Science.gov

Sample records for downstream pressure perturbations

  1. Turbocharger with downstream pressure-gain combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Sherikar, S.V.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a turbocharger. It comprises: an internal combustion engine; a compressor located upstream of the internal combustion engine for increasing the inlet pressure of the internal combustion engine; a turbine located down stream of the internal combustion engine and mechanically coupled to the compressor for driving the compressor; and a pressure-gain combustor located downstream of the turbine for decreasing the outlet pressure of the internal combustion engineer and thus increasing the turbine power output and improving the starting characteristics of the turbocharger.

  2. Calculating nonadiabatic pressure perturbations during multifield inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Ian; Christopherson, Adam J.

    2012-03-01

    Isocurvature perturbations naturally occur in models of inflation consisting of more than one scalar field. In this paper, we calculate the spectrum of isocurvature perturbations generated at the end of inflation for three different inflationary models consisting of two canonical scalar fields. The amount of nonadiabatic pressure present at the end of inflation can have observational consequences through the generation of vorticity and subsequently the sourcing of B-mode polarization. We compare two different definitions of isocurvature perturbations and show how these quantities evolve in different ways during inflation. Our results are calculated using the open source Pyflation numerical package which is available to download.

  3. Enhanced diamagnetic perturbations and electric currents observed downstream of the high power helicon

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, B. Race; Winglee, Robert; Prager, James

    2011-05-15

    The high power helicon (HPH) is capable of producing a high density plasma (10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and directed ion energies greater than 20 eV that continue to increase tens of centimeters downstream of the thruster. In order to understand the coupling mechanism between the helicon antenna and the plasma outside the immediate source region, measurements were made in the plasma plume downstream from the thruster of the propagating wave magnetic field and the perturbation of the axial bulk field using a type 'R' helicon antenna. This magnetic field perturbation ({Delta}B) peaks at more than 15 G in strength downstream of the plasma source, and is 3-5 times larger than those previously reported from HPH. Taking the curl of this measured magnetic perturbation and assuming azimuthal symmetry suggests that this magnetic field is generated by a (predominantly) azimuthal current ring with a current density on the order of tens of kA m{sup -2}. At this current density the diamagnetic field is intense enough to cancel out the B{sub 0} axial magnetic field near the source region. The presence of the diamagnetic current is important as it demonstrates modification of the vacuum fields well beyond the source region and signifies the presence of a high density, collimated plasma stream. This diamagnetic current also modifies the propagation of the helicon wave, which facilitates a better understanding of coupling between the helicon wave and the resultant plasma acceleration.

  4. Perturbation biology nominates upstream-downstream drug combinations in RAF inhibitor resistant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Anil; Wang, Weiqing; Demir, Emek; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Jing, Xiaohong; Molinelli, Evan J; Babur, Özgün; Bemis, Debra L; Onur Sumer, Selcuk; Solit, David B; Pratilas, Christine A; Sander, Chris

    2015-08-18

    Resistance to targeted cancer therapies is an important clinical problem. The discovery of anti-resistance drug combinations is challenging as resistance can arise by diverse escape mechanisms. To address this challenge, we improved and applied the experimental-computational perturbation biology method. Using statistical inference, we build network models from high-throughput measurements of molecular and phenotypic responses to combinatorial targeted perturbations. The models are computationally executed to predict the effects of thousands of untested perturbations. In RAF-inhibitor resistant melanoma cells, we measured 143 proteomic/phenotypic entities under 89 perturbation conditions and predicted c-Myc as an effective therapeutic co-target with BRAF or MEK. Experiments using the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 affecting the level of c-Myc protein and protein kinase inhibitors targeting the ERK pathway confirmed the prediction. In conclusion, we propose an anti-cancer strategy of co-targeting a specific upstream alteration and a general downstream point of vulnerability to prevent or overcome resistance to targeted drugs.

  5. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  6. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  7. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-08-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  8. Plume diagnostics of SRM static firings for pressure perturbation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambamurthi, J. K.; Alvarado, Alexis; Mathias, Edward C.

    1995-01-01

    During the shuttle launches, the solid rocket motors (SRM) occasionally experience pressure perturbations (8-13 psi) between 65 and 75 seconds into the motor burn time. The magnitudes of these perturbations are very small in comparison with the operating motor chamber pressure, which is over 600 psi during this time frame. These SRM pressure perturbations are believed to be caused primarily by the expulsion of slag (aluminum oxide). Two SRM static tests, TEM-11 and FSM-4, were instrumented extensive]y for the study of the phenomenon associated with pressure perturbations. The test instrumentation used included nonintrusive optical and infrared diagnostics of the plume, such as high-speed photography, radiometers, and thermal image cameras. Results from all these nonintrusive observations strongly support the scenario that the pressure perturbation event in the shuttle SRM is caused primarily by the expulsion of molten slag. The slag was also expelled preferentially near the bottom of the nozzle due to slag accumulation at the bottom of the aft end of the horizontally oriented motor.

  9. Step Prediction During Perturbed Standing Using Center Of Pressure Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tortolero, Xavier; Masani, Kei; Popovic, Milos R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a sensor that can measure balance during quiet standing and predict stepping response in the event of perturbation has many clinically relevant applications, including closed-loop control of a neuroprothesis for standing. This study investigated the feasibility of an algorithm that can predict in real-time when an able-bodied individual who is quietly standing will have to make a step to compensate for an external perturbation. Anterior and posterior perturbations were performed on 16 able-bodied subjects using a pulley system with a dropped weight. A linear relationship was found between the peak center of pressure (COP) velocity and the peak COP displacement caused by the perturbation. This result suggests that one can predict when a person will have to make a step based on COP velocity measurements alone. Another important feature of this finding is that the peak COP velocity occurs considerably before the peak COP displacement. As a result, one can predict if a subject will have to make a step in response to a perturbation sufficiently ahead of the time when the subject is actually forced to make the step. The proposed instability detection algorithm will be implemented in a sensor system using insole sheets in shoes with miniturized pressure sensors by which the COPv can be continuously measured. The sensor system will be integrated in a closed-loop feedback system with a neuroprosthesis for standing in the near future.

  10. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, Philip J.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2016-05-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field J =p u , which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields p and u , respectively. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous J (x ,z ,t ) from density perturbations alone: A Green's function-based calculation yields p ; u is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: The Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations and the result for J is found to agree typically to within 1% with J computed directly using p and u from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to density perturbation data from laboratory schlieren measurements of internal waves in a stratified fluid and the result for J agrees to within 6 % with results from Navier-Stokes simulations. Our method for determining the instantaneous velocity, pressure, and energy flux fields applies to any system described by a linear approximation of the density perturbation field, e.g., to small-amplitude lee waves and propagating vertical modes. The method can be applied using our matlab graphical user interface EnergyFlux.

  11. Numerical Study of Unsteady Supercavitation Perturbed by a Pressure Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J. G.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-06-01

    The unsteady features of supercavitation disturbed by an introduced pressure wave are investigated numerically using a one-fluid cavitation model. The supercavitating flow is assumed to be the homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapour which are locally under both kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. The compressibility effects of liquid water are taken into account to model the propagation of pressure wave through flow and its interaction with supercavitation bubble. The interaction between supercavity enveloping an underwater flat-nose cylinder and pressure wave is simulated and the resulting unsteady behavior of supercavitation is illustrated. It is observed that the supercavity will become unstable under the impact of the pressure wave and may collapse locally, which depends on the strength of perturbation. The huge pressure surge accompanying the collapse of supercavitation may cause the material erosion, noise, vibration and efficiency loss of operating underwater devices.

  12. Anisotropic Pressure, Transport, and Shielding of Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick and A.H. Boozer

    2008-05-23

    We compute the effect on a tokamak of applying a nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbation δΒ. An equilibrium with scalar pressure p yields zero net radial current, and therefore zero torque. Thus, the usual approach, which assumes scalar pressure, is not self-consistent, and masks the close connection which exists between that radial current and the in-surface currents, which provide shielding or amplification of δΒ. Here, we analytically compute the pressure anisoptropy, anisoptropy, pll, p⊥ ≠ p, and from this, both the radial and in-surface currents. The surface-average of the radial current recovers earlier expressions for ripple transport, while the in-surface currents provide an expression for the amount of self-consistent shielding the plasma provides.

  13. Theoretical Analysis of One-Dimensional Pressure Diffusion from a Constant Upstream Pressure to a Constant Downstream Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Insun

    2016-05-01

    The one-dimensional diffusion equation was solved to understand the pressure and flow behaviors along a cylindrical rock specimen for experimental boundary conditions of constant upstream pressure and constant downstream storage. The solution consists of a time-constant asymptotic part and a transient part that is a negative exponential function of time. This means that the transient flow exponentially decays with time and is eventually followed by a steady-state condition. For a given rock sample, the transient stage is shortest when the downstream storage is minimized. For this boundary condition, a simple equation was derived from the analytic solution to determine the hydraulic permeability from the initial flow rate during the transient stage. The specific storage of a rock sample can be obtained simply from the total flow into the sample during the entire transient stage if there is no downstream storage. In theory, both of these hydraulic properties could be obtained simultaneously from transient-flow stage measurements without a complicated curve fitting or inversion process. Sensitivity analysis showed that the derived permeability is more reliable for lower-permeability rock samples. In conclusion, the constant head method with no downstream storage might be more applicable to extremely low-permeability rocks if the upstream flow rate is measured precisely upstream.

  14. Impact of blood pressure perturbations on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisok; Pearman, Miriam E; Park, Wonil; Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-12-15

    Although the associations between chronic levels of arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) have been fairly well studied, it is not clear whether and how much arterial stiffness is influenced by acute perturbations in BP. The primary aim of this study was to determine magnitudes of BP dependence of various measures of arterial stiffness during acute BP perturbation maneuvers. Fifty apparently healthy subjects, including 25 young (20-40 yr) and 25 older adults (60-80 yr), were studied. A variety of BP perturbations, including head-up tilt, head-down tilt, mental stress, isometric handgrip exercise, and cold pressor test, were used to encompass BP changes induced by physical, mental, and/or mechanical stimuli. When each index of arterial stiffness was plotted with mean BP, all arterial stiffness indices, including cardio-ankle vascular index or CAVI (r = 0.50), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity or cfPWV (r = 0.51), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity or baPWV (r = 0.61), arterial compliance (r = -0.42), elastic modulus (r = 0.52), arterial distensibility (r = -0.32), β-stiffness index (r = 0.19), and Young's modulus (r = 0.35) were related to mean BP (all P < 0.01). Changes in CAVI, cfPWV, baPWV, and elastic modulus were significantly associated with changes in mean BP in the pooled conditions, while changes in arterial compliance, arterial distensibility, β-stiffness index, and Young's modulus were not. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BP changes in response to various forms of pressor stimuli were associated with the corresponding changes in arterial stiffness indices and that the strengths of associations with BP varied widely depending on what arterial stiffness indices were examined. PMID:26468262

  15. Impact of blood pressure perturbations on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisok; Pearman, Miriam E; Park, Wonil; Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-12-15

    Although the associations between chronic levels of arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) have been fairly well studied, it is not clear whether and how much arterial stiffness is influenced by acute perturbations in BP. The primary aim of this study was to determine magnitudes of BP dependence of various measures of arterial stiffness during acute BP perturbation maneuvers. Fifty apparently healthy subjects, including 25 young (20-40 yr) and 25 older adults (60-80 yr), were studied. A variety of BP perturbations, including head-up tilt, head-down tilt, mental stress, isometric handgrip exercise, and cold pressor test, were used to encompass BP changes induced by physical, mental, and/or mechanical stimuli. When each index of arterial stiffness was plotted with mean BP, all arterial stiffness indices, including cardio-ankle vascular index or CAVI (r = 0.50), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity or cfPWV (r = 0.51), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity or baPWV (r = 0.61), arterial compliance (r = -0.42), elastic modulus (r = 0.52), arterial distensibility (r = -0.32), β-stiffness index (r = 0.19), and Young's modulus (r = 0.35) were related to mean BP (all P < 0.01). Changes in CAVI, cfPWV, baPWV, and elastic modulus were significantly associated with changes in mean BP in the pooled conditions, while changes in arterial compliance, arterial distensibility, β-stiffness index, and Young's modulus were not. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BP changes in response to various forms of pressor stimuli were associated with the corresponding changes in arterial stiffness indices and that the strengths of associations with BP varied widely depending on what arterial stiffness indices were examined.

  16. The pattern of parallel edge plasma flows due to pressure gradients, recycling, and resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.; Feng, Y.; Reiter, D.

    2015-07-01

    High resolution plasma transport simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code have been performed to address the parallel plasma flow structure in the boundary of a poloidal divertor configuration with non-axisymmetric perturbations at DIII-D. Simulation results show that a checkerboard pattern of flows with alternating direction is generated inside the separatrix. This pattern is aligned with the position of the main resonances (i.e., where the safety factor is equal to rational values q = m / n for a perturbation field with base mode number n): m pairs of alternating forward and backward flow channel exist for each resonance. The poloidal oscillations are aligned with the subharmonic Melnikov function, which indicates that the plasma flow is generated by parallel pressure gradients along perturbed field lines. An additional scrape-off layer-like domain is introduced by the perturbed separatrix which guides field lines from the interior to the divertor targets, resulting in an enhanced outward flow that is consistent with the experimentally observed particle pump-out effect. However, while the lobe structure of the perturbed separatrix is very well reflected in the temperature profile, the same lobes can appear to be smaller in the flow profile due to a competition between high upstream pressure and downstream particle sources driving flows in opposite directions.

  17. A theoretical model for the cross spectra between pressure and temperature downstream of a combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Krejsa, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model developed to calculate pressure-temperature cross spectra, pressure spectra, temperature spectra and pressure cross spectra in a ducted combustion system is presented. The model assumes the presence of a fluctuating-volumetric-heat-release-rate disk source and takes into account the spatial distribution of the steady-state volumetric-heat flux. Using the model, pressure, velocity, and temperature perturbation relationships can be obtained. The theoretical results show that, at a given air mass flow rate, the calculated pressure-temperature cross spectra phase angle at the combustor exit depends on the model selected for the steady-state volumetric-heat flux in the combustor. Using measurements of the phase angle, an appropriate source region model was selected. The model calculations are compared with the data. The comparison shows good agreement and indicates that with the use of this model the pressure-temperature cross spectra measurements provide useful information on the physical mechanisms active at the combustion noise source.

  18. Relationships between pressure, flow, lip motion, and upstream and downstream impedances for the trombone.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Henri; Fletcher, Neville; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2015-03-01

    This experimental study investigates ten subjects playing the trombone in the lower and mid-high range of the instrument, B♭2 to F4. Several techniques are combined to show the pressures and the impedance spectra upstream and downstream of the lips, the acoustic and total flows into the instrument, the component of the acoustic flow due to the sweeping motion of the lips, and high speed video images of the lip motion and aperture. The waveforms confirm that the inertance of the air in the channel between the lips is usually negligible. For lower notes, the flow caused by the sweeping motion of the lips contributes substantially to the total flow into the mouthpiece. The phase relations among the waveforms are qualitatively similar across the range studied, with no discontinuous behavior. The players normally played at frequencies about 1.1% above that of the impedance peak of the bore, but could play below as well as above this frequency and bend from above to below without discontinuity. The observed lip motion is consistent with two-degree-of-freedom models having varying effective lengths. These provide insight into why lips can auto-oscillate with an inertive or compliant load, or without a downstream resonator.

  19. Turbulent Pressure and Velocity Perturbations Induced by Gentle Hills Covered with Sparse and Dense Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Edward G.; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2009-11-01

    How the spatial perturbations of the first and second moments of the velocity and pressure fields differ for flow over a train of gentle hills covered by either sparse or dense vegetation is explored using large-eddy simulation (LES). Two simulations are investigated where the canopy is composed of uniformly arrayed rods each with a height that is comparable to the hill height. In the first simulation, the rod density is chosen so that much of the momentum is absorbed within the canopy volume yet the canopy is not dense enough to induce separation on the lee side of the hill. In the second simulation, the rod density is large enough to induce recirculation inside the canopy on the lee side of the hill. For this separating flow case, zones of intense shear stress originating near the canopy-atmosphere interface persist all the way up to the middle layer, ‘contaminating’ much of the middle and outer layers with shear stress gradients. The implications of these persistent shear-stress gradients on rapid distortion theory and phase relationships between higher order velocity statistics and hill-induced mean velocity perturbations (Δ u) are discussed. Within the inner layer, these intense shear zones improve predictions of the spatial perturbation by K-theory, especially for the phase relationships between the shear stress ( ∂Δ u/∂ z) and the velocity variances, where z is the height. For the upper canopy layers, wake production increases with increasing leaf area density resulting in a vertical velocity variance more in phase with Δ u than with ∂Δ u/∂ z. However, background turbulence and inactive eddies may have dampened this effect for the longitudinal velocity variance. The increase in leaf area density does not significantly affect the phase relationship between mean surface pressure and topography for the two simulations, though the LES results here confirm earlier findings that the minimum mean pressure shifts downstream from the hill crest. The

  20. Relationship between stroke volume and pulse pressure during blood volume perturbation: a mathematical analysis.

    PubMed

    Bighamian, Ramin; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Arterial pulse pressure has been widely used as surrogate of stroke volume, for example, in the guidance of fluid therapy. However, recent experimental investigations suggest that arterial pulse pressure is not linearly proportional to stroke volume. However, mechanisms underlying the relation between the two have not been clearly understood. The goal of this study was to elucidate how arterial pulse pressure and stroke volume respond to a perturbation in the left ventricular blood volume based on a systematic mathematical analysis. Both our mathematical analysis and experimental data showed that the relative change in arterial pulse pressure due to a left ventricular blood volume perturbation was consistently smaller than the corresponding relative change in stroke volume, due to the nonlinear left ventricular pressure-volume relation during diastole that reduces the sensitivity of arterial pulse pressure to perturbations in the left ventricular blood volume. Therefore, arterial pulse pressure must be used with care when used as surrogate of stroke volume in guiding fluid therapy.

  1. Plume Diagnostics of the RSRM Static Firings for the Pressure Perturbation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathias, Edward C.; Sambamurthi, Jay K.; Alvarado, Alexis

    1995-01-01

    During the STS-54 launch (RSRM-29), the right hand solid rocket motor experienced a 13.9 psi chamber pressure perturbation at 67 seconds into the motor operation. This pressure augmentation equated to a thrust change of 51 klb. Concerns were raised regarding the adverse effects of this thrust imbalance on the shuttle system and the overall thrust into the external tank structural elements. Pressure perturbations have been observed in solid rocket motors due to expulsion of igniter or insulation materials; the motor thrust during such events drop abruptly before rising. However, the RSRM motors do not exhibit such behavior during the large chamber pressure perturbation events. Several scenarios were investigated to explain these pressure perturbations in the RSRM motors based on a fault tree developed after STS-54. Of these, the expulsion of the slag accumulated in the submerged nozzle region appeared to be the most plausible scenario to explain the observations. Slag is a natural combustion product of aluminized solid rocket motors. The RSRM propellant contains 16% by weight of aluminum. Any ejection of this slag mass during nozzle vectoring or other side loads on the motor will result in the chamber pressure perturbation. Two RSRM static firings were instrumented extensively to further understand the slag expulsion phenomenon in the RSRM and the associated pressure perturbations.

  2. Second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids: Relativistic effects of pressure, multicomponent, curvature, and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2007-11-15

    We present general relativistic correction terms appearing in Newton's gravity to the second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids. In our previous work we have shown that to the second-order perturbations, the density and velocity perturbation equations of general relativistic zero-pressure, irrotational, single-component fluid in a spatially flat background coincide exactly with the ones known in Newton's theory without using the gravitational potential. We also have shown the effect of gravitational waves to the second order, and pure general relativistic correction terms appearing in the third-order perturbations. Here, we present results of second-order perturbations relaxing all the assumptions made in our previous works. We derive the general relativistic correction terms arising due to (i) pressure, (ii) multicomponent, (iii) background spatial curvature, and (iv) rotation. In the case of multicomponent zero-pressure, irrotational fluids under the flat background, we effectively do not have relativistic correction terms, thus the relativistic equations expressed in terms of density and velocity perturbations again coincide with the Newtonian ones. In the other three cases we generally have pure general relativistic correction terms. In the case of pressure, the relativistic corrections appear even in the level of background and linear perturbation equations. In the presence of background spatial curvature, or rotation, pure relativistic correction terms directly appear in the Newtonian equations of motion of density and velocity perturbations to the second order; to the linear order, without using the gravitational potential (or metric perturbations), we have relativistic/Newtonian correspondences for density and velocity perturbations of a single-component fluid including the rotation even in the presence of background spatial curvature. In the small-scale limit (far inside the horizon), to the second-order, relativistic equations of density and

  3. Coupled motion in proteins revealed by pressure perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yinan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Moorman, Veronica R.; Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Hilser, Vincent J.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The cooperative nature of protein substructure and internal motion is a critical aspect of their functional competence about which little is known experimentally. NMR relaxation is used here to monitor the effects of high-pressure on fast internal motion in the protein ubiquitin. In contrast to the main chain, the motions of the methyl-bearing side chains have a large and variable pressure dependence. Within the core, this pressure sensitivity correlates with the magnitude of motion at ambient pressure. Spatial clustering of the dynamic response to applied hydrostatic pressure is also seen indicating localized cooperativity of motion on the sub-nanosecond time scale and suggesting regions of variable compressibility. These and other features indicate that the native ensemble contains a significant fraction of members with characteristics ascribed to the recently postulated “dry molten globule.” The accompanying variable side chain conformational entropy helps complete our view of the thermodynamic architecture underlying protein stability, folding and function. PMID:22452540

  4. Instability of sonoluminescing bubbles under a nonspherical symmetrical acoustic-pressure perturbation.

    PubMed

    An, Yu; Lu, Tao; Yang, Bing

    2005-02-01

    The perturbation of nonspherical symmetrical acoustic pressure is added to the equation governing the spherical stability of sonoluminescing bubbles. The numerical calculations of the shape instability of sonoluminescing bubbles with the modified equation are conducted and the results are illustrated accordingly in the p(a) - R0 phase diagrams. The calculated results indicate that the stability region vanishes as the amplitude of the driving acoustic pressure p(a) arrives at the upper threshold ( approximately 1.6 atm) due to the perturbation of a small nonspherical symmetrical acoustic pressure (about a few Pa), which is in consistence with the experimental observations.

  5. Cross spectra between pressure and temperature in a constant-area duct downstream of a hydrogen-fueled combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Wasserbauer, C. A.; Krejsa, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    Pressure temperature cross spectra are necessary in predicting noise propagation in regions of velocity gradients downstream of combustors if the effect of convective entropy disturbances is included. Pressure temperature cross spectra and coherences were measured at spatially separated points in a combustion rig fueled with hydrogen. Temperature-temperature and pressure-pressure cross spectra and coherences between the spatially separated points as well as temperature and pressure autospectra were measured. These test results were compared with previous results obtained in the same combustion rig using Jet A fuel in order to investigate their dependence on the type of combustion process. The phase relationships are not consistent with a simple source model that assumes that pressure and temperature are in phase at a point in the combustor and at all other points downstream are related to one another by only a time delay due to convection of temperature disturbances. Thus these test results indicate that a more complex model of the source is required.

  6. Downstream pressure and elastic wall reflection of droplet flow in a T-junction microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yan; Liu, Zhaomiao; Zhao, Fuwang

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses pressure variation on a wall during the process of liquid flow and droplet formation in a T-junction microchannel. Relevant pressure in the channel, deformation of the elastic wall, and responses of the droplet generation are analyzed using a numerical method. The pressure difference between the continuous and dispersed phases can indicate the droplet-generation period. The pressure along the channel of the droplet flow is affected by the position of droplets, droplet-generation period, and droplet escape from the outlet. The varying pressures along the channel cause a nonuniform deformation of the wall when they are elastic. The deformation is a vibration and has the same period as the droplet generation arising from the process of droplet formation.

  7. Cross spectra between temperature and pressure in a constant area duct downstream of a combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Wasserbauer, C. A.; Krejsa, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring pressure temperature cross spectra and coherence and temperature-temperature cross spectra and coherence at spatially separated points along with pressure and temperature auto-spectra in a combustion rig was investigated. The measurements were made near the inlet and exit of a 6.44 m long duct attached to a J-47 combustor. The fuel used was Jet A. The cross spectra and coherence measurements show the pressure and temperature fluctuations correlate best at low frequencies. At the inlet the phenomena controlling the phase relationship between pressure and temperature could not be identified. However, at the duct exit the phase angle of the pressure is related to the phase angle of the temperature by the convected flow time delay.

  8. Cross spectra between temperature and pressure in a constant area duct downstream of a combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Wasserbauer, C. A.; Krejsa, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring pressure temperature cross spectra and coherence and temperature-temperature cross spectra and coherence at spatially separated points along with pressure and temperature auto-spectra in a combustion rig was investigated. The measurements were made near the inlet and exit of a 6.44 m long duct attached to a J-47 combustor. The fuel used was Jet A. The cross spectra and coherence measurements show the pressure and temperature fluctuations correlate best at low frequencies. At the inlet the phenomena controlling the phase relationship between pressure and temperature could not be identified. However, at the duct exit the phase angle of the pressure is related to the phase angle of the temperature by the convected flow time delay. Previously announced in STAR as N83-23116

  9. Turbulent boundary-layer wall pressure fluctuations downstream of a tandem LEBU. [Large-Eddy BreakUp devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeler, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An initial measurement of turbulent wall pressure fluctuations downstream of tandem large eddy breakup devices (LEBUs) indicates a significant reduction by comparison with the reference case of a flat plate; the average magnitude of the reduction is 12.5 percent. Peak reduction is at 7-8 kHz, and is of the order of the C(f) reduction due to the tandem LEBUs. These data indicate a secondary benefit derivable from LEBUs, in addition to their skin friction reduction effect.

  10. Fast, downstream removal of photoresist using reactive oxygen species from the effluent of an atmospheric pressure plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A.; van der Schans, M.; Xu, C.; Cooke, M.; Wagenaars, E.

    2016-04-01

    In the semiconductor industry the plasma removal of photoresist (PR) between processing steps (so-called plasma ashing) is a critical issue in enabling the creation of advanced wafer architectures associated with the next generation of devices. We investigated the feasibility of a novel atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to remove PR. Our device operates at atmospheric pressure, eliminating the need for low-pressure operation used in conventional plasma ashing. Also, our method uses the downstream effluent of the source, avoiding issues relating to ion bombardment, a known hinderance to atomic precision manufacturing. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) measurements of the system has shown that the PR removal rate is directly correlated with the atomic oxygen flux to the surface. The maximum removal rates achieved were 10 μm min-1, a factor of 100 improvement over typical low-pressure methods, while the quality of the etch, as assessed by attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, was found to be equal to low-pressure standards.

  11. Effects of the pressure perturbation field in numerical models of unidirectionally sheared thunderstorm convection - Two versus three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The physical roles of 'buoyant' and 'dynamic' pressure components, and the distinction between buoyant and hydrostatic pressure perturbations, are aspects of the pressure perturbation field in strongly sheared convective storms studied by means of two- and three-dimensional anelastic numerical modeling experiments with common environmental profiles. The pressure analysis clarifies the differences between two- and three-dimensional storms. In the main updraft, strong midlevel thermal buoyancy is partly opposed by a downward-perturbed vertical pressure gradient force. This, however, occurs to a much greater extent in two dimensions than in three, contributing to smaller net upward accelerations. While the buoyant and hydrostatic fields are intimately related to the total buoyancy distribution, the buoyant pressure perturbation is smoother and of lower amplitude than its hydrostatic counterpart. For the model experiments, this distinction is far greater in three dimensions than in two, in association with the smaller scale of the active convection in three dimensions.

  12. A preliminary theoretical study of arterial pressure perturbations under shock acceleration.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, E; Ursino, M; Iemmi, E

    1989-08-01

    The artero-venous system is often stressed by accelerative perturbation, not only during exceptional performances, but also in normal life. For example, when the body is subject to fast pressure changes, accelerative perturbations combined with a change in hydrostatic pressure could have severe effects on the circulation. In such cases a preliminary mathematical inquiry, whose results allow qualitative evaluation of the perturbation produced is useful. Pressure variations are studied in this work when the body is subjected both to rectilinear and rotational movements as well as posture change. The dominant modes of the hemodynamic oscillations are emphasized and the numerical simulation results presented. The artery model used for simulation is obviously simplified with respect to the anatomical structure of an artery. Nevertheless, behavior of the main arteries (like the common carotid and aorta) can be approximately described, choosing suitable model parameters. The frequency of blood oscillations strictly depends on the Young modulus of the arterial wall. This connection could be employed for new clinical tests on the state of the arteries.

  13. Observations of height-dependent pressure-perturbation structure of a strong mesoscale gravity wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David O'C.; Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Weng, Chi Y.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne observations using a downward-looking, dual-frequency, near-infrared, differential absorption lidar system provide the first measurements of the height-dependent pressure-perturbation field associated with a strong mesoscale gravity wave. A pressure-perturbation amplitude of 3.5 mb was measured within the lowest 1.6 km of the atmosphere over a 52-km flight line. Corresponding vertical displacements of 250-500 m were inferred from lidar-observed displacement of aerosol layers. Accounting for probable wave orientation, a horizontal wavelength of about 40 km was estimated. Satellite observations reveal wave structure of a comparable scale in concurrent cirrus cloud fields over an extended area. Smaller-scale waves were also observed. Local meteorological soundings are analyzed to confirm the existence of a suitable wave duct. Potential wave-generation mechanisms are examined and discussed. The large pressure-perturbation wave is attributed to rapid amplification or possible wave breaking of a gravity wave as it propagated offshore and interacted with a very stable marine boundary layer capped by a strong shear layer.

  14. Perturbation Method for Study of Shear Strength of Materials at Pressures up to {approx}300 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, A. I.; Aprelkov, O. N.; Arinin, V. A.; Bulannikov, A. S.; Burtsev, V. V.; Golubev, V. A.; Davydov, N. B.; Zhernokletov, M. V.; Ignatova, O. N.; Igonin, V. V.; Makarov, Yu. M.; Manachkin, S. F.; Mochalov, M. A.; Nadezhin, S. S.; Nizovtsev, P. N.; Raevsky, V. A.; Sinitsyna, S. N.; Solov'ev, V. P.; Fadeev, L. A.

    2006-07-28

    The paper presents results of studies of shear strength of copper having various grain sizes under quasi-isentropic and shock-wave loading up to pressures 40 GPa and 70 GPa. The studies were performed for copper M1; large-grain copper with grain size 100 mm; and ultradispersed copper with grain size 0.5 mm. Basing on results of the experiments, the relaxation models of shear strength were developed. The model of shear strength of large -grain copper takes account for deformation heterogeneity. The first experimental data on strength properties of copper at pressure up to 300 GPa were obtained by the perturbation method.

  15. COMSOL Modeling of Transport of Neutral Radicals to Substrate Surfaces Located Downstream from an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rokibul; Lekobou, William; Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    An Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma (APWIP) Reactor generates a significant number of charged particles and neutral radicals. In our work the carrier gas is argon and the precursor molecule is acetylene. The APWIP is generated by corona discharges associated with an array of high voltage metal needles facing a grounded metal screen. Neutral radical transport downstream from the grounded screen to the substrate via diffusion and convection will be modeled with COMSOL, a finite element software package. Substrates will include objects with various shapes and characteristic dimensions that range from nanometers to centimeters. After the model is validated against canonical problems with known solutions, thin film deposition rates will be compared with experimentally measured results. Substrate geometries will include discs, spheres, fibers and highly porous surfaces such as those found on asphalt road surfaces. A single generic neutral radical will be used to represent the entire family of neutral radicals resulting from acetylene bond scission by free electron impact.

  16. Pressure perturbations from geologic carbon sequestration: Area-of-review boundaries and borehole leakage driving forces

    SciTech Connect

    Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Bryant, S.L.; Hovorka, S.D.

    2009-07-01

    We investigate the possibility that brine could be displaced upward into potable water through wells. Because of the large volumes of CO2 to be injected, the influence of the zone of elevated pressure on potential conduits such as well boreholes could extend many kilometers from the injection site-farther than the CO2 plume itself. The traditional approach to address potential brine leakage related to fluid injection is to set an area of fixed radius around the injection well/zone and to examine wells and other potentially open pathways located in the ''Area-of-Review'' (AoR). This suggests that the AoR eeds to be defined in terms of the potential for a given pressure perturbation to drive upward fluid flow in any given system rather than on some arbitrary pressure rise. We present an analysis that focuses on the changes in density/salinity of the fluids in the potentially leaking wellbore.

  17. Oyster Creek RETRAN model benchmark to pressure and level perturbation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Alammar, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    As part of GPU Nuclear's program to establish an in-house reload capability for Oyster Creek, the RETRAN-02 MOD4 SPL Computer Code has been chosen to analyze Chapter 15 Final Safety Analysis Report transients. To qualify Oyster Creek RETRAN model, a series of startup tests has been chosen to benchmark the model. Two of those tests, involved water level and vessel pressure perturbations at 100% power. Both tests were analyzed using point kinetics and one-dimensional kinetics with no noticeable impact on level or pressure. A small impact was noticed on power but was thought to be of minor significance. This is because for such mild transients the neutron flux shape function does not change appreciably throughout the transient.

  18. Spatial distribution of the electrical potential and ion concentration in the downstream area of atmospheric pressure remote plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, M. V.; Protopopova, V. S.; Uvarov, A. A.; Alexandrov, S. E.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the results from an experimental study of the ion flux characteristics behind the remote plasma zone in a vertical tube reaction chamber for atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma was generated in pure He and gas mixtures: He-Ar, He-O2, He-TEOS. We previously used the reaction system He-TEOS for the synthesis of self-assembled structures of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. It is likely that the electrical parameters of the area, where nanoparticles have been transported from the synthesis zone to the substrate, play a significant role in the self-organization processes both in the vapor phase and on the substrate surface. The results from the spatial distribution of the electrical potential and ion concentration in the discharge downstream area measured by means of the external probe of original design and the special data processing method are demonstrated in this work. Positive and negatives ions with maximum concentrations of 106-107 cm-3 have been found at 10-80 mm distance behind the plasma zone. On the basis of the revealed distributions for different gas mixtures, the physical model of the observed phenomena is proposed. The model illustrates the capability of the virtual ion emitter formation behind the discharge gap and the presence of an extremum of the electrical potential at the distance of approximately 10-2-10-1 mm from the grounded electrode.

  19. Electric Current Filamentation at a Non-potential Magnetic Null-point Due to Pressure Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, M.; Murawski, K.

    2015-10-01

    An increase of electric current densities due to filamentation is an important process in any flare. We show that the pressure perturbation, followed by an entropy wave, triggers such a filamentation in the non-potential magnetic null-point. In the two-dimensional (2D), non-potential magnetic null-point, we generate the entropy wave by a negative or positive pressure pulse that is launched initially. Then, we study its evolution under the influence of the gravity field. We solve the full set of 2D time dependent, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically, making use of the FLASH code. The negative pulse leads to an entropy wave with a plasma density greater than in the ambient atmosphere and thus this wave falls down in the solar atmosphere, attracted by the gravity force. In the case of the positive pressure pulse, the plasma becomes evacuated and the entropy wave propagates upward. However, in both cases, owing to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, the electric current in a non-potential magnetic null-point is rapidly filamented and at some locations the electric current density is strongly enhanced in comparison to its initial value. Using numerical simulations, we find that entropy waves initiated either by positive or negative pulses result in an increase of electric current densities close to the magnetic null-point and thus the energy accumulated here can be released as nanoflares or even flares.

  20. ELECTRIC CURRENT FILAMENTATION AT A NON-POTENTIAL MAGNETIC NULL-POINT DUE TO PRESSURE PERTURBATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, M.; Murawski, K.

    2015-10-20

    An increase of electric current densities due to filamentation is an important process in any flare. We show that the pressure perturbation, followed by an entropy wave, triggers such a filamentation in the non-potential magnetic null-point. In the two-dimensional (2D), non-potential magnetic null-point, we generate the entropy wave by a negative or positive pressure pulse that is launched initially. Then, we study its evolution under the influence of the gravity field. We solve the full set of 2D time dependent, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically, making use of the FLASH code. The negative pulse leads to an entropy wave with a plasma density greater than in the ambient atmosphere and thus this wave falls down in the solar atmosphere, attracted by the gravity force. In the case of the positive pressure pulse, the plasma becomes evacuated and the entropy wave propagates upward. However, in both cases, owing to the Rayleigh–Taylor instability, the electric current in a non-potential magnetic null-point is rapidly filamented and at some locations the electric current density is strongly enhanced in comparison to its initial value. Using numerical simulations, we find that entropy waves initiated either by positive or negative pulses result in an increase of electric current densities close to the magnetic null-point and thus the energy accumulated here can be released as nanoflares or even flares.

  1. Bottom shear stress and pressure perturbations under an internal solitary wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Gustavo; Diamessis, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a mode-1 internal solitary wave (ISW) of depression propagating against an oncoming model barotropic current is examined using 2-D direct numerical simulation based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. Use of a postprocessing projection onto a modified set of divergence-free basis functions enables investigation of wave-based Reynolds numbers within the range [105 ,106 ] . At sufficiently high ISW amplitude, the BBL undergoes a global instability which produces intermittent vortex shedding from within the separation bubble in the lee of the wave. The interplay between the bottom shear stress field and pressure perturbations during vortex ejection events and the subsequent evolution of the vortices is the focus of this presentation. Implications for resuspension of bottom particulate matter are discussed in the context of specific sediment transport models. Support from the Cornell Sloan Diversity Fellowship program is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Laser velocimeter measurements of the flow downstream of the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump first-stage turbine nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, T. V.; Havskjold, G. L.; Rojas, L.

    1988-01-01

    A laser two-focus velocimeter was used in an open-loop water test facility in order to map the flowfield downstream of the SSME's high-pressure oxidizer turbopump first-stage turbine nozzle; attention was given to the effects of the upstream strut-downstream nozzle configuration on the flow at the rotor inlet, in order to estimate dynamic loads on the first-stage rotor blades. Velocity and flow angles were plotted as a function of circumferential position, and were found to clearly display the periodic behavior of the wake flow field. The influence of the upstream centerbody-supporting struts on the vane nozzle wake pattern was evident.

  3. Perturbed Newtonian description of the Lemaître model with non-negligible pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Marra, Valerio; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-03-01

    We study the validity of the Newtonian description of cosmological perturbations using the Lemaître model, an exact spherically symmetric solution of Einstein's equation. This problem has been investigated in the past for the case of a dust fluid. Here, we extend the previous analysis to the more general case of a fluid with non-negligible pressure, and, for the numerical examples, we consider the case of radiation (P=ρ/3). We find that, even when the density contrast has a nonlinear amplitude, the Newtonian description of the cosmological perturbations using the gravitational potential ψ and the curvature potential phi is valid as long as we consider sub-horizon inhomogeneities. However, the relation ψ+phi=Script O(phi2)—which holds for the case of a dust fluid—is not valid for a relativistic fluid, and an effective anisotropic stress is generated. This demonstrates the usefulness of the Lemaître model which allows us to study in an exact nonlinear fashion the onset of anisotropic stress in fluids with non-negligible pressure. We show that this happens when the characteristic scale of the inhomogeneity is smaller than the sound horizon and that the deviation is caused by the nonlinear effect of the fluid's fast motion. We also find that ψ+phi= [Script O(phi2),Script O(cs2phi δ)] for an inhomogeneity with density contrast δ whose characteristic scale is smaller than the sound horizon, unless w is close to -1, where w and cs are the equation of state parameter and the sound speed of the fluid, respectively. On the other hand, we expect ψ+phi=Script O(phi2) to hold for an inhomogeneity whose characteristic scale is larger than the sound horizon, unless the amplitude of the inhomogeneity is large and w is close to -1.

  4. Heat-transfer and pressure distributions for laminar separated flows downstream of rearward-facing steps with and without mass suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.; Jakubowski, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    Heat-transfer and pressure distributions were measured for laminar separated flows downstream of rearward-facing steps with and without mass suction. The flow conditions were such that the boundary-layer thickness was comparable to or larger than the step height. For both suction and no-suction cases, an increase in the step height resulted in a sharp decrease in the initial heat-transfer rates behind the step. Downstream, however, the heat transfer gradually recovered back to less than or near attached-flow values. Mass suction from the step base area increased the local heat-transfer rates; however, this effect was relatively weak for the laminar flows considered. Even removal of the entire approaching boundary layer raised the post-step heat-transfer rates only about 10 percent above the flatplate values. Post-step pressure distributions were found to depend on the entrainment conditions at separation. In the case of the solid-faced step, a sharp pressure drop behind the step was followed by a very short plateau and relatively fast recompression. For the slotted-step connected to a large plenum but without suction, the pressure drop at the base was much smaller and the downstream recompression more gradual than that for solid-faced step.

  5. Experimental and analytical investigation of the variation of spray characteristics along a radial distance downstream of a pressure-swirl atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, J. S.; Li, W. M.; Wang, X. F.

    1986-01-01

    The variation of spray characteristics along a radial distance downstream of a pressure-swirl atomizer was measured by laser light-scattering technology. An analytical model was developed to predict the variation of spray characteristics along the radial distance. A comparison of the predicted and experimental data showed excellent agreement. Therefore, the spray model proposed, although relatively simple, is correct and can be used, with some expansion and modification of the prepared model, to predict more complicated spray systems.

  6. Heliotropic orbits at oblate asteroids: balancing solar radiation pressure and J2 perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantukh, Demyan; Russell, Ryan P.; Broschart, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    The combined effect of significant solar radiation pressure and perturbations on spacecraft orbits is investigated using both singly and doubly-averaged disturbing potentials with the Lagrange Planetary Equations. The resulting dynamics are applied to a spacecraft around an oblate asteroid. Several Sun-frozen families of orbits are identified using the singly-averaged potential, including two new families of orbits and a previously-discovered equatorial heliotropic orbit family. Families of both stable and unstable Sun-frozen orbits are mapped and characterized in the singly-averaged case. In addition, a heliotropic constraint is implemented to locate heliotropic orbits out of the equatorial plane using a constrained, doubly-averaged potential. Dynamic bounds for these 3D heliotropic orbits are shown to have an inclination limit of approximately 46 degrees for oblate bodies, and this limit is independent of the value of and radiation parameters. The resulting heliotropic and related periodic families of orbits are good candidates to consider for low-altitude science orbits around small oblate bodies with low or near-180 degree obliquity like Bennu, the target for the OSIRIS-REx mission.

