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Sample records for downstream target genes

  1. The neurotensin gene is a downstream target for Ras activation.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Zhou, Z; Celano, P; Li, J

    1995-01-01

    Ras regulates novel patterns of gene expression and the differentiation of various eukaryotic cell types. Stable transfection of Ha-ras into the human colon cancer line CaCo2 results in the morphologic differentiation to a small bowel phenotype. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the Ras regulatory pathway plays a role in the expression of the neurotensin gene (NT/N), a terminally differentiated endocrine product specifically localized in the gastrointestinal tract to the adult small bowel. We found that CaCo2-ras cells, but not parental CaCo2, express high levels of the human NT/N gene and, moreover, that this increase in gene expression is regulated at the level of transcription. Transfection experiments using NT/N-CAT mutation constructs identify the proximal 200 bp of NT/N flanking sequence as sufficient for maximal Ras-mediated NT/N reporter gene induction. Furthermore, a proximal AP-1/CRE motif is crucial for this Ras-mediated NT/N activation. Wild-type Ha-ras induces NT/N gene expression, albeit at lower levels than activated Ras; a dominant-negative Raf blocks this NT/N induction, suggesting that Raf lies down-stream of Ras in this pathway. In addition, postconfluent cultures of CaCo2 cells, which are differentiated to a small bowel phenotype, express the NT/N gene by 6 d after reaching confluency; this increase of NT/N expression is associated with concomitant increases of cellular p21ras protein. We conclude that Ras (both wild-type and activated) enhances expression of the NT/N gene in the gut-derived CaCo2 cell line, suggesting an important role for the Ras signaling pathway in NT/N gene transcription. Our results underscore the possibility that tissue-specific genes (such as NT/N) expressed in distinct subpopulations of the gut may be subject to Ras regulation. Finally, we speculate that the NT/N gene and the CaCo2 and CaCo2-ras cell systems will provide unique models to further define the cellular mechanisms leading to mammalian

  2. Integrative analysis of RUNX1 downstream pathways and target genes

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Joëlle; Simpson, Ken M; Escher, Robert; Buchet-Poyau, Karine; Beissbarth, Tim; Carmichael, Catherine; Ritchie, Matthew E; Schütz, Frédéric; Cannon, Ping; Liu, Marjorie; Shen, Xiaofeng; Ito, Yoshiaki; Raskind, Wendy H; Horwitz, Marshall S; Osato, Motomi; Turner, David R; Speed, Terence P; Kavallaris, Maria; Smyth, Gordon K; Scott, Hamish S

    2008-01-01

    Background The RUNX1 transcription factor gene is frequently mutated in sporadic myeloid and lymphoid leukemia through translocation, point mutation or amplification. It is also responsible for a familial platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (FPD-AML). The disruption of the largely unknown biological pathways controlled by RUNX1 is likely to be responsible for the development of leukemia. We have used multiple microarray platforms and bioinformatic techniques to help identify these biological pathways to aid in the understanding of why RUNX1 mutations lead to leukemia. Results Here we report genes regulated either directly or indirectly by RUNX1 based on the study of gene expression profiles generated from 3 different human and mouse platforms. The platforms used were global gene expression profiling of: 1) cell lines with RUNX1 mutations from FPD-AML patients, 2) over-expression of RUNX1 and CBFβ, and 3) Runx1 knockout mouse embryos using either cDNA or Affymetrix microarrays. We observe that our datasets (lists of differentially expressed genes) significantly correlate with published microarray data from sporadic AML patients with mutations in either RUNX1 or its cofactor, CBFβ. A number of biological processes were identified among the differentially expressed genes and functional assays suggest that heterozygous RUNX1 point mutations in patients with FPD-AML impair cell proliferation, microtubule dynamics and possibly genetic stability. In addition, analysis of the regulatory regions of the differentially expressed genes has for the first time systematically identified numerous potential novel RUNX1 target genes. Conclusion This work is the first large-scale study attempting to identify the genetic networks regulated by RUNX1, a master regulator in the development of the hematopoietic system and leukemia. The biological pathways and target genes controlled by RUNX1 will have considerable importance in disease progression in both

  3. Identification of downstream metastasis-associated target genes regulated by LSD1 in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang; Ding, Jie; Wang, Ziwei; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Xuejian; Du, Jiyi

    2017-03-21

    This study aims to identify downstream target genes regulated by lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) in colon cancer cells and investigate the molecular mechanisms of LSD1 influencing invasion and metastasis of colon cancer. We obtained the expression changes of downstream target genes regulated by small-interfering RNA-LSD1 and LSD1-overexpression via gene expression profiling in two human colon cancer cell lines. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). We screened out LSD1-target gene associated with proliferation, metastasis, and invasion from DEGs via Gene Ontology and Pathway Studio. Subsequently, four key genes (CABYR, FOXF2, TLE4, and CDH1) were computationally predicted as metastasis-related LSD1-target genes. ChIp-PCR was applied after RT-PCR and Western blot validations to detect the occupancy of LSD1-target gene promoter-bound LSD1. A total of 3633 DEGs were significantly upregulated, and 4642 DEGs were downregulated in LSD1-silenced SW620 cells. A total of 4047 DEGs and 4240 DEGs were upregulated and downregulated in LSD1-overexpressed HT-29 cells, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot validated the microarray analysis results. ChIP assay results demonstrated that LSD1 might be negative regulators for target genes CABYR and CDH1. The expression level of LSD1 is negatively correlated with mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine4(H3K4) at LSD1- target gene promoter region. No significant mono-methylation and dimethylation of H3 lysine9 methylation was detected at the promoter region of CABYR and CDH1. LSD1- depletion contributed to the upregulation of CABYR and CDH1 through enhancing the dimethylation of H3K4 at the LSD1-target genes promoter. LSD1- overexpression mediated the downregulation of CABYR and CDH1expression through decreasing the mono- and dimethylation of H3K4 at LSD1-target gene promoter in colon cancer cells. CABYR and CDH1 might be potential LSD1-target genes in colon

  4. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as a direct downstream target gene of Hoxc8

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Hyehyun; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Bok, Jinwoong; Chung, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2010-02-19

    Hoxc8 is a member of Hox family transcription factors that play crucial roles in spatiotemporal body patterning during embryogenesis. Hox proteins contain a conserved 61 amino acid homeodomain, which is responsible for recognition and binding of the proteins onto Hox-specific DNA binding motifs and regulates expression of their target genes. Previously, using proteome analysis, we identified Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as one of the putative target genes of Hoxc8. Here, we asked whether Hoxc8 regulates Pcna expression by directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Pcna. In mouse embryos at embryonic day 11.5, the expression pattern of Pcna was similar to that of Hoxc8 along the anteroposterior body axis. Moreover, Pcna transcript levels as well as cell proliferation rate were increased by overexpression of Hoxc8 in C3H10T1/2 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Characterization of 2.3 kb genomic sequence upstream of Pcna coding region revealed that the upstream sequence contains several Hox core binding sequences and one Hox-Pbx binding sequence. Direct binding of Hoxc8 proteins to the Pcna regulatory sequence was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that Pcna is a direct downstream target of Hoxc8.

  5. Mechanisms contributing to differential regulation of PAX3 downstream target genes in normal human epidermal melanocytes versus melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Danielle; Boyle, Glen M; Ziman, Mel; Medic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive and drug resistant form of skin cancer. It arises from melanocytes, the pigment producing cells of the skin. The formation of these melanocytes is driven by the transcription factor PAX3 early during embryonic development. As a result of alternative splicing, the PAX3 gene gives rise to eight different transcripts which encode isoforms that have different structures and activate different downstream target genes involved in pathways of cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and survival. Furthermore, post-translational modifications have also been shown to alter the functions of PAX3. We previously identified PAX3 downstream target genes in melanocytes and melanoma cells. Here we assessed the effects of PAX3 down-regulation on this panel of target genes in primary melanocytes versus melanoma cells. We show that PAX3 differentially regulates various downstream target genes involved in cell proliferation in melanoma cells compared to melanocytes. To determine mechanisms behind this differential downstream target gene regulation, we performed immunoprecipitation to assess post-translational modifications of the PAX3 protein as well as RNAseq to determine PAX3 transcript expression profiles in melanocytes compared to melanoma cells. Although PAX3 was found to be post-translationally modified, there was no qualitative difference in phosphorylation and ubiquitination between melanocytes and melanoma cells, while acetylation of PAX3 was reduced in melanoma cells. Additionally, there were differences in PAX3 transcript expression profiles between melanocytes and melanoma cells. In particular the PAX3E transcript, responsible for reducing melanocyte proliferation and increasing apoptosis, was found to be down-regulated in melanoma cells compared to melanocytes. These results suggest that alternate transcript expression profiles activate different downstream target genes leading to the melanoma phenotype.

  6. The myostatin gene is a downstream target gene of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MyoD.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Michael P; Kambadur, Ravi; Jeanplong, Ferenc; Thomas, Mark; Martyn, Julie K; Bass, John J; Sharma, Mridula

    2002-10-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of myogenesis, and inactivation of myostatin leads to heavy muscle growth. Here we have cloned and characterized the bovine myostatin gene promoter. Alignment of the upstream sequences shows that the myostatin promoter is highly conserved during evolution. Sequence analysis of 1.6 kb of the bovine myostatin gene upstream region revealed that it contains 10 E-box motifs (E1 to E10), arranged in three clusters, and a single MEF2 site. Deletion and mutation analysis of the myostatin gene promoter showed that out of three important E boxes (E3, E4, and E6) of the proximal cluster, E6 plays a significant role in the regulation of a reporter gene in C(2)C(12) cells. We also demonstrate by band shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay that the E6 E-box motif binds to MyoD in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, cotransfection experiments indicate that among the myogenic regulatory factors, MyoD preferentially up-regulates myostatin promoter activity. Since MyoD expression varies during the myoblast cell cycle, we analyzed the myostatin promoter activity in synchronized myoblasts and quiescent "reserve" cells. Our results suggest that myostatin promoter activity is relatively higher during the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, when MyoD expression levels are maximal. However, in the reserve cells, which lack MyoD expression, a significant reduction in the myostatin promoter activity is observed. Taken together, these results suggest that the myostatin gene is a downstream target gene of MyoD. Since the myostatin gene is implicated in controlling G(1)-to-S progression of myoblasts, MyoD could be triggering myoblast withdrawal from the cell cycle by regulating myostatin gene expression.

  7. NF-kB activation and its downstream target genes expression after heavy ions exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Schmitz, Claudia; Koch, Kristina; Feles, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    To enable long-term human space flight cellular radiation response to densely ionizing radiation needs to be better understood for developing appropriate countermeasures to mitigate acute effects and late radiation risks for the astronaut. The biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions (which constitute the most important radiation type in space) with high linear energy transfer (LET) for effecting DNA damage response pathways as a gateway to cell death or survival is of major concern not only for space missions but also for new regimes of tumor radiotherapy. In the current research study, the contribution of NF-κB in response to space-relevant radiation qualities was determined by a NF-κB reporter cell line (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo L2). The NF-κB dependent reporter gene expression (d2EGFP) after ionizing radiation (X-rays and heavy ions) exposure was evaluated by flow cytometry. Because of differences in the extent of NF-κB activation after X-irradiation and heavy ions exposure, it was expected that radiation quality (LET) might play an important role in the cellular radiation response. In addition, the biological effectiveness (RBE) of NF-κB activation and reduction of cellular survival was examined for heavy ions having a broad range of LET (˜0.3 - 9674 keV/µm). Furthermore, the effect of LET on NF-κB target gene expression was analyzed by real time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In this study it was proven that NF-κB activation and NF-κB dependent gene expression comprises an early step in cellular radiation response. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates that NF-κB activation and NF-κB-dependent gene expression by heavy ions are highest in the LET range of ˜50-200 keV/μupm. The up-regulated chemokines and cytokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL10, IL-8 and TNF) might be important for cell-cell communication among hit as well as unhit cells (bystander effect). The results obtained suggest the NF-κB pathway to be a

  8. miRNAs regulated by estrogens, tamoxifen, and endocrine disruptors and their downstream gene targets

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (22 nucleotides), single-stranded, non-coding RNAs that form complimentary base-pairs with the 3’ untranslated region of target mRNAs within the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) and block translation and/or stimulate mRNA transcript degradation. The non-coding miRBase (release 21, June 2014) reports that human genome contains ~2,588 mature miRNAs which regulate ~ 60% of human protein-coding mRNAs. Dysregulation of miRNA expression has been implicated in estrogen-related diseases including breast and endometrial cancers. The mechanism for estrogen regulation of miRNA expression and the role of estrogen-regulated miRNAs in normal homeostasis, reproduction, lactation, and in cancer is an area of great research and clinical interest. Estrogens regulate miRNAs transcription through estrogen receptors α and β in a tissue-specific and cell-dependent manner. This review focuses primary on the regulation of miRNA expression by ligand-activated ERs and their bona fide gene targets and includes miRNAs regulation by tamoxifen and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in breast cancer and cell lines. PMID:25659536

  9. Deciphering downstream gene targets of PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K pathway in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Henna; Nieminen, Anni; Saarela, Matti; Kallioniemi, Anne; Klefström, Juha; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Monni, Outi

    2008-01-01

    Background The 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RPS6KB1), located at 17q23, is amplified and overexpressed in 10–30% of primary breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. p70S6K is a serine/threonine kinase regulated by PI3K/mTOR pathway, which plays a crucial role in control of cell cycle, growth and survival. Our aim was to determine p70S6K and PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K pathway dependent gene expression profiles by microarrays using five breast cancer cell lines with predefined gene copy number and gene expression alterations. The p70S6K dependent profiles were determined by siRNA silencing of RPS6KB1 in two breast cancer cell lines overexpressing p70S6K. These profiles were further correlated with gene expression alterations caused by inhibition of PI3K/mTOR pathway with PI3K inhibitor Ly294002 or mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Results Altogether, the silencing of p70S6K altered the expression of 109 and 173 genes in two breast cancer cell lines and 67 genes were altered in both cell lines in addition to RPS6KB1. Furthermore, 17 genes including VTCN1 and CDKN2B showed overlap with genes differentially expressed after PI3K or mTOR inhibition. The gene expression signatures responsive to both PI3K/mTOR pathway and p70S6K inhibitions revealed previously unidentified genes suggesting novel downstream targets for PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K pathway. Conclusion Since p70S6K overexpression is associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis of breast cancer patients, the potential downstream targets of p70S6K and the whole PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K pathway identified in our study may have diagnostic value. PMID:18652687

  10. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TCF21 is a downstream target of the male sex determining gene SRY.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ramji K; Sadler-Riggleman, Ingrid; Clement, Tracy M; Skinner, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The cascade of molecular events involved in mammalian sex determination has been shown to involve the SRY gene, but specific downstream events have eluded researchers for decades. The current study identifies one of the first direct downstream targets of the male sex determining factor SRY as the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor TCF21. SRY was found to bind to the Tcf21 promoter and activate gene expression. Mutagenesis of SRY/SOX9 response elements in the Tcf21 promoter eliminated the actions of SRY. SRY was found to directly associate with the Tcf21 promoter SRY/SOX9 response elements in vivo during fetal rat testis development. TCF21 was found to promote an in vitro sex reversal of embryonic ovarian cells to induce precursor Sertoli cell differentiation. TCF21 and SRY had similar effects on the in vitro sex reversal gonadal cell transcriptomes. Therefore, SRY acts directly on the Tcf21 promoter to in part initiate a cascade of events associated with Sertoli cell differentiation and embryonic testis development.

  11. Anomalous altered expressions of downstream gene-targets in TP53-miRNA pathways in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sanga; Mukherjee, Nupur; Das, Smarajit; Das, Pijush; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC, continues to grow. Change in the expression of TP53 in HNSCC affects its downstream miRNAs and their gene targets, anomalously altering the expressions of the five genes, MEIS1, AGTR1, DTL, TYMS and BAK1. These expression alterations follow the repression of TP53 that upregulates miRNA-107, miRNA- 215, miRNA-34 b/c and miRNA-125b, but downregulates miRNA-155. The above five so far unreported genes are the targets of these miRNAs. Meta-analyses of microarray and RNA-Seq data followed by qRT-PCR validation unravel these new ones in HNSCC. The regulatory roles of TP53 on miRNA-155 and miRNA-125b differentiate the expressions of AGTR1 and BAK1in HNSCC vis-à-vis other carcinogenesis. Expression changes alter cell cycle regulation, angiogenic and blood cell formation, and apoptotic modes in affliction. Pathway analyses establish the resulting systems-level functional and mechanistic insights into the etiology of HNSCC. PMID:25186767

  12. ZBTB16 as a Downstream Target Gene of Osterix Regulates Osteoblastogenesis of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onizuka, Satoru; Park, Sung‐Joon; Nakai, Kenta; Yamato, Masayuki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) possess the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, and they can be utilized as a source for bone regenerative therapy. Osteoinductive pretreatment, which induces the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs in vitro, has been widely used for bone tissue engineering prior to cell transplantation. However, the molecular basis of osteoblastic differentiation induced by osteoinductive medium (OIM) is still unknown. Therefore, we used a next‐generation sequencer to investigate the changes in gene expression during the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs. The hMSCs used in this study possessed both multipotency and self‐renewal ability. Whole‐transcriptome analysis revealed that the expression of zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16 (ZBTB16) was significantly increased during the osteoblastogenesis of hMSCs. ZBTB16 mRNA and protein expression was enhanced by culturing the hMSCs with OIM. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)‐mediated gene silencing of ZBTB16 decreased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP); the expression of osteogenic genes, such as osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP), and the mineralized nodule formation induced by OIM. siRNA‐mediated gene silencing of Osterix (Osx), which is known as an essential regulator of osteoblastic differentiation, markedly downregulated the expression of ZBTB16. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that Osx associated with the ZBTB16 promoter region containing the GC‐rich canonical Sp1 sequence, which is the specific Osx binding site. These findings suggest that ZBTB16 acts as a downstream transcriptional regulator of Osx and can be useful as a late marker of osteoblastic differentiation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2423–2434, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27335174

  13. Identification of SHCBP1 as a novel downstream target gene of SS18-SSX1 and its functional analysis in progression of synovial sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Changliang; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Wei; Song, Yan; Wang, Xiaoying; Li, Ji; Qiao, Yong; Wu, Dongjin; Ma, Shengzhong; Wang, Xiuwen; Gao, Chunzheng

    2016-01-01

    The SS18-SSX1 fusion gene has been shown to play important roles in the development of synovial sarcoma (SS), but the underlying molecular mechanisms and its downstream target genes are still not clear. Here SHC SH2-domain binding protein 1 (SHCBP1) was identified and validated to be a novel downstream target gene of SS18-SSX1 by using microarray assay, quantitative real-time (qPCR) and western blot. Expression of SHCBP1 was firstly confirmed in SS cell line and SS tissues. The effects of SHCBP1 overexpression or knockdown on SS cell proliferation and tumorigenicity were then studied by cell proliferation, DNA replication, colony formation, flow cytometric assays, and its in vivo tumorigenesis was determined in the nude mice. Meanwhile, the related signaling pathways of SHCBP1 were also examined in SS cells. The results indicated that SHCBP1 was significantly increased in SS cells and SS tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. The expression of SHCBP1 was demonstrated to be positively correlated with the SS18-SSX1 level. Overexpression and ablation of SHCBP1 promoted and inhibited, respectively, the proliferation and tumorigenicity of SS cells in vitro. SHCBP1 knockdown also significantly inhibited SS cell growth in nude mice, and lowered the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways and cyclin D1 expression. Our findings disclose that SHCBP1 is a novel downstream target gene of SS18-SSX1, and demonstrate that the oncogene SS18-SSX1 promotes tumorigenesis by increasing the expression of SHCBP1, which normally acts as a tumor promoting factor. PMID:27572315

  14. Adiponectin, a downstream target gene of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, controls hepatitis B virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sarah; Jung, Jaesung; Kim, Taeyeung; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2011-01-20

    In this study, HepG2-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-stable cells that did not overexpress HBx and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells were analyzed for their expression of HBV-induced, upregulated adipogenic and lipogenic genes. The mRNAs of CCAAT enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), adiponectin, liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were expressed at higher levels in HepG2-HBV and lamivudine-treated stable cells and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells than in the HepG2 cells. Lamivudine treatment reduced the mRNA levels of PPAR{gamma} and C/EBP{alpha}. Conversely, HBV replication was upregulated by adiponectin and PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone treatments and was downregulated by adiponectin siRNAs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that HBV replication and/or protein expression, even in the absence of HBx, upregulated adipogenic or lipogenic genes, and that the control of adiponectin might prove useful as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

  15. Heat shock factor 1 deficiency via its downstream target gene αB-crystallin (Hspb5) impairs p53 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiongjie; Moskophidis, Demetrius; Hu, Yanzhong; Phillips, Andrew; Mivechi, Nahid F.

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock factor Hsf1 regulates the stress-inducibility of heat shock proteins (Hsps) or molecular chaperones. One of the functions attributed to Hsps is their participation in folding and degradation of proteins. We recently showed that hsf1−/− cells accumulate ubiquitinated proteins. However, a direct role for Hsf1 in stability of specific proteins such as p53 has not been elucidated. We present evidence that cells deficient in hsf1 accumulate wild type p53 protein. We further show that hsf1−/− cells express lower levels of αB-crystallin and cells deficient in αB-crystallin also accumulate p53 protein. Reports indicate that αB-crystallin binds to Fbx4 ubiquitin ligase, and they target cyclin D1 for degradation through a pathway involving the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box) complex. Towards determining a mechanism for p53 degradation involving αB-crystallin and Hsf1, we have found that ectopic expression of Fbx4 in wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) expressing mutant p53 (p53R175H) leads to increase in its degradation, while MEFs deficient in hsf1 or αBcry are defective in degradation of this p53 protein. In addition, immunoprecipitated p53R175H from wild type MEFs is able to pull-down both αB-crystallin and Fbx4. Finally, immunoprecipitated wild type p53 from doxorubicin treated U2OS cells can pull-down endogenous αB-crystallin and Fbx4. These results indicate that hsf1- and αBcry- deficient cells accumulate p53 due to reduced levels of αB-crystallin in these cells. Elevated levels of p53 in hsf1- and αBcry- deficient cells lead to their increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. These data reveal a novel mechanism for protein degradation through Hsf1 and αB-crystallin. PMID:19343786

  16. CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and downstream human placental growth hormone genes are targets for dysregulation in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A

    2013-08-02

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in "normal" pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this "resistance," suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) versus lean (BMI 20-25 kg/m(2)) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development.

  17. Global Oct4 target gene analysis reveals novel downstream PTEN and TNC genes required for drug-resistance and metastasis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yen-An; Chen, Chi-Hsin; Sun, H. Sunny; Cheng, Chun-Pei; Tseng, Vincent S.; Hsu, Han-Shui; Su, Wu-Chou; Lai, Wu-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of Oct4, a stemness gene encoding a transcription factor, has been reported in several cancers. However, the mechanism by which Oct4 directs transcriptional program that leads to somatic cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we provide mechanistic insight into Oct4-driven transcriptional network promoting drug-resistance and metastasis in lung cancer cell, animal and clinical studies. Through an integrative approach combining our Oct4 chromatin-immunoprecipitation sequencing and ENCODE datasets, we identified the genome-wide binding regions of Oct4 in lung cancer at promoter and enhancer of numerous genes involved in critical pathways which promote tumorigenesis. Notably, PTEN and TNC were previously undefined targets of Oct4. In addition, novel Oct4-binding motifs were found to overlap with DNA elements for Sp1 transcription factor. We provided evidence that Oct4 suppressed PTEN in an Sp1-dependent manner by recruitment of HDAC1/2, leading to activation of AKT signaling and drug-resistance. In contrast, Oct4 transactivated TNC independent of Sp1 and resulted in cancer metastasis. Clinically, lung cancer patients with Oct4 high, PTEN low and TNC high expression profile significantly correlated with poor disease-free survival. Our study reveals a critical Oct4-driven transcriptional program that promotes lung cancer progression, illustrating the therapeutic potential of targeting Oc4 transcriptionally regulated genes. PMID:25609695

  18. Regulation of sonic hedgehog-GLI1 downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, PAX6 and NKX2.2 and their epigenetic status in medulloblastoma and astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is critical for cell growth and differentiation. Impairment of this pathway can result in both birth defects and cancer. Despite its importance in cancer development, the Shh pathway has not been thoroughly investigated in tumorigenesis of brain tumors. In this study, we sought to understand the regulatory roles of GLI1, the immediate downstream activator of the Shh signaling pathway on its downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6 in medulloblastoma and astrocytic tumors. Methods We silenced GLI1 expression in medulloblastoma and astrocytic cell lines by transfection of siRNA against GLI1. Subsequently, we performed RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to assay the expression of downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6. We also attempted to correlate the pattern of expression of GLI1 and its regulated genes in 14 cell lines and 41 primary medulloblastoma and astrocytoma tumor samples. We also assessed the methylation status of the Cyclin D2 and PTCH1 promoters in these 14 cell lines and 58 primary tumor samples. Results Silencing expression of GLI1 resulted up-regulation of all target genes in the medulloblastoma cell line, while only PTCH1 was up-regulated in astrocytoma. We also observed methylation of the cyclin D2 promoter in a significant number of astrocytoma cell lines (63%) and primary astrocytoma tumor samples (32%), but not at all in any medulloblastoma samples. PTCH1 promoter methylation was less frequently observed than Cyclin D2 promoter methylation in astrocytomas, and not at all in medulloblastomas. Conclusions Our results demonstrate different regulatory mechanisms of Shh-GLI1 signaling. These differences vary according to the downstream target gene affected, the origin of the tissue, as well as epigenetic regulation of some of these genes. PMID:21059263

  19. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  20. Identification of Pou5f1, Sox2, and Nanog downstream target genes with statistical confidence by applying a novel algorithm to time course microarray and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation data

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A; Masui, Shinji; Sharova, Lioudmila V; Piao, Yulan; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Matoba, Ryo; Xin, Li; Niwa, Hitoshi; Ko, Minoru SH

    2008-01-01

    Background Target genes of a transcription factor (TF) Pou5f1 (Oct3/4 or Oct4), which is essential for pluripotency maintenance and self-renewal of embryonic stem (ES) cells, have previously been identified based on their response to Pou5f1 manipulation and occurrence of Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-binding sites in promoters. However, many responding genes with binding sites may not be direct targets because response may be mediated by other genes and ChIP-binding site may not be functional in terms of transcription regulation. Results To reduce the number of false positives, we propose to separate responding genes into groups according to direction, magnitude, and time of response, and to apply the false discovery rate (FDR) criterion to each group individually. Using this novel algorithm with stringent statistical criteria (FDR < 0.2) to a compendium of published and new microarray data (3, 6, 12, and 24 hr after Pou5f1 suppression) and published ChIP data, we identified 420 tentative target genes (TTGs) for Pou5f1. The majority of TTGs (372) were down-regulated after Pou5f1 suppression, indicating that the Pou5f1 functions as an activator of gene expression when it binds to promoters. Interestingly, many activated genes are potent suppressors of transcription, which include polycomb genes, zinc finger TFs, chromatin remodeling factors, and suppressors of signaling. Similar analysis showed that Sox2 and Nanog also function mostly as transcription activators in cooperation with Pou5f1. Conclusion We have identified the most reliable sets of direct target genes for key pluripotency genes – Pou5f1, Sox2, and Nanog, and found that they predominantly function as activators of downstream gene expression. Thus, most genes related to cell differentiation are suppressed indirectly. PMID:18522731

  1. Ca2+-activated nucleotidase 1, a novel target gene for the transcriptional repressor DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator), is involved in protein folding and degradation.

    PubMed

    Calì, Tito; Fedrizzi, Laura; Ottolini, Denis; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Mellström, Britt; Naranjo, Jose R; Carafoli, Ernesto; Brini, Marisa

    2012-05-25

    DREAM is a Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional repressor highly expressed in neuronal cells. A number of genes have already been identified as the target of its regulation. Targeted analysis performed on cerebella from transgenic mice expressing a dominant active DREAM mutant (daDREAM) showed a drastic reduction of the amount of transcript of Ca(2+)-activated nucleotidase 1 (CANT1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi resident Ca(2+)-dependent nucleoside diphosphatase that has been suggested to have a role in glucosylation reactions related to the quality control of proteins in the ER and the Golgi apparatus. CANT1 down-regulation was also found in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably overexpressing wild type (wt) DREAM or daDREAM, thus providing a simple cell model to investigate the protein maturation pathway. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the down-regulation of CANT1 is associated with reduced protein secretion and increased degradation rates. Importantly, overexpression of wtDREAM or daDREAM augmented the expression of the EDEM1 gene, which encodes a key component of the ER-associated degradation pathway, suggesting an alternative pathway to enhanced protein degradation. Restoring CANT1 levels in neuroblastoma clones recovered the phenotype, thus confirming a key role of CANT1, and of the regulation of its gene by DREAM, in the control of protein synthesis and degradation.

  2. Global genome analysis of the downstream binding targets of testis determining factor SRY and SOX9.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ramji K; Haque, Md M; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-01-01

    A major event in mammalian male sex determination is the induction of the testis determining factor Sry and its downstream gene Sox9. The current study provides one of the first genome wide analyses of the downstream gene binding targets for SRY and SOX9 to help elucidate the molecular control of Sertoli cell differentiation and testis development. A modified ChIP-Chip analysis using a comparative hybridization was used to identify 71 direct downstream binding targets for SRY and 109 binding targets for SOX9. Interestingly, only 5 gene targets overlapped between SRY and SOX9. In addition to the direct response element binding gene targets, a large number of atypical binding gene targets were identified for both SRY and SOX9. Bioinformatic analysis of the downstream binding targets identified gene networks and cellular pathways potentially involved in the induction of Sertoli cell differentiation and testis development. The specific DNA sequence binding site motifs for both SRY and SOX9 were identified. Observations provide insights into the molecular control of male gonadal sex determination.

  3. Global Genome Analysis of the Downstream Binding Targets of Testis Determining Factor SRY and SOX9

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Ramji K.; Haque, Md. M.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    A major event in mammalian male sex determination is the induction of the testis determining factor Sry and its downstream gene Sox9. The current study provides one of the first genome wide analyses of the downstream gene binding targets for SRY and SOX9 to help elucidate the molecular control of Sertoli cell differentiation and testis development. A modified ChIP-Chip analysis using a comparative hybridization was used to identify 71 direct downstream binding targets for SRY and 109 binding targets for SOX9. Interestingly, only 5 gene targets overlapped between SRY and SOX9. In addition to the direct response element binding gene targets, a large number of atypical binding gene targets were identified for both SRY and SOX9. Bioinformatic analysis of the downstream binding targets identified gene networks and cellular pathways potentially involved in the induction of Sertoli cell differentiation and testis development. The specific DNA sequence binding site motifs for both SRY and SOX9 were identified. Observations provide insights into the molecular control of male gonadal sex determination. PMID:22984422

  4. microRNA-340-5p Functions Downstream of Cardiotrophin-1 to Regulate Cardiac Eccentric Hypertrophy and Heart Failure via Target Gene Dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoya; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Zhang, Xitao; An, Xiangguang; Yan, Jun; Xin, Yue; Su, Pixiong

    2015-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy inevitably leads to the unfavorable outcomes of heart failure (HF) or even sudden death. microRNAs are key regulation factors participating in many pathophysiological processes. Recently, we observed upregulation of microRNA-340-5p (miR-340) in failing human hearts because of dilated cardiomyopathy, but the functional consequence of miR-340 remains to be clarified.We transfected neonatal cardiomyocytes with miR-340 and found fetal gene expression including Nppa, Nppb and Myh7. We also observed eccentric hypertrophy development upon treatment which was analogous to the phenotype after cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) stimulation. As a potent inducer of cardiac eccentric hypertrophy, treatment by IL-6 family members CT-1 and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) led to the elevation of miR-340. Knockdown of miR-340 using antagomir attenuated fetal gene expression and hypertrophy formation, which means miR-340 could convey the hypertrophic signal of CT-1. To demonstrate the initial factor of miR-340 activation, we constructed a volume overloaded abdominal aorta-inferior vena cava fistula rat HF model. miR-340 and CT-1 were found to be up-regulated in the left ventricle. Dystrophin (DMD), a putative target gene of miR-340 which is eccentric hypertrophy-susceptible, was decreased in this HF model upon Western blotting and immunohistochemistry tests. Luciferase assay constructed in two seed sequence of DMD gene 3'UTR showed decreased luciferase activities, and miR-340 transfected cells resulted in the degradation of DMD.miR-340 is a pro-eccentric hypertrophy miRNA, and its expression is dependent on volume overload and cytokine CT-1 activation. Cardiomyocyte structure protein DMD is a target of miR-340.

  5. Targeting pathways downstream of KRAS in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zehua; Golay, Hadrien G; Barbie, David A

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS activation is responsible for the most common genetic subtype of lung cancer. Although many of the major downstream signaling pathways that KRAS engages have been defined, these discoveries have yet to translate into effective targeted therapy. Much of the current focus has been directed at inhibiting the activation of RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but clinical trials combining multiple different agents that target these pathways have failed to show significant activity. In this article, we will discuss the evidence for RAF and PI3K as key downstream RAS effectors, as well as the RAL guanine exchange factor, which is equally essential for transformation. Furthermore, we will delineate alternative pathways, including cytokine activation and autophagy, which are co-opted by oncogenic RAS signaling and also represent attractive targets for therapy. Finally, we will present strategies for combining inhibitors of these downstream KRAS signaling pathways in a rational fashion, as multitargeted therapy will be required to achieve a cure. PMID:25303301

  6. Commissioning The Darht-II Accelerator Downstream Transport And Target

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl; Schulze, Martin E

    2008-01-01

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces a 2-kA, 17-MeV beam in a 1600-ns pulse. After exiting the accelerator, the pulse is sliced into four short pulses by a kicker and quadrupole septum and then transported for several meters to a tantalum target for conversion to x-rays for radiography. They describe the commissioning of the kicker, septum, transport, and multi-pulse converter target. The results of beam measurements made during the commissioning of the downstream transport are described.

  7. Effects of downstream genes on synthetic genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Takefumi; Yamamura, Masayuki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand and regulate complex genetic networks in living cells, it is important to build simple and well-defined genetic circuits. We designed such circuits using a synthetic biology approach that included mathematical modeling and simulation, with a focus on the effects by which downstream reporter genes are involved in the regulation of synthetic genetic circuits. Our results indicated that downstream genes exert two main effects on genes involved in the regulation of synthetic genetic circuits: (1) competition for regulatory proteins and (2) protein degradation in the cell. Our findings regarding the effects of downstream genes on regulatory genes and the role of impedance in driving large-scale and complex genetic circuits may facilitate the design of more accurate genetic circuits. This design will have wide applications in future studies of systems and synthetic biology.

  8. The statin class of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors demonstrate differential activation of the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR and FXR, as well as their downstream target genes.

    PubMed

    Howe, Katharine; Sanat, Faizah; Thumser, Alfred E; Coleman, Tanya; Plant, Nick

    2011-07-01

    The therapeutic class of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, the statins are central agents in the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and the associated conditions of cardiovascular disease, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Although statin therapy is generally considered safe, a number of known adverse effects do occur, most commonly treatment-associated muscular pain. In vitro evidence also supports the potential for drug-drug interactions involving this class of agents, and to examine this a ligand-binding assay was used to determine the ability of six clinically used statins for their ability to directly activate the nuclear receptors pregnane X-receptor (PXR), farnesoid X-receptor (FXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), demonstrating a relative activation of PXR>FXR>CAR. Using reporter gene constructs, we demonstrated that this order of activation is mirrored at the transcriptional activation level, with PXR-mediated gene activation being pre-eminent. Finally, we described a novel regulatory loop, whereby activation of FXR by statins increases PXR reporter gene expression, potentially enhancing PXR-mediated responses. Delineating the molecular interactions of statins with nuclear receptors is an important step in understanding the full biological consequences of statin exposure. This demonstration of their ability to directly activate nuclear receptors, leading to nuclear receptor cross-talk, has important potential implications for their use within a polypharmacy paradigm.

  9. Targeting TRAF3 Downstream Signaling Pathways in B cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Carissa R; Edwards, Shanique KE; Xie, Ping

    2015-01-01

    B cell neoplasms comprise >50% of blood cancers. However, many types of B cell malignancies remain incurable. Identification and validation of novel genetic risk factors and oncogenic signaling pathways are imperative for the development of new therapeutic strategies. We and others recently identified TRAF3, a cytoplasmic adaptor protein, as a novel tumor suppressor in B lymphocytes. We found that TRAF3 inactivation results in prolonged survival of mature B cells, which eventually leads to spontaneous development of B lymphomas in mice. Corroborating our findings, TRAF3 deletions and inactivating mutations frequently occur in human B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, splenic marginal zone lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, multiple myeloma, Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia, and Hodgkin lymphoma. In this context, we have been investigating TRAF3 signaling mechanisms in B cells, and are developing new therapeutic strategies to target TRAF3 downstream signaling pathways in B cell neoplasms. Here we discuss our new translational data that demonstrate the therapeutic potential of targeting TRAF3 downstream signaling pathways in B lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25960828

  10. Amine Oxidase Copper-containing 1 (AOC1) Is a Downstream Target Gene of the Wilms Tumor Protein, WT1, during Kidney Development*

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Karin M.; Braun, Julian F.W.; Jacobi, Charlotte L.; Rudigier, Lucas J.; Persson, Anja Bondke; Scholz, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Amine oxidase copper-containing 1 (AOC1; formerly known as amiloride-binding protein 1) is a secreted glycoprotein that catalyzes the degradation of putrescine and histamine. Polyamines and their diamine precursor putrescine are ubiquitous to all organisms and fulfill pivotal functions in cell growth and proliferation. Despite the importance of AOC1 in regulating polyamine breakdown, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control its expression. We report here that the Wilms tumor protein, WT1, which is necessary for normal kidney development, activates transcription of the AOC1 gene. Expression of a firefly luciferase reporter under control of the proximal AOC1 promoter was significantly enhanced by co-transfection of a WT1 expression construct. Binding of WT1 protein to a cis-regulatory element in the AOC1 promoter was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Antisense inhibition of WT1 protein translation strongly reduced Aoc1 transcripts in cultured murine embryonic kidneys and gonads. Aoc1 mRNA levels correlated with WT1 protein in several cell lines. Double immunofluorescent staining revealed a co-expression of WT1 and AOC1 proteins in the developing genitourinary system of mice and rats. Strikingly, induced changes in polyamine homeostasis affected branching morphogenesis of cultured murine embryonic kidneys in a developmental stage-specific manner. These findings suggest that WT1-dependent control of polyamine breakdown, which is mediated by changes in AOC1 expression, has a role in kidney organogenesis. PMID:25037221

  11. Targets downstream of Cdk8 in Dictyostelium development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cdk8 is a component of the mediator complex which facilitates transcription by RNA polymerase II and has been shown to play an important role in development of Dictyostelium discoideum. This eukaryote feeds as single cells but starvation triggers the formation of a multicellular organism in response to extracellular pulses of cAMP and the eventual generation of spores. Strains in which the gene encoding Cdk8 have been disrupted fail to form multicellular aggregates unless supplied with exogenous pulses of cAMP and later in development, cdk8- cells show a defect in spore production. Results Microarray analysis revealed that the cdk8- strain previously described (cdk8-HL) contained genome duplications. Regeneration of the strain in a background lacking detectable gene duplication generated strains (cdk8-2) with identical defects in growth and early development, but a milder defect in spore generation, suggesting that the severity of this defect depends on the genetic background. The failure of cdk8- cells to aggregate unless rescued by exogenous pulses of cAMP is consistent with a failure to express the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A. However, overexpression of the gene encoding this protein was not sufficient to rescue the defect, suggesting that this is not the only important target for Cdk8 at this stage of development. Proteomic analysis revealed two potential targets for Cdk8 regulation, one regulated post-transcriptionally (4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPD)) and one transcriptionally (short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR1)). Conclusions This analysis has confirmed the importance of Cdk8 at multiple stages of Dictyostelium development, although the severity of the defect in spore production depends on the genetic background. Potential targets of Cdk8-mediated gene regulation have been identified in Dictyostelium which will allow the mechanism of Cdk8 action and its role in development to be determined. PMID:21255384

  12. Enhancer Complexes Located Downstream of Both Human Immunoglobulin Cα Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Frederick C.; Harindranath, Nagaradona; Mitchell, Mary; Max, Edward E.

    1997-01-01

    To investigate regulation of human immunoglobulin heavy chain expression, we have cloned DNA downstream from the two human Cα genes, corresponding to the position in the mouse IgH cluster of a locus control region (LCR) that includes an enhancer which regulates isotype switching. Within 25 kb downstream of both the human immunoglobulin Cα1 and Cα2 genes we identified several segments of DNA which display B lymphoid–specific DNase I hypersensitivity as well as enhancer activity in transient transfections. The corresponding sequences downstream from each of the two human Cα genes are nearly identical to each other. These enhancers are also homologous to three regions which lie in similar positions downstream from the murine Cα gene and form the murine LCR. The strongest enhancers in both mouse and human have been designated HS12. Within a 135-bp core homology region, the human HS12 enhancers are ∼90% identical to the murine homolog and include several motifs previously demonstrated to be important for function of the murine enhancer; additional segments of high sequence conservation suggest the possibility of previously unrecognized functional motifs. On the other hand, certain functional elements in the murine enhancer, including a B cell–specific activator protein site, do not appear to be conserved in human HS12. The human homologs of the murine enhancers designated HS3 and HS4 show lower overall sequence conservation, but for at least two of the functional motifs in the murine HS4 (a κB site and an octamer motif  ) the human HS4 homologs are exactly conserved. An additional hypersensitivity site between human HS3 and HS12 in each human locus displays no enhancer activity on its own, but includes a region of high sequence conservation with mouse, suggesting the possibility of another novel functional element. PMID:9294139

  13. Using mechanistic Bayesian networks to identify downstream targets of the sonic hedgehog pathway.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abhik; Tenzen, Toyoaki; McMahon, Andrew P; Woolf, Peter J

    2009-12-18

    The topology of a biological pathway provides clues as to how a pathway operates, but rationally using this topology information with observed gene expression data remains a challenge. We introduce a new general-purpose analytic method called Mechanistic Bayesian Networks (MBNs) that allows for the integration of gene expression data and known constraints within a signal or regulatory pathway to predict new downstream pathway targets. The MBN framework is implemented in an open-source Bayesian network learning package, the Python Environment for Bayesian Learning (PEBL). We demonstrate how MBNs can be used by modeling the early steps of the sonic hedgehog pathway using gene expression data from different developmental stages and genetic backgrounds in mouse. Using the MBN approach we are able to automatically identify many of the known downstream targets of the hedgehog pathway such as Gas1 and Gli1, along with a short list of likely targets such as Mig12. The MBN approach shown here can easily be extended to other pathways and data types to yield a more mechanistic framework for learning genetic regulatory models.

  14. Identifying master regulators of cancer and their downstream targets by integrating genomic and epigenomic features.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Olivier; Plevritis, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Vast amounts of molecular data characterizing the genome, epigenome and transcriptome are becoming available for a variety of cancers. The current challenge is to integrate these diverse layers of molecular biology information to create a more comprehensive view of key biological processes underlying cancer. We developed a biocomputational algorithm that integrates copy number, DNA methylation, and gene expression data to study master regulators of cancer and identify their targets. Our algorithm starts by generating a list of candidate driver genes based on the rationale that genes that are driven by multiple genomic events in a subset of samples are unlikely to be randomly deregulated. We then select the master regulators from the candidate driver and identify their targets by inferring the underlying regulatory network of gene expression. We applied our biocomputational algorithm to identify master regulators and their targets in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and serous ovarian cancer. Our results suggest that the expression of candidate drivers is more likely to be influenced by copy number variations than DNA methylation. Next, we selected the master regulators and identified their downstream targets using module networks analysis. As a proof-of-concept, we show that the GBM and ovarian cancer module networks recapitulate known processes in these cancers. In addition, we identify master regulators that have not been previously reported and suggest their likely role. In summary, focusing on genes whose expression can be explained by their genomic and epigenomic aberrations is a promising strategy to identify master regulators of cancer.

  15. Detection, Validation, and Downstream Analysis of Allelic Variation in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, Daniel C.; Lu, Lu; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Wang, Xusheng; Jagalur, Manjunatha; Morris, John A.; Taylor, William L.; Dietz, Klaus; Simon, Perikles; Williams, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Common sequence variants within a gene often generate important differences in expression of corresponding mRNAs. This high level of local (allelic) control—or cis modulation—rivals that produced by gene targeting, but expression is titrated finely over a range of levels. We are interested in exploiting this allelic variation to study gene function and downstream consequences of differences in expression dosage. We have used several bioinformatics and molecular approaches to estimate error rates in the discovery of cis modulation and to analyze some of the biological and technical confounds that contribute to the variation in gene expression profiling. Our analysis of SNPs and alternative transcripts, combined with eQTL maps and selective gene resequencing, revealed that between 17 and 25% of apparent cis modulation is caused by SNPs that overlap probes rather than by genuine quantitative differences in mRNA levels. This estimate climbs to 40–50% when qualitative differences between isoform variants are included. We have developed an analytical approach to filter differences in expression and improve the yield of genuine cis-modulated transcripts to ∼80%. This improvement is important because the resulting variation can be successfully used to study downstream consequences of altered expression on higher-order phenotypes. Using a systems genetics approach we show that two validated cis-modulated genes, Stk25 and Rasd2, are likely to control expression of downstream targets and affect disease susceptibility. PMID:19884314

  16. Pharmacologically targeting the primary defect and downstream pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Rebecca J; Perkins, Kelly J; Davies, Kay E

    2012-06-01

    DMD is a devastatingly progressive muscle wasting disorder of childhood that significantly shortens life expectancy. Despite efforts to develop an effective therapy that dates back over a century, clinical interventions are still restricted to management of symptoms rather than a cure. The rationale to develop effective therapies changed in 1986 with the discovery of the dystrophin gene. Since then extensive research into both the molecular basis and pathophysiology of DMD has paved the way not only for development of strategies which aim to correct the primary defect, but also towards the identification of countless therapeutic targets with the potential to alleviate the downstream pathology. In addition to gene and cell-based therapies, which aim to deliver the missing gene and/or protein, an exciting spectrum of pharmacological approaches aimed at modulating therapeutic targets within DMD muscle cells through the use of small drugs are also being developed. This review presents promising pharmacological approaches aimed at targeting the primary defect, including suppression of nonsense mutations and functional compensation by upregulation of the dystrophin homologue, utrophin. Downstream of the primary membrane fragility, inflammation and fibrosis are reduced by blocking NF-κB, TGF-α and TGF-β, and free radical damage has been targeted using antioxidants and dietary/nutritional supplements. There are new hopes that ACE and PDE5 inhibitors can protect against skeletal as well as cardiac pathology, and modulating Ca2+ influx, NO, BMP, protein degradation and the mitochondrial permeability pore hold further promise in tackling the complex pathogenesis of this multifaceted disorder.

  17. Identification of novel stress-induced genes downstream of chop.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X Z; Kuroda, M; Sok, J; Batchvarova, N; Kimmel, R; Chung, P; Zinszner, H; Ron, D

    1998-01-01

    CHOP (GADD153) is a small nuclear protein that dimerizes avidly with members of the C/EBP family of transcription factors. Normally undetectable, it is expressed at high levels in cells exposed to conditions that perturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum and induce an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. CHOP expression in stressed cells is linked to the development of programmed cell death and, in some instances, cellular regeneration. In this study, representational difference analysis was used to compare the complement of genes expressed in stressed wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts with those expressed in cells nullizygous for chop. CHOP expression, in concert with a second signal, was found to be absolutely required for the activation by stress of a set of previously undescribed genes referred to as DOCs (for downstream of CHOP). DOC4 is a mammalian ortholog of a Drosophila gene, Tenm/Odz, implicated in patterning of the early fly embryo, whereas DOC6 encodes a newly recognized homolog of the actin-binding proteins villin and gelsolin. These results reveal the existence of a novel CHOP-dependent signaling pathway, distinct from the known endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, which may mediate changes in cell phenotype in response to stress. PMID:9649432

  18. Slug is a novel downstream target of MyoD. Temporal profiling in muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Po; Iezzi, Simona; Carver, Ethan; Dressman, Devin; Gridley, Thomas; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Hoffman, Eric P

    2002-08-16

    Temporal expression profiling was utilized to define transcriptional regulatory pathways in vivo in a mouse muscle regeneration model. Potential downstream targets of MyoD were identified by temporal expression, promoter data base mining, and gel shift assays; Slug and calpain 6 were identified as novel MyoD targets. Slug, a member of the snail/slug family of zinc finger transcriptional repressors critical for mesoderm/ectoderm development, was further shown to be a downstream target by using promoter/reporter constructs and demonstration of defective muscle regeneration in Slug null mice.

  19. Emerging role of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Yan, Xiaolong; Di, Shouyin; Jiang, Shuai; Li, Tian; Cheng, Yedong; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is a tumor suppressor and cell stress-related gene. NDRG2 is associated with tumor incidence, progression, and metastasis. NDRG2 regulates tumor-associated genes and is regulated by multiple conditions, treatments, and protein/RNA entities, including hyperthermia, trichostatin A and 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, which are promising potential cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the expression as well as the clinical and pathological significance of NDRG2 in cancer. The pathological processes and molecular pathways regulated by NDRG2 are also summarized. Moreover, mechanisms for increasing NDRG2 expression in tumors and the potential directions of future NDRG2 research are discussed. The information reviewed here should assist in experimental design and increase the potential of NDRG2 as a therapeutic target for cancer. PMID:26506239

  20. Identification of candidate downstream genes for the homeodomain transcription factor Labial in Drosophila through oligonucleotide-array transcript imaging

    PubMed Central

    Leemans, Ronny; Loop, Thomas; Egger, Boris; He, Haiqiong; Kammermeier, Lars; Hartmann, Beate; Certa, Ullrich; Reichert, Heinrich; Hirth, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Background: Homeotic genes are key developmental regulators that are highly conserved throughout evolution. Their encoded homeoproteins function as transcription factors to control a wide range of developmental processes. Although much is known about homeodomain-DNA interactions, only a small number of genes acting downstream of homeoproteins have been identified. Here we use a functional genomic approach to identify candidate target genes of the Drosophila homeodomain transcription factor Labial. Results: High-density oligonucleotide arrays with probe sets representing 1,513 identified and sequenced genes were used to analyze differential gene expression following labial overexpression in Drosophila embryos. We find significant expression level changes for 96 genes belonging to all functional classes represented on the array. In accordance with our experimental procedure, we expect that these genes are either direct or indirect targets of labial gene action. Among these genes, 48 were upregulated and 48 were downregulated following labial overexpression. This corresponds to 6.3% of the genes represented on the array. For a selection of these genes, we show that the data obtained with the oligonucleotide arrays are consistent with data obtained using quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions: Our results identify a number of novel candidate downstream target genes for Labial, suggesting that this homeoprotein differentially regulates a limited and distinct set of embryonically expressed Drosophila genes. PMID:11387036

  1. Expression of myocyte enhancer factor-2 and downstream genes in ground squirrel skeletal muscle during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Shannon N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2010-11-01

    Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) transcription factors regulate the expression of a variety of genes encoding contractile proteins and other proteins associated with muscle performance. We proposed that changes in MEF2 levels and expression of selected downstream targets would aid the skeletal muscle of thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus) in meeting metabolic challenges associated with winter hibernation; e.g., cycles of torpor-arousal, body temperature that can fall to near 0°C, long periods of inactivity that could lead to atrophy. MEF2A protein levels were significantly elevated when animals were in torpor (maximally 2.8-fold higher than in active squirrels) and the amount of phosphorylated active MEF2A Thr312 increased during entrance into torpor. MEF2C levels also rose significantly during entrance and torpor as did the amount of phosphorylated MEF2C Ser387. Furthermore, both MEF2 members showed elevated amounts in the nuclear fraction during torpor as well as enhanced binding to DNA indicating that MEF2-mediated gene expression was up-regulated in torpid animals. Indeed, the protein products of two MEF2 downstream gene targets increased in muscle during torpor (glucose transporter isoforms 4; GLUT4) or early arousal (myogenic differentiation; MyoD). Significant increases in Glut4 and MyoD mRNA transcript levels correlated with the rise in protein product levels and provided further support for the activation of MEF2-mediated gene expression in the hibernator. Transcript levels of Mef2a and Mef2c also showed time-dependent patterns with levels of both being highest during arousal from torpor. The data suggest a significant role for MEF2-mediated gene transcription in the selective adjustment of muscle protein complement over the course of torpor-arousal cycles.

  2. Conventional murine gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Albert G; Sun, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Murine gene knockout models engineered over the last two decades have continued to demonstrate their potential as invaluable tools in understanding the role of gene function in the context of normal human development and disease. The more recent elucidation of the human and mouse genomes through sequencing has opened up the capability to elucidate the function of every human gene. State-of-the-art mouse model generation allows, through a multitude of experimental steps requiring careful standardization, gene function to be reliably and predictably ablated in a live model system. The application of these standardized methodologies to directly target gene function through murine gene knockout has to date provided comprehensive and verifiable genetic models that have contributed tremendously to our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying normal and disease states in humans. The ensuing chapter provides an overview of the latest steps and procedures required to ablate gene function in a murine model.

  3. Novel downstream molecular targets of SIRT1 in melanoma: A quantitative proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Nihal, Minakshi; Sabat, Grzegorz; Kumar, Raj; Ahmad, Nihal

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most lethal forms of skin cancer and its incidence is continuing to rise in the United States. Therefore, novel mechanism and target-based strategies are needed for the management of this disease. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent class III histone deacetylase, has been implicated in a variety of physiological processes and pathological conditions. We recently demonstrated that SIRT1 is upregulated in melanoma and its inhibition by a small-molecule, tenovin-1, inhibits cell proliferation and clonogenic survival of melanoma cells, possibly via activating p53. Here, we employed a gel free quantitative proteomics approach to identify the downstream effectors and targets of SIRT1 in melanoma. The human malignant melanoma, G361 cells were treated with tenovin-1 followed by protein extraction, in liquid trypsin digestion, and peptide analyses using nanoLC-MS/MS. A total of 1091 proteins were identified, of which 20 proteins showed significant differential expression with 95% confidence interval. These proteins were subjected to gene ontology and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to obtain the information regarding their biological and molecular functions. Real-Time qRT-PCR validation showed that five of these (PSAP, MYO1B, MOCOS, HIS1H4A and BUB3) were differentially expressed at mRNA levels. Based on their important role in cell cycle regulation, we selected to focus on BUB family proteins (BUB3, as well as BUB1 and BUBR1) for subsequent validation. The qRT-PCR and immunoblot analyses showed that tenovin-1 inhibition of SIRT1 resulted in a downregulation of BUB3, BUB1 and BUBR1 in multiple melanoma cell lines. Since tenovin-1 is an inhibitor of both SIRT1 and SIRT2, we employed lentivirus mediated silencing of SIRT1 and SIRT2 in G361 cells to determine if the observed effects on BUB family proteins are due to SIRT1- or SIRT2- inhibition. We found that only SIRT1 inhibition resulted in a decrease in BUB3, BUB1 and BUBR1. Our study identified the mitotic

  4. Increased Insulin Sensitivity in Mice Lacking Collectrin, a Downstream Target of HNF-1α

    PubMed Central

    Malakauskas, Sandra M.; Kourany, Wissam M.; Zhang, Xiao Yin; Lu, Danhong; Stevens, Robert D.; Koves, Timothy R.; Hohmeier, Hans E.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Le, Thu H.

    2009-01-01

    Collectrin is a downstream target of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α), which is mutated in maturity-onset diabetes of the young subtype 3 (MODY3). Evidence from transgenic mouse models with collectrin overexpression in pancreatic islets suggests divergent roles for collectrin in influencing β-cell mass and insulin exocytosis. To clarify the function of collectrin in the pancreas, we used a mouse line with targeted deletion of the gene. We examined pancreas morphology, glucose homeostasis by ip glucose tolerance testing (IPGTT) and insulin tolerance testing (IPITT), and pancreas function by in vivo acute-phase insulin response determination and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from isolated islets. We find no difference in either pancreas morphology or function between wild-type and collectrin-deficient animals (Tmem27−/y). However, we note that by 6 months of age, Tmem27−/y mice exhibit increased insulin sensitivity by IPITT and decreased adiposity by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning compared with wild-type. We have previously reported that Tmem27−/y mice exhibit profound aminoaciduria due to failed renal recovery. We now demonstrate that Tmem27−/y animals also display inappropriate excretion of some short-chain acylcarnitines derived from amino acid and fatty acid oxidation. We provide further evidence for compensatory up-regulation of oxidative metabolism in Tmem27−/y mice, along with enhanced protein turnover associated with preserved lean mass even out to 1.5 yr of age. Our studies suggest that collectrin-deficient mice activate a number of adaptive mechanisms to defend energy homeostasis in the setting of ongoing nutrient losses. PMID:19246514

  5. Downstream of homeotic genes: in the heart of Hox function.

    PubMed

    Monier, Bruno; Tevy, Maria Florencia; Perrin, Laurent; Capovilla, Maria; Sémériva, Michel

    2007-01-01

    A functional organ is constituted of diverse cell types. Each one occupies a distinct position and is associated to specific morphological and physiological functions. The identification of the genetic programs controlling these elaborated and highly precise features of organogenesis is crucial to understand how a mature organ works under normal conditions, and how pathologies can develop. Recently, a number of studies have reported a critical role for Hox genes in one example of organogenesis: cardiogenesis in Drosophila. Beyond the interest in understanding the molecular basis of functional cardiogenesis, this system might provide a model for proposing new paradigms of how Hox genes achieve their action throughout development.

