show is determined by the speed of propagation of small scalar-field perturbations, i.e. causality, as opposed to the frequently used definition of the ratio of the pressure and energy-density perturbations.

  9. Renormalized Lie perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengaus, E.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    A Lie operator method for constructing action-angle transformations continuously connected to the identity is developed for area preserving mappings. By a simple change of variable from action to angular frequency a perturbation expansion is obtained in which the small denominators have been renormalized. The method is shown to lead to the same series as the Lagrangian perturbation method of Greene and Percival, which converges on KAM surfaces. The method is not superconvergent, but yields simple recursion relations which allow automatic algebraic manipulation techniques to be used to develop the series to high order. It is argued that the operator method can be justified by analytically continuing from the complex angular frequency plane onto the real line. The resulting picture is one where preserved primary KAM surfaces are continuously connected to one another.

  10. Covariant Bardeen perturbation formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitenti, S. D. P.; Falciano, F. T.; Pinto-Neto, N.

    2014-05-01

    In a previous work we obtained a set of necessary conditions for the linear approximation in cosmology. Here we discuss the relations of this approach with the so-called covariant perturbations. It is often argued in the literature that one of the main advantages of the covariant approach to describe cosmological perturbations is that the Bardeen formalism is coordinate dependent. In this paper we will reformulate the Bardeen approach in a completely covariant manner. For that, we introduce the notion of pure and mixed tensors, which yields an adequate language to treat both perturbative approaches in a common framework. We then stress that in the referred covariant approach, one necessarily introduces an additional hypersurface choice to the problem. Using our mixed and pure tensors approach, we are able to construct a one-to-one map relating the usual gauge dependence of the Bardeen formalism with the hypersurface dependence inherent to the covariant approach. Finally, through the use of this map, we define full nonlinear tensors that at first order correspond to the three known gauge invariant variables Φ, Ψ and Ξ, which are simultaneously foliation and gauge invariant. We then stress that the use of the proposed mixed tensors allows one to construct simultaneously gauge and hypersurface invariant variables at any order.

  11. Amplitudes of Spiral Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbol, P.; Patsis, P. A.

    2014-03-01

    It has proven very difficult to estimate the amplitudes of spiral perturbations in disk galaxies from observations due to the variation of mass-to-light ratio and extinction across spiral arms. Deep, near-infrared images of grand-design spiral galaxies obtained with HAWK-I/VLT were used to analyze the azimuthal amplitude and shape of arms, which, even in the K-band may, be significantly biased by the presence of young stellar populations. Several techniques were applied to evaluate the relative importance of young stars across the arms, such as surface brightness of the disk with light from clusters subtracted, number density of clusters detected, and texture of the disk. The modulation of the texture measurement, which correlates with the number density of faint clusters, yields amplitudes of the spiral perturbation in the range 0.1-0.2. This estimate gives a better estimate of the mass perturbation in the spiral arms, since it is dominated by old clusters.

  12. Adiabatic expansion effect of natural gas at the downstream extremity of the pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessal, Mohand; Amara, Khadidja; Belaidi, Idir

    2017-02-01

    Two numerical simulation examples of natural gas transients are studied, based on the conservation equations of fluid mechanics and energy, discribed by the flow parameters, pressure (P) and the speed (V) and temperature (T) in a gas pipeline. The considered exemple is under static pressure, at which two boundary conditions are applied to its downstream end, whith an adiabatic discharge to the atmosphere. Obtained results have shown the parameters variation induced by the conditions of these instantaneous gas output conditions.

  13. AKT/PKB Signaling: Navigating Downstream

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Brendan D.; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2009-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), is a central node in cell signaling downstream of growth factors, cytokines, and other cellular stimuli. Aberrant loss or gain of Akt activation underlies the pathophysiological properties of a variety of complex diseases, including type-2 diabetes and cancer. Here, we review the molecular properties of Akt and the approaches used to characterize its true cellular targets. In addition, we discuss those Akt substrates that are most likely to contribute to the diverse cellular roles of Akt, which include cell survival, growth, proliferation, angiogenesis, metabolism, and migration. PMID:17604717

  14. Upstream and Downstream Influence in STBLI Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Pino; Priebe, Stephan; Helm, Clara

    2016-11-01

    Priebe and Martín (JFM, 2012) show that the low-frequency unsteadiness in shockwave and turbulent boundary layer interactions (STBLI) is governed by an inviscid instability. Priebe, Tu, Martín and Rowley (JFM, 2016) show that the instability is an inviscid centrifugal one, i.e Görtlerlike vortices. Previous works had given differing conclusions as to whether the low-frequency unsteadiness in STBLI is caused by an upstream or downstream mechanism. In this paper, we reconcile these opposite views and show that upstream and downstream correlations co-exist in the context of the nature of Görtler vortices. We find that the instability is similar to that in separated subsonic and laminar flows. Since the turbulence is modulated but passive to the global mode, the turbulent separated flows are amenable to linear global analysis. As such, the characteristic length and time scales, and the receptivity of the global mode might be determined, and low-order models that represent the low-frequency dynamics in STBLI might be developed. The centrifugal instability persists even under hypersonic conditions. This work is funded by the AFOSR Grant Number AF9550-15-1-0284 with Dr. Ivett Leyva.

  15. Plasma waves downstream of weak collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In September 1983 the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) International Cometary Explorer (ICE) spacecraft made a long traversal of the distant dawnside flank region of the Earth's magnetosphere and had many encounters with the low Mach number bow shock. These weak shocks excite plasma wave electric field turbulence with amplitudes comparable to those detected in the much stronger bow shock near the nose region. Downstream of quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shocks, the E field spectra exhibit a strong peak (plateau) at midfrequencies (1 - 3 kHz); the plateau shape is produced by a low-frequency (100 - 300 Hz) emission which is more intense behind downstream of two quasi-perpendicular shocks show that the low frequency signals are polarized parallel to the magnetic field, whereas the midfrequency emissions are unpolarized or only weakly polarized. A new high frequency (10 - 30 kHz) emission which is above the maximum Doppler shift exhibit a distinct peak at high frequencies; this peak is often blurred by the large amplitude fluctuations of the midfrequency waves. The high-frequency component is strongly polarized along the magnetic field and varies independently of the lower-frequency waves.

  16. 9. VIEW WEST TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAY FROM NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW WEST TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAY FROM NORTH SIDE OF DOWNSTREAM BANK OF DAM - Upper Doughty Dam, 200 feet west of Garden State Parkway, 1.7 miles west of Absecon, Egg Harbor City, Atlantic County, NJ

  17. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  18. Channel changes downstream from a dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hadley, R.F.; Emmett, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    A flood-control dam was completed during 1979 on Bear Creek, a small tributary stream to the South Platte River in the Denver, Colorado, area. Before and after dam closure, repetitive surveys between 1977 and 1992 at five cross sections downstream of the dam documented changes in channel morphology. During this 15-year period, channel width increased slightly, but channel depth increased by more than 40 percent. Within the study reach, stream gradient decreased and median bed material sizes coarsened from sand in the pools and fine gravel on the riffle to a median coarse gravel throughout the reach. The most striking visual change was from a sparse growth of streamside grasses to a dense growth of riparian woody vegetation.

  19. Turbulence decay downstream of an active grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewley, Gregory; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-11-01

    A grid in a wind tunnel stirs up turbulence that has a certain large-scale structure. The moving parts in a so-called ``active grid'' can be programmed to produce different structures. We use a special active grid in which each of 129 paddles on the grid has its own position-controlled servomotor that can move independently of the others. We observe among other things that the anisotropy in the amplitude of the velocity fluctuations and in the correlation lengths can be set and varied with an algorithm that oscillates the paddles in a specified way. The variation in the anisotropies that we observe can be explained by our earlier analysis of anisotropic ``soccer ball'' turbulence (Bewley, Chang and Bodenschatz 2012, Phys. Fluids). We define the influence of this variation in structure on the downstream evolution of the turbulence. with Eberhard Bodenschatz and others.

  20. Downstream hydraulic geometry of alluvial rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, P. Y.

    2015-03-01

    This article presents a three-level approach to the analysis of downstream hydraulic geometry. First, empirical concepts based on field observations of "poised" conditions in irrigation canals are examined. Second, theoretical developments have been made possible by combining basic relationships for the description of flow and sediment transport in alluvial rivers. Third, a relatively new concept of equivalent channel widths is presented. The assumption of equilibrium may describe a perpetual state of change and adjustments. The new concepts define the trade-offs between some hydraulic geometry parameters such as width and slope. The adjustment of river widths and slope typically follows a decreasing exponential function and recent developments indicate how the adjustment time scale can be quantified. Some examples are also presented to illustrate the new concepts presented and the realm of complex river systems.

  1. Ammonia downstream from HH 80 North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girart, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert; Torrelles, Jose, M.; Marti, Josep; Pena, Miriam; Ayala, Sandra; Curiel, Salvador; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    HH 80-81 are two optically visible Herbig-Haro (HH) objects located about 5 minutes south of their exciting source IRAS 18162-2048. Displaced symmetrically to the north of this luminous IRAS source, a possible HH counterpart was recently detected as a radio continuum source with the very large array (VLA). This radio source, HH 80 North, has been proposed to be a member of the Herbig-Haro class since its centimeter flux density, angular size, spectral index, and morphology are all similar to those of HH 80. However, no object has been detected at optical wavelengths at the position of HH 80 North, possibly because of high extinction, and the confirmation of the radio continuum source as an HH object has not been possible. In the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, ammonia emission has been detected downstream of the flow in both objects. This detection has been intepreted as a result of an enhancement in the ammonia emission produced by the radiation field of the shock associated with the HH object. In this Letter we report the detection of the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of ammonia downstream HH 80 North. This detection gives strong suppport to the interpretation of HH 80 North as a heavily obscured HH object. In addition, we suggest that ammonia emission may be a tracer of embedded Herbig-Haro objects in other regions of star formation. A 60 micrometer IRAS source could be associated with HH 80 North and with the ammonia condensation. A tentative explanation for the far-infrared emission as arising in dust heated by their optical and UV radiation of the HH object is presented.

  2. Network response to internal and external perturbations in large sand-bed braided rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuurman, F.; Kleinhans, M. G.; Middelkoop, H.

    2015-03-01

    The intrinsic instability of bars, bifurcations and branches in large braided rivers is a challenge to understand and predict. Even more, the reach-scale effect of human-induced perturbations on the braided channel network is still unresolved. In this study, we used a physics-based model to simulate the hydromorphodynamics in a large braided river and applied different types of perturbations. We analyzed the propagation of the perturbations through the braided channel network. The results showed that the perturbations initiate an instability that propagates in downstream direction by means of bifurcation instability. It alters and rotates the approaching flow of the bifurcations. The propagation celerity is in the same order of magnitude as the theoretical sand wave propagation rate. The adjustments of the bifurcations also change bar migration and reshape, with a feedback to the upstream bifurcation and alteration of the approaching flow to the downstream bifurcation. This way, the morphological effect of a perturbation amplifies in downstream direction. Thus, the interplay of bifurcation instability and asymmetrical reshaping of bars was found to be essential for propagation of the effects of a perturbation. The study also demonstrated that the large-scale bar statistics are hardly affected.

  3. Air release measurements of V-oil 1404 downstream of a micro orifice at choked flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudigmann, H.-A.; Iben, U.; Pelz, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents measurements on air release of V-oil 1404 in the back flow of a micro orifice at choked flow conditions using a shadowgraph imaging method. The released air was determined at three positions downstream of the orifice for different pressure conditions. It was found that more than 23% of the initially dissolved air is released and appears downstream of the orifice in the form of bubbles.

  4. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique W.; Bauer, Ross O.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  5. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Henrique W; Bauer, Ross O; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  6. An experimental study of turbine vane heat transfer with leading edge and downstream film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmalan, V.; Hylton, L. D.

    1989-06-01

    This paper presents the effects of downstream film cooling, with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling, on turbine-vane external heat transfer. Steady-state experimental measurements were made in a three-vane linear two-dimensional cascade. The principal independent parameters were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions. The test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. The data obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The downstream film cooling process was shown to be a complex interaction of two competing mechanisms. The thermal dilution effect, associated with the injection of relatively cold fluid, results in a decrease in the heat transfer to the airfoil. Conversely, the turbulence augmentation, produced by the injection process, results in increased heat transfer to the airfoil.

  7. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-09-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer-Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables.

  8. Kinetics of Hydrogen Oxidation Downstream of Lean Propane and Hydrogen Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, Burton

    1961-01-01

    The decay of hydrogen was measured downstream of lean, flat, premixed hydrogen and propane-air flames seated on cooled porous burners. Experimental variables included temperature, pressure, initial equivalence ratio and diluent. Sampling of burned gas was done through uncooled quartz orifice probes, and the analysis was based on gas chromatography. An approximate treatment of the data in which diffusion was neglected led to the following rate expression for the zone downstream of hydrogen flames d[H (sub 2)] divided by (d times t) equals 1.7 times 10 (sup 10) [H (sub 2)] (sup 3) divided by (sub 2) [O (sub 2)]e (sup (-8100 divided by RT)) moles per liters per second. On the basis of a rate expression of this form, the specific rate constant for the reaction downstream of hydrogen flames was about three times as great as that determined downstream of propane flames. This result was explained on the basis of the existence of a steady state between hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the burned gas downstream of propane flames.

  9. Drug target prioritization by perturbed gene expression and network information

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Zerrin; Baldow, Christoph; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Schroeder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drugs bind to their target proteins, which interact with downstream effectors and ultimately perturb the transcriptome of a cancer cell. These perturbations reveal information about their source, i.e., drugs’ targets. Here, we investigate whether these perturbations and protein interaction networks can uncover drug targets and key pathways. We performed the first systematic analysis of over 500 drugs from the Connectivity Map. First, we show that the gene expression of drug targets is usually not significantly affected by the drug perturbation. Hence, expression changes after drug treatment on their own are not sufficient to identify drug targets. However, ranking of candidate drug targets by network topological measures prioritizes the targets. We introduce a novel measure, local radiality, which combines perturbed genes and functional interaction network information. The new measure outperforms other methods in target prioritization and proposes cancer-specific pathways from drugs to affected genes for the first time. Local radiality identifies more diverse targets with fewer neighbors and possibly less side effects. PMID:26615774

  10. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Natalia A; Valdez, Alejandra L; Fariña, Julia I

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a β-1,3-β-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length, and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc.), and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc.) applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high exopolysaccharide concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined.

  11. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Natalia A.; Valdez, Alejandra L.; Fariña, Julia I.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a β-1,3-β-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length, and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc.), and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc.) applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high exopolysaccharide concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined. PMID:26528259

  12. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M. K. S.; Kumaran, V.

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012), 10.1017/jfm.2011.55]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude.

  13. Mean Flow Perturbation Analysis of an Underexpanded Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Swagata; Gaitonde, Datta; Shen, Hao; Acoustics Technology, Boeing Research; Technology, Boeing Company Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Here, we illustrate a novel method to predict sound generated by imperfectly expanded jets where the resulting shock-cells can yield significant broadband noise in the far-field. We describe continued development of mean flow perturbation method to analyze the response of an underexpanded jet to small perturbations. This method originates from the work of Touber & Sandham (Theor. Comput. Fluid. Dyn., 2009) for nominally 2D shock-wave turbulent-boundary layer interactions. This method is an initial boundary value problem and is equally applicable to flows with sharp gradients. It degenerates into the LST, global and PSE analysis under suitable conditions. We use this method to study finer details of the noise generation mechanisms of an under-expanded round jet at M = 1 . 0 . Preliminary results on time-averaged mean turbulent flow-field perturbed by an annular multi-periodic excitation close to the nozzle-exit plane show interaction of downstream propagating disturbances with the feet of the shock-cells. This causes significant amplification of disturbances resulting in the formation of toroidal vortical structures. This further destabilize the shock-cells, finally resulting in acoustic wave propagation in two distinct downstream and upstream directions.

  14. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, N.J.L.

    1996-03-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to transport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Importantly, off-diagonal elements in the transport matrix appear to be important. This has also implications for the interpretation of the so-called `power balance` diffusivity, determined from the steady state fluxes and gradients. Experimental techniques, analysis techniques, basic formulas, etc., are briefly reviewed. Experimental results are summarized. The fundamental question whether the fluxes are linear functions of the gradients or not is discussed. 31 refs.

  15. Perturbation theory in electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, L. N.; Marthinsen, K.; Hoeier, R.

    1992-12-01

    The Bloch-wave approach is used for discussing multiple inelastic electron scattering and higher-order perturbation theory in inelastic high-energy electron diffraction. In contrast to previous work, the present work describes three-dimensional diffraction so that higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) effects are incorporated. Absorption is included and eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated from a structure matrix with the inclusion of an absorptive potential. Centrosymmetric as well as non-centrosymmetric crystal structures are allowed. An iteration method with a defined generalized propagation function for solving the inelastic coupling equations is described. It is shown that a similar iteration method with the same propagation function can be used for obtaining higher-order perturbation terms for the wave-function when a perturbation is added to the crystal potential. Finally, perturbation theory by matrix calculations when a general perturbation is added to the structure matrix is considered.

  16. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

  17. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.

    1984-05-30

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pins passageway extending through the assembly.

  18. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.

    1987-02-03

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

  19. Characterisation of turbulence downstream of a linear compressor cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mare, Luca; Jelly, Thomas; Day, Ivor

    2014-11-01

    Characterisation of turbulence in turbomachinery remains one of the most complex tasks in fluid mechanics. In addition, current closure models required for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations do not accurately represent the action of turbulent forces against the mean flow. Therefore, the statistical properties of turbulence in turbomachinery are of significant interest. In the current work, single- and two-point hot-wire measurements have been acquired downstream of a linear compressor cascade in order to examine the properties of large-scale turbulent structures and to assess how they affect turbulent momentum and energy transfer in compressor passages. The cascade has seven controlled diffusion which are representative of high-pressure stator blades found in turbofan engines. Blade chord, thickness and camber are 0.1515 m, 9.3% and 42 degrees, respectively. Measurements were acquired at a chord Reynolds number of 6 . 92 ×105 . Single-point statistics highlight differences in turbulence structure when comparing mid-span and end-wall regions. Evaluation of two-point correlations and their corresponding spectra reveal the length-scales of the energy-bearing eddies in the cascade. Ultimately, these measurements can be used to calibrate future computational models. The authors gratefully acknowledge Rolls-Royce plc for funding this work and granting permission for its publication.

  20. 5. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AND SUBSTRUCTURE (with graduated meter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AND SUBSTRUCTURE (with graduated meter pole); VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Auwaiakeakua Bridge, Spanning Auwaiakekua Gulch at Mamalahoa Highway, Waikoloa, Hawaii County, HI

  1. Downstream boundary conditions for viscous flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Gunzburger, M.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of the specification of artificial outflow conditions in flow problems is studied. It is shown that for transport type equations incorrect outflow conditions will adversely affect the solution only in a small region near the outflow boundary, while for elliptic equations, e.g. those governing the streamfunction or pressure, a correct boundary specification is essential. In addition, integral outflow boundary conditions for fluid dynamical problems are considered. It is shown that such conditions are well posed, and their effect on the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations is also considered.

  2. The effect of catalyst length and downstream reactor distance on catalytic combustor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effects on catalytic combustor performance which resulted from independently varying the length of a catalytic reactor and the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalyst. Monolithic combustion catalysts from three manufacturers were tested in a combustion test rig with no. 2 diesel fuel. Catalytic reactor lengths of 2.5 and 5.4 cm, and downstream gas-phase reaction distances of 7.3, 12.4, 17.5, and 22.5 cm were evaluated. Measurements of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and pressure drop were made. The catalytic-reactor pressure drop was less than 1 percent of the upstream total pressure for all test configurations and test conditions. Nitrogen oxides and unburned hydrocarbons emissions were less than 0.25 g NO2/kg fuel and 0.6 g HC/kg fuel, respectively. The minimum operating temperature (defined as the adiabatic combustion temperature required to obtain carbon monoxide emissions below a reference level of 13.6 g CO/kg fuel) ranged from 1230 K to 1500 K for the various conditions and configurations tested. The minimum operating temperature decreased with increasing total (catalytic-reactor-plus-downstream-gas-phase-reactor-zone) residence time but was independent of the relative times spent in each region when the catalytic-reactor residence time was greater than or equal to 1.4 ms.

  3. Perturbation solution of the shape of a nonaxisymmetric sessile drop.

    PubMed

    Prabhala, Bharadwaj; Panchagnula, Mahesh; Subramanian, Venkat R; Vedantam, Srikanth

    2010-07-06

    We develop an approximate analytical solution for the shape of a nonaxisymmetric sessile drop using regular perturbation methods and ignoring gravity. We assume that the pinned, contorted triple-line shape is known and is a small perturbation of the circular footprint of a spherical cap. We obtain an analytical solution using regular perturbation methods that we validate by comparing to the numerical solution of the Young-Laplace equation obtained using publicly available Surface Evolver software. In this process, we also show that the pressure inside the perturbed drop is unchanged and relate this to the curvature of the drop using the Young-Laplace equation. The rms error between the perturbation and Evolver solutions is calculated for a range of contact angles and amplitudes of triple-line perturbations. We show that the perturbation solution matches the numerical results well for a wide range of contact angles. In addition, we calculate the extent to which the drop surface is affected by triple-line contortions. We discuss the applicability of this solution to the possibility of real time hybrid experimental/computational characterization of the 3D sessile drop shapes, including obtaining local contact angle information.

  4. Revised Perturbation Statistics for the Global Scale Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1975-01-01

    Magnitudes and scales of atmospheric perturbations about the monthly mean for the thermodynamic variables and wind components are presented by month at various latitudes. These perturbation statistics are a revision of the random perturbation data required for the global scale atmospheric model program and are from meteorological rocket network statistical summaries in the 22 to 65 km height range and NASA grenade and pitot tube data summaries in the region up to 90 km. The observed perturbations in the thermodynamic variables were adjusted to make them consistent with constraints required by the perfect gas law and the hydrostatic equation. Vertical scales were evaluated by Buell's depth of pressure system equation and from vertical structure function analysis. Tables of magnitudes and vertical scales are presented for each month at latitude 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90 degrees.

  5. Lunar fossil magnetism and perturbations of the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbations of the solar wind downstream of the moon and lying outside of the rarefaction wave that defines the diamagnetic cavity are used to define possible source regions comprised of intrinsically magnetized areas of the moon. A map of the moon is constructed showing that a model in which the sources are exposed to the grazing solar wind during the lunation yields a selenographically invariant set of regions strongly favoring the lunar highlands over the maria. An alternative model with the source due to electromagnetic induction is explored. The ages of the field sources should be consistent with those based on the basalt ages and possibly far older if the sources are connected with the formation of the highland rocks themselves. The perturbations are tentatively identified as weak shock waves, and a Mach angle in accord with nominal values for the solar wind is found.

  6. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  7. Newtonian perturbations on models with matter creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesus, J. F.; Oliveira, F. A.; Basilakos, S.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2011-09-01

    Creation of cold dark matter (CCDM) can macroscopically be described by a negative pressure, and, therefore, the mechanism is capable to accelerate the Universe, without the need of an additional dark energy component. In this framework, we discuss the evolution of perturbations by considering a Neo-Newtonian approach where, unlike in the standard Newtonian cosmology, the fluid pressure is taken into account even in the homogeneous and isotropic background equations (Lima, Zanchin, and Brandenberger, MNRAS 291, L1, 1997). The evolution of the density contrast is calculated in the linear approximation and compared to the one predicted by the ΛCDM model. The difference between the CCDM and ΛCDM predictions at the perturbative level is quantified by using three different statistical methods, namely: a simple χ2-analysis in the relevant space parameter, a Bayesian statistical inference, and, finally, a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We find that under certain circumstances, the CCDM scenario analyzed here predicts an overall dynamics (including Hubble flow and matter fluctuation field) which fully recovers that of the traditional cosmic concordance model. Our basic conclusion is that such a reduction of the dark sector provides a viable alternative description to the accelerating ΛCDM cosmology.

  8. Thermal Instability of Advection-Dominated Disks against Revised Local Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shoji; Yamasaki, Tatsuya; Abramowicz, Marek A.; Chen, Xingming

    1997-04-01

    The thermal stability of advection-dominated accretion disks against local perturbations is re-examined in order to correct some errors in our previous paper. Thermal perturbations which are local in the radial direction are found to also be local in the vertical direction. Because of this, the using of vertically integrated quantities was irrelevant in analyzing the stability of local thermal perturbations when the disks are geometrically thick. Our new results, obtained by correcting the error, show that if the turbulence acts as a diffusion process in thermal energy transport, it strongly dampens the thermal perturbations. In these cases when the diffusion process is weak, however, perturbations grow due to a variation of the viscous heating associated with the perturbations. One such example of growth is in the case where radiation pressure greatly dominates the gas pressure.

  9. 1. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE HEADGATE STRUCTURE ON NORTH BANK, SPILLWAY ON LEFT SIDE OF DAM, AND SPLASH LOGS ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  10. 11. VIEW NORTH ALONG DOWNSTREAM BANK OF DAM FROM SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW NORTH ALONG DOWNSTREAM BANK OF DAM FROM SOUTH SIDE OF CHANNEL ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF RESERVOIR - Upper Doughty Dam, 200 feet west of Garden State Parkway, 1.7 miles west of Absecon, Egg Harbor City, Atlantic County, NJ

  11. Perturbative gadgets at arbitrary orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen P.; Farhi, Edward

    2008-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms are often most easily formulated using many-body interactions. However, experimentally available interactions are generally two-body. In 2004, Kempe, Kitaev, and Regev introduced perturbative gadgets, by which arbitrary three-body effective interactions can be obtained using Hamiltonians consisting only of two-body interactions. These three-body effective interactions arise from the third order in perturbation theory. Since their introduction, perturbative gadgets have become a standard tool in the theory of quantum computation. Here we construct generalized gadgets so that one can directly obtain arbitrary k -body effective interactions from two-body Hamiltonians. These effective interactions arise from the k th order in perturbation theory.

  12. Inflationary perturbations in bimetric gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cusin, Giulia; Durrer, Ruth; Guarato, Pietro; Motta, Mariele E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch E-mail: mariele.motta@unige.ch

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the generation of primordial perturbations in a cosmological setting of bigravity during inflation. We consider a model of bigravity which can reproduce the ΛCDM background and large scale structure and a simple model of inflation with a single scalar field and a quadratic potential. Reheating is implemented with a toy-model in which the energy density of the inflaton is entirely dissipated into radiation. We present analytic and numerical results for the evolution of primordial perturbations in this cosmological setting. We find that the amplitude of tensor perturbations generated during inflation is sufficiently suppressed to avoid the effects of the tensor instability discovered in refs. [1,2] which develops during the cosmological evolution in the physical sector. We argue that from a pure analysis of the tensor perturbations this bigravity model is compatible with present observations. However, we derive rather stringent limits on inflation from the vector and scalar sectors.

  13. Causal compensated perturbations in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to calculate linear perturbations in the gravitational and matter fields which arise causally in response to the presence of stiff matter sources in a FRW cosmology. It is shown that, in order to satisfy energy and momentum conservation, the gravitational fields of the source must be compensated by perturbations in the matter and gravitational fields, and the role of such compensation in containing the initial inhomogeneities in their subsequent evolution is discussed. A complete formal solution is derived in terms of Green functions for the perturbations produced by an arbitrary source in a flat universe containing cold dark matter. Approximate Green function solutions are derived for the late-time density perturbations and late-time gravitational waves in a universe containing a radiation fluid. A cosmological energy-momentum pseudotensor is defined to clarify the nature of energy and momentum conservation in the expanding universe.

  14. High and Low Latitude types of the Downstream Influences of the North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.

    2013-12-01

    Using reanalysis data, we find that the downstream-propagating quasi-stationary Rossby wave train associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) generally propagates along a high (low)-latitude pathway during warm (cold) El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) boreal winters. Consistent with the different propagation directions of the NAO-related downstream wave train, during the warm (cold) ENSO winters, the NAO is associated with significant 300 hPa geopotential height anomalies over eastern Siberia (the Arabian Sea, the east coast of Asia at around 40N, and the North Pacific), and the near-surface air temperature (SAT) perturbations associated with the NAO over the high latitudes of Asia are relatively strong (weak). Based on these differences, we argue that the NAO has two distinct types of downstream influence: a high-latitude type and a low-latitude type. Furthermore, we argue that the two types of NAO's downstream influence are modulated by the intensity of the subtropical potential vorticity (PV) meridional gradient over Africa. When this gradient is weak (strong), as in the warm (cold) ENSO winters, the NAO's downstream influence tends to be of the high (low)-latitude type. These results are further supported by analysis of intraseasonal NAO events. We separate NAO events into two categories in terms of the intensity of the subtropical PV gradient over Africa. Composites of the NAO events accompanied by a weak (strong) subtropical PV gradient show that the NAO-related downstream wave train tends to propagate along a high (low)-latitude pathway. Fig. 1 Regressed monthly anomalous meridional wind at 300 hPa (V 300hPa, thin contours, interval is 1 m/s) onto the monthly NAO index and the corresponding stationary wave activity fluxes (vectors, unit is m2s-2) during a) the warm ENSO winters and b) cold ENSO winters. Solid (dashed) contours represent positive (negative) values and the zero contours are omitted. The regressed results at the 95% confidence level

  15. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  16. More many-body perturbation theory for an electron-ion system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.A. Jr.; Johnson, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    From previous finite-temperature, quantum, many-body perturbation theory results for the grand partition function of an electron-ion fluid through order {epsilon}{sup 4}, we compute the electron and ion fugacities in terms of the volume per ion and the temperature to that same order in perturbation theory. From these results we also give the pressure, again to the same order in perturbation theory about the values for the non-interacting fluid.

  17. Cosmological perturbations without inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    2017-01-01

    A particularly attractive feature of inflation is that quantum fluctuations in the inflaton field may have seeded inhomogeneities in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we demonstrate that a scalar field with zero active mass, i.e. with an equation of state ρ +3p=0 , where ρ and p are its energy density and pressure, respectively, could also have produced an essentially scale-free fluctuation spectrum, though without inflation. This alternative mechanism is based on the Hollands–Wald concept of a minimum wavelength for the emergence of quantum fluctuations into the semi-classical universe. A cosmology with zero active mass does not have a horizon problem, so it does not need inflation to solve this particular (non) issue. In this picture, the {{1}\\circ}{ {--}}{{10}\\circ} fluctuations in the CMB correspond almost exactly to the Planck length at the Planck time, firmly supporting the view that CMB observations may already be probing trans-Planckian physics.

  18. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  19. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-11-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  20. Organization of Functional Postural Responses Following Perturbations in Multiple Directions in Elderly Fallers Standing Quietly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matjacic, Zlatko; Sok, David; Jakovljevic, Miroljub; Cikajlo, Imre

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess functional postural responses by analyzing the center-of-pressure trajectories resulting from perturbations delivered in multiple directions to elderly fallers. Ten elderly individuals were standing quietly on two force platforms while an apparatus delivered controlled perturbations at the level of pelvis…

  1. High-order perturbations of a spherical collapsing star

    SciTech Connect

    Brizuela, David; Martin-Garcia, Jose M.; Sperhake, Ulrich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2010-11-15

    A formalism to deal with high-order perturbations of a general spherical background was developed in earlier work [D. Brizuela, J. M. Martin-Garcia, and G. A. Mena Marugan, Phys. Rev. D 74, 044039 (2006); D. Brizuela, J. M. Martin-Garcia, and G. A. Mena Marugan, Phys. Rev. D 76, 024004 (2007)]. In this paper, we apply it to the particular case of a perfect fluid background. We have expressed the perturbations of the energy-momentum tensor at any order in terms of the perturbed fluid's pressure, density, and velocity. In general, these expressions are not linear and have sources depending on lower-order perturbations. For the second-order case we make the explicit decomposition of these sources in tensor spherical harmonics. Then, a general procedure is given to evolve the perturbative equations of motions of the perfect fluid for any value of the harmonic label. Finally, with the problem of a spherical collapsing star in mind, we discuss the high-order perturbative matching conditions across a timelike surface, in particular, the surface separating the perfect fluid interior from the exterior vacuum.

  2. High-order perturbations of a spherical collapsing star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizuela, David; Martín-García, José M.; Sperhake, Ulrich; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2010-11-01

    A formalism to deal with high-order perturbations of a general spherical background was developed in earlier work [D. Brizuela, J. M. Martín-García, and G. A. Mena Marugán, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 74, 044039 (2006);10.1103/PhysRevD.74.044039 D. Brizuela, J. M. Martín-García, and G. A. Mena Marugán, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 76, 024004 (2007)10.1103/PhysRevD.76.024004]. In this paper, we apply it to the particular case of a perfect fluid background. We have expressed the perturbations of the energy-momentum tensor at any order in terms of the perturbed fluid’s pressure, density, and velocity. In general, these expressions are not linear and have sources depending on lower-order perturbations. For the second-order case we make the explicit decomposition of these sources in tensor spherical harmonics. Then, a general procedure is given to evolve the perturbative equations of motions of the perfect fluid for any value of the harmonic label. Finally, with the problem of a spherical collapsing star in mind, we discuss the high-order perturbative matching conditions across a timelike surface, in particular, the surface separating the perfect fluid interior from the exterior vacuum.