  7. Thermal expansivities of peptides, polypeptides and proteins as measured by pressure perturbation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pandharipande, Pranav P; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this work was to provide direct experimental evidence that the expansivity of peptides, polypeptides and proteins as measured by pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC), can serve as a proxy to characterize relative compactness of proteins, especially the denatured state ensemble. This is very important as currently only small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), intrinsic viscosity and, to a lesser degree, fluorescence resonance transfer (FRET) experiments are capable of reporting on the compactness of denatured state ensembles. We combined the expansivity measurements with other biophysical methods (far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and small angle X-ray scattering). Three case studies of the effects of conformational changes on the expansivity of polypeptides in solution are presented. We have shown that expansivity appears to be insensitive to the helix-coil transition, and appears to reflect the changes in hydration of the side-chains. We also observed that the expansivity is sensitive to the global conformation of the polypeptide chain and thus can be potentially used to probe hydration of different collapsed states of denatured or even intrinsically disordered proteins.

  8. Jet Perturbation by HE target

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P; Kuklo, R M

    2001-03-01

    We have previously reported the degree of attenuation and perturbation by a Cu jet passing through Comp B explosive. Similar tests have now been performed with high explosive (HE) targets having CJ pressures higher than and lower than the CJ pressure of Comp B. The explosives were LX-14 and TNT, respectively. We found that the measured exit velocity of the jet where it transitions from perturbed to solid did not vary significantly as a function of HE type for each HE thickness. The radial momentum imparted to the perturbed jet segment did vary as a function of HE type, however, and we report the radial spreading of the jet and the penetration of a downstream target as a function of HE type and thickness.

  9. The influence of a high pressure gradient on unsteady velocity perturbations in the case of a turbulent supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dussauge, J. P.; Debieve, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The amplification or reduction of unsteady velocity perturbations under the influence of strong flow acceleration or deceleration was studied. Supersonic flows with large velocity, pressure gradients, and the conditions in which the velocity fluctuations depend on the action of the average gradients of pressure and velocity rather than turbulence, are described. Results are analyzed statistically and interpreted as a return to laminar process. It is shown that this return to laminar implies negative values in the turbulence production terms for kinetic energy. A simple geometrical representation of the Reynolds stress production is given.

  10. Downstream Hepatic Arterial Blood Pressure Changes Caused by Deployment of the Surefire AntiReflux Expandable Tip

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Steven C. Kikolski, Steven G.; Chomas, James E.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate blood pressure changes caused by deployment of the Surefire antireflux expandable tip. The pressure measurements are relevant because they imply changes in hepatoenteric arterial blood flow within this liver compartment during hepatic artery delivery of cytotoxic agents. Methods: After positioning the Surefire antireflux system in the targeted hepatic artery, blood pressure was obtained initially with the tip collapsed (or through a femoral artery sheath), then again after the tip was expanded before chemoembolization or yttrium 90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization. Results: Eighteen patients with liver malignancy underwent 29 procedures in 29 hepatic arteries (3 common hepatic, 22 lobar, 4 segmental). Systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure were all decreased by a mean of 29 mm Hg (p = 0.000004), 14 mm Hg (p = 0.0000004), and 22 mm Hg (p = 0.00000001), respectively. Conclusion: When the Surefire expandable tip is deployed to prevent retrograde reflux of agents, it also results in a significant decrease in blood pressure in the antegrade distribution, potentially resulting in hepatopedal blood flow in vessels that are difficult to embolize, such as the supraduodenal arteries.

  11. Station coordinates in the standard earth 3 system and radiation-pressure perturbations from ISAGEX camera data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.; Latimer, J.; Mendes, G.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous and individual camera observations of GEOS 1, GEOS 2, Pageos, and Midas 4 obtained during the International Satellite Geodesy Experiment are utilized to determine station coordinates. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Standard Earth III system of coordinates is used to tie the geometrical network to a geocentric system and as a reference for calculating satellite orbits. A solution for coordinates combining geometrical and dynamical methods is obtained, and a comparison between the solutions and terrestrial data is made. The radiation-pressure and earth-albedo perturbations for Pageos are very large, and Pageos' orbits are used to evaluate the analytical treatment of these perturbations. Residual effects, which are probably of interest to aeronomists, remain in the Pageos orbits.

  12. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

  13. Statistical mechanics of light elements at high pressure. VII - A perturbative free energy for arbitrary mixtures of H and He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Dewitt, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    A model free energy is presented which accurately represents results from 45 high-precision Monte Carlo calculations of the thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at pressures of astrophysical and planetophysical interest. The free energy is calculated using free-electron perturbation theory (dielectric function theory), and is an extension of the expression given in an earlier paper in this series. However, it fits the Monte Carlo results more accurately, and is valid for the full range of compositions from pure hydrogen to pure helium. Using the new free energy, the phase diagram of mixtures of liquid metallic hydrogen and helium is calculated and compared with earlier results. Sample results for mixing volumes are also presented, and the new free energy expression is used to compute a theoretical Jovian adiabat and compare the adiabat with results from three-dimensional Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory. The present theory gives slightly higher densities at pressures of about 10 megabars.

  14. Probing volumetric properties of biomolecular systems by pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC)--the effects of hydration, cosolvents and crowding.

    PubMed

    Suladze, Saba; Kahse, Marie; Erwin, Nelli; Tomazic, Daniel; Winter, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) is an efficient technique to study the volumetric properties of biomolecules in solution. In PPC, the coefficient of thermal expansion of the partial volume of the biomolecule is deduced from the heat consumed or produced after small isothermal pressure-jumps. The expansion coefficient strongly depends on the interaction of the biomolecule with the solvent or cosolvent as well as on its packing and internal dynamic properties. This technique, complemented with molecular acoustics and densimetry, provides valuable insights into the basic thermodynamic properties of solvation and volume effects accompanying interactions, reactions and phase transitions of biomolecular systems. After outlining the principles of the technique, we present representative examples on protein folding, including effects of cosolvents and crowding, together with a discussion of the interpretation, and further applications.

  15. RELAP5-3D Analysis of Pressure Perturbation at the Peach Bottom BWR During Low-Flow Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi Costa, Antonella; Petruzzi, Alessandro; D'Auria, Francesco

    2006-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies about the BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) stability have been performed to design a stable core configuration. BWR instabilities can be caused by inter-dependencies between thermal-hydraulic and reactivity feedback parameters such as the void-coefficient, for example, during a pressure perturbation event. In the present work, the pressure perturbation is considered in order to study in detail this type of transient. To simulate this event, including the strong feedback effects between core neutronic and reactor thermal-hydraulics, and to verify core behavior and evaluate parameters related to safety, RELAP5-3D code has been used in the analyses. The simulation was performed making use of Peach Bottom-2 BWR data to predict the dynamics of a real reactor during this type of event. Stability tests were conducted in the Peach Bottom 2 BWR, in 1977, and were done along the low-flow end of the rated power-flow line, and along the power-flow line corresponding to minimum recirculation pump speed. The calculated results are herein compared against the available experimental data. (authors)

  16. Functionalized single wall carbon nanotube sensor in a perturbed microwave resonant cavity based toxin/pollutant gas pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooski, S. B.

    2010-02-01

    The Vlasov and Maxwell's equations are established and solved numerically to describe the effects of toxin/pollutant gas pressure and functionalized single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sensor in a perturbed microwave resonant cavity. The dependence of the absorption coefficient on incident frequency, toxin/pollutant gas pressure, electron density, and collision frequency is presented. The numerical results illustrate that the resonant frequency shifts by a suitable amount for modest changes in toxin/pollutant gas pressure. It is also illustrated that high density and low collision of the blend of toxin/pollutant gas and SWCNT sensor in a microwave resonant cavity can be employed as broadband absorption of microwave and the detection of toxin/pollutant gas characteristics through adjustments of the amount of toxin/pollutant gas pressure and functionalized SCWNT sensor. The numerical results additionally illustrate that the microwave absorption spectra of the blend of toxin/pollutant gas and SWCNT sensor in a microwave resonant cavity are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The present method is, in principle, applicable to any kind of a single nanofiber, nanowire, silica gel, cotton fiber, and even various types of nanotubes.

  17. Cosmological perturbations in warm-tachyon inflationary universe model with viscous pressure on the brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Kamali, V.

    2013-03-01

    We study warm-viscous inflationary universe model on the brane, in a tachyon field theory. We obtain the general conditions which are required for this model to be realizable. In longitudinal gauge, the primoradial perturbation parameters are found in great details, using slow-roll and quasi-stable approximations. The general expressions of the tensor-to-scalar ratio, scalar spectral index and its running are found. We derive the characteristics of the inflationary universe model by using an effective exponential potential in two cases: 1 — dissipative parameter Γ and bulk viscous parameter ζ are constant parameters. 2 — dissipative parameter as a function of tachyon field ϕ and bulk viscous parameter as a function of radiation-matter mixture energy density ρ. The parameters of the model are restricted by recent observational data from the seven-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP7).

  18. A coupled cluster and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory study of the pressure induced phase transition in the LiH crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Grüneis, Andreas

    2015-09-14

    We employ Hartree–Fock, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation, coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) as well as CCSD plus perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) theory to study the pressure induced transition from the rocksalt to the cesium chloride crystal structure in LiH. We show that the calculated transition pressure converges rapidly in this series of increasingly accurate many-electron wave function based theories. Using CCSD(T) theory, we predict a transition pressure for the structural phase transition in the LiH crystal of 340 GPa. Furthermore, we investigate the potential energy surface for this transition in the parameter space of the Buerger path.

  19. Exospheric perturbations by radiation pressure. 2: Solution for orbits in the ecliptic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    The instantaneous rates of change for the orbital elements eccentricity, longitude of perigee from the Sun, and longitude from the Sun of the ascending node are integrated simultaneously for the case of the inclination i = 0. The results confirm the validity of using mean rates when the orbits are tightly bound to the planet and serve as examples to be reproduced by the complicated numerical solutions required for arbitrary inclination. Strongly bound hydrogen atoms escaping from Earth due to radiation pressure do not seem a likely cause of the geotail extending in the anti-sun direction. Instead, radiation pressure will cause those particles' orbits to deteriorate into the Earth's atmosphere.

  20. An unsteady microfluidic T-form mixer perturbed by hydrodynamic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanbao; Sun, Chien-Pin; Fields, Michael; Li, Yang; Haake, David A; Churchill, Bernard M; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2009-01-01

    An unsteady microfluidic T-form mixer driven by pressure disturbances was designed and investigated. The performance of the mixer was examined both through numerical simulation and experimentation. Linear Stokes equations were used for these low Reynolds number flows. Unsteady mixing in a micro-channel of two aqueous solutions differing in concentrations of chemical species was described using a convection-dominated diffusion equation. The task was greatly simplified by employing linear superimposition of a velocity field for solving a scalar species concentration equation. Low-order-based numerical codes were found not to be suitable for simulation of a convection-dominated mixing process due to erroneous computational dissipation. The convection-dominated diffusion problem was addressed by designing a numerical algorithm with high numerical accuracy and computational-cost effectiveness. This numerical scheme was validated by examining a test case prior to being applied to the mixing simulation. Parametric analysis was performed using this newly developed numerical algorithm to determine the best mixing conditions. Numerical simulation identified the best mixing condition to have a Strouhal number (St)of 0.42. For a T-junction mixer (with channel width = 196 μm), about 75% mixing can be finished within a mixing distance of less than 3 mm (i.e. 15 channel width) at St = 0.42 for flow with a Reynolds number less than 0.24. Numerical results were validated experimentally by mixing two aqueous solutions containing yellow and blue dyes. Visualization of the flow field under the microscope revealed a high level of agreement between numerical simulation and experimental results. PMID:19177174

  1. Boundary Layer Instabilities Generated by Freestream Laser Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    A controlled, laser-generated, freestream perturbation was created in the freestream of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT). The freestream perturbation convected downstream in the Mach-6 wind tunnel to interact with a flared cone model. The geometry of the flared cone is a body of revolution bounded by a circular arc with a 3-meter radius. Fourteen PCB 132A31 pressure transducers were used to measure a wave packet generated in the cone boundary layer by the freestream perturbation. This wave packet grew large and became nonlinear before experiencing natural transition in quiet flow. Breakdown of this wave packet occurred when the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations was approximately 10% of the surface pressure for a nominally sharp nosetip. The initial amplitude of the second mode instability on the blunt flared cone is estimated to be on the order of 10 -6 times the freestream static pressure. The freestream laser-generated perturbation was positioned upstream of the model in three different configurations: on the centerline, offset from the centerline by 1.5 mm, and offset from the centerline by 3.0 mm. When the perturbation was offset from the centerline of a blunt flared cone, a larger wave packet was generated on the side toward which the perturbation was offset. The offset perturbation did not show as much of an effect on the wave packet on a sharp flared cone as it did on a blunt flared cone.

  2. A study of the relationship between water and anions of the Hofmeister series using pressure perturbation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Bye, Jordan W; Falconer, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) was used to study the relationship between water and sodium salts with a range of different anions. At temperatures around 25 °C the heat on pressurisation (ΔQ) from 1 to 5 bar was negative for all solutions relative to pure water. The raw data showed that as the temperature rose, the gradient was positive relative to pure water and the transition temperature where ΔQ was zero was related to anion surface charge density and was more pronounced for the low-charge density anions. A three component model was developed comprising bulk water, the hydration layer and the solute to calculate the molar expansivity of the hydration layer around the ions in solution. The calculated molar expansivities of water in the hydration layer around the ions were consistently less than pure water. ΔQ at different disodium hydrogen phosphate concentrations showed that the change in molar enthalpy relative to pure water was not linear even as it approached infinite dilution suggesting that while hydration layers can be allocated to the water around ions this does not rule out interactions between water and ions extending beyond the immediate hydration layer. PMID:25959090

  3. A study of the relationship between water and anions of the Hofmeister series using pressure perturbation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Bye, Jordan W; Falconer, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) was used to study the relationship between water and sodium salts with a range of different anions. At temperatures around 25 °C the heat on pressurisation (ΔQ) from 1 to 5 bar was negative for all solutions relative to pure water. The raw data showed that as the temperature rose, the gradient was positive relative to pure water and the transition temperature where ΔQ was zero was related to anion surface charge density and was more pronounced for the low-charge density anions. A three component model was developed comprising bulk water, the hydration layer and the solute to calculate the molar expansivity of the hydration layer around the ions in solution. The calculated molar expansivities of water in the hydration layer around the ions were consistently less than pure water. ΔQ at different disodium hydrogen phosphate concentrations showed that the change in molar enthalpy relative to pure water was not linear even as it approached infinite dilution suggesting that while hydration layers can be allocated to the water around ions this does not rule out interactions between water and ions extending beyond the immediate hydration layer.

  4. Local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method in the Lennard-Jones system.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K; Shibahara, M

    2014-07-21

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a system composed of fluid molecules between two planar solid surfaces, and whose interactions are described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones form. This paper presents a general description of the pressure components and interfacial tension at a fluid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics, proposes a method to consider the pressure components tangential to an interface which are affected by interactions with solid atoms, and applies this method to the calculation system. The description of the perturbative method is extended to subsystems, and the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface are obtained and examined in one- and two-dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained by two alternative methods: (a) an evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane, and (b) the conventional method based on the virial expression. The accuracy of the numerical results is examined through the comparison of the results obtained by each method. The calculated local pressure components and interfacial tension of the fluid at a liquid-solid interface agreed well with the results of the two alternative methods at each local position in one dimension. In two dimensions, the results showed a characteristic profile of the tangential pressure component which depended on the direction tangential to the liquid-solid interface, which agreed with that obtained by the evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane in the present study. Such good agreement suggests that the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics used in this study is valid to obtain the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface.

  5. Local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method in the Lennard-Jones system

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2014-07-21

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a system composed of fluid molecules between two planar solid surfaces, and whose interactions are described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones form. This paper presents a general description of the pressure components and interfacial tension at a fluid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics, proposes a method to consider the pressure components tangential to an interface which are affected by interactions with solid atoms, and applies this method to the calculation system. The description of the perturbative method is extended to subsystems, and the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface are obtained and examined in one- and two-dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained by two alternative methods: (a) an evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane, and (b) the conventional method based on the virial expression. The accuracy of the numerical results is examined through the comparison of the results obtained by each method. The calculated local pressure components and interfacial tension of the fluid at a liquid-solid interface agreed well with the results of the two alternative methods at each local position in one dimension. In two dimensions, the results showed a characteristic profile of the tangential pressure component which depended on the direction tangential to the liquid-solid interface, which agreed with that obtained by the evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane in the present study. Such good agreement suggests that the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics used in this study is valid to obtain the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface.

  6. Continuous downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Jungbauer, Alois

    2013-08-01

    Continuous manufacturing has been applied in many different industries but has been pursued reluctantly in biotechnology where the batchwise process is still the standard. A shift to continuous operation can improve productivity of a process and substantially reduce the footprint. Continuous operation also allows robust purification of labile biomolecules. A full set of unit operations is available to design continuous downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals. Chromatography, the central unit operation, is most advanced in respect to continuous operation. Here, the problem of 'batch' definition has been solved. This has also paved the way for implementation of continuous downstream processing from a regulatory viewpoint. Economic pressure, flexibility, and parametric release considerations will be the driving force to implement continuous manufacturing strategies in future.

  7. Continuous downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Jungbauer, Alois

    2013-08-01

    Continuous manufacturing has been applied in many different industries but has been pursued reluctantly in biotechnology where the batchwise process is still the standard. A shift to continuous operation can improve productivity of a process and substantially reduce the footprint. Continuous operation also allows robust purification of labile biomolecules. A full set of unit operations is available to design continuous downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals. Chromatography, the central unit operation, is most advanced in respect to continuous operation. Here, the problem of 'batch' definition has been solved. This has also paved the way for implementation of continuous downstream processing from a regulatory viewpoint. Economic pressure, flexibility, and parametric release considerations will be the driving force to implement continuous manufacturing strategies in future. PMID:23849674

  8. High hydrostatic pressure perturbs the interactions between CF(0)F(1) subunits and induces a dual effect on activity.

    PubMed

    Souza, Manuela O; Creczynski-Pasa, Tânia B; Scofano, Helena M; Gräber, Peter; Mignaco, Julio A

    2004-05-01

    Chloroplast ATP-synthase is an H(+)/ATP-driven rotary motor in which a hydrophobic multi-subunit assemblage rotates within a hydrophilic stator, and subunit interactions dictate alternate-site catalysis. To explore the relevance of these interactions for catalysis we use hydrostatic pressure to induce conformational changes and/or subunit dissociation, and the resulting changes in the ATPase activity and oligomer structure are evaluated. Under moderate hydrostatic pressure (up to 60-80 MPa), ATPase activity is increased by 1.5-fold. This is not related to an increase in the affinity for ATP, but seems to correlate with an enhanced turnover induced by pressure, and an activation volume for the ATPase reaction of -23.7 ml/mol. Higher pressure (up to 200 MPa) leads to dissociation of the enzyme, as shown by enzyme inactivation, increased binding of 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (ANS) to hydrophobic regions, and labeling of specific Cys residues on the beta and alpha subunits by N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylene-4-diamine (IAEDANS). Compression-decompression cycles (between 0.1 and 200 MPa) inactivate CF(0)F(1) in a concentration-dependent manner, although after decompression no enzyme subunit is retained on a Sephadex-G-50 centrifuge column or is further labeled by IAEDANS. It is proposed that moderate hydrostatic pressures induce elastic compression of CF(0)F(1), leading to enhanced turnover. High pressure dissociation impairs the contacts needed for rotational catalysis.

  9. Ultra-sensitive pressure dependence of bandgap of rutile-GeO{sub 2} revealed by many body perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Atanu; Singh, Abhishek K.; Jain, Manish

    2015-08-14

    The reported values of bandgap of rutile GeO{sub 2} calculated by the standard density functional theory within local-density approximation (LDA)/generalized gradient approximation (GGA) show a wide variation (∼2 eV), whose origin remains unresolved. Here, we investigate the reasons for this variation by studying the electronic structure of rutile-GeO{sub 2} using many-body perturbation theory within the GW framework. The bandgap as well as valence bandwidth at Γ-point of rutile phase shows a strong dependence on volume change, which is independent of bandgap underestimation problem of LDA/GGA. This strong dependence originates from a change in hybridization among O-p and Ge-(s and p) orbitals. Furthermore, the parabolic nature of first conduction band along X-Γ-M direction changes towards a linear dispersion with volume expansion.

  10. Brine Flow Up a Borehole Caused by Pressure Perturbation From CO2 Storage: Static and Dynamic Evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial-scale storage of CO2 in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO2 plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards al...

  11. Thermoelastic analysis of non-uniform pressurized functionally graded cylinder with variable thickness using first order shear deformation theory(FSDT) and perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshgoftar, M. J.; Mirzaali, M. J.; Rahimi, G. H.

    2015-11-01

    Recently application of functionally graded materials(FGMs) have attracted a great deal of interest. These materials are composed of various materials with different micro-structures which can vary spatially in FGMs. Such composites with varying thickness and non-uniform pressure can be used in the aerospace engineering. Therefore, analysis of such composite is of high importance in engineering problems. Thermoelastic analysis of functionally graded cylinder with variable thickness under non-uniform pressure is considered. First order shear deformation theory and total potential energy approach is applied to obtain the governing equations of non-homogeneous cylinder. Considering the inner and outer solutions, perturbation series are applied to solve the governing equations. Outer solution for out of boundaries and more sensitive variable in inner solution at the boundaries are considered. Combining of inner and outer solution for near and far points from boundaries leads to high accurate displacement field distribution. The main aim of this paper is to show the capability of matched asymptotic solution for different non-homogeneous cylinders with different shapes and different non-uniform pressures. The results can be used to design the optimum thickness of the cylinder and also some properties such as high temperature residence by applying non-homogeneous material.

  12. Calculation of unsteady fan rotor response caused by downstream flow distortions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, W. F.; Richardson, S. M.; Ng, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    The present model for fan rotor/support strut airfoil interaction uses a time-marching code for the rotor flow, coupled with a potential flow model for the stator-strut region. Study of the effect of strut design variables indicates that rotor flow disturbance is increased by the primary variables of larger strut thickness and circumferential spacing, while decreasing exponentially with increased rotor-strut separation. The time-marching code predicts local rotor pressure and flow perturbations in response to an unsteady downstream boundary condition.

  13. A Semi-Analytical Solution for Large-Scale Injection-Induced PressurePerturbation and Leakage in a Laterally Bounded Aquifer-AquitardSystem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-07-15

    A number of (semi-)analytical solutions are available to drawdown analysis and leakage estimation of shallow aquifer-aquitard systems. These solutions assume that the systems are laterally infinite. When a large-scale pumping from (or injection into) an aquifer-aquitard system of lower specific storativity occurs, induced pressure perturbation (or hydraulic head drawdown/rise) may reach the lateral boundary of the aquifer. We developed semi-analytical solutions to address the induced pressure perturbation and vertical leakage in a 'laterally bounded' system consisting of an aquifer and an overlying/underlying aquitard. A one-dimensional radial flow equation for the aquifer was coupled with a one-dimensional vertical flow equation for the aquitard, with a no-flow condition imposed on the outer radial boundary. Analytical solutions were obtained for (1) the Laplace-transform hydraulic head drawdown/rise in the aquifer and in the aquitard, (2) the Laplace-transform rate and volume of leakage through the aquifer-aquitard interface integrated up to an arbitrary radial distance, (3) the transformed total leakage rate and volume for the entire interface, and (4) the transformed horizontal flux at any radius. The total leakage rate and volume depend only on the hydrogeologic properties and thicknesses of the aquifer and aquitard, as well as the duration of pumping or injection. It was proven that the total leakage rate and volume are independent of the aquifer's radial extent and wellbore radius. The derived analytical solutions for bounded systems are the generalized solutions of infinite systems. Laplace-transform solutions were numerically inverted to obtain the hydraulic head drawdown/rise, leakage rate, leakage volume, and horizontal flux for given hydrogeologic and geometric conditions of the aquifer-aquitard system, as well as injection/pumping scenarios. Application to a large-scale injection-and-storage problem in a bounded system was demonstrated.

  14. Physical Properties of Ni2GeO4 Spinel Perturbed by Magnetic Dilution and Applied Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobanik, Jory; Razavi, Fereidoon

    2014-03-01

    Geometrically frustrated magnetic systems have yielded an interesting and rich playground for physicists. Recently, a new disordered low temperature state was discovered in the frustrated pyrochlore type Ho2Ti2O7 which is termed spin ice. This phase is the magnetic analog to water ice with local spin disorder replacing proton disorder. Geometric frustration arises when nearest neighbor exchange interactions cannot be simultaneously satisfied resulting in large macroscopic degeneracy. This has the effect of suppressing Neel ordering temperature. This work seeks to understand the effects of applied pressure and magnetic dilution to the frustrated spinel Ni2GeO4. The parent material undergoes two closely spaced ordering events at T1 = 12.1K and T2 = 11.4K. Upon dilution a downward shift in the ordering temperatures is observed with a destruction of the lower T2 transition. Heat capacity, AC and DC magnetometry are used to probe the changes in physical properties.

  15. Analysis of pressure perturbation sources on a generic space launcher after-body in supersonic flow using zonal turbulence modeling and dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, Vladimir; Sayadi, Taraneh; Meinke, Matthias; Schmid, Peter; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    A sparsity promoting dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) combined with a classical data-based statistical analysis is applied to the turbulent wake of a generic axisymmetric configuration of an Ariane 5-like launcher at Ma∞ = 6.0 computed via a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large-eddy simulation (RANS/LES) method. The objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the wake flow dynamics of the generic launcher by clarification and visualization of initially unknown pressure perturbation sources on its after-body in coherent flow patterns. The investigated wake topology is characterized by a subsonic cavity region around the cylindrical nozzle extension which is formed due to the displacement effect of the afterexpanding jet plume emanating from the rocket nozzle (Mae = 2.52, pe/p∞ = 100) and the shear layer shedding from the main body. The cavity region contains two toroidal counter-rotating large-scale vortices which extensively interact with the turbulent shear layer, jet plume, and rocket walls, leading to the shear layer instability process to be amplified. The induced velocity fluctuations in the wake and the ultimately resulting pressure perturbations on the after-body feature three global characteristic frequency ranges, depending on the streamwise position inside the cavity. The most dominant peaks are detected at SrD r3 = 0.85 ± 0.075 near the nozzle exit, while the lower frequency peaks, in the range of SrD r2 = 0.55 ± 0.05 and SrD r1 = 0.25 ± 0.05, are found to be dominant closer to the rocket's base. A sparse promoting DMD algorithm is applied to the time-resolved velocity field to clarify the origin of the detected peaks. This analysis extracts three low-frequency spatial modes at SrD = 0.27, 0.56, and 0.85. From the three-dimensional shape of the DMD modes and the reconstructed modulation of the mean flow in time, it is deduced that the detected most dominant peaks of SrD r3 ≈ 0.85 are caused by the radial flapping motion of

  16. Thailand's downstream projects proliferate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-03

    Thailand continues to press expansion and modernization of its downstream sector. Among recent developments: Construction of an olefins unit at Thailand's second major petrochemical complex and a worldscale aromatics unit in Thailand is threatened by rising costs. Thailand's National Petrochemical Corp (NPC) let a 9 billion yen contract to Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co. and C. Itoh and Co. for a dual fuel cogeneration power plant at its Mab Ta Phud, Rayong province, petrochemical complex. Financing is in place to flash a green light for a $530 million Belgian-Thai joint venture sponsoring a worldscale polyvinyl chloride/vinyl chloride monomer plant in Thailand. Work is more than 50% complete on the $345 million second phase expansion of Thai Oil's Sri Racha refinery in Chon Buri province. Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT) endorsed a plan to install two more natural gas processing plants in Thailand to meet rapidly growing domestic demand for petroleum gas.

  17. Downstream influence scaling of turbulent flow past expansion corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Frank K.; Chung, Kung-Ming

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies of the high-speed viscous inviscid interaction between a turbulent boundary layer and an expansion at a convex corner have noted that surface pressure decreases toward the downstream inviscid value yielded by a Prandtl-Meyer expansion. A downstream influence on the corner is presently identified which is based on the mean surface pressure distribution; a scaling law is proposed for this distance.

  18. Experimental investigation of unsteady fan flow interaction with downstream struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, W. F.; Obrien, W. F.; Olsen, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the present study of the unsteady pressure field produced on fan rotor blades by interaction with downstream struts, a single stage, low speed axial-flow fan was instrumented with blade-mounted high frequency pressure transducers. In addition, stationary pressure problems were used to map out the flowfield. Fluctuating pressure measurements are presented for blade midspan and 85-percent span on both the suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor blades at several positions of the downstream struts, and for two different flow coefficients. The strut is found to produce an effect on the unsteady pressure field on the rotor blades; this effect exceeds that due to the stator at design rotor-stator-strut spacing, but it rapidly declines as the struts are moved downstream.

  19. Downstream in Mawrth Valles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image is from further downstream in Mawrth Valles than yesterday's image. The channel here is at the end of the vallis. This image was collected during the Northern Spring season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 26.7, Longitude 340.2 East (19.8 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages

  20. Disformal transformation of cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamitsuji, Masato

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the gauge-invariant cosmological perturbations in the gravity and matter frames in the general scalar-tensor theory where two frames are related by the disformal transformation. The gravity and matter frames are the extensions of the Einstein and Jordan frames in the scalar-tensor theory where two frames are related by the conformal transformation, respectively. First, it is shown that the curvature perturbation in the comoving gauge to the scalar field is disformally invariant as well as conformally invariant, which gives the predictions from the cosmological model where the scalar field is responsible both for inflation and cosmological perturbations. Second, in case that the disformally coupled matter sector also contributes to curvature perturbations, we derive the evolution equations of the curvature perturbation in the uniform matter energy density gauge from the energy (non)conservation in the matter sector, which are independent of the choice of the gravity sector. While in the matter frame the curvature perturbation in the uniform matter energy density gauge is conserved on superhorizon scales for the vanishing nonadiabatic pressure, in the gravity frame it is not conserved even if the nonadiabatic pressure vanishes. The formula relating two frames gives the amplitude of the curvature perturbation in the matter frame, once it is evaluated in the gravity frame.

  1. Interaction of fan rotor flow with downstream struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, W. F., Jr.; Reimers, S. L.; Richardson, S. W.

    1983-01-01

    The detailed unsteady pressure field produced on the rotor blades of an axial-flow fan by interaction with downstream struts was investigated. The experimental arrangement was similar to that found in the fan casings of turbofan aircraft engines. Acoustically significant pressure fluctuations were measured on both thy suction and pressure sides of the rotor blades for several positions of the downstream struts. The level of the observed interaction decreased with increased spacing of the struts behind the rotor. An inviscid flow analysis for the disturbance level is compared with trends of the measured results.

  2. Cosmological perturbations: Vorticity, isocurvature and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, I review some recent, interlinked, work undertaken using cosmological perturbation theory — a powerful technique for modeling inhomogeneities in the universe. The common theme which underpins these pieces of work is the presence of nonadiabatic pressure, or entropy, perturbations. After a brief introduction covering the standard techniques of describing inhomogeneities in both Newtonian and relativistic cosmology, I discuss the generation of vorticity. As in classical fluid mechanics, vorticity is not present in linearized perturbation theory (unless included as an initial condition). Allowing for entropy perturbations, and working to second order in perturbation theory, I show that vorticity is generated, even in the absence of vector perturbations, by purely scalar perturbations, the source term being quadratic in the gradients of first order energy density and isocurvature, or nonadiabatic pressure perturbations. This generalizes Crocco's theorem to a cosmological setting. I then introduce isocurvature perturbations in different models, focusing on the entropy perturbation in standard, concordance cosmology, and in inflationary models involving two scalar fields. As the final topic, I investigate magnetic fields, which are a potential observational consequence of vorticity in the early universe. I briefly review some recent work on including magnetic fields in perturbation theory in a consistent way. I show, using solely analytical techniques, that magnetic fields can be generated by higher order perturbations, albeit too small to provide the entire primordial seed field, in agreement with some numerical studies. I close this paper with a summary and some potential extensions of this work.

  3. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, N.A.

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  4. Local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of a solid surface with a nanometer-scale slit pore obtained by the perturbative method

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2015-03-07

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a liquid-solid interfacial system with a nanometer-scale slit pore in order to reveal local thermodynamic states: local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of the slit. The simulation also examined the transition mechanism between the two states of the liquid film: (a) liquid film on the slit and (b) liquid film in the slit, based on the local thermodynamic quantities from a molecular point of view. An instantaneous expression of the local pressure components and interfacial tensions, which is based on a volume perturbation, was presented to investigate time-dependent phenomena in molecular dynamics simulations. The interactions between the particles were described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential, and effects of the fluid-solid interaction intensity on the local pressure components and interfacial tensions of the fluid in the vicinity of the slit were examined in detail by the presented perturbative method. The results revealed that the local pressure components tangential to the solid surface in the vicinity of the 1st fluid layer from the solid surface are different in a two dimensional plane, and the difference became pronounced in the vicinity of the corner of the slit, for cases where the fluid-solid interaction intensities are relatively strong. The results for the local interfacial tensions of the fluid inside the slit suggested that the local interfacial tensions in the vicinity of the 2nd and 3rd layers of the solid atoms from the entrance of the slit act as a trigger for the transition between the two states under the influence of a varying fluid-solid interaction.

  5. Perturbative QUANTUM GRAVITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2003-12-01

    A good understanding of Perturbative Quantum Gravity is essential for anyone who wishes to proceed towards any kind of non-perturbative approach. This lecture is a brief resumé of the main features of the perturbative regime.

  6. Chemical downstream etching of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Simonson, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The downstream etching of tungsten and tungsten oxide has been investigated. Etching of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and e-beam deposited tungsten oxide samples was performed using atomic fluorine generated by a microwave discharge of argon and NF{sub 3}. Etching was found to be highly activated with activation energies approximated to be 6.0{plus_minus}0.5thinspkcal/mol and 5.4{plus_minus}0.4thinspkcal/mol for W and WO{sub 3}, respectively. In the case of F etching of tungsten, the addition of undischarged nitric oxide (NO) directly into the reaction chamber results in the competing effects of catalytic etch rate enhancement and the formation of a nearly stoichiometric WO{sub 3} passivating tungsten oxide film, which ultimately stops the etching process. For F etching of tungsten oxide, the introduction of downstream NO reduces the etch rate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  7. Perturbation theory in thermosphere dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Volland, H.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that density and pressure throughout the thermosphere can be adequately described in a logarithmic expansion that provides a sound basis for the application of perturbation theory. This expansion eliminates most of the important nonlinearities associated with density variations. On the basis of this expansion, the validity of perturbation theory can be extended to cover a large variety of atmospheric conditions in which the relative temperature amplitude is less than 0.5 and wind velocities are significantly less than the speed of sound.

  8. Modeling Neutral Densities Downstream of a Gridded Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    The details of a model for determining the neutral density downstream of a gridded ion thruster are presented. An investigation of the possible sources of neutrals emanating from and surrounding a NEXT ion thruster determined that the most significant contributors to the downstream neutral density include discharge chamber neutrals escaping through the perforated grids, neutrals escaping from the neutralizer, and vacuum facility background neutrals. For the neutral flux through the grids, near- and far-field equations are presented for rigorously determining the neutral density downstream of a cylindrical aperture. These equations are integrated into a spherically-domed convex grid geometry with a hexagonal array of apertures for determining neutral densities downstream of the ion thruster grids. The neutrals escaping from an off-center neutralizer are also modeled assuming diffuse neutral emission from the neutralizer keeper orifice. Finally, the effect of the surrounding vacuum facility neutrals is included and assumed to be constant. The model is used to predict the neutral density downstream of a NEXT ion thruster with and without neutralizer flow and a vacuum facility background pressure. The impacts of past simplifying assumptions for predicting downstream neutral densities are also examined for a NEXT ion thruster.

  9. Using chromatography in downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Becker, C

    1989-01-01

    This article concludes the series on the use of chromatography for downstream processing. Although it has only scratched the surface when considering the number of parameters involved in process chromatography, it does give a broad overview including the choice of components through process standards. Pharmacia LKB Biotechnology has had more than 15 years experience in the design development and running of large scale chromatographic processes. During this time the company has gathered a vast amount of experience and information on the key points to successful product purification. Pharmacia LKB can advise on the choice of techniques and the development of a separation process up to full production scale.

  10. Experimental and analytical investigation of fan flow interaction with downstream struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, T. L.; Ng, W. F.; Obrien, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation which was designed to provide insight into the fundamental aspects of fan rotor-downstream strut interaction was undertaken. High response, miniature pressure transducers were embedded in the rotor blades of an experimental fan rig. Five downstream struts were placed at several downstream locations in the discharge flow annulus of the single-stage machine. Significant interaction of the rotor blade surface pressures with the flow disturbance produced by the downstream struts was measured. Several numerical procedures for calculating the quasi-steady rotor response due to downstream flow obstructions were developed. A preliminary comparison of experimental and calculated fluctuating blade pressures on the rotor blades shows general agreement between the experimental and calculated values.

  11. Perturbed and spontaneous regional cerebral blood flow responses to changes in blood pressure after high-level spinal cord injury: the effect of midodrine.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron A; Krassioukov, Andrei V; Ainslie, Philip N; Warburton, Darren E R

    2014-03-15

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) above the T6 spinal segment suffer from orthostatic intolerance. How cerebral blood flow (CBF) responds to orthostatic challenges in SCI is poorly understood. Furthermore, it is unclear how interventions meant to improve orthostatic tolerance in SCI influence CBF. This study aimed to examine 1) the acute regional CBF responses to rapid changes in blood pressure (BP) during orthostatic stress in individuals with SCI and able-bodied (AB) individuals; and 2) the effect of midodrine (alpha1-agonist) on orthostatic tolerance and CBF regulation in SCI. Ten individuals with SCI >T6, and 10 age- and sex-matched AB controls had beat-by-beat BP and middle and posterior cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv, PCAv, respectively) recorded during a progressive tilt-test to quantify the acute CBF response and orthostatic tolerance. Dynamic MCAv and PCAv to BP relationships were evaluated continuously in the time domain and frequency domain (via transfer function analysis). The SCI group was tested again after administration of 10 mg midodrine to elevate BP. Coherence (i.e., linearity) was elevated in SCI between BP-MCAv and BP-PCAv by 35% and 22%, respectively, compared with AB, whereas SCI BP-PCAv gain (i.e., magnitudinal relationship) was reduced 30% compared with AB (all P < 0.05). The acute (i.e., 0-30 s after tilt) MCAv and PCAv responses were similar between groups. In individuals with SCI, midodrine led to improved PCAv responses 30-60 s following tilt (10 ± 3% vs. 4 ± 2% decline; P < 0.05), and a 59% improvement in orthostatic tolerance (P < 0.01). The vertebrobasilar region may be particularly susceptible to hypoperfusion in SCI, leading to increased orthostatic intolerance.

  12. Collisionless relaxation of downstream ion distributions in low-Mach number shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gedalin, M.; Friedman, Y.; Balikhin, M.

    2015-07-15

    Collisionlessly formed downstream distributions of ions in low-Mach number shocks are studied. General expressions for the asymptotic value of the ion density and pressure are derived for the directly transmitted ions. An analytical approximation for the overshoot strength is suggested for the low-β case. Spatial damping scale of the downstream magnetic oscillations is estimated.

  13. Gas phase oxidation downstream of a catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.; Anderson, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalytic reactor on the emission of CO and unburned hydrocarbons was investigated. A premixed, prevaporized propane/air feed to a 12/cm/diameter catalytic/reactor test section was used. The catalytic reactor was made of four 2.5 cm long monolithic catalyst elements. Four water cooled gas sampling probes were located at positions between 0 and 22 cm downstream of the catalytic reactor. Measurements of unburned hydrocarbon, CO, and CO2 were made. Tests were performed with an inlet air temperature of 800 K, a reference velocity of 10 m/s, pressures of 3 and 600,000 Pa, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.14 to 0.24. For very lean mixtures, hydrocarbon emissions were high and CO continued to be formed downstream of the catalytic reactor. At the highest equivalence ratios tested, hydrocarbon levels were much lower and CO was oxidized to CO2 in the gas phase downstream. To achieve acceptable emissions, a downstream region several times longer than the catalytic reactor could be required.

  14. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  15. A Downstream voyage with mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective essay for the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.As I look back on my paper, “Effects of Low Dietary Levels of Methyl Mercury on Mallard Reproduction,” published in 1974 in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a thought sticks in my mind. I realize just how much my mercury research was not unlike a leaf in a stream, carried this way and that, sometimes stalled in an eddy, restarted, and carried downstream at a pace and path that was not completely under my control. I was hired in 1969 by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to study the effects of environmental pollutants on the behavior of wildlife. A colleague was conducting a study on the reproductive effects of methylmercury on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and he offered to give me some of the ducklings. I conducted a pilot study, testing how readily ducklings approached a tape-recorded maternal call. Sample sizes were small, but the results suggested that ducklings from mercury-treated parents behaved differently than controls. That’s how I got into mercury research—pretty much by chance.

  16. A downstream voyage with mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective essay for the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.As I look back on my paper, “Effects of Low Dietary Levels of Methyl Mercury on Mallard Reproduction,” published in 1974 in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a thought sticks in my mind. I realize just how much my mercury research was not unlike a leaf in a stream, carried this way and that, sometimes stalled in an eddy, restarted, and carried downstream at a pace and path that was not completely under my control. I was hired in 1969 by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to study the effects of environmental pollutants on the behavior of wildlife. A colleague was conducting a study on the reproductive effects of methylmercury on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and he offered to give me some of the ducklings. I conducted a pilot study, testing how readily ducklings approached a tape-recorded maternal call. Sample sizes were small, but the results suggested that ducklings from mercury-treated parents behaved differently than controls. That’s how I got into mercury research—pretty much by chance.