  6. Associations between a locus downstream DRD1 gene and cerebrospinal fluid dopamine metabolite concentrations in psychosis.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Dimitrios; Söderman, Erik; Axelsson, Tomas; Sedvall, Göran C; Terenius, Lars; Agartz, Ingrid; Jönsson, Erik G

    2016-04-21

    Dopamine activity, mediated by the catecholaminergic neurotransmitter dopamine, is prominent in the human brain and has been implicated in schizophrenia. Dopamine targets five different receptors and is then degraded to its major metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA). We hypothesized that genes encoding dopamine receptors may be associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HVA concentrations in patients with psychotic disorder. We searched for association between 67 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the five dopamine receptor genes i.e., DRD1, DRD2, DRD3, DRD4 and DRD5, and the CSF HVA concentrations in 74 patients with psychotic disorder. Nominally associated SNPs were also tested in 111 healthy controls. We identified a locus, located downstream DRD1 gene, where four SNPs, rs11747728, rs11742274, rs265974 and rs11747886, showed association with CSF HVA concentrations in psychotic patients. The associations between rs11747728, which is a regulatory region variant, and rs11742274 with HVA remained significant after correction for multiple testing. These associations were restricted to psychotic patients and were absent in healthy controls. The results suggest that the DRD1 gene is implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis and support the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  7. Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM), a target for anti-thrombotic agents.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-03-01

    Circulating platelets participate in the process of numerous diseases including thrombosis, inflammation, and cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to understand the underlying mechanisms mediating platelet activation under disease conditions. Emerging evidence indicates that despite the lack of a nucleus, platelets possess molecules that are involved in gene transcription in nucleated cells. This review will summarize downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a transcriptional repressor, and highlight recent findings suggesting its novel non-transcriptional role in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  8. MicroRNA-145 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting IRS1 and its downstream Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yelin; Hu, Chen; Cheng, Jun; Chen, Binquan; Ke, Qinghong; Lv, Zhen; Wu, Jian; Zhou, Yanfeng

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • MiR-145 expression is down-regulated in HCC tissues and inversely related with IRS1 levels. • MiR-145 directly targets IRS1 in HCC cells. • Restored expression of miR-145 suppressed HCC cell proliferation and growth. • MiR-145 induced IRS1 under-expression potentially reduced downstream AKT signaling. - Abstract: Accumulating evidences have proved that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we showed that miRNA-145 level was significantly decreased in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) tissues and cell lines, and its low expression was inversely associated with the abundance of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), a key mediator in oncogenic insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling. We verified IRS1 as a direct target of miR-145 using Western blotting and luciferase reporter assay. Further, the restoration of miR-145 in HCC cell lines suppressed cancer cell growth, owing to down-regulated IRS1 expression and its downstream Akt/FOXO1 signaling. Our results demonstrated that miR-145 could inhibit HCC through targeting IRS1 and its downstream signaling, implicating the loss of miR-145 regulation may be a potential molecular mechanism causing aberrant oncogenic signaling in HCC.

  9. Isopentenyl transferase gene (ipt) downstream transcriptionally fused with gene expression improves the growth of transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-Chun; Duan, Rui-Jun; Hu, Xin-Wen; Li, Kai-Mian; Fu, Shao-Ping

    2010-04-01

    This research reports a promising approach to increase a plant's physiological cytokinin content. This approach also enables the increase to play a role in plant growth and development by introducing the ipt gene to downstream transcriptionally fuse with other genes under the control of a CaMV35S promoter, in which the ipt gene is far from the 35S promoter. According to Kozak's ribosome screening model, expression of the ipt gene is reduced by the terminal codon of the first gene and the internal untranslated nucleotides between the fused genes. In the transgenic plants pVKH35S-GUS-ipt, pVKH35S-AOC-ipt, and pVKH35S-AtGolS2-ipt, cytokinins were increased only two to threefold, and the plants grew more vigorously than the pVKH35S-AOC or pVKH35S-AtGolS2 transgenic plants lacking the ipt gene. The vigorous growth was reflected in rapid plant growth, a longer flowering period, a greater number of flowers, more seed product, and increased chlorophyll synthesis. The AOC and AtGolS2 genes play a role in a plant's tolerance of salt or cold, respectively. When the ipt gene transcriptionally fuses with AOC or AtGolS2 in the frame of AOC-ipt and AtGolS2-ipt, slight cytokinin increases were obtained in their transgenic plants; furthermore, those increases played a positive role in improvements of plant growth. Notably, an increased cytokinin volume at the physiological level, in concert with AtGolS2 expression, enhances a plant's tolerance to cold.

  10. Candidate genes and pathways downstream of PAX8 involved in ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Amata Amy; Monticelli, Antonella; Affinito, Ornella; Cocozza, Sergio; Zannini, Mariastella

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the biology and molecular pathogenesis of ovarian epithelial cancer (EOC) is key to developing improved diagnostic and prognostic indicators and effective therapies. Although research has traditionally focused on the hypothesis that high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) arises from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), recent studies suggest that additional sites of origin exist and a substantial proportion of cases may arise from precursor lesions located in the Fallopian tubal epithelium (FTE). In FTE cells, the transcription factor PAX8 is a marker of the secretory cell lineage and its expression is retained in 96% of EOC. We have recently reported that PAX8 is involved in the tumorigenic phenotype of ovarian cancer cells. In this study, to uncover genes and pathways downstream of PAX8 involved in ovarian carcinoma we have determined the molecular profiles of ovarian cancer cells and in parallel of Fallopian tube epithelial cells by means of a silencing approach followed by an RNA-seq analysis. Interestingly, we highlighted the involvement of pathways like WNT signaling, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, p53 and apoptosis. We believe that our analysis has led to the identification of candidate genes and pathways regulated by PAX8 that could be additional targets for the therapy of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:27259239

  11. C. elegans sym-1 is a downstream target of the hunchback-like-1 developmental timing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Ryusuke; Hada, Kazumasa; Moliyama, Kouichi; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L.; Tan, Yi-Meng; Olsson-Carter, Katherine; Chi, Woo; Reinke, Valerie; Slack, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the let-7 microRNA (miRNA) and its family members control the timing of key developmental events in part by directly regulating expression of hunchback-like-1 (hbl-1). C. elegans hbl-1 mutants display multiple developmental timing deficiencies, including cell cycle defects during larval development. While hbl-1 is predicted to encode a transcriptional regulator, downstream targets of HBL-1 have not been fully elucidated. Here we report using microarray analysis to uncover genes downstream of HBL-1. We established a transgenic strain that overexpresses hbl-1 under the control of a heat shock promoter. Heat shock-induced hbl-1 overexpression led to retarded hypodermal structures at the adult stage, opposite to the effect seen in loss of function (lf) hbl-1 mutants. The microarray screen identified numerous potential genes that are upregulated or downregulated by HBL-1, including sym-1, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat protein with a signal sequence. We found an increase in sym-1 transcription in the heat shock-induced hbl-1 overexpression strain, while loss of hbl-1 function caused a decrease in sym-1 expression levels. Furthermore, we found that sym-1(lf) modified the hypodermal abnormalities in hbl-1 mutants. Given that SYM-1 is a protein secreted from hypodermal cells to the surrounding cuticle, we propose that the adult-specific cuticular structures may be under the temporal control of HBL-1 through regulation of sym-1 transcription. PMID:19923914

  12. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. - Highlights: • We found that CRBN is a nucleocytoplasmic shutting protein and identified the key domain for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. • CRBN associates with the transcription factor Ikaros via the N-terminal domain. • CRBN modulates Ikaros-mediated transcriptional regulation and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  13. Cancer Immunotherapy by Targeting IDO1/TDO and Their Downstream Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Platten, Michael; von Knebel Doeberitz, Nikolaus; Oezen, Iris; Wick, Wolfgang; Ochs, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan (TRP) to kynurenine (KYN) metabolic pathway is now firmly established as a key regulator of innate and adaptive immunity. A plethora of preclinical models suggests that this immune tolerance pathway – driven by the key and rate-limiting enzymes indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase and TRP-2,3-dioxygenase – is active in cancer immunity, autoimmunity, infection, transplant rejection, and allergy. Drugs targeting this pathway, specifically indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, are already in clinical trials with the aim at reverting cancer-induced immunosuppression. In the past years, there has been an increase in our understanding of the regulation and downstream mediators of TRP metabolism, such as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor as a receptor for KYN and kynurenic acid. This more detailed understanding will expand our opportunities to interfere with the pathway therapeutically on multiple levels. Here, we discuss the perspective of targeting TRP metabolism at these different levels based on reviewing recent insight into the regulation of TRP metabolism and its downstream effectors. PMID:25628622

  14. Cancer Immunotherapy by Targeting IDO1/TDO and Their Downstream Effectors.

    PubMed

    Platten, Michael; von Knebel Doeberitz, Nikolaus; Oezen, Iris; Wick, Wolfgang; Ochs, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    The tryptophan (TRP) to kynurenine (KYN) metabolic pathway is now firmly established as a key regulator of innate and adaptive immunity. A plethora of preclinical models suggests that this immune tolerance pathway - driven by the key and rate-limiting enzymes indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase and TRP-2,3-dioxygenase - is active in cancer immunity, autoimmunity, infection, transplant rejection, and allergy. Drugs targeting this pathway, specifically indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, are already in clinical trials with the aim at reverting cancer-induced immunosuppression. In the past years, there has been an increase in our understanding of the regulation and downstream mediators of TRP metabolism, such as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor as a receptor for KYN and kynurenic acid. This more detailed understanding will expand our opportunities to interfere with the pathway therapeutically on multiple levels. Here, we discuss the perspective of targeting TRP metabolism at these different levels based on reviewing recent insight into the regulation of TRP metabolism and its downstream effectors.

  15. AKT2 is a downstream target of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (Grm1).

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Shick; Wall, Brian A; Goydos, James S; Chen, Suzie

    2010-02-01

    We reported earlier on the oncogenic properties of Grm1 by demonstrating that stable Grm1-mouse-melanocytic clones proliferate in the absence of growth supplement and anchorage in vitro. In addition, these clones also exhibit aggressive tumorigenic phenotypes in vivo with short latency in tumor formation in both immunodeficient and syngeneic mice. We also detected strong activation of AKT in allograft tumors specifically AKT2 as the predominant isoform involved. In parallel, we assessed several human melanoma biopsy samples and found again that AKT2 was the predominantly activated AKT in these human melanoma biopsies. In cultured stable Grm1-mouse-melanocytic clones, as well as an metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (Grm1) expressing human melanoma cell line, C8161, stimulation of Grm1 by its agonist led to the activation of AKT, while preincubation with Grm1-antagonist abolished Grm1-agonist-induced AKT activation. In addition, a reduction in tumor volume of Grm1-mouse-melanocytic-allografts was detected in the presence of small interfering AKT2 RNA (siAKT2). Taken together, these results showed that, in addition to the MAPK pathway previously reported being a downstream target of stimulated Grm1, AKT2 is another downstream target in Grm1 mediated melanocyte transformation.

  16. Mammalian TBX1 preferentially binds and regulates downstream targets via a tandem T-site repeat.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Raquel; Xie, Qing; Zheng, Deyou; Cvekl, Ales; Morrow, Bernice E

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency or mutation of TBX1 is largely responsible for the etiology of physical malformations in individuals with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS/22q11.2 deletion syndrome). TBX1 encodes a transcription factor protein that contains an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding domain termed the T-box that is shared with other family members. All T-box proteins, examined so far, bind to similar but not identical consensus DNA sequences, indicating that they have specific binding preferences. To identify the TBX1 specific consensus sequence, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) was performed. In contrast to other TBX family members recognizing palindrome sequences, we found that TBX1 preferentially binds to a tandem repeat of 5'-AGGTGTGAAGGTGTGA-3'. We also identified a second consensus sequence comprised of a tandem repeat with a degenerated downstream site. We show that three known human disease-causing TBX1 missense mutations (F148Y, H194Q and G310S) do not alter nuclear localization, or disrupt binding to the tandem repeat consensus sequences, but they reduce transcriptional activity in cell culture reporter assays. To identify Tbx1-downstream genes, we performed an in silico genome wide analysis of potential cis-acting elements in DNA and found strong enrichment of genes required for developmental processes and transcriptional regulation. We found that TBX1 binds to 19 different loci in vitro, which may correspond to putative cis-acting binding sites. In situ hybridization coupled with luciferase gene reporter assays on three gene loci, Fgf8, Bmper, Otog-MyoD, show that these motifs are directly regulated by TBX1 in vitro. Collectively, the present studies establish new insights into molecular aspects of TBX1 binding to DNA. This work lays the groundwork for future in vivo studies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to further elucidate the molecular

  17. Interference in transcription of overexpressed genes by promoter-proximal downstream sequences

    PubMed Central

    Turchinovich, A.; Surowy, H. M.; Tonevitsky, A. G.; Burwinkel, B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite a high sequence homology among four human RNAi-effectors Argonaute proteins and their coding sequences, the efficiency of ectopic overexpression of AGO3 and AGO4 coding sequences in human cells is greatly reduced as compared to AGO1 and AGO2. While investigating this phenomenon, we documented the existence of previously uncharacterized mechanism of gene expression regulation, which is manifested in greatly varying basal transcription levels from the RNApolII promoters depending on the promoter-proximal downstream sequences. Specifically, we show that distinct overexpression of Argonaute coding sequences cannot be explained by mRNA degradation in the cytoplasm or nucleus, and exhibits on transcriptional level. Furthermore, the first 1000–2000 nt located immediately downstream the promoter had the most critical influence on ectopic gene overexpression. The transcription inhibiting effect, associated with those downstream sequences, subsided with increasing distance to the promoter and positively correlated with promoter strength. We hypothesize that the same mechanism, which we named promoter proximal inhibition (PPI), could generally contribute to basal transcription levels of genes, and could be mainly responsible for the essence of difficult-to-express recombinant proteins. Finally, our data reveal that expression of recombinant proteins in human cells can be greatly enhanced by using more permissive promoter adjacent downstream sequences. PMID:27485701

  18. Requirement of gene VII in cis for the expression of downstream genes on the major transcript of figwort mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gowda, S; Scholthof, H B; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1991-12-01

    The six major conserved genes of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, appear in tandem array on an RNA transcript that spans the entire viral genome. Gene VI, the only cistron that appears as a separate subgenomic RNA, has been reported to transactivate the expression of downstream genes of the full-length transcript. This transcript has a long 5'-leader of about 600 nucleotides followed by a small nonconserved region (gene VII), a smaller intergenic region (57 nucleotides), and the major conserved genes in a closely spaced array. In our present experiments we have constructed expression units containing the promoter for the full-length transcript followed by the 5' leader region, gene VII, and a reporter gene. These have been tested for expression with and without gene VI as a separate plasmid by electroporation into plant protoplasts. A series of these expression units containing truncated versions of the 5' leader region placed upstream of a reporter gene (CAT) showed that gene VI transactivation occurred only when gene VII sequences were present in cis between the leader region and the reporter gene. In addition, a more complete version of the FMV genome containing the reporter gene further downstream (in viral gene IV) showed CAT expression only when gene VII sequences were present in an upstream position. A similar construct failed to express CAT activity when gene VII was absent.

  19. Transcriptional profiling of PRKG2-null growth plate identifies putative down-stream targets of PRKG2.

    PubMed

    Koltes, James E; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S; Cooper, Vickie; Reecy, James M

    2015-04-30

    Kinase activity of cGMP-dependent, type II, protein kinase (PRKG2) is required for the proliferative to hypertrophic transition of growth plate chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. Loss of PRKG2 function in rodent and bovine models results in dwarfism. The objective of this study was to identify pathways regulated or impacted by PRKG2 loss of function that may be responsible for disproportionate dwarfism at the molecular level. Microarray technology was used to compare growth plate cartilage gene expression in dwarf versus unaffected Angus cattle to identify putative downstream targets of PRGK2. Pathway enrichment of 1284 transcripts (nominal p < 0.05) was used to identify candidate pathways consistent with the molecular phenotype of disproportionate dwarfism. Analysis with the DAVID pathway suite identified differentially expressed genes that clustered in the MHC, cytochrome B, WNT, and Muc1 pathways. A second analysis with pathway studio software identified differentially expressed genes in a host of pathways (e.g. CREB1, P21, CTNNB1, EGFR, EP300, JUN, P53, RHOA, and SRC). As a proof of concept, we validated the differential expression of five genes regulated by P53, including CEBPA, BRCA1, BUB1, CD58, and VDR by real-time PCR (p < 0.05). Known and novel targets of PRKG2 were identified as enriched pathways in this study. This study indicates that loss of PRKG2 function results in differential expression of P53 regulated genes as well as additional pathways consistent with increased proliferation and apoptosis in the growth plate due to achondroplastic dwarfism.

  20. Protein kinases: mechanisms and downstream targets in inflammation-mediated obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Nandipati, Kalyana C; Subramanian, Saravanan; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-02-01

    Obesity-induced low-grade inflammation (metaflammation) impairs insulin receptor signaling. This has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Insulin signaling in the target tissues is mediated by stress kinases such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, inhibitor of NF-kB kinase complex β (IKKβ), AMP-activated protein kinase, protein kinase C, Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase, and RNA-activated protein kinase. Most of these kinases phosphorylate several key regulators in glucose homeostasis. The phosphorylation of serine residues in the insulin receptor and IRS-1 molecule results in diminished enzymatic activity in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. This has been one of the key mechanisms observed in the tissues that are implicated in insulin resistance especially in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2-DM). Identifying the specific protein kinases involved in obesity-induced chronic inflammation may help in developing the targeted drug therapies to minimize the insulin resistance. This review is focused on the protein kinases involved in the inflammatory cascade and molecular mechanisms and their downstream targets with special reference to obesity-induced T2-DM.

  1. Grainyhead-like 2 downstream targets act to suppress epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition during neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Ray, Heather J; Niswander, Lee A

    2016-04-01

    The transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) is expressed in non-neural ectoderm (NNE) and Grhl2 loss results in fully penetrant cranial neural tube defects (NTDs) in mice. GRHL2 activates expression of several epithelial genes; however, additional molecular targets and functional processes regulated by GRHL2 in the NNE remain to be determined, as well as the underlying cause of the NTDs in Grhl2 mutants. Here, we find that Grhl2 loss results in abnormal mesenchymal phenotypes in the NNE, including aberrant vimentin expression and increased cellular dynamics that affects the NNE and neural crest cells. The resulting loss of NNE integrity contributes to an inability of the cranial neural folds to move toward the midline and results in NTD. Further, we identified Esrp1, Sostdc1, Fermt1, Tmprss2 and Lamc2 as novel NNE-expressed genes that are downregulated in Grhl2 mutants. Our in vitro assays show that they act as suppressors of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Thus, GRHL2 promotes the epithelial nature of the NNE during the dynamic events of neural tube formation by both activating key epithelial genes and actively suppressing EMT through novel downstream EMT suppressors.

  2. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  3. Targeting the cis-dimerization of LINGO-1 with low MW compounds affects its downstream signalling

    PubMed Central

    Cobret, L; De Tauzia, M L; Ferent, J; Traiffort, E; Hénaoui, I; Godin, F; Kellenberger, E; Rognan, D; Pantel, J; Bénédetti, H; Morisset-Lopez, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The transmembrane protein LINGO-1 is a negative regulator in the nervous system mainly affecting axonal regeneration, neuronal survival, oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating its functions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the formation and the role of LINGO-1 cis-dimers in the regulation of its biological activity. Experimental Approach LINGO-1 homodimers were identified in both HEK293 and SH-SY5Y cells using co-immunoprecipitation experiments and BRET saturation analysis. We performed a hypothesis-driven screen for identification of small-molecule protein–protein interaction modulators of LINGO-1 using a BRET-based assay, adapted for screening. The compound identified was further assessed for effects on LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways using Western blotting analysis and AlphaScreen technology. Key Results LINGO-1 was present as homodimers in primary neuronal cultures. LINGO-1 interacted homotypically in cis-orientation and LINGO-1 cis-dimers were formed early during LINGO-1 biosynthesis. A BRET-based assay allowed us to identify phenoxybenzamine as the first conformational modulator of LINGO-1 dimers. In HEK-293 cells, phenoxybenzamine was a positive modulator of LINGO-1 function, increasing the LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of EGF receptor signalling and Erk phosphorylation. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggest that LINGO-1 forms constitutive cis-dimers at the plasma membrane and that low MW compounds affecting the conformational state of these dimers can regulate LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways. We propose that targeting the LINGO-1 dimerization interface opens a new pharmacological approach to the modulation of its function and provides a new strategy for drug discovery. PMID:25257685

  4. Identification of Aurora Kinase B and Wee1-Like Protein Kinase as Downstream Targets of V600EB-RAF in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arati; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V.; Gowda, Raghavendra; Berg, Arthur; Neves, Rogerio I.; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    BRAF is the most mutated gene in melanoma, with approximately 50% of patients containing V600E mutant protein. V600EB-RAF can be targeted using pharmacological agents, but resistance develops in patients by activating other proteins in the signaling pathway. Identifying downstream members in this signaling cascade is important to design strategies to avoid the development of resistance. Unfortunately, downstream proteins remain to be identified and therapeutic potential requires validation. A kinase screen was undertaken to identify downstream targets in the V600EB-RAF signaling cascade. Involvement of aurora kinase B (AURKB) and Wee1-like protein kinase (WEE1) as downstream proteins in the V600EB-RAF pathway was validated in xenografted tumors, and mechanisms of action were characterized in size- and time-matched tumors. Levels of only AURKB and WEE1 decreased in melanoma cells, when V600EB-RAF, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/2, or extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 protein levels were reduced using siRNA compared with other identified kinases. AURKB and WEE1 were expressed in tumors of patients with melanoma at higher levels than observed in normal human melanocytes. Targeting these proteins reduced tumor development by approximately 70%, similar to that observed when inhibiting V600EB-RAF. Furthermore, protein or activity levels of AURKB and WEE1 decreased in melanoma cells when pharmacological agents targeting upstream V600EB-RAF or mitogen-activated protein kinase were used to inhibit the V600EB-RAF pathway. Thus, AURKB and WEE1 are targets and biomarkers of therapeutic efficacy, lying downstream of V600EB-RAF in melanomas. PMID:23416158

  5. Human muscle fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets by exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Dorte E; Albers, Peter H; Prats, Clara; Baba, Otto; Birk, Jesper B; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a regulator of energy homeostasis during exercise. Studies suggest muscle fibre type-specific AMPK expression. However, fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets during exercise has not been demonstrated. We hypothesized that AMPK subunits are expressed in a fibre type-dependent manner and that fibre type-specific activation of AMPK and downstream targets is dependent on exercise intensity. Pools of type I and II fibres were prepared from biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle from healthy men before and after two exercise trials: (1) continuous cycling (CON) for 30 min at 69 ± 1% peak rate of O2 consumption () or (2) interval cycling (INT) for 30 min with 6 × 1.5 min high-intensity bouts peaking at 95 ± 2% . In type I vs. II fibres a higher β1 AMPK (+215%) and lower γ3 AMPK expression (−71%) was found. α1, α2, β2 and γ1 AMPK expression was similar between fibre types. In type I vs. II fibres phosphoregulation after CON was similar (AMPKThr172, ACCSer221, TBC1D1Ser231 and GS2+2a) or lower (TBC1D4Ser704). Following INT, phosphoregulation in type I vs. II fibres was lower (AMPKThr172, TBC1D1Ser231, TBC1D4Ser704 and ACCSer221) or higher (GS2+2a). Exercise-induced glycogen degradation in type I vs. II fibres was similar (CON) or lower (INT). In conclusion, a differentiated response to exercise of metabolic signalling/effector proteins in human type I and II fibres was evident during interval exercise. This could be important for exercise type-specific adaptations, i.e. insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial density, and highlights the potential for new discoveries when investigating fibre type-specific signalling. PMID:25640469

  6. Occurrence and removal of antibiotics and the corresponding resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants: effluents' influence to downstream water environment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianan; Cheng, Weixiao; Xu, Like; Jiao, Yanan; Baig, Shams Ali; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the occurrence of 8 antibiotics [3 tetracyclines (TCs), 4 sulfonamides, and 1 trimethoprim (TMP)], 12 antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (10 tet, 2 sul), 4 types of bacteria [no antibiotics, anti-TC, anti-sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and anti-double], and intI1 in two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were assessed and their influences in downstream lake were investigated. Both WWTPs' effluent demonstrated some similarities, but the abundance and removal rate varied significantly. Results revealed that biological treatment mainly removed antibiotics and ARGs, whereas physical techniques were found to eliminate antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARBs) abundance (about 1 log for each one). UV disinfection did not significantly enhance the removal efficiency, and the release of the abundantly available target contaminants from the excess sludge may pose threats to human and the environment. Different antibiotics showed diverse influences on the downstream lake, and the concentrations of sulfamethazine (SM2) and SMX were observed to increase enormously. The total ARG abundance ascended about 0.1 log and some ARGs (e.g., tetC, intI1, tetA) increased due to the high input of the effluent. In addition, the abundance of ARB variation in the lake also changed, but the abundance of four types of bacteria remained stable in the downstream sampling sites.

  7. Targeting Ochratoxin Biosynthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Antonia; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    The pathway of ochratoxin A (OTA) biosynthesis has not yet been completely elucidated. Essentially, two kind of genes have been demonstrated to be involved in the biosynthesis of OTA. One of them is the nrps gene encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) which catalyzes the ligation between the isocoumarin group, constituting the polyketide group of OTA molecule, and the amino acid phenylalanine.Here we describe a conventional PCR method developed for the detection of OTA-producing molds belonging to Penicillium and Aspergillus genera by Luque et al. (Food Control 29:270-278, 2013). This method is based on the OTA nrps gene of Penicillium nordicum. It produces a specific amplicon of 459 bp and its functionality in naturally infected samples was also demonstrated.

  8. Cereblon and its downstream substrates as molecular targets of immunomodulatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takumi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Thalidomide was first developed as a sedative around 60 years ago, but exhibited teratogenicity, leading to serious defects such as limb deformities. Nevertheless, thalidomide is now recognized as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of Hansen's disease and myeloma. Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), a new class of anti-cancer drug derived from thalidomide, have also been developed and exert potent anti-cancer effects. Although the molecular mechanism of thalidomide and IMiDs remained unclear for a long time, cereblon, a substrate receptor of the CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase was identified as a primary direct target by a new affinity technique. A growing body of evidence suggests that the effect of IMiDs on myeloma and other cancer cells is mediated by CRBN. Each IMiD binds to CRBN and alters the substrate specificity of the CRBN E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, resulting in breakdown of intrinsic downstream proteins such as Ikaros and Aiolos. Here we give an overview of the current understanding of mechanism of action of IMiDs via CRBN and prospects for the development of new drugs that degrade protein of interest.

  9. Developmental expression of the N-myc downstream regulated gene (Ndrg) family during Xenopus tropicalis embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chao; Zhou, Yan-Kuan; Yang, Shan-Shan; Zhao, Jun-Fang; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Chen, Hen-Huang; Chen, Pei-Chao; Huang, Li-Quan; Huang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The N-myc downstream regulated gene (Ndrg) family consists of four main members Ndrg1, 2, 3, and 4. The Ndrg genes are involved in many vital biological events including development. However, comprehensive expression patterns of this gene family during vertebrate embryogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the Ndrg family from the evolutionary perspective and examined the expression patterns of the Ndrg genes during Xenopus tropicalis embryogenesis. Different Ndrg family members of vertebrates are separated into different homology clusters which can be further classified into two groups and each Ndrg family member is well conserved during evolution. The temporal and spatial expression patterns of Ndrg1, 2, 3 and 4 are different during early Xenopus tropicalis development. Ndrg1, 2 and 4 are maternally expressed genes while Ndrg3 is a zygotically expressed gene. The Ndrg genes are differentially expressed in the developing central nervous system, the developing sensory organs, and the developing excretory organs. Moreover, they also show other specific expression domains. Our results indicate that the Ndrg genes exhibit specific expression patterns and may play different roles during vertebrate embryogenesis.

  10. Regulation of STARS and its downstream targets suggest a novel pathway involved in human skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lamon, Séverine; Wallace, Marita A; Léger, Bertrand; Russell, Aaron P

    2009-04-15

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a severe consequence of ageing, neurological disorders and chronic disease. Identifying the intracellular signalling pathways controlling changes in skeletal muscle size and function is vital for the future development of potential therapeutic interventions. Striated activator of Rho signalling (STARS), an actin-binding protein, has been implicated in rodent cardiac hypertrophy; however its role in human skeletal muscle has not been determined. This study aimed to establish if STARS, as well as its downstream signalling targets, RhoA, myocardin-related transcription factors A and B (MRTF-A/B) and serum response factor (SRF), were increased and decreased respectively, in human quadriceps muscle biopsies taken after 8 weeks of both hypertrophy-stimulating resistance training and atrophy-stimulating de-training. The mRNA levels of the SRF target genes involved in muscle structure, function and growth, such as alpha-actin, myosin heavy chain IIa (MHCIIa) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), were also measured. Following resistance training, STARS, MRTF-A, MRTF-B, SRF, alpha-actin, MHCIIa and IGF-1 mRNA, as well as RhoA and nuclear SRF protein levels were all significantly increased by between 1.25- and 3.6-fold. Following the de-training period all measured targets, except for RhoA, which remained elevated, returned to base-line. Our results show that the STARS signalling pathway is responsive to changes in skeletal muscle loading and appears to play a role in both human skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy.

  11. Molecular signature of MT1-MMP: transactivation of the downstream universal gene network in cancer.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Dmitri V; Savinov, Alexei Y; Williams, Roy; Liu, Kang; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Krajewski, Stan; Strongin, Alex Y

    2008-06-01

    Invasion-promoting MT1-MMP is directly linked to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Our studies led us to identify those genes, the expression of which is universally linked to MT1-MMP in multiple tumor types. Genome-wide expression profiling of MT1-MMP-overexpressing versus MT1-MMP-silenced cancer cells and a further data mining analysis of the preexisting expression database of 190 human tumors of 14 cancer types led us to identify 11 genes, the expression of which correlated firmly and universally with that of MT1-MMP (P < 0.00001). These genes included regulators of energy metabolism (NNT), trafficking and membrane fusion (SLCO2A1 and ANXA7), signaling and transcription (NR3C1, JAG1, PI3K delta, and CK2 alpha), chromatin rearrangement (SMARCA1), cell division (STK38/NDR1), apoptosis (DAPK1), and mRNA splicing (SNRPB2). Our subsequent extensive analysis of cultured cells, tumor xenografts, and cancer patient biopsies supported our data mining. Our results suggest that transcriptional reprogramming of the specific downstream genes, which themselves are associated with tumorigenesis, represents a distinctive "molecular signature" of the proteolytically active MT1-MMP. We suggest that the transactivation activity of MT1-MMP contributes to the promigratory cell phenotype, which is induced by this tumorigenic proteinase. The activated downstream gene network then begins functioning in unison with MT1-MMP to rework the signaling, transport, cell division, energy metabolism, and other critical cell functions and to commit the cell to migration, invasion, and, consequently, tumorigenesis.

  12. Transcription Factors Expressed in Lateral Organ Boundaries: Identification of Downstream Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Patricia S

    2010-07-12

    The processes of lateral organ initiation and patterning are central to the generation of mature plant form. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is essential to our understanding of plant development. Communication between the shoot apical meristem and initiating organ primordia is important both for functioning of the meristem and for proper organ patterning, and very little is known about this process. In particular, the boundary between meristem and leaf is emerging as a critical region that is important for SAM maintenance and regulation of organogenesis. The goal of this project was to characterize three boundary-expressed genes that encode predicted transcription factors. Specifically, we have studied LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB), LATERAL ORGAN FUSION1 (LOF1), and LATERAL ORGAN FUSION2 (LOF2). LOB encodes the founding member of the LOB-DOMAIN (LBD) plant-specific DNA binding transcription factor family and LOF1 and LOF2 encode paralogous MYB-domain transcription factors. We characterized the genetic relationship between these three genes and other boundary and meristem genes. We also used an ectopic inducible expression system to identify direct targets of LOB.

  13. Autonomous regulation of the insect gut by circadian genes acting downstream of juvenile hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Adam; Jindra, Marek; Dolezel, David

    2013-01-01

    In temperate regions, the shortening day length informs many insect species to prepare for winter by inducing diapause. The adult diapause of the linden bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, involves a reproductive arrest accompanied by energy storage, reduction of metabolic needs, and preparation to withstand low temperatures. By contrast, nondiapause animals direct nutrient energy to muscle activity and reproduction. The photoperiod-dependent switch from diapause to reproduction is systemically transmitted throughout the organism by juvenile hormone (JH). Here, we show that, at the organ-autonomous level of the insect gut, the decision between reproduction and diapause relies on an interaction between JH signaling and circadian clock genes acting independently of the daily cycle. The JH receptor Methoprene-tolerant and the circadian proteins Clock and Cycle are all required in the gut to activate the Par domain protein 1 gene during reproduction and to simultaneously suppress a mammalian-type cryptochrome 2 gene that promotes the diapause program. A nonperiodic, organ-autonomous feedback between Par domain protein 1 and Cryptochrome 2 then orchestrates expression of downstream genes that mark the diapause vs. reproductive states of the gut. These results show that hormonal signaling through Methoprene-tolerant and circadian proteins controls gut-specific gene activity that is independent of circadian oscillations but differs between reproductive and diapausing animals. PMID:23442387

  14. Integrating ChIP-sequencing and digital gene expression profiling to identify BRD7 downstream genes and construct their regulating network.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Ming; Wang, Heran; Yang, Jing; Li, Xiayu; Chen, Pan; Liao, Qianjin; Deng, Hao; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Guiyuan; Zeng, Zhaoyang

    2016-01-01

    BRD7 is a single bromodomain-containing protein that functions as a subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex to regulate transcription. It also interacts with the well-known tumor suppressor protein p53 to trans-activate genes involved in cell cycle arrest. In this paper, we report an integrative analysis of genome-wide chromatin occupancy of BRD7 by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling by RNA-sequencing upon the overexpression of BRD7 in human cells. We localized 156 BRD7-binding peaks representing 184 genes by ChIP-sequencing, and most of these peaks were co-localized with histone modification sites. Four novel motifs were significantly represented in these BRD7-enriched regions. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that 22 of these BRD7 target genes were involved in a network regulating cell death and survival. DGE profiling identified 560 up-regulated genes and 1088 down-regulated genes regulated by BRD7. Using Gene Ontology and pathway analysis, we found significant enrichment of the cell cycle and apoptosis pathway genes. For the integrative analysis of the ChIP-seq and DEG data, we constructed a regulating network of BRD7 downstream genes, and this network suggests multiple feedback regulations of the pathways. Furthermore, we validated BIRC2, BIRC3, TXN2, and NOTCH1 genes as direct, functional BRD7 targets, which were involved in the cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. These results provide a genome-wide view of chromatin occupancy and the gene regulation network of the BRD7 signaling pathway.

  15. Unc-5 homolog B (UNC5B) is one of the key downstream targets of N-α-Acetyltransferase 10 (Naa10)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huiyu; Han, Yong; Liu, Bing; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    N-α-acetyltransferase 10 (Naa10) displays alpha (N-terminal) acetyltransferase activity. It functions as a major modulator of cell growth and differentiation. Until now, a few downstream targets were found, but no studies have concerned about which gene is the early event of Naa10 downstream target. As we know, the earlier events may play more significant role in Naa10 pathway. Through construction of Naa10 stably knocked down H1299 cell line, we discovered cell morphological changes induced by Naa10. Moreover, potential function of Naa10 in cell morphogenesis was also indicated using cDNA microarray analysis of the Naa10 stably knock-down cell line. We further discovered that netrin-1 (NTN1) and its receptor UNC-5 Homology B (UNC5B) were the early event among the genes involved in Naa10 stably knocked down induced genes expression changes in cell morphogenesis. This was further validated in caudal half region of E10 mouse embryos. Negative regulation of Naa10 towards NTN1 and its receptor UNC5B were also detected upon treatment of all-trans retinoid acid, which was often used to induce morphological differentiation. PMID:27910960

  16. Profiling of promoter occupancy by the SND1 transcriptional coactivator identifies downstream glycerolipid metabolic genes involved in TNFα response in human hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Arretxe, Enara; Armengol, Sandra; Mula, Sarai; Chico, Yolanda; Ochoa, Begoña; Martínez, María José

    2015-01-01

    The NF-κB-inducible Staphylococcal nuclease and tudor domain-containing 1 gene (SND1) encodes a coactivator involved in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. While SND1 is known to interact with certain transcription factors and activate client gene expression, no comprehensive mapping of SND1 target genes has been reported. Here, we have approached this question by performing ChIP-chip assays on human hepatoma HepG2 cells and analyzing SND1 binding modulation by proinflammatory TNFα. We show that SND1 binds 645 gene promoters in control cells and 281 additional genes in TNFα-treated cells. Transcription factor binding site analysis of bound probes identified motifs for established partners and for novel transcription factors including HSF, ATF, STAT3, MEIS1/AHOXA9, E2F and p300/CREB. Major target genes were involved in gene expression and RNA metabolism regulation, as well as development and cellular metabolism. We confirmed SND1 binding to 21 previously unrecognized genes, including a set of glycerolipid genes. Knocking-down experiments revealed that SND1 deficiency compromises the glycerolipid gene reprogramming and lipid phenotypic responses to TNFα. Overall, our findings uncover an unexpected large set of potential SND1 target genes and partners and reveal SND1 to be a determinant downstream effector of TNFα that contributes to support glycerophospholipid homeostasis in human hepatocellular carcinoma during inflammation. PMID:26323317

  17. The Drosophila Medea gene is required downstream of dpp and encodes a functional homolog of human Smad4.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Podos, S D; Keith, K; Simpson, S L; Ferguson, E L

    1998-04-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-beta superfamily member decapentaplegic (dpp) acts as an extracellular morphogen to pattern the embryonic ectoderm of the Drosophila embryo. To identify components of the dpp signaling pathway, we screened for mutations that act as dominant maternal enhancers of a weak allele of the dpp target gene zerknŁllt. In this screen, we recovered new alleles of the Mothers against dpp (Mad) and Medea genes. Phenotypic analysis of the new Medea mutations indicates that Medea, like Mad, is required for both embryonic and imaginal disc patterning. Genetic analysis suggests that Medea may have two independently mutable functions in patterning the embryonic ectoderm. Complete elimination of maternal and zygotic Medea activity in the early embryo results in a ventralized phenotype identical to that of null dpp mutants, indicating that Medea is required for all dpp-dependent signaling in embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning. Injection of mRNAs encoding DPP or a constitutively activated form of the DPP receptor, Thick veins, into embryos lacking all Medea activity failed to induce formation of any dorsal cell fates, demonstrating that Medea acts downstream of the thick veins receptor. We cloned Medea and found that it encodes a protein with striking sequence similarity to human SMAD4. Moreover, injection of human SMAD4 mRNA into embryos lacking all Medea activity conferred phenotypic rescue of the dorsal-ventral pattern, demonstrating conservation of function between the two gene products.

  18. Mechanisms of gene targeting in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Akinori; Anai, Hirofumi; Hanada, Katsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genome modifications using techniques that alter the genomic information of interest have contributed to multiple studies in both basic and applied biology. Traditionally, in gene targeting, the target-site integration of a targeting vector by homologous recombination is used. However, this strategy has several technical problems. The first problem is the extremely low frequency of gene targeting, which makes obtaining recombinant clones an extremely labor intensive task. The second issue is the limited number of biomaterials to which gene targeting can be applied. Traditional gene targeting hardly occurs in most of the human adherent cell lines. However, a new approach using designer nucleases that can introduce site-specific double-strand breaks in genomic DNAs has increased the efficiency of gene targeting. This new method has also expanded the number of biomaterials to which gene targeting could be applied. Here, we summarize various strategies for target gene modification, including a comparison of traditional gene targeting with designer nucleases.

  19. Divergent Expression Regulation of Gonad Development Genes in Medaka Shows Incomplete Conservation of the Downstream Regulatory Network of Vertebrate Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Herpin, Amaury; Adolfi, Mateus C.; Nicol, Barbara; Hinzmann, Maria; Schmidt, Cornelia; Klughammer, Johanna; Engel, Mareen; Tanaka, Minoru; Guiguen, Yann; Schartl, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Genetic control of male or female gonad development displays between different groups of organisms a remarkable diversity of “master sex-determining genes” at the top of the genetic hierarchies, whereas downstream components surprisingly appear to be evolutionarily more conserved. Without much further studies, conservation of sequence has been equalized to conservation of function. We have used the medaka fish to investigate the generality of this paradigm. In medaka, the master male sex-determining gene is dmrt1bY, a highly conserved downstream regulator of sex determination in vertebrates. To understand its function in orchestrating the complex gene regulatory network, we have identified targets genes and regulated pathways of Dmrt1bY. Monitoring gene expression and interactions by transgenic fluorescent reporter fish lines, in vivo tissue-chromatin immunoprecipitation and in vitro gene regulation assays revealed concordance but also major discrepancies between mammals and medaka, notably amongst spatial, temporal expression patterns and regulations of the canonical Hedgehog and R-spondin/Wnt/Follistatin signaling pathways. Examination of Foxl2 protein distribution in the medaka ovary defined a new subpopulation of theca cells, where ovarian-type aromatase transcriptional regulation appears to be independent of Foxl2. In summary, these data show that the regulation of the downstream regulatory network of sex determination is less conserved than previously thought. PMID:23883523

  20. Cholesterol and phytosterols differentially regulate the expression of caveolin 1 and a downstream prostate cell growth-suppressor gene

    PubMed Central

    Ifere, Godwin O.; Equan, Anita; Gordon, Kereen; Nagappan, Peri; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Ananaba, Godwin A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to show the distinction between the apoptotic and anti-proliferative signaling of phytosterols and cholesterol enrichment in prostate cancer cell lines, mediated by the differential transcription of caveolin-1, and N-myc downstream regulated gene1 (NDRG1), a pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor suppressor. Methods PC-3 and DU145 cells were treated with sterols (cholesterol and phytosterols) for 72 h, followed by trypan blue dye exclusion measurement of necrosis and cell growth measured with a Coulter counter. Sterol induction of cell growth-suppressor gene expression was evaluated by mRNA transcription using RT-PCR, while cell cycle analysis was performed by FACS analysis. Altered expression of Ndrg1 protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Apoptosis was evaluated by real time RT-PCR amplification of P53, Bcl-2 gene and its related pro- and anti-apoptotic family members. Results Physiological doses (16 µM) of cholesterol and phytosterols were not cytotoxic in these cells. Cholesterol enrichment promoted cell growth (P<0.05), while phytosterols significantly induced growth-suppression (P<0.05) and apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis showed that contrary to cholesterol, phytosterols decreased mitotic subpopulations. We demonstrated for the first time that cholesterols concertedly attenuated the expression of caveolin-1(cav-1) and NDRG1 genes in both prostate cancer cell lines. Phytosterols had the opposite effect by inducing overexpression of cav-1, a known mediator of androgen-dependent signals that presumably control cell growth or apoptosis. Conclusions Cholesterol and phytosterol treatment differentially regulated the growth of prostate cancer cells and the expression of p53 and cav-1, a gene that regulates androgen-regulated signals. These sterols also differentially regulated cell cycle arrest, downstream pro-apoptotic androgen-regulated tumor-suppressor, NDRG1 suggesting that cav-1 may mediate pro-apoptotic NDRG1

  1. Targeted gene flow for conservation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ella; Phillips, Ben L

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic threats often impose strong selection on affected populations, causing rapid evolutionary responses. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses are rarely harnessed for conservation. We suggest that conservation managers pay close attention to adaptive processes and geographic variation, with an eye to using them for conservation goals. Translocating pre-adapted individuals into recipient populations is currently considered a potentially important management tool in the face of climate change. Targeted gene flow, which involves moving individuals with favorable traits to areas where these traits would have a conservation benefit, could have a much broader application in conservation. Across a species' range there may be long-standing geographic variation in traits or variation may have rapidly developed in response to a threatening process. Targeted gene flow could be used to promote natural resistance to threats to increase species resilience. We suggest that targeted gene flow is a currently underappreciated strategy in conservation that has applications ranging from the management of invasive species and their impacts to controlling the impact and virulence of pathogens.

  2. MYC, a downstream target of BRD-NUT, is necessary and sufficient for the blockade of differentiation in NUT midline carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Michael J.; Godec, Jernej; Ashworth, Todd; Ambrose, Jessica M.; Aserlind, Alexandra B.; Wang, Hongfang; Evan, Gerard; Kluk, Michael J.; Bradner, James E.; Aster, Jon C.; French, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is an aggressive type of squamous cell carcinoma that is defined by the presence of BRD-NUT fusion oncogenes, which encode chimeric proteins that block differentiation and maintain tumor growth. BRD-NUT oncoproteins contain two bromodomains whose binding to acetylated histones is required for the blockade of differentiation in NMC, but the mechanisms by which BRD-NUT act remain uncertain. Here we provide evidence that MYC is a key downstream target of BRD4-NUT. Expression profiling of NMCs show that the set of genes whose expression is maintained by BRD4-NUT is highly enriched for MYC upregulated genes, and MYC and BRD4-NUT protein expression is strongly correlated in primary NMCs. More directly, we find that BRD4-NUT associates with the MYC promoter and is required to maintain MYC expression in NMC cell lines. Moreover, both siRNA knockdown of MYC and a dominant-negative form of MYC, omomyc, induce differentiation of NMC cells. Conversely, differentiation of NMC cells induced by knockdown of BRD4-NUT is abrogated by enforced expression of MYC. Together, these findings suggest that MYC is a downstream target of BRD4-NUT that is required for maintenance of NMC cells in an undifferentiated, proliferative state. Our findings support a model in which dysregulation of MYC by BRD-NUT fusion proteins has a central role in the pathogenesis of NMC. PMID:23604113

  3. Expression of SOCS1 and the downstream targets of its putative tumor suppressor functions in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chevrier, Martin; Bobbala, Diwakar; Villalobos-Hernandez, Alberto; Khan, Md Gulam Musawwir; Ramanathan, Sheela; Saucier, Caroline; Ferbeyre, Gerardo; Geha, Sameh; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2017-02-24

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is considered a tumor suppressor due to frequent epigenetic and micro-RNA-mediated repression of its gene expression in diverse cancers. In prostate cancer (PCa), elevated expression of miR-30d that targets SOCS1 mRNA is associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. SOCS1 can mediate its tumor suppressor functions by diverse mechanisms such as inhibiting the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, promoting the tumor suppressor functions of p53, attenuating MET receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and blocking the oncogenic potential of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CIP1) (p21). Here, we studied the expression of SOCS1 and the downstream targets of its putative tumor suppressor functions (p53, MET and p21) in human PCa specimens to evaluate their significance as markers of disease prognosis. Tissue microarrays were constructed of 78 archived prostatectomy specimens that were grouped according to the recommendations of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) based on the Gleason patterns. SOCS1, p53, MET and p21 protein expression were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining alongside the common prostate cancer-related markers Ki67, prostein and androgen receptor. Statistical correlations between the staining intensities of these markers and ISUP grade groups, local invasion or lymph node metastasis were evaluated. SOCS1 showed diffuse staining in the prostatic epithelium. SOCS1 staining intensity correlated inversely with the ISUP grade groups (ρ = -0.4687, p <0.0001) and Ki67 (ρ = -0.2444, p = 0.031), and positively with prostein (ρ = 0.3511, p = 0.0016). Changes in SOCS1 levels did not significantly associate with those of p53, MET or p21. However, p21 positively correlated with androgen receptor expression (ρ = -0.1388, p = 0.0003). A subset of patients with regional lymph node metastasis, although small in number, showed reduced SOCS1 expression and increased expression of

  4. Phosphoproteomic screening identifies Rab GTPases as novel downstream targets of PINK1.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Chiang; Kondapalli, Chandana; Lehneck, Ronny; Procter, James B; Dill, Brian D; Woodroof, Helen I; Gourlay, Robert; Peggie, Mark; Macartney, Thomas J; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Campbell, David G; Itzen, Aymelt; Trost, Matthias; Muqit, Miratul Mk

    2015-11-12

    Mutations in the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are causative of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). We have previously reported that PINK1 is activated by mitochondrial depolarisation and phosphorylates serine 65 (Ser(65)) of the ubiquitin ligase Parkin and ubiquitin to stimulate Parkin E3 ligase activity. Here, we have employed quantitative phosphoproteomics to search for novel PINK1-dependent phosphorylation targets in HEK (human embryonic kidney) 293 cells stimulated by mitochondrial depolarisation. This led to the identification of 14,213 phosphosites from 4,499 gene products. Whilst most phosphosites were unaffected, we strikingly observed three members of a sub-family of Rab GTPases namely Rab8A, 8B and 13 that are all phosphorylated at the highly conserved residue of serine 111 (Ser(111)) in response to PINK1 activation. Using phospho-specific antibodies raised against Ser(111) of each of the Rabs, we demonstrate that Rab Ser(111) phosphorylation occurs specifically in response to PINK1 activation and is abolished in HeLa PINK1 knockout cells and mutant PINK1 PD patient-derived fibroblasts stimulated by mitochondrial depolarisation. We provide evidence that Rab8A GTPase Ser(111) phosphorylation is not directly regulated by PINK1 in vitro and demonstrate in cells the time course of Ser(111) phosphorylation of Rab8A, 8B and 13 is markedly delayed compared to phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser(65). We further show mechanistically that phosphorylation at Ser(111) significantly impairs Rab8A activation by its cognate guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Rabin8 (by using the Ser111Glu phosphorylation mimic). These findings provide the first evidence that PINK1 is able to regulate the phosphorylation of Rab GTPases and indicate that monitoring phosphorylation of Rab8A/8B/13 at Ser(111) may represent novel biomarkers of PINK1 activity in vivo. Our findings also suggest that disruption of Rab GTPase-mediated signalling may represent a major mechanism

  5. Downstream processing and chromatography based analytical methods for production of vaccines, gene therapy vectors, and bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Kramberger, Petra; Urbas, Lidija; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Downstream processing of nanoplexes (viruses, virus-like particles, bacteriophages) is characterized by complexity of the starting material, number of purification methods to choose from, regulations that are setting the frame for the final product and analytical methods for upstream and downstream monitoring. This review gives an overview on the nanoplex downstream challenges and chromatography based analytical methods for efficient monitoring of the nanoplex production. PMID:25751122

  6. Downstream processing and chromatography based analytical methods for production of vaccines, gene therapy vectors, and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Kramberger, Petra; Urbas, Lidija; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Downstream processing of nanoplexes (viruses, virus-like particles, bacteriophages) is characterized by complexity of the starting material, number of purification methods to choose from, regulations that are setting the frame for the final product and analytical methods for upstream and downstream monitoring. This review gives an overview on the nanoplex downstream challenges and chromatography based analytical methods for efficient monitoring of the nanoplex production.

  7. Expression of N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in central neurocytoma.

    PubMed

    Fotovati, Abbas; Abu-Ali, Samah; Sugita, Yasuo; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    2011-10-01

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), also known as Cap43, Drg-1, and rit42, is expressed in various normal tissues and cancers, in which it is often associated with a favorable prognosis. It also plays a critical role in central nervous system development, with NDRG1 deficiency resulting in neural defects in mice. Central neurocytoma (CN) is a relatively rare tumor of the neurocytes in the brain, which occurs mainly in young adults. In the present study, we found that tissue samples from four patients with CN had both nuclear and cytoplasmic/membranous expression of NDRG1 protein in highly differentiated CN tumor cells. NDRG1 was also expressed in intratumoral microvessels. Immunohistochemical study of serial sections from the same patients revealed a marked association between the expression pattern of NDRG1 and that of neuron-specific enolase, a tumor differentiation marker. The data presented in this study suggest that NDRG1 could be considered a potential differentiation marker for CN.

  8. Drosophila Fascin is a novel downstream target of prostaglandin signaling during actin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Christopher M.; Spracklen, Andrew J.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2012-01-01

    Although prostaglandins (PGs)—lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes—regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics, their mechanisms of action are unknown. We previously established Drosophila oogenesis, in particular nurse cell dumping, as a new model to determine how PGs regulate actin remodeling. PGs, and thus the Drosophila COX-like enzyme Pxt, are required for both the parallel actin filament bundle formation and the cortical actin strengthening required for dumping. Here we provide the first link between Fascin (Drosophila Singed, Sn), an actin-bundling protein, and PGs. Loss of either pxt or fascin results in similar actin defects. Fascin interacts, both pharmacologically and genetically, with PGs, as reduced Fascin levels enhance the effects of COX inhibition and synergize with reduced Pxt levels to cause both parallel bundle and cortical actin defects. Conversely, overexpression of Fascin in the germline suppresses the effects of COX inhibition and genetic loss of Pxt. These data lead to the conclusion that PGs regulate Fascin to control actin remodeling. This novel interaction has implications beyond Drosophila, as both PGs and Fascin-1, in mammalian systems, contribute to cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:23051736

  9. Identification of CD44 as a downstream target of noncanonical NF-κB pathway activated by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-encoded Tax protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Kida, Shinya; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Yamaoka, Shoji; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Hattori, Toshio

    2011-05-10

    Our previous study showed Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax induces osteopontin (OPN) expression by transactivating its promoter. As an extension, we investigated here the possible influence of Tax on CD44, an important receptor for OPN. Co-expression of Tax, but not its NF-κB-defective mutant, significantly increased the reporter gene expression directed by CD44 promoter. Tax-mediated CD44 activation was largely diminished by disrupting an element similar to the noncanonical κβ site found in other IKKα target genes, and further, co-transfection of RelB siRNA abolished CD44 induction by Tax, suggesting an involvement of noncanonical NF-κB pathway in Tax-mediated transactivation. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed a specific interaction of CD44 promoter with RelB-containing complex. Together, these results indicate that D44 gene is one of the downstream target genes of aberrantly activated noncanonical NF-κB signaling by Tax, providing an additional line of evidence explaining how Tax-induced NF-κB signaling is integrated into a fate-determining cellular program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of the Downstream Promoter Targets of Smad Tumor Suppressors in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Program Treatment of HME cells with TGF-B and Activin A effectively changed the gene expression programs and reprogrammed the cellular output. The...5 and Smad proteins mediate epithelial to mesenchymal transdifferentiation in NMuMG breast epithelial cells. J Cell Sci 112 ( Pt 24):4557-68. 33

  11. Salicylic Acid Suppresses Jasmonic Acid Signaling Downstream of SCFCOI1-JAZ by Targeting GCC Promoter Motifs via Transcription Factor ORA59[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Van der Does, Dieuwertje; Leon-Reyes, Antonio; Koornneef, Annemart; Van Verk, Marcel C.; Rodenburg, Nicole; Pauwels, Laurens; Goossens, Alain; Körbes, Ana P.; Memelink, Johan; Ritsema, Tita; Van Wees, Saskia C.M.; Pieterse, Corné M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Antagonism between the defense hormones salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) plays a central role in the modulation of the plant immune signaling network, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that suppression of the JA pathway by SA functions downstream of the E3 ubiquitin-ligase Skip-Cullin-F-box complex SCFCOI1, which targets JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressor proteins (JAZs) for proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, neither the stability nor the JA-induced degradation of JAZs was affected by SA. In silico promoter analysis of the SA/JA crosstalk transcriptome revealed that the 1-kb promoter regions of JA-responsive genes that are suppressed by SA are significantly enriched in the JA-responsive GCC-box motifs. Using GCC:GUS lines carrying four copies of the GCC-box fused to the β-glucuronidase reporter gene, we showed that the GCC-box motif is sufficient for SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Using plants overexpressing the GCC-box binding APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factors ERF1 or ORA59, we found that SA strongly reduces the accumulation of ORA59 but not that of ERF1. Collectively, these data indicate that the SA pathway inhibits JA signaling downstream of the SCFCOI1-JAZ complex by targeting GCC-box motifs in JA-responsive promoters via a negative effect on the transcriptional activator ORA59. PMID:23435661

  12. Blocking Signaling at the Level of GLI Regulates Downstream Gene Expression and Inhibits Proliferation of Canine Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi Hayat; Holt, Roseline; Rebhun, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog-GLI signaling pathway is active in a variety of human malignancies and is known to contribute to the growth and survival of human osteosarcoma cells. In this study, we examined the expression and regulation of GLI transcription factors in multiple canine osteosarcoma cell lines and analyzed the effects of inhibiting GLI with GANT61, a GLI-specific inhibitor. Compared with normal canine osteoblasts, real-time PCR showed that GLI1 and GLI2 were highly expressed in two out of three cell lines and correlated with downstream target gene expression of PTCH1and PAX6. Treatment of canine osteosarcoma cells with GANT61 resulted in decreased expression of GLI1, GLI2, PTCH1, and PAX6. Furthermore, GANT61 inhibited proliferation and colony formation in all three canine osteosarcoma cell lines. The finding that GLI signaling activity is present and active in canine osteosarcoma cells suggests that spontaneously arising osteosarcoma in dogs might serve as a good model for future preclinical testing of GLI inhibitors. PMID:24810746

  13. Bacteriophage gene targeting vectors generated by transplacement.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, C; Woltjen, K; Mansergh, F C; Ishidate, K; Rancourt, D E

    2002-10-01

    A rate-determining step in gene targeting is the generation of the targeting vector. We have developed bacteriophage gene targeting vectorology, which shortens the timeline of targeting vector construction. Using retro-recombination screening, we can rapidly isolate targeting vectors from an embryonic stem cell genomic library via integrative and excisive recombination. We have demonstrated that recombination can be used to introduce specific point mutations or unique restriction sites into gene targeting vectors via transplacement. Using the choline/ethanolamine kinase alpha and beta genes as models, we demonstrate that transplacement can also be used to introduce specifically a neo resistance cassette into a gene targeting phage. In our experience, the lambdaTK gene targeting system offers considerable flexibility and efficiency in TV construction, which makes generating multiple vectors in one week's time possible.