  3. Effects of local high-frequency perturbation on a turbulent boundary layer by synthetic jet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao; Huang, Qian-Min; Liu, Pei-qing; Qu, Qiu-Lin

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the local high-frequency perturbation effects of a synthetic jet injection on a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. Parameters of the synthetic jet are designed to force a high-frequency perturbation from a thin spanwise slot in the wall. In the test locations downstream of the slot, it is found that skin-friction is reduced by the perturbation, which is languishingly evolved downstream of the slot with corresponding influence on the near-wall regeneration mechanism of turbulent structures. The downstream slot region is divided into two regions due to the influence strength of the movement of spanwise vortices generated by the high-frequency perturbation. Interestingly, the variable interval time average technique is found to be disturbed by the existence of the spanwise vortices’ motion, especially in the region close to the slot. Similar results are obtained from the analysis of the probability density functions of the velocity fluctuation time derivatives, which is another indirect technique for detecting the enhancement or attenuation of streamwise vortices. However, both methods have shown consistent results with the skin-friction reduction mechanism in the far-away slot region. The main purpose of this paper is to remind researchers to be aware of the probable influence of spanwise vortices’ motion in wall-bounded turbulence control.

  4. Structural fluctuation of proteins induced by thermodynamic perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Fumio; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-28

    A theory to describe structural fluctuations of protein induced by thermodynamic perturbations, pressure, temperature, and denaturant, is proposed. The theory is formulated based on the three methods in the statistical mechanics: the generalized Langevin theory, the linear response theory, and the three dimensional interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory. The theory clarifies how the change in thermodynamic conditions, or a macroscopic perturbation, induces the conformational fluctuation, which is a microscopic property. The theoretical results are applied, on the conceptual basis, to explain the experimental finding by Akasaka et al., concerning the NMR experiment which states that the conformational change induced by pressure corresponds to structural fluctuations occurring in the ambient condition. A method to evaluate the structural fluctuation induced by pressure is also suggested by means of the 3D-RISM and the site-site Kirkwood-Buff theories.

  5. Effect of thermally induced perturbation in supersonic boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hong; Gaitonde, Datta

    2010-06-01

    This paper investigates the mechanism of steady and unsteady thermal perturbation (also denoted as thermal bump) in a Mach 1.5 flat plate boundary layer. A high-fidelity upwind-biased third-order Roe scheme is used with the compressive van Leer harmonic limiter on a suitably refined mesh. The study consists of two parts. In the first part, the effects of the steady and pulsed thermal bumps are explored. It is shown that the finite-span thermal bumps generate streamwise vortices. With steady heating, the disturbance decays downstream. However, when the thermal bump is pulsed, vortex shedding is observed and the streamwise vortical disturbance grows with downstream distance, consistent with linear stability analysis. The integrated disturbance energy indicates that streamwise kinetic disturbance energy growth dominates over those associated with other two velocity and thermodynamic components. The second part of this paper explores the physical consequences of the nonlinear dynamics between the vortices produced by the pulsed bump and the compressible boundary layer. The resulting three-dimensional flow distortion generates hairpin structures which are aligned in the streamwise direction, suggesting that the transition process bears some similarity to K-type breakdown. The arrangement of these vortices is connected to the low-speed streaks observed in the evolving boundary layer. The shape factor, velocity, and Reynolds stress profiles suggest that the perturbed flow shows initiation of transition to turbulence, but remains transitional at the end of the plate.

  6. Up- and downstream sheaths in an ion-beam-plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zi-an; Ma, J. X.

    2016-02-15

    Ion sheaths formed in the up- and downstream sides of a negatively biased metal plate/mesh in an ion-beam-background-plasma system were experimentally investigated in a double plasma device. Measured potential profiles near the plate exhibit asymmetric structure, showing thicker sheath in the downstream side. The presence of the ion beam causes the shrink of the sheaths on both sides. The sheath thickness decreases with the increase of beam energy and density. Furthermore, the sheaths near the mesh are substantially thinner than that near the plate because of the partial transmission of the mesh to the ions. In addition, the increase of neutral gas pressure leads to the reduction of the beam energy and density, resulting in the increase of the sheath thickness.

  7. Downstream evolution of turbulence from heated screens: Experimental and analytical results

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Shagam, R.N.; Neal, D.R.; Suo-Anttila, A.J.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1993-02-01

    This report discusses recent efforts to characterize the flow and density nonuniformities downstream of heated screens placed in a uniform flow. The Heated Screen Test Facility (HSTF) at Sandia National Laboratories and the Lockheed Palo Alto Flow Channel (LPAFC) were used to perform experiments over wide ranges of upstream velocities and heating rates. Screens of various mesh configurations were examined, including multiple screens sequentially positioned in the flow direction. Diagnostics in these experiments included pressure manometry, hot-wire anemometry, interferometry, Hartmann wavefront slope sensing, and photorefractive schlieren photography. A model was developed to describe the downstream evolution of the flow and density nonuniformities. Equations for the spatial variation of the mean flow quantities and the fluctuation magnitudes were derived by incorporating empirical correlations into the equations of motion. Numerical solutions of these equations are in fair agreement with previous and current experimental results.

  8. Water stress in global transboundary river basins: significance of upstream water use on downstream stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka, M.; Wada, Y.; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analysed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world’s transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. We found that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  9. Water Stress in Global Transboundary River Basins: Significance of Upstream Water Use on Downstream Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka,M.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analyzed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world's transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. Wefound that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  10. Effects of core perturbations on the structure of the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigart, A.V.

    1983-10-15

    A number of numerical experiments have been carried out in order to investigate the sensivity of the solar luminosity and radius to perturbations within the radiative core. In these experiments the core was perturbed by suddenly mixing various parts of the composition profile during evolutionary sequences for the present Sun. The hydrostatic readjustment caused by these ''mixing events'' induced an immediate change in the surface luminosity and radius on both the hydrodynamic time scale (approx.15 minutes) and the thermal time scale of the superadiabatic layers (approx.1 day). The subsequent evolution of the luminosity and radius perturbations was followed for 5 x 10/sup 5/ yr after each mixing event. The time-dependent behavior of these perturbations was found to depend on where the mixing event occurred. In all cases, however, the ratio W(t) = ..delta.. log R/..delta.. log L had an initial value of 0.71 and showed only a mild time dependence during the first several thousand years. Two other relationships between the luminosity and radius perturbations are also discussed. One of these, V(t) = (d log R/dd)/(d log L/dt), has a fairly constant value of 0.3 +- 0.1. Both perturbations in the mixing-length ratio ..cap alpha.. and perturbations in the magnetic pressure within the solar convective envelope yield the same value for V/(t). During the normal unperturbed evolution of the present Sun, V(t) = 0.4. Our results show that core perturbations such as the present mixing events cannot explain the decrease in the solar radius indicated by the solar eclipse data between 1925 and 1980.

  11. Solitary perturbations in the steep boundary of magnetized toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. E.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Kim, M. H.; Choi, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Park, H. K.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Park, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Solitary perturbations (SPs) localized both poloidally and radially are detected within ~100 μs before the partial collapse of the high pressure gradient boundary region (called pedestal) of magnetized toroidal plasma in the KSTAR tokamak device. The SP develops with a low toroidal mode number (typically unity) in the pedestal ingrained with quasi-stable edge-localized mode (QSM) which commonly appears during the inter-collapse period. The SPs have smaller mode pitch and different (often opposite) rotation velocity compared to the QSMs. Similar solitary perturbations are also frequently observed before the onset of complete pedestal collapse, suggesting a strong connection between the SP generation and the pedestal collapse.

  12. Suitability of air sampling locations downstream of bends and static mixing elements.

    PubMed

    McFarland, A R; Gupta, R; Anand, N K

    1999-12-01

    The revised standard for sampling effluent air from stacks and ducts of the nuclear industry places limits on the non-uniformity of velocity and contaminant profiles at the sampling location; namely, the coefficients of variation must not exceed 20% over an area that encompasses at least the center 2/3 of the cross sectional area. Tests were conducted to characterize the degree of mixing at downstream locations as affected by several types of flow disturbances, including 90 degree elbows and commercial static mixing devices. Flow straighteners were incorporated into the ducting upstream of the mixer to be tested to simulate the dampening of flow turbulence that might occur because of upstream HEPA filters. The coefficients of variation of velocity and tracer gas concentration measured in a straight tube at a distance of 3 diameters downstream from a 90 degree elbow were 17% and 69%, respectively. The mixing is impacted by the upstream flow turbulence. Without a flow straightener, the tracer gas concentration coefficient of variation was reduced to 33% at the 3-diameter location. The use of static mixing elements can greatly enhance the mixing process. A ring placed just downstream of a 90 degree elbow, which blocks the outer 56% of the cross sectional area, results in a coefficient of variation of 19% for tracer gas concentration at the 3-diameter location. Pressure loss across the elbow with the ring is about nine times that of the basic elbow. One of the commercially available static mixers provides coefficients of variation that are less than 10% for both velocity and tracer gas concentration at 4 diameters downstream from the mixer with a pressure loss that is only about 3.5 times as large as that of a 90 degree elbow.

  13. 6. DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF LOWER MITER GATES WITH FULL LOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF LOWER MITER GATES WITH FULL LOCK CHAMBER, VISITORS, AND LOCKMASTER'S HOUSE IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  14. 8. EMPTY LOCK CHAMBER FROM DOWNSTREAM (WEST) END, WITH VISITORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EMPTY LOCK CHAMBER FROM DOWNSTREAM (WEST) END, WITH VISITORS CENTER (LEFT) AND LOCKMASTER'S HOUSE ON NORTH BANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  15. 32. Otter Lake Dam. View from downstream show how the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Otter Lake Dam. View from downstream show how the dam blends into its environment. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  16. 7. Contextual view to eastnortheast showing downstream (west) side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Contextual view to east-northeast showing downstream (west) side of bridge in setting, depicting dense riparian nature of area. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  17. 29. VIEW OF STONE BUILDING, ABOUT ONE MILE DOWNSTREAM OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF STONE BUILDING, ABOUT ONE MILE DOWNSTREAM OF DAM, USED TO STORE EXPLOSIVES DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF HORSE MESA - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 10. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam under construction. Cement ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam under construction. Cement storage shed is at center right. Photographer unknown, September 1924. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, FROM DOWNSTREAM (TO RIGHT), NOTE SAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, FROM DOWNSTREAM (TO RIGHT), NOTE SAND AND SILT SLUICE GATE FOR DIVERSION DAM ON LEFT, VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Main Canal Headworks, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  20. 27. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT DOWNSTREAM END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT DOWNSTREAM END OF WEST MAIN LOCK WALL, LOOKiNG SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  1. view downstream of inside of lower lock gates closed with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    view downstream of inside of lower lock gates closed with southeast machinery house, SF 109, on right, view towards northeast - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  2. 17. Oblique view to southsoutheast of downstream (west) side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Oblique view to south-southeast of downstream (west) side of bridge, with southbound 'piggyback' train on structure. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  3. 10. VIEW WEST TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAY FROM UNDERSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW WEST TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAY FROM UNDERSIDE OF GARDEN STATE PARKWAY ABUTMENT - Upper Doughty Dam, 200 feet west of Garden State Parkway, 1.7 miles west of Absecon, Egg Harbor City, Atlantic County, NJ

  4. 5. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  5. 6. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  6. 5. VIEW SHOWING THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SWAN FALLS DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SHOWING THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SWAN FALLS DAM AND POWER HOUSE, LOOKING UPSTREAM TO SOUTH FROM THE A MOUND OF DEBRIS ABOUT THIRTY TO FORTY FEET ABOVE THE RIVER - Swan Falls Dam, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  7. 60. Storage Area for Structural Members, Iowa Side (downstream from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Storage Area for Structural Members, Iowa Side (downstream from bridge), work on Iowa Draw Span, about Sept. 20, 1895. - Pacific Shortline Bridge, U.S. Route 20,spanning Missouri River, Sioux City, Woodbury County, IA

  8. 24. DOWNSTREAM DETAIL OF PIER NO. 2 AND THROUGH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DOWNSTREAM DETAIL OF PIER NO. 2 AND THROUGH AND DECK TRUSS END PANELS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  9. 22. DOWNSTREAM DETAIL OF PIER NO. 3, TRUSS TOWER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DOWNSTREAM DETAIL OF PIER NO. 3, TRUSS TOWER AND CANTILEVER ARMS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  10. 15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO SETTLING BASIN, SHOWING RIGHT FORK WITH GATE IN PLACE AND A FEW NEEDLES IN PLACE - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  11. 14. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM TOWARD SETTLING BASIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM TOWARD SETTLING BASIN, SHOWING RIGHT FORK TO BYPASS, LEFT FORK TO BASIN - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  12. DOWNSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL VIEW WITH DOG HOUSE. NOTE CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOWNSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL VIEW WITH DOG HOUSE. NOTE CONTROL ARM AND GEAR FOR GATE. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Dresden Island Lock and Dam , 7521 North Lock Road, Channahon, Will County, IL

  13. 54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing initial masonry construction and poured concrete capping. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 65. Close up view of downstream face of arch, buttress ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Close up view of downstream face of arch, buttress ties and roadway support work. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 42. View of emergency spillway excavation looking downstream from spillway. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. View of emergency spillway excavation looking downstream from spillway. Photographer unknown, 1929. Source: ADWR. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 69. View of downstream face from west or right abutment. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. View of downstream face from west or right abutment. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 51. Downstream end of diversion tunnel around east end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Downstream end of diversion tunnel around east end of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 57. Downstream side of left section of diversion dam. Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Downstream side of left section of diversion dam. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. 70. Downstream view of Waddell Dam spillway and taintor gates. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Downstream view of Waddell Dam spillway and taintor gates. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 49. Downstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam with sluice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Downstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam with sluice opening at center. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 40. Reservoir behind Pleasant Dam, looking downstream, spillway is at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Reservoir behind Pleasant Dam, looking downstream, spillway is at right. Photographer unknown, c. late 1920s. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 27. Evening view of downstream face of Pleasant Dam under ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Evening view of downstream face of Pleasant Dam under construction. Part of construction camp housing is visible in foreground. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  3. 28. View of construction shops looking west and downstream. Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. View of construction shops looking west and downstream. Photographer unknown, October 29, 1926. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. 55. Downstream face of diversion dam looking northwest. Photographer Mark ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Downstream face of diversion dam looking northwest. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF TUMALO DIVERSION DAM AND SPILLWAY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF TUMALO DIVERSION DAM AND SPILLWAY, WITH FISH LADDER TO RIGHT OF VIEW. FROM WEST BANK OF TUMALO CREEK. LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  6. 25. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, SHOWING FISH LADDER DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, SHOWING FISH LADDER DOWNSTREAM FROM THE DAM/SPILLWAY ON THE WASHINGTON SHORE. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  7. 3. VIEW OF DIABLO CANYON LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM THE VALVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF DIABLO CANYON LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM THE VALVE HOUSE AT ELEVATION 1044, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Dam, On Skagit River, 6.9 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  8. View of Lake Sabrina Dam downstream face from parking lot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Lake Sabrina Dam downstream face from parking lot showing concrete outlet structure on tow of dam at left edge of photo, view southeast - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 2, Lake Sabrina Dam, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  9. 76. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED TYPE: DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, LITTLEROCK DAM, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED TYPE: DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION, SHEET 3; OCTOBER 2, 1919. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 25. Camp housing, downstream and south of river, at Mormon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Camp housing, downstream and south of river, at Mormon Flat Dam. Photographer Mark Durben, 1988. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. 19. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam completed. Power plant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam completed. Power plant is nearing completion. Photographer unknown, 1926. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  12. 7. VIEW OF MAIN CANAL, LOOKING SOUTH, IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF MAIN CANAL, LOOKING SOUTH, IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM FROM THE SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, SECTION 34, T2N, R37E - Woodville Canal Company, West side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Woodville, Bingham County, ID

  13. 2. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, SHOWING CHANNEL DOWNSTREAM FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, SHOWING CHANNEL DOWNSTREAM FROM NAVIGATION LOCK #1; MOVABLE BRIDGE IS VISIBLE IN LEFT FOREGROUND. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  14. 9. DETAIL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DOWNSTREAM MITER GATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DOWNSTREAM MITER GATES FOR NAVIGATION LOCK #1. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  15. View of downstream debris field at the Merry Generator House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of downstream debris field at the Merry Generator House, showing possible concrete generator seats, looking south - Arthur Holmes Merry Generator House, Signal Lake North of Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  16. 4. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION. DETAIL OF BUTTRESS ADDITION ON NORTHEAST WING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION. DETAIL OF BUTTRESS ADDITION ON NORTHEAST WING WALL. - Core Creek County Bridge, Spanning Core Creek, approximately 1 mile South of State Route 332 (Newtown Bypass), Newtown, Bucks County, PA

  17. 9. A CLOSEUP VIEW LOOKING NORTH OF THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. A CLOSE-UP VIEW LOOKING NORTH OF THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF PIER. ALSO VISIBLE IS THE NORTHWEST ABUTMENT AND WING WALL. - Cement Plant Road Bridge, Spanning Leatherwood Creek on County Road 50 South, Bedford, Lawrence County, IN

  18. Multi-field inflation and cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    We provide a concise review on multi-field inflation and cosmological perturbations. We discuss convenient and physically meaningful bases in terms of which perturbations can be systematically studied. We give formal accounts on the gauge fixing conditions and present the perturbation action in two gauges. We also briefly review nonlinear perturbations.

  19. Thermal perturbation of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twigg, L. W.; Endal, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of thermal perturbations of the solar convective zone via changes in the mixing length parameter were carried out, with a view toward understanding the possible solar radius and luminosity changes cited in the literature. The results show that: (a) a single perturbation of alpha is probably not the cause of the solar radius change and (b) the parameter W = d lambda nR./d lambda nL. can not be characterized by a single value, as implied in recent work.

  20. Electromagnetic energy conversion in downstream fronts from three dimensional kinetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Markidis, Stefano; Divin, Andrey

    2014-05-15

    The electromagnetic energy equation is analyzed term by term in a 3D simulation of kinetic reconnection previously reported by Vapirev et al. [J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 118, 1435 (2013)]. The evolution presents the usual 2D-like topological structures caused by an initial perturbation independent of the third dimension. However, downstream of the reconnection site, where the jetting plasma encounters the yet unperturbed pre-existing plasma, a downstream front is formed and made unstable by the strong density gradient and the unfavorable local acceleration field. The energy exchange between plasma and fields is most intense at the instability, reaching several pW/m{sup 3}, alternating between load (energy going from fields to particles) and generator (energy going from particles to fields) regions. Energy exchange is instead purely that of a load at the reconnection site itself in a region focused around the x-line and elongated along the separatrix surfaces. Poynting fluxes are generated at all energy exchange regions and travel away from the reconnection site transporting an energy signal of the order of about S≈10{sup −3}W/m{sup 2}.

  1. Dams and Rivers: A Primer on the Downstream Effects of Dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collier, Michael; Webb, Robert H.; Schmidt, John C.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is charged with monitoring the water and mineral resources of the United States. Beginning in 1889, the Survey established a network of water gaging stations across most of the country's rivers; some also measured sediment content of the water. Consequently, we now have valuable long-term data with which to track water supply, sediment transport, and the occurrence of floods. Many variables affect the flow of water from mountain brook to river delta. Some are short-term perturbations like summer thunderstorms. Others occur over a longer period of time, like the El Ninos that might be separated by a decade or more. We think of these variables as natural occurrences, but humans have exerted some of the most important changes -- water withdrawals for agriculture, inter-basin transfers, and especially the construction of an extensive system of dams. Dams have altered the flow of many of the Nation's rivers to meet societal needs. We expect floods to be contained. Irrigation is possible where deserts once existed. And water is released downstream not according to natural cycles but as dictated by a region's hour-by-hour needs for water or electricity. As a result, river channels below dams have changed dramatically. Depending on annual flow, flood peaks, and a river's sediment load, we might see changes such as sand building up in one channel, vegetation crowding into another, and extensive bank erosion in another. This Circular explores the emerging scientific arena of change in rivers below dams. This science tries first to understand and then anticipate changes to river beds and banks, and to riparian habitats and animal communities. To some degree, these downstream changes can be influenced by specific strategies of dam management. Scientists and resource managers have a duty to assemble this information and present it without bias to the rest of society. Society can then more intelligently choose a balance between the benefits and adverse

  2. Semidiurnal perturbations to the surge of Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Olabarrieta, Maitane; Valle, Alvaro

    2013-04-01

    Hurricane Sandy drove storm surges throughout the eastern seaboard of the United States, from Miami to Maine, at the end of October 2012. The surge was particularly high (>3 m) in coastal New York. In the southeastern United States, the surge was <1 m but had striking semidiurnal perturbations that reached a range of ~0.5 m in northern Florida and southern Georgia. These oscillations are typically not considered in surge forecasts and therefore, it is essential to understand their origin for future forecasts. Analytical and numerical approaches indicated that semidiurnal perturbations arose from an interaction between astronomical tide and atmospheric forcing from wind and barometric pressure. This combination of forcing caused phase shifts between incident and reflected tidal waves that customarily produce quasi-standing tidal conditions in the area. Atmospheric forcing of sufficient strength, which threshold remains to be established, disrupted such quasi-standing tidal behavior and triggered the semidiurnal perturbations.

  3. VHS Movies: Perturbations for Morphogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Danny L.

    This paper discusses the concept of a family system in terms of an interactive system of interrelated, interdependent parts and suggests that VHS movies can act as perturbations, i.e., change promoting agents, for certain dysfunctional family systems. Several distinct characteristics of a family system are defined with particular emphasis on…

  4. Recent Developments in Perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Lance J.; /SLAC

    2005-07-11

    I review recent progress in perturbative QCD on two fronts: extending next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections to a broader range of collider processes, and applying twistor-space methods (and related spinoffs) to computations of multi-parton scattering amplitudes.

  5. Adaptation Strategies in Perturbed /s/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Jana; Hoole, Phil; Perrier, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the role of three articulatory parameters (tongue position, jaw position and tongue grooving) in the production of /s/. Six normal speakers' speech was perturbed by a palatal prosthesis. The fricative was recorded acoustically and through electromagnetic articulography in four conditions: (1) unperturbed,…

  6. Disformal invariance of curvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Motohashi, Hayato; White, Jonathan E-mail: jwhite@post.kek.jp

    2016-02-01

    We show that under a general disformal transformation the linear comoving curvature perturbation is not identically invariant, but is invariant on superhorizon scales for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's theory. The difference between disformally related curvature perturbations is found to be given in terms of the comoving density perturbation associated with a single canonical scalar field. In General Relativity it is well-known that this quantity vanishes on superhorizon scales through the Poisson equation that is obtained on combining the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints, and we confirm that a similar result holds for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's scalar-tensor theory so long as the invertibility condition for the disformal transformation is satisfied. We also consider the curvature perturbation at full nonlinear order in the unitary gauge, and find that it is invariant under a general disformal transformation if we assume that an attractor regime has been reached. Finally, we also discuss the counting of degrees of freedom in theories disformally related to Horndeski's.

  7. Basics of QCD perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    This is an introduction to the use of QCD perturbation theory, emphasizing generic features of the theory that enable one to separate short-time and long-time effects. The author also covers some important classes of applications: electron-positron annihilation to hadrons, deeply inelastic scattering, and hard processes in hadron-hadron collisions. 31 refs., 38 figs.

  8. New results in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.K.

    1985-11-01

    Three topics in perturbative QCD important for Super-collider physics are reviewed. The topics are: (2 2) jet phenomena calculated in O( sT); new techniques for the calculation of tree graphs; and colour coherence in jet phenomena. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Effect of Body Perturbations on Hypersonic Flow Over Slender Power Law Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold; Thornton, Philip R.

    1959-01-01

    Hypersonic-slender-body theory, in the limit as the free-stream Mach number becomes infinite, is used to find the effect of slightly perturbing the surface of slender two-dimensional and axisymmetric power law bodies, The body perturbations are assumed to have a power law variation (with streamwise distance downstream of the nose of the body). Numerical results are presented for (1) the effect of boundary-layer development on two dimensional and axisymmetric bodies, (2) the effect of very small angles of attack (on tow[dimensional bodies), and (3) the effect of blunting the nose of very slender wedges and cones.

  10. Continuous pressure letdown system

    DOEpatents

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.; Matthews, David R.; Langowski, Terry

    2010-06-08

    A continuous pressure letdown system connected to a hopper decreases a pressure of a 2-phase (gas and solid) dusty gas stream flowing through the system. The system includes a discharge line for receiving the dusty gas from the hopper, a valve, a cascade nozzle assembly positioned downstream of the discharge line, a purge ring, an inert gas supply connected to the purge ring, an inert gas throttle, and a filter. The valve connects the hopper to the discharge line and controls introduction of the dusty gas stream into the discharge line. The purge ring is connected between the discharge line and the cascade nozzle assembly. The inert gas throttle controls a flow rate of an inert gas into the cascade nozzle assembly. The filter is connected downstream of the cascade nozzle assembly.

  11. Downstream hydraulic geometry relationships: Gathering reference reach-scale width values from LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, G.; Tarolli, P.; Cazorzi, F.; Dalla Fontana, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper examines the ability of LiDAR topography to provide reach-scale width values for the analysis of downstream hydraulic geometry relationships along some streams in the Dolomites (northern Italy). Multiple reach-scale dimensions can provide representative geometries and statistics characterising the longitudinal variability in the channel, improving the understanding of geomorphic processes across networks. Starting from the minimum curvature derived from a LiDAR DTM, the proposed algorithm uses a statistical approach for the identification of the scale of analysis, and for the automatic characterisation of reach-scale bankfull widths. The downstream adjustment in channel morphology is then related to flow parameters (drainage area and stream power). With the correct planning of a LiDAR survey, uncertainties in the procedure are principally due to the resolution of the DTM. The outputs are in general comparable in quality to field survey measurements, and the procedure allows the quick comparison among different watersheds. The proposed automatic approach could improve knowledge about river systems with highly variable widths, and about systems in areas covered by vegetation or inaccessible to field surveys. With proven effectiveness, this research could offer an interesting starting point for the analysis of differences between watersheds, and to improve knowledge about downstream channel adjustment in relation, for example, to scale and landscape forcing (e.g. sediment transport, tectonics, lithology, climate, geomorphology, and anthropic pressure).

  12. Mortality of zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, veligers during downstream transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horvath, T.G.; Lamberti, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    1. Streams flowing from lakes which contain zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, provide apparently suitable habitats for mussel colonization and downstream range expansion, yet most such streams contain few adult mussels. We postulated that mussel veligers experience high mortality during dispersal via downstream transport. They tested this hypothesis in Christiana Creek, a lake-outlet stream in south-western Michigan, U.S.A., in which adult mussel density declined exponentially with distance downstream. 2. A staining technique using neutral red was developed and tested to distinguish quickly live and dead veligers. Live and dead veligers were distinguishable after an exposure of fresh samples to 13.3 mg L-1 of neutral red for 3 h. 3. Neutral red was used to determine the proportion of live veligers in samples taken longitudinally along Christiana Creek. The proportion of live veligers (mean ?? SE) declined from 90 ?? 3% at the lake outlet to 40 ?? 8% 18 km downstream. 4. Veligers appear to be highly susceptible to damage by physical forces (e.g. shear), and therefore, mortality in turbulent streams could be an important mechanism limiting zebra mussel dispersal to downstream reaches. Predictions of zebra mussel spread and population growth should consider lake-stream linkages and high mortality in running waters.

  13. Modeling downstream fining in sand-bed rivers. I: Formulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, S.; Parker, G.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a numerical modeling formulation is presented for simulation of the development of the longitudinal profile and bed sediment distribution in sand-bed rivers. The objective of the model application, which is presented in the companion paper (Wright and Parker, 2005), is to study the development of two characteristics of large, low-slope, sand-bed rivers: (1) a downstream decrease in bed slope (i.e. concave upward longitudinal profile) and (2) a downstream decrease in characteristic bed sediment diameter (e.g. the median bed surface size D50). Three mechanisms that lead to an upward concave profile and downstream fining are included in the modeling formulation: (1) a delta prograding into standing water at the downstream boundary, (2) sea-level rise, and (3) tectonic subsidence. In the companion paper (Wright and Parker, 2005) the model is applied to simulate the development of the longitudinal profile and downstream fining in sand-bed rivers flowing into the ocean during the past 5000 years of relatively slow sea-level rise. ?? 2005 International Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Research.

  14. Downstream effects of mine effluent on an intermontane riparian system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Johnnie N.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Peters, Donald

    1991-01-01

    Metal concentrations were determined in benthic biota, fish livers, water, and fine-grained sediment through 215 km of an intermontane river system (Blackfoot River, Montana, USA) affected by headwater inputs of acid-mine effluent. Solute and particulate contaminants decreased rapidly downstream from headwater sources, but some extended through an extensive marsh system. Particulate contaminants penetrated through the marsh system, effectively resulting in food web contamination downstream of the marshes. Metals differed in their bioavailability within and below the marsh system. Cadmium was most consistently accumulated in the food web, and the general order of downstream mobilization of bioavailable metals appears to be Cd, Zn > Cu > As, Ni. Depauperate benthic communities and reduced fish populations occurred coincident with the sediment contamination.

  15. Comparison of pitot traverses taken at varying distances downstream of obstructions.

    PubMed

    Guffey, S E; Booth, D W

    1999-01-01

    This study determined the deviations between pitot traverses taken under "ideal" conditions--at least seven duct diameter's lengths (i.e., distance = 7D) from obstructions, elbows, junction fittings, and other disturbances to flows--with those taken downstream from commonplace disturbances. Two perpendicular 10-point, log-linear velocity pressure traverses were taken at various distances downstream of tested upstream conditions. Upstream conditions included a plain duct opening, a junction fitting, a single 90 degrees elbow, and two elbows rotated 90 degrees from each other into two orthogonal planes. Airflows determined from those values were compared with the values measured more than 40D downstream of the same obstructions under ideal conditions. The ideal measurements were taken on three traverse diameters in the same plane separated by 120 degrees in honed drawn-over-mandrel tubing. In all cases the pitot tubes were held in place by devices that effectively eliminated alignment errors and insertion depth errors. Duct velocities ranged from 1500 to 4500 ft/min. Results were surprisingly good if one employed two perpendicular traverses. When the averages of two perpendicular traverses was taken, deviations from ideal value were 6% or less even for traverses taken as close as 2D distance from the upstream disturbances. At 3D distance, deviations seldom exceeded 5%. With single diameter traverses, errors seldom exceeded 5% at 6D or more downstream from the disturbance. Interestingly, percentage deviations were about the same at high and low velocities. This study demonstrated that two perpendicular pitot traverses can be taken as close as 3D from these disturbances with acceptable (< or = 5%) deviations from measurements taken under ideal conditions.

  16. The natural and perturbed troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. W.; Hameed, S.; Pinto, J.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the chemical and climatic effects of industrial emissions into the atmosphere requires an understanding of the complex interactions of species within the atmosphere and of the atmosphere with other physical systems such as the oceans, lithosphere, and biosphere. The concentration of a particular species is determined by competition between various production and loss processes. The abundances of tropospheric gases are examined. The reactions of the members of the oxygen group are considered along with the models which have been developed to describe the involved relationships. Attention is also given to the natural carbon cycle, perturbations to the carbon cycle, the natural nitrogen cycle, perturbations to the nitrogen cycle, the hydrogen group, the sulfur group, and the halogen group.

  17. BRST quantization of cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Şengör, Gizem

    2016-11-01

    BRST quantization is an elegant and powerful method to quantize theories with local symmetries. In this article we study the Hamiltonian BRST quantization of cosmological perturbations in a universe dominated by a scalar field, along with the closely related quantization method of Dirac. We describe how both formalisms apply to perturbations in a time-dependent background, and how expectation values of gauge-invariant operators can be calculated in the in-in formalism. Our analysis focuses mostly on the free theory. By appropriate canonical transformations we simplify and diagonalize the free Hamiltonian. BRST quantization in derivative gauges allows us to dramatically simplify the structure of the propagators, whereas Dirac quantization, which amounts to quantization in synchronous gauge, dispenses with the need to introduce ghosts and preserves the locality of the gauge-fixed action.

  18. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  19. BRST quantization of cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Şengör, Gizem

    2016-11-08

    BRST quantization is an elegant and powerful method to quantize theories with local symmetries. In this article we study the Hamiltonian BRST quantization of cosmological perturbations in a universe dominated by a scalar field, along with the closely related quantization method of Dirac. We describe how both formalisms apply to perturbations in a time-dependent background, and how expectation values of gauge-invariant operators can be calculated in the in-in formalism. Our analysis focuses mostly on the free theory. By appropriate canonical transformations we simplify and diagonalize the free Hamiltonian. BRST quantization in derivative gauges allows us to dramatically simplify the structure of the propagators, whereas Dirac quantization, which amounts to quantization in synchronous gauge, dispenses with the need to introduce ghosts and preserves the locality of the gauge-fixed action.

  20. Transition duct with divided upstream and downstream portions

    DOEpatents

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Maldonado, Jaime Javier; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Flanagan, James Scott

    2015-07-14

    Turbine systems are provided. In one embodiment, a turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion extending from the inlet and a downstream portion extending from the outlet. The turbine system further includes a rib extending from an outer surface of the duct passage, the rib dividing the upstream portion and the downstream portion.

  1. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the ''MSR scheme'' which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the {mu} of MS. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like {mu} in MS). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q{approx}1 GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS.

  2. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  3. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Space physics and plasma physics experiments that can be performed from the space shuttle were identified. Potential experiment concepts were analyzed to derive requirements for a spaceborne experiment facility. The laboratory, known as the Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory consists of a 33-foot pallet of instruments connected to a 25-foot pressurized control module. Two 50-meter booms, two subsatellites, a high power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator array, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform are the primary systems deployed from the pallet. The pressurized module contains all the control and display equipment required to conduct the experiments, and life support and power subsystems.