  17. Canine adenovirus downstream processing protocol.

    PubMed

    Puig, Meritxell; Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Segura, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are efficient gene delivery tools. A major caveat with vectors derived from common human adenovirus serotypes is that most adults are likely to have been exposed to the wild-type virus and exhibit active immunity against the vectors. This preexisting immunity limits their clinical success. Strategies to circumvent this problem include the use of nonhuman adenovirus vectors. Vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) are among the best-studied representatives. CAV-2 vectors are particularly attractive for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, CAV-2 vectors have shown great promise as oncolytic agents in virotherapy approaches and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. The rising interest in CAV-2 vectors calls for the development of scalable GMP compliant production and purification strategies. A detailed protocol describing a complete scalable downstream processing strategy for CAV-2 vectors is reported here. Clarification of CAV-2 particles is achieved by microfiltration. CAV-2 particles are subsequently concentrated and partially purified by ultrafiltration-diafiltration. A Benzonase(®) digestion step is carried out between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations to eliminate contaminating nucleic acids. Chromatography purification is accomplished in two consecutive steps. CAV-2 particles are first captured and concentrated on a propyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography column followed by a polishing step using DEAE anion exchange monoliths. Using this protocol, high-quality CAV-2 vector preparations containing low levels of contamination with empty viral capsids and other inactive vector forms are typically obtained. The complete process yield was estimated to be 38-45 %. PMID:24132487

  18. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  19. Non-gravitational perturbations and satellite geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Milani, A.; Nobill, A.M.; Farinella, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the basic ideas of the physics of non-gravitational perturbations and the mathematics required to compute their orbital effects. It conveys the relevance of the different problems that must be solved to achieve a given level of accuracy in orbit determination and in recovery of geophysically significant parameters. Selected Contents are: Orders of Magnitude of the Perturbing Forces, Tides and Apparent Forces, Tools from Celestial Mechanics, Solar Radiation Pressure-Direct Effects: Satellite-Solar Radiation Interaction, Long-Term Effects on Semi-Major Axis, Radiation Pressure-Indirect Effects: Earth-Reflected Radiation Pressure, Anisotropic Thermal Emission, Drag: Orbital Perturbations by a Drag-Like Force, and Charged Particle Drag.

  20. Perturbative tests of non-perturbative counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabholkar, Atish; Gomes, João

    2010-03-01

    We observe that a class of quarter-BPS dyons in mathcal{N} = 4 theories with charge vector ( Q, P) and with nontrivial values of the arithmetic duality invariant I := gcd( Q∧ P) are nonperturbative in one frame but perturbative in another frame. This observation suggests a test of the recently computed nonperturbative partition functions for dyons with nontrivial values of the arithmetic invariant. For all values of I, we show that the nonperturbative counting yields vanishing indexed degeneracy for this class of states everywhere in the moduli space in precise agreement with the perturbative result.

  1. The symmetric turbulent plane wake downstream of a sharp trailing edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogucz, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    The analysis and modeling of the symmetric turbulent plane wake downstream of a sharp trailing edge is addressed. A compact description of the flow near the trailing edge is formulated using the results of a previous asymptotic analysis. The new description retains the two-layered structure identified in the previous work, and it clarifies the principal dynamics of the flow in the near-wake outer layer, away from the wake centerline. For zero-pressure-gradient flow, the near-wake outer layer is shown to be represented to leading order by the similarity solution that governs the outer region of the surface boundary layer. The leading perturbation in the outer layer due to the developing near-wake inner-layer flow is identified, and this is shown to be asymptotically smaller than undetermined higher-order terms associated with the surface boundary-layer flow. Results of the new near-wake analysis are used to formulate an algebraic eddy viscosity model for wake flow predictions at arbitrary distances from the trailing edge. The model is used in a numerical solution of the boundary layer equations, and computed velocity and Reynolds stress profiles are shown to compare well with experimental data.

  2. Frame independent cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Weenink, Jan E-mail: j.g.weenink@uu.nl

    2013-09-01

    We compute the third order gauge invariant action for scalar-graviton interactions in the Jordan frame. We demonstrate that the gauge invariant action for scalar and tensor perturbations on one physical hypersurface only differs from that on another physical hypersurface via terms proportional to the equation of motion and boundary terms, such that the evolution of non-Gaussianity may be called unique. Moreover, we demonstrate that the gauge invariant curvature perturbation and graviton on uniform field hypersurfaces in the Jordan frame are equal to their counterparts in the Einstein frame. These frame independent perturbations are therefore particularly useful in relating results in different frames at the perturbative level. On the other hand, the field perturbation and graviton on uniform curvature hypersurfaces in the Jordan and Einstein frame are non-linearly related, as are their corresponding actions and n-point functions.

  3. Time-Frequency Analysis of Boundary-Layer Instabilites Generated by Freestream Laser Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    A controlled disturbance is generated in the freestream of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT) by focusing a high-powered Nd:YAG laser to create a laser-induced breakdown plasma. The plasma then cools, creating a freestream thermal disturbance that can be used to study receptivity. The freestream disturbance convects down-stream in the Mach-6 wind tunnel to interact with a flared cone model. The adverse pressure gradient created by the flare of the model is capable of generating second-mode instability waves that grow large and become nonlinear before experiencing natural transition in quiet flow. The freestream laser perturbation generates a wave packet in the boundary layer at the same frequency as the natural second mode, complicating time-independent analyses of the effect of the laser perturbation. The data show that the laser perturbation creates an instability wave packet that is larger than the natural waves on the sharp flared cone. The wave packet is still difficult to distinguish from the natural instabilities on the blunt flared cone.

  4. Thermally unstable perturbations in stratified conducting atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio; Serio, Salvatore; Peres, Giovanni

    1994-10-01

    We investigate the thermal stability of isobaric perturbations in a stratified isothermal background atmosphere with solar abundances, as resulting from the competition of optically thin plasma radiative cooling and of heating conducted from the surrounding atmosphere. We have analyzed the threshold line between stable and unstable perturbations, in the plane of the two important control parameters: the initial size of the perturbation and the temperature of the unperturbed medium; this line changes with the pressure of the unperturbed atmosphere. We have extended the results of linear perturbation analysis by means of numerical calculations of the evolution of spherical isobaric perturbations, using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code including Spitzer heat conduction. We explore a wide range of the parameters appropriate to the solar and stellar upper atmospheres: the background uniform temperature is between 105 K and 107 K, the initial pressure betweeen 0.1 and 10 dyn/sq cm, and the perturbation size between 105 and 1010 cm. The numerical results are in substantial agreement with the linear analysis. We discuss possible implications of our results also in terms of observable effects, especially concerning plasma downflows, and propose thermal instability as a possible candidate to explain the observed redshifts in solar and stellar transition region lines.

  5. The Perturbed Puma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Shu-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Yu

    2012-04-01

    The puma model on the basis of the Lorentz and CPT violation may bring an economical interpretation to the conventional neutrinos oscillation and part of the anomalous oscillations. We study the effect of the perturbation to the puma model. In the case of the first-order perturbation which keeps the (23) interchange symmetry, the mixing matrix element Ue3 is always zero. The nonzero mixing matrix element Ue3 is obtained in the second-order perturbation that breaks the (23) interchange symmetry.

  6. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  7. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Dilgard, Lemoyne W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  8. Downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in transonic diffuser flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, T.; Coakley, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in two-dimensional, separated transonic diffuser flows has been conducted numerically by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation turbulence model. It was found that the unsteady diffuser flowfields are very sensitive to the location of the downstream boundary. Extension of the diffuser downstream boundary significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of oscillations for pressure, velocity and shock. Computational results suggest that the mechanism causing the self-excited oscillation changes from viscous convective wave dominated oscillations to inviscid acoustic wave dominated oscillations when the location of downstream boundary varies from 8.66 to 134.7 throat height. The existence of a suction slot in the experimental setup obscures the physical downstream boundary and, therefore, presents a difficulty for quantitative comparisons between computation and experiment.

  9. Localized electron heating and density peaking in downstream helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Barada, K. K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Bora, D.

    2015-06-01

    Localized electron temperature and density peaking at different axial locations in the downstream helicon plasma have been observed in a linear helicon device with both geometrical and magnetic expansion. The discharge is produced with an m=+1 right helical antenna powered by a RF source operating at 13.56 MHz. Axial wave field measurement shows the presence of damped helicon waves with standing wave character folded into it even at low densities (˜ {{10}16} m-3 ). The measured helicon wavelength is just about twice the antenna length and the phase velocity ≤ft({{v}p}\\right) is almost the speed required for electron impact ionization. These experimental observations strongly advocate the Landau damping heating and density production by the helicon waves, particularly in low density plasma such as ours. The electron temperature maximizes at 35-45 cm away from the antenna center in our experiments indicating a local source of heating at those locations. Different mechanisms responsible for this additional heating at a particular spatial location have been discussed for their possible roles. Further downstream from the location of the maximum electron temperature, a density peak located 55-65 cm away from the antenna is observed. This downstream density peaking can be explained through pressure balance in the system.

  10. Screened perturbation theory to three loops

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Braaten, Eric; Strickland, Michael

    2001-05-15

    The thermal physics of a massless scalar field with a {phi}{sup 4} interaction is studied within screened perturbation theory (SPT). In this method the perturbative expansion is reorganized by adding and subtracting a mass term in the Lagrangian. We consider several different mass prescriptions that generalize the one-loop gap equation to two-loop order. We calculate the pressure and entropy to three-loop order and the screening mass to two-loop order. In contrast with the weak-coupling expansion, the SPT-improved approximations appear to converge even for rather large values of the coupling constant.

  11. Perturbations for transient acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Cristofher Zuñiga; Zimdahl, Winfried; Hipólito-Ricaldi, Wiliam S. E-mail: hipolito@ceunes.ufes.br

    2012-04-01

    According to the standard ΛCDM model, the accelerated expansion of the Universe will go on forever. Motivated by recent observational results, we explore the possibility of a finite phase of acceleration which asymptotically approaches another period of decelerated expansion. Extending an earlier study on a corresponding homogeneous and isotropic dynamics, in which interactions between dark matter and dark energy are crucial, the present paper also investigates the dynamics of the matter perturbations both on the Newtonian and General Relativistic (GR) levels and quantifies the potential relevance of perturbations of the dark-energy component. In the background, the model is tested against the Supernova type Ia (SNIa) data of the Constitution set and on the perturbative level against growth rate data, among them those of the WiggleZ survey, and the data of the 2dFGRS project. Our results indicate that a transient phase of accelerated expansion is not excluded by current observations.

  12. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  13. On the downstream boundary conditions for the vorticity-stream function formulation of two-dimensional incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.

    1991-01-01

    Downstream boundary conditions equivalent to the homogeneous form of the natural boundary conditions associated with the velocity-pressure formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are derived for the vorticity-stream function formulation of two-dimensional incompressible flows. Of particular interest are the zero normal and shear stress conditions at a downstream boundary.

  14. Results from modeling and simulation of chemical downstream etch systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, E.; Vosen, S.R.; Shon, J.W.; Larson, R.S.; Fox, C.A.; Buchenauer

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes modeling work performed at Sandia in support of Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) benchmark and tool development programs under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with SEMATECH. The Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) Modeling Project supports SEMATECH Joint Development Projects (JDPs) with Matrix Integrated Systems, Applied Materials, and Astex Corporation in the development of new CDE reactors for wafer cleaning and stripping processes. These dry-etch reactors replace wet-etch steps in microelectronics fabrication, enabling compatibility with other process steps and reducing the use of hazardous chemicals. Models were developed at Sandia to simulate the gas flow, chemistry and transport in CDE reactors. These models address the essential components of the CDE system: a microwave source, a transport tube, a showerhead/gas inlet, and a downstream etch chamber. The models have been used in tandem to determine the evolution of reactive species throughout the system, and to make recommendations for process and tool optimization. A significant part of this task has been in the assembly of a reasonable set of chemical rate constants and species data necessary for successful use of the models. Often the kinetic parameters were uncertain or unknown. For this reason, a significant effort was placed on model validation to obtain industry confidence in the model predictions. Data for model validation were obtained from the Sandia Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) experiments, from the literature, from the CDE Benchmark Project (also part of the Sandia/SEMATECH CRADA), and from the JDP partners. The validated models were used to evaluate process behavior as a function of microwave-source operating parameters, transport-tube geometry, system pressure, and downstream chamber geometry. In addition, quantitative correlations were developed between CDE tool performance and operation set points.

  15. Philippines' downstream sector poised for growth

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-11

    This paper reports that the Philippines' downstream sector is poised for sharp growth. Despite a slip in refined products demand in recent years, Philippines products demand will rebound sharply by 2000, East-West Center (EWC), Honolulu, predicts. Philippines planned refinery expansions are expected to meet that added demand, EWC Director Fereidun Fesharaki says. Like the rest of the Asia-Pacific region, product specifications are changing, but major refiners in the area expect to meet the changes without major case outlays. At the same time, Fesharaki says, push toward deregulation will further bolster the outlook for the Philippines downstream sector.

  16. Perturbation analysis of electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haijun

    2014-06-01

    Lagrangian displacement and magnetic field perturbation response to the geodesic acoustic mode is analyzed by using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak. δBθ, the poloidal component of magnetic field perturbation, has poloidal wave number m = 2 created by the poloidal displacement ξθ. The parallel perturbation of magnetic field, δB∥, has a poloidally asymmetric structure with m = 1 and is on the same order of magnitude with δBθ to the leading order. The radial displacement ξr is of order O(βɛξθ) but plays a significant role in determining δB∥, where β is the plasma/magnetic pressure ratio and ɛ is the inverse aspect ratio.

  17. Perturbation analysis of electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2014-06-15

    Lagrangian displacement and magnetic field perturbation response to the geodesic acoustic mode is analyzed by using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak. δB{sub θ}, the poloidal component of magnetic field perturbation, has poloidal wave number m = 2 created by the poloidal displacement ξ{sub θ}. The parallel perturbation of magnetic field, δB{sub ∥}, has a poloidally asymmetric structure with m = 1 and is on the same order of magnitude with δB{sub θ} to the leading order. The radial displacement ξ{sub r} is of order O(βϵξ{sub θ}) but plays a significant role in determining δB{sub ∥}, where β is the plasma/magnetic pressure ratio and ϵ is the inverse aspect ratio.

  18. Cosmological perturbations in antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Brandenberger, Robert

    2014-10-01

    We compute the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a recently proposed Weyl-symmetric theory of two scalar fields with oppositely signed conformal couplings to Einstein gravity. It is motivated from the minimal conformal extension of the standard model, such that one of these scalar fields is the Higgs while the other is a new particle, the dilaton, introduced to make the Higgs mass conformally symmetric. At the background level, the theory admits novel geodesically complete cyclic cosmological solutions characterized by a brief period of repulsive gravity, or "antigravity," during each successive transition from a big crunch to a big bang. For simplicity, we consider scalar perturbations in the absence of anisotropies, with potential set to zero and without any radiation. We show that despite the necessarily wrong-signed kinetic term of the dilaton in the full action, these perturbations are neither ghostlike nor tachyonic in the limit of strongly repulsive gravity. On this basis, we argue—pending a future analysis of vector and tensor perturbations—that, with respect to perturbative stability, the cosmological solutions of this theory are viable.

  19. Scalar cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggla, Claes; Wainwright, John

    2012-05-01

    Scalar perturbations of Friedmann-Lemaitre cosmologies can be analyzed in a variety of ways using Einstein’s field equations, the Ricci and Bianchi identities, or the conservation equations for the stress-energy tensor, and possibly introducing a timelike reference congruence. The common ground is the use of gauge invariants derived from the metric tensor, the stress-energy tensor, or from vectors associated with a reference congruence, as basic variables. Although there is a complication in that there is no unique choice of gauge invariants, we will show that this can be used to advantage. With this in mind our first goal is to present an efficient way of constructing dimensionless gauge invariants associated with the tensors that are involved, and of determining their inter-relationships. Our second goal is to give a unified treatment of the various ways of writing the governing equations in dimensionless form using gauge-invariant variables, showing how simplicity can be achieved by a suitable choice of variables and normalization factors. Our third goal is to elucidate the connection between the metric-based approach and the so-called 1 + 3 gauge-invariant approach to cosmological perturbations. We restrict our considerations to linear perturbations, but our intent is to set the stage for the extension to second-order perturbations.

  20. Cosmological perturbations of a perfect fluid and noncommutative variables

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Gerard, Jean-Marc; Suyama, Teruaki

    2010-03-15

    We describe the linear cosmological perturbations of a perfect fluid at the level of an action, providing thus an alternative to the standard approach based only on the equations of motion. This action is suited not only to perfect fluids with a barotropic equation of state, but also to those for which the pressure depends on two thermodynamical variables. By quantizing the system we find that (1) some perturbation fields exhibit a noncommutativity quite analogous to the one observed for a charged particle moving in a strong magnetic field, (2) local curvature and pressure perturbations cannot be measured simultaneously, (3) ghosts appear if the null energy condition is violated.

  1. Development of a perturbation generator for vortex stability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riester, J. E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Theory predicts vortex instability when subjected to certain types of disturbances. It was desired to build a device which could introduce controlled velocity perturbations into a trailing line vortex in order to study the effects on stability. A perturbation generator was designed and manufactured which can be attached to the centerbody of an airfoil type vortex generator. Details of design tests and manufacturing of the perturbation generator are presented. The device produced controlled perturbation with frequencies in excess of 250 Hz. Preliminary testing and evaluation of the perturbation generator performance was conducted in a 4 inch cylindrical pipe. Observations of vortex shedding frequencies from a centerbody were measured. Further evaluation with the perturbation generator attached to the vortex generator in a 2 x 3 foot wind tunnel were also conducted. Hot-wire anemometry was used to confirm the perturbation generator's ability to introduce controlled frequency fluctuations. Comparison of the energy levels of the disturbances in the vortex core was made between locations 42 chord lengths and 15 chord lengths downstream.

  2. Liouvillian perturbations of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. E.; Holder, C. L.

    2007-10-01

    We apply the well-known Kovacic algorithm to find closed form, i.e., Liouvillian solutions, to the differential equations governing perturbations of black holes. Our analysis includes the full gravitational perturbations of Schwarzschild and Kerr, the full gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations of Reissner-Nordstrom, and specialized perturbations of the Kerr-Newman geometry. We also include the extreme geometries. We find all frequencies ω, in terms of black hole parameters and an integer n, which allow Liouvillian perturbations. We display many classes of black hole parameter values and their corresponding Liouvillian perturbations, including new closed-form perturbations of Kerr and Reissner-Nordstrom. We also prove that the only type 1 Liouvillian perturbations of Schwarzschild are the known algebraically special ones and that type 2 Liouvillian solutions do not exist for extreme geometries. In cases where we do not prove the existence or nonexistence of Liouvillian perturbations we obtain sequences of Diophantine equations on which decidability rests.

  3. Downstream Intensification Effects Associated with CO2 Laser Mitigation of Fused Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M J; Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Widmayer, C C; Ravizza, F L

    2007-10-29

    Mitigation of 351nm laser-induced damage sites on fused silica exit surfaces by selective CO{sub 2} treatment has been shown to effectively arrest the exponential growth responsible for limiting the lifetime of optics in high-fluence laser systems. However, the perturbation to the optical surface profile following the mitigation process introduces phase contrast to the beam, causing some amount of downstream intensification with the potential to damage downstream optics. Control of the laser treatment process and measurement of the associated phase modulation is essential to preventing downstream 'fratricide' in damage-mitigated optical systems. In this work we present measurements of the surface morphology, intensification patterns and damage associated with various CO{sub 2} mitigation treatments on fused silica surfaces. Specifically, two components of intensification pattern, one on-axis and another off-axis can lead to damage of downstream optics and are related to rims around the ablation pit left from the mitigation process. It is shown that control of the rim structure around the edge of typical mitigation sites is crucial in preventing damage to downstream optics.

  4. Downstream cumulative effects of land use on freshwater communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuglerová, L.; Kielstra, B. W.; Moore, D.; Richardson, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Many streams and rivers are subject to disturbance from intense land use such as urbanization and agriculture, and this is especially obvious for small headwaters. Streams are spatially organized into networks where headwaters represent the tributaries and provide water, nutrients, and organic material to the main stems. Therefore perturbations within the headwaters might be cumulatively carried on downstream. Although we know that the disturbance of headwaters in urban and agricultural landscapes poses threats to downstream river reaches, the magnitude and severity of these changes for ecological communities is less known. We studied stream networks along a gradient of disturbance connected to land use intensity, from urbanized watersheds to watersheds placed in agricultural settings in the Greater Toronto Area. Further, we compared the patterns and processes found in the modified watershed to a control watershed, situated in a forested, less impacted landscape. Preliminary results suggest that hydrological modifications (flash floods), habitat loss (drainage and sewer systems), and water quality issues of small streams in urbanized and agricultural watersheds represent major disturbances and threats for aquatic and riparian biota on local as well as larger spatial scales. For example, communities of riparian plants are dominated by species typical of the land use on adjacent uplands as well as the dominant land use on the upstream contributing area, instead of riparian obligates commonly found in forested watersheds. Further, riparian communities in disturbed environments are dominated by invasive species. The changes in riparian communities are vital for various functions of riparian vegetation. Bank erosion control is suppressed, leading to severe channel transformations and sediment loadings in urbanized watersheds. Food sources for instream biota and thermal regimes are also changed, which further triggers alterations of in-stream biological communities

  5. Aspects of perturbative unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2016-07-01

    We reconsider perturbative unitarity in quantum field theory and upgrade several arguments and results. The minimum assumptions that lead to the largest time equation, the cutting equations and the unitarity equation are identified. Using this knowledge and a special gauge, we give a new, simpler proof of perturbative unitarity in gauge theories and generalize it to quantum gravity, in four and higher dimensions. The special gauge interpolates between the Feynman gauge and the Coulomb gauge without double poles. When the Coulomb limit is approached, the unphysical particles drop out of the cuts and the cutting equations are consistently projected onto the physical subspace. The proof does not extend to nonlocal quantum field theories of gauge fields and gravity, whose unitarity remains uncertain.

  6. Renormalized Lie perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengaus, E.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    A Lie operator method for constructing action-angle transformations continuously connected to the identity is developed for area preserving mappings. By a simple change of variable from action to angular frequency a perturbation expansion is obtained in which the small denominators have been renormalized. The method is shown to lead to the same series as the Lagrangian perturbation method of Greene and Percival, which converges on KAM surfaces. The method is not superconvergent, but yields simple recursion relations which allow automatic algebraic manipulation techniques to be used to develop the series to high order. It is argued that the operator method can be justified by analytically continuing from the complex angular frequency plane onto the real line. The resulting picture is one where preserved primary KAM surfaces are continuously connected to one another.

  7. Degenerate density perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2016-09-01

    Fractional occupation numbers can be used in density functional theory to create a symmetric Kohn-Sham potential, resulting in orbitals with degenerate eigenvalues. We develop the corresponding perturbation theory and apply it to a system of Nd degenerate electrons in a harmonic oscillator potential. The order-by-order expansions of both the fractional occupation numbers and unitary transformations within the degenerate subspace are determined by the requirement that a differentiable map exists connecting the initial and perturbed states. Using the X α exchange-correlation (XC) functional, we find an analytic solution for the first-order density and first- through third-order energies as a function of α , with and without a self-interaction correction. The fact that the XC Hessian is not positive definite plays an important role in the behavior of the occupation numbers.

  8. Perturbed Trojan satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, M. H. M.; Murray, C. D.

    1999-09-01

    We present some mechanisms that can lead to instability of initially small eccentricity Trojan-type orbits associated with planetary satellites. Dermott & Murray (1981) showed that in the context of the hierarchical restricted three-body problem (M>> m), stable small eccentricity coorbital motion associated with the mass m, occurs within a region of relative width in semi-major axis a_s=0.74 epsilon (where epsilon is the dimensionless Hill's radius). However, for large eccentricities, the size of the stable coorbital region shrinks as a_s=4 (epsilon /e)(1/2) epsilon (Namouni 1999). The perturbations from other nearby bodies can cause increases in both eccentricity and semi-major axis, leading to ejection from the coorbital region via collisions with the parent body or a nearby perturber. We show that mean motion resonances among saturnian satellites can cause chaotic diffusion of both the eccentricity and the semi-major axis of their associated Trojan orbits. Moreover, we show that secular resonances inside the coorbital regions of some uranian and saturnian satellites can induce significant increases in the eccentricity of Trojan objects. A better insight into the complicated dynamics exhibited by Trojan objects when they are being subject to perturbations is fundamental to be able to assess the likelihood of finding real examples of these configurations. Dermott & Murray (1981). Icarus 48, 1-11. Namouni (1999). Icarus 137, 293-314.

  9. Covariant Bardeen perturbation formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitenti, S. D. P.; Falciano, F. T.; Pinto-Neto, N.

    2014-05-01

    In a previous work we obtained a set of necessary conditions for the linear approximation in cosmology. Here we discuss the relations of this approach with the so-called covariant perturbations. It is often argued in the literature that one of the main advantages of the covariant approach to describe cosmological perturbations is that the Bardeen formalism is coordinate dependent. In this paper we will reformulate the Bardeen approach in a completely covariant manner. For that, we introduce the notion of pure and mixed tensors, which yields an adequate language to treat both perturbative approaches in a common framework. We then stress that in the referred covariant approach, one necessarily introduces an additional hypersurface choice to the problem. Using our mixed and pure tensors approach, we are able to construct a one-to-one map relating the usual gauge dependence of the Bardeen formalism with the hypersurface dependence inherent to the covariant approach. Finally, through the use of this map, we define full nonlinear tensors that at first order correspond to the three known gauge invariant variables Φ, Ψ and Ξ, which are simultaneously foliation and gauge invariant. We then stress that the use of the proposed mixed tensors allows one to construct simultaneously gauge and hypersurface invariant variables at any order.

  10. Downstream Sediment Sorting as a Fractionation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paola, C.; Fedele, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    Downstream size segregation in net depositional systems can be thought of as a fractination process in which a well mixed, heterogeneous input is unmixed based on its relative mobility. Although we are accustomed to thinking of the segregation process as hydraulically driven and rather complex, we argue that at large time and length scales size segregation can be substantially simplified. The main controls are the downstream distribution of sediment extraction, which is typically controlled externally (e.g. by subsidence) and the size distribution of the sediment supply. Hydraulics plays a secondary role because of the tendency for river channels to self organize to a shape that maintains a limited range of dimensionless shear stress on the channel bed. The end result of this line of reasoning is a simple method for calculating downstream size segregation in depositional systems that is in good agreement with the limited data available. In terms of local dynamics, we introduce evidence that topographic roughness plays an important role. This is not explicitly incorporated in our analysis, and the best ways to characterize roughness for this purpose are yet to be determined. Finally, to estimate the importance of abrasion effects at large scales, we re-introduce a dimensionless parameter to describe the relative importance of abrasion, which sorts material by durability, and selective transport, which sorts by transportability.

  11. Linear effects models of signaling pathways from combinatorial perturbation data

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Ewa; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Perturbations constitute the central means to study signaling pathways. Interrupting components of the pathway and analyzing observed effects of those interruptions can give insight into unknown connections within the signaling pathway itself, as well as the link from the pathway to the effects. Different pathway components may have different individual contributions to the measured perturbation effects, such as gene expression changes. Those effects will be observed in combination when the pathway components are perturbed. Extant approaches focus either on the reconstruction of pathway structure or on resolving how the pathway components control the downstream effects. Results: Here, we propose a linear effects model, which can be applied to solve both these problems from combinatorial perturbation data. We use simulated data to demonstrate the accuracy of learning the pathway structure as well as estimation of the individual contributions of pathway components to the perturbation effects. The practical utility of our approach is illustrated by an application to perturbations of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Availability and Implementation: lem is available as a R package at http://www.mimuw.edu.pl/∼szczurek/lem. Contact: szczurek@mimuw.edu.pl; niko.beerenwinkel@bsse.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307630

  12. Turbulent flow analysis on bend and downstream of the bend for different curvature ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Rana Roy; Biswas, Suranjan; Alam, Md. Mahbubul; Islam, A. K. M. Sadrul

    2016-07-01

    A CFD analysis on the bend and downstream of the bend has been carried out for turbulent flow through 90 degree bend pipe with different curvature ratios using standard k-epsilon turbulence model. Numerical results are compared with the existing experimental results, and then a detailed study has been performed to investigate the flow characteristics. For different curvature ratios, the static pressure distributions along inner, outer wall and pressure loss factor with different Reynolds number is analyzed. The obtained results show that pressure distribution and pressure loss factor are dependent for different Reynolds number and curvature ratio throughout the bend. Again, It is observed that the disturbance of the flow due to bend exists for a downstream distance of 50D from the central plane of the bend.

  13. Flow downstream of the heliospheric terminal shock. I - Irrotational flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Nerney, Steven

    1990-01-01

    Recent reports of remote detection of the heliospheric terminal shock place it near 50 AU. These conflict with standard models which, when combined with current data on the local interstellar medium, place the shock beyod 100 AU. Resolution of this discrepancy has led to hypotheses that invoke cosmic ray pressure, momentum exchange with interstellar neutrals, and magnetic field effects between the shock and the contact discontinuity dividing the solar wind from interstellar plasma. These hypotheses depend not only on properties of the interstellar medium, but also on the downstream three-dimensional flow between the shock and the contact discontinuity, in the region called the 'heliosheath'. The downstream flow field in the absence of magnetic fields is examined here under the assumptions that the flow everywhere outside the shock can be approximated as irrotational and incompressible. It is found, in particular, that the distance between the terminal shock and the contact discontinuity is less than the heliocentric distance to the terminal shock, effectively eliminating magnetic field effects in the heliosheath as being dynamically important.

  14. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  15. Flow downstream of the heliospheric terminal shock - Magnetic field kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, S.; Suess, S. T.; Schmahl, E. J.

    1991-01-01

    A kinematic model of the interplanetary magnetic field in the heliosheath beyond the solar wind terminal shock is presented in order to evaluate the possible importance of MHD effects in that region of space. The need for this evaluation arises because the interplanetary magnetic field is compressed across the terminal shock and further amplified by the decreasing flow speed beyond the shock. Streamlines which approach the stagnation point before turning in the downstream direction lead to the strongest effects due to the extreme slowing of the solar wind and consequent compression of the embedded magnetic field. The magnetic volume force therefore cannot be neglected on streamlines that approach the heliopause in the upstream direction, where the volume containing them is a large fraction of the overall of the heliosheath in the upstream direction. The increase in the magnetic pressure may act to bring the upstream terminal shock significantly closer to the sun, potentially reconciling a conflict between models and observations.

  16. Control of Transport-Barrier Relaxations by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.

    2009-01-30

    Transport-barrier relaxation oscillations in the presence of resonant magnetic perturbations are investigated using three-dimensional global fluid turbulence simulations from first principles at the edge of a tokamak. It is shown that resonant magnetic perturbations have a stabilizing effect on these relaxation oscillations and that this effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of both residual magnetic island chains and a stochastic layer.

  17. Propagation characteristics of waves upstream and downstream of quasi-parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.

    1993-01-01

    The propagation characteristics of waves upstream and downstream of quasi-parallel shocks are investigated by using 2D hybrid simulations. At low Alfven Mach numbers, M(A) below about 2, the shock is initially associated with upstream phase-standing whistlers. At later times, backstreaming ions excite longer-wavelength whistlers via the right-hand resonant ion/ion instability. These waves propagate along the magnetic field at a group velocity no smaller than the upstream flow speed, so that the waves remain in the upstream region. At higher MA (above about 3), these waves are convected back into the shock, causing its reformation and downstream perturbations. Shock transmitted waves mode-convert into Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves which have a wave vector along the shock normal (pointing upstream) and convect downstream. The 2D simulation results confirm our earlier suggestion that the upstream waves should be field aligned, and that their convection into the downstream is associated with linear mode conversion into the Alfven/ion-cyclotron branch.

  18. Plasma waves downstream of weak collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In September 1983 the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) International Cometary Explorer (ICE) spacecraft made a long traversal of the distant dawnside flank region of the Earth's magnetosphere and had many encounters with the low Mach number bow shock. These weak shocks excite plasma wave electric field turbulence with amplitudes comparable to those detected in the much stronger bow shock near the nose region. Downstream of quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shocks, the E field spectra exhibit a strong peak (plateau) at midfrequencies (1 - 3 kHz); the plateau shape is produced by a low-frequency (100 - 300 Hz) emission which is more intense behind downstream of two quasi-perpendicular shocks show that the low frequency signals are polarized parallel to the magnetic field, whereas the midfrequency emissions are unpolarized or only weakly polarized. A new high frequency (10 - 30 kHz) emission which is above the maximum Doppler shift exhibit a distinct peak at high frequencies; this peak is often blurred by the large amplitude fluctuations of the midfrequency waves. The high-frequency component is strongly polarized along the magnetic field and varies independently of the lower-frequency waves.

  19. Headwater Influences on Downstream Water Quality

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the influence of riparian and whole watershed land use as a function of stream size on surface water chemistry and assessed regional variation in these relationships. Sixty-eight watersheds in four level III U.S. EPA ecoregions in eastern Kansas were selected as study sites. Riparian land cover and watershed land use were quantified for the entire watershed, and by Strahler order. Multiple regression analyses using riparian land cover classifications as independent variables explained among-site variation in water chemistry parameters, particularly total nitrogen (41%), nitrate (61%), and total phosphorus (63%) concentrations. Whole watershed land use explained slightly less variance, but riparian and whole watershed land use were so tightly correlated that it was difficult to separate their effects. Water chemistry parameters sampled in downstream reaches were most closely correlated with riparian land cover adjacent to the smallest (first-order) streams of watersheds or land use in the entire watershed, with riparian zones immediately upstream of sampling sites offering less explanatory power as stream size increased. Interestingly, headwater effects were evident even at times when these small streams were unlikely to be flowing. Relationships were similar among ecoregions, indicating that land use characteristics were most responsible for water quality variation among watersheds. These findings suggest that nonpoint pollution control strategies should consider the influence of small upland streams and protection of downstream riparian zones alone is not sufficient to protect water quality. PMID:17999108

  20. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Henrique W; Bauer, Ross O; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers. PMID:26172698

  1. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique W.; Bauer, Ross O.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  2. Perturbative unidirectional invisibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We outline a general perturbative method of evaluating scattering features of finite-range complex potentials and use it to examine complex perturbations of a rectangular barrier potential. In optics, these correspond to modulated refractive index profiles of the form n (x ) =n0+f (x ) , where n0 is real, f (x ) is complex valued, and |f (x ) | ≪1 ≤n0 . We give a comprehensive description of the phenomenon of unidirectional invisibility for such media, proving five general theorems on its realization in P T -symmetric and non-P T -symmetric material. In particular, we establish the impossibility of unidirectional invisibility for P T -symmetric samples whose refractive index has a constant real part and show how a simple scaling transformation of a unidirectionally invisible P T -symmetric index profile with n0=1 may be used to generate a hierarchy of unidirectionally invisible P T -symmetric index profiles with n0>1 . The results pertaining to unidirectional invisibility for n0>1 open the way for the experimental studies of this phenomenon in a variety of active materials. As an application of our general results, we show that a medium with n (x ) =n0+ζ ei K x , ζ and K real, and |ζ |≪1 can support unidirectional invisibility only for n0=1 . We then construct unidirectionally invisible index profiles of the form n (x ) =n0+∑ℓzℓei Kℓx with zℓ complex, Kℓ real, | zℓ|≪1 , and n0>1 .

  3. 9. VIEW WEST TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAY FROM NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW WEST TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAY FROM NORTH SIDE OF DOWNSTREAM BANK OF DAM - Upper Doughty Dam, 200 feet west of Garden State Parkway, 1.7 miles west of Absecon, Egg Harbor City, Atlantic County, NJ

  4. Unit 4, downstream from Johns Street Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 4, downstream from Johns Street Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  5. Unit 6, downstream from Ferndale Bridge Johnstown Local Flood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 6, downstream from Ferndale Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  6. Unit 3, downstream from Point Park Johnstown Local Flood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 3, downstream from Point Park - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  7. Unit 3, downstream from Fourth Avenue Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 3, downstream from Fourth Avenue Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  8. Unit 1, downstream from Laurel Run Johnstown Local Flood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 1, downstream from Laurel Run - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  9. Unit 5, downstream from Haynes Street Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 5, downstream from Haynes Street Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  10. Unit 6, downstream from Horner Street Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 6, downstream from Horner Street Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  11. Unit 4, downstream from First Street Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 4, downstream from First Street Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  12. Unit 5, downstream from Hickory Street Bridge Johnstown Local ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 5, downstream from Hickory Street Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  13. Unit 2, downstream from Coppersdale Bridge Johnstown Local Flood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 2, downstream from Coppersdale Bridge - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  14. 7. VIEW DOWNSTREAM FROM THE NEWHALEM INTAKE WITH NO WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW DOWNSTREAM FROM THE NEWHALEM INTAKE WITH NO WATER BEING DIVERTED TO THE POWER TUNNEL, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Newhalem Powerhouse & Dam, On Skagit River, 0.3 mile downstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  15. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures. PMID:26764847

  16. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G. E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  17. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures.

  18. Turbulence decay downstream of an active grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewley, Gregory; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-11-01

    A grid in a wind tunnel stirs up turbulence that has a certain large-scale structure. The moving parts in a so-called ``active grid'' can be programmed to produce different structures. We use a special active grid in which each of 129 paddles on the grid has its own position-controlled servomotor that can move independently of the others. We observe among other things that the anisotropy in the amplitude of the velocity fluctuations and in the correlation lengths can be set and varied with an algorithm that oscillates the paddles in a specified way. The variation in the anisotropies that we observe can be explained by our earlier analysis of anisotropic ``soccer ball'' turbulence (Bewley, Chang and Bodenschatz 2012, Phys. Fluids). We define the influence of this variation in structure on the downstream evolution of the turbulence. with Eberhard Bodenschatz and others.

  19. Channel changes downstream from a dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hadley, R.F.; Emmett, W.W.

    1998-01-01

    A flood-control dam was completed during 1979 on Bear Creek, a small tributary stream to the South Platte River in the Denver, Colorado, area. Before and after dam closure, repetitive surveys between 1977 and 1992 at five cross sections downstream of the dam documented changes in channel morphology. During this 15-year period, channel width increased slightly, but channel depth increased by more than 40 percent. Within the study reach, stream gradient decreased and median bed material sizes coarsened from sand in the pools and fine gravel on the riffle to a median coarse gravel throughout the reach. The most striking visual change was from a sparse growth of streamside grasses to a dense growth of riparian woody vegetation.

  20. Downstream process options for the ABE fermentation.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Anton

    2016-05-01

    Butanol is a very interesting substance both for the chemical industry and as a biofuel. The classical distillation process for the removal of butanol is far too energy demanding, at a factor of 220% of the energy content of butanol. Alternative separation processes studied are hybrid processes of gas-stripping, liquid-liquid extraction and pervaporation with distillation and a novel adsorption/drying/desorption hybrid process. Compared with the energy content of butanol, the resulting energy demand for butanol separation and concentration of optimized hybrid processes is 11%-22% for pervaporation/distillation and 11%-17% for liquid-liquid extraction/distillation. For a novel adsorption/drying/desorption process, the energy demand is 9.4%. But all downstream process options need further proof of industrial applicability. PMID:27020411

  1. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  2. Ammonia downstream from HH 80 North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girart, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert; Torrelles, Jose, M.; Marti, Josep; Pena, Miriam; Ayala, Sandra; Curiel, Salvador; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    HH 80-81 are two optically visible Herbig-Haro (HH) objects located about 5 minutes south of their exciting source IRAS 18162-2048. Displaced symmetrically to the north of this luminous IRAS source, a possible HH counterpart was recently detected as a radio continuum source with the very large array (VLA). This radio source, HH 80 North, has been proposed to be a member of the Herbig-Haro class since its centimeter flux density, angular size, spectral index, and morphology are all similar to those of HH 80. However, no object has been detected at optical wavelengths at the position of HH 80 North, possibly because of high extinction, and the confirmation of the radio continuum source as an HH object has not been possible. In the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, ammonia emission has been detected downstream of the flow in both objects. This detection has been intepreted as a result of an enhancement in the ammonia emission produced by the radiation field of the shock associated with the HH object. In this Letter we report the detection of the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of ammonia downstream HH 80 North. This detection gives strong suppport to the interpretation of HH 80 North as a heavily obscured HH object. In addition, we suggest that ammonia emission may be a tracer of embedded Herbig-Haro objects in other regions of star formation. A 60 micrometer IRAS source could be associated with HH 80 North and with the ammonia condensation. A tentative explanation for the far-infrared emission as arising in dust heated by their optical and UV radiation of the HH object is presented.

  3. An experimental study of turbine vane heat transfer with leading edge and downstream film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmalan, V.; Hylton, L. D.

    1989-06-01

    This paper presents the effects of downstream film cooling, with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling, on turbine-vane external heat transfer. Steady-state experimental measurements were made in a three-vane linear two-dimensional cascade. The principal independent parameters were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions. The test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. The data obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The downstream film cooling process was shown to be a complex interaction of two competing mechanisms. The thermal dilution effect, associated with the injection of relatively cold fluid, results in a decrease in the heat transfer to the airfoil. Conversely, the turbulence augmentation, produced by the injection process, results in increased heat transfer to the airfoil.

  4. An experimental study of turbine vane heat transfer with leading edge and downstream film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nirmalan, V.; Hylton, L. D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of downstream film cooling, with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling, on turbine-vane external heat transfer. Steady-state experimental measurements were made in a three-vane linear two-dimensional cascade. The principal independent parameters were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions. The test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. The data obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The downstream film cooling process was shown to be a complex interaction of two competing mechanisms. The thermal dilution effect, associated with the injection of relatively cold fluid, results in a decrease in the heat transfer to the airfoil. Conversely, the turbulence augmentation, produced by the injection process, results in increased heat transfer to the airfoil.

  5. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient.

    PubMed

    Verma, M K S; Kumaran, V

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012)]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude. PMID:25974574

  6. Stability of the flow in a soft tube deformed due to an applied pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M. K. S.; Kumaran, V.

    2015-04-01

    A linear stability analysis is carried out for the flow through a tube with a soft wall in order to resolve the discrepancy of a factor of 10 for the transition Reynolds number between theoretical predictions in a cylindrical tube and the experiments of Verma and Kumaran [J. Fluid Mech. 705, 322 (2012), 10.1017/jfm.2011.55]. Here the effect of tube deformation (due to the applied pressure difference) on the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient is incorporated in the stability analysis. The tube geometry and dimensions are reconstructed from experimental images, where it is found that there is an expansion and then a contraction of the tube in the streamwise direction. The mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations and the pressure gradient, determined using computational fluid dynamics, are found to be substantially modified by the tube deformation. The velocity profiles are then used in a linear stability analysis, where the growth rates of perturbations are calculated for the flow through a tube with the wall modeled as a neo-Hookean elastic solid. The linear stability analysis is carried out for the mean velocity profiles at different downstream locations using the parallel flow approximation. The analysis indicates that the flow first becomes unstable in the downstream converging section of the tube where the flow profile is more pluglike when compared to the parabolic flow in a cylindrical tube. The flow is stable in the upstream diverging section where the deformation is maximum. The prediction for the transition Reynolds number is in good agreement with experiments, indicating that the downstream tube convergence and the consequent modification in the mean velocity profile and pressure gradient could reduce the transition Reynolds number by an order of magnitude.