  14. Cancer gene therapy targeting cellular apoptosis machinery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin-Tao; Chen, Si-Yi; Yang, An-Gang

    2012-11-01

    The unraveling of cellular apoptosis machinery provides novel targets for cancer treatment, and gene therapy targeting this suicidal system has been corroborated to cause inflammation-free autonomous elimination of neoplastic cells. The apoptotic machinery can be targeted by introduction of a gene encoding an inducer, mediator or executioner of apoptotic cell death or by inhibition of anti-apoptotic gene expression. Strategies targeting cancer cells, which are achieved by selective gene delivery, specific gene expression or secretion of target proteins via genetic modification of autologous cells, dictate the outcome of apoptosis-based cancer gene therapy. Despite so far limited clinical success, gene therapy targeting the apoptotic machinery has great potential to benefit patients with threatening malignancies provided the availability of efficient and specific gene delivery and administration systems.

  15. Drug target prioritization by perturbed gene expression and network information

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Zerrin; Baldow, Christoph; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Schroeder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drugs bind to their target proteins, which interact with downstream effectors and ultimately perturb the transcriptome of a cancer cell. These perturbations reveal information about their source, i.e., drugs’ targets. Here, we investigate whether these perturbations and protein interaction networks can uncover drug targets and key pathways. We performed the first systematic analysis of over 500 drugs from the Connectivity Map. First, we show that the gene expression of drug targets is usually not significantly affected by the drug perturbation. Hence, expression changes after drug treatment on their own are not sufficient to identify drug targets. However, ranking of candidate drug targets by network topological measures prioritizes the targets. We introduce a novel measure, local radiality, which combines perturbed genes and functional interaction network information. The new measure outperforms other methods in target prioritization and proposes cancer-specific pathways from drugs to affected genes for the first time. Local radiality identifies more diverse targets with fewer neighbors and possibly less side effects. PMID:26615774

  16. Targeting Radiotherapy to Cancer by Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is an alternative method of radiation treatment which uses a tumor-seeking agent carrying a radioactive atom to deposits of tumor, wherever in the body they may be located. Recent experimental data signifies promise for the amalgamation of gene transfer with radionuclide targeting. This review encompasses aspects of the integration of gene manipulation and targeted radiotherapy, highlighting the possibilities of gene transfer to assist the targeting of cancer with low molecular weight radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:12721515

  17. The Metastasis Suppressor, N-MYC Downstream-regulated Gene-1 (NDRG1), Down-regulates the ErbB Family of Receptors to Inhibit Downstream Oncogenic Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Zaklina; Menezes, Sharleen V; Sahni, Sumit; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Bae, Dong-Hun; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2016-01-15

    N-MYC downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent growth and metastasis suppressor that acts through its inhibitory effects on a wide variety of cellular signaling pathways, including the TGF-β pathway, protein kinase B (AKT)/PI3K pathway, RAS, etc. To investigate the hypothesis that its multiple effects could be regulated by a common upstream effector, the role of NDRG1 on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other members of the ErbB family, namely human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), was examined. We demonstrate that NDRG1 markedly decreased the expression and activation of EGFR, HER2, and HER3 in response to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand, while also inhibiting formation of the EGFR/HER2 and HER2/HER3 heterodimers. In addition, NDRG1 also decreased activation of the downstream MAPKK in response to EGF. Moreover, novel anti-tumor agents of the di-2-pyridylketone class of thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, which markedly up-regulate NDRG1, were found to inhibit EGFR, HER2, and HER3 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells. However, the mechanism involved appeared dependent on NDRG1 for di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, but was independent of this metastasis suppressor for di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone. This observation demonstrates that small structural changes in thiosemicarbazones result in marked alterations in molecular targeting. Collectively, these results reveal a mechanism for the extensive downstream effects on cellular signaling attributed to NDRG1. Furthermore, this study identifies a novel approach for the treatment of tumors resistant to traditional EGFR inhibitors.

  18. TaWRKY70 transcription factor in wheat QTL-2DL regulates downstream metabolite biosynthetic genes to resist Fusarium graminearum infection spread within spike

    PubMed Central

    Kage, Udaykumar; Yogendra, Kalenahalli N.; Kushalappa, Ajjamada C.

    2017-01-01

    A semi-comprehensive metabolomics was used to identify the candidate metabolites and genes to decipher mechanisms of resistance in wheat near-isogenic lines (NILs) containing QTL-2DL against Fusarium graminearum (Fg). Metabolites, with high fold-change in abundance, belonging to hydroxycinnamic acid amides (HCAAs): such as coumaroylagmatine, coumaroylputrescine and Fatty acids: phosphatidic acids (PAs) were identified as resistance related induced (RRI) metabolites in rachis of resistant NIL (NIL-R), inoculated with Fg. A WRKY like transcription factor (TF) was identified within the QTL-2DL region, along with three resistance genes that biosynthesized RRI metabolites. Sequencing and in-silico analysis of WRKY confirmed it to be wheat TaWRKY70. Quantitative real time-PCR studies showed a higher expression of TaWRKY70 in NIL-R as compared to NIL-S after Fg inoculation. Further, the functional validation of TaWRKY70 based on virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) in NIL-R, not only confirmed an increased fungal biomass but also decreased expressions of downstream resistance genes: TaACT, TaDGK and TaGLI1, along with decreased abundances of RRI metabolites biosynthesized by them. Among more than 200 FHB resistance QTL identified in wheat, this is the first QTL from which a TF was identified, and its downstream target genes as well as the FHB resistance functions were deciphered. PMID:28198421

  19. The Zebrafish Maternal-effect Gene mission impossible Encodes the DEAH-box Helicase Dhx16 and is Essential for the Expression of Downstream Endodermal Genes

    PubMed Central

    Putiri, Emily; Pelegri, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Early animal embryonic development requires maternal products that drive developmental processes prior to the activation of the zygotic genome at the mid-blastula transition. During and after this transition, maternal products may continue to act within incipient zygotic developmental programs. Mechanisms that control maternally-inherited products to spatially and temporally restrict developmental responses remain poorly understood, but necessarily depend on posttranscriptional regulation. We report the functional analysis and molecular identification of the zebrafish maternal-effect gene mission impossible (mis). Our studies suggest requirements for maternally-derived mis function in events that occur during gastrulation, including cell movement and the activation of some endodermal target genes. Cell transplantation experiments show that the cell movement defect is cell autonomous. Within the endoderm induction pathway, mis is not required for the activation of early zygotic genes, but is essential to implement nodal activity downstream of casanova/sox 32 but upstream of sox17 expression. Activation of nodal signaling in blastoderm explants shows that the requirement for mis function in endoderm gene induction is independent of the underlying yolk cell. Positional cloning of mis, including genetic rescue and complementation analysis, shows that it encodes the DEAH-box RNA helicase Dhx16, shown in other systems to act in RNA regulatory processes such as splicing and translational control. Analysis of a previously identified insertional dhx16 mutation shows that the zygotic component of this gene is also essential for embryonic viability. Our studies provide a striking example of the interweaving of maternal and zygotic genetic functions during the egg-to-embryo transition. Maternal RNA helicases have long been known to be involved in the development of the animal germ line, but our findings add to growing evidence that these factors may also control specific gene

  20. TBX3, a downstream target of TGF-β1, inhibits mesangial cell apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wensing, Lislaine A.; Campos, Alexandre H.

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasingly common condition characterized by progressive loss of functional nephrons leading to renal failure. TGF-β1-induced mesangial cell (MC) phenotype alterations have been linked to the genesis of CKD. Here we show that TGF-β1 regulates TBX3 gene expression in MC. This gene encodes for two main isoforms, TBX3.1 and TBX3+2α. TBX3.1 has been implicated in cell immortalization, proliferation and apoptosis by inhibiting p14{sup ARF}-Mdm2-p53 pathway, while TBX3+2α role has not been defined. We demonstrated that TBX3 overexpression abrogated MC apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Moreover, we observed an enhancement in TBX3 protein expression both in glomerular and tubular regions in the model of 5/6 nephrectomy, temporally related to increased expression of TGF-β1, type IV collagen and fibronectin. Our results indicate that TBX3 acts as an anti-apoptotic factor in MC in vitro and may be involved in the mechanism by which TGF-β1 induces glomerulosclerosis and tubular fibrosis during the progression of nephropathies. - Highlights: • TBX3 isoforms are upregulated by TGF-b1 in mesangial cells. • TBX3 isoforms have different subcellular distribution profile in mesangial cells. • TBX3 isoforms exhibit antiapoptotic action in mesangial cells. • TBX3 protein is overexpressed in a model of nephropathy (5/6 nephrectomy)

  1. Core promoter functions in the regulation of gene expression of Drosophila dorsal target genes.

    PubMed

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kuznetsov, Olga; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-04-25

    Developmental processes are highly dependent on transcriptional regulation by RNA polymerase II. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters consist of core promoter motifs, e.g. the initiator, TATA box, and the downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. Here, we explored the importance of core promoter functions in the dorsal-ventral developmental gene regulatory network. This network includes multiple genes that are activated by different nuclear concentrations of Dorsal, an NFκB homolog transcription factor, along the dorsal-ventral axis. We show that over two-thirds of Dorsal target genes contain DPE sequence motifs, which is significantly higher than the proportion of DPE-containing promoters in Drosophila genes. We demonstrate that multiple Dorsal target genes are evolutionarily conserved and functionally dependent on the DPE. Furthermore, we have analyzed the activation of key Dorsal target genes by Dorsal, as well as by another Rel family transcription factor, Relish, and the dependence of their activation on the DPE motif. Using hybrid enhancer-promoter constructs in Drosophila cells and embryo extracts, we have demonstrated that the core promoter composition is an important determinant of transcriptional activity of Dorsal target genes. Taken together, our results provide evidence for the importance of core promoter composition in the regulation of Dorsal target genes.

  2. Honokiol suppresses lung tumorigenesis by targeting EGFR and its downstream effectors.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung Min; Anandharaj, Arunkumar; Upadhyaya, Pramod; Kirtane, Ameya R; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Hong, Kwon Ho; Panyam, Jayanth; Kassie, Fekadu

    2016-09-06

    Since epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is commonly deregulated in pre-malignant lung epithelium, targeting EGFR may arrest the development of lung cancer. Here, we showed that honokiol (2.5-7.5 μM), a bioactive compound of Magnolia officinalis, differentially suppressed proliferation (up to 93%) and induced apoptosis (up to 61%) of EGFR overexpressing tumorigenic bronchial cells and these effects were paralleled by downregulation of phospho-EGFR, phospho-Akt, phospho-STAT3 and cell cycle-related proteins as early as 6-12 h post-treatment. Autocrine secretion of EGF sensitized 1170 cells to the effects of honokiol. Molecular docking studies indicated that honokiol binds to the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR although it was less efficient than erlotinib. However, the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of honokiol were stronger than those of erlotinib. Upon combinatory treatment, honokiol sensitized bronchial cells and erlotinib resistant H1650 and H1975 cells to erlotinib. Furthermore, in a mouse lung tumor bioassay, intranasal instillation of liposomal honokiol (5 mg/kg) for 14 weeks reduced the size and multiplicity (49%) of lung tumors and the level of total- and phospho-EGFR, phospho-Akt and phospho-STAT3. Overall, our results indicate that honokiol is a promising candidate to suppress the development and even progression of lung tumors driven by EGFR deregulation.

  3. Activator protein 1 promotes gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer by upregulating its downstream target Bim

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Wenjing; Du, Yongxing; Zhang, Taiping; You, Lei; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a commonly used chemotherapy drug in pancreatic cancer. The function of activator protein 1 (AP-1) is cell-specific, and its function depends on the expression of other complex members. In the present study, we added gemcitabine to the media of Panc-1 and SW1990 cells at clinically achieved concentrations (10 µM). Compared with constitutive c-Fos expression, c-Jun expression increased in a dose-dependent manner upon gemcitabine treatment. c-Jun overexpression increased gemcitabine-induced apoptosis through Bim activation, while cell apoptosis and Bim expression decreased following c-Jun knockdown. Furthermore, gemcitabine-induced apoptosis and Bim levels decreased when c-Jun phosphorylation was blocked by SP600125. Our findings suggest that c-Jun, which is a member of the AP-1 complex, functions in gemcitabine-induced apoptosis by regulating its downstream target Bim in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:28105181

  4. Activator protein 1 promotes gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer by upregulating its downstream target Bim.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Wenjing; Du, Yongxing; Zhang, Taiping; You, Lei; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-12-01

    Gemcitabine is a commonly used chemotherapy drug in pancreatic cancer. The function of activator protein 1 (AP-1) is cell-specific, and its function depends on the expression of other complex members. In the present study, we added gemcitabine to the media of Panc-1 and SW1990 cells at clinically achieved concentrations (10 µM). Compared with constitutive c-Fos expression, c-Jun expression increased in a dose-dependent manner upon gemcitabine treatment. c-Jun overexpression increased gemcitabine-induced apoptosis through Bim activation, while cell apoptosis and Bim expression decreased following c-Jun knockdown. Furthermore, gemcitabine-induced apoptosis and Bim levels decreased when c-Jun phosphorylation was blocked by SP600125. Our findings suggest that c-Jun, which is a member of the AP-1 complex, functions in gemcitabine-induced apoptosis by regulating its downstream target Bim in pancreatic cancer cells.

  5. Mutation analysis of the EGFR gene and downstream signalling pathway in histologic samples of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Mezzapelle, R; Miglio, U; Rena, O; Paganotti, A; Allegrini, S; Antona, J; Molinari, F; Frattini, M; Monga, G; Alabiso, O; Boldorini, R

    2013-01-01

    Background: As epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in the pathogenesis of malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs), the anti-EGFR drugs may be effective in treating MPM patients. Mutations of the EGFR gene or its downstream effectors may cause constitutive activation leading to cell proliferation, and the inhibition of apoptosis and metastases. Consequently, molecular profiling is essential for select patients with MPM who may respond to anti-EGFR therapies. Methods: After manual macrodissection, genomic DNA was extracted from 77 histological samples of MPM: 59 epithelioid, 10 biphasic, and 8 sarcomatoid. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations were sought by means of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing, KRAS gene mutations by mutant-enriched PCR, and PIK3CA and BRAF gene mutations by direct sequencing. Results: Gene mutations were identified in nine cases (12%): five KRAS, three BRAF, and one PI3KCA mutation; no EGFR gene mutations were detected. There was no difference in disease-specific survival between the patients with or without gene mutations (P=0.552). Conclusions: Mutations in EGFR downstream pathways are not rare in MPM. Although none of those found in this study seemed to be prognostically significant, they may support a more specific selection of patients for future trials. PMID:23558893

  6. Characterization of TCF21 Downstream Target Regions Identifies a Transcriptional Network Linking Multiple Independent Coronary Artery Disease Loci.

    PubMed

    Sazonova, Olga; Zhao, Yuqi; Nürnberg, Sylvia; Miller, Clint; Pjanic, Milos; Castano, Victor G; Kim, Juyong B; Salfati, Elias L; Kundaje, Anshul B; Bejerano, Gill; Assimes, Themistocles; Yang, Xia; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    To functionally link coronary artery disease (CAD) causal genes identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS), and to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) with the CAD associated transcription factor TCF21 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Analysis of identified TCF21 target genes for enrichment of molecular and cellular annotation terms identified processes relevant to CAD pathophysiology, including "growth factor binding," "matrix interaction," and "smooth muscle contraction." We characterized the canonical binding sequence for TCF21 as CAGCTG, identified AP-1 binding sites in TCF21 peaks, and by conducting ChIP-Seq for JUN and JUND in HCASMC confirmed that there is significant overlap between TCF21 and AP-1 binding loci in this cell type. Expression quantitative trait variation mapped to target genes of TCF21 was significantly enriched among variants with low P-values in the GWAS analyses, suggesting a possible functional interaction between TCF21 binding and causal variants in other CAD disease loci. Separate enrichment analyses found over-representation of TCF21 target genes among CAD associated genes, and linkage disequilibrium between TCF21 peak variation and that found in GWAS loci, consistent with the hypothesis that TCF21 may affect disease risk through interaction with other disease associated loci. Interestingly, enrichment for TCF21 target genes was also found among other genome wide association phenotypes, including height and inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting a functional profile important for basic cellular processes in non-vascular tissues. Thus, data and analyses presented here suggest that study of GWAS transcription factors may be a highly useful approach to identifying disease gene interactions and thus pathways that may be relevant to complex disease etiology.

  7. Metamorphic labral axis patterning in the beetle Tribolium castaneum requires multiple upstream, but few downstream, genes in the appendage patterning network

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Frank W.; Angelini, David R.; Gaudio, Matthew; Jockusch, Elizabeth L.

    2014-01-01

    The arthropod labrum is an anterior appendage-like structure that forms the dorsal side of the preoral cavity. Conflicting interpretations of fossil, nervous system and developmental data have led to a proliferation of scenarios for labral evolution. The best supported hypothesis is that the labrum is a novel structure that shares development with appendages as a result of co-option. Here, we use RNA interference in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum to compare metamorphic patterning of the labrum to previously published data on ventral appendage patterning. As expected under the co-option hypothesis, depletion of several genes resulted in similar defects in the labrum and ventral appendages. These include proximal deletions and proximal-to-distal transformations resulting from depletion of the leg gap genes homothorax and extradenticle, large-scale deletions resulting from depletion of the leg gap gene Distal-less, and smaller distal deletions resulting from knockdown of the EGF ligand Keren. However, depletion of dachshund and many of the genes that function downstream of the leg gap genes in the ventral appendages had either subtle or no effects on labral axis patterning. This pattern of partial similarity suggests that upstream genes act through different downstream targets in the labrum. We also discovered that many appendage axis patterning genes have roles in patterning the epipharyngeal sensillum array, suggesting that they have become integrated into a novel regulatory network. These genes include Notch, Delta, and decapentaplegic, and the transcription factors abrupt, bric à brac, homothorax, extradenticle and the paralogs apterous a and apterous b. PMID:24617987

  8. Metamorphic labral axis patterning in the beetle Tribolium castaneum requires multiple upstream, but few downstream, genes in the appendage patterning network.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frank W; Angelini, David R; Gaudio, Matthew S; Jockusch, Elizabeth L

    2014-03-01

    The arthropod labrum is an anterior appendage-like structure that forms the dorsal side of the preoral cavity. Conflicting interpretations of fossil, nervous system, and developmental data have led to a proliferation of scenarios for labral evolution. The best supported hypothesis is that the labrum is a novel structure that shares development with appendages as a result of co-option. Here, we use RNA interference in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum to compare metamorphic patterning of the labrum to previously published data on ventral appendage patterning. As expected under the co-option hypothesis, depletion of several genes resulted in similar defects in the labrum and ventral appendages. These include proximal deletions and proximal-to-distal transformations resulting from depletion of the leg gap genes homothorax and extradenticle, large-scale deletions resulting from depletion of the leg gap gene Distal-less, and smaller distal deletions resulting from knockdown of the EGF ligand Keren. However, depletion of dachshund and many of the genes that function downstream of the leg gap genes in the ventral appendages had either subtle or no effects on labral axis patterning. This pattern of partial similarity suggests that upstream genes act through different downstream targets in the labrum. We also discovered that many appendage axis patterning genes have roles in patterning the epipharyngeal sensillum array, suggesting that they have become integrated into a novel regulatory network. These genes include Notch, Delta, and decapentaplegic, and the transcription factors abrupt, bric à brac, homothorax, extradenticle and the paralogs apterous a and apterous b.

  9. New Cholesterol Fighting Meds Target Key Gene

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165942.html New Cholesterol Fighting Meds Target Key Gene Two trials ... 25, 2017 THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New gene-based therapies appear to significantly decrease cholesterol ...

  10. Gene targeting: things go better with Cre.

    PubMed

    Jiang, R; Gridley, T

    1997-05-01

    New technologies are changing the way in which gene targeting experiments are being designed. It is now becoming possible to analyze gene function in defined tissues at specific times during the life of a mouse.

  11. LATERAL ROOT PRIMORDIA 1 of maize acts as a transcriptional activator in auxin signalling downstream of the Aux/IAA gene rootless with undetectable meristem 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanxiang; von Behrens, Inga; Zimmermann, Roman; Ludwig, Yvonne; Hey, Stefan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Only little is known about target genes of auxin signalling downstream of the Aux/IAA-ARF module. In the present study, it has been demonstrated that maize lateral root primordia 1 (lrp1) encodes a transcriptional activator that is directly regulated by the Aux/IAA protein ROOTLESS WITH UNDETECTABLE MERISTEM 1 (RUM1). Expression of lrp1 is confined to early root primordia and meristems and is auxin-inducible. Based on its primary protein structure, LRP1 is predicted to be a transcription factor. This notion is supported by exclusive LRP1 localization in the nucleus and its ability to activate downstream gene activity. Based on the observation that lrp1 transcription is completely repressed in the semi-dominant gain of function mutant rum1, it was demonstrated that the lrp1 promoter is a direct target of RUM1 proteins. Subsequently, promoter activation assays indicated that RUM1 represses the expression of a GFP reporter fused to the native promoter of lrp1. Constitutive repression of lrp1 in rum1 mutants is a consequence of the stability of mutated rum1 proteins which cannot be degraded by the proteasome and thus constitutively bind to the lrp1 promoter and repress transcription. Taken together, the repression of the transcriptional activator lrp1 by direct binding of RUM1 to its promoter, together with specific expression of lrp1 in root meristems, suggests a function in maize root development via the RUM1-dependent auxin signalling pathway.

  12. The metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), upregulates p21 via p53-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Zaklina; Sivagurunathan, Sutharshani; Mangs, Helena; Chikhani, Sherin; Zhang, Daohai; Richardson, Des R

    2011-05-01

    The metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1), has been shown to markedly reduce metastasis of numerous tumors. The current study was focused on further elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind the antitumor function of NDRG1. We have identified for the first time that NDRG1 upregulates the potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21. This effect was observed in three different cancer cell types, including PC3MM and DU145 prostate cancer cells and H1299 lung carcinoma cells, and occurred independently of p53. In addition, reducing NDRG1 expression using short hairpin RNA in PC3MM and DU145 cells resulted in significantly reduced p21 protein levels. Hence, p21 is closely correlated with NDRG1 expression in these latter cell types. Examining the mechanisms behind the effect of NDRG1 on p21 expression, we found that NDRG1 upregulated p21 via transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms in prostate cancer cells, although its effect on H1299 cells was posttranscriptional only. Further studies identified two additional NDRG1 protein targets. The dominant-negative p63 isoform, ΔNp63, which has been found to inhibit p21 transcription, was downregulated by NDRG1. On the other hand, a truncated 50 kDa MDM2 isoform (p50(MDM2)), which may protect p21 from proteasomal degradation, was upregulated by NDRG1. The downregulation of ΔNp63 and upregulation of p50(MDM2) are potential mechanisms by which NDRG1 increases p21 expression in these cells. Additional functional studies identified that NDRG1 inhibits cancer cell migration, suggesting that p21 is a molecular player in its antimetastatic activity.

  13. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  14. Targeted Gene Therapies: Tools, Applications, Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Olivier; Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Many devastating human diseases are caused by mutations in a single gene that prevent a somatic cell from carrying out its essential functions, or by genetic changes acquired as a result of infectious disease or in the course of cell transformation. Targeted gene therapies have emerged as potential strategies for treatment of such diseases. These therapies depend upon rare-cutting endonucleases to cleave at specific sites in or near disease genes. Targeted gene correction provides a template for homology-directed repair, enabling the cell's own repair pathways to erase the mutation and replace it with the correct sequence. Targeted gene disruption ablates the disease gene, disabling its function. Gene targeting can also promote other kinds of genome engineering, including mutation, insertion, or gene deletion. Targeted gene therapies present significant advantages compared to approaches to gene therapy that depend upon delivery of stably expressing transgenes. Recent progress has been fueled by advances in nuclease discovery and design, and by new strategies that maximize efficiency of targeting and minimize off-target damage. Future progress will build on deeper mechanistic understanding of critical factors and pathways. PMID:22530743

  15. Therapeutic targeting of tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Luc G T; Chan, Timothy A

    2015-05-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep process attributable to both gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressor genes. Currently, most molecular targeted therapies are inhibitors of oncogenes, because inactivated tumor suppressor genes have proven harder to "drug." Nevertheless, in cancers, tumor suppressor genes undergo alteration more frequently than do oncogenes. In recent years, several promising strategies directed at tumor suppressor genes, or the pathways controlled by these genes, have emerged. Here, we describe advances in a number of different methodologies aimed at therapeutically targeting tumors driven by inactivated tumor suppressor genes.

  16. Osa-containing Brahma chromatin remodeling complexes are required for the repression of Wingless target genes

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Russell T.; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2000-01-01

    The Wingless signaling pathway directs many developmental processes in Drosophila by regulating the expression of specific downstream target genes. We report here that the product of the trithorax group gene osa is required to repress such genes in the absence of the Wingless signal. The Wingless-regulated genes nubbin, Distal-less, and decapentaplegic and a minimal enhancer from the Ultrabithorax gene are misexpressed in osa mutants and repressed by ectopic Osa. Osa-mediated repression occurs downstream of the up-regulation of Armadillo but is sensitive both to the relative levels of activating Armadillo/Pangolin and repressing Groucho/Pangolin complexes present and to the responsiveness of the promoter to Wingless. Osa functions as a component of the Brahma chromatin-remodeling complex; other components of this complex are likewise required to repress Wingless target genes. These results suggest that altering the conformation of chromatin is an important mechanism by which Wingless signaling activates gene expression. PMID:11124806

  17. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27001519

  18. Characterization of TH1 and CTSZ, two non-imprinted genes downstream of GNAS1 in chromosome 20q13.

    PubMed

    Bonthron, D T; Hayward, B E; Moran, V; Strain, L

    2000-08-01

    The clustering and coordinate regulation of many imprinted genes justifies positional searches for imprinted genes adjacent to known ones. We recently characterized a locus on 20q13, containing GNAS1, which has a highly complex imprinted expression pattern. In a search for neighbouring genes, we have now characterized a new gene, TH1, downstream of GNAS1. TH1 and GNAS1 are separated by more than 70 kb consisting largely of interspersed repetitive DNA. TH1 is the homologue of a gene that, in Drosophila, lies adjacent to the DNA repair gene mei-41. We have determined the full-length structures of human, mouse and Drosophila TH1. Though of unknown function, TH1 is highly conserved and widely expressed. Nonetheless, there is no similar Caenorhabditis elegans protein. We have also determined the complete genomic structures of human and Drosophila TH1. The Drosophila gene has five exons spanning 2.6 kb. The last three introns have precise equivalents in the human gene, which has 15 exons spanning 14 kb and is transcribed away from GNAS1. Using a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the 3' untranslated region, we have demonstrated biallelic TH1 expression in human fetal tissues, suggesting that, unlike GNAS1, TH1 is probably not imprinted. Immediately downstream of TH1 lies CTSZ, encoding the recently described cysteine protease, cathepsin Z. We have also elucidated the genomic structure of this gene; it has six exons spanning 12 kb and is oriented tail-to-tail with TH1, only 70 bp separating their polyadenylation sites. A polymorphism was again identified within the CTSZ 3' untranslated region and used to demonstrate biallelic expression in fetal tissues.

  19. AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC: Signaling Pathways, Downstream Genes, Interacting Proteins, and Regulation of Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Emdad, Luni; Das, Swadesh K.; Dasgupta, Santanu; Hu, Bin; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), also known as metadherin (MTDH) and lysine-rich CEACAM1 coisolated (LYRIC), was initially cloned in 2002. AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC has emerged as an important oncogene that is overexpressed in multiple types of human cancer. Expanded research on AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC has established a functional role of this molecule in several crucial aspects of tumor progression, including transformation, proliferation, cell survival, evasion of apoptosis, migration and invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and chemoresistance. The multifunctional role of AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC in tumor development and progression is associated with a number of signaling cascades, and recent studies identified several important interacting partners of AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC in regulating cancer promotion and other biological functions. This review evaluates the current literature on AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC function relative to signaling changes, interacting partners, and angiogenesis and highlights new perspectives of this molecule, indicating its potential as a significant target for the clinical treatment of various cancers and other diseases. PMID:23889988

  20. The human RHOX gene cluster: target genes and functional analysis of gene variants in infertile men.

    PubMed

    Borgmann, Jennifer; Tüttelmann, Frank; Dworniczak, Bernd; Röpke, Albrecht; Song, Hye-Won; Kliesch, Sabine; Wilkinson, Miles F; Laurentino, Sandra; Gromoll, Jörg

    2016-09-15

    The X-linked reproductive homeobox (RHOX) gene cluster encodes transcription factors preferentially expressed in reproductive tissues. This gene cluster has important roles in male fertility based on phenotypic defects of Rhox-mutant mice and the finding that aberrant RHOX promoter methylation is strongly associated with abnormal human sperm parameters. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of RHOX function in humans. Using gene expression profiling, we identified genes regulated by members of the human RHOX gene cluster. Some genes were uniquely regulated by RHOXF1 or RHOXF2/2B, while others were regulated by both of these transcription factors. Several of these regulated genes encode proteins involved in processes relevant to spermatogenesis; e.g. stress protection and cell survival. One of the target genes of RHOXF2/2B is RHOXF1, suggesting cross-regulation to enhance transcriptional responses. The potential role of RHOX in human infertility was addressed by sequencing all RHOX exons in a group of 250 patients with severe oligozoospermia. This revealed two mutations in RHOXF1 (c.515G > A and c.522C > T) and four in RHOXF2/2B (-73C > G, c.202G > A, c.411C > T and c.679G > A), of which only one (c.202G > A) was found in a control group of men with normal sperm concentration. Functional analysis demonstrated that c.202G > A and c.679G > A significantly impaired the ability of RHOXF2/2B to regulate downstream genes. Molecular modelling suggested that these mutations alter RHOXF2/F2B protein conformation. By combining clinical data with in vitro functional analysis, we demonstrate how the X-linked RHOX gene cluster may function in normal human spermatogenesis and we provide evidence that it is impaired in human male fertility.

  1. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    AD AWARD NUMBER DAMD17-97-1-7232 TITLE: Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jinha M. Park CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...FUNDING NUMBERS Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer DAMD17-97-1-7232 6. AUTHOR(S) Jinha M. Park 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...of surface mAb has been internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis. These mAbs show promise in the specific delivery of gene therapy vectors

  2. Microarray identification of novel genes downstream of Six1, a critical factor in cranial placode, somite and kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Bo; Neilson, Karen M.; Ranganathan, Ramya; Maynard, Thomas; Streit, Andrea; Moody, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Six1 plays an important role in the development of several vertebrate organs, including cranial sensory placodes, somites and kidney. Although Six1 mutations cause one form of Branchio-Otic Syndrome (BOS), the responsible gene in many patients has not been identified; genes that act downstream of Six1 are potential BOS candidates. Results We sought to identify novel genes expressed during placode, somite and kidney development by comparing gene expression between control and Six1-expressing ectodermal explants. The expression patterns of 19 of the significantly up-regulated and 11 of the significantly down-regulated genes were assayed from cleavage to larval stages. 28/30 genes are expressed in the otocyst, a structure that is functionally disrupted in BOS, and 26/30 genes are expressed in the nephric mesoderm, a structure that is functionally disrupted in the related Branchio-Otic-Renal (BOR) syndrome. We also identified the chick homologues of 5 genes and show that they have conserved expression patterns. Conclusions Of the 30 genes selected for expression analyses, all are expressed at many of the developmental times and appropriate tissues to be regulated by Six1. Many have the potential to play a role in the disruption of hearing and kidney function seen in BOS/BOR patients. PMID:25403746

  3. Engineering targeted viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Waehler, Reinhard; Russell, Stephen J; Curiel, David T

    2007-08-01

    To achieve therapeutic success, transfer vehicles for gene therapy must be capable of transducing target cells while avoiding impact on non-target cells. Despite the high transduction efficiency of viral vectors, their tropism frequently does not match the therapeutic need. In the past, this lack of appropriate targeting allowed only partial exploitation of the great potential of gene therapy. Substantial progress in modifying viral vectors using diverse techniques now allows targeting to many cell types in vitro. Although important challenges remain for in vivo applications, the first clinical trials with targeted vectors have already begun to take place.

  4. Problem-Solving Test: Targeted Gene Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of a specific gene is the most powerful technique to analyze the biological function of the gene. This approach has been used for a long time in viruses, bacteria, yeast, and fruit fly, but looked quite hopeless in more complex organisms. Targeted inactivation of specific genes (also known as knock-out mutation) in mice is…

  5. Problem-Solving Test: Targeted Gene Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of a specific gene is the most powerful technique to analyze the biological function of the gene. This approach has been used for a long time in viruses, bacteria, yeast, and fruit fly, but looked quite hopeless in more complex organisms. Targeted inactivation of specific genes (also known as knock-out mutation) in mice is…

  6. Hox gene Ultrabithorax regulates distinct sets of target genes at successive stages of Drosophila haltere morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pavlopoulos, Anastasios; Akam, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Hox genes encode highly conserved transcription factors that regionalize the animal body axis by controlling complex developmental processes. Although they are known to operate in multiple cell types and at different stages, we are still missing the batteries of genes targeted by any one Hox gene over the course of a single developmental process to achieve a particular cell and organ morphology. The transformation of wings into halteres by the Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) in Drosophila melanogaster presents an excellent model system to study the Hox control of transcriptional networks during successive stages of appendage morphogenesis and cell differentiation. We have used an inducible misexpression system to switch on Ubx in the wing epithelium at successive stages during metamorphosis--in the larva, prepupa, and pupa. We have then used extensive microarray expression profiling and quantitative RT-PCR to identify the primary transcriptional responses to Ubx. We find that Ubx targets range from regulatory genes like transcription factors and signaling components to terminal differentiation genes affecting a broad repertoire of cell behaviors and metabolic reactions. Ubx up- and down-regulates hundreds of downstream genes at each stage, mostly in a subtle manner. Strikingly, our analysis reveals that Ubx target genes are largely distinct at different stages of appendage morphogenesis, suggesting extensive interactions between Hox genes and hormone-controlled regulatory networks to orchestrate complex genetic programs during metamorphosis.

  7. Elevated YAP and its downstream targets CCN1 and CCN2 in basal cell carcinoma: impact on keratinocyte proliferation and stromal cell activation.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Xu, Yiru; Qin, Zhaoping; Robichaud, Patrick; Betcher, Stephanie; Calderone, Ken; He, Tianyuan; Johnson, Timothy M; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2014-04-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator of hippo signaling pathway, which plays an important role in organ size control and tumorigenesis. Here we report that YAP and its downstream transcriptional targets CCN1 and CCN2 are markedly elevated in keratinocytes in human skin basal cell carcinoma tumor islands. In human keratinocytes, knockdown of YAP significantly reduced expression of CCN1 and CCN2, and repressed proliferation and survival. This inhibition of proliferation and survival was rescued by restoration of CCN1 expression, but not by CCN2 expression. In basal cell carcinoma stroma, CCN2-regulated genes type I collagen, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin were highly expressed. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy revealed increased tissue stiffness in basal cell carcinoma stroma compared to normal dermis. These data provide evidence that up-regulation of YAP in basal cell carcinoma impacts both aberrant keratinocyte proliferation, via CCN1, and tumor stroma cell activation and stroma remodeling, via CCN2. Targeting YAP and/or CCN1 and CCN2 may provide clinical benefit in basal cell carcinoma.

  8. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of SIRT1 and/or SIRT2 in melanoma: Identification of downstream targets by large-scale proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilking-Busch, Melissa J; Ndiaye, Mary A; Liu, Xiaoqi; Ahmad, Nihal

    2017-09-05

    Melanoma is the most notorious and fatal of all skin cancers and the existing treatment options have not been proven to effectively manage this neoplasm, especially the metastatic disease. Sirtuin (SIRT) proteins have been shown to be differentially expressed in melanoma. We have shown that SIRTs 1 and 2 were overexpressed in melanoma and inhibition of SIRT1 imparts anti-proliferative responses in human melanoma cells. To elucidate the impact of SIRT 1 and/or 2 in melanoma, we created stable knockdowns of SIRTs 1, 2, and their combination using shRNA mediated RNA interference in A375 human melanoma cells. We found that SIRT1 and SIRT1&2 combination knockdown caused a decreased cellular proliferation in melanoma cells. Further, the knockdown of SIRT 1 and/or 2 resulted in a decreased colony formation in melanoma cells. To explore the downstream targets of SIRTs 1 and/or 2, we employed a label-free quantitative nano-LC-MS/MS proteomics analysis using the stable lines. We found aberrant levels of proteins involved in many vital cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, ribosomal activity, oxidative stress response, and angiogenesis. These findings provide clear evidence of cellular systems undergoing alterations in response to sirtuin inhibition, and have unveiled several excellent candidates for future study. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, due to its aggressive nature, metastatic potential, and a lack of sufficient treatment options for advanced disease. Therefore, detailed investigations into the molecular mechanisms of melanoma growth and progression are needed. In the search for candidate genes to serve as therapeutic targets, the sirtuins show promise as they have been found to be upregulated in melanoma and they regulate a large number of proteins involved in cellular processes known to affect tumor growth, such as DNA damage repair, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. In this study, we used a large-scale label-free comparative

  9. Constellation Map: Downstream visualization and interpretation of gene set enrichment results.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Wu, Felix; Tamayo, Pablo; Haining, W Nicholas; Mesirov, Jill P

    2015-01-01

    Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) approaches are widely used to identify coordinately regulated genes associated with phenotypes of interest. Here, we present Constellation Map, a tool to visualize and interpret the results when enrichment analyses yield a long list of significantly enriched gene sets. Constellation Map identifies commonalities that explain the enrichment of multiple top-scoring gene sets and maps the relationships between them. Constellation Map can help investigators take full advantage of GSEA and facilitates the biological interpretation of enrichment results. Constellation Map is freely available as a GenePattern module at http://www.genepattern.org.

  10. Constellation Map: Downstream visualization and interpretation of gene set enrichment results

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, Pablo; Haining, W. Nicholas; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) approaches are widely used to identify coordinately regulated genes associated with phenotypes of interest. Here, we present Constellation Map, a tool to visualize and interpret the results when enrichment analyses yield a long list of significantly enriched gene sets. Constellation Map identifies commonalities that explain the enrichment of multiple top-scoring gene sets and maps the relationships between them. Constellation Map can help investigators take full advantage of GSEA and facilitates the biological interpretation of enrichment results. Availability: Constellation Map is freely available as a GenePattern module at http://www.genepattern.org. PMID:26594333

  11. Expression pattern of bcar3, a downstream target of Gata2, and its binding partner, bcar1, during Xenopus development

    PubMed Central

    Green, Yangsook Song; Kwon, Sunjong; Christian, Jan L.

    2015-01-01

    Primitive hematopoiesis generates red blood cells that deliver oxygen to the developing embryo. Mesodermal cells commit to a primitive blood cell fate during gastrulation and, in order to do so the mesoderm must receive non-cell autonomous signals transmitted from other germ layers. In Xenopus, the transcription factor Gata2 functions in ectodermal cells to generate or transmit the non-cell autonomous signals. Here we have identified Breast Cancer Antiestrogen Resistance 3 (bcar3) as a gene that is induced in ectodermal cells downstream of Gata2. Bcar3 and its binding partner Bcar1 function to transduce integrin signaling, leading to changes in cellular morphology, motility and adhesion. We show that gata2, bcar3 and bcar1 are co-expressed in ventral ectoderm from early gastrula to early tailbud stages. At later stages of development, bcar3 and bcar1 are co-expressed in the spinal cord, notochord, fin mesenchyme and pronephros but each shows additional unique sites of expression. These co-expression and unique expression patterns suggest that Bcar3 and Bcar1 may function together but also independently during Xenopus development. PMID:26631802

  12. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  13. Ferrochelatase is a conserved downstream target of the blue light-sensing White collar complex in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Idnurm, Alexander; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Light is a universal signal perceived by organisms, including fungi, in which light regulates common and unique biological processes depending on the species. Previous research has established that conserved proteins, originally called White collar 1 and 2 from the ascomycete Neurospora crassa, regulate UV/blue light sensing. Homologous proteins function in distant relatives of N. crassa, including the basidiomycetes and zygomycetes, which diverged as long as a billion years ago. Here we conducted microarray experiments on the basidiomycete fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to identify light-regulated genes. Surprisingly, only a single gene was induced by light above the commonly used twofold threshold. This gene, HEM15, is predicted to encode a ferrochelatase that catalyses the final step in haem biosynthesis from highly photoreactive porphyrins. The C. neoformans gene complements a Saccharomyces cerevisiae hem15Δ strain and is essential for viability, and the Hem15 protein localizes to mitochondria, three lines of evidence that the gene encodes ferrochelatase. Regulation of HEM15 by light suggests a mechanism by which bwc1/bwc2 mutants are photosensitive and exhibit reduced virulence. We show that ferrochelatase is also light-regulated in a white collar-dependent fashion in N. crassa and the zygomycete Phycomyces blakesleeanus, indicating that ferrochelatase is an ancient target of photoregulation in the fungal kingdom. PMID:20488877

  14. A Circadian Clock Gene, PER2, Activates HIF-1 as an Effector Molecule for Recruitment of HIF-1α to Promoter Regions of Its Downstream Genes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Minoru; Morinibu, Akiyo; Koyasu, Sho; Goto, Yoko; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroshi

    2017-09-30

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor functioning in cellular adaptive responses to hypoxia. Recent studies have suggested that HIF-1 activity is upregulated by one of the important circadian clock genes, period circadian clock 2 (PER2); however, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show that PER2 functions as an effector protein for the recruitment of HIF-1α to its cognate enhancer sequence, the hypoxia-response element (HRE). We found that the forced expression of PER2 enhanced HIF-1 activity without influencing expression levels of the regulatory subunit of HIF-1, HIF-1α, at either mRNA or protein levels. A series of co-immunoprecipitation-based experiments revealed that PER2 interacted with HIF-1α and facilitated the recruitment of HIF-1α to HRE derived from vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promoter. The PER2-mediated activation of HIF-1 was observed only when the asparagine residue at position 803 of HIF-1α (HIF-1α N803) was kept unhydroxylated by hypoxic stimulation, by introducing an N803A point mutation, or by an inhibitor of N803-dioxygenase, deferoxamine. However, the extent of PER-2-HIF-1α interaction was equivalent regardless of the N803 hydroxylation status. Taken together, these results suggest that, with the help of an unknown sensor molecule for the N803 hydroxylation status, PER2 functions as an effector molecule for the recruitment of HIF-1 to promoter regions of its downstream genes. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory step in the activation of HIF-1, which can be targeted to develop therapeutic strategies against HIF-1-related diseases, such as cancers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  16. The Influence of the Global Gene Expression Shift on Downstream Analyses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qifeng; Zhang, Xuegong

    2016-01-01

    The assumption that total abundance of RNAs in a cell is roughly the same in different cells is underlying most studies based on gene expression analyses. But experiments have shown that changes in the expression of some master regulators such as c-MYC can cause global shift in the expression of almost all genes in some cell types like cancers. Such shift will violate this assumption and can cause wrong or biased conclusions for standard data analysis practices, such as detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes and molecular classification of tumors based on gene expression. Most existing gene expression data were generated without considering this possibility, and are therefore at the risk of having produced unreliable results if such global shift effect exists in the data. To evaluate this risk, we conducted a systematic study on the possible influence of the global gene expression shift effect on differential expression analysis and on molecular classification analysis. We collected data with known global shift effect and also generated data to simulate different situations of the effect based on a wide collection of real gene expression data, and conducted comparative studies on representative existing methods. We observed that some DE analysis methods are more tolerant to the global shift while others are very sensitive to it. Classification accuracy is not sensitive to the shift and actually can benefit from it, but genes selected for the classification can be greatly affected.

  17. ABI3 mediates dehydration stress recovery response in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating expression of downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Sonia; Sengupta, Sourabh; Ray, Anagh; Nag Chaudhuri, Ronita

    2016-09-01

    ABI3, originally discovered as a seed-specific transcription factor is now implicated to act beyond seed physiology, especially during abiotic stress. In non-seed plants, ABI3 is known to act in desiccation stress signaling. Here we show that ABI3 plays a role in dehydration stress response in Arabidopsis. ABI3 gene was upregulated during dehydration stress and its expression was maintained during subsequent stress recovery phases. Comparative gene expression studies in response to dehydration stress and stress recovery were done with genes which had potential ABI3 binding sites in their upstream regulatory regions. Such studies showed that several genes including known seed-specific factors like CRUCIFERIN1, CRUCIFERIN3 and LEA-group of genes like LEA76, LEA6, DEHYDRIN LEA and LEA-LIKE got upregulated in an ABI3-dependent manner, especially during the stress recovery phase. ABI3 got recruited to regions upstream to the transcription start site of these genes during dehydration stress response through direct or indirect DNA binding. Interestingly, ABI3 also binds to its own promoter region during such stress signaling. Nucleosomes covering potential ABI3 binding sites in the upstream sequences of the above-mentioned genes alter positions, and show increased H3 K9 acetylation during stress-induced transcription. ABI3 thus mediates dehydration stress signaling in Arabidopsis through regulation of a group of genes that play a role primarily during stress recovery phase.

  18. vimA Gene Downstream of recA Is Involved in Virulence Modulation in Porphyromonas gingivalis W83

    PubMed Central

    Abaibou, Hafid; Chen, Zhuo; Olango, G. Jon; Liu, Yi; Edwards, Jessica; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2001-01-01

    A 0.9-kb open reading frame encoding a unique 32-kDa protein was identified downstream of the recA gene of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that both the recA gene and this open reading frame are part of the same transcriptional unit. This cloned fragment was insertionally inactivated using the ermF-ermAM antibiotic resistance cassette to create a defective mutant by allelic exchange. When plated on Brucella blood agar, the mutant strain, designated P. gingivalis FLL92, was non-black pigmented and showed significant reduction in beta-hemolysis compared with the parent strain, P. gingivalis W83. Arginine- and lysine-specific cysteine protease activities, which were mostly soluble, were approximately 90% lower than that of the parent strain. Expression of the rgpA, rgpB, and kgp protease genes was the same in P. gingivalis FLL92 as in the wild-type strain. In contrast to the parent strain, P. gingivalis FLL92 showed increased autoaggregration in addition to a significant reduction in hemagglutinating and hemolysin activities. In in vivo experiments using a mouse model, P. gingivalis FLL92 was dramatically less virulent than the parent strain. A molecular survey of this mutant and the parent strain using all known P. gingivalis insertion sequence elements as probes suggested that no intragenomic changes due to the movement of these elements have occurred in P. gingivalis FLL92. Taken together, these results suggest that the recA downstream gene, designated vimA (virulence-modulating gene), plays an important role in virulence modulation in P. gingivalis W83, possibly representing a novel posttranscriptional or translational regulation of virulence factors in P. gingivalis. PMID:11119521

  19. The histone demethylase KDM3A, and its downstream target MCAM, promote Ewing Sarcoma cell migration and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sechler, M; Parrish, J K; Birks, D K; Jedlicka, P

    2017-07-20

    Ewing Sarcoma is the second most common solid pediatric malignant neoplasm of bone and soft tissue. Driven by EWS/Ets, or rarely variant, oncogenic fusions, Ewing Sarcoma is a biologically and clinically aggressive disease with a high propensity for metastasis. However, the mechanisms underpinning Ewing Sarcoma metastasis are currently not well understood. In the present study, we identify and characterize a novel metastasis-promotional pathway in Ewing Sarcoma, involving the histone demethylase KDM3A, previously identified by our laboratory as a new cancer-promoting gene in this disease. Using global gene expression profiling, we show that KDM3A positively regulates genes and pathways implicated in cell migration and metastasis, and demonstrate, using functional assays, that KDM3A promotes migration in vitro and experimental, post-intravasation, metastasis in vivo. We further identify the melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) as a novel KDM3A target gene in Ewing Sarcoma, and an important effector of KDM3A pro-metastatic action. Specifically, we demonstrate that MCAM depletion, like KDM3A depletion, inhibits cell migration in vitro and experimental metastasis in vivo, and that MCAM partially rescues impaired migration due to KDM3A knock-down. Mechanistically, we show that KDM3A regulates MCAM expression both through a direct mechanism, involving modulation of H3K9 methylation at the MCAM promoter, and an indirect mechanism, via the Ets1 transcription factor. Finally, we identify an association between high MCAM levels in patient tumors and poor survival, in two different Ewing Sarcoma clinical cohorts. Taken together, our studies uncover a new metastasis-promoting pathway in Ewing Sarcoma, with therapeutically targetable components.

  20. Downstream DNA sequences are required to modulate Pvlea-18 gene expression in response to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Fonseca, L P; Covarrubias, A A

    2001-03-01

    We have previously shown that mRNA and protein encoded by the Pvlea-18 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris L., a member of a new family of late embryogenesis-abundant (LEA) proteins, accumulate in dark-grown bean seedlings not only in response to water deficit but also during optimal irrigation. In this work, we studied Pvlea-18 gene transcriptional regulation by using transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants containing a chimeric gene consisting of the Pvlea-18 promoter region and the 3'-nos terminator fused to the GUS gene-coding region. We demonstrate that the chimeric gene is active during Arabidopsis normal development under well-irrigated conditions, and that it is further induced in response to ABA and dehydration treatments. Replacing the 3'-nos terminator with the Pvlea-18 3' region led to an additional increase in expression during development and in response to dehydration, but not in response to exogenous ABA. These results reveal an enhancer effect of the Pvlea-18 3' region, which showed to be higher specifically under dehydration. The small decrease in Pvlea-18 promoter expression observed when transgenic plants treated with fluridone (an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor) were subjected to dehydration suggests that the Pvlea-18 gene dehydration response is predominantly ABA-independent. Finally, we present evidence indicating that Pvlea-18 gene expression is negatively regulated during etiolated growth, particularly in roots, in contrast to the expression pattern observed during normal development.

  1. A modular gene targeting system for sequential transgene stacking in plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; AlAbed, Diaa; Worden, Andrew; Novak, Stephen; Wu, Huixia; Ausmus, Carla; Beck, Margaret; Robinson, Heather; Minnicks, Tatyana; Hemingway, Daren; Lee, Ryan; Skaggs, Nicole; Wang, Lizhen; Marri, Pradeep; Gupta, Manju

    2015-08-10

    A modular, selection-based method was developed for site-specific integration of transgenes into a genomic locus to create multigene stacks. High-frequency gene targeting was obtained using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated double-strand break (DSB) formation at a pre-defined target genomic location using a unique intron directly downstream of a promoter driving a selectable marker gene to facilitate homology between target and donor sequences. In this system, only insertion into the target locus leads to a functional selectable marker, and regeneration from random insertions of the promoterless donor construct are reduced on selection media. A new stack of transgenes can potentially be loaded with each successive cycle of gene targeting by exchanging the selectable marker gene using the intron homology. This system was tested in maize using the pat selectable marker gene, whereby up to 30% of the plants regenerated on Bialaphos-containing medium were observed to have the donor construct integrated into the target locus. Unlike previous gene targeting methods that utilize defective or partial genes for selecting targeted events, the present method exchanges fully functional genes with every cycle of targeting, thereby allowing the recycling of selectable marker genes, hypothetically for multiple generations of gene targeting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Signalling Exerts Chondrogenesis Promoting and Protecting Effects: Implication of Calcineurin as a Downstream Target

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Matta, Csaba; Katona, Éva; Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Gergely, Pál; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Tóth, Gábor; Reglődi, Dóra; Tamás, Andrea; Zákány, Róza

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is an important neurotrophic factor influencing differentiation of neuronal elements and exerting protecting role during traumatic injuries or inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although increasing evidence is available on its presence and protecting function in various peripheral tissues, little is known about the role of PACAP in formation of skeletal components. To this end, we aimed to map elements of PACAP signalling in developing cartilage under physiological conditions and during oxidative stress. mRNAs of PACAP and its receptors (PAC1,VPAC1, VPAC2) were detectable during differentiation of chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Expression of PAC1 protein showed a peak on days of final commitment of chondrogenic cells. Administration of either the PAC1 receptor agonist PACAP 1-38, or PACAP 6-38 that is generally used as a PAC1 antagonist, augmented cartilage formation, stimulated cell proliferation and enhanced PAC1 and Sox9 protein expression. Both variants of PACAP elevated the protein expression and activity of the Ca-calmodulin dependent Ser/Thr protein phosphatase calcineurin. Application of PACAPs failed to rescue cartilage formation when the activity of calcineurin was pharmacologically inhibited with cyclosporine A. Moreover, exogenous PACAPs prevented diminishing of cartilage formation and decrease of calcineurin activity during oxidative stress. As an unexpected phenomenon, PACAP 6-38 elicited similar effects to those of PACAP 1-38, although to a different extent. On the basis of the above results, we propose calcineurin as a downstream target of PACAP signalling in differentiating chondrocytes either in normal or pathophysiological conditions. Our observations imply the therapeutical perspective that PACAP can be applied as a natural agent that may have protecting effect during joint inflammation and/or may promote cartilage regeneration

  3. IL-17 Induces an Expanded Range of Downstream Genes in Reconstituted Human Epidermis Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiricozzi, Andrea; Nograles, Kristine E.; Johnson-Huang, Leanne M.; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Cardinale, Irma; Bonifacio, Kathleen M.; Gulati, Nicholas; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Background IL-17 is the defining cytokine of the Th17, Tc17, and γδ T cell populations that plays a critical role in mediating inflammation and autoimmunity. Psoriasis vulgaris is an inflammatory skin disease mediated by Th1 and Th17 cytokines with relevant contributions of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17. Despite the pivotal role IL-17 plays in psoriasis, and in contrast to the other key mediators involved in the psoriasis cytokine cascade that are capable of inducing broad effects on keratinocytes, IL-17 was demonstrated to regulate the expression of a limited number of genes in monolayer keratinocytes cultured in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings Given the clinical efficacy of anti-IL-17 agents is associated with an impressive reduction in a large set of inflammatory genes, we sought a full-thickness skin model that more closely resemble in vivo epidermal architecture. Using a reconstructed human epidermis (RHE), IL-17 was able to upregulate 419 gene probes and downregulate 216 gene probes. As possible explanation for the increased gene induction in the RHE model is that C/CAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) -β, the transcription factor regulating IL-17-responsive genes, is expressed preferentially in differentiated keratinocytes. Conclusions/Significance The genes identified in IL-17-treated RHE are likely relevant to the IL-17 effects in psoriasis, since ixekizumab (anti-IL-17A agent) strongly suppressed the “RHE” genes in psoriasis patients treated in vivo with this IL-17 antagonist. PMID:24587313

  4. The 17 Nucleotides Downstream from the env Gene Stop Codon Are Important for Murine Leukemia Virus Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Shin Yu, Seung; Kim, Jong-Mook; Kim, Sunyoung

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a previously unknown nucleotide sequence important for the packaging of murine leukemia virus. This nucleotide sequence is located downstream from the stop codon of the env gene but does not overlap the polypurine tract. Deletion of 17 bp from this region resulted in a more than 10-fold decrease in viral titer. Consistent with this result, the deletion mutant showed a 20- to 30-fold drop in the amount of virion RNA in the culture supernatant. The total amount of virion protein in the culture supernatant was comparable for the deletion mutant and the parental virus, suggesting that the mutant construct could release the empty viral particles. These results suggested that the packaging signal sequence might be present at the two extreme sites of the viral genome, one in the region around the splice donor sequence downstream from the 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR) and the other immediately upstream from the 3′ LTR. Implications for gene therapy, especially in regard to construction of retroviral vectors and packaging constructs, are discussed. PMID:10954583

  5. Two GATA transcription factors are downstream effectors of floral homeotic gene action in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mara, Chloe D; Irish, Vivian F

    2008-06-01

    Floral organogenesis is dependent on the combinatorial action of MADS-box transcription factors, which in turn control the expression of suites of genes required for growth, patterning, and differentiation. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the specification of petal and stamen identity depends on the action of two MADS-box gene products, APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI). In a screen for genes whose expression was altered in response to the induction of AP3 activity, we identified GNC (GATA, nitrate-inducible, carbon-metabolism-involved) as being negatively regulated by AP3 and PI. The GNC gene encodes a member of the Arabidopsis GATA transcription factor family and has been implicated in the regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis as well as carbon and nitrogen metabolism. In addition, we found that the GNC paralog, GNL (GNC-like), is also negatively regulated by AP3 and PI. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed that promoter sequences of both GNC and GNL are bound by PI protein, suggesting a direct regulatory interaction. Analyses of single and double gnc and gnl mutants indicated that the two genes share redundant roles in promoting chlorophyll biosynthesis, suggesting that in repressing GNC and GNL, AP3/PI have roles in negatively regulating this biosynthetic pathway in flowers. In addition, coexpression analyses of genes regulated by AP3, PI, GNC, and GNL indicate a complex regulatory interplay between these transcription factors in regulating a variety of light and nutrient responsive genes. Together, these results provide new insights into the transcriptional cascades controlling the specification of floral organ identities.