  4. Mechanical picture of the linear transient growth of vortical perturbations in incompressible smooth shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagelishvili, George; Hau, Jan-Niklas; Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The linear dynamics of perturbations in smooth shear flows covers the transient exchange of energies between (1) the perturbations and the basic flow and (2) different perturbations modes. Canonically, the linear exchange of energies between the perturbations and the basic flow can be described in terms of the Orr and the lift-up mechanisms, correspondingly for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) perturbations. In this paper the mechanical basis of the linear transient dynamics is introduced and analyzed for incompressible plane constant shear flows, where we consider the dynamics of virtual fluid particles in the framework of plane perturbations (i.e., perturbations with plane surfaces of constant phase) for the 2D and 3D case. It is shown that (1) the formation of a pressure perturbation field is the result of countermoving neighboring sets of incompressible fluid particles in the flow, (2) the keystone of the energy exchange mechanism between the basic flow and perturbations is the collision of fluid particles with the planes of constant pressure in accordance with the classical theory of elastic collision of particles with a rigid wall, making the pressure field the key player in this process, (3) the interplay of the collision process and the shear flow kinematics describes the transient growth of plane perturbations and captures the physics of the growth, and (4) the proposed mechanical picture allows us to reconstruct the linearized Euler equations in spectral space with a time-dependent shearwise wave number, the linearized Euler equations for Kelvin modes. This confirms the rigor of the presented analysis, which, moreover, yields a natural generalization of the proposed mechanical picture of the transient growth to the well-established linear phenomenon of vortex-wave-mode coupling.

  5. Characteristics of a separating confluent boundary layer and the downstream wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adair, Desmond; Horne, W. Clifton

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of pressure and velocity characteristics are presented and analyzed for flow over and downstream of a NACA 4412 airfoil equipped with a NACA 4415 single-slotted flap at high angle of attack and close to maximum lift. The flow remained attached over the main element while a large region of recirculating flow occurred over the aft 61 percent of the flap. The airfoil configuration was tested at a Mach number of 0.09 and a chord Reynolds number of 1.8x10 to the 6th power in the NASA Ames Research Center 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. Measurement of mean and fluctuation velocities were obtained in regions of recirculation and high turbulence intensity using 3-D laser velocimetry. In regions where the flow had a preferred direction and relatively low turbulence intensity, hot-wire anemometry was used. Emphasis was placed on obtaining characteristics in the confluent boundary layer, the region of recirculating flow, and in the downstream wake. Surface pressure measurements were made on the main airfoil, flap, wind tunnel roof and floor. It is thought likely that because the model is large when compared to the wind tunnel cross section, the wind tunnel floor and ceiling interference should be taken into account when the flow field is calculated.

  6. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  7. Geometric Hamiltonian structures and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.

    1984-08-01

    We have been engaged in a program of investigating the Hamiltonian structure of the various perturbation theories used in practice. We describe the geometry of a Hamiltonian structure for non-singular perturbation theory applied to Hamiltonian systems on symplectic manifolds and the connection with singular perturbation techniques based on the method of averaging.

  8. 4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Five Point Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 12 miles Northwest of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  9. 9. SOUTHERLY VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. SOUTHERLY VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BIG DALTON DAM EXTENDING FROM THE DAM TO THE FOOTBRIDGE. VIEW FROM BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING THE TOE WEIR IN FOREGROUND AND FOOTBRIDGE IN BACKGROUND. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 5. WESTERLY VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. WESTERLY VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BIG TUJUNGA DAM EXTENDING FROM THE DAM TO THE FOOTBRIDGE. VIEW FROM BIG TUJUNGA DAM CREST SHOWING THE END OF PLUNGE POOL IN FOREGROUND AND FOOTBRIDGE IN BACKGROUND. - Big Tujunga Dam, 809 West Big Tujunga Road, Sunland, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 9. NORTHEAST VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. NORTHEAST VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BIG TUJUNGA DAM EXTENDING FROM THE DAM TO THE FOOTBRIDGE. BIG TUJUNGA DAM SPILLWAY BRIDGE IN BACKGROUND. - Big Tujunga Dam, 809 West Big Tujunga Road, Sunland, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 13. OVERALL VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. OVERALL VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION (FROM EDGE OF COFFERDAM) WITH BOILERHOUSE AND TAINTER GATE SECTION IN BACKGROUND TO THE RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  13. DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Pitňa, A.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Goncharov, O.; Němec, F.; Přech, L.; Chen, C. H. K.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2016-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks as typical large-scale disturbances arising from processes such as stream–stream interactions or Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) launching play a significant role in the energy redistribution, dissipation, particle heating, acceleration, etc. They can change the properties of the turbulent cascade on shorter scales. We focus on changes of the level and spectral properties of ion flux fluctuations upstream and downstream of fast forward oblique shocks. Although the fluctuation level increases by an order of magnitude across the shock, the spectral slope in the magnetohydrodynamic range is conserved. The frequency spectra upstream of IP shocks are the same as those in the solar wind (if not spoiled by foreshock waves). The spectral slopes downstream are roughly proportional to the corresponding slopes upstream, suggesting that the properties of the turbulent cascade are conserved across the shock; thus, the shock does not destroy the shape of the spectrum as turbulence passes through it. Frequency spectra downstream of IP shocks often exhibit “an exponential decay” in the ion kinetic range that was earlier reported at electron scales in the solar wind or at ion scales in the interstellar medium. We suggest that the exponential shape of ion flux spectra in this range is caused by stronger damping of the fluctuations in the downstream region.

  14. 19. Downstream elevation of bridge. Original photograph published in The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Downstream elevation of bridge. Original photograph published in The Architect and Engineer, July 1920, p.90, photographer unknown. Note width of channel, and compare to CA-126-5 and CA-126-7. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  15. 8. Chandler Falls, looking downstream, and downhill from the edge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Chandler Falls, looking downstream, and downhill from the edge of the mesa (from south). Penstock and foundation of the hydropower plant visible on left. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. Density Fluctuations Upstream and Downstream of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitňa, A.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Goncharov, O.; Němec, F.; Přech, L.; Chen, C. H. K.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2016-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks as typical large-scale disturbances arising from processes such as stream-stream interactions or Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) launching play a significant role in the energy redistribution, dissipation, particle heating, acceleration, etc. They can change the properties of the turbulent cascade on shorter scales. We focus on changes of the level and spectral properties of ion flux fluctuations upstream and downstream of fast forward oblique shocks. Although the fluctuation level increases by an order of magnitude across the shock, the spectral slope in the magnetohydrodynamic range is conserved. The frequency spectra upstream of IP shocks are the same as those in the solar wind (if not spoiled by foreshock waves). The spectral slopes downstream are roughly proportional to the corresponding slopes upstream, suggesting that the properties of the turbulent cascade are conserved across the shock thus, the shock does not destroy the shape of the spectrum as turbulence passes through it. Frequency spectra downstream of IP shocks often exhibit “an exponential decay” in the ion kinetic range that was earlier reported at electron scales in the solar wind or at ion scales in the interstellar medium. We suggest that the exponential shape of ion flux spectra in this range is caused by stronger damping of the fluctuations in the downstream region.

  17. 8. View of gabeon west wall added downstream from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of gabeon west wall added downstream from the lower dam. Photograph taken from east side of Millstone Creek. VIEW SOUTH - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  18. 1. Contextual view of bridge in setting, from downstream, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Contextual view of bridge in setting, from downstream, view to south from edge of bluff east of Rawson Road. Bridge visible among trees at left center. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  19. OVERALL VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM (EAST) SIDE OF COMPLEX, WITH NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM (EAST) SIDE OF COMPLEX, WITH NORTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-A) IN FOREGROUND, AND (R-L) SPILLWAY (MI-98-B), POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C), SUBSTATION (MI-98-D), AND SOUTH EMBANKMENT (MI-98-E). VIEW TO SOUTH - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  20. Oblique view of southeast machinery house, SF 109, at downstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of southeast machinery house, SF 109, at downstream end of lock, with interior of lack gate at left, view towards southeast - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  1. Distant view from downstream of lock with southeast machinery house, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Distant view from downstream of lock with southeast machinery house, SF 109, and timber guide wall on left, exterior view of closed lower lock gates and hydro-electric power house and dam in background, view towards west - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  2. View from downstream of lock with northeast machinery house, SF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from downstream of lock with northeast machinery house, SF 107, at center, exterior view of closed lower lock gates and concrete pylon on right, view towards west - St. Lucie Canal, St. Lucie Lock No. 1, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  3. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL WITH CRIB STRUCTURE IN CENTER. BRIDGE FOOTING CRIB STRUCTURE AT RIGHT (Upstream face of Kachess Dam in foreground) - Kachess Dam, Cutoff Channel and Crib Structures, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  4. 7. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER AT 520', CONSTRUCTED 19371938, VIEWED FROM DOWNSTREAM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER AT 520', CONSTRUCTED 1937-1938, VIEWED FROM DOWNSTREAM. DEBRIS REMOVED FROM TOP PLANKS FOR CLARITY. ONE OF TWO SPILLWAYS SEEN AT RIGHT. FLUSH VALVE SEEN AT LOWER LEFT AND WRENCH FOR VALVES IS PROPPED AGAINST CHAMBER. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  5. 5. AERATOR VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM. FLUSH VALVE AT RIGHT OPENS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERATOR VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM. FLUSH VALVE AT RIGHT OPENS TO CLEAR THE SYSTEM ABOVE THE SILT AND DEBRIS AND TO STOP THE FLOW OF WATER INTO THE SYSTEM DOWN LINE. BOX FLUME CONTINUES DOWN LINE TO SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  6. 16. Detail, lower chord connection point on downstream side at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Detail, lower chord connection point on downstream side at end panel showing lower chord eye bars, vertical tension eye bar, original and supplemental floor beams, turnbuckled lower laterals. View to northwest. - Dry Creek Bridge, Spanning Dry Creek at Cook Road, Ione, Amador County, CA

  7. 23. The Salt River, downstream, from atop Mormon Flat Dam. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. The Salt River, downstream, from atop Mormon Flat Dam. HEFU generator deck is at center bottom. Photographer Mark Durben, 1988. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. 5. Downstream elevation, view to southeast. Dark stains on side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Downstream elevation, view to southeast. Dark stains on side of main girder are from deck drain scuppers, marking deck level within the girders. Compare this view and CA-126-7 to CA-126-19 for indication of severity of siltation of Salt River channel has silted. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  9. 2. EXTERIOR VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF COTTAGE 191 TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EXTERIOR VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF COTTAGE 191 TAKEN FROM ROOF OF GARAGE 393. CAMERA FACING SOUTHEAST. COTTAGE 181 AND CHILDREN'S PLAY AREA VISIBLE ON EITHER SIDE OF ROOF. GRAPE ARBOR IN FOREGROUND. - Swan Falls Village, Cottage 191, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  10. 60. PANORAMIC VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE. No date, but believed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. PANORAMIC VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE. No date, but believed to be just subsequent to construction. Photograph by C.G. Duffey, Long Beach, California. (38' x 11' framed print). - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 59. Downstream view of Waddell Dam showing buttress ties, crane, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. Downstream view of Waddell Dam showing buttress ties, crane, housing over penstock outlet (left) and storage building (right). Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  12. 53. Humbug Creek looking downstream from Humbug Diversion Dam. Retaining ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Humbug Creek looking downstream from Humbug Diversion Dam. Retaining wall for canal is visible beginning at left center. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  13. 71. Close up view of downstream view of four large ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Close up view of downstream view of four large taintor gates and section for sector gate (now removed). Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 12. Close up view of construction on the downstream face. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Close up view of construction on the downstream face. Track at lower center conveyed aggregate from the stream bed to the mixing plant. Photographer unknown, October 15, 1924. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 46. View of downstream face of fish screens at Dingle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. View of downstream face of fish screens at Dingle Basin, looking southeast from north side of basin. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  16. 44. View of log boom (downstream) protecting fish screens at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. View of log boom (downstream) protecting fish screens at Dingle Basin, looking northeast from south side of basin. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  17. 14. DETAIL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING EAST AT DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING EAST AT DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF NORTH END OF DAM/SPILLWAY; GANTRY CRANE ABOVE MOVABLE STONEY GATE IS VISIBLE IN CENTER BACKGROUND; FISH LADDER ON WASHINGTON SHORE IS VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  18. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM OF BRIDGE IN ITS SETTING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM OF BRIDGE IN ITS SETTING, LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST FROM PIONEER BRIDGE (BUSINESS ROUTE 80). CAPITOL BANK OF COMMERCE BUILDING IS AT EXTREME RIGHT. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ('ONE-WAY BRIDGE') THAT PROVIDES PRIVATE (WWP) ACCESS TO THE MIDDLE CHANNEL OF THE POST FALLS POWER PLANT. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  20. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF THE POST FALLS POWERHOUSE LOOKING DOWNSTREAM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF THE POST FALLS POWERHOUSE LOOKING DOWNSTREAM. POWER PLANT AND INTAKE GATES ARE IN THE LEFT FOREGROUND, AND THE ATTACHED 'OLD SWITCHING BUILDING' (NOW ABANDONED) IS IN THE RIGHT BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Middle Channel Powerhouse & Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  1. 1. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING DOWNSTREAM END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING DOWNSTREAM END OF NAVIGATION LOCK #1 WITH CHAMBER FILLED; THE CONTROL HOUSE IS ON RIGHT; VIEW IS TAKEN FROM ROOF OF POWERHOUSE #1. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  2. View of Flume Bridge #5 from FS 502 looking downstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Flume Bridge #5 from FS 502 looking downstream (south). Bridge is on the left side of the photograph. This is similar to other flume bridges in the system and is the only photograph representing these features. - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Flume Bridge No. 5, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  3. DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM; AFTER COMPLETION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM; AFTER COMPLETION OF MONTAG & SONS CONTRACT. Photocopy of historic photograph (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). Unknown USBR photographer, November 24, 1940 - Wickiup Dam, Outlet Works, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  4. 20. VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM SHOWING BUTTS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM SHOWING BUTTS OF LOGS PROJECTING BETWEEN CROSS LOGS. FREQUENTLY WHOLE TREES WERE USED IN CONSTRUCTING THESE DAMS. THE BRANCHES WERE PLACED UPSTREAM AND COVERED WITH EARTH AND STONE TO ANCHOR THEM. Photographed November 6, 1935. - Forge Creek Dam-John Cable Mill, Townsend, Blount County, TN

  5. Methylation of Hg downstream from the Bonanza Hg mine, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John E.; Hines, Mark E.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Thoms, Bryn

    2012-01-01

    Speciation of Hg and conversion to methyl-Hg were evaluated in stream sediment, stream water, and aquatic snails collected downstream from the Bonanza Hg mine, Oregon. Total production from the Bonanza mine was >1360t of Hg, during mining from the late 1800s to 1960, ranking it as an intermediate sized Hg mine on an international scale. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution, transport, and methylation of Hg downstream from a Hg mine in a coastal temperate climatic zone. Data shown here for methyl-Hg, a neurotoxin hazardous to humans, are the first reported for sediment and water from this area. Stream sediment collected from Foster Creek flowing downstream from the Bonanza mine contained elevated Hg concentrations that ranged from 590 to 71,000ng/g, all of which (except the most distal sample) exceeded the probable effect concentration (PEC) of 1060ng/g, the Hg concentration above which harmful effects are likely to be observed in sediment-dwelling organisms. Concentrations of methyl-Hg in stream sediment collected from Foster Creek varied from 11 to 62ng/g and were highly elevated compared to regional baseline concentrations (0.11-0.82ng/g) established in this study. Methyl-Hg concentrations in stream sediment collected in this study showed a significant correlation with total organic C (TOC, R2=0.62), generally indicating increased methyl-Hg formation with increasing TOC in sediment. Isotopic-tracer methods indicated that several samples of Foster Creek sediment exhibited high rates of Hg-methylation. Concentrations of Hg in water collected downstream from the mine varied from 17 to 270ng/L and were also elevated compared to baselines, but all were below the 770ng/L Hg standard recommended by the USEPA to protect against chronic effects to aquatic wildlife. Concentrations of methyl-Hg in the water collected from Foster Creek ranged from 0.17 to 1.8ng/L, which were elevated compared to regional baseline sites upstream and downstream

  6. The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Richard B; Boyer, Elizabeth W; Smith, Richard A; Schwarz, Gregory E; Moore, Richard B

    2007-02-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  7. The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality1

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Richard B; Boyer, Elizabeth W; Smith, Richard A; Schwarz, Gregory E; Moore, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  8. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars in the rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Ielpi, Alessandro; Aldinucci, Mauro; Fustic, Milovan

    2016-04-01

    Classical models developed for ancient fluvial point bars are based on the assumption that meander bends invariably increase their radius as meander-bend apices migrate in a direction transverse to the channel-belt axis (i.e., meander bend expansion). However, many modern meandering rivers are also characterized by down-valley migration of the bend apex, a mechanism that takes place without a significant change in meander radius and wavelength. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars (DMFPB) are the dominant architectural element of these types of meander belts. Yet they are poorly known from ancient fluvial-channel belts, since their disambiguation from expansional point bars often requires fully-3D perspectives. This study aims to review DMFPB deposits spanning in age from Devonian to Holocene, and to discuss their main architectural and sedimentological features from published outcrop, borehole and 3D-seismic datasets. Fluvial successions hosting DMFPB mainly accumulated in low accommodation conditions, where channel belts were affected by different degrees of morphological (e.g., valleys) or tectonic (e.g., axial drainage of shortening basins) confinement. In confined settings, bends migrate downstream along the erosion-resistant valley flanks and little or no floodplain deposits are preserved. Progressive floor aggradation (e.g., valley filling) allow meander belts with DMFPB to decrease their degree of confinement. In less confined settings, meander bends migrate downstream mainly after impinging against older, erosion-resistant channel fill mud. By contrast, tectonic confinement is commonly associated with uplifted alluvial plains that prevented meander-bend expansion, in turn triggering downstream translation. At the scale of individual point bars, translational morphodynamics promote the preservation of downstream-bar deposits, whereas the coarser-grained upstream and central beds are less frequently preserved. However, enhanced preservation of upstream

  9. The role of headwater streams in downstream water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Boyer, E.W.; Smith, R.A.; Schwarz, G.E.; Moore, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  10. A novel virtual hub approach for multisource downstream service integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previtali, Mattia; Cuca, Branka; Barazzetti, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    A large development of downstream services is expected to be stimulated starting from earth observations (EO) datasets acquired by Copernicus satellites. An important challenge connected with the availability of downstream services is the possibility for their integration in order to create innovative applications with added values for users of different categories level. At the moment, the world of geo-information (GI) is extremely heterogeneous in terms of standards and formats used, thus preventing a facilitated access and integration of downstream services. Indeed, different users and data providers have also different requirements in terms of communication protocols and technology advancement. In recent years, many important programs and initiatives have tried to address this issue even on trans-regional and international level (e.g. INSPIRE Directive, GEOSS, Eye on Earth and SEIS). However, a lack of interoperability between systems and services still exists. In order to facilitate the interaction between different downstream services, a new architectural approach (developed within the European project ENERGIC OD) is proposed in this paper. The brokering-oriented architecture introduces a new mediation layer (the Virtual Hub) which works as an intermediary to bridge the gaps linked to interoperability issues. This intermediation layer de-couples the server and the client allowing a facilitated access to multiple downstream services and also Open Data provided by national and local SDIs. In particular, in this paper an application is presented integrating four services on the topic of agriculture: (i) the service given by Space4Agri (providing services based on MODIS and Landsat data); (ii) Gicarus Lab (providing sample services based on Landsat datasets) and (iii) FRESHMON (providing sample services for water quality) and services from a several regional SDIs.

  11. Downstream migrating antidunes or in-phase waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez González, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    Late back in the beginning of the 20th century, Gilbert observed bedforms that migrated in opposite direction to flow. Since this feature was remarkable and inverse to the behavior of dunes (most often observed in rivers and flumes), he called the new species antidunes. Subsequent researchers identified other characteristic attributes of the new species, and it was later commonly accepted that a defining characteristic of antidunes was that undulations of bed and water profiles were roughly in-phase. Due to its generality, such definition has given place to some ambiguities, particularly when dealing with bedforms close to the critical-supercritical transition, as occurs with bedforms with bed and water profiles roughly in-phase but migrating downstream. Such bedforms are described by different researchers, but they are not always classified as antidunes. Some sedimentologists argue that given the depositional pattern of such streamwise migrating forms is different to that of upstream-migrating antidunes, the more generic term "in-phase waves" should be applied to consider them as a different class. The lack of a stability field for 2D downstream-migrating antidunes in the classical theoretical study of Kennedy in the early sixties, has also contributed to some confusion. According to such theoretical diagram, downstream-migrating antidunes could only exist being 3D, but empirical evidences -even from Kennedy- contradict this outcome. In this work, such results and other morphodynamic features of downstream-migrating antidunes will be discussed, in light of experimental data and a simple hydraulic analysis of the direction of movement of antidunes. An open question will be left to debate about the appropriateness of classifying downstream-migrating in-phase waves as antidunes, and it will be emphasized that finding consensus between different disciplines involved with the study of bedforms will be advantageous.

  12. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Lee, Su-In

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed—having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  13. Perturbation analyses of intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yohei M.; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-08-01

    Conformational fluctuations of a protein molecule are important to its function, and it is known that environmental molecules, such as water molecules, ions, and ligand molecules, significantly affect the function by changing the conformational fluctuations. However, it is difficult to systematically understand the role of environmental molecules because intermolecular interactions related to the conformational fluctuations are complicated. To identify important intermolecular interactions with regard to the conformational fluctuations, we develop herein (i) distance-independent and (ii) distance-dependent perturbation analyses of the intermolecular interactions. We show that these perturbation analyses can be realized by performing (i) a principal component analysis using conditional expectations of truncated and shifted intermolecular potential energy terms and (ii) a functional principal component analysis using products of intermolecular forces and conditional cumulative densities. We refer to these analyses as intermolecular perturbation analysis (IPA) and distance-dependent intermolecular perturbation analysis (DIPA), respectively. For comparison of the IPA and the DIPA, we apply them to the alanine dipeptide isomerization in explicit water. Although the first IPA principal components discriminate two states (the α state and PPII (polyproline II) + β states) for larger cutoff length, the separation between the PPII state and the β state is unclear in the second IPA principal components. On the other hand, in the large cutoff value, DIPA eigenvalues converge faster than that for IPA and the top two DIPA principal components clearly identify the three states. By using the DIPA biplot, the contributions of the dipeptide-water interactions to each state are analyzed systematically. Since the DIPA improves the state identification and the convergence rate with retaining distance information, we conclude that the DIPA is a more practical method compared with the

  14. Scalar perturbations in a Friedmann-like metric with non-null Weyl tensor

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, G.B.; Bittencourt, E.; Salim, J.M. E-mail: eduardo.bittencourt@icranet.org

    2015-06-01

    In a previous work the authors have solved the Einstein equations of General Relativity for a class of metrics with constant spatial curvature, where it was found a non vanishing Weyl tensor in the presence of a primordial magnetic field with an anisotropic pressure component. Here, we perform the perturbative analysis of this model in order to study the gravitational stability under linear scalar perturbations. For this purpose, we take the Quasi-Maxwellian formalism of General Relativity as our framework, which offers a naturally covariant and gauge-invariant approach to deal with perturbations that are directly linked to observational quantities. We then compare this scenario with the perturbed dust-dominated Friedmann model emphasizing how the growth of density perturbations are enhanced in our case.

  15. "Phonon" scattering beyond perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, WuJie; Ke, XueZhi; Xi, LiLi; Wu, LiHua; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, WenQing

    2016-02-01

    Searching and designing materials with intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) have attracted extensive consideration in thermoelectrics and thermal management community. The concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state, or even part-crystalline part-amorphous state, has recently been proposed to describe the exotic structure of materials with chemical- bond hierarchy, in which a set of atoms is weakly bonded to the rest species while the other sublattices retain relatively strong rigidity. The whole system inherently manifests the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and fluctuating noncrystalline substructures. Representative materials in the unusual state can be classified into two categories, i.e., caged and non-caged ones. LTCs in both systems deviate from the traditional T -1 relationship ( T, the absolute temperature), which can hardly be described by small-parameter-based perturbation approaches. Beyond the classical perturbation theory, an extra rattling-like scattering should be considered to interpret the liquid-like and sublattice-amorphization-induced heat transport. Such a kind of compounds could be promising high-performance thermoelectric materials, due to the extremely low LTCs. Other physical properties for these part-crystalline substances should also exhibit certain novelty and deserve further exploration.

  16. Cosmological perturbations and quasistatic assumption in f (R ) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Mu-Chen; Taylor, Andy; Shu, Chenggang; Tu, Hong

    2015-11-01

    f (R ) gravity is one of the simplest theories of modified gravity to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion. Although it is usually assumed that the quasi-Newtonian approach (a combination of the quasistatic approximation and sub-Hubble limit) for cosmic perturbations is good enough to describe the evolution of large scale structure in f (R ) models, some studies have suggested that this method is not valid for all f (R ) models. Here, we show that in the matter-dominated era, the pressure and shear equations alone, which can be recast into four first-order equations to solve for cosmological perturbations exactly, are sufficient to solve for the Newtonian potential, Ψ , and the curvature potential, Φ . Based on these two equations, we are able to clarify how the exact linear perturbations fit into different limits. We find that the Compton length controls the quasistatic behaviors in f (R ) gravity. In addition, regardless the validity of quasistatic approximation, a strong version of the sub-Hubble limit alone is sufficient to reduce the exact linear perturbations in any viable f (R ) gravity to second order. Our findings disagree with some previous studies where we find little difference between our exact and quasi-Newtonian solutions even up to k =10 c-1H0.

  17. Perturbative Methods in Path Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theodore Paul

    This dissertation addresses a number of related questions concerning perturbative "path" integrals. Perturbative methods are one of the few successful ways physicists have worked with (or even defined) these infinite-dimensional integrals, and it is important as mathematicians to check that they are correct. Chapter 0 provides a detailed introduction. We take a classical approach to path integrals in Chapter 1. Following standard arguments, we posit a Feynman-diagrammatic description of the asymptotics of the time-evolution operator for the quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving nonrelativistically through a curved manifold under the influence of an external electromagnetic field. We check that our sum of Feynman diagrams has all desired properties: it is coordinate-independent and well-defined without ultraviolet divergences, it satisfies the correct composition law, and it satisfies Schrodinger's equation thought of as a boundary-value problem in PDE. Path integrals in quantum mechanics and elsewhere in quantum field theory are almost always of the shape ∫ f es for some functions f (the "observable") and s (the "action"). In Chapter 2 we step back to analyze integrals of this type more generally. Integration by parts provides algebraic relations between the values of ∫ (-) es for different inputs, which can be packaged into a Batalin--Vilkovisky-type chain complex. Using some simple homological perturbation theory, we study the version of this complex that arises when f and s are taken to be polynomial functions, and power series are banished. We find that in such cases, the entire scheme-theoretic critical locus (complex points included) of s plays an important role, and that one can uniformly (but noncanonically) integrate out in a purely algebraic way the contributions to the integral from all "higher modes," reducing ∫ f es to an integral over the critical locus. This may help explain the presence of analytic continuation in questions like the

  18. Investigation of flow pattern downstream of spiral grooved runner cone in pump-turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, T.; Maekawa, M.; Okamoto, N.; Yano, H.; Miyagawa, K.

    2012-11-01

    High amplitude of pressure fluctuation is observed in a draft tube of a hydraulic turbine and a pump-turbine, for the case of partial load operation. Several methods had been reported to mitigate the amplitude so far, such as, air or water injection to the draft tube, fins on the draft tube surface, or runner replacement with optimized velocity profile at runner exit. However, several problems for each method can be considered, such as, negative influence on efficiency, high cost, technical difficulties for installation, and so on. To solve these problems and satisfy the demand for mitigating the amplitude of pressure fluctuation simultaneously, a new runner cone with spiral grooves on the surface was developed. It was developed with unsteady draft tube calculation based on Design of Experiment (DOE) method, and the effect was confirmed by model tests. Finally, developed runner cone was installed to the prototype pump turbine, and predicted performance was confirmed by on-site tests. However, the reason why the grooved runner cone can mitigate the amplitude of pressure fluctuation in draft tube was not clarified. Therefore, numerical investigation focusing around runner cone was carried out. As a result, it was clarified that the velocity profile at runner outlet was modified by the grooved runner cone, such as, reverse flow downstream of runner cone and tangential velocity was reduced. It means the shear stress between main stream and dead water core region was weakened, therefore, it can be estimated that the amplitude of draft pressure fluctuation was reduced.

  19. PIV measurements of the flow field just downstream of an oscillating collapsible tube.

    PubMed

    Bertram, C D; Truong, N K; Hall, S D

    2008-12-01

    We probed the time-varying flow field immediately downstream of a flexible tube conveying an aqueous flow, during flow-induced oscillation of small amplitude, at time-averaged Reynolds numbers (Re) in the range 300-550. Velocity vector components in the plane of a laser sheet were measured by high-speed ("time-resolved") particle image velocimetry. The sheet was aligned alternately with both the major axis and the minor axis of the collapsing tube by rotating the pressure chamber in which the tube was mounted. The Womersley number of the oscillations was approximately 10. In the major-axis plane the flow fields were characterized by two jets that varied in lateral spacing. The rapid deceleration of flow at maximal collapse caused the jets momentarily to merge about one diameter into the downstream pipe, and strengthened and enlarged the existing retrograde flow lateral to each jet. Collapse also spread the jets maximally, allowing retrograde flow between them during the ascent from its minimum of the pressure at the end of the flexible tube. The minor-axis flow fields showed that the between-jet retrograde flow at this time extended all the way across the pipe. Whereas the retrograde flow lateral to the jets terminated within three diameters of the tube end at Re=335 at all times, it extended beyond three diameters at Re=525 for some 25% of the cycle including the time of maximal flow deceleration. Off-axis sheet positioning revealed the lateral jets to be crescent shaped. When the pressure outside the tube was increased, flattening the tube more, the jets retained a more consistent lateral position. These results illuminate the flows created by collapsible-tube oscillation in a laminar regime accessible to numerical modeling.

  20. "No. 172. General view of the dam, looking downstream from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "No. 172. General view of the dam, looking downstream from the east end. F.E.D. June, 1916." Compare this historic image, taken upon dam completion (1916), with current-condition photograph HAER CO-90-1. The dam retains a remarkable degree of integrity of design and setting - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  1. Influence of sediment storage on downstream delivery of contaminated sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmon, D.V.; Reneau, S.L.; Dunne, T.; Katzman, D.; Drakos, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment storage in alluvial valleys can strongly modulate the downstream migration of sediment and associated contaminants through landscapes. Traditional methods for routing contaminated sediment through valleys focus on in-channel sediment transport but ignore the influence of sediment exchanges with temporary sediment storage reservoirs outside the channel, such as floodplains. In theory, probabilistic analysis of particle trajectories through valleys offers a useful strategy for quantifying the influence of sediment storage on the downstream movement of contaminated sediment. This paper describes a field application and test of this theory, using 137Cs as a sediment tracer over 45 years (1952-1997), downstream of a historical effluent outfall at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), New Mexico. The theory is parameterized using a sediment budget based on field data and an estimate of the 137Cs release history at the upstream boundary. The uncalibrated model reasonably replicates the approximate magnitude and spatial distribution of channel- and floodplain-stored 137Cs measured in an independent field study. Model runs quantify the role of sediment storage in the long-term migration of a pulse of contaminated sediment, quantify the downstream impact of upstream mitigation, and mathematically decompose the future 137Cs flux near the LANL property boundary to evaluate the relative contributions of various upstream contaminant sources. The fate of many sediment-bound contaminants is determined by the relative timescales of contaminant degradation and particle residence time in different types of sedimentary environments. The theory provides a viable approach for quantifying the long-term movement of contaminated sediment through valleys. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Downstream influence of swept slot injection in hypersonic turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bushnell, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Results of an experimental and numerical investigation of tangential swept slot injection into a thick turbulent boundary layer at Mach 6 are presented. Film cooling effectiveness, skin friction, and flow structure downstream of the swept slot injection were investigated. The data were compared with that for unswept slots, and it was found that cooling effectiveness and skin friction reductions are not significantly affected by sweeping the slot.

  3. 15. Detail, lower chord connection point on downstream side, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail, lower chord connection point on downstream side, showing pinned connection of lower chord eye bars, laced vertical compression member, diagonal eye bar tension members, turnbuckled diagonal counters, and floor beam. Note also timber floor stringers supported by floor beam, and exposed ends of timber deck members visible at left above lower chord eye bar. View to northwest. - Dry Creek Bridge, Spanning Dry Creek at Cook Road, Ione, Amador County, CA

  4. Enhancer Complexes Located Downstream of Both Human Immunoglobulin Cα Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Frederick C.; Harindranath, Nagaradona; Mitchell, Mary; Max, Edward E.