  7. Numerical simulation of small perturbation transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seebass, A. R.; Yu, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a systematic study of small perturbation transonic flows are presented. Both the flow over thin airfoils and the flow over wedges were investigated. Various numerical schemes were employed in the study. The prime goal of the research was to determine the efficiency of various numerical procedures by accurately evaluating the wave drag, both by computing the pressure integral around the body and by integrating the momentum loss across the shock. Numerical errors involved in the computations that affect the accuracy of drag evaluations were analyzed. The factors that effect numerical stability and the rate of convergence of the iterative schemes were also systematically studied.

  8. On dark energy isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Mingzhe E-mail: limz@nju.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    Determining the equation of state of dark energy with astronomical observations is crucially important to understand the nature of dark energy. In performing a likelihood analysis of the data, especially of the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data the dark energy perturbations have to be taken into account both for theoretical consistency and for numerical accuracy. Usually, one assumes in the global fitting analysis that the dark energy perturbations are adiabatic. In this paper, we study the dark energy isocurvature perturbation analytically and discuss its implications for the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Furthermore, with the current astronomical observational data and by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform a global analysis of cosmological parameters assuming general initial conditions for the dark energy perturbations. The results show that the dark energy isocurvature perturbations are very weakly constrained and that purely adiabatic initial conditions are consistent with the data.

  9. Perturbation theory in electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, L. N.; Marthinsen, K.; Hoeier, R.

    1992-12-01

    The Bloch-wave approach is used for discussing multiple inelastic electron scattering and higher-order perturbation theory in inelastic high-energy electron diffraction. In contrast to previous work, the present work describes three-dimensional diffraction so that higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) effects are incorporated. Absorption is included and eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated from a structure matrix with the inclusion of an absorptive potential. Centrosymmetric as well as non-centrosymmetric crystal structures are allowed. An iteration method with a defined generalized propagation function for solving the inelastic coupling equations is described. It is shown that a similar iteration method with the same propagation function can be used for obtaining higher-order perturbation terms for the wave-function when a perturbation is added to the crystal potential. Finally, perturbation theory by matrix calculations when a general perturbation is added to the structure matrix is considered.

  10. Modulated preheating and isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Rusak, Stanislav E-mail: stanislav.rusak@helsinki.fi

    2013-03-01

    We consider a model of preheating where the coupling of the inflaton to the preheat field is modulated by an additional scalar field which is light during inflation. We establish that such a model produces the observed curvature perturbation analogously to the modulated reheating scenario. The contribution of modulated preheating to the power spectrum and to non-Gaussianity can however be significantly larger compared to modulated perturbative reheating. We also consider the implications of the current constraints on isocurvature perturbations in case where the modulating field is responsible for cold dark matter. We find that existing bounds on CDM isocurvature perturbations imply that modulated preheating is unlikely to give a dominant contribution to the curvature perturbation and that the same bounds suggest important constraints on non-Gaussianity and the amount of primordial gravitational waves.

  11. Downstream Processing of Synechocystis for Biofuel Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jie

    Lipids and free fatty acids (FFA) from cyanobacterium Synechocystis can be used for biofuel (e.g. biodiesel or renewable diesel) production. In order to utilize and scale up this technique, downstream processes including culturing and harvest, cell disruption, and extraction were studied. Several solvents/solvent systems were screened for lipid extraction from Synechocystis. Chloroform + methanol-based Folch and Bligh & Dyer methods were proved to be "gold standard" for small-scale analysis due to their highest lipid recoveries that were confirmed by their penetration of the cell membranes, higher polarity, and stronger interaction with hydrogen bonds. Less toxic solvents, such as methanol and MTBE, or direct transesterification of biomass (without preextraction step) gave only slightly lower lipid-extraction yields and can be considered for large-scale application. Sustained exposure to high and low temperature extremes severely lowered the biomass and lipid productivity. Temperature stress also triggered changes of lipid quality such as the degree of unsaturation; thus, it affected the productivities and quality of Synechocystis-derived biofuel. Pulsed electric field (PEF) was evaluated for cell disruption prior to lipid extraction. A treatment intensity > 35 kWh/m3 caused significant damage to the plasma membrane, cell wall, and thylakoid membrane, and it even led to complete disruption of some cells into fragments. Treatment by PEF enhanced the potential for the low-toxicity solvent isopropanol to access lipid molecules during subsequent solvent extraction, leading to lower usage of isopropanol for the same extraction efficiency. Other cell-disruption methods also were tested. Distinct disruption effects to the cell envelope, plasma membrane, and thylakoid membranes were observed that were related to extraction efficiency. Microwave and ultrasound had significant enhancement of lipid extraction. Autoclaving, ultrasound, and French press caused significant

  12. Effect of Pulsed Plasma Jets on the Recovering Boundary Layer Downstream of a Reflected Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Benton; Clemens, Noel; Magari, Patrick; Micka, Daniel; Ueckermann, Mattheus

    2015-11-01

    Shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation can have many detrimental effects in supersonic inlets including flow distortion and instability, structural fatigue, poor pressure recovery, and unstart. The current study investigates the effect of pulsed plasma jets on the recovering boundary layer downstream of a reflected shock wave-boundary layer interaction. The effects of pitch and skew angle of the jet as well as the heating parameter and discharge time scale are tested using several pulsing frequencies. In addition, the effect of the plasma jets on the undisturbed boundary layer at 6 mm and 11 mm downstream of the jets is measured. A pitot-static pressure probe is used to measure the velocity profile of the boundary layer 35 mm downstream of the plasma jets, and the degree of boundary layer distortion is compared between the different models and run conditions. Additionally, the effect of each actuator configuration on the shape of the mean separated region is investigated using surface oil flow visualization. Previous studies with lower energy showed a weak effect on the downstream boundary layer. The current investigation will attempt to increase this effect using a higher-energy discharge. Funded by AFRL through and SBIR in collaboration with Creare, LLC.

  13. Revised Perturbation Statistics for the Global Scale Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1975-01-01

    Magnitudes and scales of atmospheric perturbations about the monthly mean for the thermodynamic variables and wind components are presented by month at various latitudes. These perturbation statistics are a revision of the random perturbation data required for the global scale atmospheric model program and are from meteorological rocket network statistical summaries in the 22 to 65 km height range and NASA grenade and pitot tube data summaries in the region up to 90 km. The observed perturbations in the thermodynamic variables were adjusted to make them consistent with constraints required by the perfect gas law and the hydrostatic equation. Vertical scales were evaluated by Buell's depth of pressure system equation and from vertical structure function analysis. Tables of magnitudes and vertical scales are presented for each month at latitude 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90 degrees.

  14. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Natalia A; Valdez, Alejandra L; Fariña, Julia I

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a β-1,3-β-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length, and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc.), and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc.) applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high exopolysaccharide concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined. PMID:26528259

  15. Upstream/downstream: Issues in environmental ethics

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, D.

    1991-01-01

    Upstream/Downstream reminds us that there are four issues that are more or less distinctive to environmental ethics. First, and most distinctively, environmental issues involve the standing of nonhuman living things and systems. Thus, environmental politics is only partly a clash among the interest of the parties involved; it often involves actions on behalf of the existence rights of nonhuman life forms. Second, environmental ethics concern the intergenerational distribution of benefits more explicitly than do most other ethical issues, which brings out serious weaknesses in legal frameworks that rely on claims for damages. Third, the complexity and indirectness of many environmental impacts introduces a high degree of uncertainty and thus technical as well as ethical issues of prudent behavior. Specifically, where science may not fully reveal environmental risks, should development proceed; should analysis proceed if it is known to have a Pollyanna bias Fourth, insofar as environmental damage is typically done to common property, and thus its regulation is generally a matter for governmental regulation, the obligations of private actors to make sacrifices beyond what government requires is at issue - an issue that one would expect to be taken up at length in the other volumes.

  16. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Natalia A.; Valdez, Alejandra L.; Fariña, Julia I.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a β-1,3-β-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length, and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc.), and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc.) applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high exopolysaccharide concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined. PMID:26528259

  17. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.

    1984-05-30

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pins passageway extending through the assembly.

  18. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.

    1987-02-03

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

  19. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

  20. Lunar fossil magnetism and perturbations of the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbations of the solar wind downstream of the moon and lying outside of the rarefaction wave that defines the diamagnetic cavity are used to define possible source regions comprised of intrinsically magnetized areas of the moon. A map of the moon is constructed showing that a model in which the sources are exposed to the grazing solar wind during the lunation yields a selenographically invariant set of regions strongly favoring the lunar highlands over the maria. An alternative model with the source due to electromagnetic induction is explored. The ages of the field sources should be consistent with those based on the basalt ages and possibly far older if the sources are connected with the formation of the highland rocks themselves. The perturbations are tentatively identified as weak shock waves, and a Mach angle in accord with nominal values for the solar wind is found.

  1. Influence of cosmological transitions on the evolution of density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jérôme; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    1998-03-01

    We study the influence of the reheating and equality transitions on superhorizon density perturbations and gravitational waves. Recent criticisms of the ``standard result'' for large-scale perturbations in inflationary cosmology are rectified. The claim that the ``conservation law'' for the amplitude of superhorizon modes was empty is shown to be wrong. For sharp transitions, i.e. the pressure jumps, we rederive the Deruelle-Mukhanov junction conditions. For a smooth transition we correct a result obtained by Grishchuk recently. We show that the junction conditions are not crucial, because the pressure is continuous during the reheating transition. The problem occurred because the perturbed metric was not evolved correctly through the smooth reheating transition. Finally, we derive the ``standard result'' within Grishchuk's smooth (reheating) transition.

  2. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-01

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  3. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  4. Causal compensated perturbations in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to calculate linear perturbations in the gravitational and matter fields which arise causally in response to the presence of stiff matter sources in a FRW cosmology. It is shown that, in order to satisfy energy and momentum conservation, the gravitational fields of the source must be compensated by perturbations in the matter and gravitational fields, and the role of such compensation in containing the initial inhomogeneities in their subsequent evolution is discussed. A complete formal solution is derived in terms of Green functions for the perturbations produced by an arbitrary source in a flat universe containing cold dark matter. Approximate Green function solutions are derived for the late-time density perturbations and late-time gravitational waves in a universe containing a radiation fluid. A cosmological energy-momentum pseudotensor is defined to clarify the nature of energy and momentum conservation in the expanding universe.

  5. Downstream and coastal impacts of damming and water abstraction in Africa.

    PubMed

    Snoussi, Maria; Kitheka, Johnson; Shaghude, Yohanna; Kane, Alioune; Arthurton, Russell; Le Tissier, Martin; Virji, Hassan

    2007-05-01

    Anthropogenic factors associated with damming and water abstraction, and the resultant environmental pressures, are reviewed in six African river catchments using records and forecasts of climatic, demographic, and land-use change. Changes in the states of the flow regime through catchment drainage systems to the coastal sea are considered in conjunction with climate change and other human-induced pressures. The impacts of these changes on downstream and coastal environments and their communities are described in past, present, and future perspectives. Linkages between the issues and the pressures of damming and water abstraction are appraised and scientific, policy, and management responses proposed aimed at remedying existing and perceived future negative impacts. The study proposes that there is a need to integrate catchment and coastal management to account for the whole water flow regime together with its human dimensions. Management priorities relating to the operation of existing damming and abstraction schemes and planning of future schemes include the following: consideration of ways in which water discharges could be adjusted to provide improvements in downstream and coastal environmental and socioeconomic conditions; addressing the problem of sediment trapping impacting on the sustainability of dam reservoirs; and assessment of downstream and coastal impacts of future schemes in the light of climate change forecasts.

  6. The effect of catalyst length and downstream reactor distance on catalytic combustor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effects on catalytic combustor performance which resulted from independently varying the length of a catalytic reactor and the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalyst. Monolithic combustion catalysts from three manufacturers were tested in a combustion test rig with no. 2 diesel fuel. Catalytic reactor lengths of 2.5 and 5.4 cm, and downstream gas-phase reaction distances of 7.3, 12.4, 17.5, and 22.5 cm were evaluated. Measurements of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and pressure drop were made. The catalytic-reactor pressure drop was less than 1 percent of the upstream total pressure for all test configurations and test conditions. Nitrogen oxides and unburned hydrocarbons emissions were less than 0.25 g NO2/kg fuel and 0.6 g HC/kg fuel, respectively. The minimum operating temperature (defined as the adiabatic combustion temperature required to obtain carbon monoxide emissions below a reference level of 13.6 g CO/kg fuel) ranged from 1230 K to 1500 K for the various conditions and configurations tested. The minimum operating temperature decreased with increasing total (catalytic-reactor-plus-downstream-gas-phase-reactor-zone) residence time but was independent of the relative times spent in each region when the catalytic-reactor residence time was greater than or equal to 1.4 ms.

  7. AERIAL VIEW FACING NORTH. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF FABRIC BUILDING, STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL VIEW FACING NORTH. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF FABRIC BUILDING, STRUCTURAL WAREHOUSE, RAIL MILL, & OPEN HEARTH COMPLEX. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

  8. 7. STONE PIER OF ORIGINAL WATERWHEEL INSTALLATION DOWNSTREAM FROM MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. STONE PIER OF ORIGINAL WATERWHEEL INSTALLATION DOWNSTREAM FROM MILL William E. Barrett, photographer, 1973 (copy negative) - Thomas Shepherd's Grist Mill, High Street Vicinity, Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, WV

  9. 5. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AND SUBSTRUCTURE (with graduated meter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AND SUBSTRUCTURE (with graduated meter pole); VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Auwaiakeakua Bridge, Spanning Auwaiakekua Gulch at Mamalahoa Highway, Waikoloa, Hawaii County, HI

  10. Characterisation of turbulence downstream of a linear compressor cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Mare, Luca; Jelly, Thomas; Day, Ivor

    2014-11-01

    Characterisation of turbulence in turbomachinery remains one of the most complex tasks in fluid mechanics. In addition, current closure models required for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations do not accurately represent the action of turbulent forces against the mean flow. Therefore, the statistical properties of turbulence in turbomachinery are of significant interest. In the current work, single- and two-point hot-wire measurements have been acquired downstream of a linear compressor cascade in order to examine the properties of large-scale turbulent structures and to assess how they affect turbulent momentum and energy transfer in compressor passages. The cascade has seven controlled diffusion which are representative of high-pressure stator blades found in turbofan engines. Blade chord, thickness and camber are 0.1515 m, 9.3% and 42 degrees, respectively. Measurements were acquired at a chord Reynolds number of 6 . 92 ×105 . Single-point statistics highlight differences in turbulence structure when comparing mid-span and end-wall regions. Evaluation of two-point correlations and their corresponding spectra reveal the length-scales of the energy-bearing eddies in the cascade. Ultimately, these measurements can be used to calibrate future computational models. The authors gratefully acknowledge Rolls-Royce plc for funding this work and granting permission for its publication.

  11. Downstream boundary conditions for viscous flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Gunzburger, M.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of the specification of artificial outflow conditions in flow problems is studied. It is shown that for transport type equations incorrect outflow conditions will adversely affect the solution only in a small region near the outflow boundary, while for elliptic equations, e.g. those governing the streamfunction or pressure, a correct boundary specification is essential. In addition, integral outflow boundary conditions for fluid dynamical problems are considered. It is shown that such conditions are well posed, and their effect on the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations is also considered.

  12. Organization of Functional Postural Responses Following Perturbations in Multiple Directions in Elderly Fallers Standing Quietly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matjacic, Zlatko; Sok, David; Jakovljevic, Miroljub; Cikajlo, Imre

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess functional postural responses by analyzing the center-of-pressure trajectories resulting from perturbations delivered in multiple directions to elderly fallers. Ten elderly individuals were standing quietly on two force platforms while an apparatus delivered controlled perturbations at the level of pelvis…

  13. 1. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NOTE HEADGATE STRUCTURE ON NORTH BANK, SPILLWAY ON LEFT SIDE OF DAM, AND SPLASH LOGS ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  14. 11. VIEW NORTH ALONG DOWNSTREAM BANK OF DAM FROM SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW NORTH ALONG DOWNSTREAM BANK OF DAM FROM SOUTH SIDE OF CHANNEL ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF RESERVOIR - Upper Doughty Dam, 200 feet west of Garden State Parkway, 1.7 miles west of Absecon, Egg Harbor City, Atlantic County, NJ

  15. Base case and perturbation scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Edmunds, T

    1998-10-01

    This report describes fourteen energy factors that could affect electricity markets in the future (demand, process, source mix, etc.). These fourteen factors are believed to have the most influence on the State's energy environment. A base case, or most probable, characterization is given for each of these fourteen factors over a twenty year time horizon. The base case characterization is derived from quantitative and qualitative information provided by State of California government agencies, where possible. Federal government databases are nsed where needed to supplement the California data. It is envisioned that a initial selection of issue areas will be based upon an evaluation of them under base case conditions. For most of the fourteen factors, the report identities possible perturbations from base case values or assumptions that may be used to construct additional scenarios. Only those perturbations that are plausible and would have a significant effect on energy markets are included in the table. The fourteen factors and potential perturbations of the factors are listed in Table 1.1. These perturbations can be combined to generate internally consist.ent. combinations of perturbations relative to the base case. For example, a low natural gas price perturbation should be combined with a high natural gas demand perturbation. The factor perturbations are based upon alternative quantitative forecasts provided by other institutions (the Department of Energy - Energy Information Administration in some cases), changes in assumptions that drive the quantitative forecasts, or changes in assumptions about the structure of the California energy markets. The perturbations are intended to be used for a qualitative reexamination of issue areas after an initial evaluation under the base case. The perturbation information would be used as a "tiebreaker;" to make decisions regarding those issue areas that were marginally accepted or rejected under the base case. Hf a

  16. Identification of perturbation modes and controversies in ekpyrotic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai-Chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2002-10-01

    If the linear perturbation theory is valid through the bounce, the surviving fluctuations from the ekpyrotic scenario (cyclic one as well) should have very blue spectra with suppressed amplitude for the scalar-type structure. We derive the same (and consistent) result using the curvature perturbation in the uniform-field (comoving) gauge and in the zero-shear gauge. Previously, Khoury et al. interpreted results from the latter gauge condition incorrectly and claimed the scale-invariant spectrum, thus generating controversy in the literature. We also correct similar errors in the literature based on wrong mode identification and joining condition. No joining condition is needed for the derivation.

  17. Structural fluctuation of proteins induced by thermodynamic perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Fumio; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-28

    A theory to describe structural fluctuations of protein induced by thermodynamic perturbations, pressure, temperature, and denaturant, is proposed. The theory is formulated based on the three methods in the statistical mechanics: the generalized Langevin theory, the linear response theory, and the three dimensional interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory. The theory clarifies how the change in thermodynamic conditions, or a macroscopic perturbation, induces the conformational fluctuation, which is a microscopic property. The theoretical results are applied, on the conceptual basis, to explain the experimental finding by Akasaka et al., concerning the NMR experiment which states that the conformational change induced by pressure corresponds to structural fluctuations occurring in the ambient condition. A method to evaluate the structural fluctuation induced by pressure is also suggested by means of the 3D-RISM and the site-site Kirkwood-Buff theories.

  18. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-11-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  19. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  20. Pressure pulse detection apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, J.R.

    1981-04-14

    A pressure pulse detection apparatus is disclosed which is adapted to receive small signals from downhole measuring while drilling apparatus which signals are propogated as pressure pulses traveling upstream in a column of drilling mud, which signals are obscured by mud pump pressure and velocity variations traveling downstream and which are significantly larger. The preferred embodiment incorporates a transient pressure transducer and an ultrasonic fluid velocity detector, the two forming output signals which are conditioned, amplified and offset against one another. They cancel (When properly calibrated) so that pressure and velocity variations from the mud pump upstream are nulled to zero. They reinforce so that pressure and velocity variations from the downhole signal generator are enhanced, thereby forming an output signal of downhole variations of interest.

  1. Perturbation solutions of combustion instability problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Googerdy, A.; Peddieson, J., Jr.; Ventrice, M.

    1979-01-01

    A method involving approximate modal analysis using the Galerkin method followed by an approximate solution of the resulting modal-amplitude equations by the two-variable perturbation method (method of multiple scales) is applied to two problems of pressure-sensitive nonlinear combustion instability in liquid-fuel rocket motors. One problem exhibits self-coupled instability while the other exhibits mode-coupled instability. In both cases it is possible to carry out the entire linear stability analysis and significant portions of the nonlinear stability analysis in closed form. In the problem of self-coupled instability the nonlinear stability boundary and approximate forms of the limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are determined in closed form while the exact limit-cycle amplitudes and growth and decay rates are found numerically. In the problem of mode-coupled instability the limit-cycle amplitudes are found in closed form while the growth and decay rates are found numerically. The behavior of the solutions found by the perturbation method are in agreement with solutions obtained using complex numerical methods.

  2. Geoacoustic inversion by mode amplitude perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Travis L.; Lynch, James F.; Pierce, Allan D.; Frisk, George V.

    2005-09-01

    In a shallow-water waveguide the geoacoustic properties of the seafloor have a significant effect on the way sound propagates through the water. Because of this, measurements of the pressure field in the water can be used to estimate bottom properties. In this talk a perturbative method is presented which allows one to use measurements of the modal amplitudes to estimate a set of bottom parameters. A key component of the method is an expression for the derivative of the mode functions with respect to some bottom parameter. Following from the work of Thode and Kim [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 3370-2283 (2004)], the derivative is expressed as a weighted sum over all modes (both propagating and leaky). It is thought that this method can be used alongside eigenvalue perturbation [Rajan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 82, 998-1017 (1987)] to provide an inversion scheme more robust to measurement noise. To demonstrate its feasibility, the method is applied to synthetic and real data. [Work supported by the WHOI education office.

  3. Water stress in global transboundary river basins: significance of upstream water use on downstream stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka, M.; Wada, Y.; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analysed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world’s transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. We found that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  4. Water Stress in Global Transboundary River Basins: Significance of Upstream Water Use on Downstream Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka,M.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analyzed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world's transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. Wefound that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  5. Matter perturbations in Galileon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Kase, Ryotaro; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2011-02-15

    We study the evolution of matter density perturbations in Galileon cosmology where the late-time cosmic acceleration can be realized by a field kinetic energy. We obtain full perturbation equations at linear order in the presence of five covariant Lagrangians L{sub i} (i=1,{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot},5) satisfying the Galileon symmetry {partial_derivative}{sub {mu}}{phi}{yields}{partial_derivative}{sub {mu}}{phi}{sup +}b{sub {mu}} in the flat space-time. The equations for a matter perturbation as well as an effective gravitational potential are derived under a quasistatic approximation on subhorizon scales. This approximation can reproduce full numerical solutions with high accuracy for the wavelengths relevant to large-scale structures. For the model parameters constrained by the background expansion history of the Universe, the growth rate of matter perturbations is larger than that in the {Lambda}-cold dark matter model, with the growth index {gamma} today typically smaller than 0.4. We also find that, even on very large scales associated with the integrated-Sachs-Wolfe effect in cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies, the effective gravitational potential exhibits a temporal growth during the transition from the matter era to the epoch of cosmic acceleration. These properties are useful to distinguish the Galileon model from the {Lambda}-cold dark matter model in future high-precision observations.

  6. Disformal invariance of curvature perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Hayato; White, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    We show that under a general disformal transformation the linear comoving curvature perturbation is not identically invariant, but is invariant on superhorizon scales for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's theory. The difference between disformally related curvature perturbations is found to be given in terms of the comoving density perturbation associated with a single canonical scalar field. In General Relativity it is well-known that this quantity vanishes on superhorizon scales through the Poisson equation that is obtained on combining the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints, and we confirm that a similar result holds for any theory that is disformally related to Horndeski's scalar-tensor theory so long as the invertibility condition for the disformal transformation is satisfied. We also consider the curvature perturbation at full nonlinear order in the unitary gauge, and find that it is invariant under a general disformal transformation if we assume that an attractor regime has been reached. Finally, we also discuss the counting of degrees of freedom in theories disformally related to Horndeski's.

  7. VHS Movies: Perturbations for Morphogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Danny L.

    This paper discusses the concept of a family system in terms of an interactive system of interrelated, interdependent parts and suggests that VHS movies can act as perturbations, i.e., change promoting agents, for certain dysfunctional family systems. Several distinct characteristics of a family system are defined with particular emphasis on…

  8. Adaptation Strategies in Perturbed /s/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Jana; Hoole, Phil; Perrier, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the role of three articulatory parameters (tongue position, jaw position and tongue grooving) in the production of /s/. Six normal speakers' speech was perturbed by a palatal prosthesis. The fricative was recorded acoustically and through electromagnetic articulography in four conditions: (1) unperturbed,…

  9. Basics of QCD perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    This is an introduction to the use of QCD perturbation theory, emphasizing generic features of the theory that enable one to separate short-time and long-time effects. The author also covers some important classes of applications: electron-positron annihilation to hadrons, deeply inelastic scattering, and hard processes in hadron-hadron collisions. 31 refs., 38 figs.

  10. Seven topics in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    The following topics of perturbative QCD are discussed: (1) deep inelastic scattering; (2) higher order corrections to e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, to photon structure functions and to quarkonia decays; (3) higher order corrections to fragmentation functions and to various semi-inclusive processes; (4) higher twist contributions; (5) exclusive processes; (6) transverse momentum effects; (7) jet and photon physics.

  11. PERTURBATION APPROACH FOR QUANTUM COMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    G. P. BERMAN; D. I. KAMENEV; V. I. TSIFRINOVICH

    2001-04-01

    We discuss how to simulate errors in the implementation of simple quantum logic operations in a nuclear spin quantum computer with many qubits, using radio-frequency pulses. We verify our perturbation approach using the exact solutions for relatively small (L = 10) number of qubits.

  12. Influence of the Orifice on Measured Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemke, Paul E

    1926-01-01

    The influence of different orifices on the result of measuring the same pressure distributions is the subject of this note. A circular cylinder is exposed to an air stream perpendicular to its axis and its pressure distribution is repeatedly determined. The pressures measured on the downstream half of the cylinder do not change for the orifice sizes used in the tests.

  13. Intersegmental coordination elicited by unexpected multidirectional slipping-like perturbations resembles that adopted during steady locomotion.

    PubMed

    Aprigliano, Federica; Martelli, Dario; Micera, Silvestro; Monaco, Vito

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed at testing the hypothesis that reactive biomechanical responses elicited by unexpected slipping-like perturbations delivered during steady walking are characterized by an intersegmental coordination strategy resembling that adopted during unperturbed walking. Fifteen healthy subjects were asked to manage multidirectional slipping-like perturbations delivered while they walked steadily. The planar covariation law of elevation angles related to lower limb segments was the main observed variable related to unperturbed and perturbed strides. Principal component analysis was used to verify whether elevation angles covaried, both before and after the onset of the perturbation, and, if so, the orientation of the related planes of covariation was compared. Results revealed that the planar covariation law of the unperturbed limb after onset of the perturbation was systematically similar to that seen during steady walking. This occurred despite differences in range of motion and intersubject variability of both elevation and joint angles. The analysis strongly corroborates the hypothesis that the planar covariation law emerges from the interaction between spinal neural networks and limb mechanical oscillators. In particular, fast and stereotyped reactive strategies may result from the interaction among activities of downstream neural networks encrypting well-trained motor schemes, such as those related to walking, limb dynamics, and sensory motor information gathered during the perturbation. In addition, our results allowed us to speculate that rehabilitative treatment based on unexpected perturbations and relying on the plasticity of the central nervous system may also be effective in eliciting unimpaired intralimb coordination in neurological patients.

  14. Dual pressure displacement control system

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.E.; Klocke, C.C.

    1988-02-02

    This patent describes a dual pressure servo control system for a variable displacement hydraulic unit having displacement setting means positioned by a hydraulic servo mechanism. The hydraulic unit is provided with main loop lines at least one of which is capable of being subjected to high main loop pressure during operation of the hydraulic unit, a control line including a displacement control valve providing a controlled flow of fluid under pressure to the servo mechanism, and a source of fluid under pressure for the control line comprising a low pressure source connected to the control line through a check valve and high pressure source comprising of a high pressure control line connected to the control line downstream of the check valve. The high pressure control line includes a flow restriction limiting flow to the control line means and generating a significant flow induced pressure drop in the high pressure control line once movement in the servo mechanism is initiated.

  15. 3. VIEW OF DIABLO CANYON LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM THE VALVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF DIABLO CANYON LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM THE VALVE HOUSE AT ELEVATION 1044, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Diablo Dam, On Skagit River, 6.9 miles upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  16. 7. VIEW OF MAIN CANAL, LOOKING SOUTH, IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF MAIN CANAL, LOOKING SOUTH, IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM FROM THE SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, SECTION 34, T2N, R37E - Woodville Canal Company, West side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Woodville, Bingham County, ID

  17. 5. VIEW SHOWING THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SWAN FALLS DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SHOWING THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SWAN FALLS DAM AND POWER HOUSE, LOOKING UPSTREAM TO SOUTH FROM THE A MOUND OF DEBRIS ABOUT THIRTY TO FORTY FEET ABOVE THE RIVER - Swan Falls Dam, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  18. 14. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM TOWARD SETTLING BASIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM TOWARD SETTLING BASIN, SHOWING RIGHT FORK TO BYPASS, LEFT FORK TO BASIN - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  19. 15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO SETTLING BASIN, SHOWING RIGHT FORK WITH GATE IN PLACE AND A FEW NEEDLES IN PLACE - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  20. 3. EASTERLY VIEW OF THE DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EASTERLY VIEW OF THE DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING THE SOUTHEAST END OF THE DAM, AND THE HOLLOW BAYS. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 29. VIEW OF STONE BUILDING, ABOUT ONE MILE DOWNSTREAM OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF STONE BUILDING, ABOUT ONE MILE DOWNSTREAM OF DAM, USED TO STORE EXPLOSIVES DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF HORSE MESA - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. Wave and particle evolution downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Omidi, N.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Karimabadi, H.

    1995-01-01

    Distributions of ions heated in quasi-perpendicular bow shocks have large perpendicular temperature anisotropies that provide free energy for the growth of Alfven ion cyclotron (AIC) and mirror waves. These modes are often obsreved in the Earth's magnetosheath. Using two-dimensional hybrid simulations, we show that these waves are produced near the shock front and convected downstream rather than being produced locally downstream. The wave activity reduces the proton anisotropy to magnetosheath levels within a few tens of gyroradii of the shock but takes significantly longer to reduce the anisotropy of He(++) ions. The waves are primarily driven by proton anisotropy and the dynamics of the helium ions is controlled by the proton waves. Downstream of high Mach number shocks, mirror waves compete effectively with AIC waves. Downstream of low Mach number shocks, AIC waves dominate.

  3. 10. VIEW WEST TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAY FROM UNDERSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW WEST TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SPILLWAY FROM UNDERSIDE OF GARDEN STATE PARKWAY ABUTMENT - Upper Doughty Dam, 200 feet west of Garden State Parkway, 1.7 miles west of Absecon, Egg Harbor City, Atlantic County, NJ

  4. COMPLETED STRUCTURE. View is eastsoutheast of downstream side of bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COMPLETED STRUCTURE. View is east-southeast of downstream side of bridge, from beyond confluence of Trinity and South Fork Trinity Rivers - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  5. 7. View to southeast. View of downstream side of bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View to southeast. View of downstream side of bridge from confluence of Trinity and South Fork Trinity Rivers. (90mm Lens) - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  6. LOOKING EASTSOUTHEAST. Showing downstream side of completed bridge, from confluence ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING EAST-SOUTHEAST. Showing downstream side of completed bridge, from confluence of Trinity and South Fork Trinity Rivers - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  7. 10. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam under construction. Cement ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Downstream face of Mormon Flat Dam under construction. Cement storage shed is at center right. Photographer unknown, September 1924. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  8. 27. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT DOWNSTREAM END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DETAIL VIEW OF CONCRETE MONOLITH CONSTRUCTION AT DOWNSTREAM END OF WEST MAIN LOCK WALL, LOOKiNG SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  9. 32. Otter Lake Dam. View from downstream show how the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Otter Lake Dam. View from downstream show how the dam blends into its environment. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  10. 5. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  11. 6. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  12. 9. DETAIL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DOWNSTREAM MITER GATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DOWNSTREAM MITER GATES FOR NAVIGATION LOCK #1. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  13. 2. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, SHOWING CHANNEL DOWNSTREAM FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST, SHOWING CHANNEL DOWNSTREAM FROM NAVIGATION LOCK #1; MOVABLE BRIDGE IS VISIBLE IN LEFT FOREGROUND. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  14. 40. Reservoir behind Pleasant Dam, looking downstream, spillway is at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Reservoir behind Pleasant Dam, looking downstream, spillway is at right. Photographer unknown, c. late 1920s. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Downstream face of Agua Fria project's diversion dam showing initial masonry construction and poured concrete capping. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 57. Downstream side of left section of diversion dam. Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Downstream side of left section of diversion dam. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 55. Downstream face of diversion dam looking northwest. Photographer Mark ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Downstream face of diversion dam looking northwest. Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 28. View of construction shops looking west and downstream. Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. View of construction shops looking west and downstream. Photographer unknown, October 29, 1926. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. 70. Downstream view of Waddell Dam spillway and taintor gates. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Downstream view of Waddell Dam spillway and taintor gates. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 42. View of emergency spillway excavation looking downstream from spillway. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. View of emergency spillway excavation looking downstream from spillway. Photographer unknown, 1929. Source: ADWR. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 69. View of downstream face from west or right abutment. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. View of downstream face from west or right abutment. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 49. Downstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam with sluice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Downstream face of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam with sluice opening at center. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  3. 51. Downstream end of diversion tunnel around east end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Downstream end of diversion tunnel around east end of Humbug Creek Diversion Dam. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. 65. Close up view of downstream face of arch, buttress ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Close up view of downstream face of arch, buttress ties and roadway support work. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 27. Evening view of downstream face of Pleasant Dam under ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Evening view of downstream face of Pleasant Dam under construction. Part of construction camp housing is visible in foreground. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  6. 2. NORTHERLY VIEW OF THE DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. NORTHERLY VIEW OF THE DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING THE NORTHWEST END OF THE DAM, THE CONTROL HOUSE, AND SPILLWAY CHUTE. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 9. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH OF DOWNSTREAM SIDES OF ALL THREE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH OF DOWNSTREAM SIDES OF ALL THREE BRIDGES, SHOWING PROXIMITY OF BRIDGE TO ONE ANOTHER - Van Duzen River Bridge, Spanning Van Duzen River at CA State Highway 101, Alton, Humboldt County, CA

  8. 7. Contextual view to eastnortheast showing downstream (west) side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Contextual view to east-northeast showing downstream (west) side of bridge in setting, depicting dense riparian nature of area. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  9. MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, FROM DOWNSTREAM (TO RIGHT), NOTE SAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, FROM DOWNSTREAM (TO RIGHT), NOTE SAND AND SILT SLUICE GATE FOR DIVERSION DAM ON LEFT, VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Main Canal Headworks, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  10. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING CREST AND DOWNSTREAM FACE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF DAM, SHOWING CREST AND DOWNSTREAM FACE, WITH CONCRETE EXTENSION IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTH - High Mountain Dams in Bonneville Unit, Fire Lake Dam, Wasatch National Forest, Kamas, Summit County, UT

  11. 2. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF THE SOUTH CHANNEL DAM, LOOKING WEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, South Channel Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  12. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF CCCBUILT RIVERCOBBLE WING WALL ON DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF CCC-BUILT RIVER-COBBLE WING WALL ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF OUTLET WORKS AT DAM 87, LOOKING WEST - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 87, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  13. 15. WAIKOLU STREAM CROSSING NO. 1, VIEW DOWNSTREAM ACROSS TOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. WAIKOLU STREAM CROSSING NO. 1, VIEW DOWNSTREAM ACROSS TOP OF STRUCTURE. LINE IS BURIED BEYOND. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  14. 14. WAIKOLU STREAM CROSSING NO. 1, VIEW DOWNSTREAM WITH PALI ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. WAIKOLU STREAM CROSSING NO. 1, VIEW DOWNSTREAM WITH PALI SEEN IN BACKGROUND. AQUEDUCT CROSSES AT RIGHT. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  15. DOWNSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL VIEW WITH DOG HOUSE. NOTE CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DOWNSTREAM LOCK GATE DETAIL VIEW WITH DOG HOUSE. NOTE CONTROL ARM AND GEAR FOR GATE. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Illinois Waterway, Dresden Island Lock and Dam , 7521 North Lock Road, Channahon, Will County, IL

  16. 10. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING EAST OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. OBLIQUE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING EAST OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE FROM YOLO COUNTY SIDE OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  17. 8. EMPTY LOCK CHAMBER FROM DOWNSTREAM (WEST) END, WITH VISITORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EMPTY LOCK CHAMBER FROM DOWNSTREAM (WEST) END, WITH VISITORS CENTER (LEFT) AND LOCKMASTER'S HOUSE ON NORTH BANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  18. 6. DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF LOWER MITER GATES WITH FULL LOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF LOWER MITER GATES WITH FULL LOCK CHAMBER, VISITORS, AND LOCKMASTER'S HOUSE IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  19. EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF UPSTREAM WATERSHED ACTIVITIES TO DOWNSTREAM STREAMFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking the impacts of upstream activities such as urban development to changes in downstream streamflow is critical to achieving a balance between economic development and environmental protection as a basis for sustainable watershed development. This paper presents a modeling a...

  20. View of downstream debris field at the Merry Generator House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of downstream debris field at the Merry Generator House, showing possible concrete generator seats, looking south - Arthur Holmes Merry Generator House, Signal Lake North of Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  1. 18. GENERAL VIEW OF THE OUTLET STRUCTURE LOOKING DOWNSTREAM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. GENERAL VIEW OF THE OUTLET STRUCTURE LOOKING DOWNSTREAM AT WEST ABUTMENT.... Volume XVI, No. 13, July 26, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  2. 16. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF OUTLET STRUCTURE AND OUTLET CHANNEL, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF OUTLET STRUCTURE AND OUTLET CHANNEL, FROM WEST END OF EMBANKMENT. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  3. 23. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF COMPLETED OUTLET CONTROL STRUCTURE.... Volume XIX, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF COMPLETED OUTLET CONTROL STRUCTURE.... Volume XIX, No. 8, April 12, 1940. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  4. 28. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF ROCK PAVING OPERATIONS ON LEFT BANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF ROCK PAVING OPERATIONS ON LEFT BANK OF OUTLET CHANNEL.... Volume XVI, No. 18, September 29, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  5. 14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race and trestle used to carry excavated rock and construction materials across tail race. Photo c. 1909. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  6. 8. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM OUTLET CULVERT AND WING RETAINING WALLS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM OUTLET CULVERT AND WING RETAINING WALLS, LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Twin Pots Dam, Ashley National Forest, 10.1 miles North of Mountain Home, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  7. 34. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF COOLIDGE DAM COMPLETED. POWER HOUSE, INTAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF COOLIDGE DAM COMPLETED. POWER HOUSE, INTAKE TOWERS, WEST SPILLWAY CHANNEL AND DECORATIVE EAGLES ALL CLEARLY VISIBLE, c. 1928 - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  8. 14. VIEW OF DAM SITE, LOOKING SOUTH (DOWNSTREAM). MIXING PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF DAM SITE, LOOKING SOUTH (DOWNSTREAM). MIXING PLANT IS VISIBLE AT RIGHT, COFFER DAM IS UPSTREAM OF PLACING TOWER. EAST DOME IS VISIBLE AT LEFT OF TOWER, c. 1927 - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  9. Renormalization group optimized perturbation theory at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneur, Jean-Loïc; Pinto, Marcus B.

    2015-12-01

    A recently developed variant of the so-called optimized perturbation theory (OPT), making it perturbatively consistent with renormalization group (RG) properties, RGOPT, was shown to drastically improve its convergence for zero temperature theories. Here the RGOPT adapted to finite temperature is illustrated with a detailed evaluation of the two-loop pressure for the thermal scalar λ ϕ4 field theory. We show that already at the simple one-loop level this quantity is exactly scale-invariant by construction and turns out to qualitatively reproduce, with a rather simple procedure, results from more sophisticated resummation methods at two-loop order, such as the two-particle irreducible approach typically. This lowest order also reproduces the exact large-N results of the O (N ) model. Although very close in spirit, our RGOPT method and corresponding results differ drastically from similar variational approaches, such as the screened perturbation theory or its QCD-version, the (resummed) hard thermal loop perturbation theory. The latter approaches exhibit a sensibly degrading scale dependence at higher orders, which we identify as a consequence of missing RG invariance. In contrast RGOPT gives a considerably reduced scale dependence at two-loop level, even for relatively large coupling values √{λ /24 }˜O (1 ), making results much more stable as compared with standard perturbation theory, with expected similar properties for thermal QCD.

  10. Mesoscale Probing of Local Perturbations in PBX-driven Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Igor; Guirguis, Raafat; Rodrigues, Luis; Mendes, Ricardo; Plaksin, Svyatoslav; ADAI, Univ of Coimbra; NSWC-IH Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Efforts are aimed on experimental studies of how to improve a dynamic performance of the shaped charge jet. We postulated four basic elements to the problem: (1) The fluctuations in properties inherent in PBXs cause kinetic localizations in the detonation reaction zone (DRZ) structure, which cause (2) perturbations in the detonation products velocity and pressure, which induce (3) Perturbations in the response of the PBX-driven liner; and (4) Local perturbations/instabilities in liner are amplified during its collapse phase causing micro-fragmentations and ejected debris from the cumulative jet at initial stage, and then the incoherence and premature breakup of the resulting shaped charge jet. Spatially-resolved scenarios of each of phenomena (1-4) were obtained in experiments with copper-liners and HMX-based PBXs fabricated on maximum packing density of crystalline constituents, in which the DRZ-induced perturbations were recorded and quantitatively measured in the mesoscale range with application of the 96-channel optical analyzer MCOA-UC. Obtained experimental evidence is indicative that ejecta from the DRZ and ejecta-driven detonation cells are dominating in wide spectrum perturbations translated to a PBX-driven liner. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under the ONR and ONR Global Grants N00014-12-1-0477 and N62909-12-1-7131 with Drs. Clifford Bedford and Shawn Thorne Program Managers.