  6. Identification of genes downstream of the Shh signalling in the developing chick wing and syn-expressed with Hoxd13 using microarray and 3D computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Bangs, Fiona; Welten, Monique; Davey, Megan G; Fisher, Malcolm; Yin, Yili; Downie, Helen; Paton, Bob; Baldock, Richard; Burt, David W; Tickle, Cheryll

    2010-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling by the polarizing region at the posterior margin of the chick wing bud is pivotal in patterning the digits but apart from a few key downstream genes, such as Hoxd13, which is expressed in the posterior region of the wing that gives rise to the digits, the genes that mediate the response to Shh signalling are not known. To find genes that are co-expressed with Hoxd13 in the posterior of chick wing buds and regulated in the same way, we used microarrays to compare gene expression between anterior and posterior thirds of wing buds from normal chick embryos and from polydactylous talpid³ mutant chick embryos, which have defective Shh signalling due to lack of primary cilia. We identified 1070 differentially expressed gene transcripts, which were then clustered. Two clusters contained genes predominantly expressed in posterior thirds of normal wing buds; in one cluster, genes including Hoxd13, were expressed at high levels in anterior and posterior thirds in talpid³ wing buds, in the other cluster, genes including Ptc1, were expressed at low levels in anterior and posterior thirds in talpid³ wing buds. Expression patterns of genes in these two clusters were validated in normal and talpid³ mutant wing buds by in situ hybridisation and demonstrated to be responsive to application of Shh. Expression of several genes in the Hoxd13 cluster was also shown to be responsive to manipulation of protein kinase A (PKA) activity, thus demonstrating regulation by Gli repression. Genes in the Hoxd13 cluster were then sub-clustered by computational comparison of 3D expression patterns in normal wing buds to produce syn-expression groups. Hoxd13 and Sall1 are syn-expressed in the posterior region of early chick wing buds together with 6 novel genes which are likely to be functionally related and represent secondary targets of Shh signalling. Other groups of syn-expressed genes were also identified, including a group of genes involved in

  7. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  8. Gene therapy and targeted toxins for glioma.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maria G; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D; Curtin, James F; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Ghulam Muhammad, A K M; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2011-06-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of 15-18 months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors.

  9. AP-1 is involved in ICOS gene expression downstream of TCR/CD28 and cytokine receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi; Nakajima, Shinsuke; Ohnuki, Kazunobu; Ogawa, Shuhei; Yamashita, Masakatsu; Nakayama, Toshinori; Murakami, Yasufumi; Tanabe, Kazunari; Abe, Ryo

    2012-07-01

    It has been proposed that sustained ICOS expression in chronic inflammatory immune conditions, such as autoimmunity and allergy, contributes to symptom exacerbation. Therefore modulation of ICOS gene expression could be a potential therapeutic strategy for such immune diseases. However, the precise molecular mechanisms controlling ICOS gene expression remain poorly understood. In this study, we explored transcription factors involving in ICOS gene expression and examined their roles in a physiological situation. Microarray analysis revealed that one AP-1 molecule, Fos-related antigen-2 (Fra2), was highly correlated with ICOS expression. Ectopic expression of Fra2 and other AP-1 molecules upregulated ICOS expression on T cells. We identified an AP-1-responsive site (AP1-RE) within the ICOS promoter region and demonstrated AP-1 actually binds to AP1-RE upon TCR/CD28 stimulation. Meanwhile, we found several cytokines could upregulate ICOS expression on both naïve and effector T cells in a manner independent of TCR/CD28 stimulation. These cytokine stimuli induced AP-1 binding to AP1-RE. Together, our results indicate AP-1 transcription factors are involved in ICOS gene expression downstream of both TCR/CD28 signaling and cytokine receptor signaling, and suggest AP-1 activation via cytokine receptor signaling may be one of the mechanisms maintaining high level ICOS expression in chronic inflammatory immune responses.

  10. Downstream and Intermediate Interactions of Synovial Sarcoma-Associated Fusion Oncoproteins and Their Implication for Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Przybyl, Joanna; Jurkowska, Monika; Rutkowski, Piotr; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Siedlecki, Janusz A.

    2012-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS), an aggressive type of soft tissue tumor, occurs mostly in adolescents and young adults. The origin and molecular mechanism of the development of SS remain only partially known. Over 90% of SS cases are characterized by the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) translocation, which results mainly in the formation of SS18-SSX1 or SS18-SSX2 fusion genes. In recent years, several reports describing direct and indirect interactions of SS18-SSX1/SSX2 oncoproteins have been published. These reports suggest that the fusion proteins particularly affect the cell growth, cell proliferation, TP53 pathway, and chromatin remodeling mechanisms, contributing to SS oncogenesis. Additional research efforts are required to fully explore the protein-protein interactions of SS18-SSX oncoproteins and the pathways that are regulated by these partnerships for the development of effective targeted therapy. PMID:22550415

  11. Inhibition of microRNA-500 has anti-cancer effect through its conditional downstream target of TFPI in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bing; Chen, Wei; Pan, Yue; Chen, Hongde; Zhang, Yirong; Weng, Zhiliang; Li, Yeping

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the prognostic potential and regulatory mechanism of microRNA-500 (miR-500), and human gene of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in prostate cancer. MiR-500 expression was assessed by qRT-PCR in prostate cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Cancer patients' clinicopathological factors and overall survival were analyzed according to endogenous miR-500 level. MiR-500 was downregulated in DU145 and VCaP cells. Its effect on prostate cancer proliferation, invasion in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo, were probed. Possible downstream target of miR-500, TFPI was assessed by luciferase assay and qRT-PCR in prostate cancer cells. In miR-500-downregulated DU145 and VCaP cells, TFPI was silenced to see whether it was directly involved in the regulation of miR-500 in prostate cancer. TFPI alone was either upregulated or downregulated in DU145 and VCaP cells. Their effect on prostate cancer development was further evaluated. MiR-500 is upregulated in both prostate cancer cells and primary tumors. In prostate cancer patients, high miR-500 expression is associated with poor prognosis and overall survival. In DU145 and VCaP cells, miR-500 downregulation inhibited cancer proliferation, invasion in vitro, and explant growth in vivo. TFPI was verified to be associated with miR-500 in prostate cancer. Downregulation of TFPI reversed anti-cancer effects of miR-500 downregulation in prostate cancer cells. However, neither TFPI upregulation nor downregulation alone had any functional impact on prostate cancer development. MiR-500 may be a potential biomarker and molecular target in prostate cancer. TFPI may conditionally regulate prostate cancer in miR-500-downregualted prostate cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Targeting adipose tissue via systemic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, S M; Hinkle, C; Chen, S-J; Sandhu, A; Hovhannisyan, R; Stephan, S; Lagor, W R; Ahima, R S; Johnston, J C; Reilly, M P

    2014-07-01

    Adipose tissue has a critical role in energy and metabolic homeostasis, but it is challenging to adapt techniques to modulate adipose function in vivo. Here we develop an in vivo, systemic method of gene transfer specifically targeting adipose tissue using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. We constructed AAV vectors containing cytomegalovirus promoter-regulated reporter genes, intravenously injected adult mice with vectors using multiple AAV serotypes, and determined that AAV2/8 best targeted adipose tissue. Altering vectors to contain adiponectin promoter/enhancer elements and liver-specific microRNA-122 target sites restricted reporter gene expression to adipose tissue. As proof of efficacy, the leptin gene was incorporated into the adipose-targeted expression vector, package into AAV2/8 and administered intravenously to 9- to 10-week-old ob/ob mice. Phenotypic changes were measured over an 8-week period. Leptin mRNA and protein were expressed in adipose and leptin protein was secreted into plasma. Mice responded with reversal of weight gain, decreased hyperinsulinemia and improved glucose tolerance. AAV2/8-mediated systemic delivery of an adipose-targeted expression vector can replace a gene lacking in adipose tissue and correct a mouse model of human disease, demonstrating experimental application and therapeutic potential in disorders of adipose.

  13. Multifactorial Regulation of a Hox Target Gene

    PubMed Central

    Stöbe, Petra; Stein, Sokrates M. A.; Habring-Müller, Anette; Bezdan, Daniela; Fuchs, Aurelia L.; Hueber, Stefanie D.; Wu, Haijia; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    Hox proteins play fundamental roles in controlling morphogenetic diversity along the anterior–posterior body axis of animals by regulating distinct sets of target genes. Within their rather broad expression domains, individual Hox proteins control cell diversification and pattern formation and consequently target gene expression in a highly localized manner, sometimes even only in a single cell. To achieve this high-regulatory specificity, it has been postulated that Hox proteins co-operate with other transcription factors to activate or repress their target genes in a highly context-specific manner in vivo. However, only a few of these factors have been identified. Here, we analyze the regulation of the cell death gene reaper (rpr) by the Hox protein Deformed (Dfd) and suggest that local activation of rpr expression in the anterior part of the maxillary segment is achieved through a combinatorial interaction of Dfd with at least eight functionally diverse transcriptional regulators on a minimal enhancer. It follows that context-dependent combinations of Hox proteins and other transcription factors on small, modular Hox response elements (HREs) could be responsible for the proper spatio-temporal expression of Hox targets. Thus, a large number of transcription factors are likely to be directly involved in Hox target gene regulation in vivo. PMID:19282966

  14. A Hox gene controls lateral line cell migration by regulating chemokine receptor expression downstream of Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Breau, Marie A; Wilkinson, David G; Xu, Qiling

    2013-10-15

    The posterior lateral line primordium in zebrafish provides an amenable model to study mechanisms of collective cell migration. The directed migration of the cell cluster along the path of Sdf1a chemokine requires two receptors, Cxcr4b and Cxcr7b, which are expressed in the leading and trailing part of the primordium, respectively. The polarized expression of receptors is regulated by Wnt signaling, but downstream players mediating this control remain to be found. Here, we show that the Hox homeobox gene Hoxb8a is a critical component that acts downstream of the Wnt pathway to coordinate the expression of both chemokine receptors. We find that Hoxb8a is expressed in the leading part of the primordium and is required for the correct speed and extent of migration. Hoxb8a expression is dependent upon Wnt activity and needed both for cxcr4b expression and to repress and thus restrict cxcr7b expression to the trailing zone of the primordium. In the absence of Wnt activity, overexpressed Hoxb8a is able to repress cxcr7b but not up-regulate cxcr4b expression. Together with results from expressing dominant activator and repressor constructs, these findings suggest that Hoxb8a is induced by and cooperates with Wnt signaling to up-regulate cxcr4b, and acts through multiple mechanisms to repress cxcr7b expression.

  15. Neuronatin gene: Imprinted and misfolded: Studies in Lafora disease, diabetes and cancer may implicate NNAT-aggregates as a common downstream participant in neuronal loss.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Rajiv Madathiparambil

    2014-01-01

    Neuronatin (NNAT) is a ubiquitous and highly conserved mammalian gene involved in brain development. Its mRNA isoforms, chromosomal location, genomic DNA structure and regulation have been characterized. More recently there has been rapid progress in the understanding of its function in physiology and human disease. In particular there is fairly direct evidence implicating neuronatin in the causation of Lafora disease and diabetes. Neuronatin protein has a strong predisposition to misfold and form cellular aggregates that cause cell death by apoptosis. Aggregation of Neuronatin within cortical neurons and resulting cell death is the hallmark of Lafora disease, a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease. Under high glucose conditions simulating diabetes, neuronatin protein also accumulates and destroys pancreatic beta cells. The neuronatin gene is imprinted and only the paternal allele is normally expressed in the adult. However, changes in DNA methylation may cause the maternal allele to lose imprinting and trigger cell proliferation and metastasis. Neuronatin has also been shown to be translated peripherally within the dendrites of neurons, a finding of relevance in synaptic plasticity. The current understanding of the function of neuronatin raises the possibility that this gene may participate in the common downstream mechanisms associated with aberrant neuronal growth and death. A better understanding of these mechanisms may open new therapeutic targets to help modify the progression of devastating neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's and anterior horn cell disease.

  16. Dietary DHA reduces downstream endocannabinoid and inflammatory gene expression and epididymal fat mass while improving aspects of glucose use in muscle in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Carlson, M E; Kuchel, G A; Newman, J W; Watkins, B A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Endocannabinoid system (ECS) overactivation is associated with increased adiposity and likely contributes to type 2 diabetes risk. Elevated tissue cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and circulating endocannabinoids (ECs) derived from the n-6 polyunsaturated acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) occur in obese and diabetic patients. Here we investigate whether the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the diet can reduce ECS overactivation (that is, action of ligands, receptors and enzymes of EC synthesis and degradation) to influence glycemic control. This study targets the ECS tonal regulation of circulating glucose uptake by skeletal muscle as its primary end point. Design: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a semipurified diet containing DHA or the control lipid. Serum, skeletal muscle, epididymal fat pads and liver were collected after 62 and 118 days of feeding. Metabolites, genes and gene products associated with the ECS, glucose uptake and metabolism and inflammatory status were measured. Results: Dietary DHA enrichment reduced epididymal fat pad mass and increased ECS-related genes, whereas it reduced downstream ECS activation markers, indicating that ECS activation was diminished. The mRNA of glucose-related genes and proteins elevated in mice fed the DHA diet with increases in DHA-derived and reductions in AA-derived EC and EC-like compounds. In addition, DHA feeding reduced plasma levels of various inflammatory cytokines, 5-lipoxygenase-dependent inflammatory mediators and the vasoconstrictive 20-HETE. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that DHA feeding altered ECS gene expression to reduce CB1 activation and reduce fat accretion. Furthermore, the DHA diet led to higher expression of genes associated with glucose use by muscle in mice, and reduced those associated with systemic inflammatory status. PMID:26219414

  17. Dietary DHA reduces downstream endocannabinoid and inflammatory gene expression and epididymal fat mass while improving aspects of glucose use in muscle in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Carlson, M E; Kuchel, G A; Newman, J W; Watkins, B A

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoid system (ECS) overactivation is associated with increased adiposity and likely contributes to type 2 diabetes risk. Elevated tissue cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and circulating endocannabinoids (ECs) derived from the n-6 polyunsaturated acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) occur in obese and diabetic patients. Here we investigate whether the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the diet can reduce ECS overactivation (that is, action of ligands, receptors and enzymes of EC synthesis and degradation) to influence glycemic control. This study targets the ECS tonal regulation of circulating glucose uptake by skeletal muscle as its primary end point. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a semipurified diet containing DHA or the control lipid. Serum, skeletal muscle, epididymal fat pads and liver were collected after 62 and 118 days of feeding. Metabolites, genes and gene products associated with the ECS, glucose uptake and metabolism and inflammatory status were measured. Dietary DHA enrichment reduced epididymal fat pad mass and increased ECS-related genes, whereas it reduced downstream ECS activation markers, indicating that ECS activation was diminished. The mRNA of glucose-related genes and proteins elevated in mice fed the DHA diet with increases in DHA-derived and reductions in AA-derived EC and EC-like compounds. In addition, DHA feeding reduced plasma levels of various inflammatory cytokines, 5-lipoxygenase-dependent inflammatory mediators and the vasoconstrictive 20-HETE. This study provides evidence that DHA feeding altered ECS gene expression to reduce CB1 activation and reduce fat accretion. Furthermore, the DHA diet led to higher expression of genes associated with glucose use by muscle in mice, and reduced those associated with systemic inflammatory status.

  18. Gene targeting in primary human trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Sadovsky, Yoel; Jansson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Studies in primary human trophoblasts provide critical insights into placental function in normal and complicated pregnancies. Mechanistic studies in these cells require experimental tools to modulate gene expression. Lipid-based methods to transfect primary trophoblasts are fairly simple to use and allow for the efficient delivery of nucleic acids, but potential toxic effects limit these methods. Viral vectors are versatile transfection tools of native trophoblastic or foreign cDNAs, providing high transfection efficiency, low toxicity and stable DNA integration into the trophoblast genome. RNA interference (RNAi), using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA, constitutes a powerful approach to silence trophoblast genes. However, off-target effects, such as regulation of unintended complementary transcripts, inflammatory responses and saturation of the endogenous RNAi machinery, are significant concerns. Strategies to minimize off-target effects include using multiple individual siRNAs, elimination of pro-inflammatory sequences in the siRNA construct and chemical modification of a nucleotide in the guide strand or of the ribose moiety. Tools for efficient gene targeting in primary human trophoblasts are currently available, albeit not yet extensively validated. These methods are critical for exploring the function of human trophoblast genes and may provide a foundation for the future application of gene therapy that targets placental trophoblasts. PMID:22831880

  19. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  20. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these strategies should provide improved targeting of metastatic tumours following systemic gene delivery. Rapid progress in the ability to specifically control transgenes will allow systemic gene delivery for cancer therapy to become a real possibility in the near future. PMID:12721516

  1. Potential role of the N-MYC downstream-regulated gene family in reprogramming cancer metabolism under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ga Young; Chun, Yang-Sook; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming toward aerobic glycolysis and lactate fermentation supplies cancer cells with intermediate metabolites, which are used as macromolecule precursors. The oncogene MYC contributes to such aerobic metabolism by activating the expression of numerous genes essential for glycolysis and mitochondrial biogenesis. However, to survive and evolve in a hypoxic tumor milieu, cancer cells must revise MYC-driven metabolism because the mitochondrial respiratory chain provides free electrons to generate oxygen free radicals with inefficient production of ATP due to oxygen depletion. Instead, hypoxia-inducible transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) takes over the role of MYC in glycolysis, but suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis and activity to protect cells from such threats. Recently, the N-MYC downstream-regulated gene (NDRG) family has received attention as potential biomarkers of cancer prognosis. NDRGs are repressed MYC-dependently in various cancers, but induced under hypoxia because HIF-1 directly activates their promoters and indirectly de-represses them by antagonizing MYC. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the reprogramming of cancer metabolism via the counterbalance between MYC and HIF-1, and discuss the proven and putative roles of the NDRG family in adjusting cancer metabolism according to the ambient oxygen level. PMID:27447861

  2. N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) a differentiation marker of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fotovati, Abbas; Abu-Ali, Samah; Kage, Masayoshi; Shirouzu, Kazuo; Yamana, Hideaki; Kuwano, Michihiko

    2011-09-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), also called differentiation-related gene-1 (Drg1) and Cap43, is expressed in various normal tissues and suppressed in several malignancies. In this study, whether NDRG1 expression was correlated with differentiation of human breast cancer cells has been investigated. Endogenous expression level of NDRG1 was closely correlated with differentiation status of breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, sodium butyrate (NaB), an inducer of cellular differentiation, increased the expression of β-casein, a milk-related differentiation marker, together with up-regulation of NDRG1 in breast cancer cells. In contrast, inhibition of NDRG1 by its siRNA resulted in reduced accumulation of β-casein. Immunohistochemical analysis showed co-expression of NDRG1 and β-casein or milk fat protein (MFP), another differentiation marker of breast tissue, in the mouse xenograft model of breast cancer. Furthermore, overexpression of NDRG1 expanded the differentiated area in the xenograft model of breast cancer. In human breast cancer, using samples from 45 patients, we also showed close relationship between NDRG1 and β-casein or MFP expression. Altogether, in vitro and in vivo data demonstrated a possible role of NDRG1 in differentiation of breast cancer. We concluded that NDRG1 could be used as a biomarker for differentiation of breast cancer for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  3. Calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Li, L; Yang, P; Ma, Z

    2017-02-01

    The migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) shows aggregative traits in nymph marching bands and swarm formations through mutual olfactory attraction of conspecifics. However, olfactory preference in different nymph stages in gregarious locusts is not sufficiently explored. In this study, we found that the nymph olfactory preference for gregarious volatiles exhibited obvious variations at different developmental stages. The gregarious locusts show attractive response to conspecific volatiles from the third stadium. Transcriptome comparison between third- and fourth-stadium nymphs showed that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pathways are significantly enriched. Amongst the genes present in GPCR pathways, the expression level of calmodulin in locust brains significantly increased from the third- to the fourth-stadium nymphs. Amongst the four octopamine receptors (OARs) belonging to the GPCR family, only OAR α1 showed similar expression patterns to those of calmodulin, and knockdown of OAR α1 reduced the expression level of calmodulin. RNA interference of calmodulin decreased locomotion and induced the loss of olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Moreover, the activation of OAR α1 in calmodulin-knockdown locusts did not induce olfactory attraction of the nymphs to gregarious volatiles. Thus, calmodulin as a downstream gene of octopamine-OAR α1 (OA-OAR α1) signalling mediates olfactory attraction in gregarious locusts. Overall, this study provides novel insights into the mechanism of OA-OAR α1 signalling involved in olfactory attraction of gregarious locusts.

  4. Nitric oxide suppresses tumor cell migration through N-Myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) expression: role of chelatable iron.

    PubMed

    Hickok, Jason R; Sahni, Sumit; Mikhed, Yuliya; Bonini, Marcelo G; Thomas, Douglas D

    2011-12-02

    N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a ubiquitous cellular protein that is up-regulated under a multitude of stress and growth-regulatory conditions. Although the exact cellular functions of this protein have not been elucidated, mutations in this gene or aberrant expression of this protein have been linked to both tumor suppressive and oncogenic phenotypes. Previous reports have demonstrated that NDRG1 is strongly up-regulated by chemical iron chelators and hypoxia, yet its regulation by the free radical nitric oxide ((•)NO) has never been demonstrated. Herein, we examine the chemical biology that confers NDRG1 responsiveness at the mRNA and protein levels to (•)NO. We demonstrate that the interaction of (•)NO with the chelatable iron pool (CIP) and the appearance of dinitrosyliron complexes (DNIC) are key determinants. Using HCC 1806 triple negative breast cancer cells, we find that NDRG1 is up-regulated by physiological (•)NO concentrations in a dose- and time-dependant manner. Tumor cell migration was suppressed by NDRG1 expression and we excluded the involvement of HIF-1α, sGC, N-Myc, and c-Myc as upstream regulatory targets of (•)NO. Augmenting the chelatable iron pool abolished (•)NO-mediated NDRG1 expression and the associated phenotypic effects. These data, in summary, reveal a link between (•)NO, chelatable iron, and regulation of NDRG1 expression and signaling in tumor cells.

  5. Stripy Ftz target genes are coordinately regulated by Ftz-F1

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hui Ying; Heffer, Alison; Anderson, W. Ray; Liu, Jingnan; Bowler, Timothy; Pick, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    During development, cascades of regulatory genes act in a hierarchical fashion to subdivide the embryo into increasingly specified body regions. This has been best characterized in Drosophila, where genes encoding regulatory transcription factors form a network to direct the development of the basic segmented body plan. The pair-rule genes are pivotal in this process as they are responsible for the first subdivision of the embryo into repeated metameric units. The Drosophila pair-rule gene fushi tarazu (ftz) is a derived Hox gene expressed in and required for the development of alternate parasegments. Previous studies suggested that Ftz achieves its distinct regulatory specificity as a segmentation protein by interacting with a ubiquitously expressed cofactor, the nuclear receptor Ftz-F1. However, the downstream target genes regulated by Ftz and other pair-rule genes to direct segment formation are not known. In this study, we selected candidate Ftz targets by virtue of their early expression in Ftz-like stripes. This identified two new Ftz target genes, drumstick (drm) and no ocelli (noc), and confirmed that Ftz regulates a serotonin receptor (5-HT2). These are the earliest Ftz targets identified to date and all are coordinately regulated by Ftz-F1. Engrailed (En), the best-characterized Ftz/Ftz-F1 downstream target, is not an intermediate in regulation. The drm genomic region harbors two separate 7-stripe enhancers, identified by virtue of predicted Ftz-F1 binding sites and these sites are necessary for stripe expression in vivo. We propose that pair-rule genes, exemplified by Ftz/Ftz-F1, promote segmentation by acting at different hierarchical levels, regulating first, other segmentation genes; second, other regulatory genes that in turn control specific cellular processes such as tissue differentiation; and, third, 'segmentation realizator genes' that are directly involved in morphogenesis. PMID:19679121

  6. Gene inactivation by multiphoton-targeted photochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Berns, Michael W.; Wang, Zifu; Dunn, Andrew; Wallace, Vincent; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2000-01-01

    Multiphoton-targeted photochemistry was used to selectively inactivate the expression of genes in vertebrate cells. A membrane permeable DNA-associating vital dye, ethidium bromide monoacetate (visible wavelength single photon absorption peak at 530 nm) was used to photosensitize chromosomes in dividing cells. A 100-ps infrared laser beam operating at 1.06 microns was focused onto a selected region of a mitotic chromosome corresponding to the sites of the nucleolar (ribosomal) genes. Individual cells followed through mitosis demonstrated a reduction in the number of nucleoli formed in daughter cells that corresponded to the number of nucleolar genes sites irradiated. These results demonstrate the ability to selectively manipulate genes by using the focal point specificity characteristic of multiphoton microscopy. This technique should have wide biotechnology applications both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:10944219

  7. Targeted Gene Silencing to Induce Permanent Sterility

    PubMed Central

    Dissen, Gregory A.; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Boudreau, Ryan L.; Chen, Yong Hong; Davidson, Beverly L.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2012-01-01

    Contents A nonsurgical method to induce sterility would be a useful tool to control feral populations of animals. Our laboratories have experience with approaches aimed at targeting brain cells in vivo with vehicles that deliver a payload of either inhibitory RNAs or genes intended to correct cellular dysfunction. A combination/modification of these methods may provide a useful framework for the design of approaches that can be used to sterilize cats and dogs. For this approach to succeed it has to meet several conditions: It needs to target a gene essential for fertility. It must involve a method that can selectively silence the gene of interest. It also needs to deliver the silencing agent via a minimally invasive method. Finally, the silencing effect needs to be sustained for many years, so that expansion of the targeted population can be effectively prevented. In this article we discuss this subject and provide a succinct account of our previous experience with: a) molecular reagents able to disrupt reproductive cyclicity when delivered to regions of the brain involved in the control of reproduction, and b) molecular reagents able to ameliorate neuronal disease when delivered systemically using a novel approach of gene therapy. PMID:22827375

  8. Brassinosteriod Insensitive 2 (BIN2) acts as a downstream effector of the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway to regulate photoautotrophic growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fangjie; Zhang, Rui; Meng, Zhigang; Deng, Kexuan; Que, Yumei; Zhuo, Fengping; Feng, Li; Guo, Sundui; Datla, Raju; Ren, Maozhi

    2017-01-01

    The components of the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway have been well characterized in heterotrophic organisms from yeast to humans. However, because of rapamycin insensitivity, embryonic lethality in tor null mutants and a lack of reliable ways of detecting TOR protein kinase in higher plants, the key players upstream and downstream of TOR remain largely unknown in plants. Using engineered rapamycin-sensitive Binding Protein 12-2 (BP12-2) plants, the present study showed that combined treatment with rapamycin and active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis) results in synergistic inhibition of TOR activity and plant growth in Arabidopsis. Based on this system, we revealed that TOR signaling plays a crucial role in modulating the transition from heterotrophic to photoautotrophic growth in Arabidopsis. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2 (S6K2) was identified as a direct downstream target of TOR, and the growth of TOR-suppressed plants could be rescued by up-regulating S6K2. Systems, genetic, and biochemical analyses revealed that Brassinosteriod Insensitive 2 (BIN2) acts as a novel downstream effector of S6K2, and the phosphorylation of BIN2 depends on TOR-S6K2 signaling in Arabidopsis. By combining pharmacological with genetic and biochemical approaches, we determined that the TOR-S6K2-BIN2 signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating the photoautotrophic growth of Arabidopsis. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. ATP binding and hydrolysis and autophosphorylation of CbbQ encoded by the gene located downstream of RubisCO genes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobuhiro R; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2002-02-08

    CbbQ is encoded by the gene located downstream of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase genes (cbbLS) in the thermophilic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus. The protein possesses two nucleotide-binding motifs in its amino acid sequence, and it posttranslationally activates RubisCO. We present ATP hydrolysis and binding of CbbQ. CbbQ releases P(i) from ATP only in the presence of Mg(2+). CbbQ interacts with an 2'(3')-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate in the presence or absence of Mg(2+). The interaction with Mg(2+) and/or a nucleotide induces a conformational change in CbbQ. Autophosphorylation of CbbQ occurs only in the absence of Mg(2+).

  10. Systemic Gene Therapy for Targeting the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gombash, Sara E; Foust, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Systemic gene delivery is useful for modeling and treatment of a body-wide disease. Recently, it has been shown that certain agents, when delivered systemically, can efficiently target the central nervous system. This technique has been used to model and treat rodent models of neurological disease with unprecedented success. Here, we describe intravenous delivery in neonate and adult mice. These techniques are easily learned and have minimal equipment requirements.

  11. Overexpression of PgDREB2A transcription factor enhances abiotic stress tolerance and activates downstream stress-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Parinita; Agarwal, Pradeep K; Joshi, Arvind J; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2010-02-01

    The DREB transcription factors comprise conserved ERF/AP2 DNA-binding domain, bind specifically to DRE/CRT motif and regulate abiotic stress mediated gene expression. In this study we show that PgDREB2A from Pennisetum glaucum is a powerful transcription factor to engineer multiple stress tolerance in tobacco plants. The PgDREB2A protein lacks any potential PEST sequence, which is known to act as a signal peptide for protein degradation. Therefore, the transgenic tobacco plants were raised using full-length cDNA without modification. The transgenics exhibited enhanced tolerance to both hyperionic and hyperosmotic stresses. At lower concentration of NaCl and mannitol, seed germination and seedling growth was similar in WT and transgenic, however at higher concentration germination in WT decreased significantly. D15 and D46 lines showed 4-fold higher germination percent at 200 mM NaCl. At 400 mM mannitol seed germination in WT was completely arrested, whereas in transgenic line it was more than 50%. Seedlings of D15 and D46 lines showed better growth like leaf area, root number, root length and fresh weight compared to wild type for both the stresses. The quantitative Real time PCR of transgenic showed higher expression of downstream genes NtERD10B, HSP70-3, Hsp18p, PLC3, AP2 domain TF, THT1, LTP1 and heat shock (NtHSF2) and pathogen-regulated (NtERF5) factors with different stress treatments.

  12. Recombinant fungal entomopathogen RNAi target insect gene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiongbo; Wu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology is considered as an alternative for control of pests. However, RNAi has not been used in field conditions yet, since delivering exogenous ds/siRNA to target pests is very difficult. The laboratory methods of introducing the ds/siRNA into insects through feeding, micro feeding / dripping and injecting cannot be used in fields. Transgenic crop is perhaps the most effective application of RNAi for pest control, but it needs long-time basic researches in order to reduce the cost and evaluate the safety. Therefore, transgenic microbe is maybe a better choice. Entomopathogenic fungi generally invade the host insects through cuticle like chemical insecticides contact insect to control sucking sap pests. Isaria fumosorosea is a common fungal entomopathogen in whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. We constructed a recombinant strain of I. fumosorosea expressing specific dsRNA of whitefly's TLR7 gene. It could silence the TLR7 gene and improve the virulence against whitefly. Transgenic fungal entomopathogen has shown great potential to attain the application of RNAi technology for pests control in fields. In the future, the research interests should be focused on the selection of susceptible target pests and their vital genes, and optimizing the methods for screening genes and recombinants as well.

  13. A deletion in the N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) gene in Greyhounds with polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Drögemüller, Cord; Becker, Doreen; Kessler, Barbara; Kemter, Elisabeth; Tetens, Jens; Jurina, Konrad; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin; Flagstad, Annette; Perloski, Michele; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Matiasek, Kaspar

    2010-06-22

    The polyneuropathy of juvenile Greyhound show dogs shows clinical similarities to the genetically heterogeneous Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease in humans. The pedigrees containing affected dogs suggest monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance and all affected dogs trace back to a single male. Here, we studied the neuropathology of this disease and identified a candidate causative mutation. Peripheral nerve biopsies from affected dogs were examined using semi-thin histology, nerve fibre teasing and electron microscopy. A severe chronic progressive mixed polyneuropathy was observed. Seven affected and 17 related control dogs were genotyped on the 50k canine SNP chip. This allowed us to localize the causative mutation to a 19.5 Mb interval on chromosome 13 by homozygosity mapping. The NDRG1 gene is located within this interval and NDRG1 mutations have been shown to cause hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom in humans (CMT4D). Therefore, we considered NDRG1 a positional and functional candidate gene and performed mutation analysis in affected and control Greyhounds. A 10 bp deletion in canine NDRG1 exon 15 (c.1080_1089delTCGCCTGGAC) was perfectly associated with the polyneuropathy phenotype of Greyhound show dogs. The deletion causes a frame shift (p.Arg361SerfsX60) which alters several amino acids before a stop codon is encountered. A reduced level of NDRG1 transcript could be detected by RT-PCR. Western blot analysis demonstrated an absence of NDRG1 protein in peripheral nerve biopsy of an affected Greyhound. We thus have identified a candidate causative mutation for polyneuropathy in Greyhounds and identified the first genetically characterized canine CMT model which offers an opportunity to gain further insights into the pathobiology and therapy of human NDRG1 associated CMT disease. Selection against this mutation can now be used to eliminate polyneuropathy from Greyhound show dogs.

  14. Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-23

    We describe the Neutrino Factory accelerator systems downstream from the target and capture area. These include the bunching and phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and decay ring systems. We also briefly discuss the R&D program under way to develop these systems, and indicate areas where help from CERN would be invaluable.

  15. Optimal In Silico Target Gene Deletion through Nonlinear Programming for Genetic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chung-Chien; Song, Mingzhou

    2010-01-01

    Background Optimal selection of multiple regulatory genes, known as targets, for deletion to enhance or suppress the activities of downstream genes or metabolites is an important problem in genetic engineering. Such problems become more feasible to address in silico due to the availability of more realistic dynamical system models of gene regulatory and metabolic networks. The goal of the computational problem is to search for a subset of genes to knock out so that the activity of a downstream gene or a metabolite is optimized. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on discrete dynamical system modeling of gene regulatory networks, an integer programming problem is formulated for the optimal in silico target gene deletion problem. In the first result, the integer programming problem is proved to be NP-hard and equivalent to a nonlinear programming problem. In the second result, a heuristic algorithm, called GKONP, is designed to approximate the optimal solution, involving an approach to prune insignificant terms in the objective function, and the parallel differential evolution algorithm. In the third result, the effectiveness of the GKONP algorithm is demonstrated by applying it to a discrete dynamical system model of the yeast pheromone pathways. The empirical accuracy and time efficiency are assessed in comparison to an optimal, but exhaustive search strategy. Significance Although the in silico target gene deletion problem has enormous potential applications in genetic engineering, one must overcome the computational challenge due to its NP-hardness. The presented solution, which has been demonstrated to approximate the optimal solution in a practical amount of time, is among the few that address the computational challenge. In the experiment on the yeast pheromone pathways, the identified best subset of genes for deletion showed advantage over genes that were selected empirically. Once validated in vivo, the optimal target genes are expected to achieve higher

  16. Optimal in silico target gene deletion through nonlinear programming for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chung-Chien; Song, Mingzhou

    2010-02-24

    Optimal selection of multiple regulatory genes, known as targets, for deletion to enhance or suppress the activities of downstream genes or metabolites is an important problem in genetic engineering. Such problems become more feasible to address in silico due to the availability of more realistic dynamical system models of gene regulatory and metabolic networks. The goal of the computational problem is to search for a subset of genes to knock out so that the activity of a downstream gene or a metabolite is optimized. Based on discrete dynamical system modeling of gene regulatory networks, an integer programming problem is formulated for the optimal in silico target gene deletion problem. In the first result, the integer programming problem is proved to be NP-hard and equivalent to a nonlinear programming problem. In the second result, a heuristic algorithm, called GKONP, is designed to approximate the optimal solution, involving an approach to prune insignificant terms in the objective function, and the parallel differential evolution algorithm. In the third result, the effectiveness of the GKONP algorithm is demonstrated by applying it to a discrete dynamical system model of the yeast pheromone pathways. The empirical accuracy and time efficiency are assessed in comparison to an optimal, but exhaustive search strategy. Although the in silico target gene deletion problem has enormous potential applications in genetic engineering, one must overcome the computational challenge due to its NP-hardness. The presented solution, which has been demonstrated to approximate the optimal solution in a practical amount of time, is among the few that address the computational challenge. In the experiment on the yeast pheromone pathways, the identified best subset of genes for deletion showed advantage over genes that were selected empirically. Once validated in vivo, the optimal target genes are expected to achieve higher genetic engineering effectiveness than a trial

  17. Engineering liposomal nanoparticles for targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zylberberg, C; Gaskill, K; Pasley, S; Matosevic, S

    2017-08-01

    Recent mechanistic studies have attempted to deepen our understanding of the process by which liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material occurs. Understanding the interactions between lipid nanoparticles and cells is still largely elusive. Liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material faces systemic obstacles alongside entry into the cell, endosomal escape, lysosomal degradation and nuclear uptake. Rational design approaches for targeted delivery have been developed to reduce off-target effects and enhance transfection. These strategies, which have included the modification of lipid nanoparticles with target-specific ligands to enhance intracellular uptake, have shown significant promise at the proof-of-concept stage. Control of physical and chemical specifications of liposome composition, which includes lipid-to-DNA charge, size, presence of ester bonds, chain length and nature of ligand complexation, is integral to the performance of targeted liposomes as genetic delivery agents. Clinical advances are expected to rely on such systems in the therapeutic application of liposome nanoparticle-based gene therapy. Here, we discuss the latest breakthroughs in the development of targeted liposome-based agents for the delivery of genetic material, paying particular attention to new ligand and cationic lipid design as well as recent in vivo advances.

  18. Gene therapy targeting inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Van-Assche, Tim; Huygelen, Veronique; Crabtree, Mark J; Antoniades, Charalambos

    2011-12-01

    The extensive cross-talk between the immune system and vasculature leading to the infiltration of immune cells into the vascular wall is a major step in atherogenesis. In this process, reactive oxygen species play a crucial role, by inducing the oxidation of LDL and the formation of foam cells, and by activating a number of redox-sensitive transcriptional factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappa B) or activating protein 1 (AP1), that regulate the expression of multiple pro/anti inflammatory genes involved in atherogenesis. Delivery of genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase or heme oxygenase- 1) or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), suppress atherogenesis in animal models. Similarly, delivery of genes encoding regulators of redox sensitive transcriptional factors (e.g. NF-kappa B, AP-1, Nrf2 etc) or reactive oxygen species scavengers have been successfully used in experimental studies. Despite the promising results from basic science, the clinical applicability of these strategies has proven to be particularly challenging. Issues regarding the vectors used to deliver the genes (and the development of immune responses or other side effects) and the inability of sufficient and sustained local expression of these genes at the target-tissue are some of the main reasons preventing optimism regarding the use of these strategies at a clinical level. Therefore, although premature to discuss about effective "gene therapy" in atherosclerosis at a clinical level, gene delivery techniques opened new horizons in cardiovascular research, and the development of new vectors may allow their extensive use in clinical trials in the future.

  19. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 subcellular localization and lymph node metastases of colorectal neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yan; Lv, Liyang; Du, Juan; Yue, Longtao; Cao, Lili

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •We clarified NDRG1 subcellular location in colorectal cancer. •We found the changes of NDRG1 distribution during colorectal cancer progression. •We clarified the correlation between NDRG1 distribution and lymph node metastasis. •It is possible that NDRG1 subcellular localization may determine its function. •Maybe NDRG1 is valuable early diagnostic markers for metastasis. -- Abstract: In colorectal neoplasms, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a primarily cytoplasmic protein, but it is also expressed on the cell membrane and in the nucleus. NDRG1 is involved in various stages of tumor development in colorectal cancer, and it is possible that the different subcellular localizations may determine the function of NDRG1 protein. Here, we attempt to clarify the characteristics of NDRG1 protein subcellular localization during the progression of colorectal cancer. We examined NDRG1 expression in 49 colorectal cancer patients in cancerous, non-cancerous, and corresponding lymph node tissues. Cytoplasmic and membrane NDRG1 expression was higher in the lymph nodes with metastases than in those without metastases (P < 0.01). Nuclear NDRG1 expression in colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher than in the normal colorectal mucosa, and yet the normal colorectal mucosa showed no nuclear expression. Furthermore, our results showed higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression was better for differentiation, and higher membrane NDRG1 expression resulted in a greater possibility of lymph node metastasis. These data indicate that a certain relationship between the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of NDRG1 in lymph nodes exists with lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 expression may translocate from the membrane of the colorectal cancer cells to the nucleus, where it is involved in lymph node metastasis. Combination analysis of NDRG1 subcellular expression and clinical variables will help predict the incidence of lymph node metastasis.

  20. Identification of cyclins A1, E1 and vimentin as downstream targets of heme oxygenase-1 in vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Andrea; Mylroie, Hayley; Thornton, C. Clare; Calay, Damien; Birdsey, Graeme M.; Kiprianos, Allan P.; Wilson, Garrick K.; Soares, Miguel P.; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Randi, Anna M.; Mason, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential physiological process and an important factor in disease pathogenesis. However, its exploitation as a clinical target has achieved limited success and novel molecular targets are required. Although heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) acts downstream of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to modulate angiogenesis, knowledge of the mechanisms involved remains limited. We set out identify novel HO-1 targets involved in angiogenesis. HO-1 depletion attenuated VEGF-induced human endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and tube formation. The latter response suggested a role for HO-1 in EC migration, and indeed HO-1 siRNA negatively affected directional migration of EC towards VEGF; a phenotype reversed by HO-1 over-expression. EC from Hmox1−/− mice behaved similarly. Microarray analysis of HO-1-depleted and control EC exposed to VEGF identified cyclins A1 and E1 as HO-1 targets. Migrating HO-1-deficient EC showed increased p27, reduced cyclin A1 and attenuated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity. In vivo, cyclin A1 siRNA inhibited VEGF-driven angiogenesis, a response reversed by Ad-HO-1. Proteomics identified structural protein vimentin as an additional VEGF-HO-1 target. HO-1 depletion inhibited VEGF-induced calpain activity and vimentin cleavage, while vimentin silencing attenuated HO-1-driven proliferation. Thus, vimentin and cyclins A1 and E1 represent VEGF-activated HO-1-dependent targets important for VEGF-driven angiogenesis. PMID:27388959

  1. Novel Thiosemicarbazones Inhibit Lysine-Rich CEACAM1 Co-isolated (LYRIC) and the LYRIC-Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition via Up-Regulation of N-Myc Downstream-Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1).

    PubMed

    Xi, Ruxing; Pun, Ivan Ho Yuen; Menezes, Sharleen V; Fouani, Leyla; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Huang, Michael L H; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Richardson, Des R; Kovacevic, Zaklina

    2017-03-08

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) plays a vital role in cancer progression, being associated with inflammation and promotion of cancer angiogenesis and metastasis. The effects of TNFα are mediated by its down-stream target, the oncogene, lysine-rich CEACAM1 co-isolated protein (LYRIC; also known as metadherin or astrocyte elevated gene-1). LYRIC plays an important role in activating the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, which controls multiple cellular processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, etc. In contrast, the metastasis suppressor, N-myc down-stream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), has the opposite effect on the NF-κB pathway, being able to inhibit NF-κB activation and reduce angiogenesis, proliferation, migration and cancer cell invasion. These potent anti-cancer properties make NDRG1 an ideal therapeutic target. Indeed, a novel class of thiosemicarbazone anti-cancer agents that target this molecule have been developed, with the lead agent, di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (DpC), recently entering clinical trials for advanced and resistant cancers. To further elucidate the interaction between NDRG1 and oncogenic signaling, this study for the first time assessed the effects of NDRG1 on the tumorigenic properties of TNFα and its down-stream target, LYRIC. We demonstrate that NDRG1 inhibits the TNFα-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Further, NDRG1 also potently inhibited LYRIC expression, with a negative feedback loop existing between these two molecules. Examining the mechanism involved, we demonstrated that NDRG1 inhibited PI3K/AKT signaling, leading to reduced levels of the LYRIC transcriptional activator, c-Myc. Finally, we demonstrate that novel thiosemicarbazones that up-regulate NDRG1 also inhibit LYRIC expression, further highlighting their marked potential for cancer treatment.

  2. New Wnt/β-catenin target genes promote experimental metastasis and migration of colorectal cancer cells through different signals.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jingjing; Yu, Yong; Akilli Öztürk, Özlem; Holland, Jane D; Besser, Daniel; Fritzmann, Johannes; Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Eckert, Klaus; Fichtner, Iduna; Birchmeier, Walter

    2016-10-01

    We have previously identified a 115-gene signature that characterises the metastatic potential of human primary colon cancers. The signature included the canonical Wnt target gene BAMBI, which promoted experimental metastasis in mice. Here, we identified three new direct Wnt target genes from the signature, and studied their functions in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cell migration and experimental metastasis. We examined experimental liver metastases following injection of selected tumour cells into spleens of NOD/SCID mice. Molecular and cellular techniques were used to identify direct transcription target genes of Wnt/β-catenin signals. Microarray analyses and experiments that interfered with cell migration through inhibitors were performed to characterise downstream signalling systems. Three new genes from the colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis signature, BOP1, CKS2 and NFIL3, were identified as direct transcription targets of β-catenin/TCF4. Overexpression and knocking down of these genes in CRC cells promoted and inhibited, respectively, experimental metastasis in mice, EMT and cell motility in culture. Cell migration was repressed by interfering with distinct signalling systems through inhibitors of PI3K, JNK, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and/or mTOR. Gene expression profiling identified a series of migration-promoting genes, which were induced by BOP1, CKS2 and NFIL3, and could be repressed by inhibitors that are specific to these pathways. We identified new direct Wnt/β-catenin target genes, BOP1, CKS2 and NFIL3, which induced EMT, cell migration and experimental metastasis of CRC cells. These genes crosstalk with different downstream signalling systems, and activate migration-promoting genes. These pathways and downstream genes may serve as therapeutic targets in the treatment of CRC metastasis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Gene targets for fungal and mycotoxin control.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Campbell, B C; Molyneux, R; Mahoney, N; Chan, K L; Yu, J; Wilkinson, J; Cary, J; Bhatnagar, D; Cleveland, T E

    2006-03-01

    It was initially shown that gallic acid, from hydrolysable tannins in the pelliele of walnut kernels, dramatically inhibits biosynthesis of aflatoxin byAspergillus flavus. The mechanism of this inhibition was found to take place upstream from the gene cluster, including the regulatory gene,aflR, involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Additional research using other antioxidant phenolics showed similar antiaflatoxigenic activity to gallic acid. Treatment ofA. flavus withtert-butyl hydroperoxide resulted in an almost doubling of aflatoxin biosynthesis compared to untreated samples. Thus, antioxidative response systems are potentially useful molecular targets for control ofA. flavus. A high throughput screening system was developed using yeast,Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a model fungus. This screening provided an avenue to quickly identify fungal genes that were vulnerable to treatment by phenolic compounds. The assay also provided a means to quickly assess effects of combinations of phenolics and certain fungicides affecting mitochondrial respiration. For example, theS. cerevisiae sod2† mutant was highly sensitive to treatment by certain phenolics and strobilurins/antimycin A, fungicides which inhibit complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Verification of stress to this system in the target fungus,A. flavus, was shown through complementation analysis, wherein the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) gene (sodA) ofA. flavus in the ortholog mutant,sod2†, ofS. cerevisiae, relieved phenolic-induced stress. Mitochondrial antioxidative stress systems play an important role in fungal response to antifungals. Combined treatment of fungi with phenolics and inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration can effectively suppress growth ofA. flavus in a synergistic fashion.

  4. N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 expression is associated with glucose transport and correlated with prognosis in breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a novel tumour suppressor and cell stress-related gene, is involved in many cell metabolic processes, such as hormone, ion and fluid metabolism. We investigated whether NDRG2 is involved in any glucose-dependent energy metabolism, as well as the nature of its correlation with breast carcinoma. Methods The correlations between NDRG2 expression and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression in clinical breast carcinoma tissues were analysed. The effects of NDRG2 on glucose uptake were assessed in breast cancer cells and xenograft tumours. The consequences of NDRG2-induced regulation of GLUT1 at the transcription and translation levels and the interaction between NDRG2 and GLUT1 were examined. Results Data derived from clinical breast carcinoma specimens revealed that (1) patients with high NDRG2 expression had better disease-free survival and overall survival than those with low NDRG2 expression and (2) NDRG2 expression was negatively correlated with GLUT1 expression in these breast carcinoma tissues. NDRG2 inhibited glucose uptake by promoting GLUT1 protein degradation without affecting GLUT1 transcription in both breast cancer cells and xenograft tumours. In addition, NDRG2 protein interacted and partly colocalised with GLUT1 protein in cell cytoplasm areas. Conclusions The results of our study support the notion that NDRG2 plays an important role in tumour glucose metabolism, in which GLUT1 is a likely candidate contributor to glucose uptake suppression and tumour growth. Targeting the actions of NDRG2 in cell glucose-dependent energy delivery may provide an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention in human breast carcinoma. PMID:24636131

  5. Characterization of divIVA and other genes located in the chromosomal region downstream of the dcw cluster in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Daniela; Pischedda, Carla; Caldara, Fabrizio; Whalen, Michael B; Anderluzzi, Daniela; Domenici, Enrico; Massidda, Orietta

    2003-10-01

    We analyzed the chromosome region of Streptococcus pneumoniae located downstream of the division and cell wall (dcw) cluster that contains the homolog of the Bacillus subtilis cell division gene divIVA and some genes of unknown function. Inactivation of divIVA in S. pneumoniae resulted in severe growth inhibition and defects in cell shape, nucleoid segregation, and cell division. Inactivation of the ylm genes resulted in some morphological and/or division abnormalities, depending on the inactivated gene. Transcriptional analysis revealed a relationship between these genes and the ftsA and ftsZ cell division genes, also indicating that the connection between the dcw cluster and the divIVA region is more extensive than just chromosomal position and gene organization.

  6. LEDGF/p75 functions downstream from preintegration complex formation to effect gene-specific HIV-1 integration

    PubMed Central

    Shun, Ming-Chieh; Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K.; Vandegraaff, Nick; Daigle, Janet E.; Hughes, Siobhan; Kellam, Paul; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan

    2007-01-01

    LEDGF/p75 directly interacts with lentiviral integrase proteins and can modulate their enzymatic activities and chromosomal association. A novel genetic knockout model was established that allowed us for the first time to analyze HIV-1 integration in the absence of LEDGF/p75 protein. Supporting a crucial role for the cofactor in viral replication, HIV-1 vector integration and reporter gene expression were significantly reduced in LEDGF-null cells. Yet, integrase processed the viral cDNA termini normally and maintained its local target DNA sequence preference during integration. Preintegration complexes extracted from knockout cells moreover supported normal levels of DNA strand transfer activity in vitro. In contrast, HIV-1 lost its strong bias toward integrating into transcription units, displaying instead increased affinity for promoter regions and CpG islands. Our results reveal LEDGF/p75 as a critical targeting factor, commandeering lentiviruses from promoter- and/or CpG island-proximal pathways that are favored by other members of Retroviridae. Akin to yeast retrotransposons, disrupting the lentiviral targeting mechanism significantly perturbs overall integration. PMID:17639082

  7. Vitamin D supplementation reduces some AT1-AA-induced downstream targets implicated in preeclampsia including hypertension.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Jessica L; Amaral, Lorena M; Cornelius, Denise C; Cunningham, Mark W; Ibrahim, Tarek; Heep, Autumn; Campbell, Nathan; Usry, Nathan; Wallace, Kedra; Herse, Florian; Dechend, Ralf; LaMarca, Babbette

    2017-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the ANG II type I receptor (AT1-AA) are associated with preeclampsia (PE). We found that vitamin D supplementation reduced AT1-AA and blood pressure (MAP) in the RUPP rat model of PE. However, it was undetermined whether the decrease in AT1-AA was the mechanism whereby vitamin D lowered MAP or if it were through factors downstream of AT1-AA. Uterine artery resistance index, placental ET-1, and soluble FMS-like tyrosine kinase-1 are increased with AT1-AA-induced hypertension and are considered markers of PE in pregnant women. Therefore, we hypothesized that vitamin D would reduce PE factors during AT1-AA-induced hypertension and could lower blood pressure in a model of hypertension during pregnancy without PE features. Either ANG II (50 ng·kg(-1)·day) or AT1-AA (1:40) was infused from gestational day (GD) 12-19. vitamin D2 (VD2, 270 IU/day) or vitamin D3 (VD3, 15 IU/day) was administered orally from GD14-GD18. MAP (mmHg) increased in AT1-AA (121 ± 4) and ANG II (113 ± 1)-infused pregnant rats compared with normal pregnant rats (NP) (101 ± 2) but was lower in AT1-AA+VD2 (105 ± 2), AT1-AA+VD3 (109 ± 2), ANG II+VD2 (104 ± 4), and ANG II+VD3 (104 ± 3). VD2 and/or VD3 improved PE features associated with AT1-AA during pregnancy, while ANG II did not induce such features, supporting the hypothesis that AT1-AA induces PE features during pregnancy, and these are improved with vitamin D. In this study, we demonstrate that vitamin D improved many factors associated with PE and reduced blood pressure in a hypertensive model without PE features, indicating that vitamin D could be beneficial for various hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. A Highly Efficient Gene-Targeting System for Aspergillus parasiticus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene targeting via homologous recombination is often used to elucidate gene function. For filamentous fungi, the majority of transforming DNA integrates ectopically. Deletion of Aspergillus parasiticus ku70, a gene of the non-homologous end-joining pathway, drastically increased the gene targeting...