    1997-01-01

    To investigate regulation of human immunoglobulin heavy chain expression, we have cloned DNA downstream from the two human Cα genes, corresponding to the position in the mouse IgH cluster of a locus control region (LCR) that includes an enhancer which regulates isotype switching. Within 25 kb downstream of both the human immunoglobulin Cα1 and Cα2 genes we identified several segments of DNA which display B lymphoid–specific DNase I hypersensitivity as well as enhancer activity in transient transfections. The corresponding sequences downstream from each of the two human Cα genes are nearly identical to each other. These enhancers are also homologous to three regions which lie in similar positions downstream from the murine Cα gene and form the murine LCR. The strongest enhancers in both mouse and human have been designated HS12. Within a 135-bp core homology region, the human HS12 enhancers are ∼90% identical to the murine homolog and include several motifs previously demonstrated to be important for function of the murine enhancer; additional segments of high sequence conservation suggest the possibility of previously unrecognized functional motifs. On the other hand, certain functional elements in the murine enhancer, including a B cell–specific activator protein site, do not appear to be conserved in human HS12. The human homologs of the murine enhancers designated HS3 and HS4 show lower overall sequence conservation, but for at least two of the functional motifs in the murine HS4 (a κB site and an octamer motif  ) the human HS4 homologs are exactly conserved. An additional hypersensitivity site between human HS3 and HS12 in each human locus displays no enhancer activity on its own, but includes a region of high sequence conservation with mouse, suggesting the possibility of another novel functional element. PMID:9294139

  5. Dynamics of wakes downstream of wind turbine towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, M. H.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The near field wakes downstream of circular cylinders and of 12 sided cylinders were surveyed in a wind tunnel. Local velocity and velocity deficit diagrams are presented. The variation of turbulence in the wake was surveyed and the frequency of the periodic component of wake motion was determined. Differences between wakes of circular cylinders and of 12 sided cylinders are discussed. Also effects of strakes, orientation of the 12 sided cylinders, and rounding of the corners are noted.

  6. Targeting pathways downstream of KRAS in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zehua; Golay, Hadrien G; Barbie, David A

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS activation is responsible for the most common genetic subtype of lung cancer. Although many of the major downstream signaling pathways that KRAS engages have been defined, these discoveries have yet to translate into effective targeted therapy. Much of the current focus has been directed at inhibiting the activation of RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but clinical trials combining multiple different agents that target these pathways have failed to show significant activity. In this article, we will discuss the evidence for RAF and PI3K as key downstream RAS effectors, as well as the RAL guanine exchange factor, which is equally essential for transformation. Furthermore, we will delineate alternative pathways, including cytokine activation and autophagy, which are co-opted by oncogenic RAS signaling and also represent attractive targets for therapy. Finally, we will present strategies for combining inhibitors of these downstream KRAS signaling pathways in a rational fashion, as multitargeted therapy will be required to achieve a cure. PMID:25303301

  7. Accuracy of perturbative master equations.

    PubMed

    Fleming, C H; Cummings, N I

    2011-03-01

    We consider open quantum systems with dynamics described by master equations that have perturbative expansions in the system-environment interaction. We show that, contrary to intuition, full-time solutions of order-2n accuracy require an order-(2n+2) master equation. We give two examples of such inaccuracies in the solutions to an order-2n master equation: order-2n inaccuracies in the steady state of the system and order-2n positivity violations. We show how these arise in a specific example for which exact solutions are available. This result has a wide-ranging impact on the validity of coupling (or friction) sensitive results derived from second-order convolutionless, Nakajima-Zwanzig, Redfield, and Born-Markov master equations.

  8. Initial conditions for cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Gupt, Brajesh

    2017-02-01

    Penrose proposed that the big bang singularity should be constrained by requiring that the Weyl curvature vanishes there. The idea behind this past hypothesis is attractive because it constrains the initial conditions for the universe in geometric terms and is not confined to a specific early universe paradigm. However, the precise statement of Penrose’s hypothesis is tied to classical space-times and furthermore restricts only the gravitational degrees of freedom. These are encapsulated only in the tensor modes of the commonly used cosmological perturbation theory. Drawing inspiration from the underlying idea, we propose a quantum generalization of Penrose’s hypothesis using the Planck regime in place of the big bang, and simultaneously incorporating tensor as well as scalar modes. Initial conditions selected by this generalization constrain the universe to be as homogeneous and isotropic in the Planck regime as permitted by the Heisenberg uncertainty relations.

  9. Robust control with structured perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Leehyun

    1988-01-01

    Two important problems in the area of control systems design and analysis are discussed. The first is the robust stability using characteristic polynomial, which is treated first in characteristic polynomial coefficient space with respect to perturbations in the coefficients of the characteristic polynomial, and then for a control system containing perturbed parameters in the transfer function description of the plant. In coefficient space, a simple expression is first given for the l(sup 2) stability margin for both monic and non-monic cases. Following this, a method is extended to reveal much larger stability region. This result has been extended to the parameter space so that one can determine the stability margin, in terms of ranges of parameter variations, of the closed loop system when the nominal stabilizing controller is given. The stability margin can be enlarged by a choice of better stabilizing controller. The second problem describes the lower order stabilization problem, the motivation of the problem is as follows. Even though the wide range of stabilizing controller design methodologies is available in both the state space and transfer function domains, all of these methods produce unnecessarily high order controllers. In practice, the stabilization is only one of many requirements to be satisfied. Therefore, if the order of a stabilizing controller is excessively high, one can normally expect to have a even higher order controller on the completion of design such as inclusion of dynamic response requirements, etc. Therefore, it is reasonable to have a lowest possible order stabilizing controller first and then adjust the controller to meet additional requirements. The algorithm for designing a lower order stabilizing controller is given. The algorithm does not necessarily produce the minimum order controller; however, the algorithm is theoretically logical and some simulation results show that the algorithm works in general.

  10. Solitary perturbations in the steep boundary of magnetized toroidal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. E.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Kim, M. H.; Choi, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Park, H. K.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Park, Y. S.

    2017-01-01

    Solitary perturbations (SPs) localized both poloidally and radially are detected within ~100 μs before the partial collapse of the high pressure gradient boundary region (called pedestal) of magnetized toroidal plasma in the KSTAR tokamak device. The SP develops with a low toroidal mode number (typically unity) in the pedestal ingrained with quasi-stable edge-localized mode (QSM) which commonly appears during the inter-collapse period. The SPs have smaller mode pitch and different (often opposite) rotation velocity compared to the QSMs. Similar solitary perturbations are also frequently observed before the onset of complete pedestal collapse, suggesting a strong connection between the SP generation and the pedestal collapse. PMID:28338046

  11. Relativistic perturbations in ΛCDM: Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eleonora; Rampf, Cornelius E-mail: cornelius.rampf@port.ac.uk

    2016-01-01

    We study the relativistic dynamics of a pressure-less and irrotational fluid of dark matter (CDM) with a cosmological constant (Λ), up to second order in cosmological perturbation theory. In our analysis we also account for vector and tensor perturbations and include primordial non-Gaussianity. We consider three gauges: the synchronous-comoving gauge, the Poisson gauge and the total matter gauge, where the first is the unique relativistic Lagrangian frame of reference, and the latters are convenient gauge choices for Eulerian frames. Our starting point is the metric and fluid variables in the Poisson gauge up to second order. We then perform the gauge transformations to the synchronous-comoving gauge and subsequently to the total matter gauge. Our expressions for the metrics, densities, velocities, and the gauge generators are novel and coincide with known results in the limit of a vanishing cosmological constant.

  12. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    DOE PAGES

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The wavesmore » grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.« less

  13. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The waves grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.

  14. Turbulence statistics downstream of a vorticity generator at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habchi, Charbel; Lemenand, Thierry; Della Valle, Dominique; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2016-10-01

    Vortex generators (VGs) are inserted in turbulent pipe flows in order to improve mixing and heat and mass transfer while a moderate pressure drop is maintained. The purpose of the present study is to contribute to the elaboration of scaling laws for the turbulence decay downstream a row of VGs. This knowledge will help in the design of such systems, especially for optimal geometry and spacing of the VG. The experimental study is carried out using laser Doppler anemometry at different locations downstream of the row of VGs so as to probe the streamwise velocity field. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number Reλ ranges between 15 and 80 so that, for the lowest flow rates, fully developed turbulence conditions are not fulfilled. Comparison of the integral length scale to data in the open literature shows that the conventional scaling laws at the dissipative scale are fairly assessed. It is shown that the turbulence macroscale increases in the streamwise direction and is scaled by the VG dimensions. The normalized turbulent energy dissipation rate has values between 0.5 and 2.8, with -1 power-law decay as a function of the Taylor microscale Reynolds number. This observation is consistent with previous findings using direct numerical simulations (DNS). The streamwise variation of the turbulence energy dissipation rate shows an exponential decay; it reaches an asymptotic value after a distance of about 6 times the VG height.

  15. Highly resolved numerical simulation of combustion downstream of a rocket engine igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttay, R.; Gomet, L.; Lehnasch, G.; Mura, A.

    2017-02-01

    We study ignition processes in the turbulent reactive flow established downstream of highly under-expanded coflowing jets. The corresponding configuration is typical of a rocket engine igniter, and to the best knowledge of the authors, this study is the first that documents highly resolved numerical simulations of such a reactive flowfield. Considering the discharge of axisymmetric coaxial under-expanded jets, various morphologies are expected, depending on the value of the nozzle pressure ratio, a key parameter used to classify them. The present computations are conducted with a value of this ratio set to fifteen. The simulations are performed with the massively parallel CREAMS solver on a grid featuring approximately 440,000,000 computational nodes. In the main zone of interest, the level of spatial resolution is D/74, with D the central inlet stream diameter. The computational results reveal the complex topology of the compressible flowfield. The obtained results also bring new and useful insights into the development of ignition processes. In particular, ignition is found to take place rather far downstream of the shock barrel, a conclusion that contrasts with early computational studies conducted within the unsteady RANS computational framework. Consideration of detailed chemistry confirms the essential role of hydroperoxyl radicals, while the analysis of the Takeno index reveals the predominance of a non-premixed combustion mode.

  16. Biogeochemically diverse organic matter in Alpine glaciers and its downstream fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Gabriel A.; Fasching, Christina; Wilhelm, Linda; Niggemann, Jutta; Steier, Peter; Dittmar, Thorsten; Battin, Tom J.

    2012-10-01

    Besides their role in the hydrological cycle, glaciers could play an important role in the carbon cycle. They store and transform organic carbon, which on release could support downstream microbial life. Yet the origin and composition of glacial organic carbon, and its implications for the carbon cycle, remain unclear. Here, we examine the molecular composition, radiocarbon age and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in 26 glaciers in the European Alps, using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry, fluorescence spectroscopy and incubation experiments. We also measure carbon dioxide partial pressures in glacier-fed streams. We show that the glacier organic matter is highly diverse, and that a significant fraction of this material is bioavailable. Phenolic compounds derived from vascular plants or soil dominate, together with peptides and lipids, potentially derived from in situ microbial communities. Combustion products, in contrast, seem to contribute only marginally to the DOM sampled. We further show that organic matter bioavailability is positively correlated with in-stream carbon dioxide concentrations. We suggest that glacier-derived DOM contributes to downstream carbon cycling in glacier-fed streams. Our findings highlight the relevance of mountain glaciers for carbon cycling--a role that may change as glaciers recede.

  17. Singularity perturbed zero dynamics of nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isidori, A.; Sastry, S. S.; Kokotovic, P. V.; Byrnes, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    Stability properties of zero dynamics are among the crucial input-output properties of both linear and nonlinear systems. Unstable, or 'nonminimum phase', zero dynamics are a major obstacle to input-output linearization and high-gain designs. An analysis of the effects of regular perturbations in system equations on zero dynamics shows that whenever a perturbation decreases the system's relative degree, it manifests itself as a singular perturbation of zero dynamics. Conditions are given under which the zero dynamics evolve in two timescales characteristic of a standard singular perturbation form that allows a separate analysis of slow and fast parts of the zero dynamics.

  18. Kato expansion in quantum canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Andrey

    2016-06-01

    This work establishes a connection between canonical perturbation series in quantum mechanics and a Kato expansion for the resolvent of the Liouville superoperator. Our approach leads to an explicit expression for a generator of a block-diagonalizing Dyson's ordered exponential in arbitrary perturbation order. Unitary intertwining of perturbed and unperturbed averaging superprojectors allows for a description of ambiguities in the generator and block-diagonalized Hamiltonian. We compare the efficiency of the corresponding computational algorithm with the efficiencies of the Van Vleck and Magnus methods for high perturbative orders.

  19. Generic perturbations of linear integrable Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounemoura, Abed

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate perturbations of linear integrable Hamiltonian systems, with the aim of establishing results in the spirit of the KAM theorem (preservation of invariant tori), the Nekhoroshev theorem (stability of the action variables for a finite but long interval of time) and Arnold diffusion (instability of the action variables). Whether the frequency of the integrable system is resonant or not, it is known that the KAM theorem does not hold true for all perturbations; when the frequency is resonant, it is the Nekhoroshev theorem that does not hold true for all perturbations. Our first result deals with the resonant case: we prove a result of instability for a generic perturbation, which implies that the KAM and the Nekhoroshev theorem do not hold true even for a generic perturbation. The case where the frequency is nonresonant is more subtle. Our second result shows that for a generic perturbation the KAM theorem holds true. Concerning the Nekhrosohev theorem, it is known that one has stability over an exponentially long (with respect to some function of ɛ -1) interval of time and that this cannot be improved for all perturbations. Our third result shows that for a generic perturbation one has stability for a doubly exponentially long interval of time. The only question left unanswered is whether one has instability for a generic perturbation (necessarily after this very long interval of time).

  20. High Pressure Biomass Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Pradeep K

    2016-07-29

    According to the Billion Ton Report, the U.S. has a large supply of biomass available that can supplement fossil fuels for producing chemicals and transportation fuels. Agricultural waste, forest residue, and energy crops offer potential benefits: renewable feedstock, zero to low CO2 emissions depending on the specific source, and domestic supply availability. Biomass can be converted into chemicals and fuels using one of several approaches: (i) biological platform converts corn into ethanol by using depolymerization of cellulose to form sugars followed by fermentation, (ii) low-temperature pyrolysis to obtain bio-oils which must be treated to reduce oxygen content via HDO hydrodeoxygenation), and (iii) high temperature pyrolysis to produce syngas (CO + H2). This last approach consists of producing syngas using the thermal platform which can be used to produce a variety of chemicals and fuels. The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of the gasification of biomass at high pressure conditions and how various gasification parameters might affect the gasification behavior. Since most downstream applications of synags conversion (e.g., alcohol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis etc) involve utilizing high pressure catalytic processes, there is an interest in carrying out the biomass gasification at high pressure which can potentially reduce the gasifier size and subsequent downstream cleaning processes. It is traditionally accepted that high pressure should increase the gasification rates (kinetic effect). There is also precedence from coal gasification literature from the 1970s that high pressure gasification would be a beneficial route to consider. Traditional approach of using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) or high-pressure themogravimetric analyzer (PTGA) worked well in understanding the gasification kinetics of coal gasification which was useful in designing high pressure coal gasification processes. However

  1. Global phosphoproteomic profiling reveals perturbed signaling in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanov, Uros; Guo, Hongbo; Buchsbaum, Diana; Cosme, Jake; Abbasi, Cynthia; Isserlin, Ruth; Sharma, Parveen; Gramolini, Anthony O; Emili, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) plays a central role in Ca(2+) homeostasis in cardiac myocytes through regulation of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2A (SERCA2A) Ca(2+) pump. An inherited mutation converting arginine residue 9 in PLN to cysteine (R9C) results in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans and transgenic mice, but the downstream signaling defects leading to decompensation and heart failure are poorly understood. Here we used precision mass spectrometry to study the global phosphorylation dynamics of 1,887 cardiac phosphoproteins in early affected heart tissue in a transgenic R9C mouse model of DCM compared with wild-type littermates. Dysregulated phosphorylation sites were quantified after affinity capture and identification of 3,908 phosphopeptides from fractionated whole-heart homogenates. Global statistical enrichment analysis of the differential phosphoprotein patterns revealed selective perturbation of signaling pathways regulating cardiovascular activity in early stages of DCM. Strikingly, dysregulated signaling through the Notch-1 receptor, recently linked to cardiomyogenesis and embryonic cardiac stem cell development and differentiation but never directly implicated in DCM before, was a prominently perturbed pathway. We verified alterations in Notch-1 downstream components in early symptomatic R9C transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes compared with wild type by immunoblot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. These data reveal unexpected connections between stress-regulated cell signaling networks, specific protein kinases, and downstream effectors essential for proper cardiac function.

  2. Global phosphoproteomic profiling reveals perturbed signaling in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanov, Uros; Guo, Hongbo; Buchsbaum, Diana; Cosme, Jake; Abbasi, Cynthia; Isserlin, Ruth; Sharma, Parveen; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Emili, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) plays a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis in cardiac myocytes through regulation of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2A (SERCA2A) Ca2+ pump. An inherited mutation converting arginine residue 9 in PLN to cysteine (R9C) results in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans and transgenic mice, but the downstream signaling defects leading to decompensation and heart failure are poorly understood. Here we used precision mass spectrometry to study the global phosphorylation dynamics of 1,887 cardiac phosphoproteins in early affected heart tissue in a transgenic R9C mouse model of DCM compared with wild-type littermates. Dysregulated phosphorylation sites were quantified after affinity capture and identification of 3,908 phosphopeptides from fractionated whole-heart homogenates. Global statistical enrichment analysis of the differential phosphoprotein patterns revealed selective perturbation of signaling pathways regulating cardiovascular activity in early stages of DCM. Strikingly, dysregulated signaling through the Notch-1 receptor, recently linked to cardiomyogenesis and embryonic cardiac stem cell development and differentiation but never directly implicated in DCM before, was a prominently perturbed pathway. We verified alterations in Notch-1 downstream components in early symptomatic R9C transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes compared with wild type by immunoblot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. These data reveal unexpected connections between stress-regulated cell signaling networks, specific protein kinases, and downstream effectors essential for proper cardiac function. PMID:27742792

  3. A theoretical study of mixing downstream of transverse injection into a supersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Zelazny, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and analytical study was made of mixing downstream of transverse hydrogen injection, from single and multiple orifices, into a Mach 4 air boundary layer over a flat plate. Numerical solutions to the governing three-dimensional, elliptic boundary layer equations were obtained using a general purpose computer program. Founded upon a finite element solution algorithm. A prototype three-dimensional turbulent transport model was developed using mixing length theory in the wall region and the mass defect concept in the outer region. Excellent agreement between the computed flow field and experimental data for a jet/freestream dynamic pressure ratio of unity was obtained in the centerplane region of the single-jet configuration. Poorer agreement off centerplane suggests an inadequacy of the extrapolated two-dimensional turbulence model. Considerable improvement in off-centerplane computational agreement occured for a multi-jet configuration, using the same turbulent transport model.

  4. Acoustic resonance excitation of turbulent heat transfer and flow reattachment downstream of a fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcan, Claudio; Cukurel, Beni; Shashank, Judah

    2016-10-01

    The current work investigates the aero-thermal impact of standing sound waves, excited in a straight channel geometry, on turbulent, separating and reattaching flow over a fence. Effects of distinct frequency resonant forcing (ReH = 10,050 and f = 122 Hz) are quantified by wall static pressure measurements and detailed convective heat transfer distributions via liquid crystal thermometry. Acoustic boundary conditions are numerically predicted and the computed longitudinal resonance mode shapes are experimentally verified by surface microphone measurements. Findings indicate the presence of a resonant sound field to exert strong influence on local heat transfer downstream of the fence, whereas the boundary layer upstream of the obstacle remains notable unaffected. Upstream shift of the maximum heat transfer location and an earlier pressure recovery indicate a reduction in time averaged flow reattachment length of up to 37 %. Although the streamwise peak Nusselt increased by only 5 %, the heat transfer level in the vicinity of the unexcited reattachment zone was locally enhanced up to 25 %. Despite prominent impact of resonant forcing on the fence wake flow, the total pressure drop penalty remained invariant. Observations demonstrate the significant aero-thermal implications of shear layer excitation by standing sound waves superimposed on the channel flow field.

  5. Alfven waves and associated energetic ions downstream from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Belcher, J.W.; Richardson, J.D. ); Smith, C.W. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors report the observation of low-frequency waves in the solar wind downstream from Uranus. These waves are observed by the Voyager spacecraft for more than 2 weeks after the encounter with Uranus and are present during this period whenever the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented such that the field lines intersect the Uranian bow shock. The magnetic field and velocity components transverse to the background field are strongly correlated, consistent with the interpretation that these waves are Alfvenic and/or fast-mode waves. The waves have a spacecraft frame frequency of about 10{sup {minus}3} Hz, and when first observed near the bow shock have an amplitude comparable to the background field. As the spacecraft moves farther from Uranus, the amplitude decays. The waves appear to propagate along the magnetic field lines outward from Uranus and are right-hand polarized. Theory suggests that these waves are generated in the upstream region by a resonant instability with a proton beam streaming along the magnetic field lines. The solar wind subsequently carries these waves downstream to the spacecraft location. These waves are associated with the presence of energetic (> 28 keV) ions observed by the low-energy charged particle instrument. These ions appear two days after the start of the wave activity and occur thereafter whenever the Alfven waves occur, increasing in intensity away from Uranus. The ions are argued to originate in the Uranian magnetosphere, but pitch-angle scattering in the upstream region is required to bring them downstream to the spacecraft location.

  6. Growth Characteristics Downstream of a Shallow Bump: Computation and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Grosch, Chester E.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity field created by a shallow bump on a wall revealed that an energy peak in the spanwise spectrum associated with the driver decays and an initially small-amplitude secondary mode rapidly grows with distance downstream of the bump. Linear theories could not provide an explanation for this growing mode. The present Navier-Stokes simulation replicates and confirms the experimental results. Insight into the structure of the flow was obtained from a study of the results of the calculations and is presented.

  7. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Sávio Pinho; Lima, Aline Medeiros; de Souza, Cláudia Regina Batista

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops. PMID:22942725

  8. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Langnau, A.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  9. Non-perturbative approach for curvature perturbations in stochastic δ N formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Tada, Yuichiro E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    In our previous paper [1], we have proposed a new algorithm to calculate the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations generated in inflationary universe with use of the stochastic approach. Since this algorithm does not need the perturbative expansion with respect to the inflaton fields on super-horizon scale, it works even in highly stochastic cases. For example, when the curvature perturbations are very large or the non-Gaussianities of the curvature perturbations are sizable, the perturbative expansion may break down but our algorithm enables to calculate the curvature perturbations. We apply it to two well-known inflation models, chaotic and hybrid inflation, in this paper. Especially for hybrid inflation, while the potential is very flat around the critical point and the standard perturbative computation is problematic, we successfully calculate the curvature perturbations.

  10. Chiral perturbation theory with nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, U.G.

    1991-09-01

    I review the constraints posed on the interactions of pions, nucleons and photons by the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of QCD. The framework to perform these calculations, chiral perturbation theory, is briefly discussed in the meson sector. The method is a simultaneous expansion of the Greens functions in powers of external moments and quark masses around the massless case, the chiral limit. To perform this expansion, use is made of a phenomenological Lagrangian which encodes the Ward-identities and pertinent symmetries of QCD. The concept of chiral power counting is introduced. The main part of the lectures of consists in describing how to include baryons (nucleons) and how the chiral structure is modified by the fact that the nucleon mass in the chiral limit does not vanish. Particular emphasis is put on working out applications to show the strengths and limitations of the methods. Some processes which are discussed are threshold photopion production, low-energy compton scattering off nucleons, {pi}N scattering and the {sigma}-term. The implications of the broken chiral symmetry on the nuclear forces are briefly described. An alternative approach, in which the baryons are treated as very heavy fields, is touched upon.

  11. Lensing signals from spin-2 perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Adamek, Julian; Durrer, Ruth; Tansella, Vittorio E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch

    2016-01-01

    We compute the angular power spectra of the E-type and B-type lensing potentials for gravitational waves from inflation and for tensor perturbations induced by scalar perturbations. We derive the tensor-lensed CMB power spectra for both cases. We also apply our formalism to determine the linear lensing potential for a Bianchi I spacetime with small anisotropy.

  12. Scalar Quantum Electrodynamics: Perturbation Theory and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.

    2006-09-25

    In this article, we calculate scalar propagator in arbitrary dimensions and gauge and the three-point scalar-photon vertex in arbitrary dimensions and Feynman gauge, both at the one loop level. We also discuss constraints on their non perturbative structure imposed by requirements of gauge invariance and perturbation theory.

  13. Natural Origin Lycopene and Its "Green" Downstream Processing.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Emmanouil H; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, Maria; Karabelas, Anastasios J

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene is an abundant natural carotenoid pigment with several biological functions (well-known for its antioxidant properties) which is under intensive investigation in recent years. Lycopene chemistry, its natural distribution, bioavailability, biological significance, and toxicological effects are briefly outlined in the first part of this review. The second, major part, deals with various modern downstream processing techniques, which are assessed in order to identify promising approaches for the recovery of lycopene and of similar lipophilic compounds. Natural lycopene is synthesized in plants and by microorganisms, with main representatives of these two categories (for industrial production) tomato and its by-products and the fungus Blakeslea trispora, respectively. Currently, there is a great deal of effort to develop efficient downstream processing for large scale production of natural-origin lycopene, with trends strongly indicating the necessity for "green" and mild extraction conditions. In this review, emphasis is placed on final product safety and ecofriendly processing, which are expected to totally dominate in the field of natural-origin lycopene extraction and purification.

  14. Benzene and total hydrocarbons exposures in the downstream petroleum industries.

    PubMed

    Verma, D K; Johnson, D M; Shaw, M L; des Tombe, K

    2001-01-01

    A review of studies, including both articles published in peer-reviewed journals and reports that were not peer reviewed, regarding occupational exposure to benzene and total hydrocarbons in the downstream petroleum industry operations was performed. The objective was to provide a broad estimate of exposures by compiling exposure data according to the following categories: refinery, pipeline, marine, rail, bulk terminals and trucks, service stations, underground storage tanks, tank cleaning, and site remediations. The data in each category was divided into personal occupational long-term and short-term samples. The summarized data offers valuable assistance to hygienists by providing them with an estimate and range of exposures. The traditional 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) exposure and the 40-hour workweek do not generally coincide with exposure periods applicable to workers in marine, pipeline, railcar, and trucking operations. They are more comparable with short-term exposure or task-based exposure assessments. The marine sector has a large number of high exposures. Although relatively few workers are exposed, their exposures to benzene and total hydrocarbons are sometimes an order of magnitude higher than the respective exposure limits. It is recommended that in the future, it would be preferable to do more task-based exposure assessments and fewer traditional TWA long-term exposure assessments within the various sectors of the downstream petroleum industry.

  15. Ferric chloride based downstream process for microalgae based biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Kim, Bohwa; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Dong Yeon; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-01

    In this study, ferric chloride (FeCl3) was used to integrate downstream processes (harvesting, lipid extraction, and esterification). At concentration of 200 mg/L and at pH 3, FeCl3 exhibited an expected degree of coagulation and an increase in cell density of ten times (170 mg/10 mL). An iron-mediated oxidation reaction, Fenton-like reaction, was used to extract lipid from the harvested biomass, and efficiency of 80% was obtained with 0.5% H2O2 at 90 °C. The iron compound was also employed in the esterification step, and converted free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters under acidic conditions; thus, the fatal problem of saponification during esterification with alkaline catalysts was avoided, and esterification efficiency over 90% was obtained. This study clearly showed that FeCl3 in the harvesting process is beneficial in all downstream steps and have a potential to greatly reduce the production cost of microalgae-originated biodiesel.

  16. Modified acoustic transmission tube apparatus incorporating an active downstream termination.

    PubMed

    Machuca-Tzili, F Arturo; Orduña-Bustamante, Felipe; Pérez-López, Antonio; Pérez-Ruiz, Santiago J; Pérez-Matzumoto, Andrés E

    2017-02-01

    Current techniques for measuring normal incidence sound transmission loss with a modified impedance tube, or transmission tube, require setting up two different absorbing termination loads at the end of the downstream tube [ASTM E2611-09, Standard Test Method for Measurement of Normal Incidence Sound Transmission of Acoustical Materials Based on the Transfer Matrix Method (American Society for Testing and Materials, West Conshohocken, 2009)]. The process of physically handling the two required passive absorbing loads is a possible source of measurement errors, which are mainly due to changes in sample test position, or in test setup re-assembly, between measurements. In this paper, a modified transmission tube apparatus is proposed for non-intrusively changing the downstream acoustic load by means of a combined passive-active termination. It provides a controlled variable sound absorption which simplifies the setup of standard two-load techniques, without the need of physically handling the apparatus during the tests. This virtually eliminates the risk of errors associated with the physical manipulation of the two passive terminations. Transmission loss measurements in some representative test conditions are reported, showing improvements over current implementations, in reducing by approximately 50% the measurement variations associated with the setup of the two required absorbing terminations. Measurement results agree within 0.4 dB (maximum difference in high resolution broadband), and 0.04 dB (mean difference in 1/3-octave bands), with those obtained using standard passive two-load methods.

  17. Downstream processing of biopharmaceutical proteins produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Buyel, Johannes Felix; Fischer, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    All biological platforms for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins produce an initially turbid extract that must be clarified to avoid fouling sensitive media such as chromatography resins. Clarification is more challenging if the feed stream contains large amounts of dispersed particles, because these rapidly clog the filter media typically used to remove suspended solids. Charged polymers (flocculants) can increase the apparent size of the dispersed particles by aggregation, facilitating the separation of solids and liquids, and thus reducing process costs. However, many different factors can affect the behavior of flocculants, including the pH and conductivity of the medium, the size and charge distribution of the particulates, and the charge density and molecular mass of the polymer. Importantly, these properties can also affect the recovery of the target protein and the overall safety profile of the process. We therefore used a design of experiments approach to establish reliable predictive models that characterize the impact of flocculants during the downstream processing of biopharmaceutical proteins. We highlight strategies for the selection of flocculants during process optimization. These strategies will contribute to the quality by design aspects of process development and facilitate the development of safe and efficient downstream processes for plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins. PMID:24637706

  18. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Hannah; Svensson, Emma; Gigg, Camilla; Jarvius, Malin; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G) CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G) CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs. PMID:26700307

  19. PIV measurements and flow characteristics downstream of mangrove root models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Amirkhosro; Curet, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    Mangrove forests attracted attentions as a solution to protect coastal areas exposed to sea-level rising, frequent storms, and tsunamis. Mangrove forests found in tide-dominated flow regions are characterized by their massive and complex root systems, which play a prominent role in the structure of tidal flow currents. To understand the role of mangrove roots in flow structure, we modeled mangrove roots with rigid and flexible arrays of cylinders with different spacing between them as well as different configurations. In this work, we investigate the fluid dynamics downstream of the models using a 2-D time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) and flow visualization. We carried out experiments for four different Reynolds number based on cylinder diameters ranges from 2200 to 12000. We present time-averaged and time-resolved flow parameters including velocity distribution, vorticity, streamline, Reynolds shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy. The results show that the flow structure has different vortex shedding downstream of the cylinders due to interactions of shear layers separating from cylinders surface. The spectral analysis of the measured velocity data is also performed to obtain Strouhal number of the unsteady flow in the cylinder wake.

  20. Volumetric Velocity Fields Downstream of a 2-Bladed Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troolin, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Tip vortices of axial-flow turbines are important in understanding the mean and turbulent characteristics of the wake. Volumetric 3-component velocimetry (V3V) was used to examine the flow downstream of a model two-bladed turbine in air. The turbine had a diameter of 177.8 mm and was powered by a motor operating at approximately 150 rpm. The measurement volume (50 × 50 × 20 mm) was positioned approximately 5 mm downstream of the blade tip, in order to examine the tip vortex structure. The V3V system utilized three 4MP cameras with 85 mm lenses positioned in a fixed triangular frame located at a distance of 450 mm from the back of the measurement volume. The illumination source was a 200 mJ dual-head pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 7.25 Hz and illuminating 1 micron olive oil droplets as tracer particles. The particle images were then analyzed to produce volumetric vector fields. The focus was placed on visualizing the complex interaction between the turbine tip vortices. Insights on the tip vortex dynamics and three dimensional characteristics of the wake flow will be discussed.

  1. Temporal and spatial unmixedness downstream of a plate array

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaume, D. W.; LaRue, J. C.

    2000-06-01

    The effect of a plate array on a turbulent velocity and turbulent concentration field is determined. Profiles of mean and root-mean-square velocity and concentration, profiles of temporal and spatial unmixedness, and profiles of the variance of the gradient of velocity and the variance of the gradient of concentration are presented. Velocity and concentration integral length scales are compared. A biplane injection grid is used to produce the turbulent concentration and turbulent velocity field. Helium is injected through the jets at the grid nodes as air passes through the grid. The time-resolved velocity and concentration data are obtained using a two-sensor probe that consists of a hot wire and a TSI 1440-20 aspirating concentration probe. The addition of a plate array is shown to decrease the spatial unmixedness to a nearly zero value in about half the downstream distance observed without plates. Further, an increase in dissipation is shown with the array in place that reduces the temporal unmixedness to a value less than the value observed without the plates in about one-third the downstream distance. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Perturbative stability of catenoidal soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Soumya; Kar, Sayan

    2013-09-01

    The perturbative stability of catenoidal soap films formed between parallel, equal radii, coaxial rings is studied using analytical and semi-analytical methods. Using a theorem on the nature of eigenvalues for a class of Sturm-Liouville operators, we show that, for the given boundary conditions, azimuthally asymmetric perturbations are stable, while symmetric perturbations lead to an instability --a result demonstrated in Ben Amar et al. (Eur. Phys. J. B 3, 197 (1998)) using numerics and experiment. Further, we show how to obtain the lowest real eigenvalue of perturbations, using the semi-analytical Asymptotic Iteration Method (AIM). Conclusions using AIM support the analytically obtained result as well as the results by Ben Amar et al.. Finally, we compute the eigenfunctions and show, pictorially, how the perturbed soap film evolves in time.