  11. Electromagnetic energy conversion in downstream fronts from three dimensional kinetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David; Markidis, Stefano; Divin, Andrey

    2014-05-15

    The electromagnetic energy equation is analyzed term by term in a 3D simulation of kinetic reconnection previously reported by Vapirev et al. [J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 118, 1435 (2013)]. The evolution presents the usual 2D-like topological structures caused by an initial perturbation independent of the third dimension. However, downstream of the reconnection site, where the jetting plasma encounters the yet unperturbed pre-existing plasma, a downstream front is formed and made unstable by the strong density gradient and the unfavorable local acceleration field. The energy exchange between plasma and fields is most intense at the instability, reaching several pW/m{sup 3}, alternating between load (energy going from fields to particles) and generator (energy going from particles to fields) regions. Energy exchange is instead purely that of a load at the reconnection site itself in a region focused around the x-line and elongated along the separatrix surfaces. Poynting fluxes are generated at all energy exchange regions and travel away from the reconnection site transporting an energy signal of the order of about S≈10{sup −3}W/m{sup 2}.

  12. Dams and Rivers: A Primer on the Downstream Effects of Dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collier, Michael; Webb, Robert H.; Schmidt, John C.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is charged with monitoring the water and mineral resources of the United States. Beginning in 1889, the Survey established a network of water gaging stations across most of the country's rivers; some also measured sediment content of the water. Consequently, we now have valuable long-term data with which to track water supply, sediment transport, and the occurrence of floods. Many variables affect the flow of water from mountain brook to river delta. Some are short-term perturbations like summer thunderstorms. Others occur over a longer period of time, like the El Ninos that might be separated by a decade or more. We think of these variables as natural occurrences, but humans have exerted some of the most important changes -- water withdrawals for agriculture, inter-basin transfers, and especially the construction of an extensive system of dams. Dams have altered the flow of many of the Nation's rivers to meet societal needs. We expect floods to be contained. Irrigation is possible where deserts once existed. And water is released downstream not according to natural cycles but as dictated by a region's hour-by-hour needs for water or electricity. As a result, river channels below dams have changed dramatically. Depending on annual flow, flood peaks, and a river's sediment load, we might see changes such as sand building up in one channel, vegetation crowding into another, and extensive bank erosion in another. This Circular explores the emerging scientific arena of change in rivers below dams. This science tries first to understand and then anticipate changes to river beds and banks, and to riparian habitats and animal communities. To some degree, these downstream changes can be influenced by specific strategies of dam management. Scientists and resource managers have a duty to assemble this information and present it without bias to the rest of society. Society can then more intelligently choose a balance between the benefits and adverse

  13. Continuous pressure letdown system

    DOEpatents

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.; Matthews, David R.; Langowski, Terry

    2010-06-08

    A continuous pressure letdown system connected to a hopper decreases a pressure of a 2-phase (gas and solid) dusty gas stream flowing through the system. The system includes a discharge line for receiving the dusty gas from the hopper, a valve, a cascade nozzle assembly positioned downstream of the discharge line, a purge ring, an inert gas supply connected to the purge ring, an inert gas throttle, and a filter. The valve connects the hopper to the discharge line and controls introduction of the dusty gas stream into the discharge line. The purge ring is connected between the discharge line and the cascade nozzle assembly. The inert gas throttle controls a flow rate of an inert gas into the cascade nozzle assembly. The filter is connected downstream of the cascade nozzle assembly.

  14. Charge-exchange Induced Modulation of the Heliosheath Ion Distribution Downstream of the Termination Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, H. J.; Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the evolution of the solar wind ion distribution function alongthe plasma flow downstream from the termination shock induced by chargeexchange processes with cold interstellar H-atoms. We start from a kineticphase space transport equation valid in the bulk frame of the plasma flowthat takes into account convective changes, cooling processes, energydiffusion and ion injection, and describes solar wind and pick-up ionsas a co-moving, isotropic, joint ion population. From this kinetic transportequation one can ascend to an equation for the pressure moment of the iondistribution function, a so-called pressure transport equation, describingthe evolution of the ion pressure in the comoving rest frame. Assuming thatthe local ion distribution can be represented by an adequate kappa functionwith a kappa parameter that varies with the streamline coordinate, weobtain an ordinary differential equation for kappa as function of thestreamline coordinate s. With this result then we gain the heliosheath iondistribution function downstream of the termination shock. The latter thencan be used to predict the Voyager-2 measured moments of the distributionfunction like ion density and ion temperature, and it can also be used topredict spectral fluxes of ENA`s originating from these ions and registeredby IBEX-Hi and IBEX-Lo.We especially analyse the solar wind ion temperature decreasemeasured by Voyager-2 between the years 2008 to 2011 and try to explain itas a charge-exchange induced cooling of the ion distribution function duringthe associated ion convection period.

  15. Neptune's story. [Triton's orbit perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Murray, N.; Longaretti, P. Y.; Banfield, D.

    1989-01-01

    It is conjectured that Triton was captured from a heliocentric orbit as the result of a collision with what was then one of Neptune's regular satellites. The immediate post-capture orbit was highly eccentric. Dissipation due to tides raised by Neptune in Triton caused Triton's orbit to evolve to its present state in less than one billion years. For much of this time Triton was almost entirely molten. While its orbit was evolving, Triton cannibalized most of the regular satellites of Neptune and also perturbed Nereid, thus accounting for that satellite's highly eccentric and inclined orbit. The only regular satellites of Neptune that survived were those that formed well within 5 Neptune radii, and they move on inclined orbits as the result of chaotic perturbations forced by Triton.

  16. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  17. The status of perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.K.

    1988-10-01

    The advances in perturbative QCD are reviewed. The status of determinations of the coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub S/ and the parton distribution functions is presented. New theoretical results on the spin dependent structure functions of the proton are also reviewed. The theoretical description of the production of vector bosons, jets and heavy quarks is outlined with special emphasis on new results. Expected rates for top quark production at hadronic colliders are presented. 111 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Quantum fields with classical perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Dereziński, Jan

    2014-07-15

    The main purpose of these notes is a review of various models of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) involving quadratic Lagrangians. We discuss scalar and vector bosons, spin 1/2 fermions, both neutral and charged. Beside free theories, we study their interactions with classical perturbations, called, depending on the context, an external linear source, mass-like term, current or electromagnetic potential. The notes may serve as a first introduction to QFT.

  19. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  20. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the ''MSR scheme'' which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the {mu} of MS. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like {mu} in MS). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q{approx}1 GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS.

  1. Quantifying dynamic and postural balance difficulty during gait perturbations using stabilizing/destabilizing forces.

    PubMed

    Ilmane, Nabil; Croteau, Simon; Duclos, Cyril

    2015-02-01

    Intensity of balance exercises used to reduce fall risk is often poorly quantified. The study aimed to test whether balance difficulty can be rated during gait perturbations against balance difficulty during gait without perturbation, using the stabilizing/destabilizing forces. These forces represent the difficulty to maintain balance as the theoretical forces necessary to cancel body velocity and to set the body into an unstable posture, respectively. Ten healthy subjects walked on a split-belt treadmill, that also generated perturbations. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected during gait at comfortable and fast speeds without perturbation, and in five trials at comfortable speed with perturbations. Perturbations consisted of increasing or decreasing the speed of one belt to three different levels in each direction in a random order during the stance phase of 12 random steps per trial. The difficulty of maintaining balance was measured during the perturbation and the three following recovery steps. Compared to comfortable speed, higher stabilizing and lower destabilizing forces indicated higher balance difficulty during the perturbation step for faster-belt perturbations, and recovery steps for slower-belt perturbations. This was also associated with the center of mass shifted forward, and moving faster, and with the center of pressure closer to the forward limit of the base of support. Difficulty increased proportionally with the intensity of perturbation and was significantly higher for the more intense perturbations than at fast speed. Thus, the stabilizing/destabilizing forces seem adequate to evaluate balance difficulty during gait perturbations and could be used to determine the optimal difficulty for balance rehabilitation.

  2. Downstream hydraulic geometry relationships: Gathering reference reach-scale width values from LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, G.; Tarolli, P.; Cazorzi, F.; Dalla Fontana, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper examines the ability of LiDAR topography to provide reach-scale width values for the analysis of downstream hydraulic geometry relationships along some streams in the Dolomites (northern Italy). Multiple reach-scale dimensions can provide representative geometries and statistics characterising the longitudinal variability in the channel, improving the understanding of geomorphic processes across networks. Starting from the minimum curvature derived from a LiDAR DTM, the proposed algorithm uses a statistical approach for the identification of the scale of analysis, and for the automatic characterisation of reach-scale bankfull widths. The downstream adjustment in channel morphology is then related to flow parameters (drainage area and stream power). With the correct planning of a LiDAR survey, uncertainties in the procedure are principally due to the resolution of the DTM. The outputs are in general comparable in quality to field survey measurements, and the procedure allows the quick comparison among different watersheds. The proposed automatic approach could improve knowledge about river systems with highly variable widths, and about systems in areas covered by vegetation or inaccessible to field surveys. With proven effectiveness, this research could offer an interesting starting point for the analysis of differences between watersheds, and to improve knowledge about downstream channel adjustment in relation, for example, to scale and landscape forcing (e.g. sediment transport, tectonics, lithology, climate, geomorphology, and anthropic pressure).

  3. Generalized hydromechanical model for stomatal responses to hydraulic perturbations.

    PubMed

    Kwon, H W; Choi, M Y

    2014-01-01

    Stomata respond in a common pattern to various hydraulic perturbations on any part of the 'soil-plant-air' system: initial transient 'wrong-way' responses and final stationary 'right-way' responses. In order to describe this pattern on the basis of statistical physics, we propose a simple model where turgor pressure of a cell is taken to be a power function of its volume, and obtain results in qualitative agreement with experimental data for responses to a variety of hydraulic perturbations: Firstly, stationary stomatal conductance as a function of the vapor pressure deficit divides into three regimes characterized by sensitivities of the stomatal conductance and the transpiration rate with respect to vapor pressure deficit; secondly, for every hydraulic perturbation, the initial transient 'wrong-way' responses always appear; thirdly, on condition that water is supplied insufficiently, stomatal oscillations are often observed; finally, stomatal responses following leaf excision exhibit, after the initial transient wrong-way responses, slow relaxation to stomatal closing. In particular, comparison of areoles having different numbers of stomata demonstrates that areoles with small numbers of stomata tend to provoke lack of water in the soil as well as in the plant. In addition, our model also describes well dependence of the stomatal conductance on temperature. It may be extended further to describe stomatal responses to other environmental factors such as carbon dioxide, light, and temperature.

  4. Mechanical picture of the linear transient growth of vortical perturbations in incompressible smooth shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagelishvili, George; Hau, Jan-Niklas; Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The linear dynamics of perturbations in smooth shear flows covers the transient exchange of energies between (1) the perturbations and the basic flow and (2) different perturbations modes. Canonically, the linear exchange of energies between the perturbations and the basic flow can be described in terms of the Orr and the lift-up mechanisms, correspondingly for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) perturbations. In this paper the mechanical basis of the linear transient dynamics is introduced and analyzed for incompressible plane constant shear flows, where we consider the dynamics of virtual fluid particles in the framework of plane perturbations (i.e., perturbations with plane surfaces of constant phase) for the 2D and 3D case. It is shown that (1) the formation of a pressure perturbation field is the result of countermoving neighboring sets of incompressible fluid particles in the flow, (2) the keystone of the energy exchange mechanism between the basic flow and perturbations is the collision of fluid particles with the planes of constant pressure in accordance with the classical theory of elastic collision of particles with a rigid wall, making the pressure field the key player in this process, (3) the interplay of the collision process and the shear flow kinematics describes the transient growth of plane perturbations and captures the physics of the growth, and (4) the proposed mechanical picture allows us to reconstruct the linearized Euler equations in spectral space with a time-dependent shearwise wave number, the linearized Euler equations for Kelvin modes. This confirms the rigor of the presented analysis, which, moreover, yields a natural generalization of the proposed mechanical picture of the transient growth to the well-established linear phenomenon of vortex-wave-mode coupling.

  5. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Space physics and plasma physics experiments that can be performed from the space shuttle were identified. Potential experiment concepts were analyzed to derive requirements for a spaceborne experiment facility. The laboratory, known as the Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory consists of a 33-foot pallet of instruments connected to a 25-foot pressurized control module. Two 50-meter booms, two subsatellites, a high power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator array, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform are the primary systems deployed from the pallet. The pressurized module contains all the control and display equipment required to conduct the experiments, and life support and power subsystems.

  6. Studies of Alkali Sorption Kinetics for Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion by High Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, K.J.; Willenborg, W.; Fricke, C.; Prikhodovsky, A.; Hilpert, K.; Singheiser, L.

    2002-09-20

    This work describes the first approach to use High Pressure Mass Spectrometry (HPMS) for the quantification and analysis of alkali species in a gas stream downstream a sorbent bed of different tested alumosilicates.

  7. Downstream Yangtze River levels impacted by Three Gorges Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jida; Sheng, Yongwei; Gleason, Colin J.; Wada, Yoshihide

    2013-12-01

    Changes in the Yangtze River level induced by large-scale human water regulation have profound implications on the inundation dynamics of surrounding lakes/wetlands and the integrity of related ecosystems. Using in situ measurements and hydrological simulation, this study reveals an altered Yangtze level regime downstream from the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) to the Yangtze estuary in the East China Sea as a combined result of (i) TGD’s flow regulation and (ii) Yangtze channel erosion due to reduced sediment load. During the average annual cycle of TGD’s regular flow control in 2009-2012, downstream Yangtze level variations were estimated to have been reduced by 3.9-13.5% at 15 studied gauging stations, manifested as evident level decrease in fall and increase in winter and spring. The impacts on Yangtze levels generally diminished in a longitudinal direction from the TGD to the estuary, with a total time lag of ˜9-12 days. Chronic Yangtze channel erosion since the TGD closure has lowered water levels in relation to flows at most downstream stations, which in turn counteracts the anticipated level increase by nearly or over 50% in winter and spring while reinforcing the anticipated level decrease by over 20% in fall. Continuous downstream channel erosion in the near future may further counteract the benefit of increased Yangtze levels during TGD’s water supplement in winter and accelerate the receding of inundation areas/levels of downstream lakes in fall.

  8. Modeling downstream fining in sand-bed rivers. I: Formulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, S.; Parker, G.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a numerical modeling formulation is presented for simulation of the development of the longitudinal profile and bed sediment distribution in sand-bed rivers. The objective of the model application, which is presented in the companion paper (Wright and Parker, 2005), is to study the development of two characteristics of large, low-slope, sand-bed rivers: (1) a downstream decrease in bed slope (i.e. concave upward longitudinal profile) and (2) a downstream decrease in characteristic bed sediment diameter (e.g. the median bed surface size D50). Three mechanisms that lead to an upward concave profile and downstream fining are included in the modeling formulation: (1) a delta prograding into standing water at the downstream boundary, (2) sea-level rise, and (3) tectonic subsidence. In the companion paper (Wright and Parker, 2005) the model is applied to simulate the development of the longitudinal profile and downstream fining in sand-bed rivers flowing into the ocean during the past 5000 years of relatively slow sea-level rise. ?? 2005 International Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Research.

  9. Mortality of zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, veligers during downstream transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horvath, T.G.; Lamberti, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    1. Streams flowing from lakes which contain zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, provide apparently suitable habitats for mussel colonization and downstream range expansion, yet most such streams contain few adult mussels. We postulated that mussel veligers experience high mortality during dispersal via downstream transport. They tested this hypothesis in Christiana Creek, a lake-outlet stream in south-western Michigan, U.S.A., in which adult mussel density declined exponentially with distance downstream. 2. A staining technique using neutral red was developed and tested to distinguish quickly live and dead veligers. Live and dead veligers were distinguishable after an exposure of fresh samples to 13.3 mg L-1 of neutral red for 3 h. 3. Neutral red was used to determine the proportion of live veligers in samples taken longitudinally along Christiana Creek. The proportion of live veligers (mean ?? SE) declined from 90 ?? 3% at the lake outlet to 40 ?? 8% 18 km downstream. 4. Veligers appear to be highly susceptible to damage by physical forces (e.g. shear), and therefore, mortality in turbulent streams could be an important mechanism limiting zebra mussel dispersal to downstream reaches. Predictions of zebra mussel spread and population growth should consider lake-stream linkages and high mortality in running waters.

  10. Geometric Hamiltonian structures and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, S.

    1984-08-01

    We have been engaged in a program of investigating the Hamiltonian structure of the various perturbation theories used in practice. We describe the geometry of a Hamiltonian structure for non-singular perturbation theory applied to Hamiltonian systems on symplectic manifolds and the connection with singular perturbation techniques based on the method of averaging.

  11. Superconvergent perturbation method in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, W. )

    1995-02-27

    An analog of Kolmogorov's superconvergent perturbation theory in classical mechanics is constructed for self-adjoint operators. It is different from the usual Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory and yields expansions for eigenvalues and eigenvectors in terms of functions of the perturbation parameter.

  12. Investigating the role of vibrotactile noise in early response to perturbation.

    PubMed

    Hur, Pilwon; Wan, Yao-Hung; Seo, Na Jin

    2014-06-01

    Timely reaction to perturbation is important in activities of daily living. Modulation of reaction time to and early recovery from perturbation via vibrotactile noise was investigated. It was hypothesized that subthreshold vibrotactile noise applied to the upper extremity can accelerate a person's reaction to and recovery from handle perturbation. This intervention was developed based on previous studies in which the earliest cue available for people to detect handle perturbation was somatosensation detecting changes in pressure on the hand whose sensitivity can improve with subthreshold vibrotactile noise. To induce a handle perturbation, a sudden upward load was applied to the handle that subjects were lightly grasping. Eighteen healthy subjects were instructed to stop the handle from moving up when they detected the perturbation. The muscle reaction time and handle stabilization time with and without vibrotactile noise were determined. The results showed that the muscle reaction time and handle stabilization time significantly decreased by 3 ms ( ) and 6 ms ( ), respectively, when vibrotactile noise was applied to the upper extremity, regardless of where the noise was applied among four different locations within the upper extremity ( p > 0.05). In conclusion, the application of subthreshold vibrotactile noise enhanced persons' muscle reaction time to handle perturbation and led to early recovery from the perturbation. Use of the vibrotactile noise may increase a person's ability to rapidly respond to perturbation of a grasped object in potentially dangerous situations such as holding onto ladder rungs from elevation or manipulating knives.

  13. Application of Perturbation Method in Investigating the Interaction of thin Shock with Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, X.; Zank, G. P.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Shaikh, D.

    2006-09-26

    A 2D hydrodynamical model describing the interaction of thin shock with turbulence is developed by adopting a multi-scale perturbation analysis. This is extended to a 2D MHD model. The interaction is found to be governed by a two-dimentional Burger's equation involving ''perturbation terms''. Different perturbation profiles are tested with numerical simulations to show how the shock front is modified by turbulence. The results indicate that while turbulence can balance the nonlinear steepening of shock waves at some regions, it also helps to create a higher jump in physical quantities at other regions. The plasma medium in these regions can therefore experience higher compression, which will result in a downstream state that differs from the usual Rankine-Hugoniot state.

  14. Rotor wake mixing effects downstream of a compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindranath, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental study of rotor wake was conducted in the trailing-edge and near-wake regions of a moderately loaded compressor rotor blade using a rotating triaxial hot-wire probe in a rotating frame of reference. The flow-field was surveyed very close to the trailing-edge as well as inside the annulus- and hub-wall boundary layers. The large amount of data acquired during this program has been analyzed to discern the decay effects as well as the spanwise variation of three components of velocity, three components of intensities and three components of shear stresses. The data set also include extensive information on the variation of the flow properties downstream. The other derived quantities include wake momentum thickness and deviation angles at various spanwise and downstream locations. These data are presented and interpreted, with emphasis on the downstream mixing as well as endwall-wake interaction effects.

  15. Critical effects of downstream boundary conditions on vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are used to study the critical effects of the downstream boundary conditions on the supersonic vortex breakdown. The present study is applied to two supersonic vortex breakdown cases. In the first case, quasi-axisymmetric supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct, and in the second case, quasi-axisymmetric supersonic swirling jet, that is issued from a nozzle into a supersonic jet of lower Mach number, is considered. For the configured duct flow, four different types of downstream boundary conditions are used, and for the swirling jet flow from the nozzle, two types of downstream boundary conditions are used. The solutions are time accurate which are obtained using an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme.

  16. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Lee, Su-In

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed—having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  17. Transition duct with divided upstream and downstream portions

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Maldonado, Jaime Javier; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Flanagan, James Scott

    2015-07-14

    Turbine systems are provided. In one embodiment, a turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion extending from the inlet and a downstream portion extending from the outlet. The turbine system further includes a rib extending from an outer surface of the duct passage, the rib dividing the upstream portion and the downstream portion.

  18. Perturbation analyses of intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yohei M; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2011-08-01

    Conformational fluctuations of a protein molecule are important to its function, and it is known that environmental molecules, such as water molecules, ions, and ligand molecules, significantly affect the function by changing the conformational fluctuations. However, it is difficult to systematically understand the role of environmental molecules because intermolecular interactions related to the conformational fluctuations are complicated. To identify important intermolecular interactions with regard to the conformational fluctuations, we develop herein (i) distance-independent and (ii) distance-dependent perturbation analyses of the intermolecular interactions. We show that these perturbation analyses can be realized by performing (i) a principal component analysis using conditional expectations of truncated and shifted intermolecular potential energy terms and (ii) a functional principal component analysis using products of intermolecular forces and conditional cumulative densities. We refer to these analyses as intermolecular perturbation analysis (IPA) and distance-dependent intermolecular perturbation analysis (DIPA), respectively. For comparison of the IPA and the DIPA, we apply them to the alanine dipeptide isomerization in explicit water. Although the first IPA principal components discriminate two states (the α state and PPII (polyproline II) + β states) for larger cutoff length, the separation between the PPII state and the β state is unclear in the second IPA principal components. On the other hand, in the large cutoff value, DIPA eigenvalues converge faster than that for IPA and the top two DIPA principal components clearly identify the three states. By using the DIPA biplot, the contributions of the dipeptide-water interactions to each state are analyzed systematically. Since the DIPA improves the state identification and the convergence rate with retaining distance information, we conclude that the DIPA is a more practical method compared with the

  19. Transport Studies Using Perturbative Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hogeweij, G.M.D.

    2004-03-15

    By inducing a small electron temperature perturbation in a plasma in steady state one can in principle determine the conductive and convective components of the electron heat ux, and the associated thermal diffusivity and convection velocity. The same can be done for other plasma parameters, like density or ion temperature.In this paper experimental and analysis techniques are briey reviewed. The fundamental question whether the uxes are linear functions of the gradients or not is discussed. Experimental results are summarized, including so-called 'non-local' phenomena.

  20. Perturbation analyses of intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yohei M.; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-08-01

    Conformational fluctuations of a protein molecule are important to its function, and it is known that environmental molecules, such as water molecules, ions, and ligand molecules, significantly affect the function by changing the conformational fluctuations. However, it is difficult to systematically understand the role of environmental molecules because intermolecular interactions related to the conformational fluctuations are complicated. To identify important intermolecular interactions with regard to the conformational fluctuations, we develop herein (i) distance-independent and (ii) distance-dependent perturbation analyses of the intermolecular interactions. We show that these perturbation analyses can be realized by performing (i) a principal component analysis using conditional expectations of truncated and shifted intermolecular potential energy terms and (ii) a functional principal component analysis using products of intermolecular forces and conditional cumulative densities. We refer to these analyses as intermolecular perturbation analysis (IPA) and distance-dependent intermolecular perturbation analysis (DIPA), respectively. For comparison of the IPA and the DIPA, we apply them to the alanine dipeptide isomerization in explicit water. Although the first IPA principal components discriminate two states (the α state and PPII (polyproline II) + β states) for larger cutoff length, the separation between the PPII state and the β state is unclear in the second IPA principal components. On the other hand, in the large cutoff value, DIPA eigenvalues converge faster than that for IPA and the top two DIPA principal components clearly identify the three states. By using the DIPA biplot, the contributions of the dipeptide-water interactions to each state are analyzed systematically. Since the DIPA improves the state identification and the convergence rate with retaining distance information, we conclude that the DIPA is a more practical method compared with the

  1. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  2. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-06-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; we will publish the results of our thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  3. Potential Flow Downstream of the Heliospheric Terminal Shock: A Non-Spherical Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, Steven; Suess, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    We have solved for the potential flow downstream of the terminal shock of the solar wind in the limit of small departures from a spherical shock due to a latitudinal ram pressure variation in the supersonic solar wind. The solution connects anisotropic streamlines at the shock to uniform streamlines down the heliotail because we use a non-slip boundary condition on the heliopause at large radii. The rotational velocity about the heliotail in the near-field solution decays as the fourth power of distance from the shock. The polar divergence of the streamlines will have consequences for the previously discussed magnetic pressure ridge that may build-up just inside the heliopause.

  4. Potential flow downstream of the heliospheric terminal shock: A non-spherical shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, Steven; Suess, Steven T.

    1994-01-01

    We have solved for the potential flow downstream of the terminal shock of the solar wind in the limit of small departures from a spherical shock due to a latitudinal ram pressure variation in the supersonic solar wind. The solution connects anisotropic streamlines at the shock to uniform streamlines down the heliotail because we use a non-slip boundary condition on the heliopause at large radii. The rotational velocity about the heliotail in the near-field solution decays as the fourth power of distance from the shock. The polar divergence of the streamlines will have consequences for the previously discussed magnetic pressure ridge that may build-up just inside the heliopause.

  5. TYPE III RADIO BURSTS PERTURBED BY WEAK CORONAL SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2012-07-10

    Some type III bursts are observed to undergo sudden flux modifications, e.g., reductions and intensifications, when type III beams cross shocks in the upper corona or solar wind. First simulations are presented for type III bursts perturbed by weak coronal shocks, which type III beams traverse. The simulations incorporate spatially localized jumps in plasma density and electron and ion temperatures downstream of a shock. A shock is predicted to produce significant modulations to a type III burst: (1) a broadband flux reduction or frequency gap caused by the shock's density jump, (2) a narrowband flux intensification originating from where the downstream plasma density locally has a small gradient, (3) a possible intensification from the shock front or just upstream, and (4) changes in the frequency drift rate profile and the temporal evolution of radiation flux at frequencies corresponding to the shocked plasma. The modulations are caused primarily by fundamental modifications to the radiation processes in response to the shocked density and temperatures. The predicted intensifications and reductions appear qualitatively consistent with the available small number of reported observations, although it is unclear how representative these observations are. It is demonstrated that a weak shock can cause an otherwise radio-quiet type III beam to produce observable levels of narrowband radio emission. The simulations suggest that type III bursts with frequency-time fine structures may provide a tool to probe shocks in the corona and solar wind, especially for weak shocks that do not radiate by themselves.

  6. Characteristics of a separating confluent boundary layer and the downstream wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adair, Desmond; Horne, W. Clifton

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of pressure and velocity characteristics are presented and analyzed for flow over and downstream of a NACA 4412 airfoil equipped with a NACA 4415 single-slotted flap at high angle of attack and close to maximum lift. The flow remained attached over the main element while a large region of recirculating flow occurred over the aft 61 percent of the flap. The airfoil configuration was tested at a Mach number of 0.09 and a chord Reynolds number of 1.8x10 to the 6th power in the NASA Ames Research Center 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. Measurement of mean and fluctuation velocities were obtained in regions of recirculation and high turbulence intensity using 3-D laser velocimetry. In regions where the flow had a preferred direction and relatively low turbulence intensity, hot-wire anemometry was used. Emphasis was placed on obtaining characteristics in the confluent boundary layer, the region of recirculating flow, and in the downstream wake. Surface pressure measurements were made on the main airfoil, flap, wind tunnel roof and floor. It is thought likely that because the model is large when compared to the wind tunnel cross section, the wind tunnel floor and ceiling interference should be taken into account when the flow field is calculated.

  7. Scalar perturbations in a Friedmann-like metric with non-null Weyl tensor

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, G.B.; Bittencourt, E.; Salim, J.M. E-mail: eduardo.bittencourt@icranet.org

    2015-06-01

    In a previous work the authors have solved the Einstein equations of General Relativity for a class of metrics with constant spatial curvature, where it was found a non vanishing Weyl tensor in the presence of a primordial magnetic field with an anisotropic pressure component. Here, we perform the perturbative analysis of this model in order to study the gravitational stability under linear scalar perturbations. For this purpose, we take the Quasi-Maxwellian formalism of General Relativity as our framework, which offers a naturally covariant and gauge-invariant approach to deal with perturbations that are directly linked to observational quantities. We then compare this scenario with the perturbed dust-dominated Friedmann model emphasizing how the growth of density perturbations are enhanced in our case.

  8. Vector and tensor contributions to the curvature perturbation at second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrilho, Pedro; Malik, Karim A.

    2016-02-01

    We derive the evolution equation for the second order curvature perturbation using standard techniques of cosmological perturbation theory. We do this for different definitions of the gauge invariant curvature perturbation, arising from different splits of the spatial metric, and compare the expressions. The results are valid at all scales and include all contributions from scalar, vector and tensor perturbations, as well as anisotropic stress, with all our results written purely in terms of gauge invariant quantities. Taking the large-scale approximation, we find that a conserved quantity exists only if, in addition to the non-adiabatic pressure, the transverse traceless part of the anisotropic stress tensor is also negligible. We also find that the version of the gauge invariant curvature perturbation which is exactly conserved is the one defined with the determinant of the spatial part of the inverse metric.

  9. "Phonon" scattering beyond perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, WuJie; Ke, XueZhi; Xi, LiLi; Wu, LiHua; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, WenQing

    2016-02-01

    Searching and designing materials with intrinsically low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) have attracted extensive consideration in thermoelectrics and thermal management community. The concept of part-crystalline part-liquid state, or even part-crystalline part-amorphous state, has recently been proposed to describe the exotic structure of materials with chemical- bond hierarchy, in which a set of atoms is weakly bonded to the rest species while the other sublattices retain relatively strong rigidity. The whole system inherently manifests the coexistence of rigid crystalline sublattices and fluctuating noncrystalline substructures. Representative materials in the unusual state can be classified into two categories, i.e., caged and non-caged ones. LTCs in both systems deviate from the traditional T -1 relationship ( T, the absolute temperature), which can hardly be described by small-parameter-based perturbation approaches. Beyond the classical perturbation theory, an extra rattling-like scattering should be considered to interpret the liquid-like and sublattice-amorphization-induced heat transport. Such a kind of compounds could be promising high-performance thermoelectric materials, due to the extremely low LTCs. Other physical properties for these part-crystalline substances should also exhibit certain novelty and deserve further exploration.

  10. Cosmological perturbations and quasistatic assumption in f (R ) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Mu-Chen; Taylor, Andy; Shu, Chenggang; Tu, Hong

    2015-11-01

    f (R ) gravity is one of the simplest theories of modified gravity to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion. Although it is usually assumed that the quasi-Newtonian approach (a combination of the quasistatic approximation and sub-Hubble limit) for cosmic perturbations is good enough to describe the evolution of large scale structure in f (R ) models, some studies have suggested that this method is not valid for all f (R ) models. Here, we show that in the matter-dominated era, the pressure and shear equations alone, which can be recast into four first-order equations to solve for cosmological perturbations exactly, are sufficient to solve for the Newtonian potential, Ψ , and the curvature potential, Φ . Based on these two equations, we are able to clarify how the exact linear perturbations fit into different limits. We find that the Compton length controls the quasistatic behaviors in f (R ) gravity. In addition, regardless the validity of quasistatic approximation, a strong version of the sub-Hubble limit alone is sufficient to reduce the exact linear perturbations in any viable f (R ) gravity to second order. Our findings disagree with some previous studies where we find little difference between our exact and quasi-Newtonian solutions even up to k =10 c-1H0.

  11. Perturbative Methods in Path Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theodore Paul

    This dissertation addresses a number of related questions concerning perturbative "path" integrals. Perturbative methods are one of the few successful ways physicists have worked with (or even defined) these infinite-dimensional integrals, and it is important as mathematicians to check that they are correct. Chapter 0 provides a detailed introduction. We take a classical approach to path integrals in Chapter 1. Following standard arguments, we posit a Feynman-diagrammatic description of the asymptotics of the time-evolution operator for the quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving nonrelativistically through a curved manifold under the influence of an external electromagnetic field. We check that our sum of Feynman diagrams has all desired properties: it is coordinate-independent and well-defined without ultraviolet divergences, it satisfies the correct composition law, and it satisfies Schrodinger's equation thought of as a boundary-value problem in PDE. Path integrals in quantum mechanics and elsewhere in quantum field theory are almost always of the shape ∫ f es for some functions f (the "observable") and s (the "action"). In Chapter 2 we step back to analyze integrals of this type more generally. Integration by parts provides algebraic relations between the values of ∫ (-) es for different inputs, which can be packaged into a Batalin--Vilkovisky-type chain complex. Using some simple homological perturbation theory, we study the version of this complex that arises when f and s are taken to be polynomial functions, and power series are banished. We find that in such cases, the entire scheme-theoretic critical locus (complex points included) of s plays an important role, and that one can uniformly (but noncanonically) integrate out in a purely algebraic way the contributions to the integral from all "higher modes," reducing ∫ f es to an integral over the critical locus. This may help explain the presence of analytic continuation in questions like the

  12. Unsteady turbulence interaction in a tip leakage flow downstream of a simulated axial compressor rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruolong

    The unsteady behavior of a tip leakage flow downstream of a simulated axial compressor rotor has been studied. The Virginia Tech low speed linear cascade wind tunnel was adapted to model the unsteady tip leakage flow produced by a rotor operating in the vortical wakes of a set of stator vanes. The cascade, consisting of 8 GE rotor B blades, has adjustable tip gap, inlet angle of 65.1°, turning angle of 11.8° and solidity of 1.076. The cascade Reynolds number, based on blade chord, was 393,000. A moving end wall was used to simulate the relative motion between rotor and casing, and vortex generators attached to the moving end wall were used to produce an idealized periodic unsteady vortical inflow similar to that shed by the junction of a row of inlet guide vanes. Measurements of the vortical inflow to the cascade produced by the generators and of the mean blade loading at the mid span are presented. The periodic and aperiodic behavior of the tip leakage flow downstream of the cascade, produced by this vortical disturbance, is also presented using phase and time averaged 3-component turbulence and pressure fluctuation measurements. These measurements are made for tip gap from 0.83% to 3.3% chord and streamwise locations from 0.772% to 1.117% blade spacing axially downstream of the cascade. The phase averaged inflow measurements reveal that the inflow produced by the vortex generators consists of a pair asymmetric counter-rotating vortices embedded in a thin (4.6% chord) endwall boundary layer. The vortices extend some 7.4% chord from the end wall. Their strength is about two orders smaller than the typical circulation of the tip leakage vortices produced by the cascade. Phase averaged single point three component hot-wire measurements downstream of the cascade reveal that the vortical inflow is, however, capable of producing significant large scale fluctuations in the size, strength, structure and position of the tip leakage vortex. These effects increase in

  13. 3. VIEW ALONG FLUME TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW ALONG FLUME TOWARD DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE AND POWERHOUSE. FLUME IS FED FROM AFTERBAY OF POWERHOUSE. LOOKING NEAST-NORTHEAST. 90mm lens - Tule River Hydroelectric Complex, Tule River Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Middle Fork of Tule River, Springville, Tulare County, CA

  14. 5. AERATOR VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM. FLUSH VALVE AT RIGHT OPENS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERATOR VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM. FLUSH VALVE AT RIGHT OPENS TO CLEAR THE SYSTEM ABOVE THE SILT AND DEBRIS AND TO STOP THE FLOW OF WATER INTO THE SYSTEM DOWN LINE. BOX FLUME CONTINUES DOWN LINE TO SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  15. Modeling downstream fining in sand-bed rivers. II: Application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, S.; Parker, G.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the model presented in the companion paper, Wright and Parker (2005) is applied to a generic river reach typical of a large, sand-bed river flowing into the ocean in order to investigate the mechanisms controlling longitudinal profile development and downstream fining. Three mechanisms which drive downstream fining are studied: a delta prograding into standing water, sea-level rise, and tectonic subsidence. Various rates of sea-level rise (typical of the late Holocene) and tectonic subsidence are modeled in order to quantify their effects on the degree of profile concavity and downstream fining. Also, several other physical mechanisms which may affect fining are studied, including the relative importance of the suspended versus bed load, the effect of the loss of sediment overbank, and the influence of the delta bottom slope. Finally, sensitivity analysis is used to show that the grain-size distribution at the interface between the active layer and substrate has a significant effect on downstream fining. ?? 2005 International Association of Hydraulic Engineering and Research.