  9. Polyamine analogues targeting epigenetic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Marton, Laurence J; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2009-11-04

    Over the past three decades the metabolism and functions of the polyamines have been actively pursued as targets for antineoplastic therapy. Interactions between cationic polyamines and negatively charged nucleic acids play a pivotal role in DNA stabilization and RNA processing that may affect gene expression, translation and protein activity. Our growing understanding of the unique roles that the polyamines play in chromatin regulation, and the discovery of novel proteins homologous with specific regulatory enzymes in polyamine metabolism, have led to our interest in exploring chromatin remodelling enzymes as potential therapeutic targets for specific polyamine analogues. One of our initial efforts focused on utilizing the strong affinity that the polyamines have for chromatin to create a backbone structure, which could be combined with active-site-directed inhibitor moieties of HDACs (histone deacetylases). Specific PAHAs (polyaminohydroxamic acids) and PABAs (polyaminobenzamides) polyamine analogues have demonstrated potent inhibition of the HDACs, re-expression of p21 and significant inhibition of tumour growth. A second means of targeting the chromatin-remodelling enzymes with polyamine analogues was facilitated by the recent identification of flavin-dependent LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1). The existence of this enzyme demonstrated that histone lysine methylation is a dynamic process similar to other histone post-translational modifications. LSD1 specifically catalyses demethylation of mono- and di-methyl Lys4 of histone 3, key positive chromatin marks associated with transcriptional activation. Structural and catalytic similarities between LSD1 and polyamine oxidases facilitated the identification of biguanide, bisguanidine and oligoamine polyamine analogues that are potent inhibitors of LSD1. Cellular inhibition of LSD1 by these unique compounds led to the re-activation of multiple epigenetically silenced genes important in tumorigenesis. The use of

  10. Identification of Novel Gene Targets and Functions of p21-Activated Kinase 1 during DNA Damage by Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Motwani, Mona; Li, Da-Qiang; Horvath, Anelia; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    P21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), a serine/threonine protein kinase, modulates many cellular processes by phosphorylating its downstream substrates. In addition to its role in the cytoplasm, PAK1 also affects gene transcription due to its nuclear localization and association with chromatin. It is now recognized that PAK1 kinase activity and its nuclear translocation are rapidly stimulated by ionizing radiation (IR), and that PAK1 activation is a component of the DNA damage response. Owing to the role of PAK1 in the cell survival, its association with the chromatin, and now, stimulation by ionizing radiation, we hypothesize that PAK1 may be contributing to modulation of genes with roles in cellular processes that might be important in the DNA damage response. The purpose of this study was to identify new PAK1 targets in response to ionizing radiation with putative role in the DNA damage response. We examined the effect of IR on the gene expression patterns in the murine embryonic fibroblasts with or without Pak1 using microarray technology. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified using Gene Spring GX 10.0.2. Pathway, network, functional analyses and gene family classification were carried out using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Ingenuity Pathway, Gene Ontology and PANTHER respectively. Selective targets of PAK1 were validated by RT-qPCR. For the first time, we provide a genome-wide analysis of PAK1 and identify its targets with potential roles in the DNA damage response. Gene Ontology analysis identified genes in the IR-stimulated cells that were involved in cell cycle arrest and cell death. Pathway analysis revealed p53 pathway being most influenced by IR responsive, PAK1 targets. Gene family of transcription factors was over represented and gene networks involved in DNA replication, repair and cellular signaling were identified. In brief, this study identifies novel PAK1 dependent IR responsive genes which reveal new aspects of PAK1

  11. The bereft gene, a potential target of the neural selector gene cut, contributes to bristle morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hardiman, Kirsten E; Brewster, Rachel; Khan, Shaema M; Deo, Monika; Bodmer, Rolf

    2002-01-01

    The neural selector gene cut, a homeobox transcription factor, is required for the specification of the correct identity of external (bristle-type) sensory organs in Drosophila. Targets of cut function, however, have not been described. Here, we study bereft (bft) mutants, which exhibit loss or malformation of a majority of the interommatidial bristles of the eye and cause defects in other external sensory organs. These mutants were generated by excising a P element located at chromosomal location 33AB, the enhancer trap line E8-2-46, indicating that a gene near the insertion site is responsible for this phenotype. Similar to the transcripts of the gene nearest to the insertion, reporter gene expression of E8-2-46 coincides with Cut in the support cells of external sensory organs, which secrete the bristle shaft and socket. Although bft transcripts do not obviously code for a protein product, its expression is abolished in bft deletion mutants, and the integrity of the bft locus is required for (interommatidial) bristle morphogenesis. This suggests that disruption of the bft gene is the cause of the observed bristle phenotype. We also sought to determine what factors regulate the expression of bft and the enhancer trap line. The correct specification of individual external sensory organ cells involves not only cut, but also the lineage genes numb and tramtrack. We demonstrate that mutations of these three genes affect the expression levels at the bft locus. Furthermore, cut overexpression is sufficient to induce ectopic bft expression in the PNS and in nonneuronal epidermis. On the basis of these results, we propose that bft acts downstream of cut and tramtrack to implement correct bristle morphogenesis. PMID:12019237

  12. Variants in activators and downstream targets of ATM, radiation exposure, and contralateral breast cancer risk in the WECARE study.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jennifer D; Teraoka, Sharon N; Reiner, Anne S; Satagopan, Jaya M; Bernstein, Leslie; Thomas, Duncan C; Capanu, Marinela; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A; Wei, Shan; Shore, Roy E; Boice, John D; Lynch, Charles F; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Malone, Kathleen E; Liang, Xiaolin; Haile, Robert W; Concannon, Patrick; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a breast carcinogen that induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and variation in genes involved in the DNA DSB response has been implicated in radiation-induced breast cancer. The Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) study is a population-based study of cases with contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and matched controls with unilateral breast cancer. The location-specific radiation dose received by the contralateral breast was estimated from radiotherapy records and mathematical models. One hundred fifty-two SNPs in six genes (CHEK2, MRE11A, MDC1, NBN, RAD50, TP53BP1) involved in the DNA DSBs response were genotyped. No variants or haplotypes were associated with CBC risk (649 cases and 1,284 controls) and no variants were found to interact with radiation dose. Carriers of a RAD50 haplotype exposed to ≥1 gray (Gy) had an increased risk of CBC compared with unexposed carriers (Rate ratios [RR] = 4.31 [95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.93-9.62]); with an excess relative risk (ERR) per Gy = 2.13 [95% CI 0.61-5.33]). Although the results of this study were largely null, carriers of a haplotype in RAD50 treated with radiation had a greater CBC risk than unexposed carriers. This suggests that carriers of this haplotype may be susceptible to the DNA-damaging effects of radiation therapy associated with radiation-induced breast cancer.

  13. EWS/FLI-1 silencing and gene profiling of Ewing cells reveal downstream oncogenic pathways and a crucial role for repression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Alexandre; Tirode, Franck; Cohen, Pinchas; Delattre, Olivier

    2004-08-01

    Ewing tumors are characterized by abnormal transcription factors resulting from the oncogenic fusion of EWS with members of the ETS family, most commonly FLI-1. RNA interference targeted to the junction between EWS and FLI-1 sequences was used to inactivate the EWS/FLI-1 fusion gene in Ewing cells and to explore the resulting phenotype and alteration of the gene expression profile. Loss of expression of EWS/FLI-1 resulted in the complete arrest of growth and was associated with a dramatic increase in the number of apoptotic cells. Gene profiling of Ewing cells in which the EWS/FLI-1 fusion gene had been inactivated identified downstream targets which could be grouped in two major functional clusters related to extracellular matrix structure or remodeling and regulation of signal transduction pathways. Among these targets, the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 gene (IGFBP-3), a major regulator of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) proliferation and survival signaling, was strongly induced upon treating Ewing cells with EWS/FLI-1-specific small interfering RNAs. We show that EWS/FLI-1 can bind the IGFBP-3 promoter in vitro and in vivo and can repress its activity. Moreover, IGFBP-3 silencing can partially rescue the apoptotic phenotype caused by EWS/FLI-1 inactivation. Finally, IGFBP-3-induced Ewing cell apoptosis relies on both IGF-1-dependent and -independent pathways. These findings therefore identify the repression of IGFBP-3 as a key event in the development of Ewing's sarcoma.

  14. The Ste20 Kinase Misshapen Regulates Both Photoreceptor Axon Targeting and Dorsal Closure, Acting Downstream of Distinct Signals

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi-Chi; Maurel-Zaffran, Corinne; Treisman, Jessica E.; Skolnik, Edward Y.

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that the Ste20 kinase encoded by misshapen (msn) functions upstream of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase module in Drosophila. msn is required to activate the Drosophila JNK, Basket (Bsk), to promote dorsal closure of the embryo. A mammalian homolog of Msn, Nck interacting kinase, interacts with the SH3 domains of the SH2-SH3 adapter protein Nck. We now show that Msn likewise interacts with Dreadlocks (Dock), the Drosophila homolog of Nck. dock is required for the correct targeting of photoreceptor axons. We have performed a structure-function analysis of Msn in vivo in Drosophila in order to elucidate the mechanism whereby Msn regulates JNK and to determine whether msn, like dock, is required for the correct targeting of photoreceptor axons. We show that Msn requires both a functional kinase and a C-terminal regulatory domain to activate JNK in vivo in Drosophila. A mutation in a PXXP motif on Msn that prevents it from binding to the SH3 domains of Dock does not affect its ability to rescue the dorsal closure defect in msn embryos, suggesting that Dock is not an upstream regulator of msn in dorsal closure. Larvae with only this mutated form of Msn show a marked disruption in photoreceptor axon targeting, implicating an SH3 domain protein in this process; however, an activated form of Msn is not sufficient to rescue the dock mutant phenotype. Mosaic analysis reveals that msn expression is required in photoreceptors in order for their axons to project correctly. The data presented here genetically link msn to two distinct biological events, dorsal closure and photoreceptor axon pathfinding, and thus provide the first evidence that Ste20 kinases of the germinal center kinase family play a role in axonal pathfinding. The ability of Msn to interact with distinct classes of adapter molecules in dorsal closure and photoreceptor axon pathfinding may provide the flexibility that allows it to link to distinct

  15. The Ste20 kinase misshapen regulates both photoreceptor axon targeting and dorsal closure, acting downstream of distinct signals.

    PubMed

    Su, Y C; Maurel-Zaffran, C; Treisman, J E; Skolnik, E Y

    2000-07-01

    We have previously shown that the Ste20 kinase encoded by misshapen (msn) functions upstream of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase module in Drosophila. msn is required to activate the Drosophila JNK, Basket (Bsk), to promote dorsal closure of the embryo. A mammalian homolog of Msn, Nck interacting kinase, interacts with the SH3 domains of the SH2-SH3 adapter protein Nck. We now show that Msn likewise interacts with Dreadlocks (Dock), the Drosophila homolog of Nck. dock is required for the correct targeting of photoreceptor axons. We have performed a structure-function analysis of Msn in vivo in Drosophila in order to elucidate the mechanism whereby Msn regulates JNK and to determine whether msn, like dock, is required for the correct targeting of photoreceptor axons. We show that Msn requires both a functional kinase and a C-terminal regulatory domain to activate JNK in vivo in Drosophila. A mutation in a PXXP motif on Msn that prevents it from binding to the SH3 domains of Dock does not affect its ability to rescue the dorsal closure defect in msn embryos, suggesting that Dock is not an upstream regulator of msn in dorsal closure. Larvae with only this mutated form of Msn show a marked disruption in photoreceptor axon targeting, implicating an SH3 domain protein in this process; however, an activated form of Msn is not sufficient to rescue the dock mutant phenotype. Mosaic analysis reveals that msn expression is required in photoreceptors in order for their axons to project correctly. The data presented here genetically link msn to two distinct biological events, dorsal closure and photoreceptor axon pathfinding, and thus provide the first evidence that Ste20 kinases of the germinal center kinase family play a role in axonal pathfinding. The ability of Msn to interact with distinct classes of adapter molecules in dorsal closure and photoreceptor axon pathfinding may provide the flexibility that allows it to link to distinct

  16. Network and pathway analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YING; ZHAO, SHISHUN; XU, ZHIWEN

    2016-01-01

    To date, there has been rapid development with regard to gene and microRNA (miR/miRNA) research in gliomas. However, the regulatory mechanisms of the associated genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, the genes, miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs) were considered as elements in the regulatory network, and focus was placed on the associations between TFs and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and miRNAs and host genes. In order to show the regulatory correlation clearly, all the elements were investigated and three regulatory networks, namely the differentially-expressed, related and global networks, were constructed. Certain important pathways were highlighted, with analysis of the similarities and differences among the networks. Next, the upstream and downstream elements of differentially-expressed genes, miRNAs and predicted TFs were listed. The most notable aspect of the present study was the three levels of network, particularly the differentially-expressed network, since the differentially-expressed associations that these networks provide appear at the initial stages of cancers such as glioma. If the states of the differentially-expressed associations can be adjusted to the normal state via alterations in regulatory associations, which were also recorded in the study networks and tables, it is likely that cancer can be regulated or even avoided. In the present study, the differentially-expressed network illuminated the pathogenesis of glioma; for example, a TF can regulate one or more miRNAs, and a target gene can be targeted by one or more miRNAs. Therefore, the host genes and target genes, the host genes and TFs, and the target genes and TFs indirectly affect each other through miRNAs. The association also exists between TFs and TFs, target genes and target genes, and host genes and host genes. The present study also demonstrated self-adaption associations and circle-regulations. The related network further described the regulatory mechanism

  17. Plakoglobin is a new target gene of histone deacetylase in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong Sup; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2004-03-04

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) plays a key role in gene expression, by suppressing the transcription of a number of target genes. Identification of such genes is important for deciphering the functional role of HDAC. Here, using cancer gene-focused DNA microarray analysis, we identified plakoglobin as a new target gene of HDAC. Functional inhibition of HDAC by its specific inhibitors induced the expression of plakoglobin by eight-fold in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. However, the expression of beta-catenin, which is closely related to plakoglobin, was not altered, implying the specific function of HDAC in plakoglobin expression. Using antiacetyl-H4 antibody, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that the distal region (-945 approximately -646) of the promoter of plakoglobin is responsible for the HDAC-mediated repression of the gene. Moreover, the induced expression of plakoglobin by the inhibition of HDAC activated the Tcf/Lef-dependent luciferase reporter gene, a well-known downstream effector of the Wnt signaling pathway. Furthermore, transient transfection of plakoglobin also activated Tcf/Lef reporter gene expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plakoglobin is a new target gene governed by HDAC, and that it acts as an oncogene in HT1080 cells.

  18. [Monogenic hypercholesterolemias: new genes, new drug targets].

    PubMed

    Mandel'shtam, M Iu; Vasil'ev, V B

    2008-10-01

    This review is focused on recent data on structure and functions of PCSK9 proprotein convertase, a newly identified participant in cholesterol metabolism in mammalian organisms, including humans. Proprotein convertase acts as a molecular chaperone for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, targeting it to the lysosomal degradation pathway. Various mutations increasing the PCSK9 affinity toward the LDL receptor cause autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia. In contrast, loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 gene decrease the blood plasma cholesterol level, thus acting as a protection factor against atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. It is supposed that pharmacological agents inhibiting the interaction between PCSK9 and LDL receptor may substantially amplify the benefits of drugs--statins and cholesterol absorption blockers--in the treatment of all types of hypercholesterolemia, including its widespread multigenic and multifactorial forms.

  19. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) is a downstream target of the homeobox transcription factor Nkx2-5.

    PubMed

    Funke-Kaiser, H; Lemmer, J; Langsdorff, C V; Thomas, A; Kovacevic, S D; Strasdat, M; Behrouzi, T; Zollmann, F S; Paul, M; Orzechowski, H-D

    2003-08-01

    The homeobox transcription factor Nkx2-5 and the zinc metalloprotease endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) are essential for cardiac development. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a functional link between Nkx2-5 and ECE-1. In transiently transfected rat H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, the alternative promoters specific for ECE-1a, ECE-1b, and ECE-1c are activated by Nkx2-5 coexpression. Lack of a consensus sequence for Nkx2-5 binding within the ECE-1c promoter and mutational analyses of Nkx2-5 consensus sequences identified in the ECE-1a and ECE-1b promoters, respectively, reveal an indirect mechanism of activation that is supported by gel shift assays. Furthermore, we have evidence of an additional direct activation mechanism of the ECE-1b promoter by Nkx2-5. With the use of RNase protection assay, Northern blot, and real-time PCR, the activating effect of Nkx2-5 on mRNA expression of ECE-1 isoforms was confirmed in the chromatin context of H9c2 and endothelial EA.hy926 cells, respectively, by stable Nkx2-5 overexpression. The interaction presented in this work provides a possible explanation for distinct phenotypic aspects of patients carrying mutations in the Nkx2-5 gene and may also be of significance for the pathophysiology of heart failure.

  20. MicroRNA-22 Gates Long-Term Heterosynaptic Plasticity in Aplysia through Presynaptic Regulation of CPEB and Downstream Targets.

    PubMed

    Fiumara, Ferdinando; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Antonov, Igor; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Sossin, Wayne S; Kandel, Eric R

    2015-06-30

    The maintenance phase of memory-related long-term facilitation (LTF) of synapses between sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia depends on a serotonin (5-HT)-triggered presynaptic upregulation of CPEB, a functional prion that regulates local protein synthesis at the synapse. The mechanisms whereby serotonin regulates CPEB levels in presynaptic sensory neurons are not known. Here, we describe a sensory neuron-specific microRNA 22 (miR-22) that has multiple binding sites on the mRNA of CPEB and inhibits it in the basal state. Serotonin triggers MAPK/Erk-dependent downregulation of miR-22, thereby upregulating the expression of CPEB, which in turn regulates, through functional CPE elements, the presynaptic expression of atypical PKC (aPKC), another candidate regulator of memory maintenance. Our findings support a model in which the neurotransmitter-triggered downregulation of miR-22 coordinates the regulation of genes contributing synergistically to the long-term maintenance of memory-related synaptic plasticity.

  1. Gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy.

    PubMed

    Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) form a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by dysfunction of one of the lysosomal proteins, resulting in the accumulation of certain compounds. Although these disorders are among first genetic diseases for which specific treatments were proposed, there are still serious unsolved problems that require development of novel therapeutic procedures. An example is neuronopathy, which develops in most of LSD and cannot be treated efficiently by currently approved therapies. Recently, a new potential therapy, called gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy (GET IT), has been proposed for a group of LSD named mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), in which storage of incompletely degraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) results in severe symptoms of virtually all tissues and organs, including central nervous system. The idea of this therapy is to inhibit synthesis of GAGs by modulating expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in synthesis of these compounds. Such a modulation is possible by using isoflavones, particularly genistein, which interfere with a signal transduction process necessary for stimulation of expression of certain genes. Results of in vitro experiments and studies on animal models indicated a high efficiency of GET IT, including correction of behavior of affected mice. However, clinical trials, performed with soy isoflavone extracts, revealed only limited efficacy. This caused a controversy about GET IT as a potential, effective treatment of patients suffering from MPS, especially neuronopathic forms of these diseases. It this critical review, I present possible molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action of isoflavones (particularly genistein) and suggest that efficacy of GET IT might be sufficiently high when using relatively high doses of synthetic genistein (which was employed in experiments on cell cultures and mouse models) rather than low doses of soy isoflavone extracts (which were used in clinical trials). This

  2. Human differentiation-related gene NDRG1 is a Myc downstream-regulated gene that is repressed by Myc on the core promoter region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Suning; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Xinping; Shi, Hai; Che, Honglei; Wang, Weizhong; Li, Fuyang; Yao, Libo

    2008-07-01

    N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (ndrg1) is up-regulated in N-Myc knockout mouse embryos. The human NDRG family consists of 4 highly homologous members and human Ndrg1 exhibits approximately 94% homology with mouse ndrg1. However, the regulatory mechanism of NDRG1 via Myc repression is as yet unknown. We previously identified human NDRG2 and demonstrated that this gene is transcriptionally down-regulated by Myc via Miz-1-dependent interaction with the core promoter region of NDRG2. Here, we provide evidence that human NDRG1 is regulated by Myc in a manner similar to NDRG2. We found that Ndrg1 expression levels were enhanced as Myc expression declined in differentiated cells, but were down-regulated following Myc induction. The data revealed that both N-Myc and c-Myc can repress human NDRG1 at the transcriptional level. We further determined that the core promoter region of human NDRG1 is required for Myc repression, and verified the interaction of Myc with the core promoter region. However, the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide could reverse the repression of Myc, indicating the indirect repression of human NDRG1 by Myc. Moreover, we found that c-Myc-mediated repression can be inhibited by TSA, an HDACs inhibitor, which suggests the involvement of HDACs in the repression process. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in common with NDRG2, human NDRG1 can be indirectly transcriptionally down-regulated by Myc via interaction with the NDRG1 core promoter.

  3. Cotransformation and gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, L H; Shesely, E G; Kim, H S; Smithies, O

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated cotransformation in mammalian cells and its potential for identifying cells that have been modified by gene targeting. Selectable genes on separate DNA fragments were simultaneously introduced into cells by coelectroporation. When the introduced fragments were scored for random integration, 75% of the transformed cells integrated both fragments within the genome of the same cell. When one of the cointroduced fragments was scored for integration at a specific locus by gene targeting, only 4% of the targeted cells cointegrated the second fragment. Apparently, cells that have been modified by gene targeting with one DNA fragment rarely incorporate a second DNA fragment. Despite this limitation, we were able to use the cotransformation protocol to identify targeted cells by screening populations of colonies that had been transformed with a cointroduced selectable gene. When hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) targeting DNA was coelectroporated with a selectable neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene into embryonic stem (ES) cells, hprt-targeted colonies were isolated from the population of neo transformants at a frequency of 1 per 70 G418-resistant colonies. In parallel experiments with the same targeting construct, hprt-targeted cells were found at a frequency of 1 per 5,500 nonselected colonies. Thus, an 80-fold enrichment for targeted cells was observed within the population of colonies transformed with the cointroduced DNA compared with the population of nonselected colonies. This enrichment for targeted cells after cotransformation should be useful in the isolation of colonies that contain targeted but nonselectable gene alterations. Images PMID:1850104

  4. Insulin receptor substrate-1 and Golgi phosphoprotein 3 are downstream targets of miR‑126 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Haomiao; Meng, Fanyu; Ma, Jun; Yu, Yongkui; Hua, Xionghuai; Qin, Jianjun; Li, Yin

    2014-09-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a common histologic subtype in China. It has been suggested that abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is associated with carcinogenesis. We investigated miR-126 expression and its potential targets in ESCC. The expression of miR-126 was detected in cancerous and paired paracancer tissues from 102 patients with ESCC. Target analysis of miR-126 was predicted using online tools. The effect of miR-126 expression on target proteins was assessed using miR-126 mimics or miR-126 inhibitors in ESCC cell lines. In addition, the impact of miR-126 on cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion was detected in ESCC cell lines. The expression of miR-126 was significantly lower in ESCC tissues, which was associated with tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, tumor in-depth and TNM stage. Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and Golgi phosphoprotein 3 (GOLPH3) were overexpressed in ESCC. Overexpression of IRS-1 was associated with cell differentiation, whereas GOLPH3 was related to lymph node metastasis, tumor invasion in-depth and TNM stage in ESCC patients. miR-126 mimics downregulated the expression of IRS-1 and GOLPH3 protein and suppressed the proliferation, migration and invasion of ESCC cells, whereas miR-126 inhibitors led to the opposite results. miR-126 suppressed the proliferation, migration and invasion of ESCC cells, and acted as a tumor suppressor in the carcinogenesis of ESCC. IRS-1 and GOLPH3 are downstream targets of miR-126 at the post-transcriptional level in ESCC.

  5. GeneHancer: genome-wide integration of enhancers and target genes in GeneCards

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Noa; Hadar, Rotem; Plaschkes, Inbar; Iny Stein, Tsippi; Rosen, Naomi; Kohn, Asher; Twik, Michal; Safran, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A major challenge in understanding gene regulation is the unequivocal identification of enhancer elements and uncovering their connections to genes. We present GeneHancer, a novel database of human enhancers and their inferred target genes, in the framework of GeneCards. First, we integrated a total of 434 000 reported enhancers from four different genome-wide databases: the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE), the Ensembl regulatory build, the functional annotation of the mammalian genome (FANTOM) project and the VISTA Enhancer Browser. Employing an integration algorithm that aims to remove redundancy, GeneHancer portrays 285 000 integrated candidate enhancers (covering 12.4% of the genome), 94 000 of which are derived from more than one source, and each assigned an annotation-derived confidence score. GeneHancer subsequently links enhancers to genes, using: tissue co-expression correlation between genes and enhancer RNAs, as well as enhancer-targeted transcription factor genes; expression quantitative trait loci for variants within enhancers; and capture Hi-C, a promoter-specific genome conformation assay. The individual scores based on each of these four methods, along with gene–enhancer genomic distances, form the basis for GeneHancer’s combinatorial likelihood-based scores for enhancer–gene pairing. Finally, we define ‘elite’ enhancer–gene relations reflecting both a high-likelihood enhancer definition and a strong enhancer–gene association. GeneHancer predictions are fully integrated in the widely used GeneCards Suite, whereby candidate enhancers and their annotations are displayed on every relevant GeneCard. This assists in the mapping of non-coding variants to enhancers, and via the linked genes, forms a basis for variant–phenotype interpretation of whole-genome sequences in health and disease. Database URL: http://www.genecards.org/ PMID:28605766

  6. Targeted gene knockout in chickens mediated by TALENs.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Sub; Lee, Hong Jo; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Han, Jae Yong

    2014-09-02

    Genetically modified animals are used for industrial applications as well as scientific research, and studies on these animals contribute to a better understanding of biological mechanisms. Gene targeting techniques have been developed to edit specific gene loci in the genome, but the conventional strategy of homologous recombination with a gene-targeted vector has low efficiency and many technical complications. Here, we generated specific gene knockout chickens through the use of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated gene targeting. In this study, we accomplished targeted knockout of the ovalbumin (OV) gene in the chicken primordial germ cells, and OV gene mutant offspring were generated through test-cross analysis. TALENs successfully induced nucleotide deletion mutations of ORF shifts, resulting in loss of chicken OV gene function. Our results demonstrate that the TALEN technique used in the chicken primordial germ cell line is a powerful strategy to create specific genome-edited chickens safely for practical applications.

  7. Targeted gene knockout in chickens mediated by TALENs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Sub; Lee, Hong Jo; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Han, Jae Yong

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified animals are used for industrial applications as well as scientific research, and studies on these animals contribute to a better understanding of biological mechanisms. Gene targeting techniques have been developed to edit specific gene loci in the genome, but the conventional strategy of homologous recombination with a gene-targeted vector has low efficiency and many technical complications. Here, we generated specific gene knockout chickens through the use of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated gene targeting. In this study, we accomplished targeted knockout of the ovalbumin (OV) gene in the chicken primordial germ cells, and OV gene mutant offspring were generated through test-cross analysis. TALENs successfully induced nucleotide deletion mutations of ORF shifts, resulting in loss of chicken OV gene function. Our results demonstrate that the TALEN technique used in the chicken primordial germ cell line is a powerful strategy to create specific genome-edited chickens safely for practical applications. PMID:25139993

  8. Improved Algorithms for Blending Dam Releases to Meet Downstream Water-Temperature Targets in the CE-QUAL-W2 Water-Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rounds, S. A.; Buccola, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    The two-dimensional (longitudinal, vertical) water-quality model CE-QUAL-W2, version 3.7, was enhanced with new features to help dam operators and managers efficiently explore and optimize potential solutions for temperature management downstream of thermally stratified reservoirs. Such temperature management often is accomplished by blending releases from multiple dam outlets that access water of different temperatures at different depths in the reservoir. The original blending algorithm in this version of the model was limited to mixing releases from two outlets at a time, and few constraints could be imposed. The new enhanced blending algorithm allows the user to (1) specify a time-series of target release temperatures, (2) designate from 2 to 10 floating or fixed-elevation outlets for blending, (3) impose maximum head constraints as well as minimum and maximum flow constraints for any blended outlet, and (4) set a priority designation for each outlet that allows the model to choose which outlets to use and how to balance releases among them. The modified model was tested against a previously calibrated model of Detroit Lake on the North Santiam River in northwestern Oregon, and the results compared well. The enhanced model code is being used to evaluate operational and structural scenarios at multiple dam/reservoir systems in the Willamette River basin in Oregon, where downstream temperature management for endangered fish is a high priority for resource managers and dam operators. These updates to the CE-QUAL-W2 blending algorithm allow scenarios involving complicated dam operations and/or hypothetical outlet structures to be evaluated more efficiently with the model, with decreased need for multiple/iterative model runs or preprocessing of model inputs to fully characterize the operational constraints.

  9. Target mimics: an embedded layer of microRNA-involved gene regulatory networks in plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an essential role in gene regulation in plants. At the same time, the expression of miRNA genes is also tightly controlled. Recently, a novel mechanism called “target mimicry” was discovered, providing another layer for modulating miRNA activities. However, except for the artificial target mimics manipulated for functional studies on certain miRNA genes, only one example, IPS1 (Induced by Phosphate Starvation 1)—miR399 was experimentally confirmed in planta. To date, few analyses for comprehensive identification of natural target mimics have been performed in plants. Thus, limited evidences are available to provide detailed information for interrogating the questionable issue whether target mimicry was widespread in planta, and implicated in certain biological processes. Results In this study, genome-wide computational prediction of endogenous miRNA mimics was performed in Arabidopsis and rice, and dozens of target mimics were identified. In contrast to a recent report, the densities of target mimic sites were found to be much higher within the untranslated regions (UTRs) when compared to those within the coding sequences (CDSs) in both plants. Some novel sequence characteristics were observed for the miRNAs that were potentially regulated by the target mimics. GO (Gene Ontology) term enrichment analysis revealed some functional insights into the predicted mimics. After degradome sequencing data-based identification of miRNA targets, the regulatory networks constituted by target mimics, miRNAs and their downstream targets were constructed, and some intriguing subnetworks were further exploited. Conclusions These results together suggest that target mimicry may be widely implicated in regulating miRNA activities in planta, and we hope this study could expand the current understanding of miRNA-involved regulatory networks. PMID:22613869

  10. Taxol resistance in breast cancer cells is mediated by the hippo pathway component TAZ and its downstream transcriptional targets Cyr61 and CTGF.

    PubMed

    Lai, Dulcie; Ho, King Ching; Hao, Yawei; Yang, Xiaolong

    2011-04-01

    Taxol (paclitaxel) resistance represents a major challenge in breast cancer treatment. The TAZ (transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif) oncogene is a major component of the novel Hippo-LATS signaling pathway and a transcriptional coactivator that interacts with and activates multiple transcription factors to regulate various biological processes. Here, we report that elevated levels of TAZ found in human breast cancer cells are responsible for their resistance to Taxol. DNA microarray analysis identified the oncogenes Cyr61 and CTGF as downstream transcriptional targets of TAZ. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of both Cyr61 and CTGF reversed TAZ-induced Taxol resistance in breast cancer cells. Interaction of TAZ with the TEAD family of transcription factors was essential for TAZ to activate the Cyr61/CTGF promoters and to induce Taxol resistance. Our findings define the TAZ-TEAD-Cyr61/CTGF signaling pathway as an important modifier of the Taxol response in breast cancer cells, as well as highlighting it as a novel therapeutic target to treat drug-resistant breast cancers that arise commonly at advanced stages of disease.

  11. AKT-STAT3 Pathway as a Downstream Target of EGFR Signaling to Regulate PD-L1 Expression on NSCLC cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamed, Sherif; Ogura, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Satoru; Saiki, Ikuo; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    While cancer development and progression can be controlled by cytotoxic T cells, it is also known that tumor-specific CD8(+)T cells become functionally impaired by acquiring a group of inhibitory receptors known as immune checkpoints. Amongst those, programmed death-1 (PD-1) is one of the most recognized negative regulators of T cell function. In non-small lung cancers (NSCLCs), the aberrant activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to induce PD-L1 expression and further the treatment with gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) for EGFR, decrease the expression of PD-L1 on NSCLC. Given the acquired resistance to gefitinib treatment frequently observed by developing secondary-site mutations limiting its efficacy, it is important to understand the downstream mechanism of activated-EGFR signaling for regulating PD-L1 in NSCLC. In this study, we demonstrated that AKT-STAT3 pathway could be a potential target for regulating the surface expression of PD-L1 on NSCLCs with aberrant EGFR activity and, further, the inhibition of AKT or STAT3 activity could down-regulate the expression of PD-L1 even in gefitinib-resistant NSCLCs. These results highlight an importance of AKT-STAT3 pathway as a promising target for potentiating anti-tumor immune responses by regulating PD-L1 expression on cancer cells with aberrant EGFR activity.

  12. Arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage is mediated by decreased PGC-1α expression and its downstream targets in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-08-25

    The present study was carried out to investigate the molecular mechanism of arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relation to biogenesis in rat brain. Chronic sodium arsenite (25 ppm, orally) administration for 12 weeks decreased mitochondrial complexes activities and mRNA expression of selective complexes subunits. The expression of mitochondrial biogenesis regulator PGC-1α, and its downstream targets NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam were decreased significantly both at mRNA and protein levels suggesting impaired biogenesis following chronic arsenic-exposure. In addition to this, protein expression analysis also revealed activation of Bax and caspase-3, leading to translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. This was further confirmed by electron microscopy study which depicted morphological changes in mitochondria in terms of altered nuclear and mitochondrial shape and chromatin condensation in arsenic-treated rats. The immunohistochemical studies showed both nuclear and cytosolic localization of NRF-1 and NRF-2 in arsenic-exposed rat brain further suggesting regulatory role of these transcription factors under arsenic neurotoxicity. The results of present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative damage is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat brain that may present as important target to reveal the mechanism for arsenic-induced neurotoxicity.

  13. Honey bee foraging induces upregulation of early growth response protein 1, hormone receptor 38 and candidate downstream genes of the ecdysteroid signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Singh, A S; Shah, A; Brockmann, A

    2017-10-07

    In honey bees, continuous foraging at an artificial feeder induced a sustained upregulation of the immediate early genes early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1) and hormone receptor 38 (Hr38). This gene expression response was accompanied by an upregulation of several Egr-1 candidate downstream genes: ecdysone receptor (EcR), dopamine/ecdysteroid receptor (DopEcR), dopamine decarboxylase and dopamine receptor 2. Hr38, EcR and DopEcR are components of the ecdysteroid signalling pathway, which is highly probably involved in learning and memory processes in honey bees and other insects. Time-trained foragers still showed an upregulation of Egr-1 when the feeder was presented at an earlier time of the day, suggesting that the genomic response is more dependent on the food reward than training time. However, presentation of the feeder at the training time without food was still capable of inducing a transient increase in Egr-1 expression. Thus, learnt feeder cues, or even training time, probably affect Egr-1 expression. In contrast, whole brain Egr-1 expression changes did not differ between dancing and nondancing foragers. On the basis of our results we propose that food reward induced continuous foraging ultimately elicits a genomic response involving Egr-1 and Hr38 and their downstream genes. Furthermore this genomic response is highly probably involved in foraging-related learning and memory responses. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. An IS711 Element Downstream of the bp26 Gene Is a Specific Marker of Brucella spp. Isolated from Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, Axel; Grayon, Maggy; Grepinet, Olivier

    2000-01-01

    DNA polymorphism of the bp26 gene, coding for a diagnostic protein antigen for brucellosis, was assessed by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using primers to amplify the bp26 gene with its flanking regions. Surprisingly, whereas PCR performed on DNA of the reference strains of the six recognized Brucella species produced a product of the expected size (1,029 bp), PCR performed on DNA of three representative strains from marine mammals (from a seal, a dolphin, and a porpoise) produced a larger product, of about 1,900 bp. Nucleotide sequencing of the 1,900-bp PCR products revealed the presence of an insertion sequence, IS711, downstream of the bp26 gene and adjacent to a Bru-RS1 element previously described as being a hot spot for IS711 insertion. PCR performed on a large number of field strains from different geographic origins and from marine mammal isolates indicated that the occurrence of an IS711 element downstream of the bp26 gene was a feature specific to the marine mammal Brucella strains. Thus, this PCR assay is able to differentiate Brucella terrestrial isolates from marine mammal isolates and could be applied for diagnostic purposes. PMID:10973465

  15. A superfamily of DNA transposons targeting multicopy small RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Target-specific integration of transposable elements for multicopy genes, such as ribosomal RNA and small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes, is of great interest because of the relatively harmless nature, stable inheritance and possible application for targeted gene delivery of target-specific transposable elements. To date, such strict target specificity has been observed only among non-LTR retrotransposons. We here report a new superfamily of sequence-specific DNA transposons, designated Dada. Dada encodes a DDE-type transposase that shows a distant similarity to transposases encoded by eukaryotic MuDR, hAT, P and Kolobok transposons, as well as the prokaryotic IS256 insertion element. Dada generates 6-7 bp target site duplications upon insertion. One family of Dada DNA transposons targets a specific site inside the U6 snRNA genes and are found in various fish species, water flea, oyster and polycheate worm. Other target sequences of the Dada transposons are U1 snRNA genes and different tRNA genes. The targets are well conserved in multicopy genes, indicating that copy number and sequence conservation are the primary constraints on the target choice of Dada transposons. Dada also opens a new frontier for target-specific gene delivery application.

  16. Characterization of Antirrhinum Petal Development and Identification of Target Genes of the Class B MADS Box Gene DEFICIENSW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bey, Melanie; Stüber, Kurt; Fellenberg, Kurt; Schwarz-Sommer, Zsuzsanna; Sommer, Hans; Saedler, Heinz; Zachgo, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    The class B MADS box transcription factors DEFICIENS (DEF) and GLOBOSA (GLO) of Antirrhinum majus together control the organogenesis of petals and stamens. Toward an understanding of how the downstream molecular mechanisms controlled by DEF contribute to petal organogenesis, we conducted expression profiling experiments using macroarrays comprising >11,600 annotated Antirrhinum unigenes. First, four late petal developmental stages were compared with sepals. More than 500 ESTs were identified that comprise a large number of stage-specifically regulated genes and reveal a highly dynamic transcriptional regulation. For identification of DEF target genes that might be directly controlled by DEF, we took advantage of the temperature-sensitive def-101 mutant. To enhance the sensitivity of the profiling experiments, one petal developmental stage was selected, characterized by increased transcriptome changes that reflect the onset of cell elongation processes replacing cell division processes. Upon reduction of the DEF function, 49 upregulated and 52 downregulated petal target genes were recovered. Eight target genes were further characterized in detail by RT-PCR and in situ studies. Expression of genes responding rapidly toward an altered DEF activity is confined to different petal tissues, demonstrating the complexity of the DEF function regulating diverse basic processes throughout petal morphogenesis. PMID:15539471

  17. In silico analysis of polymorphisms in microRNAs that target genes affecting aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Tsutsumi, Rie

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer cells preferentially metabolize glucose through aerobic glycolysis, an observation known as the Warburg effect. Recently, studies have deciphered the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in regulating the Warburg effect. Furthermore, mutations in glycolytic enzymes identified in various cancers highlight the importance of the Warburg effect at the molecular and cellular level. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression and are dysregulated in the pathogenesis of various types of human cancers. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA genes may affect miRNA biogenesis, processing, function, and stability and provide additional complexity in the pathogenesis of cancer. Moreover, mutations in miRNA target sequences in target mRNAs can affect expression. Methods In silico analysis and cataloguing polymorphisms in miRNA genes that target genes directly or indirectly controlling aerobic glycolysis was carried out using different publically available databases. Results miRNA SNP2.0 database revealed several SNPs in miR-126 and miR-25 in the upstream and downstream pre-miRNA flanking regions respectively should be inserted after flanking regions and miR-504 and miR-451 had the fewest. These miRNAs target genes that control aerobic glycolysis indirectly. SNPs in premiRNA genes were found in miR-96, miR-155, miR-25 and miR34a by miRNASNP. Dragon database of polymorphic regulation of miRNA genes (dPORE-miRNA) database revealed several SNPs that modify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) or creating new TFBS in promoter regions of selected miRNA genes as analyzed by dPORE-miRNA. Conclusions Our results raise the possibility that integration of SNP analysis in miRNA genes with studies of metabolic adaptations in cancer cells could provide greater understanding of oncogenic mechanisms. PMID:27004216

  18. PGC-1α and ERRα target gene downregulation is a signature of the failing human heart

    PubMed Central

    Sihag, Smita; Li, Allie Y.; Cresci, Sharon; Sucharov, Carmen C.; Lehman, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in developed nations, and results from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. To discover gene regulatory networks underlying heart failure, we analyzed DNA microarray data based on left ventricular free-wall myocardium from 59 failing (32 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 27 idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy) and 33 non-failing explanted human hearts from the Cardiogenomics Consortium. In particular, we sought to investigate cardiac gene expression changes at the level of individual genes, as well as biological pathways which contain groups of functionally related genes. Utilizing a combination of computational techniques, including Comparative Marker Selection and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we identified a subset of downstream gene targets of the master mitochondrial transcriptional regulator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), whose expression is collectively decreased in failing human hearts. We also observed decreased expression of the key PGC-1α regulatory partner, estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), as well as ERRα target genes which may participate in the downregulation of mitochondrial metabolic capacity. Gene expression of the antiapoptotic Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway was decreased in failing hearts. Alterations in PGC-1α and ERRα target gene sets were significantly correlated with an important clinical parameter of disease severity - left ventricular ejection fraction, and were predictive of failing vs. non-failing phenotypes. Overall, our results implicate PGC-1α and ERRα in the pathophysiology of human heart failure, and define dynamic target gene sets sharing known interrelated regulatory mechanisms capable of contributing to the mitochondrial dysfunction characteristic of this disease process. PMID:19061896

  19. Bio and nanotechnological strategies for tumor-targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Toita, Riki; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy is a new medical approach for the treatment of tumors. For safe and efficient gene therapy, therapeutic genes need to be delivered efficiently into the target tumor cells. Development of gene delivery systems to specifically recognize and target tumor cells and to distinguish them from normal cells, especially in the same tissue or organ, is one of the most important issues regarding the present gene delivery methodologies. The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect using the characteristics of angiogenic tumor blood vessels, as well as gene delivery systems recognizing hyperactivated receptors or intracellular signals, is broadly applied to tumor-targeted gene therapy. In addition, bacterial vectors can be a useful means for targeting hypoxic or anoxic regions of a tumor.

  20. An in silico strategy identified the target gene candidates regulated by dehydration responsive element binding proteins (DREBs) in Arabidopsis genome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shichen; Yang, Shuo; Yin, Yuejia; Guo, Xiaosen; Wang, Shan; Hao, Dongyun

    2009-01-01

    Identification of downstream target genes of stress-relating transcription factors (TFs) is desirable in understanding cellular responses to various environmental stimuli. However, this has long been a difficult work for both experimental and computational practices. In this research, we presented a novel computational strategy which combined the analysis of the transcription factor binding site (TFBS) contexts and machine learning approach. Using this strategy, we conducted a genome-wide investigation into novel direct target genes of dehydration responsive element binding proteins (DREBs), the members of AP2-EREBPs transcription factor super family which is reported to be responsive to various abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. The genome-wide searching yielded in total 474 target gene candidates. With reference to the microarray data for abiotic stresses-inducible gene expression profile, 268 target gene candidates out of the total 474 genes predicted, were induced during the 24-h exposure to abiotic stresses. This takes about 57% of total predicted targets. Furthermore, GO annotations revealed that these target genes are likely involved in protein amino acid phosphorylation, protein binding and Endomembrane sorting system. The results suggested that the predicted target gene candidates were adequate to meet the essential biological principle of stress-resistance in plants.

  1. Aptamer-guided gene targeting in yeast and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Patrick; Koh, Kyung Duk; Keskin, Havva; Pai, Rekha B.; Storici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is a genetic technique to modify an endogenous DNA sequence in its genomic location via homologous recombination (HR) and is useful both for functional analysis and gene therapy applications. HR is inefficient in most organisms and cell types, including mammalian cells, often limiting the effectiveness of gene targeting. Therefore, increasing HR efficiency remains a major challenge to DNA editing. Here, we present a new concept for gene correction based on the development of DNA aptamers capable of binding to a site-specific DNA binding protein to facilitate the exchange of homologous genetic information between a donor molecule and the desired target locus (aptamer-guided gene targeting). We selected DNA aptamers to the I-SceI endonuclease. Bifunctional oligonucleotides containing an I-SceI aptamer sequence were designed as part of a longer single-stranded DNA molecule that contained a region with homology to repair an I-SceI generated double-strand break and correct a disrupted gene. The I-SceI aptamer-containing oligonucleotides stimulated gene targeting up to 32-fold in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and up to 16-fold in human cells. This work provides a novel concept and research direction to increase gene targeting efficiency and lays the groundwork for future studies using aptamers for gene targeting. PMID:24500205

  2. Improved algorithms in the CE-QUAL-W2 water-quality model for blending dam releases to meet downstream water-temperature targets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rounds, Stewart A.; Buccola, Norman L.

    2015-01-01

    Water-quality models allow water resource professionals to examine conditions under an almost unlimited variety of potential future scenarios. The two-dimensional (longitudinal, vertical) water-quality model CE-QUAL-W2, version 3.7, was enhanced and augmented with new features to help dam operators and managers explore and optimize potential solutions for temperature management downstream of thermally stratified reservoirs. Such temperature management often is accomplished by blending releases from multiple dam outlets that access water of different temperatures at different depths. The modified blending algorithm in version 3.7 of CE-QUAL-W2 allows the user to specify a time-series of target release temperatures, designate from 2 to 10 floating or fixed-elevation outlets for blending, impose minimum and maximum head and flow constraints for any blended outlet, and set priority designations for each outlet that allow the model to choose which outlets to use and how to balance releases among them. The modified model was tested with a variety of examples and against a previously calibrated model of Detroit Lake on the North Santiam River in northwestern Oregon, and the results compared well. These updates to the blending algorithms will allow more complicated dam-operation scenarios to be evaluated somewhat automatically with the model, with decreased need for multiple model runs or preprocessing of model inputs to fully characterize the operational constraints.

  3. Bacteriophage-Derived Vectors for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pranjol, Md Zahidul Islam; Hajitou, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy expanded and reached its pinnacle in research in the last decade. Both viral and non-viral vectors have entered clinical trials, and significant successes have been achieved. However, a systemic administration of a vector, illustrating safe, efficient, and targeted gene delivery to solid tumors has proven to be a major challenge. In this review, we summarize the current progress and challenges in the targeted gene therapy of cancer. Moreover, we highlight the recent developments of bacteriophage-derived vectors and their contributions in targeting cancer with therapeutic genes following systemic administration. PMID:25606974

  4. miR-2478 inhibits TGFβ1 expression by targeting the transcriptional activation region downstream of the TGFβ1 promoter in dairy goats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuanjian; Lan, Xianyong; Han, Ruili; Wang, Jing; Huang, Yongzhen; Sun, Jiajie; Guo, Wenjiao; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    In a previous study, miR-2478 was demonstrated to be up-regulated in dairy goat mammary glands during peak lactation compared with the dry period. However, the detailed mechanisms by which miR-2478 regulates physiological lactation and mammary gland development in dairy goats remain unclear. In this study, we used bioinformatics analysis and homologous cloning to predict the target genes of miR-2478 and selected INSR, FBXO11, TGFβ1 and ING4 as candidate target genes of miR-2478. Subsequently, by targeting the 5′UTR of the TGFβ1 gene, we verified that miR-2478 significantly inhibited TGFβ1 transcription and the Pearson’s correlation coefficient between miR-2478 expression and TGFβ1 expression was −0.98. Furthermore, we identified the potential promoter and transcription factor binding regions of TGFβ1 and analyzed the potential mechanisms of interaction between miR-2478 and TGFβ1. Dual-luciferase reporter assays revealed that two regions, spanning from −904 to −690 bp and from −79 to +197 bp, were transcription factor binding regions of TGFβ1. Interesting, the miR-2478 binding sequence was determined to span from +123 to +142 bp in the TGFβ1 gene promoter. Thus, our results have demonstrated that miR-2478 binds to the core region of the TGFβ1 promoter and that it affects goat mammary gland development by inhibiting TGFβ1 transcription. PMID:28198456

  5. Gene Targeting Without DSB Induction Is Inefficient in Barley.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Mihaly; Steinbiss, Hans-Henning; Reiss, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Double strand-break (DSB) induction allowed efficient gene targeting in barley (Hordeum vulgare), but little is known about efficiencies in its absence. To obtain such data, an assay system based on the acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene was established, a target gene which had been used previously in rice and Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of recombinases RAD51 and RAD54 had been shown to improve gene targeting in A. thaliana and positive-negative (P-N) selection allows the routine production of targeted mutants without DSB induction in rice. We implemented these approaches in barley and analysed gene targeting with the ALS gene in wild type and RAD51 and RAD54 transgenic lines. In addition, P-N selection was tested. In contrast to the high gene targeting efficiencies obtained in the absence of DSB induction in A. thaliana or rice, not one single gene targeting event was obtained in barley. These data suggest that gene targeting efficiencies are very low in barley and can substantially differ between different plants, even at the same target locus. They also suggest that the amount of labour and time would become unreasonably high to use these methods as a tool in routine applications. This is particularly true since DSB induction offers efficient alternatives. Barley, unlike rice and A. thaliana has a large, complex genome, suggesting that genome size or complexity could be the reason for the low efficiencies. We discuss to what extent transformation methods, genome size or genome complexity could contribute to the striking differences in the gene targeting efficiencies between barley, rice and A. thaliana.

  6. Gene Targeting Without DSB Induction Is Inefficient in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Mihaly; Steinbiss, Hans-Henning; Reiss, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Double strand-break (DSB) induction allowed efficient gene targeting in barley (Hordeum vulgare), but little is known about efficiencies in its absence. To obtain such data, an assay system based on the acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene was established, a target gene which had been used previously in rice and Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of recombinases RAD51 and RAD54 had been shown to improve gene targeting in A. thaliana and positive-negative (P-N) selection allows the routine production of targeted mutants without DSB induction in rice. We implemented these approaches in barley and analysed gene targeting with the ALS gene in wild type and RAD51 and RAD54 transgenic lines. In addition, P-N selection was tested. In contrast to the high gene targeting efficiencies obtained in the absence of DSB induction in A. thaliana or rice, not one single gene targeting event was obtained in barley. These data suggest that gene targeting efficiencies are very low in barley and can substantially differ between different plants, even at the same target locus. They also suggest that the amount of labour and time would become unreasonably high to use these methods as a tool in routine applications. This is particularly true since DSB induction offers efficient alternatives. Barley, unlike rice and A. thaliana has a large, complex genome, suggesting that genome size or complexity could be the reason for the low efficiencies. We discuss to what extent transformation methods, genome size or genome complexity could contribute to the striking differences in the gene targeting efficiencies between barley, rice and A. thaliana. PMID:28105032

  7. A differentially regulated AP2/ERF transcription factor gene cluster acts downstream of a MAP kinase cascade to modulate terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Paul, Priyanka; Singh, Sanjay K; Patra, Barunava; Sui, Xueyi; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling

    2017-02-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces bioactive terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the chemotherapeutics, vincristine and vinblastine. Transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis is not fully understood. The jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive AP2/ERF transcription factor (TF), ORCA3, and its regulator, CrMYC2, play key roles in TIA biosynthesis. ORCA3 forms a physical cluster with two uncharacterized AP2/ERFs, ORCA4 and 5. Here, we report that (1) the ORCA gene cluster is differentially regulated; (2) ORCA4, while overlapping functionally with ORCA3, modulates an additional set of TIA genes. Unlike ORCA3, ORCA4 overexpression resulted in dramatic increase of TIA accumulation in C. roseus hairy roots. In addition, CrMYC2 is capable of activating ORCA3 and co-regulating TIA pathway genes concomitantly with ORCA3. The ORCA gene cluster and CrMYC2 act downstream of a MAP kinase cascade that includes a previously uncharacterized MAP kinase kinase, CrMAPKK1. Overexpression of CrMAPKK1 in C. roseus hairy roots upregulated TIA pathways genes and increased TIA accumulation. This work provides detailed characterization of a TF gene cluster and advances our understanding of the transcriptional and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that govern TIA biosynthesis in C. roseus.

  8. Development of a new approach for targeted gene editing in primordial germ cells using TALENs in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Keisuke; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A gene of interest can be efficiently modified using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) (Christian et al., 2010;Li et al., 2011). However, if a target gene is essential for development, growth and fertility, use of TALENs with high mutagenic activity in F0 frogs could result in developmental disorders or sterility, which would reduce the number of F1 progeny and make F1 phenotypical analysis difficult. We used the 3′ untranslated region of DEADSouth gene (DS-3′) of Xenopus tropicalis to solve this problem, because the addition of the DS-3′ to mRNA is known to induce primordial germ cell (PGC)-specific expression and reduce the stability in somatic cells of mRNA in Xenopus laevis. At first, we inserted the X. tropicalis DS-3′ downstream of the EGFP termination codon and confirmed that the EGFP expression was specifically detected in PGCs for three weeks. Therefore, we inserted the DS-3′ downstream of the termination codon of the TALEN coding sequence. The tyrosinase gene was selected as the target gene for TALEN because the bi-allelic mutation of this gene is easily discernible by the albino phenotype. When fertilized eggs were microinjected with TALEN mRNAs fused to the DS-3′, their sperm and oocytes had a high rate (84–100%) of target-gene modification in contrast to the lower rate (0–45%) of nucleotide alteration observed in somatic cells. PMID:25661867

  9. Development of a new approach for targeted gene editing in primordial germ cells using TALENs in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Keisuke; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2015-02-06

    A gene of interest can be efficiently modified using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) (Christian et al., 2010;Li et al., 2011). However, if a target gene is essential for development, growth and fertility, use of TALENs with high mutagenic activity in F0 frogs could result in developmental disorders or sterility, which would reduce the number of F1 progeny and make F1 phenotypical analysis difficult. We used the 3' untranslated region of DEADSouth gene (DS-3') of Xenopus tropicalis to solve this problem, because the addition of the DS-3' to mRNA is known to induce primordial germ cell (PGC)-specific expression and reduce the stability in somatic cells of mRNA in Xenopus laevis. At first, we inserted the X. tropicalis DS-3' downstream of the EGFP termination codon and confirmed that the EGFP expression was specifically detected in PGCs for three weeks. Therefore, we inserted the DS-3' downstream of the termination codon of the TALEN coding sequence. The tyrosinase gene was selected as the target gene for TALEN because the bi-allelic mutation of this gene is easily discernible by the albino phenotype. When fertilized eggs were microinjected with TALEN mRNAs fused to the DS-3', their sperm and oocytes had a high rate (84-100%) of target-gene modification in contrast to the lower rate (0-45%) of nucleotide alteration observed in somatic cells.

  10. Multi-focal control of mitochondrial gene expression by oncogenic MYC provides potential therapeutic targets in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Amanda R.; Adams, Clare M.; Zhang, Xiao-yong; Gennaro, Victoria J.; Pfeiffer, Harla K.; Mellert, Hestia S.; Seidel, Hans E.; Mascioli, Kirsten; Kaplan, Jordan; Gaballa, Mahmoud R.; Shen, Chen; Rigoutsos, Isidore; King, Michael P.; Cotney, Justin L.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Sharma, Suresh D.; Martinez, Ubaldo E.; Vakoc, Christopher R.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Thompson, James E.; Bradner, James E.; Cameron, Craig E.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Eischen, Christine M.; McMahon, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite ubiquitous activation in human cancer, essential downstream effector pathways of the MYC transcription factor have been difficult to define and target. Using a structure/function-based approach, we identified the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT) locus as a critical downstream target of MYC. The multifunctional POLRMT enzyme controls mitochondrial gene expression, a process required both for mitochondrial function and mitochondrial biogenesis. We further demonstrate that inhibition of this newly defined MYC effector pathway causes robust and selective tumor cell apoptosis, via an acute, checkpoint-like mechanism linked to aberrant electron transport chain complex assembly and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Fortuitously, MYC-dependent tumor cell death can be induced by inhibiting the mitochondrial gene expression pathway using a variety of strategies, including treatment with FDA-approved antibiotics. In vivo studies using a mouse model of Burkitt's Lymphoma provide pre-clinical evidence that these antibiotics can successfully block progression of MYC-dependent tumors. PMID:27590350

  11. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    From the studies performed during the last one year, we determined the effects of AAV-mediated anti-angiogenic gene therapy as a combination therapy...angiogenic gene therapy in combination with chemotherapy. In the next year, we will determine whether such a combination therapy would provide regression of established tumors.

  12. Renal diseases as targets of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brett; Giannoukakis, Nick; Trucco, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    A number of renal pathologies exist that have seen little or no improvement in treatment methods over the past 20 years. These pathologies include acute and chronic kidney diseases as well as posttransplant kidney survival and host rejection. A novel approach to treatment methodology may provide new insight to further progress our understanding of the disease and overall patient outcome. Recent advances in human genomics and gene delivery systems have opened the door to possible cures through the direct modulation of cellular genes. These techniques of gene therapy have not been extensively applied to renal pathologies, but clinical trials on other organ systems and kidney research in animal models hold promise. Techniques have employed viral and nonviral vectors to deliver gene modulating compounds directly into the cell. These vectors have the capability to replace defective alleles, express novel genes, or suppress the expression of pathogenic genes in a wide variety of kidney cell types. Focus has also been placed on ex vivo modification of kidney tissue to promote allograft survival and limit the resulting immune response to the transplanted organ. This could prove a valuable alternative to current immunosuppressive drugs and their deleterious effects on patients. While continued research and clinical trials are needed to identify a robust system of gene delivery, gene therapy techniques have great potential to treat kidney disease at the cellular level and improve patient quality of life.