  3. The recursion relation in Lagrangian perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rampf, Cornelius

    2012-12-01

    We derive a recursion relation in the framework of Lagrangian perturbation theory, appropriate for studying the inhomogeneities of the large scale structure of the universe. We use the fact that the perturbative expansion of the matter density contrast is in one-to-one correspondence with standard perturbation theory (SPT) at any order. This correspondence has been recently shown to be valid up to fourth order for a non-relativistic, irrotational and dust-like component. Assuming it to be valid at arbitrary (higher) order, we express the Lagrangian displacement field in terms of the perturbative kernels of SPT, which are itself given by their own and well-known recursion relation. We argue that the Lagrangian solution always contains more non-linear information in comparison with the SPT solution, (mainly) if the non-perturbative density contrast is restored after the displacement field is obtained.

  4. Covariant generalization of cosmological perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Hoegdahl, Janne; Nurmi, Sami; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2007-01-15

    We present an approach to cosmological perturbations based on a covariant perturbative expansion between two worldlines in the real inhomogeneous universe. As an application, at an arbitrary order we define an exact scalar quantity which describes the inhomogeneities in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and which is conserved on all scales for a barotropic ideal fluid. We derive a compact form for its conservation equation at all orders and assign it a simple physical interpretation. To make a comparison with the standard perturbation theory, we develop a method to construct gauge-invariant quantities in a coordinate system at arbitrary order, which we apply to derive the form of the nth order perturbation in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and its exact evolution equation. On large scales, this provides the gauge-invariant expression for the curvature perturbation on uniform density hypersurfaces and its evolution equation at any order.

  5. Single bubble perturbation in cavitation proximity of solid glass: hot spot versus distance.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth; Suslick, Kenneth

    2014-02-28

    A systematic study of the energy loss of a cavitation bubble in a close proximity of a glass surface is introduced for the first time in a low acoustic field (1.2-2.4 bar). Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is used as a tool to predict the temperature and pressure decrease of bubble (μm) versus surface distance. A glass as a model system is used to imitate the boundary conditions relevant for nano- or micromaterials. SBSL preequilibrated with 5% argon is perturbed by a glass rod with the tip (Z-perturbation) and with the long axis (X-perturbation) at a defined distance. From 2 mm to 500 μm argon-SBSL lines monotonically narrow and the effective emission temperature decreases from 9000 K to 6800 K comparable to multiple bubbles. The electron density decreases by two orders of magnitude in Z-perturbation and is by a factor of two higher in X-perturbation than the unperturbed cavitating bubble. The perturbed single bubble sonoluminescence pressure decreases from 2700 atm to 1200 atm at 2.4 bar. In water new non-SBSL SiO molecular emission lines are observed and OH emission disappears.

  6. Building a non-perturbative quark-gluon vertex from a perturbative one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Rocio

    2016-10-01

    The quark-gluon vertex describes the electromagnetic and the strong interaction among these particles. The description of this interaction at high precision in both regimes, perturbative and non-perturbative, continues being a matter of interest in the context of QCD and Hadron Physics. There exist very helpful models in the literature that explain perturbative aspects of the theory but they fail describing non-perturbative phenomena, as confinement and dynamic chiral symmetry breaking. In this work we study the structure of the quark-gluon vertex in a non-perturbative regime examining QCD, checking results with QED, and working in the Schwinger-Dyson formalism.

  7. Aging and balance control in response to external perturbations: role of anticipatory and compensatory postural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2014-06-01

    The ability to maintain balance deteriorates with increasing age. Anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments (APAs and CPAs, respectively), both, are known to be affected in the elderly. We examined the effect of aging on the ability of older adults to utilize APAs and its effect on subsequent control of posture (CPAs). Ten elderly individuals were exposed to external predictable and unpredictable perturbations applied to the upper body in the sagittal plane. Body kinematics, electromyographic activity of 13 muscles, and ground reaction forces were analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory phases of postural control. The elderly were capable of recognizing an upcoming predictable perturbation and activated muscles prior to it. However, the older adults used different muscle strategies and sequence of muscle recruitment than that reported in young adults. Additionally, when the perturbations were unpredictable, no APAs were seen which resulted in large CPAs and greater peak displacements of the center of pressure (COP) and center of mass (COM) following perturbations. As opposed to this, when the perturbations were predictable, APAs were seen in older adults resulting in significantly smaller CPAs. The presence and utilization of APAs in older adults also improved postural stability following the perturbation as seen by significantly smaller COP and COM peak displacements. Using APAs in older adults significantly reduces the need for large CPAs, resulting in greater postural stability following a perturbation. The results provide a foundation for investigating the role of training in improving the interplay between anticipatory and compensatory postural control in older adults.

  8. Large Wood Storage Does Not Decrease Downstream Through a Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, M.; Pasternack, G. B.; Senter, A. E.; Dahlke, H. E.

    2013-12-01

    The storage of large wood in streams at the watershed scale has long been characterized as decreasing downstream due to a transport limitation in headwater streams, and a supply limitation in larger rivers. The objective of this study was to test this hypothesis through a field study in the Upper Yuba River watershed in Northern California, USA. While most studies surveyed within the wetted channel at selected reaches of different sizes, this study measured overbank deposits of large wood in addition to those in-channel to reflect the total storage within the active river corridor, and used a stratified random sampling scheme to see if relations held at the watershed scale. The watershed is large (2,874 km2), mountainous, mostly forested, and has been dramatically altered by human activities primarily related to gold mining. One hundred fourteen field sites of varied drainage area sizes were visited, inventoried for large wood (length > 1 m, diameter > 10 cm) storage within the active river corridor, and the volume storage per river length was calculated. Inclusion of floodplains in field surveys illuminates the fact that the distribution of large wood changes within the active river corridor, while the total storage does not decrease downstream. Among many watershed-scale control variables, such as drainage area, stream order, and upslope distance, the local amount of shrub cover and bankfull channel width were the only significant predictors of large wood storage in a multiple linear regression model, both with positive coefficients. A critical literature review was also conducted to investigate the evidence for the common conceptual model. Findings were that (1) the observed downstream trend of large wood storage is largely a function of the methods employed by each study, (2) the use of storage per channel area has confounded the commonly held conceptual model, due to its correlation with channel width, and (3) there is little evidence to support the hypothesis

  9. Plasma turbulence in the downstream ionosheath of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Scarf, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Observations made by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma analyzer and the plasma wave instrument in the Venus ionosheath are compared. Large increases in plasma wave turbulence levels appear to be connected with changing plasma distributions and interpenetrating plasma beams. Some of these plasma waves are identified as Doppler - shifted ion acoustic waves due to beam/beam interactions, but it is noted that different forms of instabilities are probably also operative. The changes in the temperature, intensity and energy of the peak in the PVO plasma distributions are similar to those observed by Venera 10 closer to the planet and appear to be evidence for rarefaction and compression in the downstream ionosheath. Some of the changes in the PVO plasma distributions may be related to the presence of a second ion population or the acceleration of protons.

  10. Continuous downstream processing for high value biological products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in the possibility of developing truly continuous processes for the large-scale production of high value biological products. Continuous processing has the potential to provide significant reductions in cost and facility size while improving product quality and facilitating the design of flexible multi-product manufacturing facilities. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art in separations technology suitable for continuous downstream bioprocessing, focusing on unit operations that would be most appropriate for the production of secreted proteins like monoclonal antibodies. This includes cell separation/recycle from the perfusion bioreactor, initial product recovery (capture), product purification (polishing), and formulation. Of particular importance are the available options, and alternatives, for continuous chromatographic separations. Although there are still significant challenges in developing integrated continuous bioprocesses, recent technological advances have provided process developers with a number of attractive options for development of truly continuous bioprocessing operations.

  11. Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam: Implications for Downstream Riparian Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Block, P. J.; Hammond, M.; King, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ethiopia has begun seriously developing their significant hydropower potential by launching construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile River to facilitate local and regional growth. Although this has required substantial planning on Ethiopia's part, no policy dictating the reservoir filling rate strategy has been publicly issued. This filling stage will have clear implications on downstream flows in Sudan and Egypt, complicated by evaporative losses, climate variability, and climate change. In this study, various filling policies and future climate states are simultaneously explored to infer potential streamflow reductions at Lake Nasser, providing regional decision-makers with a set of plausible, justifiable, and comparable outcomes. Schematic of the model framework Box plots of 2017-2032 percent change in annual average streamflow at Lake Nasser for each filling policy constructed from the 100 time-series and weighted precipitation changes. All values are relative to the no dam policy and no changes to future precipitation.

  12. Progesterone and its downstream molecules as blastocyst implantation essential factors.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Koji

    2014-08-01

    This review is to update the previous review (Am J Reprod Immunol, 63, 2010 and 413) on the research on blastocyst implantation essential factors (BIEFs). Focus of the current review is on progesterone and its downstream molecules in the process of blastocyst implantation. To understand the process of implantation, we need to know where and when the BIEFs are expressed and what they do. Progress in this research area is rapid, and its update is indeed necessary. The basic concept of BIEFs is that they have dual functions, one physiological and the other immunological (J Reprod Dev, 58, 2012 and 196). As we are still exploring the mechanism of implantation, available data are incomplete and human data are few. Thus, I will use information obtained through research on animal models, in vitro studies, cell lines, and some human studies where available. The ultimate goal of the review is to understand human blastocyst implantation.

  13. Upstream and downstream signals of nitric oxide in pathogen defence.

    PubMed

    Gaupels, Frank; Kuruthukulangarakoola, Gitto Thomas; Durner, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is now recognised as a crucial player in plant defence against pathogens. Considerable progress has been made in defining upstream and downstream signals of NO. Recently, MAP kinases, cyclic nucleotide phosphates, calcium and phosphatidic acid were demonstrated to be involved in pathogen-induced NO-production. However, the search for inducers of NO synthesis is difficult because of the still ambiguous enzymatic source of NO. Accumulation of NO triggers signal transduction by other second messengers. Here we depict NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED 1 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as central redox switches translating NO redox signalling into cellular responses. Although the exact position of NO in defence signal networks is unresolved at last some NO-related signal cascades are emerging.

  14. 7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH PORTAL AND DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH PORTAL AND DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE, LOOKING WEST. Lights and illuminated sign on portal bracing were elements of an overheight load warning system designed to eliminate accidents of the type which damaged the bridge. However, the system was in place only on the north side of the bridge, controlling trucks approaching from Oregon. In theory, trucks with overheight, overwidth, or overweight loads from California would be controlled by the State's permit system. In fact, it was a 'permit' load originating in California, being hauled without the requisite permit which struck and damaged the bridge. - Smith River Bridge, CA State Highway 199 Spanning Smith River, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  15. The Effect of Dam Closure on Downstream Rapids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, William L.

    1980-02-01

    The force of flowing water and the resistance of the largest boulder provide a means of evaluation of the stability of rapids in canyon rivers. Field measurements and calculations show that the closure of Flaming Gorge Dam, Utah, has had a significant effect on the stability of rapids in the canyons of the Green River in Dinosaur National Monument 68 km (42 mi) downstream from the dam. The reduction in peak flows by the dam has limited the competence of the river to move boulders deposited in the main channel by tributary processes, landslides, and prehistoric floods. Before the dam was closed, 62% of the rapids were stable, as indicated by the immobility of the largest boulder in each rapid. After the dam was closed, 93% of the rapids were stable as geomorphic/hydraulic features, though small boulders continue to move. A continuing buildup of boulders in the rapids will result from tributary contributions which are not affected by the dam.

  16. Follistatin Operates Downstream of Wnt4 in Mammalian Ovary Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Humphrey H.C.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Jorgez, Carolina J.; Menke, Douglas B.; Page, David C.; Swain, Amanda; Capel, Blanche

    2014-01-01

    Wnt4−/− XX gonads display features normally associated with testis differentiation, suggesting that WNT4 actively represses elements of the male pathway during ovarian development. Here, we show that follistatin (Fst), which encodes a TGFβ superfamily binding protein, is a downstream component of Wnt4 signaling. Fst inhibits formation of the XY-specific coelomic vessel in XX gonads. In addition, germ cells in the ovarian cortex are almost completely lost in both Wnt4 and Fst null gonads before birth. Thus, we propose that WNT4 acts through FST to regulate vascular boundaries and maintain germ cell survival in the ovary. Developmental Dynamics 230:210–215, 2004. PMID:15162500

  17. Axion as a cold dark matter candidate: analysis to third order perturbation for classical axion

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Hyerim; Hwang, Jai-chan; Park, Chan-Gyung E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr

    2015-12-01

    We investigate aspects of axion as a coherently oscillating massive classical scalar field by analyzing third order perturbations in Einstein's gravity in the axion-comoving gauge. The axion fluid has its characteristic pressure term leading to an axion Jeans scale which is cosmologically negligible for a canonical axion mass. Our classically derived axion pressure term in Einstein's gravity is identical to the one derived in the non-relativistic quantum mechanical context in the literature. We present the general relativistic continuity and Euler equations for an axion fluid valid up to third order perturbation. Equations for axion are exactly the same as that of a zero-pressure fluid in Einstein's gravity except for an axion pressure term in the Euler equation. Our analysis includes the cosmological constant.

  18. Postural adjustment after an unexpected perturbation in children with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    De Souza, F M B; Pereira, R P; Minuque, N P; Do Carmo, C M; De Mello, M H M; Villaça, P; Tanaka, C

    2012-05-01

    Children with haemophilia often bleed inside joints and muscles, which may impair postural adjustments. These postural adjustments are necessary to control postural balance during daily activities. The inability to quickly recover postural balance could elevate the risk of bleeding. To determine whether children with haemophilia have impaired postural adjustment after an unexpected perturbation compared with healthy children. Twenty children with haemophilia comprised the haemophilic group (HG), and 20 healthy, age-paired children comprised the control group (CG). Subjects stood on a force plate, and 4% of the subjects' body weight was applied via a pulley system to a belt around the subjects' trunks. The centre of pressure (COP) displacement was measured after the weight was unexpectedly released to produce a controlled postural perturbation followed by postural adjustment to recover balance. The subjects' postural adjustments in eight subsequent intervals of 1 s (t1-t8), beginning with the moment of weight removal, were compared among intervals and between groups. The applied perturbation magnitudes were the same for both groups, and no difference was observed between the groups in t1. However, the COP displacement in t2 in the HG was significantly higher than in the CG. No differences were observed between the groups in the other intervals. Within-group analysis showed that the COP was higher in t2 than in t4 (P = 0.016), t5 (P = 0.001) and t8 (P = 0.050) in the HG. No differences were observed among intervals in the CG. Children with haemophilia demonstrated differences in postural adjustment while undergoing unexpected balance perturbations when compared with healthily children.

  19. Downstream evolution of unconfined vortices: mechanical and thermal aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Saborid, M.; Herrada, M. A.; Gómez-Barea, A.; Barrero, A.

    2002-11-01

    We present a numerical study of the downstream evolution (mechanical and thermal) of vortex-jet cores whose velocity and temperature fields far from the axis match a family of inviscid and non-conducting vortices. The far-velocity field is rotational, except for a particular case which corresponds to the well-known Long's vortex. The evolution of the vortex core depends on both the conditions at a certain upstream station, characterized by the dimensionless value of the velocity at the axis, and a dimensionless swirling parameter L defined as the ratio of the values of the azimuthal and axial velocities outside the vortex core. This numerical study, based on the quasi-cylindrical approximation (QC) of the Navier Stokes equations, determines the conditions under which the vortex evolution proceeds smoothly, eventually reaching an asymptotic self-similar behaviour as described in the literature (Fernández-Feria, Fernández de la Mora & Barrero 1995; Herrada, Pérez-Saborid & Barrero 1999), or breaks in a non-slender solution (vortex breakdown). In particular, the critical value L = Lb(a) beyond which vortex breakdown occurs downstream is a function of a dimensionless parameter a characterizing the axial momentum of the vortex jet at an initial upstream station. It is found numerically that for very large values of a this vortex breakdown criterion tends to an asymptote which is precisely the value L = L* predicted by the self-similar analysis, and beyond which a self-similar structure of the vortex core does not exist. In addition, the computation of the total temperature field provides useful information on the physical mechanisms responsible for the thermal separation phenomenon observed in Ranque Hilsch tubes and other swirling jet devices. In particular, the mechanical work of viscous forces which gives rise to an intense loss of kinetic energy during the initial stages of the evolution has been identified as the physical mechanism responsible for thermal

  20. A Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyadi Kalia, Andre; Frei, Michaela; Lege, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    SAR Interferometry is a powerful technique able to detect and monitor various surface displacements caused by e.g. gravitative mass movement, subrosion, groundwater extraction, fluid injection, natural gas extraction. These processes can e.g. cause damage to buildings, infrastructure, affect ecosystems, agriculture and the economic use of the geological underground by influencing the hydro(geo)logical setting. Advanced techniques of interferometric processing (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry, PSI) allow highly precise displacement measurements (mm precision) by analyzing stacks of SAR imagery. The PSI mapping coverage can be increased to entire nations by using several adjacent satellite tracks. In order to assist the operational use of this technique a German-wide, officially approved, PSI dataset is under development. The intention of this presentation is to show i) the concept of the Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany and ii) a pilot study to exemplarily demonstrate the workflow and potential products from the Copernicus downstream service. The pilot study is focusing on the built up of an officially approved wide-area PSI dataset. The study area covers an area of more than 30.000 km² and is located in the Northwest German Basin. Several natural processes (e.g. compaction of marine sediments, peat loss) and anthropogenic activities (e.g. natural gas extraction, rock salt mining) are causing surface displacements in the study area. The PSI analysis is based on six ERS-1/-2 data stacks covering the timespan from 1992 until 2001. Each data stack consists of 49 to 73 ERS-1/-2 SAR images. A comparison of the PSI results with thematic data (e.g. volume and location of extracted natural gas) strongly indicates that a part of the detected land subsidence is caused by natural gas extraction. Furthermore, land subsidence caused by e.g. fluid injection and rock salt mining were successfully detected by the PSI analysis.

  1. Fully non-linear cosmological perturbations of multicomponent fluid and field systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim; Park, Chan-Gyung

    2016-09-01

    We present fully non-linear and exact cosmological perturbation equations in the presence of multiple components of fluids and minimally coupled scalar fields. We ignore the tensor-type perturbation. The equations are presented without taking the temporal gauge condition in the Friedmann background with general curvature and the cosmological constant. We include the anisotropic stress. Even in the absence of anisotropic stress of individual component, the multiple component nature introduces the anisotropic stress in the collective fluid quantities. We prove the Newtonian limit of multiple fluids in the zero-shear gauge and the uniform-expansion gauge conditions, present the Newtonian hydrodynamic equations in the presence of general relativistic pressure in the zero-shear gauge, and present the fully non-linear equations and the third-order perturbation equations of the non-relativistic pressure fluids in the CDM-comoving gauge.

  2. Experimental investigation of primary and corner shock boundary layer interactions at mild back pressure ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburk, M.; Narayanaswamy, V.

    2016-08-01

    Unstart of rectangular inlets occurs as a result of interactions between shock-induced separation units along the floor/ceiling, corner, and sidewalls. While a significant body of literature exists regarding the individual flow interactions at the inlet floor/ceiling (called primary separation) and sidewalls, limited efforts have focused on the mean and dynamic features of the corner separation. Experiments are conducted to investigate primary and corner shock boundary layer interactions (SBLI) with the objectives of elucidating the flow interactions that occur in the corner, and characterizing the interaction between the corner and primary separation units at mild back pressure ratios. Surface streakline flow visualization and high-frequency wall static pressure measurements are performed along the centerline and corner regions of shock-induced flow separation generated by a 12° compression ramp in a Mach 2.5 flow. Sidewall fences that extend upstream of the leading edge of the flat plate generate corner separation of adequate size to determine the mean flow structures, characterize the unsteady motions, and investigate the mechanisms that drive the unsteadiness of primary and corner SBLI. Results show that the corner and primary SBLI units differ fundamentally in both their mean and unsteady features and their response to upstream and downstream flow perturbations. These observations suggest that the two behave as independent units at this relatively low shock-induced back pressure ratio.

  3. Vector perturbations in a contracting Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.J.; Brandenberger, R.

    2004-12-15

    In this note we show that vector perturbations exhibit growing mode solutions in a contracting Universe, such as the contracting phase of the pre big bang or the cyclic/ekpyrotic models of the Universe. This is not a gauge artifact and will in general lead to the breakdown of perturbation theory--a severe problem that has to be addressed in any bouncing model. We also comment on the possibility of explaining, by means of primordial vector perturbations, the existence of the observed large-scale magnetic fields. This is possible since they can be seeded by vorticity.

  4. Asymptotic stability of singularly perturbed differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artstein, Zvi

    2017-02-01

    Asymptotic stability is examined for singularly perturbed ordinary differential equations that may not possess a natural split into fast and slow motions. Rather, the right hand side of the equation is comprised of a singularly perturbed component and a regular one. The limit dynamics consists then of Young measures, with values being invariant measures of the fast contribution, drifted by the slow one. Relations between the asymptotic stability of the perturbed system and the limit dynamics are examined, and a Lyapunov functions criterion, based on averaging, is established.

  5. Perturbation calculation of thermodynamic density of states

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Greg; Schulthess, Thomas C; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    The density of states g( ) is frequently used to calculate the temperature-dependent properties of a thermodynamic system. Here a derivation is given for calculating the warped density of states g ( ) resulting from the addition of a perturbation. The method is validated for a classical Heisenberg model of bcc Fe and the errors in the free energy are shown to be second order in the perturbation. Taking the perturbation to be the difference between a first-principles quantum-mechanical energy and a corresponding classical energy, this method can significantly reduce the computational effort required to calculate g( ) for quantum systems using the Wang-Landau approach.

  6. Cosmological perturbations and the Weinberg theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Jazayeri, Sadra E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir

    2015-12-01

    The celebrated Weinberg theorem in cosmological perturbation theory states that there always exist two adiabatic scalar modes in which the comoving curvature perturbation is conserved on super-horizon scales. In particular, when the perturbations are generated from a single source, such as in single field models of inflation, both of the two allowed independent solutions are adiabatic and conserved on super-horizon scales. There are few known examples in literature which violate this theorem. We revisit the theorem and specify the loopholes in some technical assumptions which violate the theorem in models of non-attractor inflation, fluid inflation, solid inflation and in the model of pseudo conformal universe.

  7. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  8. Quantitative methods in classical perturbation theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgilli, A.

    Poincaré proved that the series commonly used in Celestial mechanics are typically non convergent, although their usefulness is generally evident. Recent work in perturbation theory has enlightened this conjecture of Poincaré, bringing into evidence that the series of perturbation theory, although non convergent in general, furnish nevertheless valuable approximations to the true orbits for a very large time, which in some practical cases could be comparable with the age of the universe. The aim of the author's paper is to introduce the quantitative methods of perturbation theory which allow to obtain such powerful results.

  9. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  10. Characterization of a Laser-Generated Perturbation in High-Speed Flow for Receptivity Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    in two different wind tunnels. These measurements were made with hot-wire probes, optical techniques, and pressure transducer probes. Existing...length M Mach number p pressure, kPa T temperature, K u streamwise velocity, m/s x horizontal location, mm (along optical axis) y vertical location, mm...perpendicular to optical axis) z distance from nozzle throat, m ∆z distance between probe and perturbation generation location, mm ρ density, kg/m3

  11. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Teens > Peer Pressure A A A ... for the school play. previous continue When the Pressure's On Sometimes, though, the stresses in your life ...

  12. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  13. Perturbations of black p-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, Elcio; Fernandez Piedra, Owen Pavel; Oliveira, Jeferson de; Molina, C.

    2010-03-15

    We consider black p-brane solutions of the low-energy string action, computing scalar perturbations. Using standard methods, we derive the wave equations obeyed by the perturbations and treat them analytically and numerically. We have found that tensorial perturbations obtained via a gauge-invariant formalism leads to the same results as scalar perturbations. No instability has been found. Asymptotically, these solutions typically reduce to a AdS{sub (p+2)}xS{sup (8-p)} space which, in the framework of Maldacena's conjecture, can be regarded as a gravitational dual to a conformal field theory defined in a (p+1)-dimensional flat space-time. The results presented open the possibility of a better understanding the AdS/CFT correspondence, as originally formulated in terms of the relation among brane structures and gauge theories.

  14. The Perturbational MO Method for Saturated Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical approach using nonbonding MO's and perturbation theory to correlate properties of saturated hydrocarbons. Discussion is limited to correctly predicted using this method. Suggests calculations can be carried out quickly in organic chemistry. (Author/SA)

  15. Simple Perturbation Example for Quantum Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodfriend, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a simple example that illustrates various aspects of the Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory. The example is a particularly good one because it is straightforward and can be compared with both the exact solution and with experimental data. (JN)

  16. Controlling roll perturbations in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Beatus, Tsevi; Guckenheimer, John M.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Owing to aerodynamic instabilities, stable flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here, we investigate how flies control perturbations along their body roll angle, which is unstable and their most sensitive degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly and apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air. Fast video shows flies correct perturbations up to 100° within 30 ± 7 ms by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear proportional–integral controller. For more aggressive perturbations, we show evidence for nonlinear and hierarchical control mechanisms. Flies respond to roll perturbations within 5 ms, making this correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom. PMID:25762650

  17. Preconditioning the pressure operator for the time dependent Stokes problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    In implicit time stepping procedures for the linearized Navier Stokes equations, a linear perturbed Stokes problem must be solved at each time step. Many methods for doing this require a good preconditioner for the resulting pressure operator (Schur complement). In contrast to the time independent Stokes equations where the pressure operator is well conditioned, the pressure operator for the perturbed system becomes more illconditioned as the time step is reduced (and/or the Reynolds number is increased). The authors describe the method for solving the coupled velocity/pressure systems and, in particular, show how to construct good preconditioners for the poorly conditioned pressure operator.

  18. Singular Perturbation for Discontinuous Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, M. A.; da Silva, P. R.

    In this article some qualitative aspects of non-smooth systems on ℝn are studied through methods of Geometric Singular Perturbation Theory (GSP-Theory). We present some results that generalize some settings in low dimension, that bridge the space between such systems and singularly perturbed smooth systems. We analyze the local behavior around typical singularities and prove that the dynamics of the so called Sliding Vector Field is determined by the reduced problem on the center manifold.

  19. Local gravitomagnetic perturbations of the lunar orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahid-Saless, Bahman

    1992-01-01

    Using the metric in the local inertial frame of the Earth, we calculate relativistic effects on the lunar orbit with the synodic month period. It is shown that such perturbations arise entirely from the gravitomagnetic components of the local metric which exist because of the relative motion of the sun with respect to the Earth. In the case of general relativity, the net perturbation has an amplitude of 3 cm for the lunar range.

  20. The impact of Indonesian peatland degradation on downstream marine ecosystems and the global carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jesse F; Hohn, Sönke; Rixen, Tim; Baum, Antje; Merico, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Tropical peatlands are among the most space-efficient stores of carbon on Earth containing approximately 89 Gt C. Of this, 57 Gt (65%) are stored in Indonesian peatlands. Large-scale exploitation of land, including deforestation and drainage for the establishment of oil palm plantations, is changing the carbon balance of Indonesian peatlands, turning them from a natural sink to a source via outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere and leakage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the coastal ocean. The impacts of this perturbation to the coastal environment and at the global scale are largely unknown. Here, we evaluate the downstream effects of released Indonesian peat carbon on coastal ecosystems and on the global carbon cycle. We use a biogeochemical box model in combination with novel and literature observations to investigate the impact of different carbon emission scenarios on the combined ocean-atmosphere system. The release of all carbon stored in the Indonesian peat pool, considered as a worst-case scenario, will increase atmospheric pCO2 by 8 ppm to 15 ppm within the next 200 years. The expected impact on the Java Sea ecosystems is most significant on the short term (over a few hundred years) and is characterized by an increase of 3.3% in phytoplankton, 32% in seagrass biomass, and 5% decrease in coral biomass. On the long term, however, the coastal ecosystems will recover to reach near pre-excursion conditions. Our results suggest that the ultimate fate of the peat carbon is in the deep ocean with 69% of it landing in the deep DIC pool after 1000 years, but the effects on the global ocean carbonate chemistry will be marginal.

  1. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone signalling downstream of calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Melamed, P; Savulescu, D; Lim, S; Wijeweera, A; Luo, Z; Luo, M; Pnueli, L

    2012-12-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) regulates reproduction via binding a G-protein coupled receptor on the surface of the gonadotroph, through which it transmits signals, mostly via the mitogen-activated protein (MAPK) cascade, to increase synthesis of the gonadotrophin hormones: luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Activation of the MAPK cascade requires an elevation in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, which is a result of both calcium influx and mobilisation from intracellular stores. However, Ca(2+) also transmits signals via an MAPK-independent pathway, through binding calmodulin (CaM), which is then able to bind a number of proteins to impart diverse downstream effects. Although the ability of GnRH to activate CaM was recognised over 20 years ago, only recently have some of the downstream effects been elucidated. GnRH was shown to activate the CaM-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, which targets gonadotrophin gene expression both directly and indirectly via transcription factors such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells and Nur77, the Transducer of Regulated CREB (TORC) co-activators and also the prolyl isomerase, Pin1. Gonadotrophin gene expression is also regulated by GnRH-induced CaM-dependent kinases (CaMKs); CaMKI is able to derepress the histone deacetylase-inhibition of β-subunit gene expression, whereas CaMKII appears to be essential for the GnRH-activation of all three subunit genes. Asides from activating gonadotrophin gene expression, GnRH also exerts additional effects on gonadotroph function, some of which clearly occur via CaM, including the proliferation of immature gonadotrophs, which is dependent on calcineurin. In this review, we summarise these pathways, and discuss the additional functions that have been proposed for CaM with respect to modifying GnRH-induced signalling pathways via the regulation of the small GTP-binding protein, Gem, and/or the regulator of G-protein signalling protein 2.

  2. Corrosion impact of reductant on DWPF and downstream facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Imrich, K. J.; Jantzen, C. M.; Murphy, T. H.; Wilderman, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternate reductant in the preparation of high level waste for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). During processing, the glycolic acid is not completely consumed and small quantities of the glycolate anion are carried forward to other high level waste (HLW) facilities. The impact of the glycolate anion on the corrosion of the materials of construction throughout the waste processing system has not been previously evaluated. A literature review had revealed that corrosion data in glycolate-bearing solution applicable to SRS systems were not available. Therefore, testing was recommended to evaluate the materials of construction of vessels, piping and components within DWPF and downstream facilities. The testing, conducted in non-radioactive simulants, consisted of both accelerated tests (electrochemical and hot-wall) with coupons in laboratory vessels and prototypical tests with coupons immersed in scale-up and mock-up test systems. Eight waste or process streams were identified in which the glycolate anion might impact the performance of the materials of construction. These streams were 70% glycolic acid (DWPF feed vessels and piping), SRAT/SME supernate (Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels and piping), DWPF acidic recycle (DWPF condenser and recycle tanks and piping), basic concentrated recycle (HLW tanks, evaporators, and transfer lines), salt processing (ARP, MCU, and Saltstone tanks and piping), boric acid (MCU separators), and dilute waste (HLW evaporator condensate tanks and transfer line and ETF components). For each stream, high temperature limits and worst-case glycolate concentrations were identified for performing the recommended tests. Test solution chemistries were generally based on analytical results of actual waste samples taken from the various process facilities or of prototypical simulants produced in the laboratory. The materials of construction for most vessels

  3. Synthetic Routes to Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway Intermediates and Downstream Isoprenoids

    PubMed Central

    Jarchow-Choy, Sarah K; Koppisch, Andrew T; Fox, David T

    2014-01-01

    Isoprenoids constitute the largest class of natural products with greater than 55,000 identified members. They play essential roles in maintaining proper cellular function leading to maintenance of human health, plant defense mechanisms against predators, and are often exploited for their beneficial properties in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. Most impressively, all known isoprenoids are derived from one of two C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In order to study the enzyme transformations leading to the extensive structural diversity found within this class of compounds there must be access to the substrates. Sometimes, intermediates within a biological pathway can be isolated and used directly to study enzyme/pathway function. However, the primary route to most of the isoprenoid intermediates is through chemical catalysis. As such, this review provides the first exhaustive examination of synthetic routes to isoprenoid and isoprenoid precursors with particular emphasis on the syntheses of intermediates found as part of the 2C-methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In addition, representative syntheses are presented for the monoterpenes (C10), sesquiterpenes (C15), diterpenes (C20), triterpenes (C30) and tetraterpenes (C40). Finally, in some instances, the synthetic routes to substrate analogs found both within the MEP pathway and downstream isoprenoids are examined. PMID:25009443

  4. Hydroeconomic optimization of reservoir management under downstream water quality constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Claus; Liu, Suxia; Mo, Xingguo; Holm, Peter E.; Trapp, Stefan; Rosbjerg, Dan; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2015-10-01

    A hydroeconomic optimization approach is used to guide water management in a Chinese river basin with the objectives of meeting water quantity and water quality constraints, in line with the China 2011 No. 1 Policy Document and 2015 Ten-point Water Plan. The proposed modeling framework couples water quantity and water quality management and minimizes the total costs over a planning period assuming stochastic future runoff. The outcome includes cost-optimal reservoir releases, groundwater pumping, water allocation, wastewater treatments and water curtailments. The optimization model uses a variant of stochastic dynamic programming known as the water value method. Nonlinearity arising from the water quality constraints is handled with an effective hybrid method combining genetic algorithms and linear programming. Untreated pollutant loads are represented by biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and the resulting minimum dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration is computed with the Streeter-Phelps equation and constrained to match Chinese water quality targets. The baseline water scarcity and operational costs are estimated to 15.6 billion CNY/year. Compliance to water quality grade III causes a relatively low increase to 16.4 billion CNY/year. Dilution plays an important role and increases the share of surface water allocations to users situated furthest downstream in the system. The modeling framework generates decision rules that result in the economically efficient strategy for complying with both water quantity and water quality constraints.