  16. 8. NORTHERLY VIEW OF THE DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTHERLY VIEW OF THE DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING THE HOLLOW BAYS 2, 3, 4, 5, AND 6 AND THE PLUNGE POOL IN THE FOREGROUND. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 1. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHEAST) ALONG WINTER'S RUN TOWARD THE MITCHELL'S ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHEAST) ALONG WINTER'S RUN TOWARD THE MITCHELL'S MILL BRIDGE, SHOWING THE SETTING OF THE BRIDGE. CARRS MILL ROAD APPROACHES THE BRIDGE FROM THE SOUTH, ON THE RIGHT. - Mitchell's Mill Bridge, Spanning Winter's Run on Carrs Mill Road, west of Bel Air, Bel Air, Harford County, MD

  18. 8. Detail view of downstream side, looking south. Buttresses, struttie ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail view of downstream side, looking south. Buttresses, strut-tie beams, and arch-rings are shown. The white discoloration on the concrete is the result of efflorescence. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL WITH CRIB STRUCTURE IN CENTER. BRIDGE FOOTING CRIB STRUCTURE AT RIGHT (Upstream face of Kachess Dam in foreground) - Kachess Dam, Cutoff Channel and Crib Structures, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  20. 16. Detail, lower chord connection point on downstream side at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Detail, lower chord connection point on downstream side at end panel showing lower chord eye bars, vertical tension eye bar, original and supplemental floor beams, turnbuckled lower laterals. View to northwest. - Dry Creek Bridge, Spanning Dry Creek at Cook Road, Ione, Amador County, CA

  1. STEEL ERECTION. View of downstream of bridge, looking southeast from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL ERECTION. View of downstream of bridge, looking southeast from confluence of Trinity and South Fork Trinity rivers. The old suspension bridge is in background - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

  2. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM OF BRIDGE IN ITS SETTING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM OF BRIDGE IN ITS SETTING, LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST FROM PIONEER BRIDGE (BUSINESS ROUTE 80). CAPITOL BANK OF COMMERCE BUILDING IS AT EXTREME RIGHT. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  3. 13. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCH NEAR THE TOP AND THE SPILLWAY OF BIG TUJUNGA DAM, TAKEN ON APRIL 22, 1931, (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON JUNE 5, 1973, BY PHOTOGRAPHER GATSON OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Tujunga Dam, 809 West Big Tujunga Road, Sunland, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 8. Chandler Falls, looking downstream, and downhill from the edge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Chandler Falls, looking downstream, and downhill from the edge of the mesa (from south). Penstock and foundation of the hydropower plant visible on left. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 2. View from the Minnesota bank looking downstream (northnorthwest) at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View from the Minnesota bank looking downstream (north-northwest) at bridge's southwest elevation; the bridge approach is missing - Enloe Bridge No. 90021, Spanning Red River of North between Minnesota & North Dakota on County State Aid Highway 28, Wolverton, Wilkin County, MN

  6. 1. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING DOWNSTREAM END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING DOWNSTREAM END OF NAVIGATION LOCK #1 WITH CHAMBER FILLED; THE CONTROL HOUSE IS ON RIGHT; VIEW IS TAKEN FROM ROOF OF POWERHOUSE #1. - Bonneville Project, Navigation Lock No. 1, Oregon shore of Columbia River near first Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  7. 51. Photocopy of photograph, October 16, 1942. VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photocopy of photograph, October 16, 1942. VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, OF POWER HOUSE DURING FLOOD. (Courtesy of the Potomac Edison Company Library (Hagerstown, MD), Historical Data Files, Dam NO. 5 listing) - Dam No. 5 Hydroelectric Plant, On Potomac River, Hedgesville, Berkeley County, WV

  8. 5. DETAIL OF THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF THE GATES SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF THE GATES SHOWING REINFORCEMENT AND THE TOP EDGE OF THE UPSTREAM MASONRY WALL OF THE HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN FROM THE SOUTHERN EMBANKMENT. VIEW LOOKING NORTH. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  9. 4. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN FROM THE NORTH BANK OF THE CHANNEL BETWEEN THE OLD WORKS AND TWIN LAKES DAM. VIEW LOOKING WEST. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  10. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF THE MASONRY FACING ON THE DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF THE MASONRY FACING ON THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF THE HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  11. 3. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS TAKEN FROM THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE CHANNEL BETWEEN THE OLD WORKS AND TWIN LAKES DAM. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  12. 53. Humbug Creek looking downstream from Humbug Diversion Dam. Retaining ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Humbug Creek looking downstream from Humbug Diversion Dam. Retaining wall for canal is visible beginning at left center. Photographer James Eastwood, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  13. 71. Close up view of downstream view of four large ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Close up view of downstream view of four large taintor gates and section for sector gate (now removed). Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 59. Downstream view of Waddell Dam showing buttress ties, crane, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. Downstream view of Waddell Dam showing buttress ties, crane, housing over penstock outlet (left) and storage building (right). Photographer Mark Durben, 1986. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 10. EASTERLY VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. EASTERLY VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BIG DALTON DAM EXTENDING FROM THE FOOTBRIDGE TO THE GAGING STATION. BIG DALTON DAM IN BACKGROUND. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 13. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION OF BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ARCHES AND ARCH WALLS TAKEN IN 1928-1929 (PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN). PICTURE WAS DEVELOPED FROM COPY NEGATIVES WHICH WERE TAKEN ON 2-15-1973 BY PHOTOGRAPHER D. MEIER OF L.A. COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 2. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM END OF SPILLWAY CHUTE FROM SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM END OF SPILLWAY CHUTE FROM SOUTH SIDE OF PLUNGE POOL, FACING NORTHWEST. CUTOFF WALL AND RETAINING WALL (ON EAST SIDE OF CHUTE) VISIBLE ABOVE WATER LEVEL - Cushman No. 1 Hydroelectric Power Plant, Spillway, North Fork of Skokomish River, 5 miles West of Hood Canal, Hoodsport, Mason County, WA

  18. 19. Downstream elevation of bridge. Original photograph published in The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Downstream elevation of bridge. Original photograph published in The Architect and Engineer, July 1920, p.90, photographer unknown. Note width of channel, and compare to CA-126-5 and CA-126-7. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  19. 12. Close up view of construction on the downstream face. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Close up view of construction on the downstream face. Track at lower center conveyed aggregate from the stream bed to the mixing plant. Photographer unknown, October 15, 1924. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF CHECK DAM, CONCRETE SPILLWAY WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF CHECK DAM, CONCRETE SPILLWAY WITH MORTARED ROCK WALLS, AND CIPPOLETTI WEIR ON TUMALO RESERVOIR FEED CANAL NEAR COLLINS ROAD (IN BACKGROUND). LOOKING NORTHEAST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  1. 60. PANORAMIC VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE. No date, but believed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. PANORAMIC VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE. No date, but believed to be just subsequent to construction. Photograph by C.G. Duffey, Long Beach, California. (38' x 11' framed print). - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 9. OBLIQUE OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE, LOOKING EAST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. OBLIQUE OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE, LOOKING EAST FROM YOLO COUNTY SIDE OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER. VESSEL MOORED AT RIGHT IS DELTA KING, WHICH HAS SINCE BEEN REFURBISHED AND MOVED UPSTREAM OF BRIDGE TO PERMANENT MOORING. CAPITOL BANK OF COMMERCE BUILDING IS BEHIND VESSEL. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  3. 13. OVERALL VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. OVERALL VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF LIFT GATE SECTION (FROM EDGE OF COFFERDAM) WITH BOILERHOUSE AND TAINTER GATE SECTION IN BACKGROUND TO THE RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  4. 1. Contextual view of bridge in setting, from downstream, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Contextual view of bridge in setting, from downstream, view to south from edge of bluff east of Rawson Road. Bridge visible among trees at left center. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  5. 20. VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM SHOWING BUTTS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF DAM SHOWING BUTTS OF LOGS PROJECTING BETWEEN CROSS LOGS. FREQUENTLY WHOLE TREES WERE USED IN CONSTRUCTING THESE DAMS. THE BRANCHES WERE PLACED UPSTREAM AND COVERED WITH EARTH AND STONE TO ANCHOR THEM. Photographed November 6, 1935. - Forge Creek Dam-John Cable Mill, Townsend, Blount County, TN

  6. 8. View of gabeon west wall added downstream from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of gabeon west wall added downstream from the lower dam. Photograph taken from east side of Millstone Creek. VIEW SOUTH - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  7. 9. SOUTHERLY VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. SOUTHERLY VIEW OF THE ACCESS ROAD TO THE DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BIG DALTON DAM EXTENDING FROM THE DAM TO THE FOOTBRIDGE. VIEW FROM BIG DALTON DAM SHOWING THE TOE WEIR IN FOREGROUND AND FOOTBRIDGE IN BACKGROUND. - Big Dalton Dam, 2600 Big Dalton Canyon Road, Glendora, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 23. The Salt River, downstream, from atop Mormon Flat Dam. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. The Salt River, downstream, from atop Mormon Flat Dam. HEFU generator deck is at center bottom. Photographer Mark Durben, 1988. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 5. Downstream elevation, view to southeast. Dark stains on side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Downstream elevation, view to southeast. Dark stains on side of main girder are from deck drain scuppers, marking deck level within the girders. Compare this view and CA-126-7 to CA-126-19 for indication of severity of siltation of Salt River channel has silted. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  10. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF THE POST FALLS POWERHOUSE LOOKING DOWNSTREAM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF THE POST FALLS POWERHOUSE LOOKING DOWNSTREAM. POWER PLANT AND INTAKE GATES ARE IN THE LEFT FOREGROUND, AND THE ATTACHED 'OLD SWITCHING BUILDING' (NOW ABANDONED) IS IN THE RIGHT BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Middle Channel Powerhouse & Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  11. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ('ONE-WAY BRIDGE') THAT PROVIDES PRIVATE (WWP) ACCESS TO THE MIDDLE CHANNEL OF THE POST FALLS POWER PLANT. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  12. 3. DOWNSTREAM AERIAL VIEW OF THE DIVERSION CHANNEL AND CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DOWNSTREAM AERIAL VIEW OF THE DIVERSION CHANNEL AND CONTROL WORKS. THE OUTLET CONTROL TOWER AND THE PIER FOR THE SERVICE BRIDGE ARE SHOWN COMPLETED.... Volume XVIII, No. 11, January 18, 1940. - Prado Dam, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  13. 20. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF THE INTAKE STRUCTURE, SHOWING THE SLIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DOWNSTREAM VIEW OF THE INTAKE STRUCTURE, SHOWING THE SLIDE GATES FOR THE CONTROLLED OUTLET, IN POSITION FOR INSTALLATION.... Volume XVII, No. 15, November 13, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  14. 27. A DOWNSTREAM VIEW FROM THE LOWER END OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. A DOWNSTREAM VIEW FROM THE LOWER END OF THE OUTLET CONDUIT, SHOWING STILLING BASIN BAFFLE PIERS.... Volume XVII, No. 17, November 29, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  15. 17. VIEW EASTERLY ALONG DOWNSTREAM END OF THE SPILLWAY, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW EASTERLY ALONG DOWNSTREAM END OF THE SPILLWAY, SHOWING CELL WALL CONSTRUCTION IN THE CRIB CUTOFF.... Volume XX, No. 4, August 3, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  16. 7. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE AND TOE OF DAM, WITH OUTLET CULVERT AND WING RETAINING WALLS, LOOKING NORTH - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Twin Pots Dam, Ashley National Forest, 10.1 miles North of Mountain Home, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  17. 2. EXTERIOR VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF COTTAGE 191 TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EXTERIOR VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF COTTAGE 191 TAKEN FROM ROOF OF GARAGE 393. CAMERA FACING SOUTHEAST. COTTAGE 181 AND CHILDREN'S PLAY AREA VISIBLE ON EITHER SIDE OF ROOF. GRAPE ARBOR IN FOREGROUND. - Swan Falls Village, Cottage 191, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  18. 3. View of Potomac River looking downstream from the Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Potomac River looking downstream from the Great Falls of the Potomac. Reduction of stream in width during low water, is clearly shown by exposed beach on left side and indisputable normal water height markings shown on right side of photograph. Mr. Horyduzak, photographer, 1943. - Potowmack Company: Great Falls Canal & Locks, Great Falls, Fairfax County, VA

  19. View of Flume Bridge #5 from FS 502 looking downstream ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Flume Bridge #5 from FS 502 looking downstream (south). Bridge is on the left side of the photograph. This is similar to other flume bridges in the system and is the only photograph representing these features. - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Flume Bridge No. 5, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  20. The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Richard B; Boyer, Elizabeth W; Smith, Richard A; Schwarz, Gregory E; Moore, Richard B

    2007-02-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  1. The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality1

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Richard B; Boyer, Elizabeth W; Smith, Richard A; Schwarz, Gregory E; Moore, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  2. The role of headwater streams in downstream water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Boyer, E.W.; Smith, R.A.; Schwarz, G.E.; Moore, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  3. Methylation of Hg downstream from the Bonanza Hg mine, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John E.; Hines, Mark E.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Thoms, Bryn

    2012-01-01

    Speciation of Hg and conversion to methyl-Hg were evaluated in stream sediment, stream water, and aquatic snails collected downstream from the Bonanza Hg mine, Oregon. Total production from the Bonanza mine was >1360t of Hg, during mining from the late 1800s to 1960, ranking it as an intermediate sized Hg mine on an international scale. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution, transport, and methylation of Hg downstream from a Hg mine in a coastal temperate climatic zone. Data shown here for methyl-Hg, a neurotoxin hazardous to humans, are the first reported for sediment and water from this area. Stream sediment collected from Foster Creek flowing downstream from the Bonanza mine contained elevated Hg concentrations that ranged from 590 to 71,000ng/g, all of which (except the most distal sample) exceeded the probable effect concentration (PEC) of 1060ng/g, the Hg concentration above which harmful effects are likely to be observed in sediment-dwelling organisms. Concentrations of methyl-Hg in stream sediment collected from Foster Creek varied from 11 to 62ng/g and were highly elevated compared to regional baseline concentrations (0.11-0.82ng/g) established in this study. Methyl-Hg concentrations in stream sediment collected in this study showed a significant correlation with total organic C (TOC, R2=0.62), generally indicating increased methyl-Hg formation with increasing TOC in sediment. Isotopic-tracer methods indicated that several samples of Foster Creek sediment exhibited high rates of Hg-methylation. Concentrations of Hg in water collected downstream from the mine varied from 17 to 270ng/L and were also elevated compared to baselines, but all were below the 770ng/L Hg standard recommended by the USEPA to protect against chronic effects to aquatic wildlife. Concentrations of methyl-Hg in the water collected from Foster Creek ranged from 0.17 to 1.8ng/L, which were elevated compared to regional baseline sites upstream and downstream

  4. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars in the rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Ielpi, Alessandro; Aldinucci, Mauro; Fustic, Milovan

    2016-04-01

    Classical models developed for ancient fluvial point bars are based on the assumption that meander bends invariably increase their radius as meander-bend apices migrate in a direction transverse to the channel-belt axis (i.e., meander bend expansion). However, many modern meandering rivers are also characterized by down-valley migration of the bend apex, a mechanism that takes place without a significant change in meander radius and wavelength. Downstream-migrating fluvial point bars (DMFPB) are the dominant architectural element of these types of meander belts. Yet they are poorly known from ancient fluvial-channel belts, since their disambiguation from expansional point bars often requires fully-3D perspectives. This study aims to review DMFPB deposits spanning in age from Devonian to Holocene, and to discuss their main architectural and sedimentological features from published outcrop, borehole and 3D-seismic datasets. Fluvial successions hosting DMFPB mainly accumulated in low accommodation conditions, where channel belts were affected by different degrees of morphological (e.g., valleys) or tectonic (e.g., axial drainage of shortening basins) confinement. In confined settings, bends migrate downstream along the erosion-resistant valley flanks and little or no floodplain deposits are preserved. Progressive floor aggradation (e.g., valley filling) allow meander belts with DMFPB to decrease their degree of confinement. In less confined settings, meander bends migrate downstream mainly after impinging against older, erosion-resistant channel fill mud. By contrast, tectonic confinement is commonly associated with uplifted alluvial plains that prevented meander-bend expansion, in turn triggering downstream translation. At the scale of individual point bars, translational morphodynamics promote the preservation of downstream-bar deposits, whereas the coarser-grained upstream and central beds are less frequently preserved. However, enhanced preservation of upstream

  5. A novel virtual hub approach for multisource downstream service integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previtali, Mattia; Cuca, Branka; Barazzetti, Luigi

    2016-08-01

    A large development of downstream services is expected to be stimulated starting from earth observations (EO) datasets acquired by Copernicus satellites. An important challenge connected with the availability of downstream services is the possibility for their integration in order to create innovative applications with added values for users of different categories level. At the moment, the world of geo-information (GI) is extremely heterogeneous in terms of standards and formats used, thus preventing a facilitated access and integration of downstream services. Indeed, different users and data providers have also different requirements in terms of communication protocols and technology advancement. In recent years, many important programs and initiatives have tried to address this issue even on trans-regional and international level (e.g. INSPIRE Directive, GEOSS, Eye on Earth and SEIS). However, a lack of interoperability between systems and services still exists. In order to facilitate the interaction between different downstream services, a new architectural approach (developed within the European project ENERGIC OD) is proposed in this paper. The brokering-oriented architecture introduces a new mediation layer (the Virtual Hub) which works as an intermediary to bridge the gaps linked to interoperability issues. This intermediation layer de-couples the server and the client allowing a facilitated access to multiple downstream services and also Open Data provided by national and local SDIs. In particular, in this paper an application is presented integrating four services on the topic of agriculture: (i) the service given by Space4Agri (providing services based on MODIS and Landsat data); (ii) Gicarus Lab (providing sample services based on Landsat datasets) and (iii) FRESHMON (providing sample services for water quality) and services from a several regional SDIs.

  6. Fully nonlinear and exact perturbations of the Friedmann world model: non-flat background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Hyerim

    2014-07-01

    We extend the fully non-linear and exact cosmological perturbation equations in a Friedmann background universe to include the background curvature. The perturbation equations are presented in a gauge ready form, so any temporal gauge condition can be adopted freely depending on the problem to be solved. We consider the scalar, and vector perturbations without anisotropic stress. As an application, we analyze the equations in the special case of irrotational zero-pressure fluid in the comoving gauge condition. We also present the fully nonlinear formulation for a minimally coupled scalar field.

  7. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Horn, Bart; Parikh, Sarthak

    2016-02-01

    We study pairs of coaxial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  8. Perturbative nature of color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William E.; Liu, James T.; Ren, Hai-cang

    2000-06-01

    Color superconductivity is a possible phase of high density QCD. We present a systematic derivation of the transition temperature T{sub C} from the QCD Lagrangian through study of the di-quark proper vertex. With this approach, we confirm the dependence of T{sub C} on the coupling g, namely T{sub C}{approx}{mu}g{sup -5}e{sup -{kappa}}{sup /g}, previously obtained from the one-gluon exchange approximation in the superconducting phase. The diagrammatic approach we employ allows us to examine the perturbative expansion of the vertex and the propagators. We find an additional O(1) contribution to the prefactor of the exponential from the one-loop quark self energy and that the other one-loop radiative contributions and the two gluon exchange vertex contribution are subleading. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. Robust control with structured perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, Leehyun

    1988-01-01

    Two important problems in the area of control systems design and analysis are discussed. The first is the robust stability using characteristic polynomial, which is treated first in characteristic polynomial coefficient space with respect to perturbations in the coefficients of the characteristic polynomial, and then for a control system containing perturbed parameters in the transfer function description of the plant. In coefficient space, a simple expression is first given for the l(sup 2) stability margin for both monic and non-monic cases. Following this, a method is extended to reveal much larger stability region. This result has been extended to the parameter space so that one can determine the stability margin, in terms of ranges of parameter variations, of the closed loop system when the nominal stabilizing controller is given. The stability margin can be enlarged by a choice of better stabilizing controller. The second problem describes the lower order stabilization problem, the motivation of the problem is as follows. Even though the wide range of stabilizing controller design methodologies is available in both the state space and transfer function domains, all of these methods produce unnecessarily high order controllers. In practice, the stabilization is only one of many requirements to be satisfied. Therefore, if the order of a stabilizing controller is excessively high, one can normally expect to have a even higher order controller on the completion of design such as inclusion of dynamic response requirements, etc. Therefore, it is reasonable to have a lowest possible order stabilizing controller first and then adjust the controller to meet additional requirements. The algorithm for designing a lower order stabilizing controller is given. The algorithm does not necessarily produce the minimum order controller; however, the algorithm is theoretically logical and some simulation results show that the algorithm works in general.

  10. Investigation of environmental perturbations on passive asymmetric satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tate, V.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of environmental perturbations on the attitude of a slow tumbling earth-oriented satellite are investigated. The environmental perturbations considered were aerodynamic drag, gravity-gradient, solar radiation pressure, and magnetic torques. The Euler attitude equations were solved numerically for the Skylab spacecraft. Results are presented for both torque-free motion and for cases in which aerodynamic and gravity-gradient torques are acting in a slow tumble mode. Simulations show gravity-gradient effects on satellite momentum to be cyclic and to increase the precession rate of the angular momentum vector about the radius vector. This also tends to align the minor axis along the radius vector. Aerodynamic drag initially decreases angular momentum, slowly precesses the momentum vector about the radius vector, and finally drives the satellite into an unstable mode. Combined gravity-gradient and aerodynamic torques reduce angular momentum and energy, and induce a steady precession rate of the momentum vector about the radius vector.

  11. Relativistic perturbations in ΛCDM: Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eleonora; Rampf, Cornelius E-mail: cornelius.rampf@port.ac.uk

    2016-01-01

    We study the relativistic dynamics of a pressure-less and irrotational fluid of dark matter (CDM) with a cosmological constant (Λ), up to second order in cosmological perturbation theory. In our analysis we also account for vector and tensor perturbations and include primordial non-Gaussianity. We consider three gauges: the synchronous-comoving gauge, the Poisson gauge and the total matter gauge, where the first is the unique relativistic Lagrangian frame of reference, and the latters are convenient gauge choices for Eulerian frames. Our starting point is the metric and fluid variables in the Poisson gauge up to second order. We then perform the gauge transformations to the synchronous-comoving gauge and subsequently to the total matter gauge. Our expressions for the metrics, densities, velocities, and the gauge generators are novel and coincide with known results in the limit of a vanishing cosmological constant.

  12. Intracranial compensatory mechanisms for volume perturbations: a theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, S; Anand, S

    1993-06-01

    The proposed mathematical formulation accounts for the role of the absorption and production mechanisms of the intracranial cavity. The transport barrier conduction is governed by the pressure gradients across them and hence by the instantaneous flow rates. The above mentioned mechanisms have now been incorporated into a previous model for static changes in the cranial cavity. The integrated model now evolved is simulated for a constant, bolus and sinusoidal infusion. The output has been correlated to experimentally observed trends. The results that emerge, point to a system whose response is sensitive to the nature of CSF volume perturbations. The production and absorption mechanisms function in a relay configuration, whose primary objective is to maintain the base line CSF pressure values when deviations in pressure occur. These mechanisms have a finite activation time which is dependent on the nature of the volume variation.

  13. Investigation of flow pattern downstream of spiral grooved runner cone in pump-turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, T.; Maekawa, M.; Okamoto, N.; Yano, H.; Miyagawa, K.

    2012-11-01

    High amplitude of pressure fluctuation is observed in a draft tube of a hydraulic turbine and a pump-turbine, for the case of partial load operation. Several methods had been reported to mitigate the amplitude so far, such as, air or water injection to the draft tube, fins on the draft tube surface, or runner replacement with optimized velocity profile at runner exit. However, several problems for each method can be considered, such as, negative influence on efficiency, high cost, technical difficulties for installation, and so on. To solve these problems and satisfy the demand for mitigating the amplitude of pressure fluctuation simultaneously, a new runner cone with spiral grooves on the surface was developed. It was developed with unsteady draft tube calculation based on Design of Experiment (DOE) method, and the effect was confirmed by model tests. Finally, developed runner cone was installed to the prototype pump turbine, and predicted performance was confirmed by on-site tests. However, the reason why the grooved runner cone can mitigate the amplitude of pressure fluctuation in draft tube was not clarified. Therefore, numerical investigation focusing around runner cone was carried out. As a result, it was clarified that the velocity profile at runner outlet was modified by the grooved runner cone, such as, reverse flow downstream of runner cone and tangential velocity was reduced. It means the shear stress between main stream and dead water core region was weakened, therefore, it can be estimated that the amplitude of draft pressure fluctuation was reduced.

  14. Kato expansion in quantum canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Andrey

    2016-06-01

    This work establishes a connection between canonical perturbation series in quantum mechanics and a Kato expansion for the resolvent of the Liouville superoperator. Our approach leads to an explicit expression for a generator of a block-diagonalizing Dyson's ordered exponential in arbitrary perturbation order. Unitary intertwining of perturbed and unperturbed averaging superprojectors allows for a description of ambiguities in the generator and block-diagonalized Hamiltonian. We compare the efficiency of the corresponding computational algorithm with the efficiencies of the Van Vleck and Magnus methods for high perturbative orders.

  15. On adiabatic perturbations in the ekpyrotic scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Vikman, A. E-mail: Viatcheslav.Mukhanov@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2010-02-01

    In a recent paper, Khoury and Steinhardt proposed a way to generate adiabatic cosmological perturbations with a nearly flat spectrum in a contracting Universe. To produce these perturbations they used a regime in which the equation of state exponentially rapidly changed during a short time interval. Leaving aside the singularity problem and the difficult question about the possibility to transmit these perturbations from a contracting Universe to the expanding phase, we will show that the methods used in Khoury are inapplicable for the description of the cosmological evolution and of the process of generation of perturbations in this scenario.

  16. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    DOE PAGES

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The wavesmore » grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.« less

  17. Pressure fluctuations beneath instability wavepackets and turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2014-09-09

    To investigate the pressure-fluctuation field beneath turbulent spots in a hypersonic boundary layer, a study was conducted on the nozzle wall of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel. Controlled disturbances were created by pulsed-glow perturbations based on the electrical breakdown of air. Under quiet-flow conditions, the nozzle-wall boundary layer remains laminar and grows very thick over the long nozzle length. This allows the development of large disturbances that can be well-resolved with high-frequency pressure transducers. A disturbance first grows into a second-mode instability wavepacket that is concentrated near its own centreline. Weaker disturbances are seen spreading from the centre. The waves grow and become nonlinear before breaking down to turbulence. The breakdown begins in the core of the packets where the wave amplitudes are largest. Second-mode waves are still evident in front of and behind the breakdown point and can be seen propagating in the spanwise direction. The turbulent core grows downstream, resulting in a spot with a classical arrowhead shape. Behind the spot, a low-pressure calmed region develops. However, the spot is not merely a localized patch of turbulence; instability waves remain an integral part. Limited measurements of naturally occurring disturbances show many similar characteristics. From the controlled disturbance measurements, the convection velocity, spanwise spreading angle, and typical pressure-fluctuation field were obtained.

  18. Spatial Response of Epilithic Diatom Communities to Downstream Nutrient Increases.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Marilia; Oliveira, Maria Angelica; Lobo, Eduardo A

    2015-06-01

    To monitor water quality and investigate relationships between downstream nutrient increases and diatom communities in the Pardo River Basin, Brazil, water and diatom samples were collected between 2005 and 2009. There were significant differences in diatom community composition among all river zones, with the greatest differences found between the upper and lower reaches. Significant changes were detected in relative abundances of diatom species and spatial structuring was evident. Dissolved oxygen, phosphates, turbidity, Eicherichia coli, and total dissolved solids were the most important variables shaping diatom communities, characterizing an organic pollution and eutrophication gradient. However, the hypothesis of sensitive species prevailing upstream and their gradual downstream replacement for more tolerant species was not confirmed because shifts in relative abundances of the same group of species in both the upper and lower reaches of the rivers were identified. PMID:26459823

  19. Dynamics of wakes downstream of wind turbine towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, M. H.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The near field wakes downstream of circular cylinders and of 12 sided cylinders were surveyed in a wind tunnel. Local velocity and velocity deficit diagrams are presented. The variation of turbulence in the wake was surveyed and the frequency of the periodic component of wake motion was determined. Differences between wakes of circular cylinders and of 12 sided cylinders are discussed. Also effects of strakes, orientation of the 12 sided cylinders, and rounding of the corners are noted.

  20. 15. Detail, lower chord connection point on downstream side, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail, lower chord connection point on downstream side, showing pinned connection of lower chord eye bars, laced vertical compression member, diagonal eye bar tension members, turnbuckled diagonal counters, and floor beam. Note also timber floor stringers supported by floor beam, and exposed ends of timber deck members visible at left above lower chord eye bar. View to northwest. - Dry Creek Bridge, Spanning Dry Creek at Cook Road, Ione, Amador County, CA

  1. "No. 172. General view of the dam, looking downstream from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "No. 172. General view of the dam, looking downstream from the east end. F.E.D. June, 1916." Compare this historic image, taken upon dam completion (1916), with current-condition photograph HAER CO-90-1. The dam retains a remarkable degree of integrity of design and setting - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  2. Influence of sediment storage on downstream delivery of contaminated sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmon, D.V.; Reneau, S.L.; Dunne, T.; Katzman, D.; Drakos, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment storage in alluvial valleys can strongly modulate the downstream migration of sediment and associated contaminants through landscapes. Traditional methods for routing contaminated sediment through valleys focus on in-channel sediment transport but ignore the influence of sediment exchanges with temporary sediment storage reservoirs outside the channel, such as floodplains. In theory, probabilistic analysis of particle trajectories through valleys offers a useful strategy for quantifying the influence of sediment storage on the downstream movement of contaminated sediment. This paper describes a field application and test of this theory, using 137Cs as a sediment tracer over 45 years (1952-1997), downstream of a historical effluent outfall at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), New Mexico. The theory is parameterized using a sediment budget based on field data and an estimate of the 137Cs release history at the upstream boundary. The uncalibrated model reasonably replicates the approximate magnitude and spatial distribution of channel- and floodplain-stored 137Cs measured in an independent field study. Model runs quantify the role of sediment storage in the long-term migration of a pulse of contaminated sediment, quantify the downstream impact of upstream mitigation, and mathematically decompose the future 137Cs flux near the LANL property boundary to evaluate the relative contributions of various upstream contaminant sources. The fate of many sediment-bound contaminants is determined by the relative timescales of contaminant degradation and particle residence time in different types of sedimentary environments. The theory provides a viable approach for quantifying the long-term movement of contaminated sediment through valleys. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Alfven waves and associated energetic ions downstream from Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Belcher, J. W.; Richardson, J. D.; Smith, C. W.

    1991-02-01

    Low-frequency waves have been observed in the solar wind downstream from Uranus. These waves are observed by the Voyager spacecraft for more than 2 weeks after the encounter with Uranus and are present during this period whenever the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented such that field lines intersect the Uranian bow shock. The magnetic field and velocity components transverse to the background field are strongly correlated, consistent with the interpretation that these waves are Alfvenic and/or fast-mode waves. The waves appear to propagate along the magnetic field lines outward from Uranus and are right-hand polarized. Theory suggests that these waves are generated in the upstream region by a resonant instability with a proton beam streaming along the magnetic field lines. The solar wind subsequently carries these waves downstream to the spacecraft location. These waves are associated with the presence of energetic ions observed by the low-energy charged particle instrument. These ions appear two days after the start of the wave activity and occur thereafter whenever the Alfven waves occur, increasing in intensity away from Uranus. The ions are argued to originate in the Uranian magnetosphere, but pitch-angle scattering in the upstream region is required to bring them downstream to the spacecraft location.

  4. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Langnau, A.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  5. Non-perturbative approach for curvature perturbations in stochastic δ N formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Tada, Yuichiro E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    In our previous paper [1], we have proposed a new algorithm to calculate the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations generated in inflationary universe with use of the stochastic approach. Since this algorithm does not need the perturbative expansion with respect to the inflaton fields on super-horizon scale, it works even in highly stochastic cases. For example, when the curvature perturbations are very large or the non-Gaussianities of the curvature perturbations are sizable, the perturbative expansion may break down but our algorithm enables to calculate the curvature perturbations. We apply it to two well-known inflation models, chaotic and hybrid inflation, in this paper. Especially for hybrid inflation, while the potential is very flat around the critical point and the standard perturbative computation is problematic, we successfully calculate the curvature perturbations.

  6. Chiral perturbation theory with nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, U.G.

    1991-09-01

    I review the constraints posed on the interactions of pions, nucleons and photons by the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of QCD. The framework to perform these calculations, chiral perturbation theory, is briefly discussed in the meson sector. The method is a simultaneous expansion of the Greens functions in powers of external moments and quark masses around the massless case, the chiral limit. To perform this expansion, use is made of a phenomenological Lagrangian which encodes the Ward-identities and pertinent symmetries of QCD. The concept of chiral power counting is introduced. The main part of the lectures of consists in describing how to include baryons (nucleons) and how the chiral structure is modified by the fact that the nucleon mass in the chiral limit does not vanish. Particular emphasis is put on working out applications to show the strengths and limitations of the methods. Some processes which are discussed are threshold photopion production, low-energy compton scattering off nucleons, {pi}N scattering and the {sigma}-term. The implications of the broken chiral symmetry on the nuclear forces are briefly described. An alternative approach, in which the baryons are treated as very heavy fields, is touched upon.

  7. Degenerate Open Shell Density Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenik, Mark; Dunlap, Brett

    The density perturbation theory (DPT) methodology we have developed applies the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem to perturbations in density functional theory. At each order, the energy is directly minimized with respect to the density at all lower orders. The difference between the perturbed and unperturbed densities is expanded in terms of a finite number of basis functions, and a single matrix inversion in this space reduces the complexity of the problem to that of non-interacting perturbation theory. For open-shell systems with symmetry, however, the situation becomes more complex. Typically, the perturbation will break the symmetry leading to a zeroth-order shift in the Kohn-Sham potential. Because the symmetry breaking is independent of the strength of the perturbation, the mapping from the initial to the perturbed KS potential is discontinuous and techniques from perturbation theory for noninteracting particles fail. We describe a rigorous formulation of DPT for use in systems that display an initial degeneracy, such as atoms and Fe55Cp*12 clusters and present initial calculations on these systems.

  8. Double soft theorem for perturbative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Arnab Priya

    2016-09-01

    Following up on the recent work of Cachazo, He and Yuan [1], we derive the double soft graviton theorem in perturbative gravity. We show that the double soft theorem derived using CHY formula precisely matches with the perturbative computation involving Feynman diagrams. In particular, we find how certain delicate limits of Feynman diagrams play an important role in obtaining this equivalence.

  9. Examination of a genetic algorithm for the application in high-throughput downstream process development.

    PubMed

    Treier, Katrin; Berg, Annette; Diederich, Patrick; Lang, Katharina; Osberghaus, Anna; Dismer, Florian; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Compared to traditional strategies, application of high-throughput experiments combined with optimization methods can potentially speed up downstream process development and increase our understanding of processes. In contrast to the method of Design of Experiments in combination with response surface analysis (RSA), optimization approaches like genetic algorithms (GAs) can be applied to identify optimal parameter settings in multidimensional optimizations tasks. In this article the performance of a GA was investigated applying parameters applicable in high-throughput downstream process development. The influence of population size, the design of the initial generation and selection pressure on the optimization results was studied. To mimic typical experimental data, four mathematical functions were used for an in silico evaluation. The influence of GA parameters was minor on landscapes with only one optimum. On landscapes with several optima, parameters had a significant impact on GA performance and success in finding the global optimum. Premature convergence increased as the number of parameters and noise increased. RSA was shown to be comparable or superior for simple systems and low to moderate noise. For complex systems or high noise levels, RSA failed, while GA optimization represented a robust tool for process optimization. Finally, the effect of different objective functions is shown exemplarily for a refolding optimization of lysozyme.

  10. Intelligent perturbation algorithms for space scheduling optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtzman, Clifford R.

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent perturbation algorithms for space scheduling optimization are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: optimization of planning, scheduling, and manifesting; searching a discrete configuration space; heuristic algorithms used for optimization; use of heuristic methods on a sample scheduling problem; intelligent perturbation algorithms are iterative refinement techniques; properties of a good iterative search operator; dispatching examples of intelligent perturbation algorithm and perturbation operator attributes; scheduling implementations using intelligent perturbation algorithms; major advances in scheduling capabilities; the prototype ISF (industrial Space Facility) experiment scheduler; optimized schedule (max revenue); multi-variable optimization; Space Station design reference mission scheduling; ISF-TDRSS command scheduling demonstration; and example task - communications check.

  11. The recursion relation in Lagrangian perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rampf, Cornelius

    2012-12-01

    We derive a recursion relation in the framework of Lagrangian perturbation theory, appropriate for studying the inhomogeneities of the large scale structure of the universe. We use the fact that the perturbative expansion of the matter density contrast is in one-to-one correspondence with standard perturbation theory (SPT) at any order. This correspondence has been recently shown to be valid up to fourth order for a non-relativistic, irrotational and dust-like component. Assuming it to be valid at arbitrary (higher) order, we express the Lagrangian displacement field in terms of the perturbative kernels of SPT, which are itself given by their own and well-known recursion relation. We argue that the Lagrangian solution always contains more non-linear information in comparison with the SPT solution, (mainly) if the non-perturbative density contrast is restored after the displacement field is obtained.

  12. Covariant generalization of cosmological perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Hoegdahl, Janne; Nurmi, Sami; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2007-01-15

    We present an approach to cosmological perturbations based on a covariant perturbative expansion between two worldlines in the real inhomogeneous universe. As an application, at an arbitrary order we define an exact scalar quantity which describes the inhomogeneities in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and which is conserved on all scales for a barotropic ideal fluid. We derive a compact form for its conservation equation at all orders and assign it a simple physical interpretation. To make a comparison with the standard perturbation theory, we develop a method to construct gauge-invariant quantities in a coordinate system at arbitrary order, which we apply to derive the form of the nth order perturbation in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and its exact evolution equation. On large scales, this provides the gauge-invariant expression for the curvature perturbation on uniform density hypersurfaces and its evolution equation at any order.

  13. IR divergences in inflation and entropy perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Wei; Brandenberger, Robert; Gao, Xian E-mail: xgao@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2012-06-01

    We study leading order perturbative corrections to the two point correlation function of the scalar field describing the curvature perturbation in a slow-roll inflationary background, paying particular attention to the contribution of entropy mode loops. We find that the infrared divergences are worse than in pure de Sitter space: they are power law rather than logarithmic. The validity of perturbation theory and thus of the effective field theory of cosmological perturbations leads to stringent constraints on the coupling constants describing the interactions, in our model the quartic self-interaction coupling constant of the entropy field. If the self coupling constant is larger than some critical value which depends in particular on the duration of the inflationary phase, then perturbation theory breaks down. Our analysis may have implications for the stability of de Sitter space: the quantum effects which lead to an instability of de Sitter space will be larger in magnitude in the presence of entropy fluctuations.

  14. Single bubble perturbation in cavitation proximity of solid glass: hot spot versus distance.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth; Suslick, Kenneth

    2014-02-28

    A systematic study of the energy loss of a cavitation bubble in a close proximity of a glass surface is introduced for the first time in a low acoustic field (1.2-2.4 bar). Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is used as a tool to predict the temperature and pressure decrease of bubble (μm) versus surface distance. A glass as a model system is used to imitate the boundary conditions relevant for nano- or micromaterials. SBSL preequilibrated with 5% argon is perturbed by a glass rod with the tip (Z-perturbation) and with the long axis (X-perturbation) at a defined distance. From 2 mm to 500 μm argon-SBSL lines monotonically narrow and the effective emission temperature decreases from 9000 K to 6800 K comparable to multiple bubbles. The electron density decreases by two orders of magnitude in Z-perturbation and is by a factor of two higher in X-perturbation than the unperturbed cavitating bubble. The perturbed single bubble sonoluminescence pressure decreases from 2700 atm to 1200 atm at 2.4 bar. In water new non-SBSL SiO molecular emission lines are observed and OH emission disappears.

  15. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of ... pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would be evaluated for having high blood pressure. If left ...

  16. Effect of Nozzle Material on Downstream Lateral Injection Cold Spray Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, D.; Leblanc-Robert, S.; Fernández, R.; Farjam, A.; Jodoin, B.

    2016-08-01

    In cold gas dynamic spraying, the gas nature, process stagnation pressure and temperature, and the standoff distance are known to be important parameters that affect the deposition efficiency and coating quality. This investigation attempts to elucidate the effect of nozzle material on coatings produced using a downstream lateral injection cold spray system. Through experimentation, it is shown that the nozzle material has a substantial effect on deposition efficiency and particle velocity. It is proposed that the effects are related to complex interaction between the particles and the internal nozzle walls. The results obtained lead to the conclusion that during the particle/nozzle wall contact, a nozzle with higher thermal diffusivity transfers more heat to the particles. This heat transfer results in lower critical velocities and therefore higher deposition efficiencies, despite a noticeable reduction of particle velocities which is also attributed to particle-nozzle interactions.

  17. A theoretical study of mixing downstream of transverse injection into a supersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Zelazny, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and analytical study was made of mixing downstream of transverse hydrogen injection, from single and multiple orifices, into a Mach 4 air boundary layer over a flat plate. Numerical solutions to the governing three-dimensional, elliptic boundary layer equations were obtained using a general purpose computer program. Founded upon a finite element solution algorithm. A prototype three-dimensional turbulent transport model was developed using mixing length theory in the wall region and the mass defect concept in the outer region. Excellent agreement between the computed flow field and experimental data for a jet/freestream dynamic pressure ratio of unity was obtained in the centerplane region of the single-jet configuration. Poorer agreement off centerplane suggests an inadequacy of the extrapolated two-dimensional turbulence model. Considerable improvement in off-centerplane computational agreement occured for a multi-jet configuration, using the same turbulent transport model.

  18. Effect of initial conditions on turbulent reattachment downstream of a backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.; Johnston, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The reattachment of a fully turbulent, two-dimentional shear layer downstream of a backward-facing step has been studied experimentally. The work examines the effect of variations in inlet conditions on the process of reattachment. A series of experiments was conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel using specialized instrumentation suited to the highly turbulent reversing flow near reattachment. Accurate characterization of the time-mean features of the reattaching flows was possible. Assuming linear scaling normalized on distance from reattachment, distributions of normalized pressure coefficient and forward flow fraction, and time-averaged skin friction coefficient appear universal for two-dimensional reattachment, independent of initial conditions and step height, for given duct geometry (area ratio) and for high step-height Reyolds numbers with thin separating boundary layers. The results suggest universal flow structure in the reattachment zone.

  19. On the role of successive downstream development in East Asian polar air outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, C. H.; Hitchman, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    Common features were drawn from 16 events of wintertime migration of cold Siberian air moving southeastward across the east Asia coast, accompanied by strong northerly winds. Criteria for including an event as an instance of a typical synoptic scale occurrence comprised a surface pressure gradient over Korea exceeding 2.5 mb/100 km, and a drop in the daily mean temperature of over 5 C in one day. The events were required to have at least a 10 day separation. A sequence of events was discerned, including the formation of troughs and ridges over the western north Atlantic 6-7 days before an event, their development and decay downstream from one another across the Eurasian continent, and then an outbreak of polar weather. The troughs and ridges displayed maximum amplitude in the same places in the majority of cases studied, with the center moving along a curved trajectory of the 300 mb flow at nearly 30 deg longitudinally every day.

  20. Tubulin-perturbing naphthoquinone spiroketals.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Raghavan; Hopkins, Tamara D; Thomas, Catherine A; Wipf, Peter; Day, Billy W

    2008-02-01

    Several natural and synthetic naphthoquinone spiroketals are potent inhibitors of the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase redox system. Based on the antimitotic and weak antitubulin actions noted for SR-7 ([8-(furan-3-ylmethoxy)-1-oxo-1,4-dihydronaphthalene-4-spiro-2'-naphtho[1'',8''-de][1',3'][dioxin]), a library of related compounds was screened for tubulin-perturbing properties. Two compounds, TH-169 (5'-hydroxy-4'H-spiro[1,3-dioxolane-2,1'-naphthalen]-4'-one) and TH-223 (5'-methoxy-4'H-spiro[1,3-dioxane-2,1'-naphthalen]-4'-one), had substantial effects on tubulin assembly and were antiproliferative at low micromolar concentrations. TH-169 was the most potent at blocking GTP-dependent polymerization of 10 mum tubulin in vitro with a remarkable 50% inhibitory concentration of ca. 400 nm. It had no effect on paclitaxel-induced microtubule assembly and did not cause microtubule hypernucleation. TH-169 failed to compete with colchicine for binding to beta-tubulin. The 50% antiproliferative concentration of TH-169 against human cancer cells was at or slightly below 1 mum. Flow cytometry showed that 1 mum TH-169 caused an increase in G(2)/M and hypodiploid cells. TH-169 eliminated the PC-3 cells' polyploid population and increased their expression of p21(WAF1) and Hsp70 in a concentration-dependent manner. The antiproliferative effect of TH-169 was irreversible and independent of changes in caspases, actin, tubulin, glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase or Bcl-x(S/L). This structurally simple naphthoquinone spiroketal represents a small molecule, tubulin-interactive agent with a novel apoptotic pathway and attractive biological function. PMID:18194192

  1. Acoustic resonance excitation of turbulent heat transfer and flow reattachment downstream of a fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcan, Claudio; Cukurel, Beni; Shashank, Judah

    2015-12-01

    The current work investigates the aero-thermal impact of standing sound waves, excited in a straight channel geometry, on turbulent, separating and reattaching flow over a fence. Effects of distinct frequency resonant forcing (ReH = 10,050 and f = 122 Hz) are quantified by wall static pressure measurements and detailed convective heat transfer distributions via liquid crystal thermometry. Acoustic boundary conditions are numerically predicted and the computed longitudinal resonance mode shapes are experimentally verified by surface microphone measurements. Findings indicate the presence of a resonant sound field to exert strong influence on local heat transfer downstream of the fence, whereas the boundary layer upstream of the obstacle remains notable unaffected. Upstream shift of the maximum heat transfer location and an earlier pressure recovery indicate a reduction in time averaged flow reattachment length of up to 37 %. Although the streamwise peak Nusselt increased by only 5 %, the heat transfer level in the vicinity of the unexcited reattachment zone was locally enhanced up to 25 %. Despite prominent impact of resonant forcing on the fence wake flow, the total pressure drop penalty remained invariant. Observations demonstrate the significant aero-thermal implications of shear layer excitation by standing sound waves superimposed on the channel flow field.

  2. Acoustic resonance excitation of turbulent heat transfer and flow reattachment downstream of a fence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcan, Claudio; Cukurel, Beni; Shashank, Judah

    2016-10-01

    The current work investigates the aero-thermal impact of standing sound waves, excited in a straight channel geometry, on turbulent, separating and reattaching flow over a fence. Effects of distinct frequency resonant forcing (ReH = 10,050 and f = 122 Hz) are quantified by wall static pressure measurements and detailed convective heat transfer distributions via liquid crystal thermometry. Acoustic boundary conditions are numerically predicted and the computed longitudinal resonance mode shapes are experimentally verified by surface microphone measurements. Findings indicate the presence of a resonant sound field to exert strong influence on local heat transfer downstream of the fence, whereas the boundary layer upstream of the obstacle remains notable unaffected. Upstream shift of the maximum heat transfer location and an earlier pressure recovery indicate a reduction in time averaged flow reattachment length of up to 37 %. Although the streamwise peak Nusselt increased by only 5 %, the heat transfer level in the vicinity of the unexcited reattachment zone was locally enhanced up to 25 %. Despite prominent impact of resonant forcing on the fence wake flow, the total pressure drop penalty remained invariant. Observations demonstrate the significant aero-thermal implications of shear layer excitation by standing sound waves superimposed on the channel flow field.