  13. Microbiological characterization of aquatic microbiomes targeting taxonomical marker genes and antibiotic resistance genes of opportunistic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Johannes; Bollmann, Anna; Seitz, Wolfram; Schwartz, Thomas

    2015-04-15

    The dissemination of medically relevant antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (blaVIM-1, vanA, ampC, ermB, and mecA) and opportunistic bacteria (Enterococcus faecium/faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, and CNS) was determined in different anthropogenically influenced aquatic habitats in a selected region of Germany. Over a period of two years, four differently sized wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with and without clinical influence, three surface waters, four rain overflow basins, and three groundwater sites were analyzed by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). Results were calculated in cell equivalents per 100 ng of total DNA extracted from water samples and per 100 mL sample volume, which seems to underestimate the abundance of antibiotic resistance and opportunistic bacteria. High abundances of opportunistic bacteria and ARG were quantified in clinical wastewaters and influents of the adjacent WWTP. The removal capacities of WWTP were up to 99% for some, but not all investigated bacteria. The abundances of most ARG targets were found to be increased in the bacterial population after conventional wastewater treatment. As a consequence, downstream surface water and also some groundwater compartments displayed high abundances of all four ARGs. It became obvious that the dynamics of the ARG differed from the fate of the opportunistic bacteria. This underlines the necessity of an advanced microbial characterization of anthropogenically influenced environments.

  14. Gene expression of peripheral blood cells reveals pathways downstream of glucocorticoid receptor antagonism and nab-paclitaxel treatment

    PubMed Central

    Maranville, Joseph C; Nanda, Rita; Fleming, Gini F; Skor, Maxwell N; Di Rienzo, Anna; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While paclitaxel treatment is associated with leukopenia, the mechanisms that underlie this effect are not well-characterized. Additionally, despite the importance of glucocorticoid signaling in cancer treatment, the genomic effects of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonism by mifepristone treatment in primary human cells have never been described. Methods As part of a randomized Phase 1 clinical trial, we used microarrays to profile gene expression in peripheral blood cells sampled from each of 4 patients at baseline, after placebo/nab-paclitaxel treatment (cycle 1), and after mifepristone/nab-paclitaxel treatment (cycle 2). Results We found that 63 genes were differentially-expressed following treatment with nab-paclitaxel, including multiple genes in the tubulin pathway. We also found 606 genes that were differentially expressed in response to mifepristone; genes down-regulated by mifepristone overlapped significantly with those previously identified as being up-regulated by dexamethasone. Conclusions These results provide insights into the mechanisms of paclitaxel and GR inhibition in peripheral blood cells. PMID:25000515

  15. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  16. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    SciTech Connect

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Scott, Samantha A.; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-catenin{sup S45F}-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  17. CoCr enriched medium modulates integrin-based downstream signaling and requires a set of inflammatory genes reprograming in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Célio J C; Bezerra, Fabio; do Carmo, Maiara das D; Feltran, Georgia; Rossi, Mariana C; da Silva, Rodrigo A; Padilha, Pedro de M; Zambuzzi, Willian F

    2017-09-22

    Significant health concerns have been raised by the high levels of Cr and Co ions into whole blood as resulted of corrosion process released from biomedical implants, but very little is known about their biological behavior in governing cell metabolism. Thus, we prompted to address this issue by exploring the effects of CoCr enriched medium on both fibroblast and pre-osteoblast (pre-Ob) cells. Firstly, we showed there is a significant difference in Co and Cr releasing dependent on engineered surface, it being even more released in dual acid-etching treating surface (named w/DAE) than the machined surfaces (named wo/DAE). Thereafter, we showed CoCr affects pre-osteoblast and fibroblast metabolism by dynamically modulating integrin-based downstream signaling (FAK, Src, Rac1 and Cofilin). Specifically on this matter, we have shown there is dynamic ß1-integrin gene activation up 24 hours in both pre-osteoblast and fibroblast. Our analysis showed also that both pre-Ob and fibroblast are important resource of pro-inflammatory cytokines when responding to CoCr enriched medium. In addition, survival-related signaling pathway was also affected interfering on survival and proliferating signal, mainly affecting CDK2, mapk-Erk and mapk-p38 phosphorylations, while AKT/PKB-related gene remained active. In addition, during cell adhesion PP2A (an important Ser/Thr phosphatase) was inactive in both cell lineages and it seems be a CoCr's molecular fingerprint, regulating specific metabolic pathways involved with cytoskeleton rearrangement. Altogether, our results showed for the first time CoCr affects cellular performance in vitro by modulating integrin activation-based downstream signaling and requiring a reprograming of inflammatory genes activations in vitro. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Double targeted gene replacement for creating null mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, A; Coburn, C M; Beverley, S M

    1991-01-01

    We have used double gene targeting to create homozygous gene replacements in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, an asexual diploid. This method uses two independent selectable markers in successive rounds of gene targeting to replace both alleles of an endogenous gene. We developed an improved hygromycin B-resistance cassette encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase (HYG) for use as a selectable marker for Leishmania. HYG-containing vectors functioned equivalently to those containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (NEO) cassette previously used for extrachromosomal transformation or gene targeting. Drug resistances conferred by the NEO and HYG markers were independent, allowing simultaneous selection for both markers. A HYG targeting vector was utilized to replace the single dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene remaining in a line heterozygous for a NEO replacement at the dhfr-ts locus (+/neo), with a targeting efficiency comparable to that seen with wild-type recipients. The resultant dhfr-ts- line (hyg/neo) was auxotrophic for thymidine. The double targeted replacement method will enable functional genetic testing in a variety of asexual diploids, including cultured mammalian cells and fungi such as Candida albicans. Additionally, it may be possible to use Leishmania bearing conditionally auxotrophic gene replacements as safe, improved live vaccines for leishmaniasis. Images PMID:1651496

  19. Double targeted gene replacement for creating null mutants.

    PubMed

    Cruz, A; Coburn, C M; Beverley, S M

    1991-08-15

    We have used double gene targeting to create homozygous gene replacements in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, an asexual diploid. This method uses two independent selectable markers in successive rounds of gene targeting to replace both alleles of an endogenous gene. We developed an improved hygromycin B-resistance cassette encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase (HYG) for use as a selectable marker for Leishmania. HYG-containing vectors functioned equivalently to those containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (NEO) cassette previously used for extrachromosomal transformation or gene targeting. Drug resistances conferred by the NEO and HYG markers were independent, allowing simultaneous selection for both markers. A HYG targeting vector was utilized to replace the single dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene remaining in a line heterozygous for a NEO replacement at the dhfr-ts locus (+/neo), with a targeting efficiency comparable to that seen with wild-type recipients. The resultant dhfr-ts- line (hyg/neo) was auxotrophic for thymidine. The double targeted replacement method will enable functional genetic testing in a variety of asexual diploids, including cultured mammalian cells and fungi such as Candida albicans. Additionally, it may be possible to use Leishmania bearing conditionally auxotrophic gene replacements as safe, improved live vaccines for leishmaniasis.

  20. AAV-mediated gene targeting methods for human cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Iram F; Hirata, Roli K; Russell, David W

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types, with targeting frequencies ranging from 10−5 to 10−2 per infected cell. these targeting frequencies are 1–4 logs higher than those obtained by conventional transfection or electroporation approaches. a wide variety of different types of mutations can be introduced into chromosomal loci with high fidelity and without genotoxicity. Here we provide a detailed protocol for gene targeting in human cells with AAV vectors. We describe methods for vector design, stock preparation and titration. optimized transduction protocols are provided for human pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts and transformed cell lines, as well as a method for identifying targeted clones by southern blots. this protocol (from vector design through a single round of targeting and screening) can be completed in ~10 weeks; each subsequent round of targeting and screening should take an additional 7 weeks. PMID:21455185

  1. Roles of Wnt Target Genes in the Journey of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee-Heun; Park, So-Yeon; Jun, Youngsoo; Kim, Ji-Young; Nam, Jeong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    The importance of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been acknowledged; however, the mechanism through which it regulates the biological function of CSCs and promotes cancer progression remains elusive. Hence, to understand the intricate mechanism by which Wnt controls stemness, the specific downstream target genes of Wnt were established by analyzing the genetic signatures of multiple types of metastatic cancers based on gene set enrichment. By focusing on the molecular function of Wnt target genes, the biological roles of Wnt were interpreted in terms of CSC dynamics from initiation to metastasis. Wnt signaling participates in cancer initiation by generating CSCs from normal stem cells or non-CSCs and augmenting persistent growth at the primary region, which is resistant to anti-cancer therapy. Moreover, it assists CSCs in invading nearby tissues and in entering the blood stream, during which the negative feedback of the Wnt signaling pathway maintains CSCs in a dormant state that is suitable for survival. When CSCs arrive at distant organs, another burst of Wnt signaling induces CSCs to succeed in re-initiation and colonization. This comprehensive understanding of Wnt target genes provides a plausible explanation for how Wnt allows CSCs variation during cancer progression. PMID:28757546

  2. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leόn, Alberto J; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S H; Farooqui, Amber; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus-epithelial cell interaction.

  3. Associating transcription factor-binding site motifs with target GO terms and target genes

    PubMed Central

    Bodén, Mikael; Bailey, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    The roles and target genes of many transcription factors (TFs) are still unknown. To predict the roles of TFs, we present a computational method for associating Gene Ontology (GO) terms with TF-binding motifs. The method works by ranking all genes as potential targets of the TF, and reporting GO terms that are significantly associated with highly ranked genes. We also present an approach, whereby these predicted GO terms can be used to improve predictions of TF target genes. This uses a novel gene-scoring function that reflects the insight that genes annotated with GO terms predicted to be associated with the TF are more likely to be its targets. We construct validation sets of GO terms highly associated with known targets of various yeast and human TF. On the yeast reference sets, our prediction method identifies at least one correct GO term for 73% of the TF, 49% of the correct GO terms are predicted and almost one-third of the predicted GO terms are correct. Results on human reference sets are similarly encouraging. Validation of our target gene prediction method shows that its accuracy exceeds that of simple motif scanning. PMID:18544606

  4. Gene expression profiling for targeted cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yuryev, Anton

    2015-01-01

    There is certain degree of frustration and discontent in the area of microarray gene expression data analysis of cancer datasets. It arises from the mathematical problem called 'curse of dimensionality,' which is due to the small number of samples available in training sets, used for calculating transcriptional signatures from the large number of differentially expressed (DE) genes, measured by microarrays. The new generation of causal reasoning algorithms can provide solutions to the curse of dimensionality by transforming microarray data into activity of a small number of cancer hallmark pathways. This new approach can make feature space dimensionality optimal for mathematical signature calculations. The author reviews the reasons behind the current frustration with transcriptional signatures derived from DE genes in cancer. He also provides an overview of the novel methods for signature calculations based on differentially variable genes and expression regulators. Furthermore, the authors provide perspectives on causal reasoning algorithms that use prior knowledge about regulatory events described in scientific literature to identify expression regulators responsible for the differential expression observed in cancer samples. The author advocates causal reasoning methods to calculate cancer pathway activity signatures. The current challenge for these algorithms is in ensuring quality of the knowledgebase. Indeed, the development of cancer hallmark pathway collections, together with statistical algorithms to transform activity of expression regulators into pathway activity, are necessary for causal reasoning to be used in cancer research.

  5. Genes targeted by the Hedgehog-signaling pathway can be regulated by Estrogen related receptor β.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Lubahn, Dennis B

    2015-11-23

    Nuclear receptor family member, Estrogen related receptor β, and the Hedgehog signal transduction pathway are both reported to relate to tumorigenesis and induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming. We hypothesize that Estrogen related receptor β can modulate the Hedgehog signaling pathway and affect Hedgehog driven downstream gene expression. We established an estrogen related receptor β-expressing Hedgehog-responsive NIH3T3 cell line by Esrrb transfection, and performed mRNA profiling using RNA-Seq after Hedgehog ligand conditioned medium treatment. Esrrb expression altered 171 genes, while Hedgehog signaling activation alone altered 339 genes. Additionally, estrogen related receptor β expression in combination with Hedgehog signaling activation affects a group of 109 Hedgehog responsive mRNAs, including Hsd11b1, Ogn, Smoc2, Igf1, Pdcd4, Igfbp4, Stmn1, Hp, Hoxd8, Top2a, Tubb4b, Sfrp2, Saa3, Prl2c3 and Dpt. We conclude that Estrogen related receptor β is capable of interacting with Hh-signaling downstream targets. Our results suggest a new level of regulation of Hedgehog signaling by Estrogen related receptor β, and indicate modulation of Estrogen related receptor β can be a new strategy to regulate various functions driven by the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

  6. Profound biotinidase deficiency caused by a point mutation that creates a downstream cryptic 3' splice acceptor site within an exon of the human biotinidase gene.

    PubMed

    Pomponio, R J; Reynolds, T R; Mandel, H; Admoni, O; Melone, P D; Buck, G A; Wolf, B

    1997-05-01

    Biotinidase recycles the vitamin biotin from biocytin upon the degradation of the biotin-dependent carboxylases. We have identified a novel point mutation within the biotinidase gene that encodes the signal peptide in two unrelated individuals with profound biotinidase deficiency. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from these individuals revealed a G to A transition (G100-->A) located 57 bases downstream of the authentic splice acceptor site in exon B. Although this mutation predicts a G34S substitution, it also generates a 3' splice acceptor site. Sequence of the PCR-amplified cDNA from the homozygous child revealed that all the product was shorter than that of normal individuals and was the result of aberrant splicing. The aberrantly spliced transcript lacked 57 bases, including a second in-frame ATG, that encode most of the putative signal peptide and results in an in-frame deletion of 19 amino acids. The mutation results in failure to secrete the aberrant protein into the blood. This is the first reported example in which a point mutation creates a cryptic 3' splice acceptor site motif that is used preferentially over the upstream authentic splice site. The preferential usage of the downstream splice site is not consistent with the 5'-3' scanning model, but is consistent with the exon definition model of RNA splicing.

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  8. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well. PMID:20936127

  9. A high throughput platform for stem cell-niche co-cultures and downstream gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gracz, Adam D; Williamson, Ian A; Roche, Kyle C; Johnston, Michael J; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Yuli; Attayek, Peter J; Balowski, Joseph; Liu, Xiao Fu; Laurenza, Ryan J; Gaynor, Liam T; Sims, Christopher E; Galanko, Joseph A; Li, Linheng; Allbritton, Nancy L; Magness, Scott T

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells reside in “niches”, where support cells provide signaling critical for tissue renewal. Culture methods mimic niche conditions and support the growth of stem cells in vitro. However, current functional assays preclude statistically meaningful studies of clonal stem cells, stem cell-niche interactions, and genetic analysis of single cells and their organoid progeny. Here, we describe a “microraft array” (MRA) that facilitates high-throughput clonogenic culture and computational identification of single intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and niche cells co-cultures. We use MRAs to demonstrate that Paneth cells, a known ISC niche component, enhance organoid formation in a contact-dependent manner. MRAs facilitate retrieval of early enteroids for qPCR to correlate functional properties, such as enteroid morphology, with differences in gene expression. MRAs have broad applicability to assaying stem cell-niche interactions and organoid development, and serve as a high-throughput culture platform to interrogate gene expression at early stages of stem cell fate choices. PMID:25664616

  10. Viroreplicative Gene Therapy Targeted to Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    University of Southern California. Principles of the Helsinki Declaration were followed. For immunization and prophylactic vaccination exper- iments 6 to 8...drug 5- fluorouracil (5FU), as RCR vectors using this suicide gene have moved forward to Phase I clinical trials for the treatment of patients...proceeding to human clinical trials , we have modified the original vector back bone of Logg et al. [13], and inserted various forms of the cytosine deaminase

  11. Genome-Wide Identification of KANADI1 Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Felix; Weigel, Detlef; Bowman, John L.; Heisler, Marcus G.; Wenkel, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Plant organ development and polarity establishment is mediated by the action of several transcription factors. Among these, the KANADI (KAN) subclade of the GARP protein family plays important roles in polarity-associated processes during embryo, shoot and root patterning. In this study, we have identified a set of potential direct target genes of KAN1 through a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation/DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and genome-wide transcriptional profiling using tiling arrays. Target genes are over-represented for genes involved in the regulation of organ development as well as in the response to auxin. KAN1 affects directly the expression of several genes previously shown to be important in the establishment of polarity during lateral organ and vascular tissue development. We also show that KAN1 controls through its target genes auxin effects on organ development at different levels: transport and its regulation, and signaling. In addition, KAN1 regulates genes involved in the response to abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, ethylene, cytokinins and gibberellins. The role of KAN1 in organ polarity is antagonized by HD-ZIPIII transcription factors, including REVOLUTA (REV). A comparison of their target genes reveals that the REV/KAN1 module acts in organ patterning through opposite regulation of shared targets. Evidence of mutual repression between closely related family members is also shown. PMID:24155946

  12. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene therapy research and its application in relation to anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22977356

  13. Targeted gene deletion in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Mollapour, M; Piper, P

    2001-01-30

    Yeasts of the genus Zygosaccharomyces are notable agents of large-scale food spoilage. Despite the economic importance of these organisms, little is known about the stress adaptations whereby they adapt to many of the more severe conditions of food preservation. In this study it was shown that genes of Z. bailii, a yeast notable for its high resistances to food preservatives and ethanol, can be isolated by complementation of the corresponding mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was also discovered that the acquisition by S. cerevisiae of a single small Z. bailii gene (ZbYME2) was sufficient for the former yeast to acquire the ability to degrade two major food preservatives, benzoic acid and sorbic acid. Using DNA cassettes containing dominant selectable markers and methods originally developed for performing gene deletions in S. cerevisiae, the two copies of ZbYME2 in the Z. bailii genome were sequentially deleted. The resulting Zbyme2/Zbyme2 homozygous deletant strain had lost any ability to utilize benzoate as sole carbon source and was more sensitive to weak acid preservatives during growth on glucose. Thus, ZbYME2, probably the nuclear gene for a mitochondrial mono-oxygenase function, is essential for Z. bailii to degrade food preservatives. This ability to catabolize weak acid preservatives is a significant factor contributing to the preservative resistance of Z. bailii under aerobic conditions. This study is the first to demonstrate that it is possible to delete in Z. bailii genes that are suspected as being important for growth of this organism in preserved foods and beverages. With the construction of further mutant of Z. bailii strains, a clearer picture should emerge of how this yeast adapts to the conditions of food preservation. This information will, in turn, allow the design of new preservation strategies. GenBank Accession Nos: ZbURA3 (AF279259), ZbTIM9 (AF279260), ZbYME2 (AF279261), ZbTRP1 (AF279262), ZbHHT1(AF296170).

  14. Chimeric DNA methyltransferases target DNA methylation to specific DNA sequences and repress expression of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Papworth, Monika; Minczuk, Michal; Rohde, Christian; Zhang, Yingying; Ragozin, Sergei; Jeltsch, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing by targeted DNA methylation has potential applications in basic research and therapy. To establish targeted methylation in human cell lines, the catalytic domains (CDs) of mouse Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b DNA methyltransferases (MTases) were fused to different DNA binding domains (DBD) of GAL4 and an engineered Cys2His2 zinc finger domain. We demonstrated that (i) Dense DNA methylation can be targeted to specific regions in gene promoters using chimeric DNA MTases. (ii) Site-specific methylation leads to repression of genes controlled by various cellular or viral promoters. (iii) Mutations affecting any of the DBD, MTase or target DNA sequences reduce targeted methylation and gene silencing. (iv) Targeted DNA methylation is effective in repressing Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in cell culture with the viral titer reduced by at least 18-fold in the presence of an MTase fused to an engineered zinc finger DBD, which binds a single site in the promoter of HSV-1 gene IE175k. In short, we show here that it is possible to direct DNA MTase activity to predetermined sites in DNA, achieve targeted gene silencing in mammalian cell lines and interfere with HSV-1 propagation. PMID:17151075

  15. Epithelial Expression of Human ABO Blood Group Genes Is Dependent upon a Downstream Regulatory Element Functioning through an Epithelial Cell-specific Transcription Factor, Elf5.

    PubMed

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Kubo, Rieko; Kobayashi, Momoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Takeshita, Haruo; Ogasawara, Kenichi; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-21

    The human ABO blood group system is of great importance in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO system is composed of complex carbohydrate structures that are biosynthesized by A- and B-transferases encoded by the ABO gene. However, the mechanisms regulating ABO gene expression in epithelial cells remain obscure. On the basis of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in and around ABO in epithelial cells, we prepared reporter plasmid constructs including these sites. Subsequent luciferase assays and histone modifications indicated a novel positive regulatory element, designated the +22.6-kb site, downstream from ABO, and this was shown to enhance ABO promoter activity in an epithelial cell-specific manner. Expression of ABO and B-antigen was reduced in gastric cancer KATOIII cells by biallelic deletion of the +22.6-kb site using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the site bound to an epithelial cell-specific transcription factor, Elf5. Mutation of the Ets binding motifs to abrogate binding of this factor reduced the regulatory activity of the +22.6-kb site. Furthermore, ELF5 knockdown with shRNA reduced both endogenous transcription from ABO and B-antigen expression in KATOIII cells. Thus, Elf5 appeared to be involved in the enhancer potential of the +22.6-kb site. These results support the contention that ABO expression is dependent upon a downstream positive regulatory element functioning through a tissue-restricted transcription factor, Elf5, in epithelial cells.

  16. A Flexible Approach for Highly Multiplexed Candidate Gene Targeted Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Natsoulis, Georges; Bell, John M.; Xu, Hua; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Ordonez, Heather; Grimes, Susan; Newburger, Daniel; Jensen, Michael; Zahn, Jacob M.; Zhang, Nancy; Ji, Hanlee P.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an integrated strategy for targeted resequencing and analysis of gene subsets from the human exome for variants. Our capture technology is geared towards resequencing gene subsets substantially larger than can be done efficiently with simplex or multiplex PCR but smaller in scale than exome sequencing. We describe all the steps from the initial capture assay to single nucleotide variant (SNV) discovery. The capture methodology uses in-solution 80-mer oligonucleotides. To provide optimal flexibility in choosing human gene targets, we designed an in silico set of oligonucleotides, the Human OligoExome, that covers the gene exons annotated by the Consensus Coding Sequencing Project (CCDS). This resource is openly available as an Internet accessible database where one can download capture oligonucleotides sequences for any CCDS gene and design custom capture assays. Using this resource, we demonstrated the flexibility of this assay by custom designing capture assays ranging from 10 to over 100 gene targets with total capture sizes from over 100 Kilobases to nearly one Megabase. We established a method to reduce capture variability and incorporated indexing schemes to increase sample throughput. Our approach has multiple applications that include but are not limited to population targeted resequencing studies of specific gene subsets, validation of variants discovered in whole genome sequencing surveys and possible diagnostic analysis of disease gene subsets. We also present a cost analysis demonstrating its cost-effectiveness for large population studies. PMID:21738606

  17. OsCOL10, a CONSTANS-Like Gene, Functions as a Flowering Time Repressor Downstream of Ghd7 in Rice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Junjie; Jin, Mingna; Wang, Jiachang; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jiulin; Zheng, Xiaoming; Chen, Liping; Wang, Min; Zhu, Shanshan; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Xuanming; Wang, Chunming; Wang, Haiyang; Wu, Chuanyin; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-04-01

    Flowering time, or heading date, is a critical agronomic trait that determines the cropping season and regional adaptability, and ultimately grain yield in rice. A number of genes involved in photoperiodic flowering have been cloned and their roles in modulating expression of the flowering genes have been characterized to a certain extent. However, much less is known about the pathway in transmitting the day length response signal(s) to induce transition to reproductive growth. Here, we report a constitutive flowering repressor OsCOL10, which encodes a member of the CONSTANS-like (COL) family. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsCOL10 (driven by a strong promoter or by fusing it to the activation domain of VP64) showed delayed flowering time under both short and long days.OsCOL10 is affected by the circadian clock and is preferentially expressed in leaf mesophyll cells; it is localized to the nucleus and has transcriptional activation activity. Further studies show that OsCOL10 represses the expression of theFT-like genes RFT1 and Hd3a through Ehd1. Transcripts of OsCOL10 are more abundant in plants carrying a functional Ghd7 allele or overexpressing Ghd7 than in Ghd7-deficient plants, thus placing OsCOL10 downstream of Ghd7.Taking these findings together, we conclude that OsCOL10 functions as a flowering time repressor that links Ghd7 and Ehd1 in rice.

  18. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    or transduced son, WI). A mouse monoclonal anti-human VEGF with 100 multiplicities of infection (MOI) of rAAV-sFlt-l. receptor-1 (FIt-1 receptor...only partial amounts of the cancer patients correlate with advanced and metastatic deficient protein/enzyme for phenotypic correction of disease and...activity of matrix metalloproteinase. Cancer Res 2000;60: 4- sulfatase to the retinal pigment epithelium of feline mucopolysacchar- 5410-3. idosis VI. J Gene Med 2002;4:613-321.

  19. Transductional targeting of adenovirus vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, JN; Everts, M; Curiel, DT

    2007-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy approaches will derive considerable benefit from adenovirus (Ad) vectors capable of self-directed localization to neoplastic disease or immunomodulatory targets in vivo. The ablation of native Ad tropism coupled with active targeting modalities has demonstrated that innate gene delivery efficiency may be retained while circumventing Ad dependence on its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and Ad receptor. Herein, we describe advances in Ad targeting that are predicated on a fundamental understanding of vector/cell interplay. Further, we propose strategies by which existing paradigms, such as nanotechnology, may be combined with Ad vectors to form advanced delivery vehicles with multiple functions. PMID:16439993

  20. The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Domashenko, A; Cotsarelis, G

    2001-01-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells for continued hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be targeted by topical gene delivery to mouse skin. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrated the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts as well. We defined liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection occurred only during anagen onset. Considerations and obstacles for using gene therapy to treat alopecias and skin disease are discussed. A theoretical framework for future gene therapy treatments for cutaneous and systemic disorders is presented.

  1. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Stéphane G.; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leon, Alberto J.; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S.H.; Farooqui, Amber; and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  2. An examination of targeted gene neighborhoods in strawberry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Strawberry (Fragaria spp.) is the familiar name of a group of economically important crop plants and wild relatives that also represent an emerging system for the study of gene and genome evolution. Its small stature, rapid seed-to-seed cycle, transformability and miniscule basic genome make strawberry an attractive system to study processes related to plant physiology, development and crop production; yet it lacks substantial genomics-level resources. This report addresses this deficiency by characterizing 0.71 Mbp of gene space from a diploid species (F. vesca). The twenty large genomic tracks (30-52 kb) captured as fosmid inserts comprise gene regions with roles in flowering, disease resistance, and metabolism. Results A detailed description of the studied regions reveals 131 Blastx-supported gene sites and eight additional EST-supported gene sites. Only 15 genes have complete EST coverage, enabling gene modelling, while 76 lack EST support. Instances of microcolinearity with Arabidopsis thaliana were identified in twelve inserts. A relatively high portion (25%) of targeted genes were found in unanticipated tandem duplications. The effectiveness of six FGENESH training models was assessed via comparisons among ab initio predictions and homology-based gene and start/stop codon identifications. Fourteen transposable-element-related sequences and 158 simple sequence repeat loci were delineated. Conclusions This report details the structure and content of targeted regions of the strawberry genome. The data indicate that the strawberry genome is gene-dense, with an average of one protein-encoding gene or pseudogene per 5.9 kb. Current overall EST coverage is sparse. The unexpected gene duplications and their differential patterns of EST support suggest possible subfunctionalization or pseudogenization of these sequences. This report provides a high-resolution depiction of targeted gene neighborhoods that will aid whole-genome sequence assembly, provide

  3. Disease modeling by gene targeting using microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lan, C-C; Leong, I U S; Lai, D; Love, D R

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish have proved to be a popular species for the modeling of human disease. In this context, there is a need to move beyond chemical-based mutagenesis and develop tools that target genes that are orthologous to those that are implicated in human heritable diseases. Targeting can take the form of creating mutations that are nonsense or mis-sense, or to mimic haploinsufficiency through the regulated expression of RNA effector molecules. In terms of the latter, we describe here the development and investigation of microRNA (miRNA)-based directed gene silencing methods in zebrafish. Unlike small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), miRNA-based methods offer temporal and spatial regulation of gene silencing. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate the efficacy of the method in zebrafish embryos, which provide the foundation for developing disease models using miRNA-based gene-targeting.

  4. Target of rapamycin complex 2 signals to downstream effector yeast protein kinase 2 (Ypk2) through adheres-voraciously-to-target-of-rapamycin-2 protein 1 (Avo1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsien-Ching; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2012-02-24

    The conserved Ser/Thr kinase target of rapamycin (TOR) serves as a central regulator in controlling cell growth-related functions. There exist two distinct TOR complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, each coupling to specific downstream effectors and signaling pathways. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TORC2 is involved in regulating actin organization and maintaining cell wall integrity. Ypk2 (yeast protein kinase 2), a member of the cAMP-dependent, cGMP-dependent, and PKC (AGC) kinase family, is a TORC2 substrate known to participate in actin and cell wall regulation. Employing avo3(ts) mutants with defects in TORC2 functions that are suppressible by active Ypk2, we investigated the molecular interactions involved in mediating TORC2 signaling to Ypk2. GST pulldown assays in yeast lysates demonstrated physical interactions between Ypk2 and components of TORC2. In vitro binding assays revealed that Avo1 directly binds to Ypk2. In avo3(ts) mutants, the TORC2-Ypk2 interaction was reduced and could be restored by AVO1 overexpression, highlighting the important role of Avo1 in coupling TORC2 to Ypk2. The interaction was mapped to an internal region (amino acids 600-840) of Avo1 and a C-terminal region of Ypk2. Ypk2(334-677), a truncated form of Ypk2 containing the Avo1-interacting region, was able to interfere with Avo1-Ypk2 interaction in vitro. Overexpressing Ypk2(334-677) in yeast cells resulted in a perturbation of TORC2 functions, causing defective cell wall integrity, aberrant actin organization, and diminished TORC2-dependent Ypk2 phosphorylation evidenced by the loss of an electrophoretic mobility shift. Together, our data support the conclusion that the direct Avo1-Ypk2 interaction is crucial for TORC2 signaling to the downstream Ypk2 pathway.

  5. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M. Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species. PMID:27581768

  6. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species.

  7. Gene-targeting technologies for the study of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Beglopoulos, Vassilios; Shen, Jie

    2004-01-01

    Studies using genetic manipulations have proven invaluable in the research of neurological disorders. In the forefront of these approaches is the knockout technology that engineers a targeted gene mutation in mice resulting in inactivation of gene expression. In many cases, important roles of a particular gene in embryonic development have precluded the in vivo study of its function in the adult brain, which is usually the most relevant experimental context for the study of neurological disorders. The conditional knockout technology has provided a tool to overcome this restriction and has been used successfully to generate viable mouse models with gene inactivation patterns in certain regions or cell types of the postnatal brain. This review first describes the methodology of gene targeting in mice, detailing the aspects of designing a targeting vector, introducing it into embryonic stem cells in culture and screening for correct recombination events, and generating chimeric and null mutant mice from the positive clones. It then discusses the special issues and considerations for the generation of conditional knockout mice, including a section about approaches for inducible gene inactivation in the brain and some of their applications. An overview of gene-targeted mouse models that have been used in the study of several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, seizure disorders, and schizophrenia, is also presented. The importance of the results obtained by these models for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanism underlying the disorders is discussed.

  8. Gene expression signature based screening identifies ribonucleotide reductase as a candidate therapeutic target in Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Kelli L.; Gordon, David J.

    2016-01-01

    There is a critical need in cancer therapeutics to identify targeted therapies that will improve outcomes and decrease toxicities compared to conventional, cytotoxic chemotherapy. Ewing sarcoma is a highly aggressive bone and soft tissue cancer that is caused by the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein. Although EWS-FLI1 is specific for cancer cells, and required for tumorigenesis, directly targeting this transcription factor has proven challenging. Consequently, targeting unique dependencies or key downstream mediators of EWS-FLI1 represent important alternative strategies. We used gene expression data derived from a genetically defined model of Ewing sarcoma to interrogate the Connectivity Map and identify a class of drugs, iron chelators, that downregulate a significant number of EWS-FLI1 target genes. We then identified ribonucleotide reductase M2 (RRM2), the iron-dependent subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), as one mediator of iron chelator toxicity in Ewing sarcoma cells. Inhibition of RNR in Ewing sarcoma cells caused apoptosis in vitro and attenuated tumor growth in an in vivo, xenograft model. Additionally, we discovered that the sensitivity of Ewing sarcoma cells to inhibition or suppression of RNR is mediated, in part, by high levels of SLFN11, a protein that sensitizes cells to DNA damage. This work demonstrates a unique dependency of Ewing sarcoma cells on RNR and supports further investigation of RNR inhibitors, which are currently used in clinical practice, as a novel approach for treating Ewing sarcoma. PMID:27557498

  9. Male-Specific Fruitless Isoforms Target Neurodevelopmental Genes to Specify a Sexually Dimorphic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Megan C.; Nojima, Tetsuya; Ashley, Elizabeth; Parker, Darren J.; Walker, John; Southall, Tony; Van de Sande, Bram; Marques, Ana C.; Fischer, Bettina; Brand, Andrea H.; Russell, Steven; Ritchie, Michael G.; Aerts, Stein; Goodwin, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In Drosophila, male courtship behavior is regulated in large part by the gene fruitless (fru). fru encodes a set of putative transcription factors that promote male sexual behavior by controlling the development of sexually dimorphic neuronal circuitry. Little is known about how Fru proteins function at the level of transcriptional regulation or the role that isoform diversity plays in the formation of a male-specific nervous system. Results To characterize the roles of sex-specific Fru isoforms in specifying male behavior, we generated novel isoform-specific mutants and used a genomic approach to identify direct Fru isoform targets during development. We demonstrate that all Fru isoforms directly target genes involved in the development of the nervous system, with individual isoforms exhibiting unique binding specificities. We observe that fru behavioral phenotypes are specified by either a single isoform or a combination of isoforms. Finally, we illustrate the utility of these data for the identification of novel sexually dimorphic genomic enhancers and novel downstream regulators of male sexual behavior. Conclusions These findings suggest that Fru isoform diversity facilitates both redundancy and specificity in gene expression, and that the regulation of neuronal developmental genes may be the most ancient and conserved role of fru in the specification of a male-specific nervous system. PMID:24440396

  10. Nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2016-01-01

    Despite striking insights on lung cancer progression, and cutting-edge therapeutic approaches the survival of patients with lung cancer, remains poor. In recent years, targeted gene therapy with nanoparticles is one of the most rapidly evolving and extensive areas of research for lung cancer. The major goal of targeted gene therapy is to bring forward a safe and efficient treatment to cancer patients via specifically targeting and deterring cancer cells in the body. To achieve high therapeutic efficacy of gene delivery, various carriers have been engineered and developed to provide protection to the genetic materials and efficient delivery to targeted cancer cells. Nanoparticles play an important role in the area of drug delivery and have been widely applied in cancer treatments for the purposes of controlled release and cancer cell targeting. Nanoparticles composed of artificial polymers, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids have been developed for the delivery of therapeutic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences to target cancer. In addition, the effectiveness of cancer targeting has been enhanced by surface modification or conjugation with biomolecules on the surface of nanoparticles. In this review article we provide an overview on the latest developments in nanoparticle-based targeted gene therapy for lung cancers. Firstly, we outline the conventional therapies and discuss strategies for targeted gene therapy using nanoparticles. Secondly, we provide the most representative and recent researches in lung cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma, mainly focusing on the application of Polymeric, Lipid-based, and Metal-based nanoparticles. Finally, we discuss current achievements and future challenges. PMID:27294004

  11. Single molecule targeted sequencing for cancer gene mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Deng, Liwei; Yan, Qin; Gao, Yongqian; Wu, Zengding; Cai, Jinsen; Ji, Daorui; Li, Gailing; Wu, Ping; Jin, Huan; Zhao, Luyang; Liu, Song; Ge, Liangjin; Deem, Michael W.; He, Jiankui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid decline in cost of sequencing, it is now affordable to examine multiple genes in a single disease-targeted clinical test using next generation sequencing. Current targeted sequencing methods require a separate step of targeted capture enrichment during sample preparation before sequencing. Although there are fast sample preparation methods available in market, the library preparation process is still relatively complicated for physicians to use routinely. Here, we introduced an amplification-free Single Molecule Targeted Sequencing (SMTS) technology, which combined targeted capture and sequencing in one step. We demonstrated that this technology can detect low-frequency mutations using artificially synthesized DNA sample. SMTS has several potential advantages, including simple sample preparation thus no biases and errors are introduced by PCR reaction. SMTS has the potential to be an easy and quick sequencing technology for clinical diagnosis such as cancer gene mutation detection, infectious disease detection, inherited condition screening and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27193446

  12. Targeted gene correction with 5' acridine-oligonucleotide conjugates.

    PubMed

    de Piédoue, G; Andrieu-Soler, C; Concordet, J P; Maurisse, R; Sun, J-S; Lopez, B; Kuzniak, I; Leboulch, P; Feugeas, J-P

    2007-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides (SSOs) mediate gene repair of punctual chromosomal mutations at a low frequency. We hypothesized that enhancement of DNA binding affinity of SSOs by intercalating agents may increase the number of corrected cells. Several biochemical modifications of SSOs were tested for their capability to correct a chromosomally integrated and mutated GFP reporter gene in human 293 cells. SSOs of 25 nucleotide length conjugated with acridine at their 5' end increased the efficiency of gene correction up to 10-fold compared to nonmodified SSOs. Acridine and psoralen conjugates were both evaluated, and acridine-modified SSOs were the most effective. Conjugation with acridine at the 3' end of the SSO inhibited gene correction, whereas flanking the SSO by acridine on both sides provided an intermediate level of correction. These results suggest that increasing the stability of hybridization between SSO and its target without hampering a 3' extension improves gene targeting, in agreement with the "annealing-integration" model of DNA repair.

  13. Transcriptional silencing of N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in metastatic colon cancer cell line SW620.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Chen, Hong

    2011-02-01

    N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) plays vital roles in tumor metastasis suppression and is frequently silenced in metastatic colon cancers. NDRG1 is silenced in a highly metastatic colon cancer cell line SW620. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential mechanisms involved in silencing of the NDRG1 gene. SW480 and SW620 are two colon cancer cell lines established from the same patient with different metastatic potentials, making them an ideal model for investigation of metastatic mechanisms. Knockdown of NDRG1 in SW480 to a level that is similar to that in SW620 also modulated cell cycle and proliferation in SW480 towards the status of the highly metastatic SW620. Epigenetic mechanisms of the transcriptional control of NDRG1 were investigated. The silencing of NDRG1 in SW620 was not due to promoter hyper-methylation as bisulfite sequencing of the NDRG1 promoter showed minimal DNA methylation in both cell lines. On the other hand, chromatin immunoprecipitation showed a significantly higher level of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) association with the NDRG1 promoter in SW480 compared to SW620, in agreement with its gene expression level. The low Pol II binding at the NDRG1 promoter in SW620 was associated with gene-wide decrease in histone H4 acetylation and increase in histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation. Meanwhile, the NDRG1 coding region showed much higher histone H3 lysine 4 methylation in SW480. In conclusion we observed unique histone modifications in two colon cancer cell lines with different metastatic potentials, indicating possible mechanisms for the down-regulation of NDRG1 in metastatic SW620.

  14. Comparative gene expression analysis of Dtg, a novel target gene of Dpp signaling pathway in the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo.

    PubMed

    Hodar, Christian; Zuñiga, Alejandro; Pulgar, Rodrigo; Travisany, Dante; Chacon, Carlos; Pino, Michael; Maass, Alejandro; Cambiazo, Verónica

    2014-02-10

    In the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo, Dpp, a secreted molecule that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily of growth factors, activates a set of downstream genes to subdivide the dorsal region into amnioserosa and dorsal epidermis. Here, we examined the expression pattern and transcriptional regulation of Dtg, a new target gene of Dpp signaling pathway that is required for proper amnioserosa differentiation. We showed that the expression of Dtg was controlled by Dpp and characterized a 524-bp enhancer that mediated expression in the dorsal midline, as well as, in the differentiated amnioserosa in transgenic reporter embryos. This enhancer contained a highly conserved region of 48-bp in which bioinformatic predictions and in vitro assays identified three Mad binding motifs. Mutational analysis revealed that these three motifs were necessary for proper expression of a reporter gene in transgenic embryos, suggesting that short and highly conserved genomic sequences may be indicative of functional regulatory regions in D. melanogaster genes. Dtg orthologs were not detected in basal lineages of Dipterans, which unlike D. melanogaster develop two extra-embryonic membranes, amnion and serosa, nevertheless Dtg orthologs were identified in the transcriptome of Musca domestica, in which dorsal ectoderm patterning leads to the formation of a single extra-embryonic membrane. These results suggest that Dtg was recruited as a new component of the network that controls dorsal ectoderm patterning in the lineage leading to higher Cyclorrhaphan flies, such as D. melanogaster and M. domestica. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chlorate reductase is cotranscribed with cytochrome c and other downstream genes in the gene cluster for chlorate respiration of Ideonella dechloratans.

    PubMed

    Hellberg Lindqvist, Miriam; Nilsson, Thomas; Sundin, Pontus; Rova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    The chlorate-respiring bacterium Ideonella dechloratans is a facultative anaerobe that can use both oxygen and chlorate as terminal electron acceptors. The genes for the enzymes chlorate reductase (clrABDC) and chlorite dismutase, necessary for chlorate metabolism and probably acquired by lateral gene transfer, are located in a gene cluster that also includes other genes potentially important for chlorate metabolism. Among those are a gene for cytochrome c (cyc) whose gene product may serve as an electron carrier during chlorate reduction, a cofactor biosynthesis gene (mobB) and a predicted transcriptional regulator (arsR). Only chlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase have been shown to be expressed in vivo. Here, we report the in vivo production of a single polycistronic transcript covering eight open reading frames including clrABDC, cyc, mobB and arsR. Transcription levels of the cyc and clrA genes were compared to each other by the use of qRT-PCR in RNA preparations from cells grown under aerobic or chlorate reducing anaerobic conditions. The two genes showed the same mRNA levels under both growth regimes, indicating that no transcription termination occurs between them. Higher transcription levels were observed at growth without external oxygen supply. Implications for electron pathway integration following lateral gene transfer are discussed.

  16. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

  17. Targeted inactivation of francisella tularensis genes by group II introns.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Stephen A; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Davis, Greg; Arulanandam, Bernard P; Klose, Karl E

    2008-05-01

    Studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, have been hampered by a lack of genetic techniques for rapid targeted gene disruption in the most virulent subspecies. Here we describe efficient targeted gene disruption in F. tularensis utilizing mobile group II introns (targetrons) specifically optimized for F. tularensis. Utilizing a targetron targeted to blaB, which encodes ampicillin resistance, we showed that the system works at high efficiency in three different subspecies: F. tularensis subsp. tularensis, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, and "F. tularensis subsp. novicida." A targetron was also utilized to inactivate F. tularensis subsp. holarctica iglC, a gene required for virulence. The iglC gene is located within the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI), which has been duplicated in the most virulent subspecies. Importantly, the iglC targetron targeted both copies simultaneously, resulting in a strain mutated in both iglC genes in a single step. This system will help illuminate the contributions of specific genes, and especially those within the FPI, to the pathogenesis of this poorly studied organism.

  18. A sympathetic neuron autonomous role for Egr3-mediated gene regulation in dendrite morphogenesis and target tissue innervation.

    PubMed

    Quach, David H; Oliveira-Fernandes, Michelle; Gruner, Katherine A; Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2013-03-06

    Egr3 is a nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced transcriptional regulator that is essential for normal sympathetic nervous system development. Mice lacking Egr3 in the germline have sympathetic target tissue innervation abnormalities and physiologic sympathetic dysfunction similar to humans with dysautonomia. However, since Egr3 is widely expressed and has pleiotropic function, it has not been clear whether it has a role within sympathetic neurons and if so, what target genes it regulates to facilitate target tissue innervation. Here, we show that Egr3 expression within sympathetic neurons is required for their normal innervation since isolated sympathetic neurons lacking Egr3 have neurite outgrowth abnormalities when treated with NGF and mice with sympathetic neuron-restricted Egr3 ablation have target tissue innervation abnormalities similar to mice lacking Egr3 in all tissues. Microarray analysis performed on sympathetic neurons identified many target genes deregulated in the absence of Egr3, with some of the most significantly deregulated genes having roles in axonogenesis, dendritogenesis, and axon guidance. Using a novel genetic technique to visualize axons and dendrites in a subpopulation of randomly labeled sympathetic neurons, we found that Egr3 has an essential role in regulating sympathetic neuron dendrite morphology and terminal axon branching, but not in regulating sympathetic axon guidance to their targets. Together, these results indicate that Egr3 has a sympathetic neuron autonomous role in sympathetic nervous system development that involves modulating downstream target genes affecting the outgrowth and branching of sympathetic neuron dendrites and axons.

  19. Different Polycomb group complexes regulate common target genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Makarevich, Grigory; Leroy, Olivier; Akinci, Umut; Schubert, Daniel; Clarenz, Oliver; Goodrich, Justin; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Köhler, Claudia

    2006-09-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins convey epigenetic inheritance of repressed transcriptional states. Although the mechanism of the action of PcG is not completely understood, methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) is important in establishing PcG-mediated transcriptional repression. We show that the plant PcG target gene PHERES1 is regulated by histone trimethylation on H3K27 residues mediated by at least two different PcG complexes in plants, containing the SET domain proteins MEDEA or CURLY LEAF/SWINGER. Furthermore, we identify FUSCA3 as a potential PcG target gene and show that FUSCA3 is regulated by MEDEA and CURLY LEAF/SWINGER. We propose that different PcG complexes regulate a common set of target genes during the different stages of plant development.

  20. Gene regulation: ancient microRNA target sequences in plants.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Sandra K; Bowman, John L

    2004-04-01

    MicroRNAs are an abundant class of small RNAs that are thought to regulate the expression of protein-coding genes in plants and animals. Here we show that the target sequence of two microRNAs, known to regulate genes in the class-III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) gene family of the flowering plant Arabidopsis, is conserved in homologous sequences from all lineages of land plants, including bryophytes, lycopods, ferns and seed plants. We also find that the messenger RNAs from these genes are cleaved within the same microRNA-binding site in representatives of each land-plant group, as they are in Arabidopsis. Our results indicate not only that microRNAs mediate gene regulation in non-flowering as well as flowering plants, but also that the regulation of this class of plant genes dates back more than 400 million years.

  1. Alternative epigenetic chromatin states of polycomb target genes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Yuri B; Kahn, Tatyana G; Stenberg, Per; Ohno, Katsuhito; Bourgon, Richard; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb (PcG) regulation has been thought to produce stable long-term gene silencing. Genomic analyses in Drosophila and mammals, however, have shown that it targets many genes, which can switch state during development. Genetic evidence indicates that critical for the active state of PcG target genes are the histone methyltransferases Trithorax (TRX) and ASH1. Here we analyze the repertoire of alternative states in which PcG target genes are found in different Drosophila cell lines and the role of PcG proteins TRX and ASH1 in controlling these states. Using extensive genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, RNAi knockdowns, and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that, in addition to the known repressed state, PcG targets can reside in a transcriptionally active state characterized by formation of an extended domain enriched in ASH1, the N-terminal, but not C-terminal moiety of TRX and H3K27ac. ASH1/TRX N-ter domains and transcription are not incompatible with repressive marks, sometimes resulting in a "balanced" state modulated by both repressors and activators. Often however, loss of PcG repression results instead in a "void" state, lacking transcription, H3K27ac, or binding of TRX or ASH1. We conclude that PcG repression is dynamic, not static, and that the propensity of a target gene to switch states depends on relative levels of PcG, TRX, and activators. N-ter TRX plays a remarkable role that antagonizes PcG repression and preempts H3K27 methylation by acetylation. This role is distinct from that usually attributed to TRX/MLL proteins at the promoter. These results have important implications for Polycomb gene regulation, the "bivalent" chromatin state of embryonic stem cells, and gene expression in development.

  2. N-myc Downstream-Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1) mediates pomegranate juice protection from apoptosis in hypoxic BeWo cells but not in primary human trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baosheng; Zaveri, Parul G.; Longtine, Mark S.; Nelson, D. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) expression is increased in placentas of human pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction and in hypoxic cultured primary trophoblasts. We previously showed that elevated NDRG1 decreases trophoblast apoptosis induced by hypoxia. Separately, we found that pomegranate juice (PJ) decreases cell death induced by hypoxia in trophoblasts. Here, we test the hypothesis that PJ protects trophoblasts from hypoxia-induced apoptosis by modulating NDRG1 expression. Methods Quantitative rtPCR was used to investigate the effects of PJ treatment on mRNA levels of 22 candidate genes involved in apoptosis, oxidative stress, and differentiation in trophoblasts. Western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to analyze NDRG1 protein levels. siRNA-mediated NDRG1 knockdown was used to investigate the role of NDRG1 in response to PJ in hypoxic BeWo choriocarcinoma cells and hypoxic cultured primary human trophoblasts. Results The mRNA levels of eight genes were altered, with NDRG1 showing the largest response to PJ and thus, we pursued the role of NDRG1 here. PJ significantly increased NDRG1 protein expression in primary trophoblasts and in BeWo cells. Knockdown of NDRG1 in hypoxic BeWo cells in the presence of PJ yielded increased apoptosis. In contrast, knockdown of NDRG1 in hypoxic primary trophoblasts in the presence of PJ did not increase apoptosis. Discussion We conclude that the PJ-mediated decrease in cell death in hypoxia is partially mediated by NDRG1 in BeWo cells but not in primary trophoblasts. The disparate effects of NDRG1 between BeWo cells and primary trophoblasts indicate caution is required when extrapolating from results obtained with cell lines to primary trophoblasts. PMID:26028238

  3. Transcription of the Escherichia coli dcw cluster: evidence for distal upstream transcripts being involved in the expression of the downstream ftsZ gene.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, A; Palacios, P; Vicente, M

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains VIP596 and VIP597 have been constructed to compare the amount of transcription of the ftsZ gene derived from proximal promoters in the ddlB-ftsZ region with that originating in the upstream regions of the dcw cluster. Both strains have in common a beta-galactosidase reporter fusion located at the ddlB locus, but differ in that VIP597 has a transcription terminator Omega interposon located downstream from lacZ. In addition, these strains have the ddlB, ftsQ, ftsA and ftsZ genes under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter P(tac), allowing to control artificially ftsZ expression for normal cell division to take place. When beta-galactosidase activity was measured in VIP596 and VIP597 and compared to the levels measured in strain VIP407, in which the lacZ reporter fusion is located in the ftsZ gene, they were found to account for nearly 66% of the total transcription entering into ftsZ. This result indicates that the reduction in ftsZ transcription observed when the promoters in the ddlB-ftsA region are disconnected from the upstream sequences of the dcw cluster (as observed by Flärdh et al., Mol. Microbiol. 30 (1998) 305-316) in strain VIP490) is the direct consequence of the interruption in the transcription originated upstream and not due to the effect of such sequences on the promoters proximal to ftsZ.

  4. Expression of PAX8 Target Genes in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rosignolo, Francesca; Sponziello, Marialuisa; Durante, Cosimo; Puppin, Cinzia; Mio, Catia; Baldan, Federica; Di Loreto, Carla; Russo, Diego; Filetti, Sebastiano; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    PAX8 is a thyroid-specific transcription factor whose expression is dysregulated in thyroid cancer. A recent study using a conditional knock-out mouse model identified 58 putative PAX8 target genes. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of 11 of these genes in normal and tumoral thyroid tissues from patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). ATP1B1, GPC3, KCNIP3, and PRLR transcript levels in tumor tissues were significantly lower in PTCs than in NT, whereas LCN2, LGALS1 and SCD1 expression was upregulated in PTC compared with NT. Principal component analysis of the expression of the most markedly dysregulated PAX8 target genes was able to discriminate between PTC and NT. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of proteins encoded by the two most dyregulated PAX8 target genes, LCN2 and GPC3. Interestingly, GPC3 was detectable in all of the NT samples but none of the PTC samples. Collectively, these findings point to significant PTC-associated dysregulation of several PAX8 target genes, supporting the notion that PAX8-regulated molecular cascades play important roles during thyroid tumorigenesis. PMID:27249794

  5. Molecular pathways: targeting ETS gene fusions in cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Felix Y; Brenner, J Chad; Hussain, Maha; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2014-09-01

    Rearrangements, or gene fusions, involving the ETS family of transcription factors are common driving events in both prostate cancer and Ewing sarcoma. These rearrangements result in pathogenic expression of the ETS genes and trigger activation of transcriptional programs enriched for invasion and other oncogenic features. Although ETS gene fusions represent intriguing therapeutic targets, transcription factors, such as those comprising the ETS family, have been notoriously difficult to target. Recently, preclinical studies have demonstrated an association between ETS gene fusions and components of the DNA damage response pathway, such as PARP1, the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNAPK), and histone deactylase 1 (HDAC1), and have suggested that ETS fusions may confer sensitivity to inhibitors of these DNA repair proteins. In this review, we discuss the role of ETS fusions in cancer, the preclinical rationale for targeting ETS fusions with inhibitors of PARP1, DNAPK, and HDAC1, as well as ongoing clinical trials targeting ETS gene fusions. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Scaling the Drosophila Wing: TOR-Dependent Target Gene Access by the Hippo Pathway Transducer Yorkie.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joseph; Struhl, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Organ growth is controlled by patterning signals that operate locally (e.g., Wingless/Ints [Wnts], Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [BMPs], and Hedgehogs [Hhs]) and scaled by nutrient-dependent signals that act systemically (e.g., Insulin-like peptides [ILPs] transduced by the Target of Rapamycin [TOR] pathway). How cells integrate these distinct inputs to generate organs of the appropriate size and shape is largely unknown. The transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki, a YES-Associated Protein, or YAP) acts downstream of patterning morphogens and other tissue-intrinsic signals to promote organ growth. Yki activity is regulated primarily by the Warts/Hippo (Wts/Hpo) tumour suppressor pathway, which impedes nuclear access of Yki by a cytoplasmic tethering mechanism. Here, we show that the TOR pathway regulates Yki by a separate and novel mechanism in the Drosophila wing. Instead of controlling Yki nuclear access, TOR signaling governs Yki action after it reaches the nucleus by allowing it to gain access to its target genes. When TOR activity is inhibited, Yki accumulates in the nucleus but is sequestered from its normal growth-promoting target genes--a phenomenon we term "nuclear seclusion." Hence, we posit that in addition to its well-known role in stimulating cellular metabolism in response to nutrients, TOR also promotes wing growth by liberating Yki from nuclear seclusion, a parallel pathway that we propose contributes to the scaling of wing size with nutrient availability.

  7. Genomewide analysis of Drosophila GAGA factor target genes reveals context-dependent DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    van Steensel, Bas; Delrow, Jeffrey; Bussemaker, Harmen J.