  5. Upstream and Downstream: Anthropological Contributions to River Basin Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, M.

    2003-04-01

    It is now almost 30 years since Thayer Scudder and Elizabeth Colson first focused anthropological analysis on the consequences of forced relocation of peoples from the reservoir areas upstream from large dams. The rate of large dam construction has been enormous, more than 50,000 having been built since the mid-1930s, and the total number of persons forcibly relocated has reached the many millions. Inspired by their work, my colleagues and I at the Institute for Development Anthropology began focusing on the downstream consequences of dam construction, particularly on the Senegal River, invited by the Organisation pour la Mise en Valeur du Fleuve Senegal (OMVS). The work resulted not only in an analysis, but in a proposed alternative dam-management approach that would permit hydropower generation yet substantially reduce the costs of changed flow regimes borne by the riparian peoples. In this discussion, I would like to bring the situation up-to-date. What has happened to those recommendations, initially embraced by at least some of the players involved in the river's management?

  6. Downstream Processing, Formulation Development and Antithrombotic Evaluation of Microbial Nattokinase.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rohit; Harde, Harshad; Jain, Sanyog; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Panda, Bibhu Prasad

    2015-07-01

    The present research work describes the downstreaming of nattokinase (NK) produced by Bacillus subtilis under solid state fermentation; and the role of efficient oral formulation of purified NK in the management of thrombotic disorders. Molecular weight of purified NK was estimated to be 28 kDa with specific activity of 504.4 FU/mg. Acid stable nattokinase loaded chitosan nanoparticles (sNLCN) were fabricated for oral delivery of this enzyme. Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to investigate and validate the effect of process (independent) variables on the quality attributes (dependent variables) of nanoparticles. The integrity, conformational stability and preservation of fibrinolytic activity of NK (in both free and sNLCN forms) were established by SDS-PAGE, CD analysis and in vitro clot lytic examination, respectively. A 'tail thrombosis model' demonstrated significant decrease in frequency of thrombosis in Wistar rats upon peroral administration of sNLCN in comparison with negative control and free NK group. Furthermore, coagulation analysis, namely the measurement of prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time illustrated that sNLCN showed significantly (p < 0.001) higher anti-thrombotic potential in comparison to the free NK. Further, sNLCN showed anti-thrombotic profile similar to warfarin. This study signifies the potential of sNLCN in oral delivery of NK for the management of thrombotic disorders.

  7. Flume experiments on scour downstream of wood stream restoration structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliara, Stefano; Kurdistani, Sahameddin Mahmoudi

    2017-02-01

    River restoration aims to improve physical natural form and processes of a river. Techniques to control the riverbed, stabilize channel alignment, protect stream banks, and rebuild the natural habitat are an important part of river restoration projects. Rivers can be stabilized and habitat restored through techniques such as rebuilding meanders and pool-riffle sequences and managing large wood. Structures that limit channel width to accelerate the normal flows through the constricted section are referred to as stream deflectors. Single-wing, double-wing and triangular deflectors are the most commonly used types of this measure. Log-frame deflectors consist of a triangular log frame filled with rock. Deflector constructions singly or in series in low gradient meandering streams, divert base flows toward the center of the channel and, under certain conditions, increase the depth and velocity of flow thereby creating scour pools and enhancing fish habitat. Scour characteristics and morphologies downstream of log-frame deflectors have been analyzed at the hydraulic laboratory of the University of Pisa. All experiments have been carried out in clear water conditions. The results showed that the tailwater depth plays an important role on scour characteristics. In addition, it was experimentally proven that using log-frame deflectors instead of log-deflectors result in a better river bank protection. In this case, for all the tested hydraulic conditions, the scour hole never occurred close to the channel bank. Useful empirical relationships have been proposed in order to evaluate the main features of the scour geometry.

  8. Therapeutic l-asparaginase: upstream, downstream and beyond.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André Moreni; Oliveira-Nascimento, Laura de; Ribeiro, Artur; Tairum, Carlos Abrunhosa; Breyer, Carlos Alexandre; Oliveira, Marcos Antonio de; Monteiro, Gisele; Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria de; Magalhães, Pérola de Oliveira; Avendaño, Jorge Gonzalo Farías; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur Manuel; Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota de Oliveira; Sette, Lara Durães; Converti, Attilio; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2017-02-01

    l-asparaginase (l-asparagine amino hydrolase, E.C.3.5.1.1) is an enzyme clinically accepted as an antitumor agent to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphosarcoma. It catalyzes l-asparagine (Asn) hydrolysis to l-aspartate and ammonia, and Asn effective depletion results in cytotoxicity to leukemic cells. Microbial l-asparaginase (ASNase) production has attracted considerable attention owing to its cost effectiveness and eco-friendliness. The focus of this review is to provide a thorough review on microbial ASNase production, with special emphasis to microbial producers, conditions of enzyme production, protein engineering, downstream processes, biochemical characteristics, enzyme stability, bioavailability, toxicity and allergy potential. Some issues are also highlighted that will have to be addressed to achieve better therapeutic results and less side effects of ASNase use in cancer treatment: (a) search for new sources of this enzyme to increase its availability as a drug; (b) production of new ASNases with improved pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and toxicological profiles, and (c) improvement of ASNase production by recombinant microorganisms. In this regard, rational protein engineering, directed mutagenesis, metabolic flux analysis and optimization of purification protocols are expected to play a paramount role in the near future.

  9. Oxidative stress and its downstream signaling in aging eyes

    PubMed Central

    Pinazo-Durán, María Dolores; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; García-Medina, Jose Javier; Zanón-Moreno, Vicente; Nucci, Carlo; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Martínez-Castillo, Sebastián; Galbis-Estrada, Carmen; Marco-Ramírez, Carla; López-Gálvez, Maria Isabel; Galarreta, David J; Díaz-Llópis, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress (OS) and its biomarkers are the biochemical end point of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the ability of the antioxidant (AOX) biological systems to fight against oxidative injury. Objective We reviewed the role of OS and its downstream signaling in aging eyes. Methods A search of the literature and current knowledge on the physiological and pathological mechanisms of OS were revisited in relation to the eyes and the aging process. Most prevalent ocular diseases have been analyzed herein in relation to OS and nutraceutic supplements, such as dry-eye disorders, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. Results Clinical, biochemical, and molecular data from anterior and posterior eye segment diseases point to OS as the common pathogenic mechanism in the majority of these ocular disorders, many of which are pathologies causing visual impairment, blindness, and subsequent loss of life quality. Studies with nutraceutic supplements in aging eye-related pathologies have also been reviewed. Conclusion OS, nutritional status, and nutraceutic supplements have to be considered within the standards of care of older ophthalmologic patients. OS biomarkers and surrogate end points may help in managing the aging population with ocular diseases. PMID:24748782

  10. Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Protection Agency – through the independent Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) - is soliciting public comment on a new draft science report titled: Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters. A public docket has been opened to receive comments and those comments received by November 6, 2013, will be provided to the SAB Panel for its consideration in advance of their December 16- 18, 2013 meeting. Comments received after November 6, 2013, will be marked late and cannot be guaranteed to be provided to the Panel in advance of their meeting. This draft science report presents a review and synthesis of relevant peer reviewed scientific literature that will inform an upcoming joint USEPA/ Army Corps of Engineers rulemaking to enhance protection of the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of our nation’s waters by clarifying Clean Water Act (CWA) jurisdiction. Recent decisions of the Supreme Court have underscored the need for EPA and the public to better understand the connectivity or isolation of streams and wetlands relative to larger water bodies such as rivers, lakes, estuaries, and oceans, and to use that understanding to underpin regulatory actions and increase certainty among various CWA stakeholders. This report, when finalized, will provide the scientific basis needed to clarify CWA jurisdiction, including a description of the factors that influence connectivity and the mechanisms by which connecte

  11. Downstream process development in biotechnological itaconic acid manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Antonio Irineudo; de Carvalho, Júlio Cesar; Medina, Jesus David Coral; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Itaconic acid is a promising chemical that has a wide range of applications and can be obtained in large scale using fermentation processes. One of the most important uses of this biomonomer is the environmentally sustainable production of biopolymers. Separation of itaconic acid from the fermented broth has a considerable impact in the total production cost. Therefore, optimization and high efficiency downstream processes are technological challenges to make biorefineries sustainable and economically viable. This review describes the current state of the art in recovery and purification for itaconic acid production via bioprocesses. Previous studies on the separation of itaconic acid relying on operations such as crystallization, precipitation, extraction, electrodialysis, diafiltration, pertraction, and adsorption. Although crystallization is a typical method of itaconic acid separation from fermented broth, other methods such as membrane separation and reactive extraction are promising as a recovery steps coupled to the fermentation, potentially enhancing the overall process yield. Another approach is adsorption in fixed bed columns, which efficiently separates itaconic acid. Despite recent advances in separation and recovery methods, there is still space for improvement in IA recovery and purification.

  12. Remote downstream monitoring of Savannah River hydropower releases. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, J.W.; Vorwerk, M.C.; Jabour, W.E.; Carroll, J.H.

    1996-08-01

    Increased concerns over the water quality associated with hydropower releases have prompted a greater need for accurate and reliable tailrace monitoring techniques. Remote automated monitors afford the best method for continuous, unattended logging of release waters. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has installed and maintained remote monitors below three Savannah River reservoirs, Hartwell, Richard B. Russell, and J. Strom Thurmond. Data obtained from the monitors are utilized for operation of an oxygen-injection system, maintenance of a trout fishery, monitoring pumped storage testing, and evaluation of the water quality entering the Savannah River down-stream of the three impoundments. Each monitor provides real-time information and continuous data records of water quality that are stored onsite and remotely accessible via modem. Maintenance schedules include bi-weekly calibrations combined with bi-monthly servicing. Although no single system design is universally appropriate, by careful consideration of the monitoring objectives, site characteristics, parameters of concern, and available funding, aspects of these monitoring systems may be adapted to meet the specific needs of other sites.

  13. Perturbations of ultralight vector field dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Maroto, A. L.; Núñez Jareño, S. J.

    2017-02-01

    We study the dynamics of cosmological perturbations in models of dark matter based on ultralight coherent vector fields. Very much as for scalar field dark matter, we find two different regimes in the evolution: for modes with {k}^2≪ Hma, we have a particle-like behaviour indistinguishable from cold dark matter, whereas for modes with {k}^2≫ Hma, we get a wave-like behaviour in which the sound speed is non-vanishing and of order c s 2 ≃ k 2/ m 2 a 2. This implies that, also in these models, structure formation could be suppressed on small scales. However, unlike the scalar case, the fact that the background evolution contains a non-vanishing homogeneous vector field implies that, in general, the evolution of the three kinds of perturbations (scalar, vector and tensor) can no longer be decoupled at the linear level. More specifically, in the particle regime, the three types of perturbations are actually decoupled, whereas in the wave regime, the three vector field perturbations generate one scalar-tensor and two vector-tensor perturbations in the metric. Also in the wave regime, we find that a non-vanishing anisotropic stress is present in the perturbed energy-momentum tensor giving rise to a gravitational slip of order ( Φ - Ψ)/ Φ ˜ c s 2 . Moreover in this regime the amplitude of the tensor to scalar ratio of the scalar-tensor modes is also h/ Φ ˜ c s 2 . This implies that small-scale density perturbations are necessarily associated to the presence of gravity waves in this model. We compare their spectrum with the sensitivity of present and future gravity waves detectors.

  14. Bidirectional Pressure-Regulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth; Miller, John R.

    2008-01-01

    A bidirectional pressure-regulator system has been devised for use in a regenerative fuel cell system. The bidirectional pressure-regulator acts as a back-pressure regulator as gas flows through the bidirectional pressure-regulator in one direction. Later, the flow of gas goes through the regulator in the opposite direction and the bidirectional pressure-regulator operates as a pressure- reducing pressure regulator. In the regenerative fuel cell system, there are two such bidirectional regulators, one for the hydrogen gas and another for the oxygen gas. The flow of gases goes from the regenerative fuel cell system to the gas storage tanks when energy is being stored, and reverses direction, flowing from the storage tanks to the regenerative fuel cell system when the stored energy is being withdrawn from the regenerative fuel cell system. Having a single bidirectional regulator replaces two unidirectional regulators, plumbing, and multiple valves needed to reverse the flow direction. The term "bidirectional" refers to both the bidirectional nature of the gas flows and capability of each pressure regulator to control the pressure on either its upstream or downstream side, regardless of the direction of flow.

  15. Perturbation Effects on a Supercritical C7H16/N2 Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okongo'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2008-01-01

    A computational-simulation study has been presented of effects of perturbation wavelengths and initial Reynolds numbers on the transition to turbulence of a heptane/nitrogen mixing layer at supercritical pressure. The governing equations for the simulations were the same as those of related prior studies reported in NASA Tech Briefs. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were performed with initially im posed span wise perturbations whereas three-dimensional (3D) simulations had both streamwise and spanwise initial perturbations. The 2D simulations were undertaken to ascertain whether perturbations having the shortest unstable wavelength obtained from a linear stability analysis for inviscid flow are unstable in viscous nonlinear flows. The goal of the 3D simulations was to ascertain whether perturbing the mixing layer at different wavelengths affects the transition to turbulence. It was found that transitions to turbulence can be obtained at different perturbation wavelengths, provided that they are longer than the shortest unstable wavelength as determined by 2D linear stability analysis for the inviscid case and that the initial Reynolds number is proportionally increased as the wavelength is decreased. The transitional states thus obtained display different dynamic and mixture characteristics, departing strongly from the behaviors of perfect gases and ideal mixtures.

  16. Meso-beta scale numerical simulation studies of terrain-induced jet streak mass/momentum perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Mesoscale model simulations provide insight into the complex jet streak adjustments on 11-12 July 1981 that preceded the first of two significant gravity wave events to have been generated over the Rocky Mountains in Montana. Simulations employing a variety of terrain treatments indicate that prior to wave formation, geostrophic adjustment processes modified the structure of the mid-upper tropospheric jet streak by creating secondary jetlets to the southeast of the polar jet streak in proximity to the gravity wave generation region. This simulated restructuring of the mid-upper tropospheric jet streak is the result of a four stage process. During stage 1, the wind adjusts to the mass field as the jet streak exit region propagates into the inflection point between the upstream trough and downstream ridge in the height field. Stage 2 is initiated as the mass field is forced to adjust to the new ageostrophic wind field created during stage 1. Stage 3 is defined by a second geostrophic adjustment process occurring in a similar manner but to the south and east of the adjustment which occurs during stage 1. A low-level mesoscale jetlet is formed during stage 4 in response to the low-level pressure falls that are established during stage 3. The perturbation of this jetlet, caused by orographically-induced adiabatic and diabatic physical processes, is the likely mechanism responsible for the generation of the first and second episode of observed gravity waves. The dynamics responsible for this wave episode are discussed as differential surface sensible heating inducing an orographically-forced mountain-plains solenoid, resulting in the formation of additional mesoscale jetlets and internal gravity waves. Also discussed is how convective latent heating modifies the numerically simulated terrain-induced internal gravity waves, especially their amplitude and phase velocities, which provide better agreement with those wave characteristics observed in nature. Finally, the three

  17. Acoustic oscillatory pressure control for ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.S.; Dunlap, R.

    1988-08-02

    A method for controlling the acoustic oscillatory pressures generated by gas flow at the combustor inlet to a ramjet engine, the inlet including a sudden geometry expansion is described characterized by; restricting the inlet at the sudden expansion geometry such that the gas flow separates upstream and has a vena contracta downstream of the restricted inlet.

  18. Local perturbations perturb—exponentially–locally

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, W. Schütz, M.

    2015-06-15

    We elaborate on the principle that for gapped quantum spin systems with local interaction, “local perturbations [in the Hamiltonian] perturb locally [the groundstate].” This principle was established by Bachmann et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 309, 835–871 (2012)], relying on the “spectral flow technique” or “quasi-adiabatic continuation” [M. B. Hastings, Phys. Rev. B 69, 104431 (2004)] to obtain locality estimates with sub-exponential decay in the distance to the spatial support of the perturbation. We use ideas of Hamza et al. [J. Math. Phys. 50, 095213 (2009)] to obtain similarly a transformation between gapped eigenvectors and their perturbations that is local with exponential decay. This allows to improve locality bounds on the effect of perturbations on the low lying states in certain gapped models with a unique “bulk ground state” or “topological quantum order.” We also give some estimate on the exponential decay of correlations in models with impurities where some relevant correlations decay faster than one would naively infer from the global gap of the system, as one also expects in disordered systems with a localized groundstate.

  19. Compensation to whole body active rotation perturbation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S; Gazzellini, S; Petrarca, M; Patanè, F; Salfa, I; Castelli, E; Cappa, P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the exploration of the compensation mechanisms in healthy adults elicited by superimposing a horizontal perturbation, through a rotation of the support base, during a whole body active rotation around the participant's own vertical body axis. Eight healthy participants stood on a rotating platform while executing 90° whole body rotations under three conditions: no concurrent platform rotation (NP), support surface rotation of ± 45° in the same (45-S) and opposite (45-O) directions. Participants' kinematics and CoP displacements were analyzed with an optoelectronic system and a force platform. In both 45-S and 45-O conditions, there was a tendency for the head to be affected by the external perturbation and to be the last and least perturbed segment while the pelvis was the most perturbed. The observed reduced head perturbation in 45-S and 45-O trials is consistent with a goal-oriented strategy mediated by vision and vestibular information, whereas the tuning of lumbar rotation is consistent with control mechanisms mediated by somato-sensory information.

  20. Second order density perturbations for dust cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggla, Claes; Wainwright, John

    2014-08-01

    We present simple expressions for the relativistic first and second order fractional density perturbations for Friedmann-Lemaître cosmologies with dust, in four different gauges: the Poisson, uniform curvature, total matter and synchronous-comoving gauges. We include a cosmological constant and arbitrary spatial curvature in the background. A distinctive feature of our approach is our description of the spatial dependence of the perturbations using a canonical set of quadratic differential expressions involving an arbitrary spatial function that arises as a conserved quantity. This enables us to unify, simplify and extend previous seemingly disparate results. We use the primordial matter and metric perturbations that emerge at the end of the inflationary epoch to determine the additional arbitrary spatial function that arises when integrating the second order perturbation equations. This introduces a non-Gaussianity parameter into the expressions for the second order density perturbation. In the special case of zero spatial curvature we show that the time evolution simplifies significantly, and requires the use of only two nonelementary functions, the so-called growth suppression factor at the linear level, and one new function at the second order level. We expect that the results will be useful in applications, for example, studying the effects of primordial non-Gaussianity on the large scale structure of the Universe.

  1. Perturbed kernel approximation on homogeneous manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesley, J.; Sun, X.

    2007-02-01

    Current methods for interpolation and approximation within a native space rely heavily on the strict positive-definiteness of the underlying kernels. If the domains of approximation are the unit spheres in euclidean spaces, then zonal kernels (kernels that are invariant under the orthogonal group action) are strongly favored. In the implementation of these methods to handle real world problems, however, some or all of the symmetries and positive-definiteness may be lost in digitalization due to small random errors that occur unpredictably during various stages of the execution. Perturbation analysis is therefore needed to address the stability problem encountered. In this paper we study two kinds of perturbations of positive-definite kernels: small random perturbations and perturbations by Dunkl's intertwining operators [C. Dunkl, Y. Xu, Orthogonal polynomials of several variables, Encyclopedia of Mathematics and Its Applications, vol. 81, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001]. We show that with some reasonable assumptions, a small random perturbation of a strictly positive-definite kernel can still provide vehicles for interpolation and enjoy the same error estimates. We examine the actions of the Dunkl intertwining operators on zonal (strictly) positive-definite kernels on spheres. We show that the resulted kernels are (strictly) positive-definite on spheres of lower dimensions.

  2. Mode coupling of Schwarzschild perturbations: Ringdown frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Enrique; Brizuela, David; Martín-García, José M.; Tiglio, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Within linearized perturbation theory, black holes decay to their final stationary state through the well-known spectrum of quasinormal modes. Here we numerically study whether nonlinearities change this picture. For that purpose we study the ringdown frequencies of gauge-invariant second-order gravitational perturbations induced by self-coupling of linearized perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes. We do so through high-accuracy simulations in the time domain of first and second-order Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli type equations, for a variety of initial data sets. We consider first-order even-parity (ℓ=2, m=±2) perturbations and odd-parity (ℓ=2, m=0) ones, and all the multipoles that they generate through self-coupling. For all of them and all the initial data sets considered we find that—in contrast to previous predictions in the literature—the numerical decay frequencies of second-order perturbations are the same ones of linearized theory, and we explain the observed behavior. This would indicate, in particular, that when modeling or searching for ringdown gravitational waves, appropriately including the standard quasinormal modes already takes into account nonlinear effects.

  3. Wind-Driven Ecological Flow Regimes Downstream from Hydropower Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, J.; Characklis, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    Conventional hydropower can be turned on and off quicker and less expensively than thermal generation (coal, nuclear, or natural gas). These advantages enable hydropower utilities to respond to rapid fluctuations in energy supply and demand. More recently, a growing renewable energy sector has underlined the need for flexible generation capacity that can complement intermittent renewable resources such as wind power. While wind power entails lower variable costs than other types of generation, incorporating it into electric power systems can be problematic. Due to variable and unpredictable wind speeds, wind power is difficult to schedule and must be used when available. As a result, integrating large amounts of wind power into the grid may result in atypical, swiftly changing demand patterns for other forms of generation, placing a premium on sources that can be rapidly ramped up and down. Moreover, uncertainty in wind power forecasts will stipulate increased levels of 'reserve' generation capacity that can respond quickly if real-time wind supply is less than expected. These changes could create new hourly price dynamics for energy and reserves, altering the short-term financial signals that hydroelectric dam operators use to schedule water releases. Traditionally, hourly stream flow patterns below hydropower dams have corresponded in a very predictable manner to electricity demand, whose primary factors are weather (hourly temperature) and economic activity (workday hours). Wind power integration has the potential to yield more variable, less predictable flows at hydro dams, flows that at times could resemble reciprocal wind patterns. An existing body of research explores the impacts of standard, demand-following hydroelectric dams on downstream ecological flows; but weighing the benefits of increased reliance on wind power against further impacts to ecological flows may be a novel challenge for the environmental community. As a preliminary step in meeting this

  4. The application of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to study the hydrophobic hydration.

    PubMed

    Mohoric, Tomaz; Urbic, Tomaz; Hribar-Lee, Barbara

    2013-07-14

    The thermodynamic perturbation theory was tested against newly obtained Monte Carlo computer simulations to describe the major features of the hydrophobic effect in a simple 3D-Mercedes-Benz water model: the temperature and hydrophobe size dependence on entropy, enthalpy, and free energy of transfer of a simple hydrophobic solute into water. An excellent agreement was obtained between the theoretical and simulation results. Further, the thermodynamic perturbation theory qualitatively correctly (with respect to the experimental data) describes the solvation thermodynamics under conditions where the simulation results are difficult to obtain with good enough accuracy, e.g., at high pressures.

  5. The relationship between the human state and external perturbations of atmospheric, geomagnetic and solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavryuseva, E.; Kroussanova, N.

    2002-12-01

    The relationship between the state of human body and the external factors such as the different phenomena of solar activity, geomagnetic perturbations and local atmospheric characteristics is studied. The monitoring of blood pressure and electro-conductivity of human body in acupuncture points for a group fo 28 people over the period of 1.5 year has been performed daily from February 2001 to August 2002 in Capodimonte Observatory in Naples, Italy. The modified Voll method of electropuncture diagnostics was used. The strong correlation between the human body state and meteo conditions is found and the probable correlation with geomagnetic perturbations is discussed.

  6. Perturbing effect of solar radiation on the Spektr-RG spacecraft in operational orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatov, S. I.; Mordvinkin, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Results and analysis are presented for a numerical simulation of solar radiation forces acting on the Spektr-RG spacecraft in operational orbit. The possibility is investigated of compensating the radiation pressure-induced perturbing torque without adding new units and assemblies into the spacecraft configuration. A rationale is given for ways of implementing the compensation techniques that enable 65% compensation of sufficiently large perturbing torques, thus considerably reducing (by 5-6 kg) the propellant consumption in the control system engines and increasing the lifetime of the spacecraft.

  7. Note on the semiclassicality of cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donà, Pietro; Marcianò, Antonino

    2016-12-01

    Moving from the consideration that matter fields must be treated in terms of their fundamental quantum counterparts, we show straightforward arguments, within the framework of ordinary quantum mechanics and quantum field theory, in order to convince readers that cosmological perturbations must be addressed in term of the semiclassical limit of the expectation value of quantum fields. We first take into account cosmological perturbations originated by a quantum scalar field, and then extend our treatment in order to account for the expectation values of bilinears of Dirac fermion fields. The latter can indeed transform as scalar quantities under diffeomorphisms, as well as all the other bilinear of the Dirac fields that belong to the Clifford algebra. This is the first of a series of works that is intended to prove that cosmological quantum perturbations can actually be accounted for in terms of Dirac fermion fields, which must be treated as fundamental quantum objects, and their dynamics.

  8. Perturbations in a regular bouncing universe

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.J.; Geshnizjani, G.

    2006-03-15

    We consider a simple toy model of a regular bouncing universe. The bounce is caused by an extra timelike dimension, which leads to a sign flip of the {rho}{sup 2} term in the effective four dimensional Randall Sundrum-like description. We find a wide class of possible bounces: big bang avoiding ones for regular matter content, and big rip avoiding ones for phantom matter. Focusing on radiation as the matter content, we discuss the evolution of scalar, vector and tensor perturbations. We compute a spectral index of n{sub s}=-1 for scalar perturbations and a deep blue index for tensor perturbations after invoking vacuum initial conditions, ruling out such a model as a realistic one. We also find that the spectrum (evaluated at Hubble crossing) is sensitive to the bounce. We conclude that it is challenging, but not impossible, for cyclic/ekpyrotic models to succeed, if one can find a regularized version.

  9. The non-perturbative unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entern, D. R.; Ortega, P. G.; Fernández, F.

    2017-03-01

    In recent years states in the quarkonium spectrum not expected in the naive quark model have appeared and created a lot of interest. In the theoretical side the study of the effect of meson-meson thresholds in the spectrum have been performed in different approximations. In a quark model framework, and in the spirit of the Cornell model, when a meson-meson threshold is included, the coupling to all the quark-antiquark states have to be considered. In practice only the closest states are included perturbatively. In this contribution we will present a framework in which we couple quark-antiquark states with meson-meson states non-perturbatively, taking into account effectively the coupling to all quark-antiquark states. The method will be applied to the study of the X(3872) and a comparison with the perturbative calculation will be performed.

  10. Elementary theorems regarding blue isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Yoo, Hojin

    2015-04-01

    Blue CDM-photon isocurvature perturbations are attractive in terms of observability and may be typical from the perspective of generic mass relations in supergravity. We present and apply three theorems useful for blue isocurvature perturbations arising from linear spectator scalar fields. In the process, we give a more precise formula for the blue spectrum associated with the axion model of Kasuya and Kawasaki [Axion Isocurvature Fluctuations with Extremely Blue Spectrum, Phys. Rev. D 80, 023516 (2009).], which can in a parametric corner give a factor of O (10 ) correction. We explain how a conserved current associated with Peccei-Quinn symmetry plays a crucial role and explicitly plot several example spectra including the breaks in the spectra. We also resolve a little puzzle arising from a naive multiplication of isocurvature expression that sheds light on the gravitational imprint of the adiabatic perturbations on the fields responsible for blue isocurvature fluctuations.

  11. Instability of charged Lovelock black holes: Vector perturbations and scalar perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    We examine the stability of charged Lovelock black hole solutions under vector-type and scalar-type perturbations. We find suitable master variables for the stability analysis; the equations for these variables are Schrödinger-type equations with two components, and these Schrödinger operators are symmetric. By these master equations, we show that charged Lovelock black holes are stable under vector-type perturbations. For scalar-type perturbations, we show the criteria for instability and check these numerically. In our previous paper [T. Takahashi, Prog. Theor. Phys. 125, 1289 (2011)], we have shown that nearly extreme black holes show instability under tensor-type perturbations. In this paper, we find that black holes with a small charge show instability under scalar-type perturbations even if they have a relatively large mass.

  12. Downstream processing and chromatography based analytical methods for production of vaccines, gene therapy vectors, and bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Kramberger, Petra; Urbas, Lidija; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Downstream processing of nanoplexes (viruses, virus-like particles, bacteriophages) is characterized by complexity of the starting material, number of purification methods to choose from, regulations that are setting the frame for the final product and analytical methods for upstream and downstream monitoring. This review gives an overview on the nanoplex downstream challenges and chromatography based analytical methods for efficient monitoring of the nanoplex production. PMID:25751122

  13. Wall parallel cross-correlations of volumetric PTV measurements in a perturbed turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan Ming; Longmire, Ellen

    2016-11-01

    A canonical turbulent boundary layer (Reτ = 2500) was perturbed by a narrowly spaced (0.2 δ) array of cylinders extending normal to the wall. Two array heights were considered, H = 0.2 δ and H = δ . Volumetric PTV measurements were acquired to understand 3-D variations in large scale structures within the log region of the unperturbed and perturbed flow. The recovery in the streamwise velocity coherence across the depth of the log region was analyzed using cross correlations between wall parallel planes. Conditional cross correlations are analyzed to examine the recovery in coherence specific to low momentum regions (LMRs), which can be signatures of vortex packets. The measurement volume was 0.70 δ (streamwise,x), 0.90 δ (spanwise,y), 0.12 δ (wall-normal,z). In the unperturbed flow, LMRs frequently extended through the entire depth (155 <=z+ <= 465). The cross correlations between planes at z+ = 155 and z+ = 465 exhibited strong skewness indicative of forward leaning structures. By comparison, downstream of the H = δ array, the wall normal extent of individual LMRs was frequently limited to the lower part of the measurement volume. The cross correlation magnitude and skewness remained suppressed relative to unperturbed flow up to 4.7 δ downstream. These observations suggest reduced coherence of LMRs and high momentum regions across the log region. This result was consistent with previous planar PIV measurements at z+ = 500 that showed hardly any long LMRs over distances up to 7 δ downstream of the H = δ array.

  14. A perturbative DFT approach for magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, Khoong Hong; Laskowski, Robert

    2017-04-01

    We develop a perturbative formalism for computing magnetocrystalline anisotropy within density functional theory and the magnetic force theorem. Instead of computing eigenvalues of the spin-orbit Hamiltonian for selected spin polarizations, as in the conventional ;force theorem; approach, we show that the effect can be cast into a redefined form of the spin-orbit operator. This allows to separate the large eigenvalue shift due to spin-orbit interaction common for both polarizations from the much smaller magnetic anisotropy splitting. As a consequence the anisotropy splitting may by considered as a perturbation.

  15. Death to perturbative QCD in exclusive processes?

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, R.; Hansper, J.; Gari, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The authors discuss the question of whether perturbative QCD is applicable in calculations of exclusive processes at available momentum transfers. They show that the currently used method of determining hadronic quark distribution amplitudes from QCD sum rules yields wave functions which are completely undetermined because the polynomial expansion diverges. Because of the indeterminacy of the wave functions no statement can be made at present as to whether perturbative QCD is valid. The authors emphasize the necessity of a rigorous discussion of the subject and the importance of experimental data in the range of interest.

  16. Evolution of perturbations in an inflationary universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, J. A.; Will, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of inhomogeneous density perturbations in a model of the very early universe that is dominated for a time by a constant energy density of a false quantum-mechanical vacuum is analyzed. During this period, the universe inflates exponentially and supercools exponentially, until a phase transition back to the true vacuum reheats the matter and radiation. Focus is on the physically measurable, coordinate-independent modes of inhomogeneous perturbations of this model and it is found that all modes either are constant or are exponentially damped during the inflationary era.

  17. Non-perturbative QCD and hadron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos-Martínez, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    A brief exposition of contemporary non-perturbative methods based on the Schwinger-Dyson (SDE) and Bethe-Salpeter equations (BSE) of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and their application to hadron physics is given. These equations provide a non-perturbative continuum formulation of QCD and are a powerful and promising tool for the study of hadron physics. Results on some properties of hadrons based on this approach, with particular attention to the pion distribution amplitude, elastic, and transition electromagnetic form factors, and their comparison to experimental data are presented.

  18. Bayesian model selection and isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, María; García-Bellido, Juan; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liddle, Andrew R.; Slosar, Anže

    2005-03-01

    Present cosmological data are well explained assuming purely adiabatic perturbations, but an admixture of isocurvature perturbations is also permitted. We use a Bayesian framework to compare the performance of cosmological models including isocurvature modes with the purely adiabatic case; this framework automatically and consistently penalizes models which use more parameters to fit the data. We compute the Bayesian evidence for fits to a data set comprised of WMAP and other microwave anisotropy data, the galaxy power spectrum from 2dFGRS and SDSS, and Type Ia supernovae luminosity distances. We find that Bayesian model selection favors the purely adiabatic models, but so far only at low significance.

  19. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  20. Conservative perturbation theory for nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Tirth; Chattopadhyay, Rohitashwa; Vaidya, Kedar; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we show how to use canonical perturbation theory for dissipative dynamical systems capable of showing limit-cycle oscillations. Thus, our work surmounts the hitherto perceived barrier for canonical perturbation theory that it can be applied only to a class of conservative systems, viz., Hamiltonian systems. In the process, we also find Hamiltonian structure for an important subset of Liénard system—a paradigmatic system for modeling isolated and asymptotic oscillatory state. We discuss the possibility of extending our method to encompass an even wider range of nonconservative systems.