  3. Alfven waves and associated energetic ions downstream from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Belcher, J.W.; Richardson, J.D. ); Smith, C.W. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors report the observation of low-frequency waves in the solar wind downstream from Uranus. These waves are observed by the Voyager spacecraft for more than 2 weeks after the encounter with Uranus and are present during this period whenever the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented such that the field lines intersect the Uranian bow shock. The magnetic field and velocity components transverse to the background field are strongly correlated, consistent with the interpretation that these waves are Alfvenic and/or fast-mode waves. The waves have a spacecraft frame frequency of about 10{sup {minus}3} Hz, and when first observed near the bow shock have an amplitude comparable to the background field. As the spacecraft moves farther from Uranus, the amplitude decays. The waves appear to propagate along the magnetic field lines outward from Uranus and are right-hand polarized. Theory suggests that these waves are generated in the upstream region by a resonant instability with a proton beam streaming along the magnetic field lines. The solar wind subsequently carries these waves downstream to the spacecraft location. These waves are associated with the presence of energetic (> 28 keV) ions observed by the low-energy charged particle instrument. These ions appear two days after the start of the wave activity and occur thereafter whenever the Alfven waves occur, increasing in intensity away from Uranus. The ions are argued to originate in the Uranian magnetosphere, but pitch-angle scattering in the upstream region is required to bring them downstream to the spacecraft location.

  4. Growth Characteristics Downstream of a Shallow Bump: Computation and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Grosch, Chester E.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity field created by a shallow bump on a wall revealed that an energy peak in the spanwise spectrum associated with the driver decays and an initially small-amplitude secondary mode rapidly grows with distance downstream of the bump. Linear theories could not provide an explanation for this growing mode. The present Navier-Stokes simulation replicates and confirms the experimental results. Insight into the structure of the flow was obtained from a study of the results of the calculations and is presented.

  5. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Sávio Pinho; Lima, Aline Medeiros; de Souza, Cláudia Regina Batista

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops. PMID:22942725

  6. Downstream System for the Second Axis of the DARHT Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y-J; Bertolini, L; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Cook, E G; Falabella, S; Goldin, F J; Guethlein, G; Ho, D D-M; McCarrick, J F; Nelson, S D; Neurath, R; Paul, A C; Pincosy, P A; Poole, B R; Richardson, R A; Sampayan, S; Wang, L-F; Watson, J A; Westenskow, G A; Weir, J T

    2002-07-15

    This paper presents the physics design of the DARHT-II downstream system, which consists of a diagnostic beam stop, a fast, high-precision kicker system and the x-ray converter target assembly. The beamline configuration, the transverse resistive wall instability and the ion hose instability modeling are presented. They also discuss elimination of spot size dilution during kicker switching and implementation of the foil-barrier scheme to minimize the backstreaming ion focusing effects. Finally, they present the target converter's configuration, and the simulated DARHT-II x-ray spot sizes and doses. Some experimental results, which support the physics design, are also presented.

  7. Persistence despite perturbations for interacting populations.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Sebastian J

    2006-10-21

    Two definitions of persistence despite perturbations in deterministic models are presented. The first definition, persistence despite frequent small perturbations, is shown to be equivalent to the existence of a positive attractor i.e. an attractor bounded away from extinction. The second definition, persistence despite rare large perturbations, is shown to be equivalent to permanence i.e. a positive attractor whose basin of attraction includes all positive states. Both definitions set up a natural dichotomy for classifying models of interacting populations. Namely, a model is either persistent despite perturbations or not. When it is not persistent, it follows that all initial conditions are prone to extinction due to perturbations of the appropriate type. For frequent small perturbations, this method of classification is shown to be generically robust: there is a dense set of models for which persistent (respectively, extinction prone) models lies within an open set of persistent (resp. extinction prone) models. For rare large perturbations, this method of classification is shown not to be generically robust. Namely, work of Josef Hofbauer and the author have shown there are open sets of ecological models containing a dense sets of permanent models and a dense set of extinction prone models. The merits and drawbacks of these different definitions are discussed.

  8. Adaptive Modeling Procedure Selection by Data Perturbation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongli; Shen, Xiaotong

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many procedures have been developed to deal with the high-dimensional problem that is emerging in various business and economics areas. To evaluate and compare these procedures, modeling uncertainty caused by model selection and parameter estimation has to be assessed and integrated into a modeling process. To do this, a data perturbation method estimates the modeling uncertainty inherited in a selection process by perturbing the data. Critical to data perturbation is the size of perturbation, as the perturbed data should resemble the original dataset. To account for the modeling uncertainty, we derive the optimal size of perturbation, which adapts to the data, the model space, and other relevant factors in the context of linear regression. On this basis, we develop an adaptive data-perturbation method that, unlike its nonadaptive counterpart, performs well in different situations. This leads to a data-adaptive model selection method. Both theoretical and numerical analysis suggest that the data-adaptive model selection method adapts to distinct situations in that it yields consistent model selection and optimal prediction, without knowing which situation exists a priori. The proposed method is applied to real data from the commodity market and outperforms its competitors in terms of price forecasting accuracy. PMID:26640319

  9. Axion as a cold dark matter candidate: analysis to third order perturbation for classical axion

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Hyerim; Hwang, Jai-chan; Park, Chan-Gyung E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr

    2015-12-01

    We investigate aspects of axion as a coherently oscillating massive classical scalar field by analyzing third order perturbations in Einstein's gravity in the axion-comoving gauge. The axion fluid has its characteristic pressure term leading to an axion Jeans scale which is cosmologically negligible for a canonical axion mass. Our classically derived axion pressure term in Einstein's gravity is identical to the one derived in the non-relativistic quantum mechanical context in the literature. We present the general relativistic continuity and Euler equations for an axion fluid valid up to third order perturbation. Equations for axion are exactly the same as that of a zero-pressure fluid in Einstein's gravity except for an axion pressure term in the Euler equation. Our analysis includes the cosmological constant.

  10. Perturbation calculation of thermodynamic density of states

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Greg; Schulthess, Thomas C; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    The density of states g( ) is frequently used to calculate the temperature-dependent properties of a thermodynamic system. Here a derivation is given for calculating the warped density of states g ( ) resulting from the addition of a perturbation. The method is validated for a classical Heisenberg model of bcc Fe and the errors in the free energy are shown to be second order in the perturbation. Taking the perturbation to be the difference between a first-principles quantum-mechanical energy and a corresponding classical energy, this method can significantly reduce the computational effort required to calculate g( ) for quantum systems using the Wang-Landau approach.

  11. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  12. Cosmological perturbations and the Weinberg theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Jazayeri, Sadra E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir

    2015-12-01

    The celebrated Weinberg theorem in cosmological perturbation theory states that there always exist two adiabatic scalar modes in which the comoving curvature perturbation is conserved on super-horizon scales. In particular, when the perturbations are generated from a single source, such as in single field models of inflation, both of the two allowed independent solutions are adiabatic and conserved on super-horizon scales. There are few known examples in literature which violate this theorem. We revisit the theorem and specify the loopholes in some technical assumptions which violate the theorem in models of non-attractor inflation, fluid inflation, solid inflation and in the model of pseudo conformal universe.

  13. Shielding of External Magnetic Perturbations By Torque In Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Sabbagh, Steve A.

    2009-08-24

    The imposition of a nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbation on a rotating tokamak plasma requires energy and toroidal torque. Fundamental electrodynamics implies that the torque is essentially limited and must be consistent with the external response of a plasma equilibrium ƒ = j x B. Here magnetic measurements on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) device are used to derive the energy and the torque, and these empirical evaluations are compared with theoretical calculations based on perturbed scalar pressure equilibria ƒ = ∇p coupled with the theory of nonambipolar transport. The measurement and the theory are consistent within acceptable uncertainties, but can be largely inconsistent when the torque is comparable to the energy. This is expected since the currents associated with the torque are ignored in scalar pressure equilibria, but these currents tend to shield the perturbation.

  14. Fully non-linear cosmological perturbations of multicomponent fluid and field systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim; Park, Chan-Gyung

    2016-09-01

    We present fully non-linear and exact cosmological perturbation equations in the presence of multiple components of fluids and minimally coupled scalar fields. We ignore the tensor-type perturbation. The equations are presented without taking the temporal gauge condition in the Friedmann background with general curvature and the cosmological constant. We include the anisotropic stress. Even in the absence of anisotropic stress of individual component, the multiple component nature introduces the anisotropic stress in the collective fluid quantities. We prove the Newtonian limit of multiple fluids in the zero-shear gauge and the uniform-expansion gauge conditions, present the Newtonian hydrodynamic equations in the presence of general relativistic pressure in the zero-shear gauge, and present the fully non-linear equations and the third-order perturbation equations of the non-relativistic pressure fluids in the CDM-comoving gauge.

  15. Initial PVO Evidence of Electron Depletion Signatures Downstream of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Hartle, R. E.; Perez-de-Tejada, H.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    This first analysis of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) plasma analyzer electron measurements obtained in early 1992 during the PVO entry phase of the mission indicates the presence downstream from the terminator of a depletion or "bite out" of energetic ionosheath electrons similar to that observed on Mariner 10. There is more than one possible explanation for this energetic electron depletion. If it is due to atmospheric scattering, the electrons traveling along draped magnetic flux tubes that thread through the Venus neutral atmosphere would lose energy from impact ionization with oxygen. The cross-section for such electron impact ionization of oxygen has a peak near 100 eV, and it remains high above this energy, so atmospheric loss could provide a natural process for electrons at these energies to be selectively removed. In this case, our results are consistent with the Kar et al. (1994) study of PVO atmospheric entry ion mass spectrometer data which indicates that electron impact plays a significant role in maintaining the nightside ionosphere. Although it is appealing to interpret the energetic electron depletion in terms of direct atmospheric scattering, alternatively it could result from strong draping which connects the depletion region magnetically to the weak downstream bow shock and thereby reduces the electron source strength.

  16. Initial PVO evidence of electron depletion signatures downstream of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Hartle, R. E.; Perez-De-tejada, H.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    This first analysis of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) plasma analyzer electron measurements obtained in early 1992 during teh PVO entry phase of the mission indicates the presence downstream from the terminator of a depletion or 'bite out' of energetic ionosheath electrons similar to that observed on Mariner 10. There is more than one possible explanation for this energetic electron depletion. If it is due to atmospheric scattering, the electrons traveling along draped magnetic flux tubes that thread through the Venus neutral atmosphere would lose energy from impact ionization with oxygen. The cross-section for such electron impact ionization of oxygen has a peak near 100 eV, and it remains high above this energy, so atmospheric loss could provde a natural process for electrons at these energies to be selectively removed. In this case, our results are consistent with the Kar et al. (1994) study of PVO atmospheric entry ion mass spectrometer data, which indicates that electron impact plays a significant role in maintaining the nightside ionosphere. Although it is appealing to interpret the energetic electron depletion in terms of direct atmospheric scattering, alternatively it could result from strong draping which connects the depletion region magnetically to the weak downstream bow shock and thereby reduces the electron source strength.

  17. Volumetric Velocity Fields Downstream of a 2-Bladed Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troolin, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Tip vortices of axial-flow turbines are important in understanding the mean and turbulent characteristics of the wake. Volumetric 3-component velocimetry (V3V) was used to examine the flow downstream of a model two-bladed turbine in air. The turbine had a diameter of 177.8 mm and was powered by a motor operating at approximately 150 rpm. The measurement volume (50 × 50 × 20 mm) was positioned approximately 5 mm downstream of the blade tip, in order to examine the tip vortex structure. The V3V system utilized three 4MP cameras with 85 mm lenses positioned in a fixed triangular frame located at a distance of 450 mm from the back of the measurement volume. The illumination source was a 200 mJ dual-head pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 7.25 Hz and illuminating 1 micron olive oil droplets as tracer particles. The particle images were then analyzed to produce volumetric vector fields. The focus was placed on visualizing the complex interaction between the turbine tip vortices. Insights on the tip vortex dynamics and three dimensional characteristics of the wake flow will be discussed.

  18. Downstream processing of biopharmaceutical proteins produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Buyel, Johannes Felix; Fischer, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    All biological platforms for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins produce an initially turbid extract that must be clarified to avoid fouling sensitive media such as chromatography resins. Clarification is more challenging if the feed stream contains large amounts of dispersed particles, because these rapidly clog the filter media typically used to remove suspended solids. Charged polymers (flocculants) can increase the apparent size of the dispersed particles by aggregation, facilitating the separation of solids and liquids, and thus reducing process costs. However, many different factors can affect the behavior of flocculants, including the pH and conductivity of the medium, the size and charge distribution of the particulates, and the charge density and molecular mass of the polymer. Importantly, these properties can also affect the recovery of the target protein and the overall safety profile of the process. We therefore used a design of experiments approach to establish reliable predictive models that characterize the impact of flocculants during the downstream processing of biopharmaceutical proteins. We highlight strategies for the selection of flocculants during process optimization. These strategies will contribute to the quality by design aspects of process development and facilitate the development of safe and efficient downstream processes for plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins. PMID:24637706

  19. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Hannah; Svensson, Emma; Gigg, Camilla; Jarvius, Malin; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G) CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G) CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs. PMID:26700307

  20. Ferric chloride based downstream process for microalgae based biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Kim, Bohwa; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Dong Yeon; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-01

    In this study, ferric chloride (FeCl3) was used to integrate downstream processes (harvesting, lipid extraction, and esterification). At concentration of 200 mg/L and at pH 3, FeCl3 exhibited an expected degree of coagulation and an increase in cell density of ten times (170 mg/10 mL). An iron-mediated oxidation reaction, Fenton-like reaction, was used to extract lipid from the harvested biomass, and efficiency of 80% was obtained with 0.5% H2O2 at 90 °C. The iron compound was also employed in the esterification step, and converted free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters under acidic conditions; thus, the fatal problem of saponification during esterification with alkaline catalysts was avoided, and esterification efficiency over 90% was obtained. This study clearly showed that FeCl3 in the harvesting process is beneficial in all downstream steps and have a potential to greatly reduce the production cost of microalgae-originated biodiesel.

  1. Differential amplification of structural perturbations in weakly coupled MEMS resonators.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatanathan, Pradyumna; Yan, Jize; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2010-03-01

    Measuring shifts in eigenstates caused by vibration localization in an array of weakly coupled resonators offers 2 distinct advantages for sensor applications compared with the technique of simply measuring resonant frequency shifts: 1) orders of magnitude enhancement in parametric sensitivity; and 2) intrinsic common mode rejection. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate the common mode rejection in weakly coupled MEMS resonators with significant potential implications for sensor applications. The vibration behavior is studied in pairs of nearly identical MEMS resonators that are electrically coupled and subjected to small perturbations in stiffness under different ambient pressure and temperature. The shifts in the eigenstates for the same parametric perturbation in stiffness are experimentally demonstrated to be more than 3 orders of magnitude greater than corresponding resonant frequency variations. They are also shown to remain relatively constant to variations in ambient temperature and pressure. This increased relative robustness to environmental drift, along with the advantage of ultra-high parametric sensitivity, opens the door to an alternative approach to achieving higher sensitivity and stability in micromechanical sensors.

  2. Experimental investigation of primary and corner shock boundary layer interactions at mild back pressure ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburk, M.; Narayanaswamy, V.

    2016-08-01

    Unstart of rectangular inlets occurs as a result of interactions between shock-induced separation units along the floor/ceiling, corner, and sidewalls. While a significant body of literature exists regarding the individual flow interactions at the inlet floor/ceiling (called primary separation) and sidewalls, limited efforts have focused on the mean and dynamic features of the corner separation. Experiments are conducted to investigate primary and corner shock boundary layer interactions (SBLI) with the objectives of elucidating the flow interactions that occur in the corner, and characterizing the interaction between the corner and primary separation units at mild back pressure ratios. Surface streakline flow visualization and high-frequency wall static pressure measurements are performed along the centerline and corner regions of shock-induced flow separation generated by a 12° compression ramp in a Mach 2.5 flow. Sidewall fences that extend upstream of the leading edge of the flat plate generate corner separation of adequate size to determine the mean flow structures, characterize the unsteady motions, and investigate the mechanisms that drive the unsteadiness of primary and corner SBLI. Results show that the corner and primary SBLI units differ fundamentally in both their mean and unsteady features and their response to upstream and downstream flow perturbations. These observations suggest that the two behave as independent units at this relatively low shock-induced back pressure ratio.

  3. Perturbations induced by electrostatic probe in the discharge of Hall thrusters.

    PubMed

    Grimaud, L; Pétin, A; Vaudolon, J; Mazouffre, S

    2016-04-01

    Emissive and Langmuir probes are two widely used plasma diagnostic techniques that, when used properly, give access to a wide range of information on the plasma's ions and electrons. We show here that their use in small and medium power Hall thrusters produces large perturbations in the discharge characteristics. Potential measurements performed by both probes and non-invasive Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy highlight significant discrepancies in the discharge profile. This phenomenon is observed both in the 200 W and the 1.5 kW-class thrusters. In order to have a better understanding of these perturbations, ion velocity distribution functions are acquired by LIF spectroscopy at different positions in the smaller thruster, with and without the probes. Emissive probes are shown to produce the biggest perturbation, shifting the acceleration region upstream. The probe insertion is also shown to have significant effect on both the average discharge current, increasing it by as much as 30%, and its harmonic content in both amplitude and spectrum. These perturbations appear as the probe tip passes a threshold located between 0 and 5 mm downstream of the thruster exit plane.

  4. Perturbations induced by electrostatic probe in the discharge of Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, L.; Pétin, A.; Vaudolon, J.; Mazouffre, S.

    2016-04-01

    Emissive and Langmuir probes are two widely used plasma diagnostic techniques that, when used properly, give access to a wide range of information on the plasma's ions and electrons. We show here that their use in small and medium power Hall thrusters produces large perturbations in the discharge characteristics. Potential measurements performed by both probes and non-invasive Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy highlight significant discrepancies in the discharge profile. This phenomenon is observed both in the 200 W and the 1.5 kW-class thrusters. In order to have a better understanding of these perturbations, ion velocity distribution functions are acquired by LIF spectroscopy at different positions in the smaller thruster, with and without the probes. Emissive probes are shown to produce the biggest perturbation, shifting the acceleration region upstream. The probe insertion is also shown to have significant effect on both the average discharge current, increasing it by as much as 30%, and its harmonic content in both amplitude and spectrum. These perturbations appear as the probe tip passes a threshold located between 0 and 5 mm downstream of the thruster exit plane.

  5. Perturbations of the Black Hole-Torus System: Instabilities and QPOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Orhan

    2016-07-01

    The existence of the black hole (BH)-torus system has been given a considerable attention to explain the variability of X-ray and Gamma-ray (γ-ray) data. The perturbation of the black hole-torus system creates instabilities and some of these instabilities are responsible for a quasi-periodic oscillation. In this talk, we present the results from numerical simulation of the dynamical instability of a pressure-supported relativistic torus, rotating around the black hole with a constant specific angular momentum on a fixed space-time background, in case of perturbation. The types of instabilities and their amplitudes strongly depend on what kind of perturbation is applied. The types of perturbations can be a blob of hot gas, Bondi-Hoyle accretion from a finite distance, radial and angular velocity perturbations of the stable accreted torus, and non-spherical accretion as a consequence of isotropic fall of the spherical-shell which has finite thickness. We study the effects of perturbations onto the torus-black hole system by solving the hydrodynamical equations and we have found that the torus around the black hole would have an instability, which is called the Papaloizou-Pringle, and a quasi-periodic oscillation only if we choose a suitable perturbations and initial data. It is noted that, while the perturbations, which are called blob of hot gas, radial velocity perturbations and Bondi-Hoyle accretion, create the Papaloizou-Pringle instability, the Papaloizou-Pringle instability is softly developed and removed in a short time scale for spherical shell accretion. Our studies also indicate that QPOs are common phenomena on the disc around the black holes. If the accretion disc or torus has a quasi-periodic behavior, it emits continuous radiation during the oscillation.

  6. SHARP ENTRYWISE PERTURBATION BOUNDS FOR MARKOV CHAINS

    PubMed Central

    THIEDE, ERIK; VAN KOTEN, BRIAN; WEARE, JONATHAN

    2015-01-01

    For many Markov chains of practical interest, the invariant distribution is extremely sensitive to perturbations of some entries of the transition matrix, but insensitive to others; we give an example of such a chain, motivated by a problem in computational statistical physics. We have derived perturbation bounds on the relative error of the invariant distribution that reveal these variations in sensitivity. Our bounds are sharp, we do not impose any structural assumptions on the transition matrix or on the perturbation, and computing the bounds has the same complexity as computing the invariant distribution or computing other bounds in the literature. Moreover, our bounds have a simple interpretation in terms of hitting times, which can be used to draw intuitive but rigorous conclusions about the sensitivity of a chain to various types of perturbations. PMID:26491218

  7. Controlling roll perturbations in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Beatus, Tsevi; Guckenheimer, John M.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Owing to aerodynamic instabilities, stable flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here, we investigate how flies control perturbations along their body roll angle, which is unstable and their most sensitive degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly and apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air. Fast video shows flies correct perturbations up to 100° within 30 ± 7 ms by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear proportional–integral controller. For more aggressive perturbations, we show evidence for nonlinear and hierarchical control mechanisms. Flies respond to roll perturbations within 5 ms, making this correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom. PMID:25762650

  8. Quarks in Coulomb gauge perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Popovici, C.; Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2009-02-15

    Coulomb gauge quantum chromodynamics within the first order functional formalism is considered. The quark contributions to the Dyson-Schwinger equations are derived and one-loop perturbative results for the two-point functions are presented.

  9. The Perturbational MO Method for Saturated Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes a theoretical approach using nonbonding MO's and perturbation theory to correlate properties of saturated hydrocarbons. Discussion is limited to correctly predicted using this method. Suggests calculations can be carried out quickly in organic chemistry. (Author/SA)

  10. Primordial perturbations during a slow expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Yun-Song

    2007-10-01

    Recently, it has been shown that a slow expansion, which is asymptotically a static state in infinite past and may be described as an evolution with γ≪-1, of early universe may lead to the generation of primordial perturbation responsible for the structure formation of observable universe. However, its feasibility depends on whether the growing mode of Bardeen potential before phase transition can be inherited by the constant mode of curvature perturbation after phase transition. In this paper, we phenomenally regard this slow expansion as that driven by multi-NEC (null energy condition) violating scalar fields. We calculate the curvature perturbation induced by the entropy perturbation before phase transition and find that the spectrum is naturally scale invariant with a slight red tilt. The result has an interesting similarity to that of slow roll inflation.

  11. Cosmological perturbations in mimetic Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroja, Frederico; Bartolo, Nicola; Karmakar, Purnendu; Matarrese, Sabino

    2016-04-01

    We study linear scalar perturbations around a flat FLRW background in mimetic Horndeski gravity. In the absence of matter, we show that the Newtonian potential satisfies a second-order differential equation with no spatial derivatives. This implies that the sound speed for scalar perturbations is exactly zero on this background. We also show that in mimetic G3 theories the sound speed is equally zero. We obtain the equation of motion for the comoving curvature perturbation (first order differential equation) and solve it to find that the comoving curvature perturbation is constant on all scales in mimetic Horndeski gravity. We find solutions for the Newtonian potential evolution equation in two simple models. Finally we show that the sound speed is zero on all backgrounds and therefore the system does not have any wave-like scalar degrees of freedom.

  12. Perturbations of black p-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, Elcio; Fernandez Piedra, Owen Pavel; Oliveira, Jeferson de; Molina, C.

    2010-03-15

    We consider black p-brane solutions of the low-energy string action, computing scalar perturbations. Using standard methods, we derive the wave equations obeyed by the perturbations and treat them analytically and numerically. We have found that tensorial perturbations obtained via a gauge-invariant formalism leads to the same results as scalar perturbations. No instability has been found. Asymptotically, these solutions typically reduce to a AdS{sub (p+2)}xS{sup (8-p)} space which, in the framework of Maldacena's conjecture, can be regarded as a gravitational dual to a conformal field theory defined in a (p+1)-dimensional flat space-time. The results presented open the possibility of a better understanding the AdS/CFT correspondence, as originally formulated in terms of the relation among brane structures and gauge theories.

  13. Plasma perturbation induced by laser photodetachment.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, M; Sasao, M; Wada, M; Bacal, M

    2001-03-01

    The plasma dynamics arising from laser photodetachment is discussed herein theoretically and experimentally. The hybrid fluid-kinetic model, where the positive ions and electrons are treated by the fluid theory and the negative ions are treated within the ballistic approximation, is extended and applied to the analysis of densities perturbed by laser photodetachment. The agreement between the theory and measured data confirms the validity of the considered plasma dynamics model. This model, including the positive ion perturbation, shows a good agreement with the time evolution and the spatial distribution of perturbed electron densities which are measured by a Langmuir probe inside and outside the laser beam. From the overshoot in the time evolution of perturbed electron current in the center of the laser beam, the positive ion temperature was found to be in the range 0.1-0.25 eV, while the electron temperature changes from 0.3 to 3.2 eV.

  14. Fluctuating shells under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paulose, Jayson; Vliegenthart, Gerard A.; Gompper, Gerhard; Nelson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fluctuations strongly modify the large length-scale elastic behavior of cross-linked membranes, giving rise to scale-dependent elastic moduli. Whereas thermal effects in flat membranes are well understood, many natural and artificial microstructures are modeled as thin elastic shells. Shells are distinguished from flat membranes by their nonzero curvature, which provides a size-dependent coupling between the in-plane stretching modes and the out-of-plane undulations. In addition, a shell can support a pressure difference between its interior and its exterior. Little is known about the effect of thermal fluctuations on the elastic properties of shells. Here, we study the statistical mechanics of shape fluctuations in a pressurized spherical shell, using perturbation theory and Monte Carlo computer simulations, explicitly including the effects of curvature and an inward pressure. We predict novel properties of fluctuating thin shells under point indentations and pressure-induced deformations. The contribution due to thermal fluctuations increases with increasing ratio of shell radius to thickness and dominates the response when the product of this ratio and the thermal energy becomes large compared with the bending rigidity of the shell. Thermal effects are enhanced when a large uniform inward pressure acts on the shell and diverge as this pressure approaches the classical buckling transition of the shell. Our results are relevant for the elasticity and osmotic collapse of microcapsules. PMID:23150558

  15. On perturbations of a quintom bounce

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Yifu; Qiu Taotao; Zhang Xinmin; Brandenberger, Robert; Piao Yunsong E-mail: qiutt@mail.ihep.ac.cn E-mail: yspiao@gucas.ac.cn

    2008-03-15

    A quintom universe with an equation of state crossing the cosmological constant boundary can provide a bouncing solution dubbed the quintom bounce and thus resolve the big bang singularity. In this paper, we investigate the cosmological perturbations of the quintom bounce both analytically and numerically. We find that the fluctuations in the dominant mode in the post-bounce expanding phase couple to the growing mode of the perturbations in the pre-bounce contracting phase.

  16. Regular attractors and nonautonomous perturbations of them

    SciTech Connect

    Vishik, Marko I; Zelik, Sergey V; Chepyzhov, Vladimir V

    2013-01-31

    We study regular global attractors of dissipative dynamical semigroups with discrete or continuous time and we investigate attractors for nonautonomous perturbations of such semigroups. The main theorem states that the regularity of global attractors is preserved under small nonautonomous perturbations. Moreover, nonautonomous regular global attractors remain exponential and robust. We apply these general results to model nonautonomous reaction-diffusion systems in a bounded domain of R{sup 3} with time-dependent external forces. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  17. Aspects of Perturbative Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srednyak, Stanislav

    This thesis consists of three parts. The first is devoted to the calculation of multiplicity of two-gluon production in heavy ion collisions in the framework of Colour Glass Condensate. The second exhibits a finite basis for the perturbative correlation functions at a given loop order. The third demonstrates that the number of integrations in a perturbative amplitude can be reduced in half in even dimensions, and provides explicit formula for such a reduction in the (2,2) signature.

  18. Coupled perturbed modes and internal solitary waves.

    PubMed

    Higham, C J; Tindle, C T

    2003-05-01

    Coupled perturbed mode theory combines conventional coupled modes and perturbation theory. The theory is used to directly calculate mode coupling in a range-dependent shallow water problem involving propagation through continental shelf internal solitary waves. The solitary waves considered are thermocline depressions, separating well-mixed upper and lower layers. The method is fast and accurate. Results highlight mode coupling associated with internal solitary waves, and mode capture or loss to and from the discrete mode spectrum.

  19. Gauge and motion in perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Through second order in perturbative general relativity, a small compact object in an external vacuum spacetime obeys a generalized equivalence principle: although it is accelerated with respect to the external background geometry, it is in free fall with respect to a certain effective vacuum geometry. However, this single principle takes very different mathematical forms, with very different behaviors, depending on how one treats perturbed motion. Furthermore, any description of perturbed motion can be altered by a gauge transformation. In this paper, I clarify the relationship between two treatments of perturbed motion and the gauge freedom in each. I first show explicitly how one common treatment, called the Gralla-Wald approximation, can be derived from a second, called the self-consistent approximation. I next present a general treatment of smooth gauge transformations in both approximations, in which I emphasize that the approximations' governing equations can be formulated in an invariant manner. All of these analyses are carried through second perturbative order, but the methods are general enough to go to any order. Furthermore, the tools I develop, and many of the results, should have broad applicability to any description of perturbed motion, including osculating-geodesic and two-timescale descriptions.

  20. Ignition of PTFE-lined flexible hoses by rapid pressurization with oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoff, Dwight; Bamford, Larry J.; Newton, Barry E.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1989-01-01

    A high-volume pneumatic-impact system has been used to test PTFE-lined stainless steel braided hoses, in order to characterize the roles played in the mechanism of oxygen-induced ignition by impact pressure, pressurization rate, and upstream and downstream volumes of the hose. Ignitions are noted to have occurred at impact pressures well below the working pressure of the hoses, as well as at pressurization rates easily obtainable through manual operation of valves. The use of stainless steel hardlines downstream of the hose prevented ignitions at all pressures and pressurization rates; internal observations have shown evidence of shock ionization in the oxygen prior to ignition.

  1. Preconditioning the pressure operator for the time dependent Stokes problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    In implicit time stepping procedures for the linearized Navier Stokes equations, a linear perturbed Stokes problem must be solved at each time step. Many methods for doing this require a good preconditioner for the resulting pressure operator (Schur complement). In contrast to the time independent Stokes equations where the pressure operator is well conditioned, the pressure operator for the perturbed system becomes more illconditioned as the time step is reduced (and/or the Reynolds number is increased). The authors describe the method for solving the coupled velocity/pressure systems and, in particular, show how to construct good preconditioners for the poorly conditioned pressure operator.

  2. 7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH PORTAL AND DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTH PORTAL AND DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE, LOOKING WEST. Lights and illuminated sign on portal bracing were elements of an overheight load warning system designed to eliminate accidents of the type which damaged the bridge. However, the system was in place only on the north side of the bridge, controlling trucks approaching from Oregon. In theory, trucks with overheight, overwidth, or overweight loads from California would be controlled by the State's permit system. In fact, it was a 'permit' load originating in California, being hauled without the requisite permit which struck and damaged the bridge. - Smith River Bridge, CA State Highway 199 Spanning Smith River, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  3. Plasma turbulence in the downstream ionosheath of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Scarf, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Observations made by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma analyzer and the plasma wave instrument in the Venus ionosheath are compared. Large increases in plasma wave turbulence levels appear to be connected with changing plasma distributions and interpenetrating plasma beams. Some of these plasma waves are identified as Doppler - shifted ion acoustic waves due to beam/beam interactions, but it is noted that different forms of instabilities are probably also operative. The changes in the temperature, intensity and energy of the peak in the PVO plasma distributions are similar to those observed by Venera 10 closer to the planet and appear to be evidence for rarefaction and compression in the downstream ionosheath. Some of the changes in the PVO plasma distributions may be related to the presence of a second ion population or the acceleration of protons.

  4. Downstream properties of magnetic flux transfer events. [in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the downstream evolution of the field line tubes known as 'flux transfer events' (FTEs), whose magnetic field and plasma properties are distinct from those of the nearby unmerged magnetosheath and magnetosphere field lines. After the FTE has moved 200 earth radii down the tail, its drained portion reaches 25 earth radii radially outward from the tail boundary. It is suggested that most multiple crossings of the tail boundary observed by spacecraft are encounters with tailward-moving FTEs, thereby explaining both the behavior of boundary normals during multiple crossings and how the sign of the IMF causes the observed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the thickness of the magnetotail boundary layer.

  5. Plasma fluctuations in the magnetosheath downstream from Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, John D.; Zhang, Ming; Belcher, John W.; Siscoe, George L.

    1990-01-01

    The Voyager plasma experiment observed large-amplitude plasma fluctuations in the Uranian magnetosheat downstream from the planet. This is a region that has not been well sampled in the earth's magnetosphere. These waves have periods of tens of minutes, are characterized by an anticorrelation between the plasma density and temperature, and are associated with deflections in the flow angle of the plasma. These fluctuations are observed only in regions where the magnetic field is rapidly varying. These waves have time and distance scales placing them in the MHD regime, but their characteristics are not compatible with any known solution of the MHD equations. It is suggested that these fluctuations are produced by the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere at the bow shock, but the physics governing the production and propagation of these fluctuations is not understood.

  6. Tone generation by rotor-downstream strut interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Balombin, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A JT15D fan stage was acoustically tested in the NASA Lewis anechoic chamber as part of the joint Lewis-Langley Research Center investigation of flight simulation techniques and flight effects using the JT15D engine as a common test vehicle. Suspected rotor-downstream support strut interaction was confirmed through the use of simulated support struts which were tested at three axial rotor-strut spacings. Tests were also performed with the struts removed. Inlet boundary layer suction in conjuction with an inflow control device was also explored. The removal of the boundary layer reduced the fan fundamental tone levels suggesting that the mounting and mating of such a device to the nacelle requires careful attention. With the same inflow control device installed good acoustic agreement was shown between the engine on an outdoor test stand and the fan in the anechoic chamber.

  7. Tone generation by rotor-downstream strut interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Balombin, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A JT15D fan stage was acoustically tested in the NASA Lewis anechoic chamber as part of the joint Lewis-Langley Research Center investigation of flight simulation techniques and flight effects using the JT15D engine as a common test vehicle. Suspected rotor-downstream support strut interaction was confirmed through the use of simulated support struts which were tested at three axial rotor-strut spacings. Tests were also performed with the struts removed. Inlet boundary layer suction in conjunction with an inflow control device was also explored. The removal of the boundary layer reduced the fan fundamental tone levels suggesting that the mounting and mating of such a device to the nacelle requires careful attention. With the same inflow control device installed good acoustic agreement was shown between the engine on an outdoor test stand and the fan in the anechoic chamber.

  8. Optical radiation from regions downstream of mercury bombardment thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milder, N. L.; Sovey, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A 0.5 meter focal length, plane grating monochromator was used to measure the radiance of spectral radiation emanating from regions downstream of a mercury bombardment thruster. The wavelength range investigated was 2800 A. This radiation was due primarily to the radiative decay of excited mercury atoms exhausted from the thruster. Radiance values ranged from 10 to the minus 11th power to 10 to the minus 9th power W/sq cm sr, varying with wavelength. For resonant radiation, the spectral radiance may exceed 10 to the minus 8th power W/sq cm sr. From such radiance measurements, it was concluded that the thruster background radiation should not interfere with the control functions of a star tracker viewing through the thruster exhaust, provided that the tracker is designed to operate with a sufficiently small field of view.

  9. Plasma fluctuations in the magnetosheath downstream from Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Zhang, M.; Belcher, J. W.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1990-05-01

    The Voyager plasma experiment observed large-amplitude plasma fluctuations in the Uranian magnetosheat downstream from the planet. This is a region that has not been well sampled in the earth's magnetosphere. These waves have periods of tens of minutes, are characterized by an anticorrelation between the plasma density and temperature, and are associated with deflections in the flow angle of the plasma. These fluctuations are observed only in regions where the magnetic field is rapidly varying. These waves have time and distance scales placing them in the MHD regime, but their characteristics are not compatible with any known solution of the MHD equations. It is suggested that these fluctuations are produced by the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere at the bow shock, but the physics governing the production and propagation of these fluctuations is not understood.

  10. Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam: Implications for Downstream Riparian Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Block, P. J.; Hammond, M.; King, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ethiopia has begun seriously developing their significant hydropower potential by launching construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile River to facilitate local and regional growth. Although this has required substantial planning on Ethiopia's part, no policy dictating the reservoir filling rate strategy has been publicly issued. This filling stage will have clear implications on downstream flows in Sudan and Egypt, complicated by evaporative losses, climate variability, and climate change. In this study, various filling policies and future climate states are simultaneously explored to infer potential streamflow reductions at Lake Nasser, providing regional decision-makers with a set of plausible, justifiable, and comparable outcomes. Schematic of the model framework Box plots of 2017-2032 percent change in annual average streamflow at Lake Nasser for each filling policy constructed from the 100 time-series and weighted precipitation changes. All values are relative to the no dam policy and no changes to future precipitation.

  11. Progesterone and its downstream molecules as blastocyst implantation essential factors.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Koji

    2014-08-01

    This review is to update the previous review (Am J Reprod Immunol, 63, 2010 and 413) on the research on blastocyst implantation essential factors (BIEFs). Focus of the current review is on progesterone and its downstream molecules in the process of blastocyst implantation. To understand the process of implantation, we need to know where and when the BIEFs are expressed and what they do. Progress in this research area is rapid, and its update is indeed necessary. The basic concept of BIEFs is that they have dual functions, one physiological and the other immunological (J Reprod Dev, 58, 2012 and 196). As we are still exploring the mechanism of implantation, available data are incomplete and human data are few. Thus, I will use information obtained through research on animal models, in vitro studies, cell lines, and some human studies where available. The ultimate goal of the review is to understand human blastocyst implantation. PMID:24754263

  12. Continuous downstream processing for high value biological products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in the possibility of developing truly continuous processes for the large-scale production of high value biological products. Continuous processing has the potential to provide significant reductions in cost and facility size while improving product quality and facilitating the design of flexible multi-product manufacturing facilities. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art in separations technology suitable for continuous downstream bioprocessing, focusing on unit operations that would be most appropriate for the production of secreted proteins like monoclonal antibodies. This includes cell separation/recycle from the perfusion bioreactor, initial product recovery (capture), product purification (polishing), and formulation. Of particular importance are the available options, and alternatives, for continuous chromatographic separations. Although there are still significant challenges in developing integrated continuous bioprocesses, recent technological advances have provided process developers with a number of attractive options for development of truly continuous bioprocessing operations. PMID:26153056

  13. Operating multireservoir hydropower systems for downstream water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Hydropower reservoir operations often impact tailwater quality and water quality in the stream or river below the impoundment for many miles. Determining optimal operating strategies for a system of hydropower reservoirs involves solving a highly dimensional nonlinear, nonconvex optimization problem. This research adds the additional complexities of downstream water quality considerations within the optimization formulation to determine operating strategies for a system of hydropower reservoirs operating in series (tandem) or parallel. The formulation was used to determine operating strategies for six reservoirs of the upper Cumberland river basin in Tennessee and Kentucky. Significant dissolved oxygen (DO) violations occur just upstream of Nashville, Tennessee below Old Hickory dam during the months of August and September. Daily reservoir releases were determined for the period of June through September which would produce the maximum hydropower revenue while meeting downstream water quality objectives. Optimal releases for three operational strategies were compared to historical operations for the years 1985, 1986, and 1988. These strategies included: spilling as necessary to meet water quality criteria, near normal operation (minimal spills), and drawdown of reservoirs as necessary to meet criteria without spills. Optimization results showed an 8% to 15% hydropower loss may be necessary to meet water quality criteria through spills and a 2% to 9% improvement in DO below Old Hickory may be possible without significant spills. Results also showed that substantial increases in initial headwater elevations would be necessary to meet daily DO criteria and avoid spills. The optimal control theory algorithm used to solve the problem proved to be an efficient and robust solver of this large optimization problem.

  14. Serine-71 phosphorylation of Rac1 modulates downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Janett; Proff, Julia; Hävemeier, Anika; Ladwein, Markus; Rottner, Klemens; Barlag, Britta; Pich, Andreas; Tatge, Helma; Just, Ingo; Gerhard, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 regulate a variety of cellular functions by signaling to different signal pathways. It is believed that the presence of a specific effector at the location of GTPase activation determines the route of downstream signaling. We previously reported about EGF-induced Ser-71 phosphorylation of Rac1/Cdc42. By using the phosphomimetic S71E-mutants of Rac1 and Cdc42 we investigated the impact of Ser-71 phosphorylation on binding to selected effector proteins. Binding of the constitutively active (Q61L) variants of Rac1 and Cdc42 to their specific interaction partners Sra-1 and N-WASP, respectively, as well as to their common effector protein PAK was abrogated when Ser-71 was exchanged to glutamate as phosphomimetic substitution. Interaction with their common effector proteins IQGAP1/2/3 or MRCK alpha was, however, hardly affected. This ambivalent behaviour was obvious in functional assays. In contrast to Rac1 Q61L, phosphomimetic Rac1 Q61L/S71E was not able to induce increased membrane ruffling. Instead, Rac1 Q61L/S71E allowed filopodia formation, which is in accordance with abrogation of the dominant Sra-1/Wave signalling pathway. In addition, in contrast to Rac1 transfected cells Rac1 S71E failed to activate PAK1/2. On the other hand, Rac1 Q61L/S71E was as effective in activation of NF-kappaB as Rac1 Q61L, illustrating positive signal transduction of phosphorylated Rac1. Together, these data suggest that phosphorylation of Rac1 and Cdc42 at serine-71 represents a reversible mechanism to shift specificity of GTPase/effector coupling, and to preferentially address selected downstream pathways. PMID:22970203

  15. A Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyadi Kalia, Andre; Frei, Michaela; Lege, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    SAR Interferometry is a powerful technique able to detect and monitor various surface displacements caused by e.g. gravitative mass movement, subrosion, groundwater extraction, fluid injection, natural gas extraction. These processes can e.g. cause damage to buildings, infrastructure, affect ecosystems, agriculture and the economic use of the geological underground by influencing the hydro(geo)logical setting. Advanced techniques of interferometric processing (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry, PSI) allow highly precise displacement measurements (mm precision) by analyzing stacks of SAR imagery. The PSI mapping coverage can be increased to entire nations by using several adjacent satellite tracks. In order to assist the operational use of this technique a German-wide, officially approved, PSI dataset is under development. The intention of this presentation is to show i) the concept of the Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany and ii) a pilot study to exemplarily demonstrate the workflow and potential products from the Copernicus downstream service. The pilot study is focusing on the built up of an officially approved wide-area PSI dataset. The study area covers an area of more than 30.000 km² and is located in the Northwest German Basin. Several natural processes (e.g. compaction of marine sediments, peat loss) and anthropogenic activities (e.g. natural gas extraction, rock salt mining) are causing surface displacements in the study area. The PSI analysis is based on six ERS-1/-2 data stacks covering the timespan from 1992 until 2001. Each data stack consists of 49 to 73 ERS-1/-2 SAR images. A comparison of the PSI results with thematic data (e.g. volume and location of extracted natural gas) strongly indicates that a part of the detected land subsidence is caused by natural gas extraction. Furthermore, land subsidence caused by e.g. fluid injection and rock salt mining were successfully detected by the PSI analysis.