    2003-01-01

    The association of sequence-specific DNA-binding factors with their cognate target sequences in vivo depends on the local molecular context, yet this context is poorly understood. To address this issue, we have performed genomewide mapping of in vivo target genes of Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF). The resulting list of ≈250 target genes indicates that GAF regulates many cellular pathways. We applied unbiased motif-based regression analysis to identify the sequence context that determines GAF binding. Our results confirm that GAF selectively associates with (GA)n repeat elements in vivo. GAF binding occurs in upstream regulatory regions, but less in downstream regions. Surprisingly, GAF binds abundantly to introns but is virtually absent from exons, even though the density of (GA)n is roughly the same. Intron binding occurs equally frequently in last introns compared with first introns, suggesting that GAF may not only regulate transcription initiation, but possibly also elongation. We provide evidence for cooperative binding of GAF to closely spaced (GA)n elements and explain the lack of GAF binding to exons by the absence of such closely spaced GA repeats. Our approach for revealing determinants of context-dependent DNA binding will be applicable to many other transcription factors. PMID:12601174

  8. Dimension reduction with gene expression data using targeted variable importance measurement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background When a large number of candidate variables are present, a dimension reduction procedure is usually conducted to reduce the variable space before the subsequent analysis is carried out. The goal of dimension reduction is to find a list of candidate genes with a more operable length ideally including all the relevant genes. Leaving many uninformative genes in the analysis can lead to biased estimates and reduced power. Therefore, dimension reduction is often considered a necessary predecessor of the analysis because it can not only reduce the cost of handling numerous variables, but also has the potential to improve the performance of the downstream analysis algorithms. Results We propose a TMLE-VIM dimension reduction procedure based on the variable importance measurement (VIM) in the frame work of targeted maximum likelihood estimation (TMLE). TMLE is an extension of maximum likelihood estimation targeting the parameter of interest. TMLE-VIM is a two-stage procedure. The first stage resorts to a machine learning algorithm, and the second step improves the first stage estimation with respect to the parameter of interest. Conclusions We demonstrate with simulations and data analyses that our approach not only enjoys the prediction power of machine learning algorithms, but also accounts for the correlation structures among variables and therefore produces better variable rankings. When utilized in dimension reduction, TMLE-VIM can help to obtain the shortest possible list with the most truly associated variables. PMID:21849016

  9. Organ targeted prenatal gene therapy--how far are we?

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vedanta; Abi Nader, Khalil; Waddington, Simon; David, Anna L

    2011-07-01

    Prenatal gene therapy aims to deliver genes to cells and tissues early in prenatal life, allowing correction of a genetic defect, before long-term tissue damage has occurred. In contrast to postnatal gene therapy, prenatal application can target genes to a large population of dividing stem cells, and the smaller fetal size allows a higher vector-to-target cell ratio to be achieved. Early-gestation delivery may allow the development of immune tolerance to the transgenic protein which would facilitate postnatal repeat vector administration if needed. Targeting particular organs will depend on manipulating the vector to achieve selective tropism and on choosing the most appropriate gestational age and injection method for fetal delivery. Intra-amniotic injection reaches the skin, and other organs that are bathed in the fluid however since gene transfer to the lung and gut is usually poor more direct injection methods will be needed. Delivery to the liver and blood can be achieved by systemic delivery via the umbilical vein or peritoneal cavity. Gene transfer to the central nervous system in the fetus is difficult but newer vectors are available that transduce neuronal tissue even after systemic delivery.

  10. Mechanisms of epigenetic and cell-type specific regulation of Hey target genes in ES cells and cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Weber, David; Heisig, Julia; Kneitz, Susanne; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin; Gessler, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Hey bHLH transcription factors are critical effectors of Notch signaling. During mammalian heart development they are expressed in atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and in the developing endocardium. Hey knockout mice suffer from lethal cardiac defects, such as ventricular septum defects, valve defects and cardiomyopathy. Despite this functional relevance, little is known about the regulation of downstream targets in relevant cell types. The objective of this study was to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms by which Hey proteins affect gene expression in a cell type specific manner. We used an in vitro cardiomyocyte differentiation system with inducible Hey1 or Hey2 expression to study target gene regulation in cardiomyocytes (CM) generated from murine embryonic stem cells (ESC). The effects of Hey1 and Hey2 are largely redundant, but cell type specific. The number of regulated genes is comparable between ESC and CM, but the total number of binding sites is much higher, especially in ESC, targeting mainly genes involved in transcriptional regulation and developmental processes. Repression by Hey proteins generally correlates with the extent of Hey-binding to target promoters, Hdac recruitment and lower histone acetylation. Functionally, treatment with the Hdac inhibitor TSA abolished Hey target gene regulation. However, in CM the repressive effect of Hey-binding is lost for a subset of genes. These also lack Hey-dependent histone deacetylation in CM and are enriched for binding sites of cardiac specific activators like Srf, Nkx2-5, and Gata4. Ectopic Nkx2-5 overexpression in ESC blocks Hey-mediated repression of these genes. Thus, Hey proteins mechanistically repress target genes via Hdac recruitment and histone deacetylation. In CM Hey-repression is counteracted by cardiac activators, which recruit histone acetylases and prevent Hey mediated deacetylation and subsequent repression for a subset of genes.

  11. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  12. Overexpressed microRNA-182 promotes proliferation and invasion in prostate cancer PC-3 cells by down-regulating N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ranlu; Li, Jing; Teng, Zhigang; Zhang, Zhihong; Xu, Yong

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs, non-coding 20-22 nucleotide single-stranded RNAs, result in translational repression or degradation and gene silencing of their target genes, and significantly contribute to the regulation of gene expression. In the current study, we report that miR-182 expression was significantly upregulated in prostate cancer tissues and four cell lines, compared to benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues and normal prostatic epithelial (RWPE-1) cells. Ectopic overexpression of miR-182 significantly promotes the proliferation, increases the invasion, promotes the G1/S cell cycle transition and reduces early apotosis of PC-3 cells, while suppression of miR-182 decreased the proliferation and invasion, inhibits the G1/S cell cycle transition and increase early apotosis of PC-3 cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that miR-182 could downregulate expression of NDRG1 by directly targeting the NDRG1 3'-untranslated region. In conclusion, our results suggest that miR-182 plays an important role in the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells by directly suppressing the tumor supressor gene NDRG1. We uncovered a new epigenetic regulation of NDRG1.

  13. Engineering nucleases for gene targeting: safety and regulatory considerations.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Katia; Podevin, Nancy; Breyer, Didier; Carroll, Dana; Herman, Philippe

    2014-01-25

    Nuclease-based gene targeting (NBGT) represents a significant breakthrough in targeted genome editing since it is applicable from single-celled protozoa to human, including several species of economic importance. Along with the fast progress in NBGT and the increasing availability of customized nucleases, more data are available about off-target effects associated with the use of this approach. We discuss how NBGT may offer a new perspective for genetic modification, we address some aspects crucial for a safety improvement of the corresponding techniques and we also briefly relate the use of NBGT applications and products to the regulatory oversight.

  14. Fungal virulence genes as targets for antifungal chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Perfect, J R

    1996-01-01

    Fungal virulence genes have now met the age of molecular pathogenesis. The definition of virulence genes needs to be broad so that it encompasses the focus on molecular antifungal targets and vaccine epitopes. However, in the broad but simple definition of a virulence gene, there will be many complex genetic and host interactions which investigators will need to carefully define. Nevertheless, with the increasing numbers of serious fungal infections produced by old and newly reported organisms, the paucity of present antifungal drugs, and the likelihood of increasing drug resistance, the need for investigations into understanding fungal virulence at the molecular level has never been more important. PMID:8807043

  15. Identification of the TFII-I family target genes in the vertebrate genome

    PubMed Central

    Chimge, Nyam-Osor; Makeyev, Aleksandr V.; Ruddle, Frank H.; Bayarsaihan, Dashzeveg

    2008-01-01

    GTF2I and GTF2IRD1 encode members of the TFII-I transcription factor family and are prime candidates in the Williams syndrome, a complex neurodevelopmental disorder. Our previous expression microarray studies implicated TFII-I proteins in the regulation of a number of genes critical in various aspects of cell physiology. Here, we combined bioinformatics and microarray results to identify TFII-I downstream targets in the vertebrate genome. These results were validated by chromatin immunoprecipitation and siRNA analysis. The collected evidence revealed the complexity of TFII-I-mediated processes that involve distinct regulatory networks. Altogether, these results lead to a better understanding of specific molecular events, some of which may be responsible for the Williams syndrome phenotype. PMID:18579769

  16. Chlorotoxin Labeled Magnetic Nanovectors for Targeted Gene Delivery to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors, and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site, but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  17. Rescuing the Failing Heart by Targeted Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Yoshiaki; Ladage, Dennis; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2011-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. While progress in conventional treatments is making steady and incremental gains to reduce heart failure mortality, there is a critical need to explore new therapeutic approaches. Gene therapy was initially applied in the clinical setting for inherited monogenic disorders. It is now apparent that gene therapy has broader potential that also includes acquired polygenic diseases, such as congestive heart failure. Recent advances in understanding of the molecular basis of myocardial dysfunction, together with the evolution of increasingly efficient gene transfer technology, has placed heart failure within reach of gene-based therapy. Furthermore, the recent successful and safe completion of a phase 2 trial targeting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pump (SERCA2a) along with the start of more recent phase 1 trials usher a new era for gene therapy for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:21371634

  18. [Real-time PCR detection and quantification of emerging waterborne pathogens (EWPs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the downstream area of Jiulong River].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Lin, Hui-rong; Zhang, Shu-ting; Yu, Xin

    2012-08-01

    The emerging waterborne pathogens (EWPs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are important for drinking water safety. The detection and quantification of 7 EWPs and 4 ARGs were carried out in Jiulong River, which is the main water source of southwestern Fujian Province. The water samples were collected from four sites of the Jiulong River downstream area and a drinking water treatment plant nearby. DNA was extracted and quantified by real-time (SYBR Green) PCR methods after the samples were filtered through 0.22 pim membranes. The results showed that the amount of Salmonella enterica (Salmonella spp.), Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) could reach up to 10(3), 10(4) and 10(5) copies x mL(-1), respectively. The concentration of organic matter in water may affect the copy numbers significantly. The water plant could effectively remove most EWPs and ARGs except Salmonella spp.. Therefore, more efforts should be made on water pollution source control, water treatment technology and point-of-use system to make sure the safety of drinking water.

  19. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology.

  20. Isogenic Strain Construction and Gene Targeting in Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Staib, Peter; Moran, Gary P.; Sullivan, Derek J.; Coleman, David C.; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a recently described opportunistic fungal pathogen that is closely related to Candida albicans but differs from it with respect to epidemiology, certain virulence characteristics, and the ability to develop fluconazole resistance in vitro. A comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis at the molecular level should therefore provide clues about the mechanisms used by these two species to adapt to their human host. In contrast to C. albicans, no auxotrophic C. dubliniensis strains are available for genetic manipulations. Therefore, we constructed homozygous ura3 mutants from a C. dubliniensis wild-type isolate by targeted gene deletion. The two URA3 alleles were sequentially inactivated using the MPAR-flipping strategy, which is based on the selection of integrative transformants carrying a mycophenolic acid resistance marker that is subsequently deleted again by site-specific, FLP-mediated recombination. The URA3 gene from C. albicans (CaURA3) was then used as a selection marker for targeted integration of a fusion between the C. dubliniensis MDR1 (CdMDR1) promoter and a C. albicans-adapted GFP reporter gene. Uridine-prototrophic transformants were obtained with high frequency, and all transformants of two independent ura3-negative parent strains had correctly integrated the reporter gene fusion into the CdMDR1 locus, demonstrating that the CaURA3 gene can be used for efficient and specific targeting of recombinant DNA into the C. dubliniensis genome. Transformants carrying the reporter gene fusion did not exhibit detectable fluorescence during growth in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose medium in vitro, suggesting that CdMDR1 is not significantly expressed under these conditions. Fluconazole had no effect on MDR1 expression, but the addition of the drug benomyl strongly activated the reporter gene fusion in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating that the CdMDR1 gene, which encodes an efflux pump mediating resistance to toxic compounds, is

  1. N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 overexpression reduces matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activities and cell invasion of A549 lung cancer cell line in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Seyed Nooredin; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is a candidate gene for tumor suppression. The expression of NDRG2 is down-regulated in several tumors including lung cancer. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of NDRG2 overexpression on invasion, migration, and enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9) in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Materials and Methods: A recombinant plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged NDRG2 (pCMV6-AC-NDRG2-GFP) was used to overexpress GFP-tagged NDRG2 in A549 cells. The cells in the experimental group and those in the control group were transfected with pCMV6-AC-NDRG2-GFP and a control plasmid without NDRG2 (pCMV6-AC-GFP), respectively. Fluorescent microscopy and flowcytometry analysis of GFP expression were used to evaluate the cellular expression of GFP-tagged NDRG2 and the efficiency of transfection. The effects of NDRG2 expression on cell invasion and migration were evaluated using transwell filter migration assay. The gelatinase activity of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 was measured by gelatin zymography. Results: Our results demonstrated the expression of GFP-tagged NDRG2 in the cytoplasm and nucleus of A549 cells. The findings of transwell assay showed that NDRG2 overexpression reduced migration and invasion of A549 cells compared to control cells. Gelatin zymography analyses revealed that NDRG2 overexpression decreased the gelatinase activity of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9. Conclusion: These findings suggest that NDRG2 may be a new anti-invasion factor in lung cancer that inhibits MMPs activities. PMID:26557966

  2. Correction of human. beta. sup S -globin gene by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Shesely, E.G.; Hyungsuk Kim; Shehee, W.R.; Smithies, O. ); Papayannopoulou, T. ); Popovich, B.W. )

    1991-05-15

    As a step toward using gene targeting for gene therapy, the authors have corrected a human {beta}{sup S}-globin gene to the normal {beta}{sup A} allele by homologous recombination in the mouse-human hybrid cell line BSM. BSM is derived from a mouse erythroleukemia cell line and carries a single human chromosome 11 with the {beta}{sup S}-globin allele. A {beta}{sup A}-globin targeting construct containing a unique oligomer and a neomycin-resistance gene was electroporated into the BSM cells, which were then placed under G418 selection. Then 126 resulting pools containing a total {approx}29,000 G418-resistant clones were screened by PCR for the presence of a targeted recombinant: 3 positive pools were identified. A targeted clone was isolated by replating one of the positive pools into smaller pools and rescreening by PCR, followed by dilution cloning. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the isolated clone had been targeted as planned. The correction of the {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A} was confirmed both by allele-specific PCR and by allele-specific antibodies. Expression studies comparing the uninduced and induced RNA levels in unmodified BSM cells and in the targeted clone showed no significant alteration in the ability of the targeted clone to undergo induction, despite the potentially disrupting presence of a transcriptionally active neomycin gene 5{prime} to the human {beta}{sup A}-globin gene. Thus gene targeting can correct a {beta}{sup S} allele to {beta}{sup A}, and the use of a selectable helper gene need not significantly interfere with the induction of the corrected gene.

  3. Rad6B acts downstream of Wnt signaling to stabilize β-catenin: Implications for a novel Wnt/β-catenin target

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling is associated with breast cancer even though genetic mutations in Wnt signaling components are rare. We have previously demonstrated that Rad6B, an ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, stabilizes β-catenin via polyubiqutin modifications that render β-catenin insensitive to proteasomal degradation. Rad6B is a transcriptional target of β-catenin, creating a positive feedback loop between Rad6B expression and β-catenin activation. Methods To isolate subpopulations expressing high or low Rad6B levels, we transfected MDA-MB-231 or WS-15 human breast cancer cells with ZsGreen fluorescent reporter vector in which the expression of ZsGreen was placed under the control of Rad6B promoter. ZsGreenhigh and ZsGreenlow subpopulations, reflective of high and low Rad6B promoter activity, respectively, were isolated by FACS. To determine the relevance of Wnt signaling in Rad6B-mediated β-catenin stabilization/activation, the ZsGreenhigh cells were transfected with signaling-defective Wnt coreceptor LRP6Δ173. Rad6B expression and promoter activity were determined by RT-PCR, Western blot and Rad6B promoter-mediated luciferase assays. β-catenin levels and transcriptional activity were determined by Western blot and TOP/FOP Flash reporter assays. Tumor formation and morphologies of ZsGreenlow, ZsGreenhigh, and ZsGreenhigh/LRP6Δ173 cells compared to unsorted vector controls were evaluated in nude mice. Expression of Wnt signaling related genes was profiled using the Wnt signaling pathway RT2 Profiler PCR arrays. Results ZsGreenhigh subpopulations showed high Rad6B expression and Rad6B promoter activity as compared to ZsGreenlow cells. ZsGreenhigh (high Rad6B expressors) also showed elevated β-catenin levels and TOP/Flash activity. Inhibiting Wnt signaling in the high Rad6B expressors decreased ZsGreen fluorescence, Rad6B gene expression, β-catenin levels and TOP/Flash activity. Tumors derived from high Rad6B expressors were predominantly

  4. Epigenetic Editing: targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes

    PubMed Central

    de Groote, Marloes L.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined DNA sequences are uniquely suited to answer such questions and could provide potent (bio)medical tools. Toward the goal of gene-specific GEM by overwriting epigenetic marks (Epigenetic Editing, EGE), instructive epigenetic marks need to be identified and their writers/erasers should then be fused to gene-specific DNA binding domains. The appropriate epigenetic mark(s) to change in order to efficiently modulate gene expression might have to be validated for any given chromatin context and should be (mitotically) stable. Various insights in such issues have been obtained by sequence-specific targeting of epigenetic enzymes, as is presented in this review. Features of such studies provide critical aspects for further improving EGE. An example of this is the direct effect of the edited mark versus the indirect effect of recruited secondary proteins by targeting epigenetic enzymes (or their domains). Proof-of-concept of expression modulation of an endogenous target gene is emerging from the few EGE studies reported. Apart from its promise in correcting disease-associated epi-mutations, EGE represents a powerful tool to address fundamental epigenetic questions. PMID:23002135

  5. Both DNA strands of antibody genes are hypermutation targets

    PubMed Central

    Milstein, Cesar; Neuberger, Michael S.; Staden, Rodger

    1998-01-01

    During the maturation of the immune response, antibody genes are subjected to localized hypermutation. Mutations are not evenly distributed along the V gene; intrinsic hot spots exist that are correlated with primary sequence motifs. Although the mechanism of hypermutation remains unknown, it has been proposed to exhibit DNA strand polarity because purine residues on the coding strand are more frequently targeted for mutation than pyrimidines. However, this polarity may not be an intrinsic property of the hypermutation mechanism but a consequence of evolutionary-selected peculiarities of V gene sequences. Furthermore, the possibility that both strands are hypermutation targets has received little attention. To discriminate between these possibilities, we have analyzed the average frequency of mutations of each of the three bases of all nucleotide triplets by using large databases taken from both V and non-V mutation targets. We also have reassessed the sequence motifs associated with hot spots. We find that even in non-Ig sequences, A mutates more than T, consistent with a strand-dependent component to targeting. However, the mutation biases of triplets and of their inverted complements are correlated, demonstrating that there is a sequence-specific but strand-independent component to mutational targeting. Thus, there are two aspects of the hypermutation process that are sensitive to local DNA sequences, one that is DNA strand-dependent and the other that is not. PMID:9671757

  6. Chromatin immunoselection defines a TAL-1 target gene.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kaminsky, S; Maouche-Chrétien, L; Vitelli, L; Vinit, M A; Blanchard, I; Yamamoto, M; Peschle, C; Roméo, P H

    1998-01-01

    Despite the major functions of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TAL-1 in hematopoiesis and T-cell leukemogenesis, no TAL-1 target gene has been identified. Using immunoprecipitation of genomic fragments bound to TAL-1 in the chromatin of murine erythro-leukemia (MEL) cells, we found that 10% of the immunoselected fragments contained a CAGATG or a CAGGTG E-box, followed by a GATA site. We studied one of these fragments containing two E-boxes, CAGATG and CAGGTC, followed by a GATA motif, and showed that TAL-1 binds to the CAGGTG E-box with an affinity modulated by the CAGATG or the GATA site, and that the CAGGTG-GATA motif exhibits positive transcriptional activity in MEL but not in HeLa cells. This immunoselected sequence is located within an intron of a new gene co-expressed with TAL-1 in endothelial and erythroid cells, but not expressed in fibroblasts or adult liver where no TAL-1 mRNA was detected. Finally, in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells towards the erythro/megakaryocytic pathways showed that the TAL-1 target gene expression followed TAL-1 and GATA-1 expression. These results establish that TAL-1 is likely to activate its target genes through a complex that binds an E-box-GATA motif and define the first gene regulated by TAL-1. PMID:9724651

  7. A Gly98Val Mutation in the N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1) in Alaskan Malamutes with Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bruun, Camilla S.; Jäderlund, Karin H.; Berendt, Mette; Jensen, Kristine B.; Spodsberg, Eva H.; Gredal, Hanne; Shelton, G. Diane; Mickelson, James R.; Minor, Katie M.; Lohi, Hannes; Bjerkås, Inge; Stigen, Øyvind; Espenes, Arild; Rohdin, Cecilia; Edlund, Rebecca; Ohlsson, Jennie; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Leifsson, Páll S.; Drögemüller, Cord; Moe, Lars; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2013-01-01

    The first cases of early-onset progressive polyneuropathy appeared in the Alaskan Malamute population in Norway in the late 1970s. Affected dogs were of both sexes and were ambulatory paraparetic, progressing to non-ambulatory tetraparesis. On neurologic examination, affected dogs displayed predominantly laryngeal paresis, decreased postural reactions, decreased spinal reflexes and muscle atrophy. The disease was considered eradicated through breeding programmes but recently new cases have occurred in the Nordic countries and the USA. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene (NDRG1) is implicated in neuropathies with comparable symptoms or clinical signs both in humans and in Greyhound dogs. This gene was therefore considered a candidate gene for the polyneuropathy in Alaskan Malamutes. The coding sequence of the NDRG1 gene derived from one healthy and one affected Alaskan Malamute revealed a non-synonymous G>T mutation in exon 4 in the affected dog that causes a Gly98Val amino acid substitution. This substitution was categorized to be “probably damaging” to the protein function by PolyPhen2 (score: 1.000). Subsequently, 102 Alaskan Malamutes from the Nordic countries and the USA known to be either affected (n = 22), obligate carriers (n = 7) or healthy (n = 73) were genotyped for the SNP using TaqMan. All affected dogs had the T/T genotype, the obligate carriers had the G/T genotype and the healthy dogs had the G/G genotype except for 13 who had the G/T genotype. A protein alignment showed that residue 98 is conserved in mammals and also that the entire NDRG1 protein is highly conserved (94.7%) in mammals. We conclude that the G>T substitution is most likely the mutation that causes polyneuropathy in Alaskan Malamutes. Our characterization of a novel candidate causative mutation for polyneuropathy offers a new canine model that can provide further insight into pathobiology and therapy of human polyneuropathy. Furthermore, selection against this mutation

  8. A Gly98Val mutation in the N-Myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in Alaskan Malamutes with polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bruun, Camilla S; Jäderlund, Karin H; Berendt, Mette; Jensen, Kristine B; Spodsberg, Eva H; Gredal, Hanne; Shelton, G Diane; Mickelson, James R; Minor, Katie M; Lohi, Hannes; Bjerkås, Inge; Stigen, Oyvind; Espenes, Arild; Rohdin, Cecilia; Edlund, Rebecca; Ohlsson, Jennie; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Leifsson, Páll S; Drögemüller, Cord; Moe, Lars; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2013-01-01

    The first cases of early-onset progressive polyneuropathy appeared in the Alaskan Malamute population in Norway in the late 1970s. Affected dogs were of both sexes and were ambulatory paraparetic, progressing to non-ambulatory tetraparesis. On neurologic examination, affected dogs displayed predominantly laryngeal paresis, decreased postural reactions, decreased spinal reflexes and muscle atrophy. The disease was considered eradicated through breeding programmes but recently new cases have occurred in the Nordic countries and the USA. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene (NDRG1) is implicated in neuropathies with comparable symptoms or clinical signs both in humans and in Greyhound dogs. This gene was therefore considered a candidate gene for the polyneuropathy in Alaskan Malamutes. The coding sequence of the NDRG1 gene derived from one healthy and one affected Alaskan Malamute revealed a non-synonymous G>T mutation in exon 4 in the affected dog that causes a Gly98Val amino acid substitution. This substitution was categorized to be "probably damaging" to the protein function by PolyPhen2 (score: 1.000). Subsequently, 102 Alaskan Malamutes from the Nordic countries and the USA known to be either affected (n = 22), obligate carriers (n = 7) or healthy (n = 73) were genotyped for the SNP using TaqMan. All affected dogs had the T/T genotype, the obligate carriers had the G/T genotype and the healthy dogs had the G/G genotype except for 13 who had the G/T genotype. A protein alignment showed that residue 98 is conserved in mammals and also that the entire NDRG1 protein is highly conserved (94.7%) in mammals. We conclude that the G>T substitution is most likely the mutation that causes polyneuropathy in Alaskan Malamutes. Our characterization of a novel candidate causative mutation for polyneuropathy offers a new canine model that can provide further insight into pathobiology and therapy of human polyneuropathy. Furthermore, selection against this mutation can

  9. Myostatin gene targeting in cultured China Han ovine myoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Yang, X; An, X; Chen, Y

    2007-11-01

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, has been shown to be a negative regulator of myogenesis. Natural mutation in beef cattle causes double-muscling phenotypes. We report an investigation designed to knockout the MSTN gene by gene targeting in ovine myoblast cells. Two promoter-trap targeting vectors MSTN-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and MSTN-neo were constructed and used to transfect foetal and neonatal ovine primary myoblast cells. Both GFP-expressing cells and drug-resistant cells were obtained. Targeted cells expressing GFP were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and drug-resistant cells were characterised by PCR and Southern blot after growing into cell clones.

  10. [The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Cotsarelis, G

    2002-05-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells required for continuous hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be the target of topical gene delivery in the skin of the mouse. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrate the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts. We consider liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection is possible only during the early anagen phase. Factors and obstacles for the use of gene therapy in treating alopecia and skin diseases are discussed. A theoretical framework for future treatment of cutaneous and systemic disorders using gene therapy is presented.

  11. Large scale RNAi screen in Tribolium reveals novel target genes for pest control and the proteasome as prime target.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Julia; Dao, Van Anh; Majumdar, Upalparna; Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schwirz, Jonas; Schultheis, Dorothea; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Leboulle, Gérard; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stanke, Mario; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-09-03

    Insect pest control is challenged by insecticide resistance and negative impact on ecology and health. One promising pest specific alternative is the generation of transgenic plants, which express double stranded RNAs targeting essential genes of a pest species. Upon feeding, the dsRNA induces gene silencing in the pest resulting in its death. However, the identification of efficient RNAi target genes remains a major challenge as genomic tools and breeding capacity is limited in most pest insects impeding whole-animal-high-throughput-screening. We use the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum as a screening platform in order to identify the most efficient RNAi target genes. From about 5,000 randomly screened genes of the iBeetle RNAi screen we identify 11 novel and highly efficient RNAi targets. Our data allowed us to determine GO term combinations that are predictive for efficient RNAi target genes with proteasomal genes being most predictive. Finally, we show that RNAi target genes do not appear to act synergistically and that protein sequence conservation does not correlate with the number of potential off target sites. Our results will aid the identification of RNAi target genes in many pest species by providing a manageable number of excellent candidate genes to be tested and the proteasome as prime target. Further, the identified GO term combinations will help to identify efficient target genes from organ specific transcriptomes. Our off target analysis is relevant for the sequence selection used in transgenic plants.

  12. Gene targeting in maize by somatic ectopic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ayar, Ayhan; Wehrkamp-Richter, Sophie; Laffaire, Jean-Baptiste; Le Goff, Samuel; Levy, Julien; Chaignon, Sandrine; Salmi, Hajer; Lepicard, Alexandra; Sallaud, Christophe; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I; Paul, Wyatt

    2013-04-01

    Low transformation efficiency and high background of non-targeted events are major constraints to gene targeting in plants. We demonstrate here applicability in maize of a system that reduces the constraint from transformation efficiency. The system requires regenerable transformants in which all of the following elements are stably integrated in the genome: (i) donor DNA with the gene of interest adjacent to sequence for repair of a defective selectable marker, (ii) sequence encoding a rare-cutting endonuclease such as I-SceI, (iii) a target locus (TL) comprising the defective selectable marker and I-SceI cleavage site. Typically, this requires additional markers for the integration of the donor and target sequences, which may be assembled through cross-pollination of separate transformants. Inducible expression of I-SceI then cleaves the TL and facilitates homologous recombination, which is assayed by selection for the repaired marker. We used bar and gfp markers to identify assembled transformants, a dexamethasone-inducible I-SceI::GR protein, and selection for recombination events that restored an intact nptII. Applying this strategy to callus permitted the selection of recombination into the TL at a frequency of 0.085% per extracted immature embryo (29% of recombinants). Our results also indicate that excision of the donor locus (DL) through the use of flanking I-SceI cleavage sites may be unnecessary, and a source of unwanted repair events at the DL. The system allows production, from each assembled transformant, of many cells that subsequently can be treated to induce gene targeting. This may facilitate gene targeting in plant species for which transformation efficiencies are otherwise limiting.

  13. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jariwala, Unnati; Prescott, Jennifer; Jia, Li; Barski, Artem; Pregizer, Steve; Cogan, Jon P; Arasheben, Armin; Tilley, Wayne D; Scher, Howard I; Gerald, William L; Buchanan, Grant; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Frenkel, Baruch

    2007-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa). However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant) and LNCaP (androgen-dependent) PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT), Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD), Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2), Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3), and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1) – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are repressed. In general

  14. Intelectin 1 suppresses the growth, invasion and metastasis of neuroblastoma cells through up-regulation of N-myc downstream regulated gene 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Mei, Hong; Pu, Jiarui; Xiang, Xuan; Zhao, Xiang; Qu, Hongxia; Huang, Kai; Zheng, Liduan; Tong, Qiangsong

    2015-02-21

    Recent studies have revealed the potential roles of intelectin 1 (ITLN1) in tumorigenesis. However, its functions and underlying mechanisms in neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood, still remain largely unknown. Human neuroblastoma cell lines were treated with recombinant ITLN1 protein or stably transfected with ITLN1 expression and short hairpin RNA vectors. Gene expression and signaling pathway were detected by western blot and real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Gene promoter activity and transcription factor binding were detected by luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells were measured by MTT colorimetry, colony formation, scratch assay, matrigel invasion assay, and nude mice model. Mining of public microarray databases revealed that N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) was significantly correlated with ITLN1 in NB. Gain- and loss-of-function studies indicated that secretory ITLN1 facilitated the NDRG2 expression, resulting in down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), in NB cell lines SH-SY5Y, SK-N-BE(2), and SK-N-SH. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), a transcription factor crucial for NDRG2 expression, was up-regulated by ITLN1 in NB cells via inactivation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling. Ectopic expression of ITLN1 suppressed the growth, invasion and metastasis of NB cells in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, knockdown of ITLN1 promoted the growth, invasion, and metastasis of NB cells. In addition, rescue experiments in ITLN1 over-expressed or silenced NB cells showed that restoration of NDRG2 expression prevented the tumor cells from ITLN1-mediated changes in these biological features. In clinical NB tissues, ITLN1 was down-regulated and positively correlated with NDRG2 expression. Patients with high ITLN1 or NDRG2 expression had greater survival probability. These findings indicate that

  15. Insertion of transposon Tn5tac1 in the Sinorhizobium meliloti malate dehydrogenase (mdh) gene results in conditional polar effects on downstream TCA cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Dymov, Sergiy I; Meek, David J J; Steven, Blaire; Driscoll, Brian T

    2004-12-01

    To isolate Sinorhizobium meliloti mutants deficient in malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity, random transposon Tn5tac1 insertion mutants were screened for conditional lethal phenotypes on complex medium. Tn5tac1 has an outward-oriented isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible promoter (Ptac). The insertion in strain Rm30049 was mapped to the mdh gene, which was found to lie directly upstream of the genes encoding succinyl-CoA synthetase (sucCD) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (sucAB and lpdA). Rm30049 required IPTG for wild-type growth in complex media, and had a complex growth phenotype in minimal media with different carbon sources. The mdh:: Tn5tacl insertion eliminated MDH activity under all growth conditions, and activities of succinyl-CoA synthetase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase were affected by the addition of IPTG. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies confirmed that expression from Ptac was induced by IPTG and leaky in its absence. Alfalfa plants inoculated with Rm30049 were chlorotic and stunted, with small white root nodules, and had shoot dry weight and percent-N content values similar to those of uninoculated plants. Cosmid clone pDS15 restored MDH activity to Rm30049, complemented both the mutant growth and symbiotic phenotypes, and was found to carry six complete (sdhB, mdh, sucCDAB) and two partial (IpdA, sdhA) tricarboxylic acid cycle genes.

  16. Differential action of 13-HPODE on PPARalpha downstream genes in rat Fao and human HepG2 hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    König, Bettina; Eder, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    In rats, oxidized fats activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), leading to reduced triglyceride concentrations in liver, plasma and very low density lipoproteins. Oxidation products of linoleic acid constitute an important portion of oxidized dietary fats. This study was conducted to check whether the primary lipid peroxidation product of linoleic acid, 13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE), might be involved in the PPARalpha-activating effect of oxidized fats. Therefore, we examined the effect of 13-HPODE on the expression of PPARalpha target genes in the rat Fao and the human HepG2 hepatoma cell lines. In Fao cells, 13-HPODE increased the mRNA concentration of the PPARalpha target genes acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO), cytochrome P450 4A1 and carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A). Furthermore, the concentration of cellular and secreted triglycerides was reduced in Fao cells treated with 13-HPODE. Because PPARalpha mRNA was not influenced, we conclude that these effects are due to an activation of PPARalpha by 13-HPODE. In contrast, HepG2 cells seemed to be resistant to PPARalpha activation by 13-HPODE because no remarkable induction of the PPARalpha target genes ACO, CPT1A, mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase and delta9-desaturase was observed. Consequently, cellular and secreted triglyceride levels were not changed after incubation of HepG2 cells with 13-HPODE. In conclusion, this study shows that 13-HPODE activates PPARalpha in rat Fao but not in human HepG2 hepatoma cells.

  17. Honokiol reverses alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and the expression of its downstream lipogenesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Youn-Chul; Chung, Young-Suk; Kim, Young-Chul; Shin, Young-Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-04-01

    Ethanol induces hepatic steatosis via a complex mechanism that is not well understood. Among the variety of molecules that have been proposed to participate in this mechanism, the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding proteins (SREBPs) have been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of honokiol on alcoholic steatosis and investigated its possible effect on the inhibition of SREBP-1c maturation. In in vitro studies, H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells developed increased lipid droplets when exposed to ethanol, but co-treatment with honokiol reversed this effect. Honokiol inhibited the maturation of SREBP-1c and its translocation to the nucleus, the binding of nSREBP-1c to SRE or SRE-related sequences of its lipogenic target genes, and the expression of genes for fatty acid synthesis. In contrast, magnolol, a structural isomer of honokiol, had no effect on nSREBP-1c levels. Male Wistar rats fed with a standard Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet for 4 weeks exhibited increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased hepatic glutathione levels, with concomitantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase and TNF-{alpha} levels. Daily administration of honokiol (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage during the final 2 weeks of ethanol treatment completely reversed these effects on hepatotoxicity markers, including hepatic triglyceride, hepatic glutathione, and serum TNF-{alpha}, with efficacious abrogation of fat accumulation in the liver. Inhibition of SREBP-1c protein maturation and of the expression of Srebf1c and its target genes for hepatic lipogenesis were also observed in vivo. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated inhibition of specific binding of SREBP-1c to the Fas promoter by honokiol in vivo. These results demonstrate that honokiol has the potential to ameliorate alcoholic steatosis by blocking fatty acid synthesis regulated by SREBP-1c.

  18. CRISPR/Cas-Mediated In Planta Gene Targeting.

    PubMed

    Schiml, Simon; Fauser, Friedrich; Puchta, Holger

    2017-01-01

    The recent emergence of the CRISPR/Cas system has boosted the possibilities for precise genome engineering approaches throughout all kingdoms of life. The most common application for plants is targeted mutagenesis, whereby a Cas9-mediated DNA double-strand break (DSB) is repaired by mutagenic nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). However, the site-specific alteration of a genomic sequence or integration of a transgene relies on the precise repair by homologous recombination (HR) using a suitable donor sequence: this poses a particular challenge in plants, as NHEJ is the preferred repair mechanism for DSBs in somatic tissue. Here, we describe our recently developed in planta gene targeting (ipGT) system, which works via the induction of DSBs by Cas9 to activate the target and the targeting vector at the same time, making it independent of high transformation efficiencies.

  19. RFMirTarget: predicting human microRNA target genes with a random forest classifier.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Mariana R; da Fonseca, Guilherme C; Loss-Morais, Guilherme; Alves, Ronnie; Margis, Rogerio; Bazzan, Ana L C

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key regulators of eukaryotic gene expression whose fundamental role has already been identified in many cell pathways. The correct identification of miRNAs targets is still a major challenge in bioinformatics and has motivated the development of several computational methods to overcome inherent limitations of experimental analysis. Indeed, the best results reported so far in terms of specificity and sensitivity are associated to machine learning-based methods for microRNA-target prediction. Following this trend, in the current paper we discuss and explore a microRNA-target prediction method based on a random forest classifier, namely RFMirTarget. Despite its well-known robustness regarding general classifying tasks, to the best of our knowledge, random forest have not been deeply explored for the specific context of predicting microRNAs targets. Our framework first analyzes alignments between candidate microRNA-target pairs and extracts a set of structural, thermodynamics, alignment, seed and position-based features, upon which classification is performed. Experiments have shown that RFMirTarget outperforms several well-known classifiers with statistical significance, and that its performance is not impaired by the class imbalance problem or features correlation. Moreover, comparing it against other algorithms for microRNA target prediction using independent test data sets from TarBase and starBase, we observe a very promising performance, with higher sensitivity in relation to other methods. Finally, tests performed with RFMirTarget show the benefits of feature selection even for a classifier with embedded feature importance analysis, and the consistency between relevant features identified and important biological properties for effective microRNA-target gene alignment.

  20. Targeted gene disruption in Francisella tularensis by group II introns.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Stephen A; Davis, Greg; Klose, Karl E

    2009-11-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of tularemia. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for F. tularensis virulence, in part due to the paucity of genetic tools available for the study of F. tularensis. We have developed a gene knockout system for F. tularensis that utilizes retargeted mobile group II introns, or "targetrons". These targetrons disrupt both single and duplicated target genes at high efficiency in three different F. tularensis subspecies. Here we describe in detail the targetron-based method for insertional mutagenesis of F. tularensis genes, which should facilitate a better understanding of F. tularensis pathogenesis. Group II introns can be adapted to inactivate genes in bacteria for which few genetic tools exist, thus providing a powerful tool to study the genetic basis of bacterial pathogenesis.

  1. Targeted gene knock-in by CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in porcine zygotes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Sandmaier, Shelley E S; Kim, Chan-Mi; Mileham, Alan; Donovan, David M; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2017-02-14

    The domestic pig is an important "dual purpose" animal model for agricultural and biomedical applications. There is an emerging consensus in the biomedical community for the use of large animal models such as pigs to either serve as an alternative, or complement investigations from the mouse. However, the use of pig has not proven popular due to technical difficulties and time required in generating models with desired genetic modifications. In this regard, the ability to directly modify the genome in the zygote and generate edited animals is highly desirable. This report demonstrates for the first time, the generation of gene targeted animals by direct injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complex and short stretches of DNA sequences into porcine zygotes. The Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes was pre-complexed with a single guide RNA targeting downstream of the ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene, and co-injected with a single-stranded repair template into porcine zygotes. Using this approach a line of pigs that carry pseudo attP sites within the COL1A locus to enable phiC31 integrase mediated introduction of transgenes has been generated. This new route for genome engineering in pigs via zygote injection should greatly enhance applications in both agriculture and biomedicine.

  2. Targeted gene knock-in by CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in porcine zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Eun; Powell, Anne; Sandmaier, Shelley E. S.; Kim, Chan-Mi; Mileham, Alan; Donovan, David M.; Telugu, Bhanu P.

    2017-01-01

    The domestic pig is an important “dual purpose” animal model for agricultural and biomedical applications. There is an emerging consensus in the biomedical community for the use of large animal models such as pigs to either serve as an alternative, or complement investigations from the mouse. However, the use of pig has not proven popular due to technical difficulties and time required in generating models with desired genetic modifications. In this regard, the ability to directly modify the genome in the zygote and generate edited animals is highly desirable. This report demonstrates for the first time, the generation of gene targeted animals by direct injection of Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complex and short stretches of DNA sequences into porcine zygotes. The Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes was pre-complexed with a single guide RNA targeting downstream of the ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene, and co-injected with a single-stranded repair template into porcine zygotes. Using this approach a line of pigs that carry pseudo attP sites within the COL1A locus to enable phiC31 integrase mediated introduction of transgenes has been generated. This new route for genome engineering in pigs via zygote injection should greatly enhance applications in both agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:28195163

  3. Targeted AAV5-Smad7 gene therapy inhibits corneal scarring in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Suneel; Rodier, Jason T.; Sharma, Ajay; Giuliano, Elizabeth A.; Sinha, Prashant R.; Hesemann, Nathan P.; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Mohan, Rajiv R.

    2017-01-01

    Corneal scarring is due to aberrant activity of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling pathway following traumatic, mechanical, infectious, or surgical injury. Altered TGFβ signaling cascade leads to downstream Smad (Suppressor of mothers against decapentaplegic) protein-mediated signaling events that regulate expression of extracellular matrix and myogenic proteins. These events lead to transdifferentiation of keratocytes into myofibroblasts through fibroblasts and often results in permanent corneal scarring. Hence, therapeutic targets that reduce transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts may provide a clinically relevant approach to treat corneal fibrosis and improve long-term visual outcomes. Smad7 protein regulates the functional effects of TGFβ signaling during corneal wound healing. We tested that targeted delivery of Smad7 using recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5-Smad7) delivered to the corneal stroma can inhibit corneal haze post photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in vivo in a rabbit corneal injury model. We demonstrate that a single topical application of AAV5-Smad7 in rabbit cornea post-PRK led to a significant decrease in corneal haze and corneal fibrosis. Further, histopathology revealed lack of immune cell infiltration following AAV5-Smad7 gene transfer into the corneal stroma. Our data demonstrates that AAV5-Smad7 gene therapy is relatively safe with significant potential for the treatment of corneal disease currently resulting in fibrosis and impaired vision. PMID:28339457

  4. Targeted AAV5-Smad7 gene therapy inhibits corneal scarring in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suneel; Rodier, Jason T; Sharma, Ajay; Giuliano, Elizabeth A; Sinha, Prashant R; Hesemann, Nathan P; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Mohan, Rajiv R

    2017-01-01

    Corneal scarring is due to aberrant activity of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling pathway following traumatic, mechanical, infectious, or surgical injury. Altered TGFβ signaling cascade leads to downstream Smad (Suppressor of mothers against decapentaplegic) protein-mediated signaling events that regulate expression of extracellular matrix and myogenic proteins. These events lead to transdifferentiation of keratocytes into myofibroblasts through fibroblasts and often results in permanent corneal scarring. Hence, therapeutic targets that reduce transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts may provide a clinically relevant approach to treat corneal fibrosis and improve long-term visual outcomes. Smad7 protein regulates the functional effects of TGFβ signaling during corneal wound healing. We tested that targeted delivery of Smad7 using recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5-Smad7) delivered to the corneal stroma can inhibit corneal haze post photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in vivo in a rabbit corneal injury model. We demonstrate that a single topical application of AAV5-Smad7 in rabbit cornea post-PRK led to a significant decrease in corneal haze and corneal fibrosis. Further, histopathology revealed lack of immune cell infiltration following AAV5-Smad7 gene transfer into the corneal stroma. Our data demonstrates that AAV5-Smad7 gene therapy is relatively safe with significant potential for the treatment of corneal disease currently resulting in fibrosis and impaired vision.

  5. A novel promoterless gene targeting vector to efficiently disrupt PRNP gene in cattle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohua; Zhang, Kun; Ding, Fangrong; Zhao, Rui; Li, Song; Li, Rong; Xu, Lingling; Song, Chi; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2013-02-20

    The PRNP gene encodes a cellular protein named prion, whose misfolded form has been implicated in a number of neuropathic diseases in mammals such as the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle. BSE has brought devastating impact on the world economy and human health. Recently, several groups have performed the gene targeting strategy to disrupt the PRNP gene in bovine fibroblast cells and produce BSE-resistant cattle by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, the enrichment efficiency of the gene targeting vector was low. Here, we constructed a novel promoterless gene targeting vector to sequentially disrupt the PRNP gene in bovine fibroblast cells and generate gene targeted cattle by SCNT. The enrichment efficiency of the novel vector was 100% and 60%, respectively. After nuclear transfer, no significant difference was found in the rate of cleavage and blastocyst formation between the knockout and wild type cloned embryos. One PRNP⁺/⁻ calf was born with no obvious abnormal development by now. Fusion RT-PCR and real-time PCR showed one allele of the PRNP gene was functionally disrupted, and the mRNA expression reduced dramatically in the PRNP⁺/⁻ cattle. The reconstituted PRNP⁻/⁻ embryos showed double alleles disruption, and no difference in the rate of cleavage and blastocyst formation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Muscle as a target for supplementary factor IX gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Brad E; Dobrzynski, Eric; Wang, Lixin; Hirao, Lauren; Mingozzi, Federico; Cao, Ou; Herzog, Roland W

    2007-07-01

    Immune responses to the factor IX (F.IX) transgene product are a concern in gene therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B. The risk for such responses is determined by several factors, including the vector, target tissue, and others. Previously, we have demonstrated that hepatic gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors can induce F.IX-specific immune tolerance. Muscle-derived F.IX expression, however, is limited by a local immune response. Here, skeletal muscle was investigated as a target for supplemental gene transfer. Given the low invasiveness of intramuscular injections, this route would be ideal for secondary gene transfer, thereby boosting levels of transgene expression. However, this is feasible only if immune tolerance established by compartmentalization of expression to the liver extends to other sites. Immune tolerance to human F.IX established by prior hepatic AAV-2 gene transfer was maintained after subsequent injection of AAV-1 or adenoviral vector into skeletal muscle, and tolerized mice failed to form antibodies or an interferon (IFN)-gamma(+) T cell response to human F.IX. A sustained increase in systemic transgene expression was obtained for AAV-1, whereas an increase after adenoviral gene transfer was transient. A CD8(+) T cell response specifically against adenovirus-transduced fibers was observed, suggesting that cytotoxic T cell responses against viral antigens were sufficient to eliminate expression in muscle. In summary, the data demonstrate that supplemental F.IX gene transfer to skeletal muscle does not break tolerance achieved by liver-derived expression. The approach is efficacious, if the vector for muscle gene transfer does not express immunogenic viral proteins.

  7. Opaque-2 is a transcriptional activator that recognizes a specific target site in 22-kD zein genes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R J; Ketudat, M; Aukerman, M J; Hoschek, G

    1992-06-01

    opaque-2 (o2) is a regulatory locus in maize that plays an essential role in controlling the expression of genes encoding the 22-kD zein proteins. Through DNase I footprinting and DNA binding analyses, we have identified the binding site for the O2 protein (O2) in the promoter of 22-kD zein genes. The sequence in the 22-kD zein gene promoter that is recognized by O2 is similar to the target site recognized by other "basic/leucine zipper" (bZIP) proteins in that it contains an ACGT core that is necessary for DNA binding. The site is located in the -300 region relative to the translation start and lies about 20 bp downstream of the highly conserved zein gene sequence motif known as the "prolamin box." Employing gel mobility shift assays, we used O2 antibodies and nuclear extracts from an o2 null mutant to demonstrate that the O2 protein in maize endosperm nuclei recognizes the target site in the zein gene promoter. Mobility shift assays using nuclear proteins from an o2 null mutant indicated that other endosperm proteins in addition to O2 can bind the O2 target site and that O2 may be associated with one of these proteins. We also demonstrated that in yeast cells the O2 protein can activate expression of a lacZ gene containing a multimer of the O2 target sequence as part of its promoter, thus confirming its role as a transcriptional activator. A computer-assisted search indicated that the O2 target site is not present in the promoters of zein genes other than those of the 22-kD class. These data suggest a likely explanation at the molecular level for the differential effect of o2 mutations on expression of certain members of the zein gene family.

  8. All-optical regulation of gene expression in targeted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Liu, Dayong; Lan, Bei; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-06-01

    Controllable gene expression is always a challenge and of great significance to biomedical research and clinical applications. Recently, various approaches based on extra-engineered light-sensitive proteins have been developed to provide optogenetic actuators for gene expression. Complicated biomedical techniques including exogenous genes engineering, transfection, and material delivery are needed. Here we present an all-optical method to regulate gene expression in targeted cells. Intrinsic or exogenous genes can be activated by a Ca2+-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) driven by a short flash of femtosecond-laser irradiation. When applied to mesenchymal stem cells, expression of a differentiation regulator Osterix can be activated by this method to potentially induce differentiation of them. A laser-induced ``Ca2+-comb'' (LiCCo) by multi-time laser exposure is further developed to enhance gene expression efficiency. This noninvasive method hence provides an encouraging advance of gene expression regulation, with promising potential of applying in cell biology and stem-cell science.

  9. Neuronal Gene Targets of NF-κB and Their Dysregulation in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Wanda M.; Albensi, Benedict C.

    2016-01-01

    in AD is warranted and may have important implications for uncovering treatments for the disease. This review aims to provide a comprehensive view of our current understanding of the gene targets of this transcription factor in neurons in the intact brain and provide an overview of studies investigating NF-κB signaling, including its downstream targets, in the AD brain as a means of uncovering the basic physiological mechanisms by which memory becomes fragile in the disease. PMID:27881951

  10. N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1)/Cap43 enhances portal vein invasion and intrahepatic metastasis in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Jun; Ogasawara, Sachiko; Kawahara, Akihiko; Nishida, Naoyo; Sanada, Sakiko; Moriya, Fukuko; Kuwano, Michihiko; Nakashima, Osamu; Yano, Hirohisa

    2008-12-01

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1)/Cap43 is a 43 kDa protein that is widely distributed in the body. Its expression is regulated by nickel, cobalt, hypoxic condition and others; it is reported to be weaker in tumors than normal tissues; and NDRG1/Cap43 is considered to act suppressively to tumor metastasis. This current study immunohistochemically examined NDRG1/Cap43 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and analyzed its relationship to clinicopathologic factors and prognosis. The samples were 105 surgically resected HCC tissue blocks, i.e., 18 well-differentiated HCC, 61 moderately differentiated HCC, 10 poorly differentiated HCC, 9 'nodule-in-nodule' type HCC, and 7 sarcomatous HCC. In all cases, NDRG1/Cap43 was not expressed in normal liver cells. Strong expression was found in 65 of the 105 cases (62%), i.e., in 11.1% of well-differentiated HCC, 72.1% of moderately differentiated HCC, 80.0% of poorly differentiated HCC, and 71.4% of sarcomatous HCC. In the 'nodule-in-nodule' type, its expression was found in 55.6% of their well-differentiated component, and this frequency was significantly higher than that in well-differentiated HCC (11.1%). In the cases showing strong NDRG1/Cap43 expression, frequency of portal vein invasion and of intrahepatic metastasis was significantly high. No clear relationship between the expression and prognosis was observed. NDRG1/Cap43 expression that was found in advanced HCC was thought to accelerate tumor invasion and metastasis. NDRG1/Cap43 could act as a useful biomarker of HCC.

  11. N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 promotes tumor inflammatory angiogenesis through JNK activation and autocrine loop of interleukin-1α by human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yuichi; Watari, Kosuke; Shibata, Tomohiro; Uba, Manami; Ureshino, Hiroki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Abe, Hideyuki; Izumi, Hiroto; Mukaida, Naofumi; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi

    2013-08-30

    The expression of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) was significantly correlated with tumor angiogenesis and malignant progression together with poor prognosis in gastric cancer. However, the underlying mechanism for the role of NDRG1 in the malignant progression of gastric cancer remains unknown. Here we examined whether and how NDRG1 could modulate tumor angiogenesis by human gastric cancer cells. We established NU/Cap12 and NU/Cap32 cells overexpressing NDRG1 in NUGC-3 cells, which show lower tumor angiogenesis in vivo. Compared with parental NU/Mock3, NU/Cap12, and NU/Cap32 cells: 1) induced higher tumor angiogenesis than NU/Mock3 cells accompanied by infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages in mouse dorsal air sac assay and Matrigel plug assay; 2) showed much higher expression of CXC chemokines, MMP-1, and the potent angiogenic factor VEGF-A; 3) increased the expression of the representative inflammatory cytokine, IL-1α; 4) augmented JNK phosphorylation and nuclear expression of activator protein 1 (AP-1). Further analysis demonstrated that knockdown of AP-1 (Jun and/or Fos) resulted in down-regulation of the expression of VEGF-A, CXC chemokines, and MMP-1, and also suppressed expression of IL-1α in NDRG1-overexpressing cell lines. Treatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) resulted in down-regulation of JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation, and the expression of VEGF-A, CXC chemokines, and MMP-1 in NU/Cap12 and NU/Cap32 cells. Finally, administration of IL-1ra suppressed both tumor angiogenesis and infiltration of macrophages by NU/Cap12 in vivo. Together, activation of JNK/AP-1 thus seems to promote tumor angiogenesis in relationship to NDRG1-induced inflammatory stimuli by gastric cancer cells.

  12. Candidate genes and potential targets for therapeutics in Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Christopher; Coppes, Max J; Narendran, Aru

    2010-09-01

    Wilms' tumour (WT) is the most common malignant renal tumour of childhood. During the past two decades or so, molecular studies carried out on biopsy specimens and tumour-derived cell lines have identified a multitude of chromosomal and epigenetic alterations in WT. In addition, a significant amount of evidence has been gathered to identify the genes and signalling pathways that play a defining role in its genesis, growth, survival and treatment responsiveness. As such, these molecules and mechanisms constitute potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies for refractory WT. In this report we aim to review some of the many candidate genes and intersecting pathways that underlie the complexities of WT biology.

  13. Transient Silencing of DNA Repair Genes Improves Targeted Gene Integration in the Filamentous Fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Chum, Pak Yang; Schmidt, Georg; Saloheimo, Markku; Landowski, Christopher P

    2017-08-01

    Trichoderma reesei is a filamentous fungus that is used worldwide to produce industrial enzymes. Industrial strains have traditionally been created though systematic strain improvement using mutagenesis and screening approaches. It is also desirable to specifically manipulate the genes of the organism to further improve and to modify the strain. Targeted integration in filamentous fungi is typically hampered by very low frequencies of homologous recombination. To address this limitation, we have developed a simple transient method for silencing genes in T. reesei Using gene-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeted to mus53, we could achieve up to 90% knockdown of mus53 mRNA. As a practical example, we demonstrated that transient silencing of DNA repair genes significantly improved homologous integration of DNA at a specific locus in a standard protoplast transformation. The best transient silencing of mus53 with siRNAs in protoplasts could achieve up to 59% marker gene integration.IMPORTANCE The previous solution for improving targeted integration efficiency has been deleting nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair genes. However, deleting these important repair genes may lead to unintended consequences for genomic stability and could lead to the accumulation of spontaneous mutations. Our method of transiently silencing NHEJ repair pathway genes allows recovery of their important repair functions. Here we report a silencing approach for improving targeted DNA integration in filamentous fungi. Furthermore, our transient silencing method is a truly flexible approach that is capable of knocking down the expression of a target gene in growing mycelial cultures, which could facilitate the broad study of gene functions in T. reesei. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Scaling the Drosophila Wing: TOR-Dependent Target Gene Access by the Hippo Pathway Transducer Yorkie

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Joseph; Struhl, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Organ growth is controlled by patterning signals that operate locally (e.g., Wingless/Ints [Wnts], Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [BMPs], and Hedgehogs [Hhs]) and scaled by nutrient-dependent signals that act systemically (e.g., Insulin-like peptides [ILPs] transduced by the Target of Rapamycin [TOR] pathway). How cells integrate these distinct inputs to generate organs of the appropriate size and shape is largely unknown. The transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki, a YES-Associated Protein, or YAP) acts downstream of patterning morphogens and other tissue-intrinsic signals to promote organ growth. Yki activity is regulated primarily by the Warts/Hippo (Wts/Hpo) tumour suppressor pathway, which impedes nuclear access of Yki by a cytoplasmic tethering mechanism. Here, we show that the TOR pathway regulates Yki by a separate and novel mechanism in the Drosophila wing. Instead of controlling Yki nuclear access, TOR signaling governs Yki action after it reaches the nucleus by allowing it to gain access to its target genes. When TOR activity is inhibited, Yki accumulates in the nucleus but is sequestered from its normal growth-promoting target genes—a phenomenon we term “nuclear seclusion.” Hence, we posit that in addition to its well-known role in stimulating cellular metabolism in response to nutrients, TOR also promotes wing growth by liberating Yki from nuclear seclusion, a parallel pathway that we propose contributes to the scaling of wing size with nutrient availability. PMID:26474042

  15. Evaluation of drug-targetable genes by defining modes of abnormality in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Junseong; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Chulhee

    2015-09-04

    In the post-genomic era, many researchers have taken a systematic approach to identifying abnormal genes associated with various diseases. However, the gold standard has not been established, and most of these abnormalities are difficult to be rehabilitated in real clinical settings. In addition to identifying abnormal genes, for a practical purpose, it is necessary to investigate abnormality diversity. In this context, this study is aimed to demonstrate simply restorable genes as useful drug targets. We devised the concept of "drug targetability" to evaluate several different modes of abnormal genes by predicting events after drug treatment. As a representative example, we applied our method to breast cancer. Computationally, PTPRF, PRKAR2B, MAP4K3, and RICTOR were calculated as highly drug-targetable genes for breast cancer. After knockdown of these top-ranked genes (i.e., high drug targetability) using siRNA, our predictions were validated by cell death and migration assays. Moreover, inhibition of RICTOR or PTPRF was expected to prolong lifespan of breast cancer patients according to patient information annotated in microarray data. We anticipate that our method can be widely applied to elaborate selection of novel drug targets, and, ultimately, to improve the efficacy of disease treatment.