  1. Poynting-Robertson effect. II - Perturbation equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klacka, J.

    1992-12-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the complete set of perturbation equations of celestial mechanics as applied to the Poynting-Robertson effect. Differential equations and initial conditions for them are justified. The sudden beginning of the operation of the Poynting-Robertson effect (e.g., sudden release of dust particles from a comet) is taken into account. Two sets of differential equations and initial conditions for them are obtained. Both of them are completely equivalent to Newton's equation of motion. It is stressed that the transformation mu yields mu(1-beta) must be made in perturbation equations of celestial mechanics.

  2. Galilean invariant resummation schemes of cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peloso, Marco; Pietroni, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Many of the methods proposed so far to go beyond Standard Perturbation Theory break invariance under time-dependent boosts (denoted here as extended Galilean Invariance, or GI). This gives rise to spurious large scale effects which spoil the small scale predictions of these approximation schemes. By using consistency relations we derive fully non-perturbative constraints that GI imposes on correlation functions. We then introduce a method to quantify the amount of GI breaking of a given scheme, and to correct it by properly tailored counterterms. Finally, we formulate resummation schemes which are manifestly GI, discuss their general features, and implement them in the so called Time-Flow, or TRG, equations.

  3. Perturbative approach to Markovian open quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Andy C. Y.; Petruccione, F.; Koch, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The exact treatment of Markovian open quantum systems, when based on numerical diagonalization of the Liouville super-operator or averaging over quantum trajectories, is severely limited by Hilbert space size. Perturbation theory, standard in the investigation of closed quantum systems, has remained much less developed for open quantum systems where a direct application to the Lindblad master equation is desirable. We present such a perturbative treatment which will be useful for an analytical understanding of open quantum systems and for numerical calculation of system observables which would otherwise be impractical. PMID:24811607

  4. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  5. High NO2/NOx emissions downstream of the catalytic diesel particulate filter: An influencing factor study.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; Li, Jiaqiang; Ma, Zhilei; Tan, Jianwei; Zhao, Longqing

    2015-09-01

    Diesel vehicles are responsible for most of the traffic-related nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, including nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The use of after-treatment devices increases the risk of high NO2/NOx emissions from diesel engines. In order to investigate the factors influencing NO2/NOx emissions, an emission experiment was carried out on a high pressure common-rail, turbocharged diesel engine with a catalytic diesel particulate filter (CDPF). NO2 was measured by a non-dispersive ultraviolet analyzer with raw exhaust sampling. The experimental results show that the NO2/NOx ratios downstream of the CDPF range around 20%-83%, which are significantly higher than those upstream of the CDPF. The exhaust temperature is a decisive factor influencing the NO2/NOx emissions. The maximum NO2/NOx emission appears at the exhaust temperature of 350°C. The space velocity, engine-out PM/NOx ratio (mass based) and CO conversion ratio are secondary factors. At a constant exhaust temperature, the NO2/NOx emissions decreased with increasing space velocity and engine-out PM/NOx ratio. When the CO conversion ratios range from 80% to 90%, the NO2/NOx emissions remain at a high level.

  6. Wake Measurement Downstream of a Hybrid Wing Body Model with Blown Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John C.; Jones, Gregory S.; Allan, Brian G.; Westra, Bryan W.; Collins, Scott W.; Zeune, Cale H.

    2010-01-01

    Flow-field measurements were obtained in the wake of a full-span Hybrid Wing Body model with internally blown flaps. The test was performed at the NASA Langley 14 x 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel at low speeds. Off-body measurements were obtained with a 7-hole probe rake survey system. Three model configurations were investigated. At 0deg angle of attack the surveys were completed with 0deg and 60deg flap deflections. At 10deg angle of attack the wake surveys were completed with a slat and a 60deg flap deflection. The 7-hole probe results further quantified two known swirling regions (downstream of the outboard flap edge and the inboard/outboard flap juncture) for the 60deg flap cases with blowing. Flowfield results and the general trends are very similar for the two blowing cases at nozzle pressure ratios of 1.37 and 1.56. High downwash velocities correlated with the enhanced lift for the 60deg flap cases with blowing. Jet-induced effects are the largest at the most inboard station for all (three) velocity components due in part to the larger inboard slot height. The experimental data are being used to improve computational tools for high-lift wings with integrated powered-lift technologies.

  7. Formation of annular plasma downstream by magnetic aperture in the helicon experimental device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Yadav, S.; Barada, K. K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Pal, R.; Bora, D.

    2017-02-01

    In the Helicon eXperimental (HeX) device, the geometric aperture is fixed, but the position of the magnetic aperture can be varied. Working with Argon gas in the pressure range of 1 - 10 × 10 - 4 mbar, an annular plasma (density ˜ 10 16 m - 3 ) is formed downstream, always in front of the magnetic aperture. This occurs irrespective of the relative position of the geometric aperture or the presence of a radial electric field. This is in contrary to the earlier proposition made by others that a radial electric field is necessary to produce a hollow plasma profile. Instead, the ionization of neutrals in the radially outer region by the tail electrons, rotating fast due to gradient-B drift in the azimuthal direction, seems to account for the observed off-axis density peaking in the present experiment. This also explains the variation of the plasma annulus diameter seen here by changing the input radio frequency power ( 100 - 800 W ) .

  8. Heat transfer enhancement downstream of vortex generators on a flat plate

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, A.Y.

    1984-01-01

    This investigation was conducted in order to better understand the augmentation of forced convective heat transfer when a single row of counter-rotating vortex blades is attached to a flat surface. The major emphasis of the work is to study the way in which vortex generators augment the heat transfer coefficient of an initially-laminar boundary layer over a flat, constant heat flux surface exposed to favorable free stream pressure gradients. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship between the geometry of vortex generators and the augmentation of local and overall heat transfer coefficients. The behavior of the boundary layer downstream of vortex generators is partially explored. This dissertation includes results of an experimental investigation that indicates the amount of heat transfer enhancement depends on the vortex blade height and arrangement on the plate surface. The local enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient was increased up to 300% over that for a plain flat plate mainly because of high turbulence produced over the region adjacent to the plate surface, resulting in increased mixing of the slower fluid near the plate surface with the free stream. A set of guidelines for the design of more efficient surface with vortex generators was proposed.

  9. Initial condition effect on pressure waves in an axisymmetric jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey H.; Raman, Ganesh

    1988-01-01

    A pair of microphones (separated axially by 5.08 cm and laterally by 1.3 cm) are placed on either side of the jet centerline to investigate coherent pressure fluctuations in an axisymmetric jet at Strouhal numbers less than unity. Auto-spectra, transfer-function, and coherence measurements are made for a tripped and untripped boundary layer initial condition. It was found that coherent acoustic pressure waves originating in the upstream plenum chamber propagate a greater distance downstream for the tripped initial condition than for the untripped initial condition. In addition, for the untripped initial condition the development of the coherent hydrodynamic pressure waves shifts downstream.

  10. Primordial Black Holes in non-linear perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan Carlos

    2009-10-01

    This thesis begins with a study of the origin of cosmological fluctuations with special attention to those cases in which the non-Gaussian correlation functions are large. The analysis shows that perturbations from an almost massless auxiliary field generically produce large values of the non-linear parameter f_NL. The effects of including non-Gaussian correlation functions in the statistics of cosmological structure are explored by constructing a non-Gaussian probability distribution function (PDF). Such PDF is derived for the comoving curvature perturbation from first principles in the context of quantum field theory, with n-point correlation functions as the only input. The non-Gaussian PDF is then used to explore two important problems in the physics of primordial black holes (PBHs): First, to compute non-Gaussian corrections to the number of PBHs generated from the primordial curvature fluctuations. The second application concerns new cosmological observables. The formation of PBHs is known to depend on two main physical characteristics: the strength of the gravitational field produced by the initial curvature inhomogeneity and the pressure gradient at the edge of the curvature configuration. We account for the probability of finding these configurations by using two parameters: The amplitude of the inhomogeneity and its second radial derivative, evaluated at the centre of the configuration. The implications of the derived probability for the fraction of mass in the universe in the form of PBHs are discussed.

  11. On the Milankovitch orbital elements for perturbed Keplerian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, Aaron J.; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2014-03-01

    We consider sets of natural vectorial orbital elements of the Milankovitch type for perturbed Keplerian motion. These elements are closely related to the two vectorial first integrals of the unperturbed two-body problem; namely, the angular momentum vector and the Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector. After a detailed historical discussion of the origin and development of such elements, nonsingular equations for the time variations of these sets of elements under perturbations are established, both in Lagrangian and Gaussian form. After averaging, a compact, elegant, and symmetrical form of secular Milankovitch-like equations is obtained, which reminds of the structure of canonical systems of equations in Hamiltonian mechanics. As an application of this vectorial formulation, we analyze the motion of an object orbiting about a planet (idealized as a point mass moving in a heliocentric elliptical orbit) and subject to solar radiation pressure acceleration (obeying an inverse-square law). We show that the corresponding secular problem is integrable and we give an explicit closed-form solution.

  12. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  13. The neurotensin gene is a downstream target for Ras activation.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Zhou, Z; Celano, P; Li, J

    1995-01-01

    Ras regulates novel patterns of gene expression and the differentiation of various eukaryotic cell types. Stable transfection of Ha-ras into the human colon cancer line CaCo2 results in the morphologic differentiation to a small bowel phenotype. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the Ras regulatory pathway plays a role in the expression of the neurotensin gene (NT/N), a terminally differentiated endocrine product specifically localized in the gastrointestinal tract to the adult small bowel. We found that CaCo2-ras cells, but not parental CaCo2, express high levels of the human NT/N gene and, moreover, that this increase in gene expression is regulated at the level of transcription. Transfection experiments using NT/N-CAT mutation constructs identify the proximal 200 bp of NT/N flanking sequence as sufficient for maximal Ras-mediated NT/N reporter gene induction. Furthermore, a proximal AP-1/CRE motif is crucial for this Ras-mediated NT/N activation. Wild-type Ha-ras induces NT/N gene expression, albeit at lower levels than activated Ras; a dominant-negative Raf blocks this NT/N induction, suggesting that Raf lies down-stream of Ras in this pathway. In addition, postconfluent cultures of CaCo2 cells, which are differentiated to a small bowel phenotype, express the NT/N gene by 6 d after reaching confluency; this increase of NT/N expression is associated with concomitant increases of cellular p21ras protein. We conclude that Ras (both wild-type and activated) enhances expression of the NT/N gene in the gut-derived CaCo2 cell line, suggesting an important role for the Ras signaling pathway in NT/N gene transcription. Our results underscore the possibility that tissue-specific genes (such as NT/N) expressed in distinct subpopulations of the gut may be subject to Ras regulation. Finally, we speculate that the NT/N gene and the CaCo2 and CaCo2-ras cell systems will provide unique models to further define the cellular mechanisms leading to mammalian

  14. Measuring the speed of dark: Detecting dark energy perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Putter, Roland de; Huterer, Dragan; Linder, Eric V.

    2010-05-15

    The nature of dark energy can be probed not only through its equation of state but also through its microphysics, characterized by the sound speed of perturbations to the dark energy density and pressure. As the sound speed drops below the speed of light, dark energy inhomogeneities increase, affecting both cosmic microwave background and matter power spectra. We show that current data can put no significant constraints on the value of the sound speed when dark energy is purely a recent phenomenon, but can begin to show more interesting results for early dark energy models. For example, the best fit model for current data has a slight preference for dynamics [w(a){ne}-1], degrees of freedom distinct from quintessence (c{sub s{ne}}1), and early presence of dark energy [{Omega}{sub de}(a<<1){ne}0]. Future data may open a new window on dark energy by measuring its spatial as well as time variation.

  15. Thermodynamical analysis of acoustical perturbations in the bronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, Margarita; Perez-Guerrero, Armando; Alvarado, Manuel

    2002-11-01

    In the airways, very complex flows occur because of different conditions and the existence of a lot of complications: constantly changing temperature and pressure during the respiration process, a normally turbulent flow in the trachea which, in heavy breathing, remains so in the first three or four generations of airways, changes of the direction of the flow over the breathing cycle, from inspiration to expiration, etc. We also know the air that flows in the bronchial tree is perturbed by several sources such as the heart and the circulatory system, the diaphragm and stomach movements, etc., which produce sound waves. Thus an acoustical analysis of the phenomenon can lead us to a physical model which could help us to better understand the phenomena and to demonstrate the importance to clinical applications such as the pneumocardiograms. To this purpose we use a thermodynamical model that originally was developed to analyze supersonic air jets to explain the production of shock waves in the bronchial tree.

  16. Evolution of surface structure in laser-preheated perturbed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, C. A.; Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Rasmus, A. M.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2017-02-01

    We report an experimental and computational study investigating the effects of laser preheat on the hydrodynamic behavior of a material layer. In particular, we find that perturbation of the surface of the layer results in a complex interaction, in which the bulk of the layer develops density, pressure, and temperature structure and in which the surface experiences instability-like behavior, including mode coupling. A uniform one-temperature preheat model is used to reproduce the experimentally observed behavior, and we find that this model can be used to capture the evolution of the layer, while also providing evidence of complexities in the preheat behavior. This result has important consequences for inertially confined fusion plasmas, which can be difficult to diagnose in detail, as well as for laser hydrodynamics experiments, which generally depend on assumptions about initial conditions in order to interpret their results.

  17. Plasma perturbations HF-induced in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuemin; Frolov, Vladimir; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Shufan; Ruzhin, Yury; Shen, Xuhui; Zhima, Zeren; Liu, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Three plasma perturbations induced by SURA HF (high-frequency) heating have been selected and analyzed in detail with the DEMETER satellite observing data by instruments of Langmuir probe and ion analyzer. Some common features are revealed, such as (1) electron density and electron temperature both increased during the heating period; (2) both O+ density and ion temperature also increased generally, while H+ varied negatively with O+ density; (3) the ions were accelerated in upward and northward directions, resulting from the thermal pressure gradient, which also caused the variations in ULF (ultralow-frequency) electric field due to V>⇀×B>⇀ effects; and (4) the simulation results verify the electron density and temperature enhancement at the topside ionosphere due to the ohmic heating process and thermal self-focusing instability over the heating region, which is consistent with the observing phenomena by the DEMETER satellite.

  18. Discrete perturbation theory for continuous soft-core potential fluids.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, L A; Jaime-Muñoz, G; Benavides, A L; Torres-Arenas, J; Sastre, F

    2015-03-21

    In this work, we present an equation of state for an interesting soft-core continuous potential [G. Franzese, J. Mol. Liq. 136, 267 (2007)] which has been successfully used to model the behavior of single component fluids that show some water-type anomalies. This equation has been obtained using discrete perturbation theory. It is an analytical expression given in terms of density, temperature, and the set of parameters that characterize the intermolecular interaction. Theoretical results for the vapor-liquid phase diagram and for supercritical pressures are compared with previous and new simulation data and a good agreement is found. This work also clarifies discrepancies between previous Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation results for this potential.

  19. Bursting process of large- and small-scale structures in turbulent boundary layer perturbed by a cylinder roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhanqi; Jiang, Nan; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wu, Yanhua

    2016-05-01

    Hot-wire measurements on a turbulent boundary layer flow perturbed by a wall-mounted cylinder roughness element (CRE) are carried out in this study. The cylindrical element protrudes into the logarithmic layer, which is similar to those employed in turbulent boundary layers by Ryan et al. (AIAA J 49:2210-2220, 2011. doi: 10.2514/1.j051012) and Zheng and Longmire (J Fluid Mech 748:368-398, 2014. doi: 10.1017/jfm.2014.185) and in turbulent channel flow by Pathikonda and Christensen (AIAA J 53:1-10, 2014. doi: 10.2514/1.j053407). The similar effects on both the mean velocity and Reynolds stress are observed downstream of the CRE perturbation. The series of hot-wire data are decomposed into large- and small-scale fluctuations, and the characteristics of large- and small-scale bursting process are observed, by comparing the bursting duration, period and frequency between CRE-perturbed case and unperturbed case. It is indicated that the CRE perturbation performs the significant impact on the large- and small-scale structures, but within the different impact scenario. Moreover, the large-scale bursting process imposes a modulation on the bursting events of small-scale fluctuations and the overall trend of modulation is not essentially sensitive to the present CRE perturbation, even the modulation extent is modified. The conditionally averaging fluctuations are also plotted, which further confirms the robustness of the bursting modulation in the present experiments.

  20. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  1. Characterization of a Laser-Generated Perturbation in High-Speed Flow for Receptivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of receptivity can contribute to the development of an amplitude-based method of transition prediction. This type of prediction model would incorporate more physics than the semi-empirical methods, which are widely used. The experimental study of receptivity requires a characterization of the external disturbances and a study of their effect on the boundary layer instabilities. Characterization measurements for a laser-generated perturbation were made in two different wind tunnels. These measurements were made with hot-wire probes, optical techniques, and pressure transducer probes. Existing methods all have their limitations, so better measurements will require the development of new instrumentation. Nevertheless, the freestream laser-generated perturbation has been shown to be about 6 mm in diameter at a static density of about 0.045 kg/cubic m. The amplitude of the perturbation is large, which may be unsuitable for the study of linear growth.

  2. On-Shell Methods in Perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Zvi; Dixon, Lance J.; Kosower, David A.

    2007-04-25

    We review on-shell methods for computing multi-parton scattering amplitudes in perturbative QCD, utilizing their unitarity and factorization properties. We focus on aspects which are useful for the construction of one-loop amplitudes needed for phenomenological studies at the Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Staggered heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2008-03-01

    Although taste violations significantly affect the results of staggered calculations of pseudoscalar and heavy-light mesonic quantities, those entering staggered calculations of baryonic quantities have not been quantified. Here I develop staggered chiral perturbation theory in the light-quark baryon sector by mapping the Symanzik action into heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. For 2+1 dynamical quark flavors, the masses of flavor-symmetric nucleons are calculated to third order in partially quenched and fully dynamical staggered chiral perturbation theory. To this order the expansion includes the leading chiral logarithms, which come from loops with virtual decuplet-like states, as well as terms of O(m{sub {pi}}{sup 3}), which come from loops with virtual octet-like states. Taste violations enter through the meson propagators in loops and tree-level terms of O(a{sup 2}). The pattern of taste symmetry breaking and the resulting degeneracies and mixings are discussed in detail. The resulting chiral forms are appropriate to lattice results obtained with operators already in use and could be used to study the restoration of taste symmetry in the continuum limit. I assume that the fourth root of the fermion determinant can be incorporated in staggered chiral perturbation theory using the replica method.

  4. Revealing global regulatory perturbations across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hani; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    Summary The discovery of pathways and regulatory networks whose perturbation contributes to neoplastic transformation remains a fundamental challenge for cancer biology. We show that such pathway perturbations, and the cis-regulatory elements through which they operate, can be efficiently extracted from global gene-expression profiles. Our approach utilizes information-theoretic analysis of expression levels, pathways, and genomic sequences. Analysis across a diverse set of human cancers reveals the majority of previously known cancer pathways. Through de novo motif discovery we associate these pathways with transcription-factor binding sites and miRNA targets, including those of E2F, NF-Y, p53, and let-7. Follow-up experiments confirmed that these predictions correspond to functional in vivo regulatory interactions. Strikingly, the majority of the perturbations, associated with putative cis-regulatory elements, fall outside of known cancer pathways. Our study provides a systems-level dissection of regulatory perturbations in cancer—an essential component of a rational strategy for therapeutic intervention and drug-target discovery. PMID:20005852

  5. What Perturbs the ggrdgr Rings of Uranus?

    PubMed

    French, R G; Kangas, J A; Elliot, J L

    1986-01-31

    The gamma and delta rings have by far the largest radial perturbations of any of the nine known Uranian rings. These two rings deviate from Keplerian orbits, having typical root-mean-square residuals of about 3 kilometers (compared to a few hundred meters for the other seven known rings). Possible causes for the perturbations include nearby shepherd satellites and Lindblad resonances. If shepherd satellites are responsible, they could be as large as several tens of kilometers in diameter. The perturbation patterns of the gamma and delta rings have been examined for evidence of Lindblad resonances of azimuthal wave number m = 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4. The beta ring radial residuals are well matched by a 2:1 Lindblad resonance. If this represents a real physical phenomenon and is not an artifact of undersampling, then the most plausible interpretation is that there is an undiscovered satellite orbiting 76,522 +/- 8 kilometers from Uranus, with an orbital period of 15.3595 +/- 0.0001 hours and a radius of 75 to 100 kilometers. Such a satellite would be easily detected by the Voyager spacecraft when it encounters Uranus. The 2:1 resonance location is 41 +/- 9 kilometers inside the delta ring, which makes it unlikely that the resonance is due to a viscous instability within the ring. In contrast, no low-order Lindblad resonance matches the gamma ring perturbations, which are probably caused by one or more shepherd satellites large enough to be clearly visible in Voyager images.

  6. On the divergences of inflationary superhorizon perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, K; Nurmi, S; Podolsky, D; Rigopoulos, G I E-mail: sami.nurmi@helsinki.fi E-mail: gerasimos.rigopoulos@helsinki.fi

    2008-04-15

    We discuss the infrared divergences that appear to plague cosmological perturbation theory. We show that, within the stochastic framework, they are regulated by eternal inflation so that the theory predicts finite fluctuations. Using the {Delta}N formalism to one loop, we demonstrate that the infrared modes can be absorbed into additive constants and the coefficients of the diagrammatic expansion for the connected parts of two-and three-point functions of the curvature perturbation. As a result, the use of any infrared cutoff below the scale of eternal inflation is permitted, provided that the background fields are appropriately redefined. The natural choice for the infrared cutoff would, of course, be the present horizon; other choices manifest themselves in the running of the correlators. We also demonstrate that it is possible to define observables that are renormalization-group-invariant. As an example, we derive a non-perturbative, infrared finite and renormalization point-independent relation between the two-point correlators of the curvature perturbation for the case of the free single field.

  7. Cosmological perturbations and classical change of signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jérôme

    1995-12-01

    Cosmological perturbations on a manifold admitting signature change are studied. The background solution consists in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe filled by a constant scalar field playing the role of a cosmological constant. It is shown that no regular solution exists satisfying the junction conditions at the surface of change. The comparison with similar studies in quantum cosmology is made.

  8. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Perturbation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Kay M.; Henneberger, Walter C.

    1978-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohn effect is obtained in first-order perturbation theory. It is shown that the effect occurs only when the initial state is a superposition of eigenstates of Lz corresponding to eigenvalues having opposite sign. (Author/GA)

  9. Privacy Is Become with, Data Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Er. Niranjan; Singhai, Niky

    2011-06-01

    Privacy is becoming an increasingly important issue in many data mining applications that deal with health care, security, finance, behavior and other types of sensitive data. Is particularly becoming important in counterterrorism and homeland security-related applications. We touch upon several techniques of masking the data, namely random distortion, including the uniform and Gaussian noise, applied to the data in order to protect it. These perturbation schemes are equivalent to additive perturbation after the logarithmic Transformation. Due to the large volume of research in deriving private information from the additive noise perturbed data, the security of these perturbation schemes is questionable Many artificial intelligence and statistical methods exist for data analysis interpretation, Identifying and measuring the interestingness of patterns and rules discovered, or to be discovered is essential for the evaluation of the mined knowledge and the KDD process as a whole. While some concrete measurements exist, assessing the interestingness of discovered knowledge is still an important research issue. As the tool for the algorithm implementations we chose the language of choice in industrial world MATLAB.

  10. Doubly perturbed neutral stochastic functional equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lanying; Ren, Yong

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we prove the existence and uniqueness of the solution to a class of doubly perturbed neutral stochastic functional equations (DPNSFEs in short) under some non-Lipschitz conditions. The solution is constructed by successive approximation. Furthermore, we give the continuous dependence of the solution on the initial value by means of the corollary of Bihari inequality.

  11. Laboratory experiments in the argon plasma perturbed by injections of the electronegative gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Cao, Jin-xiang; Liu, Yu; Yu, Peng-cheng; Zhang, Zhong-kai

    2016-07-01

    In this study, laboratory observations of the perturbations of the magnetic field are reported due to the injection of attachment chemicals (CF4, SF6, and CO2) into argon plasmas. Besides the well-known electron density reduction, we also observed magnetic field perturbation in the experiment. The measured induced voltage B ˙ , which is taken as a proxy of the time-changing electromagnetic field, fluctuates in the boundary layer between the ambient plasmas and negative ions plasmas. Perturbations of the magnetic field were investigated by changing the ambient pressure and ratio of attachment chemicals. The measured B ˙ keeps increasing in these lower pressures; but it no longer increases as the ambient pressure higher than a threshold, e.g., for CF4, SF6, and CO2, the transition pressure is 6Pa, 5Pa and 4Pa, respectively. The magnitude of the B ˙ increase with the change of the ratio of release flow until at higher ratios, e.g., 40%. We transformed these time-sampled data into the frequency domain and found coherent modes with fundamental frequencies lying in the lower hybrid range. In addition, these coherent frequencies show a frequency drift with the increase of the contents of the negative ions. These modes were suggested as the magnetic component of electron-ion hybrid mode. This work has an important application in the study of artificially-created ionospheric depletion which is usually generated by releasing of attachment chemicals in the upper atmosphere.

  12. The effects of a perturbed source on contaminant transport near the Weldon Spring quarry

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.

    1989-03-01

    The effects of a perturbed contamination source at the Weldon Spring quarry in St. Charles County, Missouri, on downstream solute concentrations were investigated using one-dimensional analytical solutions to an advection-dispersion equation developed for both constant-strength and multiple-stepped source functions. A sensitivity study using parameter base-case values and ranges consistent with the geologic conceptualization of the quarry area indicates that the parameters having the greatest effect on predicted concentrations are the distance from the quarry to the point of interest, the average linear groundwater velocity, the contaminant retardation coefficient, and the amplitude and duration of the source perturbation caused by response action activities. Use of base-case parameter value and realistic values for the amplitude and duration of the source perturbation produced a small effect on solute concentrations near the western extremity of the nearby municipal well field, as well as small uncertainties in the predicted results for the assumed model. The effect of simplifying assumptions made in deriving the analytic solution is unknown: use of a multidimensional flow and transport model and additional field work are needed to validate the model. 13 refs., 18 figs.

  13. Passage of downstream migrant American eels through an airlift-assisted deep bypass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haro, Alexander J.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Noreika, John

    2016-01-01

    Traditional downstream guidance and bypass facilities for anadromous fishes (i.e., surface bypasses, surface guidance structures, and behavioral barriers) have frequently been ineffective for anguillid eels. Because eels typically spend the majority of their time near the bottom in the vicinity of intake structures, deep bypass structures with entrances near the bottom hold promise for increased effectiveness, thereby aiding in the recovery of this important species. A new design of a deep bypass system that uses airlift technology (the Conte Airlift Bypass) to induce flow in a bypass pipe was tested in a simulated intake entrance environment under controlled laboratory conditions. Water velocities of 0.9–1.5 m s−1 could be generated at the bypass entrance (opening with 0.073 m2 area), with corresponding flows through the bypass pipe of 0.07–0.11 m3 s−1. Gas saturation and hydrostatic pressure within the bypass pipe did not vary appreciably from a control (no air) condition under tested airflows. Migratory silver-phase American eels (Anguilla rostrata) tested during dark conditions readily located, entered, and passed through the bypass; initial avoidance rates (eels approaching but not entering the bypass entrance) were lower at higher entrance velocities. Eels that investigated the bypass pipe entrance tended to enter headfirst, but those that then exited the pipe upstream did so more frequently at lower entrance velocities. Eels appeared to swim against the flow while being transported downstream through the pipe; median transit times through the bypass for each test velocity ranged from 5.8 to 12.2 s, with transit time decreasing with increasing entrance velocity. Eels did not show strong avoidance of the vertical section of the pipe which contained injected air. No mortality or injury of bypassed eels was observed, and individual eels repeatedly passed through the bypass at rates of up to 40 passes per hour, suggesting that individuals do not

  14. Preliminary Assessment of Landslides Along the Florida River Downstream from Lemon Reservoir, La Plata County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, William H.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, William L.; Kibler, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly two-dozen shallow landslides were active during spring 2005 on a hillside located along the east side of the Florida River about one kilometer downstream from Lemon Reservoir in La Plata County, southwestern Colorado. Landslides on the hillside directly threaten human safety, residential structures, a county roadway, utilities, and the Florida River, and indirectly threaten downstream areas and Lemon Dam. Most of the area where the landslides occurred was burned during the 2002 Missionary Ridge wildfire. We performed geologic mapping, subsurface exploration and sampling, radiocarbon dating, and shallow ground-water and ground-displacement monitoring to assess landslide activity. Active landslides during spring 2005 were as large as 35,000 m3 and confined to colluvium. Debris flows were mobilized from most of the landslides, were as large as 1,500 m3, and traveled as far as 250 m. Landslide activity was triggered by elevated ground-water pressures within the colluvium caused by infiltration of snowmelt. Landslide activity ceased as ground-water pressures dropped during the summer. Shallow landslides on the hillside appear to be much more likely following the Missionary Ridge fire because of the loss of tree root strength and evapotranspiration. We used monitoring data and observations to develop preliminary, approximate rainfall/snowmelt thresholds above which shallow landslide activity can be expected. Landslides triggered during spring 2005 occurred within a 1.97 x 107 m3 older landslide that extends, on average, about 40 m into bedrock. The south end of this older landslide appears to have experienced deep secondary landsliding. Radiocarbon dating of sediments at the head of the older landslide suggests that the landslide was active about 1,424-1,696 years ago. A relatively widespread wildfire may have preceded the older landslide, and the landslide may have occurred during a wetter time. The wetter climate and effects of the wildfire would likely have

  15. 40 CFR 80.210 - What sulfur standards apply to gasoline downstream from refineries and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline downstream from refineries and importers? 80.210 Section 80.210 Protection of Environment... Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.210 What sulfur standards apply to gasoline downstream from refineries and importers? The sulfur standard for gasoline at any point in the gasoline distribution...

  16. DOWNSTREAM-WATER-LEVEL CONTROL TEST RESULTS ON THE WM LATERAL CANAL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On steep canals, distant downstream water-level control can be challenging. SacMan (Software for Automated Canal Management) was developed, in part, to test various distant downstream water level controllers. It was implemented on the WM canal of the Maricopa Stanfield Irrigation and Drainage Distri...

  17. Rupture of thin stagnant films on a solid surface due to random thermal and mechanical perturbations.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2005-07-15

    A generalized formalism for the rupture of a nondraining thin film on a solid support due to imposed random thermal and mechanical perturbations, modeled as a Gaussian white noise, is presented. The evolution of amplitude of perturbation is described by a stochastic differential equation. The average film rupture time is the average time for the amplitude of perturbation to equal to the film thickness and is calculated by employing a first passage time analysis for different amplitudes of imposed perturbations, wavenumbers, film thickness, van der Waals and electrostatic interactions and surface tensions. The results indicate the existence of an optimum wavenumber at which the rupture time is minimum. A critical film thickness is identified based on the sign of the disjoining pressure gradient, below which the film is unstable in that the rupture time is very small. The calculated values of rupture time as well as the optimum wavenumber in the present analysis agree well with the results of linear stability analysis for immobile as well as completely mobile gas-liquid film interfaces. For stable films, the rupture time is found to increase dramatically with film thickness near the critical film thickness. As expected, the average rupture time was found to be higher for smaller amplitudes of imposed perturbations, larger surface potentials, larger surface tensions and smaller Hamaker constants.

  18. Short-Term Perturbations Within the D-Region Detected Above the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, Israel; Price, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The ionospheric D-region lies in the altitude range of ~60-95 km. This part of the atmosphere is highly sensitive to waves propagating upwards from the troposphere, either as pressure perturbations (gravity and acoustic waves) or electromagnetic (EM) perturbations from lightning discharges (resulting in EMPs, sprites, elves, etc.). These perturbations can affect the temperature, wind, species concentration, conductivity, and ionization in the upper atmosphere. Very low frequencies (VLF) radio signals, generated by man-made communication transmitters, have been recorded using ground-based VLF receivers in Israel. These radio waves propagate over long distances within the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, reflected off the Earth's surface and the D-region. The characteristics of the received signals depend on several parameters along the path, but are fairly constant over short periods of time. In this study we present analysis of VLF narrowband data transmitted from Sicily, Italy, spanning one year, and detected in Tel Aviv, Israel. We show observations of the interaction between both pressure and EM perturbations from thunderstorms with the narrowband VLF signals aloft. We clearly observe short period (~2-4 minutes) acoustic waves, longer period gravity waves (~5-7 minutes periods), while also many transient events related to heating and ionization of the D-region. Comparisons with WWLLN lightning data show the potential link between tropospheric thunderstorms and D-region variability.

  19. Short-Term Perturbations Within the D-Region Detected Above the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Colin; Silber, Israel

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric D-region lies in the altitude range of ~60-95 km. This part of the atmosphere is highly sensitive to waves propagating upwards from the troposphere, either as pressure perturbations (gravity and acoustic waves) or electromagnetic (EM) perturbations from lightning discharges (resulting in EMPs, sprites, elves, etc.). These perturbations can affect the temperature, wind, species concentration, conductivity, and ionization in the upper atmosphere. Very low frequencies (VLF) radio signals, generated by man-made communication transmitters, have been recorded using ground-based VLF receivers in Israel. These radio waves propagate over long distances within the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, reflected off the Earth's surface and the D-region. The characteristics of the received signals depend on several parameters along the path, but are fairly constant over short periods of time. In this study we present analysis of VLF narrowband data transmitted from Sicily, Italy, spanning one year, and detected in Tel Aviv, Israel. We show observations of the interaction between both pressure and EM perturbations from thunderstorms with the narrowband VLF signals aloft. We clearly observe short period (~2-4 minutes) acoustic waves, longer period gravity waves (~5-7 minutes periods), while also many transient events related to heating and ionization of the D-region. Comparisons with WWLLN lightning data show the potential link between tropospheric thunderstorms and D-region variability.