  16. Carbon contamination removal in larger chambers with low-power downstream plasma cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, C. G.; Vane, R.

    2012-03-01

    There is a need for pristine vacuum environments free of carbon contamination in many lithography tools. Carbon is a particularly irksome contaminant due to its ubiquity and its reactivity with energetic electron or EUV photon beams. When residual hydrocarbons land on a surface that is being impinged by an energetic beam, they will crack and reform as less mobile deposits. Carbon buildup cause loss in image resolution resulting in line width measurement increases during multiple CD-SEM scans, and on EUV optics it can lead to lower reflectivity and throughput of a lithography system. A new downstream plasma cleaner has been developed to clean larger chambers at lower pressures and higher RF plasma power (50W) and operates efficiently with current turbomolecular pumps. Cleaning rates can be measured by using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with its surface previously contaminated with hydrocarbons. Rates have been measured at over 1 nm/minute at a distance of over 0.5 m from the plasma source. The cleaner can be used with room air, oxygen gas mixtures, and hydrogen gas. Although it is slightly larger than the currently available Evactron® De-Contaminator, it still has a compact footprint which allows it to be easily installed on lithography tools. This paper will explore the operation of the new plasma cleaner, examining the effect of the cleaning rate due to changes in various conditions including power, pressure and distance from the plasma source.

  17. Secular Planetary Perturbations in Circumstellar Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Joseph M.; Capobianco, C.

    2006-12-01

    Circumstellar debris disks are likely the by-product of collisions among unseen planetesimals. Planetesimals are also the seeds of planets, so it is reasonable to expect that some debris disks might also harbor planets. In fact several such disks, like those orbiting beta Pictoris, Fomalhaut, etc., do appear to be perturbed by unseen planets orbiting within. The signatures of planetary perturbations include: central gaps, warps, and radial offsets in the disk's surface brightness. By modeling the disturbances observed in a circumstellar dust disk, one can then measure or constrain the masses and orbits of the planets that may be lurking within. Of particular interest here are the warps and radial offsets seen in such disks, since these features can be due to secular planetary perturbations (Mouillet et al 1997, Wyatt et al 1999). Secular perturbations are the slowly varying gravitational perturbations that can excite orbital eccentricities and inclinations in a disk, and can also drive a slow orbital precession. Note that a dust grain's motion is completely analytic when suffering secular perturbations (Murray & Dermott 1999), which allows us to rapidly generate a synthetic image of a simulated disk as would be seen in scattered starlight or via thermal emission. And because this model is quite fast, our model can rapidly scan a rather large parameter space in order to determine the planetary configuration that may be responsible for the disk's perturbed appearance. We have applied this dust-disk model to Hubble observations of the β Pictoris dust-disk (from Heap et al 2000), and will report on the planets that may be responsible for the warp seen in this edge-on disk. We will also apply the model to optical and IR observations of debris disks at Fomalhaut, AU Microscopii, and others, with additional results to be reported at conference time.

  18. Perturbation Effects on a Supercritical C7H16/N2 Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okongo'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2008-01-01

    A computational-simulation study has been presented of effects of perturbation wavelengths and initial Reynolds numbers on the transition to turbulence of a heptane/nitrogen mixing layer at supercritical pressure. The governing equations for the simulations were the same as those of related prior studies reported in NASA Tech Briefs. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were performed with initially im posed span wise perturbations whereas three-dimensional (3D) simulations had both streamwise and spanwise initial perturbations. The 2D simulations were undertaken to ascertain whether perturbations having the shortest unstable wavelength obtained from a linear stability analysis for inviscid flow are unstable in viscous nonlinear flows. The goal of the 3D simulations was to ascertain whether perturbing the mixing layer at different wavelengths affects the transition to turbulence. It was found that transitions to turbulence can be obtained at different perturbation wavelengths, provided that they are longer than the shortest unstable wavelength as determined by 2D linear stability analysis for the inviscid case and that the initial Reynolds number is proportionally increased as the wavelength is decreased. The transitional states thus obtained display different dynamic and mixture characteristics, departing strongly from the behaviors of perfect gases and ideal mixtures.

  19. Meso-beta scale numerical simulation studies of terrain-induced jet streak mass/momentum perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Mesoscale model simulations provide insight into the complex jet streak adjustments on 11-12 July 1981 that preceded the first of two significant gravity wave events to have been generated over the Rocky Mountains in Montana. Simulations employing a variety of terrain treatments indicate that prior to wave formation, geostrophic adjustment processes modified the structure of the mid-upper tropospheric jet streak by creating secondary jetlets to the southeast of the polar jet streak in proximity to the gravity wave generation region. This simulated restructuring of the mid-upper tropospheric jet streak is the result of a four stage process. During stage 1, the wind adjusts to the mass field as the jet streak exit region propagates into the inflection point between the upstream trough and downstream ridge in the height field. Stage 2 is initiated as the mass field is forced to adjust to the new ageostrophic wind field created during stage 1. Stage 3 is defined by a second geostrophic adjustment process occurring in a similar manner but to the south and east of the adjustment which occurs during stage 1. A low-level mesoscale jetlet is formed during stage 4 in response to the low-level pressure falls that are established during stage 3. The perturbation of this jetlet, caused by orographically-induced adiabatic and diabatic physical processes, is the likely mechanism responsible for the generation of the first and second episode of observed gravity waves. The dynamics responsible for this wave episode are discussed as differential surface sensible heating inducing an orographically-forced mountain-plains solenoid, resulting in the formation of additional mesoscale jetlets and internal gravity waves. Also discussed is how convective latent heating modifies the numerically simulated terrain-induced internal gravity waves, especially their amplitude and phase velocities, which provide better agreement with those wave characteristics observed in nature. Finally, the three

  20. The impact of Indonesian peatland degradation on downstream marine ecosystems and the global carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jesse F; Hohn, Sönke; Rixen, Tim; Baum, Antje; Merico, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Tropical peatlands are among the most space-efficient stores of carbon on Earth containing approximately 89 Gt C. Of this, 57 Gt (65%) are stored in Indonesian peatlands. Large-scale exploitation of land, including deforestation and drainage for the establishment of oil palm plantations, is changing the carbon balance of Indonesian peatlands, turning them from a natural sink to a source via outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere and leakage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the coastal ocean. The impacts of this perturbation to the coastal environment and at the global scale are largely unknown. Here, we evaluate the downstream effects of released Indonesian peat carbon on coastal ecosystems and on the global carbon cycle. We use a biogeochemical box model in combination with novel and literature observations to investigate the impact of different carbon emission scenarios on the combined ocean-atmosphere system. The release of all carbon stored in the Indonesian peat pool, considered as a worst-case scenario, will increase atmospheric pCO2 by 8 ppm to 15 ppm within the next 200 years. The expected impact on the Java Sea ecosystems is most significant on the short term (over a few hundred years) and is characterized by an increase of 3.3% in phytoplankton, 32% in seagrass biomass, and 5% decrease in coral biomass. On the long term, however, the coastal ecosystems will recover to reach near pre-excursion conditions. Our results suggest that the ultimate fate of the peat carbon is in the deep ocean with 69% of it landing in the deep DIC pool after 1000 years, but the effects on the global ocean carbonate chemistry will be marginal. PMID:26416553

  1. The impact of Indonesian peatland degradation on downstream marine ecosystems and the global carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jesse F; Hohn, Sönke; Rixen, Tim; Baum, Antje; Merico, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Tropical peatlands are among the most space-efficient stores of carbon on Earth containing approximately 89 Gt C. Of this, 57 Gt (65%) are stored in Indonesian peatlands. Large-scale exploitation of land, including deforestation and drainage for the establishment of oil palm plantations, is changing the carbon balance of Indonesian peatlands, turning them from a natural sink to a source via outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere and leakage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the coastal ocean. The impacts of this perturbation to the coastal environment and at the global scale are largely unknown. Here, we evaluate the downstream effects of released Indonesian peat carbon on coastal ecosystems and on the global carbon cycle. We use a biogeochemical box model in combination with novel and literature observations to investigate the impact of different carbon emission scenarios on the combined ocean-atmosphere system. The release of all carbon stored in the Indonesian peat pool, considered as a worst-case scenario, will increase atmospheric pCO2 by 8 ppm to 15 ppm within the next 200 years. The expected impact on the Java Sea ecosystems is most significant on the short term (over a few hundred years) and is characterized by an increase of 3.3% in phytoplankton, 32% in seagrass biomass, and 5% decrease in coral biomass. On the long term, however, the coastal ecosystems will recover to reach near pre-excursion conditions. Our results suggest that the ultimate fate of the peat carbon is in the deep ocean with 69% of it landing in the deep DIC pool after 1000 years, but the effects on the global ocean carbonate chemistry will be marginal.

  2. Center of mass velocity-based predictions in balance recovery following pelvis perturbations during human walking.

    PubMed

    Vlutters, M; van Asseldonk, E H F; van der Kooij, H

    2016-05-15

    In many simple walking models, foot placement dictates the center of pressure location and ground reaction force components, whereas humans can modulate these aspects after foot contact. Because of the differences, it is unclear to what extent predictions made by models are valid for human walking. Yet, both model simulations and human experimental data have previously indicated that the center of mass (COM) velocity plays an important role in regulating stable walking. Here, perturbed human walking was studied to determine the relationship of the horizontal COM velocity at heel strike and toe-off with the foot placement location relative to the COM, the forthcoming center of pressure location relative to the COM, and the ground reaction forces. Ten healthy subjects received mediolateral and anteroposterior pelvis perturbations of various magnitudes at toe-off, during 0.63 and 1.25 m s(-1) treadmill walking. At heel strike after the perturbation, recovery from mediolateral perturbations involved mediolateral foot placement adjustments proportional to the mediolateral COM velocity. In contrast, for anteroposterior perturbations, no significant anteroposterior foot placement adjustment occurred at this heel strike. However, in both directions the COM velocity at heel strike related linearly to the center of pressure location at the subsequent toe-off. This relationship was affected by the walking speed and was, for the slow speed, in line with a COM velocity-based control strategy previously applied by others in a linear inverted pendulum model. Finally, changes in gait phase durations suggest that the timing of actions could play an important role during the perturbation recovery. PMID:26994171

  3. Nonambipolar Transport and Torque in Perturbed Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Wang, Z. R.; Berkery, J. W.; Kim, K.; Menard, J. E.

    2013-10-01

    A new Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) code has been developed to calculate the neoclassical toroidal torque from radial current composed of both passing and trapped particles in perturbed equilibria. This presentation outlines the physics approach used in the development of the PENT code, with emphasis on the effects of retaining general aspect-ratio geometric effects. First, nonambipolar transport coefficients and corresponding neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque in perturbed equilibria are re-derived from the first order gyro-drift-kinetic equation in the ``combined-NTV'' PENT formalism. The equivalence of NTV torque and change in potential energy due to kinetic effects [J-K. Park, Phys. Plas., 2011] is then used to showcase computational challenges shared between PENT and stability codes MISK and MARS-K. Extensive comparisons to a reduced model, which makes numerous large aspect ratio approximations, are used throughout to emphasize geometry dependent physics such as pitch angle resonances. These applications make extensive use of the PENT code's native interfacing with the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC), and the combination of these codes is a key step towards an iterative solver for self-consistent perturbed equilibrium torque. Supported by US DOE contract #DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the DOE Office of Science Graduate Fellowship administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science & Education under contract #DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  4. Cosmological perturbations on the phantom brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Satadru; Viznyuk, Alexander; Shtanov, Yuri; Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations in a multi-component braneworld. Our braneworld possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, weff < ‑1, but no big-rip future singularity. In addition to matter and radiation, the braneworld possesses a new effective degree of freedom—the `Weyl fluid' or `dark radiation'. Setting initial conditions on super-Hubble spatial scales at the epoch of radiation domination, we evolve perturbations of radiation, pressureless matter and the Weyl fluid until the present epoch. We observe a gradual decrease in the amplitude of the Weyl-fluid perturbations after Hubble-radius crossing, which results in a negligible effect of the Weyl fluid on the evolution of matter perturbations on spatial scales relevant for structure formation. Consequently, the quasi-static approximation of Koyama and Maartens provides a good fit to the exact results during the matter-dominated epoch. We find that the late-time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials Φ and Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which Φ = Ψ. On the brane, by contrast, the ratio Φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter-dominated epoch (z lesssim 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large-scale structure.

  5. Cosmological perturbations on the phantom brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Satadru; Viznyuk, Alexander; Shtanov, Yuri; Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations in a multi-component braneworld. Our braneworld possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, weff < -1, but no big-rip future singularity. In addition to matter and radiation, the braneworld possesses a new effective degree of freedom—the `Weyl fluid' or `dark radiation'. Setting initial conditions on super-Hubble spatial scales at the epoch of radiation domination, we evolve perturbations of radiation, pressureless matter and the Weyl fluid until the present epoch. We observe a gradual decrease in the amplitude of the Weyl-fluid perturbations after Hubble-radius crossing, which results in a negligible effect of the Weyl fluid on the evolution of matter perturbations on spatial scales relevant for structure formation. Consequently, the quasi-static approximation of Koyama and Maartens provides a good fit to the exact results during the matter-dominated epoch. We find that the late-time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials Φ and Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which Φ = Ψ. On the brane, by contrast, the ratio Φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter-dominated epoch (z lesssim 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large-scale structure.

  6. Effect of tape recording on perturbation measures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Lin, E; Hanson, D G

    1998-10-01

    Tape recorders have been shown to affect measures of voice perturbation. Few studies, however, have been conducted to quantitatively justify the use or exclusion of certain types of recorders in voice perturbation studies. This study used sinusoidal and triangular waves and synthesized vowels to compare perturbation measures extracted from directly digitized signals with those recorded and played back through various tape recorders, including 3 models of digital audio tape recorders, 2 models of analog audio cassette tape recorders, and 2 models of video tape recorders. Signal contamination for frequency perturbation values was found to be consistently minimal with digital recorders (percent jitter = 0.01%-0.02%), mildly increased with video recorders (0.05%-0.10%), moderately increased with a high-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.15%), and most prominent with a low-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.24%). Recorder effect on amplitude perturbation measures was lowest in digital recorders (percent shimmer = 0.09%-0.20%), mildly to moderately increased in video recorders and a high-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.25%-0.45%), and most prominent in a low-quality analog audio cassette tape recorder (0.98%). The effect of cassette tape material, length of spooled tape, and duration of analysis were also tested and are discussed.

  7. Compensation to whole body active rotation perturbation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S; Gazzellini, S; Petrarca, M; Patanè, F; Salfa, I; Castelli, E; Cappa, P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the exploration of the compensation mechanisms in healthy adults elicited by superimposing a horizontal perturbation, through a rotation of the support base, during a whole body active rotation around the participant's own vertical body axis. Eight healthy participants stood on a rotating platform while executing 90° whole body rotations under three conditions: no concurrent platform rotation (NP), support surface rotation of ± 45° in the same (45-S) and opposite (45-O) directions. Participants' kinematics and CoP displacements were analyzed with an optoelectronic system and a force platform. In both 45-S and 45-O conditions, there was a tendency for the head to be affected by the external perturbation and to be the last and least perturbed segment while the pelvis was the most perturbed. The observed reduced head perturbation in 45-S and 45-O trials is consistent with a goal-oriented strategy mediated by vision and vestibular information, whereas the tuning of lumbar rotation is consistent with control mechanisms mediated by somato-sensory information.

  8. Local perturbations perturb—exponentially-locally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roeck, W.; Schütz, M.

    2015-06-01

    We elaborate on the principle that for gapped quantum spin systems with local interaction, "local perturbations [in the Hamiltonian] perturb locally [the groundstate]." This principle was established by Bachmann et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 309, 835-871 (2012)], relying on the "spectral flow technique" or "quasi-adiabatic continuation" [M. B. Hastings, Phys. Rev. B 69, 104431 (2004)] to obtain locality estimates with sub-exponential decay in the distance to the spatial support of the perturbation. We use ideas of Hamza et al. [J. Math. Phys. 50, 095213 (2009)] to obtain similarly a transformation between gapped eigenvectors and their perturbations that is local with exponential decay. This allows to improve locality bounds on the effect of perturbations on the low lying states in certain gapped models with a unique "bulk ground state" or "topological quantum order." We also give some estimate on the exponential decay of correlations in models with impurities where some relevant correlations decay faster than one would naively infer from the global gap of the system, as one also expects in disordered systems with a localized groundstate.

  9. A special perturbation method in orbital dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez, Jesús; Hedo, José Manuel; Rodríguez de Andrés, Pedro

    2007-02-01

    The special perturbation method considered in this paper combines simplicity of computer implementation, speed and precision, and can propagate the orbit of any material particle. The paper describes the evolution of some orbital elements based in Euler parameters, which are constants in the unperturbed problem, but which evolve in the time scale imposed by the perturbation. The variation of parameters technique is used to develop expressions for the derivatives of seven elements for the general case, which includes any type of perturbation. These basic differential equations are slightly modified by introducing one additional equation for the time, reaching a total order of eight. The method was developed in the Grupo de Dinámica de Tethers (GDT) of the UPM, as a tool for dynamic simulations of tethers. However, it can be used in any other field and with any kind of orbit and perturbation. It is free of singularities related to small inclination and/or eccentricity. The use of Euler parameters makes it robust. The perturbation forces are handled in a very simple way: the method requires their components in the orbital frame or in an inertial frame. A comparison with other schemes is performed in the paper to show the good performance of the method.

  10. Rolling axions during inflation: perturbativity and signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peloso, Marco; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Unal, Caner

    2016-09-01

    The motion of a pseudo-scalar field X during inflation naturally induces a significant amplification of the gauge fields to which it is coupled. The amplified gauge fields can source characteristic scalar and tensor primordial perturbations. Several phenomenological implications have been discussed in the cases in which (i) X is the inflaton, and (ii) X is a field different from the inflaton, that experiences a temporary speed up during inflation. In this second case, visible sourced gravitational waves (GW) can be produced at the CMB scales without affecting the scalar perturbations, even if the scale of inflation is several orders of magnitude below what is required to produce a visible vacuum GW signal. Perturbativity considerations can be used to limit the regime in which these results are under perturbative control. We revised limits recently claimed for the case (i), and we extend these considerations to the case (ii). We show that, in both cases, these limits are satisfied by the applications that generate signals at CMB scales. Applications that generate gravitational waves and primordial black holes at much smaller scales are at the limit of the validity of this perturbativity analysis, so we expect those results to be valid up to possibly order one corrections.

  11. Cosmological perturbations in teleparallel Loop Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Haro, Jaime

    2013-11-01

    Cosmological perturbations in Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) are usually studied incorporating either holonomy corrections, where the Ashtekar connection is replaced by a suitable sinus function in order to have a well-defined quantum analogue, or inverse-volume corrections coming from the eigenvalues of the inverse-volume operator. In this paper we will develop an alternative approach to calculate cosmological perturbations in LQC based on the fact that, holonomy corrected LQC in the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry could be also obtained as a particular case of teleparallel F(T) gravity (teleparallel LQC). The main idea of our approach is to mix the simple bounce provided by holonomy corrections in LQC with the non-singular perturbation equations given by F(T) gravity, in order to obtain a matter bounce scenario as a viable alternative to slow-roll inflation. In our study, we have obtained an scale invariant power spectrum of cosmological perturbations. However, the ratio of tensor to scalar perturbations is of order 1, which does not agree with the current observations. For this reason, we suggest a model where a transition from the matter domination to a quasi de Sitter phase is produced in order to enhance the scalar power spectrum.

  12. Controlling Complex Networks with Compensatory Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Sean; Kath, William; Motter, Adilson

    2012-02-01

    The response of complex networks to perturbations is of critical importance in areas as diverse as ecosystem management, power system design, and cell reprogramming. These systems have the property that localized perturbations can propagate through the network, causing the system as a whole to change behavior and possibly collapse. We will show how this same mechanism can actually be exploited to prevent such failures and, more generally, control a network's behavior. This strategy is based on counteracting a deleterious perturbation through the judicious application of additional, compensatory perturbations---a prospect recently demonstrated heuristically in metabolic and food-web networks. Here, we introduce a method to identify such compensatory perturbations in general complex networks, under arbitrary constraints that restrict the interventions one can actually implement in real systems. Our method accounts for the full nonlinear time evolution of real complex networks, and in fact capitalizes on this behavior to bring the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible. Altogether, these results provide a new framework for the rescue, control, and reprogramming of complex networks in various domains.

  13. High-order azimuthal instabilities on a cylindrical liquid jet driven by temporal and spatial perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1998-09-01

    A method has been developed to drive a cylindrical liquid jet unstable for deformations with axial wavelengths shorter than the circumference of the jet and azimuthal mode numbers greater than 0. The benefit of this method is that a cylindrical liquid jet can be broken into a spray with an average diameter smaller than the diameter of the initial jet. The higher-order instabilities were created by establishing initial conditions for the jet in space and time at the nozzle. An electromechanical transducer creates the applied temporal initial condition which is a sinusoidally varying velocity perturbation added to the steady velocity of the jet. The amplitude of the velocity perturbation can be as large as the jet's steady velocity and the energy in the applied velocity perturbation drives the instability. The spatial perturbation is created by placing perturbations in the circumference of the nozzle. As the velocity perturbation travels on the jet, its leading edge steepens and the trailing edge broadens in a manner analogous to the steepening of a pressure pulse in a compressible gas. If the driven velocity perturbation is sufficiently large, a shock or jump forms on the leading edge of the velocity pulse and the jet may break up into higher-order modes. A theoretical analysis of the breakup process, based on an adaptation of compressible fluid shock theory, is used to derive a fundamental lower bound on the spray's Sauter mean diameter as a function of the velocity perturbation amplitude. Techniques for approaching the theoretical minimum spray diameter by using the higher-order modes to atomize liquid jets are discussed.

  14. Canards in a rheodynamic model of cardiac pressure pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Feng; Chen, Xian-Feng

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports on the canard phenomenon occurring in a rheodynamic model of cardiac pressure pulsations. By singular perturbation techniques the corresponding parameter value at which canards exist is obtained. The physiological significance of canards in this model is given.

  15. Acoustic oscillatory pressure control for ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.S.; Dunlap, R.

    1988-08-02

    A method for controlling the acoustic oscillatory pressures generated by gas flow at the combustor inlet to a ramjet engine, the inlet including a sudden geometry expansion is described characterized by; restricting the inlet at the sudden expansion geometry such that the gas flow separates upstream and has a vena contracta downstream of the restricted inlet.

  16. Bidirectional Pressure-Regulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth; Miller, John R.

    2008-01-01

    A bidirectional pressure-regulator system has been devised for use in a regenerative fuel cell system. The bidirectional pressure-regulator acts as a back-pressure regulator as gas flows through the bidirectional pressure-regulator in one direction. Later, the flow of gas goes through the regulator in the opposite direction and the bidirectional pressure-regulator operates as a pressure- reducing pressure regulator. In the regenerative fuel cell system, there are two such bidirectional regulators, one for the hydrogen gas and another for the oxygen gas. The flow of gases goes from the regenerative fuel cell system to the gas storage tanks when energy is being stored, and reverses direction, flowing from the storage tanks to the regenerative fuel cell system when the stored energy is being withdrawn from the regenerative fuel cell system. Having a single bidirectional regulator replaces two unidirectional regulators, plumbing, and multiple valves needed to reverse the flow direction. The term "bidirectional" refers to both the bidirectional nature of the gas flows and capability of each pressure regulator to control the pressure on either its upstream or downstream side, regardless of the direction of flow.

  17. The relationship between the human state and external perturbations of atmospheric, geomagnetic and solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavryuseva, E.; Kroussanova, N.

    2002-12-01

    The relationship between the state of human body and the external factors such as the different phenomena of solar activity, geomagnetic perturbations and local atmospheric characteristics is studied. The monitoring of blood pressure and electro-conductivity of human body in acupuncture points for a group fo 28 people over the period of 1.5 year has been performed daily from February 2001 to August 2002 in Capodimonte Observatory in Naples, Italy. The modified Voll method of electropuncture diagnostics was used. The strong correlation between the human body state and meteo conditions is found and the probable correlation with geomagnetic perturbations is discussed.

  18. The application of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to study the hydrophobic hydration

    PubMed Central

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Urbic, Tomaz; Hribar-Lee, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic perturbation theory was tested against newly obtained Monte Carlo computer simulations to describe the major features of the hydrophobic effect in a simple 3D-Mercedes-Benz water model: the temperature and hydrophobe size dependence on entropy, enthalpy, and free energy of transfer of a simple hydrophobic solute into water. An excellent agreement was obtained between the theoretical and simulation results. Further, the thermodynamic perturbation theory qualitatively correctly (with respect to the experimental data) describes the solvation thermodynamics under conditions where the simulation results are difficult to obtain with good enough accuracy, e.g., at high pressures. PMID:23862923

  19. The application of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to study the hydrophobic hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Urbic, Tomaz; Hribar-Lee, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    The thermodynamic perturbation theory was tested against newly obtained Monte Carlo computer simulations to describe the major features of the hydrophobic effect in a simple 3D-Mercedes-Benz water model: the temperature and hydrophobe size dependence on entropy, enthalpy, and free energy of transfer of a simple hydrophobic solute into water. An excellent agreement was obtained between the theoretical and simulation results. Further, the thermodynamic perturbation theory qualitatively correctly (with respect to the experimental data) describes the solvation thermodynamics under conditions where the simulation results are difficult to obtain with good enough accuracy, e.g., at high pressures.

  20. The application of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to study the hydrophobic hydration.

    PubMed

    Mohoric, Tomaz; Urbic, Tomaz; Hribar-Lee, Barbara

    2013-07-14

    The thermodynamic perturbation theory was tested against newly obtained Monte Carlo computer simulations to describe the major features of the hydrophobic effect in a simple 3D-Mercedes-Benz water model: the temperature and hydrophobe size dependence on entropy, enthalpy, and free energy of transfer of a simple hydrophobic solute into water. An excellent agreement was obtained between the theoretical and simulation results. Further, the thermodynamic perturbation theory qualitatively correctly (with respect to the experimental data) describes the solvation thermodynamics under conditions where the simulation results are difficult to obtain with good enough accuracy, e.g., at high pressures.

  1. Perturbing effect of solar radiation on the Spektr-RG spacecraft in operational orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatov, S. I.; Mordvinkin, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Results and analysis are presented for a numerical simulation of solar radiation forces acting on the Spektr-RG spacecraft in operational orbit. The possibility is investigated of compensating the radiation pressure-induced perturbing torque without adding new units and assemblies into the spacecraft configuration. A rationale is given for ways of implementing the compensation techniques that enable 65% compensation of sufficiently large perturbing torques, thus considerably reducing (by 5-6 kg) the propellant consumption in the control system engines and increasing the lifetime of the spacecraft.

  2. The application of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to study the hydrophobic hydration.

    PubMed

    Mohoric, Tomaz; Urbic, Tomaz; Hribar-Lee, Barbara

    2013-07-14

    The thermodynamic perturbation theory was tested against newly obtained Monte Carlo computer simulations to describe the major features of the hydrophobic effect in a simple 3D-Mercedes-Benz water model: the temperature and hydrophobe size dependence on entropy, enthalpy, and free energy of transfer of a simple hydrophobic solute into water. An excellent agreement was obtained between the theoretical and simulation results. Further, the thermodynamic perturbation theory qualitatively correctly (with respect to the experimental data) describes the solvation thermodynamics under conditions where the simulation results are difficult to obtain with good enough accuracy, e.g., at high pressures. PMID:23862923

  3. Electron acceleration at nearly perpendicular collisionless shocks. 3: Downstream distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft observations at the Earth's bow shock and at interplanetary shocks have established that the largest fluxes of accelerated suprathermal electrons occur in so-called shock spike events immediately downstream of the shock ramp. Previous theoretical efforts have mainly focused on explaining upstream energetic electron beams. Here we investigate the general motion and acceleration of energetic electrons in a curved, nearly perpendicular shock by numerically integrating the orbits of solar wind halo electrons in shock fields generated by a hybrid simulation (core electron fluid and kinetic ions). Close to the angle Theta(sub Bn) = 90 degs between the upstream magnetic field and shock normal, the calculations result in a (perpendicular) temperature increase proportional to the magnetic field ratio and give the highest phase space densities in the overshoot. For a steep distribution, the temperature change can correspond to an enhancement of the distribution by several orders of magnitude. These results are in agreement with predictions from adiabatic mapping. With smaller angles Theta(sub Bn), the overshoot and downstream densities fall off quickly, because the adiabatic energy gain is less and fewer electrons transmit. The shock curvature also leads to an accumulation of electrons close to 90 degs. Without pitch angle scattering, energization is only significant within a few (approximately 5 to 10 degs) degrees of the point of tangency. However, shock spike events appear to be observed more easily and farther away from 90 degs. Given that over a region of several degrees around 90 degs the theory gives enhancements of up to approximately 4 orders of magnitude, such electrons could in principle account for the typically observed enhancements of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, if they were distributed over Theta(sub Bn). To test the idea that scattering could efficiently redistribute the energetic electrons, we have conducted test particle simulations in which

  4. Corrosion impact of reductant on DWPF and downstream facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Imrich, K. J.; Jantzen, C. M.; Murphy, T. H.; Wilderman, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternate reductant in the preparation of high level waste for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). During processing, the glycolic acid is not completely consumed and small quantities of the glycolate anion are carried forward to other high level waste (HLW) facilities. The impact of the glycolate anion on the corrosion of the materials of construction throughout the waste processing system has not been previously evaluated. A literature review had revealed that corrosion data in glycolate-bearing solution applicable to SRS systems were not available. Therefore, testing was recommended to evaluate the materials of construction of vessels, piping and components within DWPF and downstream facilities. The testing, conducted in non-radioactive simulants, consisted of both accelerated tests (electrochemical and hot-wall) with coupons in laboratory vessels and prototypical tests with coupons immersed in scale-up and mock-up test systems. Eight waste or process streams were identified in which the glycolate anion might impact the performance of the materials of construction. These streams were 70% glycolic acid (DWPF feed vessels and piping), SRAT/SME supernate (Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels and piping), DWPF acidic recycle (DWPF condenser and recycle tanks and piping), basic concentrated recycle (HLW tanks, evaporators, and transfer lines), salt processing (ARP, MCU, and Saltstone tanks and piping), boric acid (MCU separators), and dilute waste (HLW evaporator condensate tanks and transfer line and ETF components). For each stream, high temperature limits and worst-case glycolate concentrations were identified for performing the recommended tests. Test solution chemistries were generally based on analytical results of actual waste samples taken from the various process facilities or of prototypical simulants produced in the laboratory. The materials of construction for most vessels

  5. Perturbation calculation of thermodynamic density of states.

    PubMed

    Brown, G; Schulthess, T C; Nicholson, D M; Eisenbach, M; Stocks, G M

    2011-12-01

    The density of states g (ε) is frequently used to calculate the temperature-dependent properties of a thermodynamic system. Here a derivation is given for calculating the warped density of states g*(ε) resulting from the addition of a perturbation. The method is validated for a classical Heisenberg model of bcc Fe and the errors in the free energy are shown to be second order in the perturbation. Taking the perturbation to be the difference between a first-principles quantum-mechanical energy and a corresponding classical energy, this method can significantly reduce the computational effort required to calculate g(ε) for quantum systems using the Wang-Landau approach.

  6. Perturbations in a regular bouncing universe

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.J.; Geshnizjani, G.

    2006-03-15

    We consider a simple toy model of a regular bouncing universe. The bounce is caused by an extra timelike dimension, which leads to a sign flip of the {rho}{sup 2} term in the effective four dimensional Randall Sundrum-like description. We find a wide class of possible bounces: big bang avoiding ones for regular matter content, and big rip avoiding ones for phantom matter. Focusing on radiation as the matter content, we discuss the evolution of scalar, vector and tensor perturbations. We compute a spectral index of n{sub s}=-1 for scalar perturbations and a deep blue index for tensor perturbations after invoking vacuum initial conditions, ruling out such a model as a realistic one. We also find that the spectrum (evaluated at Hubble crossing) is sensitive to the bounce. We conclude that it is challenging, but not impossible, for cyclic/ekpyrotic models to succeed, if one can find a regularized version.

  7. Inhomogeneous Broadening in Perturbed Angular Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Austin; Adams, Mike; Hodges, Jeffery; Park, Tyler; Stufflebeam, Michael; Evenson, William; Matheson, Phil; Zacate, Matthew

    2009-10-01

    Our research concerns the effect of a static distribution of defects on the net electric field gradient (EFG) within crystal structures. Defects and vacancies perturb the distribution of gamma rays emitted from radioactive probe nuclei within the crystal. These defects and vacancies produce a net EFG at the site of the probe which causes the magnetic quadrupole moment of the nucleus of the probe to precess about the EFG. The net EFG, which is strongly dependent upon the defect concentration, perturbs the angular correlation (PAC) of the gamma rays, and is seen in the damping of the perturbation function, G2(t), in time and broadening of the spectral peaks in the Fourier transform. We have used computer simulations to study the probability distribution of EFG tensor components in order to uncover the concentration dependence of G2(t). This in turn can be used to analyze experimental PAC data and quantitatively describe properties of the crystal.

  8. Perturbation measurement of waveguides for acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic thermometers normally embed small acoustic transducers in the wall bounding a gas-filled cavity resonator. At high temperature, insulators of transducers loss electrical insulation and degrade the signal-to-noise ratio. One essential solution to this technical trouble is to couple sound by acoustic waveguides between resonator and transducers. But waveguide will break the ideal acoustic surface and bring perturbations(Δf+ig) to the ideal resonance frequency. The perturbation model for waveguides was developed based on the first-order acoustic theory in this paper. The frequency shift Δf and half-width change g caused by the position, length and radius of waveguides were analyzed using this model. Six different length of waveguides (52˜1763 mm) were settled on the cylinder resonator and the perturbation (Δf+ig) were measured at T=332 K and p=250˜500 kPa. The experiment results agreed with the theoretical prediction very well.

  9. Singular perturbations and the sounding rocket problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper, Goddard's problem of maximizing the final altitude of a sounding rocket (a singular problem of optimal control) is analyzed using singular perturbation methods. The problem is first cast in singular perturbation form and then solved to zero order by adding boundary-layer corrections to the reduced solution. For a quadratic drag law, a closed-form solution is obtained, although consideration of a numerical example indicates that this solution is not useful for practical sounding rockets. However, use of state variable transformations allows a very accurate numerical approximation to be constructed. It is concluded that application of singular perturbation methods to the well-known sounding rocket problem indicates that these methods may have utility in dealing with singular problems of optimal control.

  10. Non-perturbative quantum geometry III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krefl, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit of the refined topological string on toric Calabi-Yau manifolds and the resulting quantum geometry is studied from a non-perturbative perspective. The quantum differential and thus the quantum periods exhibit Stokes phenomena over the combined string coupling and quantized Kähler moduli space. We outline that the underlying formalism of exact quantization is generally applicable to points in moduli space featuring massless hypermultiplets, leading to non-perturbative band splitting. Our prime example is local ℙ1 + ℙ1 near a conifold point in moduli space. In particular, we will present numerical evidence that in a Stokes chamber of interest the string based quantum geometry reproduces the non-perturbative corrections for the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit of 4d supersymmetric SU(2) gauge theory at strong coupling found in the previous part of this series. A preliminary discussion of local ℙ2 near the conifold point in moduli space is also provided.

  11. Hypersurface-invariant approach to cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salopek, D. S.; Stewart, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Using Hamilton-Jacobi theory, we develop a formalism for solving semiclassical cosmological perturbations which does not require an explicit choice of time hypersurface. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation for gravity interacting with matter (either a scalar or dust field) is solved by making an ansatz which includes all terms quadratic in the spatial curvature. Gravitational radiation and scalar perturbations are treated on an equal footing. Our technique encompasses linear perturbation theory and it also describes some mild nonlinear effects. As a concrete example of the method, we compute the galaxy-galaxy correlation function as well as large-angle microwave background fluctuations for power-law inflation, and we compare with recent observations.

  12. Cosmological perturbations in extended massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümrükçüoğlu, A. Emir; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Lin, Chunshan; Mukohyama, Shinji; Trodden, Mark

    2013-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations around self-accelerating solutions to two extensions of nonlinear massive gravity: the quasi-dilaton theory and the mass-varying theory. We examine stability of the cosmological solutions, and the extent to which the vanishing of the kinetic terms for scalar and vector perturbations of self-accelerating solutions in massive gravity is generic when the theory is extended. We find that these kinetic terms are in general nonvanishing in both extensions, though there are constraints on the parameters and background evolution from demanding that they have the correct sign. In particular, the self-accelerating solutions of the quasi-dilaton theory are always unstable to scalar perturbations with wavelength shorter than the Hubble length.

  13. Perturbation-induced dynamics of dark solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivshar, Yuri S.; Yang, Xiaoping

    1994-02-01

    We study analytically and numerically the effect of perturbations on (spatial and temporal) dark optical solitons. Our purpose is to elaborate a general analytical approach to describe the dynamics of dark solitons in the presence of physically important effects which break integrability of the primary nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We show that the corresponding perturbation theory differs for the cases of constant and varying backgrounds which support the dark solitons. We present a general formalism describing the perturbation-induced dynamics for both cases and also analyze the influence of several physically important effects, such as linear and two-photon absorption, Raman self-induced scattering, gain with saturation, on the propagation of the dark soliton. As we show, the perturbation-induced dynamics of a dark soliton may be treated as a result of the combined effect of the background evolution and internal soliton dynamics, the latter being characterized by the soliton phase angle. A similar approach is applied to the problem of the dark-soliton propagation on a finite-width background. We analyze adiabatic modification of a dark pulse propagating on a dispersively spreading finite-width background, and we prove analytically that a frequency chirp of the background does not affect the soliton motion. As a matter of fact, the results obtained describe the perturbation-induced dynamics of dark solitons in the so-called adiabatic approximation and, as we show for all the cases analyzed, they are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations of the corresponding perturbed nonlinear Schrödinger equation, provided the effects produced by the emitted radiation are small.

  14. Perturbative QCD at Finite Temperature and Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niégawa, A.

    This is a comprehensive review on the perturbative hot QCD including the recent developments. The main body of the review is concentrated upon dealing with physical quantities like reaction rates. Contents: S1. Introduction, S2. Perturbative thermal field theory: Feynman rules, S3. Reaction-rate formula, S4. Hard-thermal-loop resummation scheme in hot QCD, S5. Effective action, S6. Hard modes with |P2| ≤ O (g2 T2), S7. Application to the computation of physical quantities, S8. Beyond the hard-thermal-loop resummation scheme, S9. Conclusions.

  15. Death to perturbative QCD in exclusive processes?

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, R.; Hansper, J.; Gari, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The authors discuss the question of whether perturbative QCD is applicable in calculations of exclusive processes at available momentum transfers. They show that the currently used method of determining hadronic quark distribution amplitudes from QCD sum rules yields wave functions which are completely undetermined because the polynomial expansion diverges. Because of the indeterminacy of the wave functions no statement can be made at present as to whether perturbative QCD is valid. The authors emphasize the necessity of a rigorous discussion of the subject and the importance of experimental data in the range of interest.

  16. Conservative perturbation theory for nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Tirth; Chattopadhyay, Rohitashwa; Vaidya, Kedar; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we show how to use canonical perturbation theory for dissipative dynamical systems capable of showing limit-cycle oscillations. Thus, our work surmounts the hitherto perceived barrier for canonical perturbation theory that it can be applied only to a class of conservative systems, viz., Hamiltonian systems. In the process, we also find Hamiltonian structure for an important subset of Liénard system—a paradigmatic system for modeling isolated and asymptotic oscillatory state. We discuss the possibility of extending our method to encompass an even wider range of nonconservative systems.

  17. Perturbative approach to Markovian open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Andy C. Y.; Petruccione, F.; Koch, Jens

    2014-05-01

    The exact treatment of Markovian open quantum systems, when based on numerical diagonalization of the Liouville super-operator or averaging over quantum trajectories, is severely limited by Hilbert space size. Perturbation theory, standard in the investigation of closed quantum systems, has remained much less developed for open quantum systems where a direct application to the Lindblad master equation is desirable. We present such a perturbative treatment which will be useful for an analytical understanding of open quantum systems and for numerical calculation of system observables which would otherwise be impractical.

  18. Evolution of perturbations in an inflationary universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, J. A.; Will, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of inhomogeneous density perturbations in a model of the very early universe that is dominated for a time by a constant energy density of a false quantum-mechanical vacuum is analyzed. During this period, the universe inflates exponentially and supercools exponentially, until a phase transition back to the true vacuum reheats the matter and radiation. Focus is on the physically measurable, coordinate-independent modes of inhomogeneous perturbations of this model and it is found that all modes either are constant or are exponentially damped during the inflationary era.

  19. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  20. Conservative perturbation theory for nonconservative systems.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tirth; Chattopadhyay, Rohitashwa; Vaidya, Kedar; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we show how to use canonical perturbation theory for dissipative dynamical systems capable of showing limit-cycle oscillations. Thus, our work surmounts the hitherto perceived barrier for canonical perturbation theory that it can be applied only to a class of conservative systems, viz., Hamiltonian systems. In the process, we also find Hamiltonian structure for an important subset of Liénard system-a paradigmatic system for modeling isolated and asymptotic oscillatory state. We discuss the possibility of extending our method to encompass an even wider range of nonconservative systems. PMID:26764794