  20. Short-Term Perturbations Within the D-Region Detected Above the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, I.; Price, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    The ionospheric D-region lies in the altitude range of ~65-95 km. This part of the atmosphere is highly sensitive to waves propagating upwards from the troposphere, either as pressure perturbations (gravity and acoustic waves) or electromagnetic perturbations from lightning discharges (resulting in EMPs, sprites, elves, etc.). These perturbations can affect the temperature, wind, species concentration, and even ionization in the upper atmosphere. Very low frequencies (VLF) radio signals, generated by man-made communication transmitters, have been recorded using ground-based VLF receivers in Israel. These radio waves propagate over long distances within the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, reflected off the Earth's surface and the D-region. The characteristics of the received signals depend on several parameters along the path, but are fairly constant over short periods of time. In this study we present analysis of VLF narrowband data transmitted from Sicily, Italy, spanning one year, and detected in Tel Aviv, Israel. We show observations of the interaction between both pressure and EM perturbations from thunderstorms with the narrowband VLF data aloft. We clearly observe short period (~2-4 minutes) acoustic waves, longer period gravity waves (~5-7 minutes periods), while also many transient events related to heating and ionization of the D-region. Comparisons with WWLLN lightning data show the link between tropospheric thunderstorms and D-region variability.

  1. Downstream gradients in bioindicator responses: Point source contaminant effects on fish health

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall Adams, S.; Ham, K.D.; Greeley, M.S.; Hinton, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    To investigate potential causal relationships between contaminant exposure and biological responses in fish, a suite of bioindicators ranging from the biochemical to the community-level were measured in fish populations and communities downstream from a bleached kraft mill effluent (BKME) discharge. Downstream gradients in responses were evident in elevated hepatic mixed-function oxygenase activity, several measures of condition and bioenergetic status, growth, the health assessment index, and several fish community-level parameters. A multivariate discriminant analysis procedure, which included many of the individual bioindicators, also demonstrated a gradient in integrated health status of a sentinel fish species in the contaminated river. These downstream response gradients were probably influenced to a greater degree by contaminant discharges than by natural or anthropogenic nutrient sources downstream. Establishing causal relationships between a specific contaminant source and responses in sentinel aquatic organisms becomes relatively more straightforward when downstream gradients in biological responses are observed at multiple levels of biological organization.

  2. Non-perturbative effects of primordial curvature perturbations on the apparent value of a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea Romano, Antonio; Sanes Negrete, Sergio; Sasaki, Misao; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2014-06-01

    We study effects on the luminosity distance of a local inhomogeneity seeded by primordial curvature perturbations of the type predicted by the inflationary scenario and constrained by the cosmic microwave background radiation. We find that a local underdensity originated from a one, two or three standard deviations peaks of the primordial curvature perturbations field can induce corrections to the value of a cosmological constant of the order of 0.6{%},1{%},1.5{%} , respectively. These effects cannot be neglected in the precision cosmology era in which we are entering. Our results can be considered an upper bound for the effect of the monopole component of the local non-linear structure which can arise from primordial curvature perturbations and requires a fully non-perturbative relativistic treatment.

  3. Unified classical path theories of pressure broadening.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottcher, C.

    1971-01-01

    Derivation of a unified classical path theory of pressure broadening, using only elementary concepts. It is shown that the theory of Smith, Cooper and Vidal (1969) is only correct at all frequencies to first order in the number density of perturbers.

  4. Conformal invariant cosmological perturbations via the covariant approach

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingzhe; Mou, Yicen E-mail: moinch@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    It is known that some cosmological perturbations are conformal invariant. This facilitates the studies of perturbations within some gravitational theories alternative to general relativity, for example the scalar-tensor theory, because it is possible to do equivalent analysis in a certain frame in which the perturbation equations are simpler. In this paper we revisit the problem of conformal invariances of cosmological perturbations in terms of the covariant approach in which the perturbation variables have clear geometric and physical meanings. We show that with this approach the conformal invariant perturbations are easily identified.

  5. Pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, S.

    1985-04-02

    A pressure receiving element for receiving an external pressure is attached to one end of a body and a temperature compensating diaphragm is attached to the other end of the body. A coupling shaft disposed in the body is fixed at both ends to the pressure receiving element and the diaphragm, respectively. A liquid is sealed in the body and means is provided for detecting displacement or force applied to the coupling shaft in accordance with a pressure received by the pressure receiving element. The diaphragm has corrugations of concentric circles and the crests of a plurality of them are made flat and one of the flat crests is fixed to the body. The effective area of the diaphragm inside of the flat crest that is fixed to the body is selected substantially to be equal to the effective area of the pressure receiving element.

  6. Uniqueness of static photon surfaces: Perturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Hirotaka

    2017-02-01

    A photon surface S is defined as a three-dimensional timelike hypersurface such that any null geodesic initially tangent to S continues to be included in S , like r =3 M of the Schwarzschild spacetime. Using analytic solutions to static perturbations of a Schwarzschild spacetime, we examine whether a nonspherical spacetime can possess a distorted static photon surface. It is shown that if the region outside of r =3 M is vacuum, no distorted photon surface can be present. Therefore, we establish the perturbative uniqueness for an asymptotically flat vacuum spacetime with a static photon surface. It is also pointed out that if matter is present in the outside region, there is a possibility that a distorted photon surface could form.

  7. Control of asymmetric magnetic perturbations in tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Schaffer, Michael J; Menard, Jonathan E; Boozer, Allen H

    2007-11-09

    The sensitivity of tokamak plasmas to very small deviations from the axisymmetry of the magnetic field |deltaB/B| approximately 10{-4} is well known. What was not understood until very recently is the importance of the perturbation to the plasma equilibrium in assessing the effects of externally produced asymmetries in the magnetic field, even far from a stability limit. DIII-D and NSTX experiments find that when the deleterious effects of asymmetries are mitigated, the external asymmetric field was often made stronger and had an increased interaction with the magnetic field of the unperturbed equilibrium. This Letter explains these counterintuitive results. The explanation using ideal perturbed equilibria has important implications for the control of field errors in all toroidal plasmas.

  8. Revisiting perturbations in extended quasidilaton massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the theory of extended quasidilaton massive gravity together with the presence of matter fields. After discussing the homogeneous and isotropic fully dynamical background equations, which governs the exact expansion history of the universe, we consider small cosmological perturbations around these general FLRW solutions. The stability of tensor, vector and scalar perturbations on top of these general background solutions give rise to slightly different constraints on the parameters of the theory than those obtained in the approximative assumption of the late-time asymptotic form of the expansion history, which does not correspond to our current epoch. This opens up the possibility of stable FLRW solutions to be compared with current data on cosmic expansion with the restricted parameter space based on theoretical ground.

  9. Four-loop screened perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jens O.; Kyllingstad, Lars

    2008-10-01

    We study the thermodynamics of massless ϕ4-theory using screened perturbation theory. In this method, the perturbative expansion is reorganized by adding and subtracting a thermal mass term in the Lagrangian. We calculate the free energy through four loops expanding in a double power expansion in m/T and g2, where m is the thermal mass and g is the coupling constant. The expansion is truncated at order g7 and the loop expansion is shown to have better convergence properties than the weak-coupling expansion. The free energy at order g6 involves the four-loop triangle sum-integral evaluated by Gynther, Laine, Schröder, Torrero, and Vuorinen using the methods developed by Arnold and Zhai. The evaluation of the free energy at order g7 requires the evaluation of a nontrivial three-loop sum-integral, which we calculate by the same methods.

  10. Perturbation theory for asymmetric deformed microdisk cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullig, Julius; Wiersig, Jan

    2016-10-01

    In an article by Dubertrand et al. [Phys. Rev. A 77, 013804 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.77.013804] the perturbation theory for slightly deformed optical microcavities with a mirror-reflection symmetry was developed. However, in real experiments such a mirror-reflection symmetry is often not present either intended or unintended via production tolerances. In this paper we therefore extended the perturbation theory to asymmetric boundary deformations. Consequently, we are able to describe interesting non-Hermitian phenomena like copropagation of optical modes in the (counter-)clockwise direction inside the cavity. The derived analytic formulas are demonstrated at two generic boundary shapes, the spiral and the double-notched circle where a good agreement to the numerical boundary element method is observed.

  11. Random matter density perturbations and LMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, N.; Guzzo, M. M.; de Holanda, P. C.

    There are reasons to believe that mechanisms exist in the solar interior which lead to random density perturbations in the resonant region of the Large Mixing Angle solution to the solar neutrino problem. We find that, in the presence of these density perturbations, the best fit point in the (sin 2 2θ , Δ m2) parameter space moves to smaller values, compared with the values obtained for the standard LMA solution. Combining solar data with KamLAND results, we find a new compatibility region, which we call VERY-LOW LMA, where sin 2 2θ ~ 0.6 and Δm2 2× 10-5 eV2, for random density fluctuations of order 5% < ξ < 8%. We argue that such values of density fluctuations are still allowed by helioseismological observations at small scales of order 10 - 1000 km deep inside the solar core. PACS: 26.65 - 90.60J - 96.60.H

  12. Confinement with Perturbation Theory, After All?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Paul

    2015-09-01

    I call attention to the possibility that QCD bound states (hadrons) could be derived using rigorous Hamiltonian, perturbative methods. Solving Gauss' law for A 0 with a non-vanishing boundary condition at spatial infinity gives an linear potential for color singlet and qqq states. These states are Poincaré and gauge covariant and thus can serve as initial states of a perturbative expansion, replacing the conventional free in and out states. The coupling freezes at , allowing reasonable convergence. The bound states have a sea of pairs, while transverse gluons contribute only at . Pair creation in the linear A 0 potential leads to string breaking and hadron loop corrections. These corrections give finite widths to excited states, as required by unitarity. Several of these features have been verified analytically in D = 1 + 1 dimensions, and some in D = 3 + 1.

  13. Cosmological perturbations in transient phantom inflation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richarte, Martín G.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a model of inflation where the inflaton is accommodated as a phantom field which exhibits an initial transient pole behavior and then decays into a quintessence field which is responsible for a radiation era. We must stress that the present unified model only deals with a single field and that the transition between the two eras is achieved in a smooth way, so the model does not suffer from the eternal inflation issue. We explore the conditions for the crossing of the phantom divide line within the inflationary era along with the structural stability of several critical points. We study the behavior of the phantom field within the slow-climb approximation along with the necessary conditions to have sufficient inflation. We also examine the model at the level of classical perturbations within the Newtonian gauge and determine the behavior of the gravitational potential, contrast density and perturbed field near the inflation stage and the subsequent radiation era.

  14. Stability of gradient semigroups under perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragão-Costa, E. R.; Caraballo, T.; Carvalho, A. N.; Langa, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we prove that gradient-like semigroups (in the sense of Carvalho and Langa (2009 J. Diff. Eqns 246 2646-68)) are gradient semigroups (possess a Lyapunov function). This is primarily done to provide conditions under which gradient semigroups, in a general metric space, are stable under perturbation exploiting the known fact (see Carvalho and Langa (2009 J. Diff. Eqns 246 2646-68)) that gradient-like semigroups are stable under perturbation. The results presented here were motivated by the work carried out in Conley (1978 Isolated Invariant Sets and the Morse Index (CBMS Regional Conference Series in Mathematics vol 38) (RI: American Mathematical Society Providence)) for groups in compact metric spaces (see also Rybakowski (1987 The Homotopy Index and Partial Differential Equations (Universitext) (Berlin: Springer)) for the Morse decomposition of an invariant set for a semigroup on a compact metric space).

  15. Thermostat-Like Perturbations of an Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidlin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    We consider an oscillator with one degree of freedom perturbed by a deterministic thermostat-like perturbation and another system, in particular, another oscillator, coupled with the first one. If the Hamiltonian of the first system has saddle points, the whole system has, in a sense, a stochastic behavior on long time intervals. Under certain conditions, one can introduce the relative entropy and describe metastability and other large deviation effects in this deterministic system. If the coupled system is also an oscillator, the long time evolution of the energy of this oscillator has a diffusion approximation. To get these results one has to regularize the system. But the results are, to some extent, independent of the regularization: the stochasticity is due to instabilities at saddle points of the original system.

  16. Intelligent perturbation algorithms for space scheduling optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtzman, Clifford R.

    1990-01-01

    The optimization of space operations is examined in the light of optimization heuristics for computer algorithms and iterative search techniques. Specific attention is given to the search concepts known collectively as intelligent perturbation algorithms (IPAs) and their application to crew/resource allocation problems. IPAs iteratively examine successive schedules which become progressively more efficient, and the characteristics of good perturbation operators are listed. IPAs can be applied to aerospace systems to efficiently utilize crews, payloads, and resources in the context of systems such as Space-Station scheduling. A program is presented called the MFIVE Space Station Scheduling Worksheet which generates task assignments and resource usage structures. The IPAs can be used to develop flexible manifesting and scheduling for the Industrial Space Facility.

  17. Constraining compensated isocurvature perturbations using the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tristan L.; Rhiannon Smith, Kyle Yee, Julian Munoz, Daniel Grin

    2017-01-01

    Compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs) are variations in the cosmic baryon fraction which leave the total non-relativistic matter (and radiation) density unchanged. They are predicted by models of inflation which involve more than one scalar field, such as the curvaton scenario. At linear order, they leave the CMB two-point correlation function nearly unchanged: this is why existing constraints to CIPs are so much more permissive than constraints to typical isocurvature perturbations. Recent work articulated an efficient way to calculate the second order CIP effects on the CMB two-point correlation. We have implemented this method in order to explore constraints to the CIP amplitude using current Planck temperature and polarization data. In addition, we have computed the contribution of CIPs to the CMB lensing estimator which provides us with a novel method to use CMB data to place constraints on CIPs. We find that Planck data places a constraint to the CIP amplitude which is competitive with other methods.

  18. Following the Evolution of Hard Sphere Glasses in Infinite Dimensions under External Perturbations: Compression and Shear Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainone, Corrado; Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Yoshino, Hajime; Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We consider the adiabatic evolution of glassy states under external perturbations. The formalism we use is very general. Here we use it for infinite-dimensional hard spheres where an exact analysis is possible. We consider perturbations of the boundary, i.e., compression or (volume preserving) shear strain, and we compute the response of glassy states to such perturbations: pressure and shear stress. We find that both quantities overshoot before the glass state becomes unstable at a spinodal point where it melts into a liquid (or yields). We also estimate the yield stress of the glass. Finally, we study the stability of the glass basins towards breaking into sub-basins, corresponding to a Gardner transition. We find that close to the dynamical transition, glasses undergo a Gardner transition after an infinitesimal perturbation.

  19. Perturbational analysis of plasmon decay in jellium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Macke, Wilhelm; Miesenböck, Helga M.; Schinner, Andreas

    1991-02-01

    Plasmon damping in the three-dimensional homogeneous electron gas is investigated within second order perturbation theory for the density-density response function. The equivalence of several existing approaches that take into account lowest order two-pair excitations is shown explicitly. Finally, a complete Monte-Carlo analysis of the multi-dimensional integrals for the dielectric function is made for arbitrary densities.

  20. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-04-04

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism.

  1. A chiral perturbation expansion for gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Zeid, Mohab; Hull, Christopher M.

    2006-02-01

    A formulation of Einstein gravity, analogous to that for gauge theory arising from the Chalmers-Siegel action, leads to a perturbation theory about an asymmetric weak coupling limit that treats positive and negative helicities differently. We find power counting rules for amplitudes that suggest the theory could find a natural interpretation in terms of a twistor-string theory for gravity with amplitudes supported on holomorphic curves in twistor space.

  2. Multiple scattering by deep perturbed gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Knotts, M.E.; O`Donnell, K.A.

    1994-11-01

    We present measurements of the far-field scattered intensity for gratings consisting of uniform, regularly spaced, wavelength-scale grooves that have randomly fluctuating depths. The complete polarization dependence of the scattering is determined, and particular attention is given to measurements that isolate multiple scattering. For both perturbed and unperturbed gratings, effects similar to backscattering enhancement seen for randomly rough surfaces are observed, and these effects are linked to the coherent interference of reciprocal pairs of waves multiply scattered within the grooves.

  3. Intelligent perturbation algorithms to space scheduling optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtzman, Clifford R.

    1991-01-01

    The limited availability and high cost of crew time and scarce resources make optimization of space operations critical. Advances in computer technology coupled with new iterative search techniques permit the near optimization of complex scheduling problems that were previously considered computationally intractable. Described here is a class of search techniques called Intelligent Perturbation Algorithms. Several scheduling systems which use these algorithms to optimize the scheduling of space crew, payload, and resource operations are also discussed.

  4. Study of the spectrum of inflaton perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenz, Matthew M.; Parker, Leonard

    2009-09-01

    We examine the spectrum of inflaton fluctuations resulting from any given long period of exponential inflation. Infrared and ultraviolet divergences in the inflaton dispersion summed over all modes do not appear in our approach. We show how the scale invariance of the perturbation spectrum arises. We also examine the spectrum of scalar perturbations of the metric that is created by the inflaton fluctuations that have left the Hubble sphere during inflation and the spectrum of density perturbations that they produce at reentry after inflation has ended. When the inflaton dispersion spectrum is renormalized during the expansion, we show (for the case of the quadratic inflaton potential) that the density perturbation spectrum approaches a mass-independent limit as the inflaton mass approaches zero, and remains near that limiting value for masses less than about 1/4 of the inflationary Hubble constant. We show that this limiting behavior does not occur if one only makes the Minkowski space subtraction, without the further adiabatic subtractions that involve time derivatives of the expansion scale factor a(t). We also find a parametrized expression for the energy density produced by the change in a(t) as inflation ends. If the end of inflation were sufficiently abrupt, then the temperature corresponding to this energy density could be very significant. We also show that fluctuations of the inflaton field that are present before inflation starts are not dissipated during inflation and could have a significant observational effect today. The mechanism for this is caused by the initial fluctuations through stimulated emission from the vacuum.

  5. Study of the spectrum of inflaton perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Glenz, Matthew M.; Parker, Leonard

    2009-09-15

    We examine the spectrum of inflaton fluctuations resulting from any given long period of exponential inflation. Infrared and ultraviolet divergences in the inflaton dispersion summed over all modes do not appear in our approach. We show how the scale invariance of the perturbation spectrum arises. We also examine the spectrum of scalar perturbations of the metric that is created by the inflaton fluctuations that have left the Hubble sphere during inflation and the spectrum of density perturbations that they produce at reentry after inflation has ended. When the inflaton dispersion spectrum is renormalized during the expansion, we show (for the case of the quadratic inflaton potential) that the density perturbation spectrum approaches a mass-independent limit as the inflaton mass approaches zero, and remains near that limiting value for masses less than about 1/4 of the inflationary Hubble constant. We show that this limiting behavior does not occur if one only makes the Minkowski space subtraction, without the further adiabatic subtractions that involve time derivatives of the expansion scale factor a(t). We also find a parametrized expression for the energy density produced by the change in a(t) as inflation ends. If the end of inflation were sufficiently abrupt, then the temperature corresponding to this energy density could be very significant. We also show that fluctuations of the inflaton field that are present before inflation starts are not dissipated during inflation and could have a significant observational effect today. The mechanism for this is caused by the initial fluctuations through stimulated emission from the vacuum.

  6. (Perturbed angular correlations in zirconia ceramics)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This is the progress report for the first year of the currently-approved three year funding cycle. We have carried on a vigorous program of experimental and theoretical research on microscopic properties of zirconia and ceria using the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experimental technique. The experimental method was described in the original proposal and in a number of references as well as several of the technical reports that accompany this progress report.

  7. Perturbations of nested branes with induced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sbisà, Fulvio; Koyama, Kazuya E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    We study the behaviour of weak gravitational fields in models where a 4D brane is embedded inside a 5D brane equipped with induced gravity, which in turn is embedded in a 6D spacetime. We consider a specific regularization of the branes internal structures where the 5D brane can be considered thin with respect to the 4D one. We find exact solutions corresponding to pure tension source configurations on the thick 4D brane, and study perturbations at first order around these background solutions. To perform the perturbative analysis, we adopt a bulk-based approach and we express the equations in terms of gauge invariant and master variables using a 4D scalar-vector-tensor decomposition. We then propose an ansatz on the behaviour of the perturbation fields when the thickness of the 4D brane goes to zero, which corresponds to configurations where gravity remains finite everywhere in the thin limit of the 4D brane. We study the equations of motion using this ansatz, and show that they give rise to a consistent set of differential equations in the thin limit, from which the details of the internal structure of the 4D brane disappear. We conclude that the thin limit of the ''ribbon'' 4D brane inside the (already thin) 5D brane is well defined (at least when considering first order perturbations around pure tension configurations), and that the gravitational field on the 4D brane remains finite in the thin limit. We comment on the crucial role of the induced gravity term on the 5D brane.

  8. Hamiltonian formalism for Perturbed Black Hole Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaylov, Deyan; Gair, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Present and future gravitational wave observations provide a new mechanism to probe the predictions of general relativity. Observations of extreme mass ratio inspirals with millihertz gravitational wave detectors such as LISA will provide exquisite constraints on the spacetime structure outside astrophysical black holes, enabling tests of the no-hair property that all general relativistic black holes are described by the Kerr metric. Previous work to understand what constraints LISA observations will be able to place has focussed on specific alternative theories of gravity, or generic deviations that preserve geodesic separability. We describe an alternative approach to this problem--a technique that employs canonical perturbations of the Hamiltonian function describing motion in the Kerr metric. We derive this new approach and demonstrate its application to the cases of a slowly rotating Kerr black hole which is viewed as a perturbation of a Schwarzschild black hole, of coupled perturbations of black holes in the second-order Chern-Simons modified gravity theory, and several more indicative scenarios. Deyan Mihaylov is funded by STFC.

  9. Perturbative gravity in the causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum theory of the gravitation in the causal approach is studied up to the second order of perturbation theory in the causal approach. We emphasize the use of cohomology methods in this framework. After describing in detail the mathematical structure of the cohomology method we apply it in three different situations: (a) the determination of the most general expression of the interaction Lagrangian; (b) the proof of gauge invariance in the second order of perturbation theory for the pure gravity system—massless and massive; (c) the investigation of the arbitrariness of the second-order chronological products compatible with renormalization principles and gauge invariance (i.e. the renormalization problem in the second order of perturbation theory). In case (a) we investigate pure gravity systems and the interaction of massless gravity with matter (described by scalars and spinors) and massless Yang-Mills fields. We obtain a difference with respect to the classical field theory due to the fact that in quantum field theory one cannot enforce the divergenceless property on the vector potential and this spoils the divergenceless property of the usual energy-momentum tensor. To correct this one needs a supplementary ghost term in the interaction Lagrangian. In all three case, the computations are more simple than by the usual methods.

  10. Noninflationary model with scale invariant cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Patrick; Pinho, Emanuel J. C.; Pinto-Neto, Nelson

    2007-01-15

    We show that a contracting universe which bounces due to quantum cosmological effects and connects to the hot big-bang expansion phase, can produce an almost scale invariant spectrum of perturbations provided the perturbations are produced during an almost matter dominated era in the contraction phase. This is achieved using Bohmian solutions of the canonical Wheeler-DeWitt equation, thus treating both the background and the perturbations in a fully quantum manner. We find a very slightly blue spectrum (n{sub S}-1>0). Taking into account the spectral index constraint as well as the cosmic microwave background normalization measure yields an equation of state that should be less than {omega} < or approx. 8x10{sup -4}, implying n{sub S}-1{approx}O(10{sup -4}), and that the characteristic curvature scale of the Universe at the bounce is L{sub 0}{approx}10{sup 3}l{sub Pl}, a region where one expects that the Wheeler-DeWitt equation should be valid without being spoiled by string or loop quantum gravity effects. We have also obtained a consistency relation between the tensor-to-scalar ratio T/S and the scalar spectral index as T/S{approx}4.6x10{sup -2}{radical}(n{sub S}-1), leading to potentially measurable differences with inflationary predictions.

  11. Quantum inflaton, primordial perturbations, and CMB fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, F.J.; Vega, H.J. de; Sanchez, N.G.

    2004-10-15

    We compute the primordial scalar, vector and tensor metric perturbations arising from quantum field inflation. Quantum field inflation takes into account the nonperturbative quantum dynamics of the inflaton consistently coupled to the dynamics of the (classical) cosmological metric. For chaotic inflation, the quantum treatment avoids the unnatural requirements of an initial state with all the energy in the zero mode. For new inflation it allows a consistent treatment of the explosive particle production due to spinodal instabilities. Quantum field inflation (under conditions that are the quantum analog of slow-roll) leads, upon evolution, to the formation of a condensate starting a regime of effective classical inflation. We compute the primordial perturbations taking the dominant quantum effects into account. The results for the scalar, vector and tensor primordial perturbations are expressed in terms of the classical inflation results. For a N-component field in a O(N) symmetric model, adiabatic fluctuations dominate while isocurvature or entropy fluctuations are negligible. The results agree with the current Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations and predict corrections to the power spectrum in classical inflation. Such corrections are estimated to be of the order of (m{sup 2}/NH{sup 2}), where m is the inflaton mass and H the Hubble constant at the moment of horizon crossing. An upper estimate turns to be about 4% for the cosmologically relevant scales. This quantum field treatment of inflation provides the foundations to the classical inflation and permits to compute quantum corrections to it.

  12. Non-perturbative effects in spin glasses

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Michele; Parisi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    We present a numerical study of an Ising spin glass with hierarchical interactions—the hierarchical Edwards-Anderson model with an external magnetic field (HEA). We study the model with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in the mean-field (MF) and non-mean-field (NMF) regions corresponding to d ≥ 4 and d < 4 for the d-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model respectively. We compare the MC results with those of a renormalization-group (RG) study where the critical fixed point is treated as a perturbation of the MF one, along the same lines as in the -expansion for the Ising model. The MC and the RG method agree in the MF region, predicting the existence of a transition and compatible values of the critical exponents. Conversely, the two approaches markedly disagree in the NMF case, where the MC data indicates a transition, while the RG analysis predicts that no perturbative critical fixed point exists. Also, the MC estimate of the critical exponent ν in the NMF region is about twice as large as its classical value, even if the analog of the system dimension is within only ~2% from its upper-critical-dimension value. Taken together, these results indicate that the transition in the NMF region is governed by strong non-perturbative effects. PMID:25733337

  13. Cosmic perturbations through the cyclic ages

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Joel K.; Gratton, Steven; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2007-06-15

    We analyze the evolution of cosmological perturbations in the cyclic model, paying particular attention to their behavior and interplay over multiple cycles. Our key results are: (1) galaxies and large scale structure present in one cycle are generated by the quantum fluctuations in the preceding cycle without interference from perturbations or structure generated in earlier cycles and without interfering with structure generated in later cycles; (2) the ekpyrotic phase, an epoch of gentle contraction with equation of state w>>1 preceding the hot big bang, makes the universe homogeneous, isotropic and flat within any given observer's horizon; and (3) although the universe is uniform within each observer's horizon, the structure of the cyclic universe on very large scales is more complex, owing to the effects of superhorizon length perturbations, and cannot be described globally as a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. In particular, we show that the ekpyrotic contraction phase is so effective in smoothing, flattening and isotropizing the universe within the horizon that this phase alone suffices to solve the horizon and flatness problems even without an extended period of dark energy domination (a kind of low energy inflation). Instead, the cyclic model rests on a genuinely novel, noninflationary mechanism (ekpyrotic contraction) for resolving the classic cosmological conundrums.

  14. Topological quantum order: Stability under local perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Bravyi, Sergey; Hastings, Matthew B.; Michalakis, Spyridon

    2010-09-15

    We study zero-temperature stability of topological phases of matter under weak time-independent perturbations. Our results apply to quantum spin Hamiltonians that can be written as a sum of geometrically local commuting projectors on a D-dimensional lattice with certain topological order conditions. Given such a Hamiltonian H{sub 0}, we prove that there exists a constant threshold {epsilon}>0 such that for any perturbation V representable as a sum of short-range bounded-norm interactions, the perturbed Hamiltonian H=H{sub 0}+{epsilon}V has well-defined spectral bands originating from low-lying eigenvalues of H{sub 0}. These bands are separated from the rest of the spectra and from each other by a constant gap. The band originating from the smallest eigenvalue of H{sub 0} has exponentially small width (as a function of the lattice size). Our proof exploits a discrete version of Hamiltonian flow equations, the theory of relatively bounded operators, and the Lieb-Robinson bound.

  15. Relativistic Positioning System in perturbed spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostić, Uroš; Horvat, Martin; Gomboc, Andreja

    2015-11-01

    We present a variant of a Global Navigation Satellite System called a Relativistic Positioning System (RPS), which is based on emission coordinates. We modelled the RPS dynamics in a spacetime around Earth, described by a perturbed Schwarzschild metric, where we included the perturbations due to Earth multipoles (up to the 6th), the Moon, the Sun, Venus, Jupiter, solid tide, ocean tide, and Kerr rotation effect. The exchange of signals between the satellites and a user was calculated using a ray-tracing method in the Schwarzschild spacetime. We find that positioning in a perturbed spacetime is feasible and is highly accurate already with standard numerical procedures: the positioning algorithms used to transform between the emission and the Schwarzschild coordinates of the user are very accurate and time efficient—on a laptop it takes 0.04 s to determine the user’s spatial and time coordinates with a relative accuracy of {10}-28-{10}-26 and {10}-32-{10}-30, respectively.

  16. Perturbative Critical Behavior from Spacetime Dependent Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Horn, Bart; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2012-08-03

    We find novel perturbative fixed points by introducing mildly spacetime-dependent couplings into otherwise marginal terms. In four-dimensional QFT, these are physical analogues of the small-{epsilon} Wilson-Fisher fixed point. Rather than considering 4-{epsilon} dimensions, we stay in four dimensions but introduce couplings whose leading spacetime dependence is of the form {lambda}x{sup {kappa}}{mu}{sup {kappa}}, with a small parameter {kappa} playing a role analogous to {epsilon}. We show, in {phi}{sup 4} theory and in QED and QCD with massless flavors, that this leads to a critical theory under perturbative control over an exponentially wide window of spacetime positions x. The exact fixed point coupling {lambda}{sub *}(x) in our theory is identical to the running coupling of the translationally invariant theory, with the scale replaced by 1/x. Similar statements hold for three-dimensional {phi}{sup 6} theories and two-dimensional sigma models with curved target spaces. We also describe strongly coupled examples using conformal perturbation theory.

  17. Multifrequency perturbations in matter-wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, A.; Rembold, A.; Schütz, G.; Stibor, A.

    2015-11-01

    High-contrast matter-wave interferometry is essential in various fundamental quantum mechanical experiments as well as for technical applications. Thereby, contrast and sensitivity are typically reduced by decoherence and dephasing effects. While decoherence accounts for a general loss of quantum information in a system due to entanglement with the environment, dephasing is due to collective time-dependent external phase shifts, which can be related to temperature drifts, mechanical vibrations, and electromagnetic oscillations. In contrast to decoherence, dephasing can, in principle, be reversed. Here, we demonstrate in experiment and theory a method for the analysis and reduction of the influence of dephasing noise and perturbations consisting of several external frequencies in an electron interferometer. This technique uses the high spatial and temporal resolution of a delay-line detector to reveal and remove dephasing perturbations by second-order correlation analysis. It allows matter-wave experiments under perturbing laboratory conditions and can be applied, in principle, to electron, atom, ion, neutron, and molecule interferometers.

  18. Non-perturbative effects in spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellana, Michele; Parisi, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    We present a numerical study of an Ising spin glass with hierarchical interactions--the hierarchical Edwards-Anderson model with an external magnetic field (HEA). We study the model with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in the mean-field (MF) and non-mean-field (NMF) regions corresponding to d >= 4 and d < 4 for the d-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model respectively. We compare the MC results with those of a renormalization-group (RG) study where the critical fixed point is treated as a perturbation of the MF one, along the same lines as in the -expansion for the Ising model. The MC and the RG method agree in the MF region, predicting the existence of a transition and compatible values of the critical exponents. Conversely, the two approaches markedly disagree in the NMF case, where the MC data indicates a transition, while the RG analysis predicts that no perturbative critical fixed point exists. Also, the MC estimate of the critical exponent ν in the NMF region is about twice as large as its classical value, even if the analog of the system dimension is within only ~2% from its upper-critical-dimension value. Taken together, these results indicate that the transition in the NMF region is governed by strong non-perturbative effects.

  19. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a Λ(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  20. Using Lagrangian perturbation theory for precision cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Naonori S.

    2014-06-10

    We explore the Lagrangian perturbation theory (LPT) at one-loop order with Gaussian initial conditions. We present an expansion method to approximately compute the power spectrum LPT. Our approximate solution has good convergence in the series expansion and enables us to compute the power spectrum in LPT accurately and quickly. Non-linear corrections in this theory naturally satisfy the law of conservation of mass because the relation between matter density and the displacement vector of dark matter corresponds to the conservation of mass. By matching the one-loop solution in LPT to the two-loop solution in standard perturbation theory, we present an approximate solution of the power spectrum which has higher order corrections than the two-loop order in standard perturbation theory with the conservation of mass satisfied. With this approximation, we can use LPT to compute a non-linear power spectrum without any free parameters, and this solution agrees with numerical simulations at k = 0.2 h Mpc{sup –1} and z = 0.35 to better than 2%.