  16. Identification of target genes of cediranib in alveolar soft part sarcoma using a gene microarray.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenhua; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Xiaodong; Wang, Ping

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the target genes of cediranib and the associated signaling pathways in alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS). A microarray dataset (GSE32569) was obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The R software package was used for data normalization and screening of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery was used to perform Gene Ontology analysis. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis was performed to obtain the up- and downregulated pathways in ASPS. The Distant Regulatory Elements of co-regulated genes database was used to identify the transcription factors (TFs) that were enriched in the signaling pathways. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database and was visualized using Cytoscape software. A total of 71 DEGs, including 59 upregulated genes and 12 downregulated genes, were identified. Gene sets associated with ASPS were enriched primarily in four signaling pathways: The phenylalanine metabolism pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, the taste transduction pathway and the intestinal immune network for the production of immunoglobulin A. Furthermore, 107 TFs were identified to be enriched in the MAPK signaling pathway. Certain genes, including those coding for Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1, kinase insert domain receptor, E-selectin and platelet-derived growth factor receptor D, that were associated with other genes in the PPI network, were identified. The present study identified certain potential target genes and the associated signaling pathways of cediranib action in ASPS, which may be helpful in understanding the efficacy of cediranib and the development of new targets for cediranib.

  17. Comparison of two kinds of nanomedicine for targeted gene therapy: premodified or postmodified gene delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhaoshun; Sun, Cong; Yin, Zhaohui; Zhou, Fang; Ge, Linfu; Liu, Ximin; Kong, Fansheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The applications of ligand-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified nanocarriers have now emerged, as well as recognized strategies to provide the vectors with active targeting properties. In this research, premodification and postmodification were compared using the same ligand, ie, a novel conjugated mannan-containing PEG and L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Methods Premodified and postmodified solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared and the characteristics of the two kinds of vehicles were evaluated. The modified vectors were then administered intravenously to rats and the in vivo targeting behavior of the complexes was investigated in liver macrophages. Results By carefully formulating the carriers with an optimal ratio of mannan-containing PEG-PE, postmodified vehicles displayed more efficient gene expression in rat Kupffer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Postmodified gene carriers are superior to premodified gene vectors, although the latter is also promising for targeted gene delivery. This discovery could guide our future research. PMID:22619539

  18. Bioengineered Silk Gene Delivery System for Nuclear Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Tokareva, Olena; Varone, Antonio; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery research has gained momentum with the use of lipophilic vectors that mimic viral systems to increase transfection efficiency. However, maintaining cell viability with these systems remains a major challenge. Therefore biocompatible and nontoxic biopolymers that are designed by combining non-immunological viral mimicking components with suitable carriers have been explored to address these limitations. In the present study recombinant DNA technology was used to design a multi-functional gene delivery system for nuclear targeting, while also supporting cell viability. Spider dragline silk recombinant proteins were modified with DNA condensing units and the proton sponge endosomal escape pathway was utilized for enhanced delivery. Short-term transfection efficiency in a COS-7 cell line (adherent kidney cells isolated from African green monkey) was enhanced compared to lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine (PEI), as was cell viability with these recombinant bio-polyplexes. Endosomal escape and consequent nuclear targeting were shown with fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24889658

  19. Targeting MicroRNAs in Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Weidan; Sun, Bin; Su, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a kind of conserved small non-coding RNAs that participate in regulating gene expression by targeting multiple molecules. Early studies have shown that the expression of miRNAs changes significantly in different tumor tissues and cancer cell lines. It is well acknowledged that such variation is involved in almost all biological processes, including cell proliferation, mobility, survival and differentiation. Increasing experimental data indicate that miRNA dysregulation is a biomarker of several pathological conditions including cancer, and that miRNA can exert a causal role, as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, in different steps of the tumorigenic process. Anticancer therapies based on miRNAs are currently being developed with a goal to improve outcomes of cancer treatment. In our present study, we review the function of miRNAs in tumorigenesis and development, and discuss the latest clinical applications and strategies of therapy targeting miRNAs in cancer. PMID:28075356

  20. Early-phase GVHD gene expression profile in target versus non-target tissues: kidney, a possible target?

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, B; Al-Chaqmaqchi, H; Al-Hashmi, S; Brodin, D; Hassan, Z; Abedi-Valugerdi, M; Moshfegh, A; Hassan, M

    2013-02-01

    GVHD is a major complication after allo-SCT. In GVHD, some tissues like liver, intestine and skin are infiltrated by donor T cells while others like muscle are not. The mechanism underlying targeted tropism of donor T cells is not fully understood. In the present study, we aim to explore differences in gene expression profile among target versus non-target tissues in a mouse model of GVHD based on chemotherapy conditioning. Expression levels of JAK-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT), CXCL1, ICAM1 and STAT3 were increased in the liver and remained unchanged (or decreased) in the muscle and kidney after conditioning. At the start of GVHD the expression levels of CXCL9, ITGb2, SAA3, MARCO, TLR and VCAM1 were significantly higher in the liver or kidney compared with the muscle of GVHD animals. Moreover, biological processes of inflammatory reactions, leukocyte migration, response to bacterium and chemotaxis followed the same pattern. Our data show that both chemotherapy and allogenicity exclusively induce expression of inflammatory genes in target tissues. Moreover, gene expression profile and histopathological findings in the kidney are similar to those observed in the liver of GVHD mice.

  1. Identification of key target genes and pathways in laryngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Du, Jintao; Liu, Jun; Wen, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to screen the key genes associated with laryngeal carcinoma and to investigate the molecular mechanism of laryngeal carcinoma progression. The gene expression profile of GSE10935 [Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) accession number], including 12 specimens from laryngeal papillomas and 12 specimens from normal laryngeal epithelia controls, was downloaded from the GEO database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened in laryngeal papillomas compared with normal controls using Limma package in R language, followed by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and pathway enrichment analysis. Furthermore, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed using Cytoscape software and modules were analyzed using MCODE plugin from the PPI network. Furthermore, significant biological pathway regions (sub-pathway) were identified by using iSubpathwayMiner analysis. A total of 67 DEGs were identified, including 27 up-regulated genes and 40 down-regulated genes and they were involved in different GO terms and pathways. PPI network analysis revealed that Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family member 1 (RASSF1) was a hub protein. The sub-pathway analysis identified 9 significantly enriched sub-pathways, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and nitrogen metabolism. Genes such as phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), carbonic anhydrase II (CA2), and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA12) whose node degrees were >10 were identified in the disease risk sub-pathway. Genes in the sub-pathway, such as RASSF1, PGK1, CA2 and CA12 were presumed to serve critical roles in laryngeal carcinoma. The present study identified DEGs and their sub-pathways in the disease, which may serve as potential targets for treatment of laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:27446427

  2. Targeted disruption of the Lowe syndrome gene (OCRL-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenne, P.A.; Olivos, I.; Grinberg, A.

    1994-09-01

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) is a rare X-linked disease characterized by congenital cataract formation, mental retardation and renal tubular dysfunction (Fanconi syndrome). The gene for OCRL (OCRL-1) has recently been identified through positional cloning techniques and is highly homologous to a previously reported gene encoding a 75 kDa inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase. Thus OCRL might be caused by an alteration in inositol metabolism. In order to further investigate the role of OCRL-1 in Lowe`s syndrome, we decided to use targeted disruption to create mice lacking a functional OCRL-1 protein. The murine homologue of OCRL-1 (Ocrl-1) was cloned from a 129Sv genomic library. Two targeting vectors were created from the 3{prime}-end of the gene by fusing a neomycin resistance gene (PGK-Neo) into two exons. The first vector employed a classic positive negative selection scheme whereas the second vector included a polyadenylation trap. The vectors were electroporated into CCE or J1 ES cells and recombinants were screened by Southern blotting. Targeted cells were obtained at a frequency of 1/50 (for CCE) and 1/16 (for J1 using the polyadenylation trap). Using antibodies made to an OCRL-1 fusion protein, we could demonstrate a lack of Ocrl-1 protein product in the targeted ES cell lines. Therefore, we had created a null allele at the Ocrl-1 locus. The targeted ES clones were injected into 3.5 dpc C57B1/6 blastocysts and chimeric mice were obtained. Male chimeras have been made from five targeted cell lines. The males were mated with C57B1/6 females and germline transmission has been obtained from males derived from two of the five cell lines (one from CCE and one from J1 targeted ES cells). Preliminary analysis of male Ocrl-1{sup {minus}} mice suggests the presence of a proximal renal tubular dysfunction but the absence of detectable cataracts. We are presently continuing our phenotypic analyses.

  3. Tenebrio molitor Gram-negative-binding protein 3 (TmGNBP3) is essential for inducing downstream antifungal Tenecin 1 gene expression against infection with Beauveria bassiana JEF-007.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Ting; Lee, Mi Rong; Lee, Se Jin; Kim, Sihyeon; Nai, Yu-Shin; Kim, Jae Su

    2017-05-23

    The Toll signaling pathway is responsible for defense against both Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. Gram-negative binding protein 3 (GNBP3) has a strong affinity for the fungal cell wall component, β-1,3-glucan, which can activate the prophenoloxidase (proPO) cascade and induce the Toll signaling pathway. Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is an intracellular adaptor protein involved in the Toll signaling pathway. In this study, we monitored the response of 5 key genes (TmGNBP3, TmMyD88, and Tenecin 1, 2, and 3) in the Toll pathway of the mealworm Tenebrio molitor immune system against the fungus Beauveria bassiana JEF-007 using RT-PCR. TmGNBP3, Tenecin 1, and Tenecin 2 were significantly upregulated after fungal infection. To better understand the roles of the Toll signaling pathway in the mealworm immune system, TmGNBP3 and TmMyD88 were knocked down by RNAi silencing. Target gene expression levels decreased at 2 d postknockdown and were dramatically reduced at 6 d post-dsRNA injection. Therefore, mealworms were compromised by B. bassiana JEF-007 at 6 d post-dsRNA injection. Silencing of TmMyD88 and TmGNBP3 resulted in reduced resistance of the host to fungal infection. Particularly, reducing TmGNBP3 levels obviously downregulated Tenecin 1 and Tenecin 2 expression levels, whereas silencing TmMyD88 expression resulted in decreased Tenecin 2 expression. These results indicate that TmGNBP3 is essential to induce downstream antifungal peptide Tenecin 1 expression against B. bassiana JEF-007. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Treating psoriasis by targeting its susceptibility gene Rel.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Wang, Shaowen; Yu, Linjiang; Yi, Huqiang; Liu, Ruiling; Geng, Wenwen; Wan, Xiaochun; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao; Chen, Youhai H; Ruan, Qingguo

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the skin. Accumulating evidence indicates that the Rel gene, a member of the NF-κB family, is a risk factor for the disease. We sought to investigate whether psoriasis can be prevented by directly targeting the Rel gene transcript, i.e., the c-Rel mRNA. Using chemically-modified c-Rel specific siRNA (siRel) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(l-leucine) (PEG-PLL-PLLeu) micelles, we successfully knocked down the expression of c-Rel, and showed that the expression of cytokine IL-23, a direct target of c-Rel that can drive the development of IL-17-producing T cells, was markedly inhibited. More importantly, treating mice with siRel not only prevented but also ameliorated imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriasis. Mechanistic studies showed that siRel treatment down-regulated the expression of multiple inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results indicate that the susceptibility gene Rel can be targeted to treat and prevent psoriasis.

  5. Modification of the apolipoprotein B gene in HepG2 cells by gene targeting.

    PubMed Central

    Farese, R V; Flynn, L M; Young, S G

    1992-01-01

    The HepG2 cell line has been used extensively to study the synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein (apo) B. In this study, we tested whether gene-targeting techniques can be used to inactivate one of the apo B alleles in HepG2 cells by homologous recombination using a transfected gene-targeting vector. Our vector contained exons 1-7 of the apo B gene, in which exon 2 was interrupted by a promoterless neomycin resistance (neo(r)) gene. The recombination of this vector with the cognate gene would inactivate an apo B allele and enable the apo B promoter to activate the transcription of the neo(r) gene. To detect the rare homologous recombinant clone, we developed a novel solid phase RIA that uses the apo B-specific monoclonal antibody MB19 to analyze the apo B secreted by G418-resistant (G418r) clones. Antibody MB19 detects a two-allele genetic polymorphism in apo B by binding to the apo B allotypes MB19(1) and MB19(2) with high and low affinity, respectively. HepG2 cells normally secrete both the apo B MB19 allotypes. Using the MB19 immunoassay, we identified a G418r HepG2 clone that had lost the ability to secrete the MB19(1) allotype. The inactivation of an apo B allele of this clone was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction amplification of an 865-bp fragment unique to the targeted apo B allele and by Southern blotting of genomic DNA. This study demonstrates that gene-targeting techniques can be used to modify the apo B gene in HepG2 cells and demonstrates the usefulness of a novel solid phase RIA system for detecting apo B gene targeting events in this cell line. Images PMID:1321843

  6. Targeted gene repair: the ups and downs of a promising gene therapy approach.

    PubMed

    de Semir, David; Aran, Josep M

    2006-08-01

    As a novel form of molecular medicine based on direct actions over the genes, targeted gene repair has raised consideration recently above classical gene therapy strategies based on genetic augmentation or complementation. Targeted gene repair relies on the local induction of the cell's endogenous DNA repair mechanisms to attain a therapeutic gene conversion event within the genome of the diseased cell. Successful repair has been achieved both in vitro and in vivo with a variety of corrective molecules ranging from oligonucleotides (chimeraplasts, modified single-stranded oligonucleotides, triplex-forming oligonucleotides), to small DNA fragments (small fragment homologous replacement (SFHR)), and even viral vectors (AAV-based). However, controversy on the consistency and lack of reproducibility of early experiments regarding frequencies and persistence of targeted gene repair, particularly for chimeraplasty, has flecked the field. Nevertheless, several hurdles such as inefficient nuclear uptake of the corrective molecules, and misleading assessment of targeted repair frequencies have been identified and are being addressed. One of the key bottlenecks for exploiting the overall potential of the different targeted gene repair modalities is the lack of a detailed knowledge of their mechanisms of action at the molecular level. Several studies are now focusing on the assessment of the specific repair pathway(s) involved (homologous recombination, mismatch repair, etc.), devising additional strategies to increase their activity (using chemotherapeutic drugs, chimeric nucleases, etc.), and assessing the influence of the cell cycle in the regulation of the repair process. Until therapeutic correction frequencies for single gene disorders are reached both in cellular and animal models, precision and undesired side effects of this promising gene therapy approach will not be thoroughly evaluated.

  7. Modification of the apolipoprotein B gene in HepG2 cells by gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Farese, R V; Flynn, L M; Young, S G

    1992-07-01

    The HepG2 cell line has been used extensively to study the synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein (apo) B. In this study, we tested whether gene-targeting techniques can be used to inactivate one of the apo B alleles in HepG2 cells by homologous recombination using a transfected gene-targeting vector. Our vector contained exons 1-7 of the apo B gene, in which exon 2 was interrupted by a promoterless neomycin resistance (neo(r)) gene. The recombination of this vector with the cognate gene would inactivate an apo B allele and enable the apo B promoter to activate the transcription of the neo(r) gene. To detect the rare homologous recombinant clone, we developed a novel solid phase RIA that uses the apo B-specific monoclonal antibody MB19 to analyze the apo B secreted by G418-resistant (G418r) clones. Antibody MB19 detects a two-allele genetic polymorphism in apo B by binding to the apo B allotypes MB19(1) and MB19(2) with high and low affinity, respectively. HepG2 cells normally secrete both the apo B MB19 allotypes. Using the MB19 immunoassay, we identified a G418r HepG2 clone that had lost the ability to secrete the MB19(1) allotype. The inactivation of an apo B allele of this clone was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction amplification of an 865-bp fragment unique to the targeted apo B allele and by Southern blotting of genomic DNA. This study demonstrates that gene-targeting techniques can be used to modify the apo B gene in HepG2 cells and demonstrates the usefulness of a novel solid phase RIA system for detecting apo B gene targeting events in this cell line.

  8. Translation of a minigene in the 5' leader sequence of the enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli LEE1 transcription unit affects expression of the neighbouring downstream gene.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Shaw, Robert K; Frankel, Gad; Pallen, Mark J; Busby, Stephen J W

    2012-01-01

    The 5' end of the major RNA transcript of the LEE1 operon of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli contains ~170 bases before the AUG translation start codon of the first recognized gene, ler. This unusually long leader sequence carries three potential alternative AUG start codons. Using a lac fusion expression vector, we confirmed that the ler gene AUG is functional for translation initiation, and we checked for translation initiation at the three alternative AUG codons. Whereas two of the alternative AUG codons appear incompetent for translation initiation, we detected strong initiation at the third AUG, which is followed by one AAA codon and a UAG stop codon. The location of this very short two-codon open reading frame with respect to the ler translation start appears to be critical. Hence mutations that destroy the UAG stop codon, or short deletions between the UAG stop codon and the ler translation initiation region, result in big effects on ler expression. In the context of the full-length LEE1 operon leader sequence, translation of this very short two-codon open reading frame is necessary for optimal expression of the ler gene and for the subsequent interactions of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli with host target cells.

  9. Generation of novel resistance genes using mutation and targeted gene editing.

    PubMed

    Gal-On, Amit; Fuchs, Marc; Gray, Stewart

    2017-08-09

    Classical breeding for virus resistance is a lengthy process and is restricted by the availability of resistance genes. Precise genome editing is a 'dream technology' to improve plants for virus resistance and these tools have opened new and very promising ways to generate virus resistant plants by disrupting host susceptibility genes, or by increasing the expression of viral resistance genes. However, precise targets must be identified and their roles understood to minimize potential negative effects on the plant. Nonetheless, the opportunities for genome editing are expanding, as are the technologies to generate effective and broad-spectrum resistance against plant viruses. Here we provide insights into recent progress related to gene targets and gene editing technologies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Gene Targeting in the Rat: Advances and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Howard J.; Lazar, Jozef; Dwinell, Melinda R.; Moreno, Carol; Geurts, Aron M.

    2010-01-01

    The rat has long been a model favored by physiologists, pharmacologists, and neuroscientists. However, over the last two decades, many investigators in these fields have turned to the mouse because of its gene modification technologies and extensive genomic resources. While the genomic resources of the rat have nearly caught-up, gene targeting has lagged far behind, limiting the value of the rat for many investigators. In the last two years, advances in transposon- and zinc finger nuclease-mediated gene knockout as well as the establishment and culturing of embryonic and inducible pluripotent stem cells have created new opportunities for rat genetic research. Here, we provide a high-level description and potential uses of these new technologies for investigators using the rat for biomedical research. PMID:20869786

  11. Targeting Co-Stimulatory Pathways in Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy with recombinant viral vectors such as adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus holds great promise in treating a wide range of diseases because of the high efficiency with which the viruses transfer their genomes into host cells in vivo. However, the activation of the host immune responses remains a major hurdle to successful gene therapy. Studies in the past two decades have elucidated the important role co-stimulation plays in the activation of both T and B cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of T cell co-stimulatory pathways, and strategies targeting these co-stimulatory pathways in gene therapy applications as well as potential future directions. PMID:22046171

  12. Identification of Targetable FGFR Gene Fusions in Diverse Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Mi; Su, Fengyun; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Khazanov, Nick; Ateeq, Bushra; Cao, Xuhong; Lonigro, Robert J.; Vats, Pankaj; Wang, Rui; Lin, Su-Fang; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Siddiqui, Javed; Tomlins, Scott A.; Wyngaard, Peter; Sadis, Seth; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Hussain, Maha H.; Feng, Felix Y.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Talpaz, Moshe; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Rhodes, Daniel R.; Robinson, Dan R.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2013-01-01

    Through a prospective clinical sequencing program for advanced cancers, four index cases were identified which harbor gene rearrangements of FGFR2 including patients with cholangiocarcinoma, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. After extending our assessment of FGFR rearrangements across multiple tumor cohorts, we identified additional FGFR gene fusions with intact kinase domains in lung squamous cell cancer, bladder cancer, thyroid cancer, oral cancer, glioblastoma, and head and neck squamous cell cancer. All FGFR fusion partners tested exhibit oligomerization capability, suggesting a shared mode of kinase activation. Overexpression of FGFR fusion proteins induced cell proliferation. Two bladder cancer cell lines that harbor FGFR3 fusion proteins exhibited enhanced susceptibility to pharmacologic inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Due to the combinatorial possibilities of FGFR family fusion to a variety of oligomerization partners, clinical sequencing efforts which incorporate transcriptome analysis for gene fusions are poised to identify rare, targetable FGFR fusions across diverse cancer types. PMID:23558953

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fillat, Cristina; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed. PMID:24212620

  14. Nanos3 gene targeting in medaka ES cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guijun; Yan, Yan; Chen, Tiansheng; Yi, Meisheng; Ni, Hong; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Hong, Yunhan

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting (GT) by homologous recombination offers the best precision for genome editing in mice. nanos3 is a highly conserved gene and encodes a zinc-finger RNA binding protein essential for germ stem cell maintenance in Drosophila, zebrafish and mouse. Here we report nanos3 GT in embryonic stem (ES) cells of the fish medaka as a lower vertebrate model organism. A vector was designed for GT via homologous recombination on the basis of positive-negative selection (PNS). The ES cell line MES1 after gene transfer and PNS produced 56 colonies that were expanded into ES cell sublines. Nine sublines were GT-positive by PCR genotyping, 4 of which were homologous recombinants as revealed by Southern blot. We show that one of the 4, A15, contains a precisely targeted nanos3 allele without any random events, demonstrating the GT feasibility in medaka ES cells. Importantly, A15 retained all features of undifferentiated ES cells, including stable self-renewal, an undifferentiated phenotype, pluripotency gene expression and differentiation during chimeric embryogenesis. These results provide first evidence that the GT procedure and genuine GT on a chromosomal locus such as nanos3 do not compromise pluripotency in ES cells of a lower vertebrate.

  15. The MSX1 homeobox transcription factor is a downstream target of PHOX2B and activates the Delta-Notch pathway in neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Revet, Ingrid; Huizenga, Gerda; Chan, Alvin; Koster, Jan; Volckmann, Richard; Sluis, Peter van; Ora, Ingrid; Versteeg, Rogier; Geerts, Dirk

    2008-02-15

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumour of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system (SNS). One of the master regulator genes for peripheral SNS differentiation, the homeobox transcription factor PHOX2B, is mutated in familiar and sporadic neuroblastomas. Here we report that inducible expression of PHOX2B in the neuroblastoma cell line SJNB-8 down-regulates MSX1, a homeobox gene important for embryonic neural crest development. Inducible expression of MSX1 in SJNB-8 caused inhibition of both cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar. Affymetrix micro-array and Northern blot analysis demonstrated that MSX1 strongly up-regulated the Delta-Notch pathway genes DLK1, NOTCH3, and HEY1. In addition, the proneural gene NEUROD1 was down-regulated. Western blot analysis showed that MSX1 induction caused cleavage of the NOTCH3 protein to its activated form, further confirming activation of the Delta-Notch pathway. These experiments describe for the first time regulation of the Delta-Notch pathway by MSX1, and connect these genes to the PHOX2B oncogene, indicative of a role in neuroblastoma biology. Affymetrix micro-array analysis of a neuroblastic tumour series consisting of neuroblastomas and the more benign ganglioneuromas showed that MSX1, NOTCH3 and HEY1 are more highly expressed in ganglioneuromas. This suggests a block in differentiation of these tumours at distinct developmental stages or lineages.

  16. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3'-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes.

  17. A targeted ultrasound contrast agent carrying gene and cell-penetrating peptide: preparation and gene transfection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianli; Zhang, Ping; Tian, Ju; Zhou, Zhiyi; Liu, Xingzhao; Wang, Dong; Wang, Zhigang

    2014-09-01

    Targeted and high efficient gene delivery is a main issue in gene treatment. Taking advantage of ischemic memory target P-selectin and our previous study-synergistic effects of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) and TAT peptide on gene transfection, which were characterized by targeted aggregation and high efficient gene transfection, we set up a 'smart' gene delivery system-targeted ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) carrying gene and cell-permeable peptides (CPP). Such UCA had a strong binding force with DNA which was protected from being hydrolysed by nuclease. Moreover, synergistic effects of UTMD and TAT peptide increased gene transfection. Specifically, the UCA were reacted with an ischemic memory target P-selectin overexpressed by ischemic issues (including ischemic heart disease) and loaded with gene and CPP, which enabled targeted localization and gene delivery to ischemic cells overexpressing P-selectin. We demonstrated their targeting affinity for hypoxia human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and gene transfection in vitro. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that gene and CPP were distributed on the shell of UCA. Red fluorescence was observed on the surface of targeted UCA using immunofluorescent microscopy, which demonstrated that the antibody was successfully connected to the UCA. The targeted UCA was specifically and tightly binded to hypoxia HUVEC, while there were no or little non-targeted UCA binding around hypoxia HUVEC. 24h after transfection, gene transfection efficiency detected by FCM was higher in targeted group than non-targeted group. Overall, the targeted UCA carrying gene and CPP was prepared successfully. It had a strong target binding capacity to hypoxia HUVEC and high efficient gene transfection, which maybe provide a novel strategy for gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Endosymbiotic Bacterium Wolbachia Selectively Kills Male Hosts by Targeting the Masculinizing Gene.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Takahiro; Kawamoto, Munetaka; Shoji, Keisuke; Kiuchi, Takashi; Sugano, Sumio; Shimada, Toru; Suzuki, Yutaka; Katsuma, Susumu

    2015-07-01

    Pathogens are known to manipulate the reproduction and development of their hosts for their own benefit. Wolbachia is an endosymbiotic bacterium that infects a wide range of insect species. Wolbachia is known as an example of a parasite that manipulates the sex of its host's progeny. Infection of Ostrinia moths by Wolbachia causes the production of all-female progeny, however, the mechanism of how Wolbachia accomplishes this male-specific killing is unknown. Here we show for the first time that Wolbachia targets the host masculinizing gene of Ostrinia to accomplish male-killing. We found that Wolbachia-infected O. furnacalis embryos do not express the male-specific splice variant of doublesex, a gene which acts at the downstream end of the sex differentiation cascade, throughout embryonic development. Transcriptome analysis revealed that Wolbachia infection markedly reduces the mRNA level of Masc, a gene that encodes a protein required for both masculinization and dosage compensation in the silkworm Bombyx mori. Detailed bioinformatic analysis also elucidated that dosage compensation of Z-linked genes fails in Wolbachia-infected O. furnacalis embryos, a phenomenon that is extremely similar to that observed in Masc mRNA-depleted male embryos of B. mori. Finally, injection of in vitro transcribed Masc cRNA into Wolbachia-infected embryos rescued male progeny. Our results show that Wolbachia-induced male-killing is caused by a failure of dosage compensation via repression of the host masculinizing gene. Our study also shows a novel strategy by which a pathogen hijacks the host sex determination cascade.

  19. Targeting receptor tyrosine kinases and their downstream signaling with cell-penetrating peptides in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Wilson, Jamie L; Taylor, Linda; Rahimi, Nader; Mierke, Dale; Polgar, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) intracellular delivery of receptor signaling motifs provides an opportunity to regulate specific receptor tyrosine kinase signal transductions. We targeted tyrosine residues Y740 and Y751 of the PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) and Y1175 of the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). The Y740 and Y751 motifs activated ERK and Akt, while the Y1175 motif activated ERK. Targeting either Y740 or Y751 of the PDGFRβ in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) effectively inhibited PDGF activation of ERK or Akt. Interfering with the Y751 region of the PDGFRβ proved more effective than targeting the Y740 region. The phosphorylation of Y751 of the CPP and the length and exact sequence of the mimicking peptide proved crucial. On the other hand, in human pulmonary artery endothelial cell phosphorylation of the VEGFR2 Y1175 CPP was not a determinant in blockage of ERK activation. Likewise, the length of the peptide mimic was not crucial with a very small sequence containing the Y1175 remaining effective. Physiologic proof of concept for the effectiveness of the CPP was confirmed by blockage of HPASMC migration in response to PDGF following culture injury. Thus targeted blockage of tyrosine kinase receptor signaling can be very effective.

  20. Construction of a biosensor mutant of Comamonas testosteroni for testosterone determination by cloning the EGFP gene downstream to the regulatory region of the 3,17β-HSD gene.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guangming; Maser, Edmund

    2015-06-05

    Comamonas testosteroni (C. testosteroni) is able to catabolize a variety of steroids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. 3,17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3,17β-HSD) from C. testosteroni is a testosterone-inducible protein and a key enzyme in steroid degradation. 3,17β-HSD is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. We found that a 2.4 kb regulatory DNA fragment upstream of the 3,17β-HSD gene (βhsd) responds to steroids and triggers βhsd gene induction. To exploit this cis-acting regulatory element for a steroid determination system, plasmids pK2.4-EGFP-4 and pBB2.4-EGFP-8 were constructed. Both plasmids contain the EGFP gene fused downstream to a 2.4 kb DNA fragment from C. testosteroni. However, whereas pK2.4-EGFP-4 could integrate into the chromosomal DNA of C. testosteroni and knock out the βhsd gene promoter, pBB2.4-EGFP-8 could replicate in C. testosteroni cells as a free plasmid DNA. After integration of pK2.4-EGFP-4 into the βhsd gene promoter, 3,17β-HSD expression could not be induced such that EGFP expression in the mutant cells was at low levels. In contrast, in C. testosteroni cells transformed with pBB2.4-EGFP-8 the expression of EGFP was induced with testosterone. Our results showed that fluorescence counts (relative fluorescence units; RFU) increased in parallel with testosterone concentrations. Of note, estradiol and cholesterol could not induce the EGFP reporter gene. In summary, this new biosensor system might be used for the specific determination of testosterone.

  1. The metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), inhibits stress-induced autophagy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Sumit; Bae, Dong-Hun; Lane, Darius J R; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Jansson, Patric J; Richardson, Des R

    2014-04-04

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor with an undefined role in the stress response. Autophagy is a pro-survival pathway and can be regulated via the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK)/eIF2α-mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. Hence, we investigated the role of NDRG1 in stress-induced autophagy as a mechanism of inhibiting metastasis via the induction of apoptosis. As thiosemicarbazone chelators induce stress and up-regulate NDRG1 to inhibit metastasis, we studied their effects on the ER stress response and autophagy. This was important to assess, as little is understood regarding the role of the stress induced by iron depletion and its role in autophagy. We observed that the chelator, di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), which forms redox-active iron and copper complexes, effectively induced ER stress as shown by activation of the PERK/eIF2α pathway. Dp44mT also increased the expression of the autophagic marker, LC3-II, and this was dependent on activation of the PERK/eIF2α axis, as silencing PERK prevented LC3-II accumulation. The effect of Dp44mT on LC3-II expression was at least partially due to iron-depletion, as this effect was also demonstrated with the classical iron chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO), and was not observed for the DFO-iron complex. NDRG1 overexpression also inhibited basal autophagic initiation and the ER stress-mediated autophagic pathway via suppression of the PERK/eIF2α axis. Moreover, NDRG1-mediated suppression of the pro-survival autophagic pathway probably plays a role in its anti-metastatic effects by inducing apoptosis. In fact, multiple pro-apoptotic markers were increased, whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was decreased upon NDRG1 overexpression. This study demonstrates the role of NDRG1 as an autophagic inhibitor that is important for understanding its mechanism of action.

  2. N-myc downstream regulated gene1/Cap43 overexpression suppresses tumor growth by hepatic cancer cells through cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Jun; Murakami, Yuichi; Noda, Masaki; Watari, Kosuke; Ogasawara, Sachiko; Yoshida, Takafumi; Kawahara, Akihiko; Sanada, Sakiko; Yasumoto, Makiko; Yamaguchi, Rin; Kage, Masayoshi; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi; Yano, Hirohisa

    2011-11-01

    N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1)/Cap43 regulates tumor growth and metastasis in various carcinomas. In this study we examined whether and how NDRG1/Cap43 modulates tumor growth by human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. NDRG1/Cap43 cDNA was used to transfect HCC cell lines (KIM-1), and stable transfectants overexpressing NDRG1/Cap43 (KIM-1/Cap43) were obtained. Cell cycle analysis showed that KIM-1/Cap43 cells were arrested in the G0/G1 phase. Western blot analysis demonstrated an increase in p21 in KIM-1/Cap43 cells in culture under full confluency as compared with KIM-1/Mock. When KIM-1 cells, which are very low in NDRG1/Cap43 expression, were treated with mimosine, a G0/G1 cell cycle blocker, expression of NDRG1/Cap43 was induced in a dose dependent manner, together with p21 induction and CDK4 reduction. In vivo, KIM-1/Cap43 cells showed markedly decreased tumor growth rates compared with those of KIM-1/Mock. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated markedly higher p21 labeling index in the KIM-1/Cap43 tumor than KIM-1/Mock tumor, and lower CDK4 and Ki-67 labeling index in the KIM-1/Cap43 than KIM-1/Mock. In order to confirm suppressive effects of NDRG1/Cap43, we further established a stable transfectant expressing NDRG1/Cap43 (HAK-1B/Cap43) using another HCC cell line, HAK-1B. Western blot analysis demonstrated an increase in p21 and a decrease in CDK4 in HAK-1B/Cap43 cells in culture under full confluency as compared with HAK-1B/Mock. HAK-1B/Cap43 also showed decreased tumor growth rates as compared with its control counterpart in vivo. NDRG1/Cap43 overexpression thus induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase accompanied by increased p21 and decreased CDK4 expression in HCC cells. NDRG1/Cap43 might play a key role in the cell cycle control of G0/G1 in HCC cells.

  3. Cytoprotective effect of bioactive sea buckthorn extract on paraquat-exposed A549 cells via induction of Nrf2 and its downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Podder, Biswajit; Kim, Yong-Sik; Song, Ho-Yeon

    2013-12-01

    The extract of sea buckthorn (SBT) [Hippophae rhamnoides L. (Elaeagnaceae)], is used as a food supplement and traditional medicine in numerous countries. This study investigated the protective effects of the functional extract of SBT against paraquat (PQ)-induced toxicity via antioxidant mechanisms in A549 cells. The methanol extract of SBT (25-200 µg/ml) was used to protect cells against PQ (200 µM)-induced cell death. A viability assay was conducted using 3-(4,5-dimethylthioazol-2-ly)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Total intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured and plotted. For validation of the SBT-induced expression of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its target genes, western blot analysis and qPCR were performed. The present study showed that pretreatment of A549 cells with SBT extract significantly attenuated PQ (200 µM)-induced cellular toxicity. The maximum cytoprotective effect was identified using 200 µg/ml SBT extract; it began 24 h following exposure and was sustained up to 120 h (P<0.05). SBT extract significantly reduced LDH activity by 35.63% and ROS levels by 30.90% (P<0.05). Pretreatment with SBT extract activated Nrf2 mRNA and protein expression and its nuclear translocation. The SBT extract effectively induced Nrf2 target genes, such as NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1, glutathione peroxidase 1, glutathione reductase and catalase following treatment with PQ. Based on these results, it was hypothesized that SBT extract may be used as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of various oxidative stress-related diseases.

  4. Charting a course downstream

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    In the petroleum industry, the term downstream refers to those business operations that take place after the search for and the production of crude oil. The actual purchase of crude oil, its transportation to refineries, its refining and the subsequent marketing and distribution of the refined products take place, in industry parlance, downstream. No other industry is required to coordinate the movement of so large a volume of liquids to so many destinations. And few other industries contend with raw material and end-product uncertainties so profound. Both the mixture of available world crude oil supplies and the demand patterns for petroleum products are subject to change. The downstream operations of Marathon Petroleum Company are discussed. The objective is to maximize profitability in the context of constantly changing prices for a variety of products.

  5. Electrostimulation during hindlimb unloading modulates PI3K-AKT downstream targets without preventing soleus atrophy and restores slow phenotype through ERK.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Erwan; Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Bastide, Bruno; Stevens, Laurence

    2011-02-01

    Our aim was to analyze the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT and MAPK signaling pathways in the regulation of muscle mass and slow-to-fast phenotype transition during hindlimb unloading (HU). For that purpose, we studied, in rat slow soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus muscles, the time course of anabolic PI3K-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin, catabolic PI3K-AKT-forkhead box O (FOXO), and MAPK signaling pathway activation after 7, 14, and 28 days of HU. Moreover, we performed chronic low-frequency soleus electrostimulation during HU to maintain exclusively contractile phenotype and so to determine more precisely the role of these signaling pathways in the modulation of muscle mass. HU induced a downregulation of the anabolic AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase, 4E-binding protein 1, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β targets, and an upregulation of the catabolic FOXO1 and muscle-specific RING finger protein-1 targets correlated with soleus muscle atrophy. Unexpectedly, soleus electrostimulation maintained 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase, 4E-binding protein 1, FOXO1, and muscle-specific RING finger protein-1 to control levels, but failed to reduce muscle atrophy. HU decreased ERK phosphorylation, while electrostimulation enabled the maintenance of ERK phosphorylation similar to control level. Moreover, slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain phenotype transition and upregulated glycolytic metabolism were prevented by soleus electrostimulation during HU. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the processes responsible for gradual disuse muscle plasticity in HU conditions involved both PI3-AKT and MAPK pathways. Moreover, electrostimulation during HU restored PI3K-AKT activation without counteracting soleus atrophy, suggesting the involvement of other signaling pathways. Finally, electrostimulation maintained initial contractile and metabolism properties in parallel to ERK activation, reinforcing the idea of a

  6. Prospects for retinal cone-targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, John J; Hauswirth, William W

    2008-06-01

    Gene therapy strategies that target therapeutic genes to retinal cones are a worthy goal both because cone photoreceptor diseases are severely vision limiting and because many retinal diseases that do not affect cones directly eventually lead to cone loss, the reason for eventual blindness. Human achromatopsia is a genetic disease of cones that renders them nonfunctional but otherwise intact. Thus, animal models of achromatopsia were used in conjunction with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors whose serotype efficiently transduces cones and with a promoter that limits transgene expression to cones. In the Gnat2(cpfl3) mouse model of one genetic form of human achromatopsia, we were able to demonstrate recovery of normal cone function and visual acuity after a single subretinal treatment of vector that supplied wild-type Gnat2 protein to cones. This validates the overall strategy of targeting cones using recombinant viral vectors and justifies a more complete examination of animal models of cone disease as a prelude to considering a clinical gene therapy trial. Copyright 2008 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative determination of target gene with electrical sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuzhi; Li, Qiufen; Jin, Xianshi; Jiang, Cheng; Lu, Yong; Tavallaie, Roya; Gooding, J. Justin

    2015-01-01

    Integrating loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D), we have developed an electrical sensor for the simultaneous amplification and detection of specific sequence DNA. Using the O26-wzy gene as a model, the amount of initial target gene could be determined via the threshold time obtained by monitoring the progression of the LAMP reaction in real time. Using the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 12.5 copy/μL can be obtained within 30 min. Monitoring the LAMP reaction by C4D has not only all the advantages that existing electrochemical methods have, but also additional attractive features including being completely free of carryover contamination risk, high simplicity and extremely low cost. These benefits all arise from the fact that the electrodes are separated from the reaction solution, that is C4D is a contactless method. Hence in proof of principle, the new strategy promises a robust, simple, cost-effective and sensitive method for quantitative determination of a target gene, that is applicable either to specialized labs or at point-of-care. PMID:26205714

  8. Quantitative determination of target gene with electrical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuzhi; Li, Qiufen; Jin, Xianshi; Jiang, Cheng; Lu, Yong; Tavallaie, Roya; Gooding, J. Justin

    2015-07-01

    Integrating loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D), we have developed an electrical sensor for the simultaneous amplification and detection of specific sequence DNA. Using the O26-wzy gene as a model, the amount of initial target gene could be determined via the threshold time obtained by monitoring the progression of the LAMP reaction in real time. Using the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 12.5 copy/μL can be obtained within 30 min. Monitoring the LAMP reaction by C4D has not only all the advantages that existing electrochemical methods have, but also additional attractive features including being completely free of carryover contamination risk, high simplicity and extremely low cost. These benefits all arise from the fact that the electrodes are separated from the reaction solution, that is C4D is a contactless method. Hence in proof of principle, the new strategy promises a robust, simple, cost-effective and sensitive method for quantitative determination of a target gene, that is applicable either to specialized labs or at point-of-care.

  9. Sgs1 and Exo1 suppress targeted chromosome duplication during ends-in and ends-out gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    Štafa, Anamarija; Miklenić, Marina; Žunar, Bojan; Lisnić, Berislav; Symington, Lorraine S.; Svetec, Ivan-Krešimir

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is extremely efficient in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is performed by transformation with a linear, non-replicative DNA fragment carrying a selectable marker and containing ends homologous to the particular locus in a genome. However, even in S. cerevisiae, transformation can result in unwanted (aberrant) integration events, the frequency and spectra of which are quite different for ends-out and ends-in transformation assays. It has been observed that gene replacement (ends-out gene targeting) can result in illegitimate integration, integration of the transforming DNA fragment next to the target sequence and duplication of a targeted chromosome. By contrast, plasmid integration (ends-in gene targeting) is often associated with multiple targeted integration events but illegitimate integration is extremely rare and a targeted chromosome duplication has not been reported. Here we systematically investigated the influence of design of the ends-out assay on the success of targeted genetic modification. We have determined transformation efficiency, fidelity of gene targeting and spectra of all aberrant events in several ends-out gene targeting assays designed to insert, delete or replace a particular sequence in the targeted region of the yeast genome. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time that targeted chromosome duplications occur even during ends-in gene targeting. Most importantly, the whole chromosome duplication is POL32 dependent pointing to break-induced replication (BIR) as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, the occurrence of duplication of the targeted chromosome was strikingly increased in the exo1Δ sgs1Δ double mutant but not in the respective single mutants demonstrating that the Exo1 and Sgs1 proteins independently suppress whole chromosome duplication during gene targeting. PMID:25089886

  10. Sgs1 and Exo1 suppress targeted chromosome duplication during ends-in and ends-out gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Štafa, Anamarija; Miklenić, Marina; Zunar, Bojan; Lisnić, Berislav; Symington, Lorraine S; Svetec, Ivan-Krešimir

    2014-10-01

    Gene targeting is extremely efficient in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is performed by transformation with a linear, non-replicative DNA fragment carrying a selectable marker and containing ends homologous to the particular locus in a genome. However, even in S. cerevisiae, transformation can result in unwanted (aberrant) integration events, the frequency and spectra of which are quite different for ends-out and ends-in transformation assays. It has been observed that gene replacement (ends-out gene targeting) can result in illegitimate integration, integration of the transforming DNA fragment next to the target sequence and duplication of a targeted chromosome. By contrast, plasmid integration (ends-in gene targeting) is often associated with multiple targeted integration events but illegitimate integration is extremely rare and a targeted chromosome duplication has not been reported. Here we systematically investigated the influence of design of the ends-out assay on the success of targeted genetic modification. We have determined transformation efficiency, fidelity of gene targeting and spectra of all aberrant events in several ends-out gene targeting assays designed to insert, delete or replace a particular sequence in the targeted region of the yeast genome. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time that targeted chromosome duplications occur even during ends-in gene targeting. Most importantly, the whole chromosome duplication is POL32 dependent pointing to break-induced replication (BIR) as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, the occurrence of duplication of the targeted chromosome was strikingly increased in the exo1Δ sgs1Δ double mutant but not in the respective single mutants demonstrating that the Exo1 and Sgs1 proteins independently suppress whole chromosome duplication during gene targeting.

  11. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  12. Anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles containing IL12 and salmosin genes for targeted cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Seok; Kang, Seong Jae; Jeong, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Min Woo; Park, Sang Il; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Hong Sung; Kim, Keun Sik; Park, Yong Serk

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-directed gene delivery is of major interest in the field of cancer gene therapy. Varied functionalizations of non-viral vectors have been suggested to enhance tumor targetability. In the present study, we prepared two different types of anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) immunonanoparticles containing pDNA, neutrally charged liposomes and cationic lipoplexes, for tumor-directed transfection of cancer therapeutic genes. Even though both anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles had a high binding affinity to the EGFR-positive cancer cells, the anti-EGFR immunolipoplex formulation exhibited approximately 100-fold higher transfection to the target cells than anti-EGFR immunoliposomes. The lipoplex formulation also showed a higher transfection to SK-OV-3 tumor xenografts in mice. Thus, IL12 and/or salmosin genes were loaded in the anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes and intravenously administered to mice carrying SK-OV-3 tumors. Co-transfection of IL12 and salmosin genes using anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes significantly reduced tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Furthermore, combinatorial treatment with doxorubicin synergistically inhibited tumor growth. These results suggest that anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes containing pDNA encoding therapeutic genes could be utilized as a gene-transfer modality for cancer gene therapy.

  13. Disposables in downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Disposable equipment has been used for many years in the downstream processing industry, but mainly for filtration and buffer/media storage. Over the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the use of disposable concepts for chromatography, replacing steel and glass fixed systems with disposable plastic modules that can be discarded once exhausted, fouled or contaminated. These modules save on cleaning and validation costs, and their reduce footprints reduce buffer consumption, water for injection, labor and facility space, contributing to an overall reduction in expenditure that lowers the cost of goods. This chapter examines the practical and economic benefits of disposable modules in downstream processing.

  14. Targeted Gene Knockin in Porcine Somatic Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Eun; Park, Chi-Hun; Powell, Anne; Martin, Jessica; Donovan, David M; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-05-26

    The pig is an ideal large animal model for genetic engineering applications. A relatively short gestation interval and large litter size makes the pig a conducive model for generating and propagating genetic modifications. The domestic pig also shares close similarity in anatomy, physiology, size, and life expectancy, making it an ideal animal for modeling human diseases. Often, however, the technical difficulties in generating desired genetic modifications such as targeted knockin of short stretches of sequences or transgenes have impeded progress in this field. In this study, we have investigated and compared the relative efficiency of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in engineering targeted knockin of pseudo attP sites downstream of a ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene in porcine somatic cells and generated live fetuses by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). By leveraging these knockin pseudo attP sites, we have demonstrated subsequent phiC31 integrase mediated integration of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene into the site. This work for the first time created an optimized protocol for CRISPR/Cas mediated knockin in porcine somatic cells, while simultaneously creating a stable platform for future transgene integration and generating transgenic animals.

  15. MicroRNAs and their target gene networks in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Redova, Martina; Svoboda, Marek; Slaby, Ondrej

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} MiRNAs are related to the processes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis in RCC. {yields} MiRNAs expression profiles are associated with several RCC-specific genetic alterations. {yields} It has been well documented that several miRNAs are downstream effector molecules of the HIF-induced hypoxia response. {yields} MiR-200 family is linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition which is one of the most significant pathogenetic mechanism in RCC. {yields} Mechanistic studies in RCC have provided the rationale of using miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding short single stranded RNAs in the size range 19-25 nucleotides that are associated with gene regulation at the transcriptional and translational level. Recent studies have proved that miRNAs play important roles in a large number of biological processes, including cellular differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, etc. Changes in their expression were found in a variety of human cancers, including renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis. Specific miRNA alterations were associated with key pathogenetic mechanisms of renal cell carcinoma like hypoxia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in renal cell carcinoma with an emphasis on miRNAs potential to serve as a powerful biomarker of disease and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  16. Targeted Gene Knockin in Porcine Somatic Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Eun; Park, Chi-Hun; Powell, Anne; Martin, Jessica; Donovan, David M.; Telugu, Bhanu P.

    2016-01-01

    The pig is an ideal large animal model for genetic engineering applications. A relatively short gestation interval and large litter size makes the pig a conducive model for generating and propagating genetic modifications. The domestic pig also shares close similarity in anatomy, physiology, size, and life expectancy, making it an ideal animal for modeling human diseases. Often, however, the technical difficulties in generating desired genetic modifications such as targeted knockin of short stretches of sequences or transgenes have impeded progress in this field. In this study, we have investigated and compared the relative efficiency of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins in engineering targeted knockin of pseudo attP sites downstream of a ubiquitously expressed COL1A gene in porcine somatic cells and generated live fetuses by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). By leveraging these knockin pseudo attP sites, we have demonstrated subsequent phiC31 integrase mediated integration of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene into the site. This work for the first time created an optimized protocol for CRISPR/Cas mediated knockin in porcine somatic cells, while simultaneously creating a stable platform for future transgene integration and generating transgenic animals. PMID:27240344

  17. Linking Biosynthetic Gene Clusters to their Metabolites via Pathway-Targeted Molecular Networking

    PubMed Central

    Trautman, Eric P.; Crawford, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    The connection of microbial biosynthetic gene clusters to the small molecule metabolites they encode is central to the discovery and characterization of new metabolic pathways with ecological and pharmacological potential. With increasing microbial genome sequence information being deposited into publicly available databases, it is clear that microbes have the coding capacity for many more biologically active small molecules than previously realized. Of increasing interest are the small molecules encoded by the human microbiome, as these metabolites likely mediate a variety of currently uncharacterized human-microbe interactions that influence health and disease. In this mini-review, we describe the ongoing biosynthetic, structural, and functional characterizations of the genotoxic colibactin pathway in gut bacteria as a thematic example of linking biosynthetic gene clusters to their metabolites. We also highlight other natural products that are produced through analogous biosynthetic logic and comment on some current disconnects between bioinformatics predictions and experimental structural characterizations. Lastly, we describe the use of pathway-targeted molecular networking as a tool to characterize secondary metabolic pathways within complex metabolomes and to aid in downstream metabolite structural elucidation efforts. PMID:26456470

  18. p53 activated by AND gate genetic circuit under radiation and hypoxia for targeted cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Miao; Li, Rong; He, Rong; Wang, Xingyong; Yi, Qijian; Wang, Weidong

    2015-09-01

    Radio-activated gene therapy has been developed as a novel therapeutic strategy against cancer; however, expression of therapeutic gene in peritumoral tissues will result in unacceptable toxicity to normal cells. To restrict gene expression in targeted tumor mass, we used hypoxia and radiation tolerance features of tumor cells to develop a synthetic AND gate genetic circuit through connecting radiation sensitivity promoter cArG6 , heat shock response elements SNF1, HSF1 and HSE4 with retroviral vector plxsn. Their construction and dynamic activity process were identified through downstream enhanced green fluorescent protein and wtp53 expression in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells and in a nude mice model. The result showed that AND gate genetic circuit could be activated by lower required radiation dose (6 Gy) and after activated, AND gate could induce significant apoptosis effects and growth inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The radiation- and hypoxia-activated AND gate genetic circuit, which could lead to more powerful target tumoricidal activity represented a promising strategy for both targeted and effective gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma and low dose activation character of the AND gate genetic circuit implied that this model could be further exploited to decrease side-effects of clinical radiation therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. p53 activated by AND gate genetic circuit under radiation and hypoxia for targeted cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Miao; Li, Rong; He, Rong; Wang, Xingyong; Yi, Qijian; Wang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Radio-activated gene therapy has been developed as a novel therapeutic strategy against cancer; however, expression of therapeutic gene in peritumoral tissues will result in unacceptable toxicity to normal cells. To restrict gene expression in targeted tumor mass, we used hypoxia and radiation tolerance features of tumor cells to develop a synthetic AND gate genetic circuit through connecting radiation sensitivity promoter cArG6, heat shock response elements SNF1, HSF1 and HSE4 with retroviral vector plxsn. Their construction and dynamic activity process were identified through downstream enhanced green fluorescent protein and wtp53 expression in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells and in a nude mice model. The result showed that AND gate genetic circuit could be activated by lower required radiation dose (6 Gy) and after activated, AND gate could induce significant apoptosis effects and growth inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The radiation- and hypoxia-activated AND gate genetic circuit, which could lead to more powerful target tumoricidal activity represented a promising strategy for both targeted and effective gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma and low dose activation character of the AND gate genetic circuit implied that this model could be further exploited to decrease side-effects of clinical radiation therapy. PMID:26177264

  20. Targeted Gene Capture by Hybridization to Illuminate Ecosystem Functioning.

    PubMed

    Ribière, Céline; Beugnot, Réjane; Parisot, Nicolas; Gasc, Cyrielle; Defois, Clémence; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Boucher, Delphine; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities are extremely abundant and diverse on earth surface and play key role in the ecosystem functioning. Thus, although next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have greatly improved knowledge on microbial diversity, it is necessary to reduce the biological complexity to better understand the microorganism functions. To achieve this goal, we describe a promising approach, based on the solution hybrid selection (SHS) method for the selective enrichment in a target-specific biomarker from metagenomic and metatranscriptomic samples. The success of this method strongly depends on the determination of sensitive, specific, and explorative probes to assess the complete targeted gene repertoire. Indeed, in this method, RNA probes were used to capture large DNA or RNA fragments harboring biomarkers of interest that potentially allow to link structure and function of communities of interest.

  1. Modeling and Targeting MYC Genes in Childhood Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Sonja; Bolin, Sara; Weishaupt, Holger; Swartling, Fredrik J

    2017-03-23

    Brain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers, accounting for about 20%-25% of all pediatric tumors. Deregulated expression of the MYC family of transcription factors, particularly c-MYC and MYCN genes, has been found in many of these neoplasms, and their expression levels are often correlated with poor prognosis. Elevated c-MYC/MYCN initiates and drives tumorigenesis in many in vivo model systems of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, inhibition of their oncogenic function is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we explore the roles of MYC oncoproteins and their molecular targets during the formation, maintenance, and recurrence of childhood brain tumors. We also briefly summarize recent progress in the development of therapeutic approaches for pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity in these tumors.

  2. Modeling and Targeting MYC Genes in Childhood Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Sonja; Bolin, Sara; Weishaupt, Holger; Swartling, Fredrik J.

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers, accounting for about 20%–25% of all pediatric tumors. Deregulated expression of the MYC family of transcription factors, particularly c-MYC and MYCN genes, has been found in many of these neoplasms, and their expression levels are often correlated with poor prognosis. Elevated c-MYC/MYCN initiates and drives tumorigenesis in many in vivo model systems of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, inhibition of their oncogenic function is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we explore the roles of MYC oncoproteins and their molecular targets during the formation, maintenance, and recurrence of childhood brain tumors. We also briefly summarize recent progress in the development of therapeutic approaches for pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity in these tumors. PMID:28333115

  3. Clusterin is a Gene Specific Target of MicroRNA-21 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mydlarz, Wojciech; Uemura, Mamoru; Ahn, Sun; Hennessey, Patrick; Chang, Steven; Demokan, Semra; Sun, Wenyue; Shao, Chunbo; Bishop, Justin; Krosting, Julie; Mambo, Elizabeth; Westra, William; Ha, Patrick; Sidransky, David; Califano, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: MicroRNA-21 (miRNA-21) has proto-oncogenic properties, though no miRNA-21 specific targets have been found in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Further study of miRNA-21 and its specific targets is essential to understanding HNSCC biology. Experimental Design: miRNA expression profiles of 10 HNSCC and 10 normal mucosa samples were investigated using a custom miRNA microarray. 13 HNSCC and 5 normal mucosa primary tissue specimens underwent mRNA expression microarray analysis. To identify miRNA-21 downstream targets, oral keratinocyte cells were subjected to microarray analysis after miRNA-21 transient transfection. miRNA and mRNA expression were validated by RT-qPCR in a separate cohort of 16 HNSCC and 15 normal mucosal samples. Microarray and bioinformatics analyses were integrated to identify potential gene targets. In vitro assays looked at the function and interaction of miRNA-21 and its specific gene targets. Results: miRNA-21 was upregulated in HNSCC and stimulated cell growth. Integrated analyses identified Clusterin (CLU) as a potential miRNA-21 gene target. CLU was downregulated after forced expression of miRNA-21 in normal and HNSCC cell lines. The activity of a luciferase construct containing the 3’UTR of CLU was repressed by the ectopic expression of miRNA-21. CLU was also downregulated in primary HNSCC and correlated with miRNA-21 over-expression. CLU variant 1 (CLU-1) was the predominant splice variant in HNSCC, and showed growth suppression function that was reversed by miRNA-21 over-expression. Conclusions: CLU is a specific, functional target of oncogenic miRNA-21 in HNSCC. CLU-1 isoform is the predominant growth suppressive variant targeted by miRNA-21. PMID:24327270

  4. Identification of targetable FGFR gene fusions in diverse cancers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Mi; Su, Fengyun; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Khazanov, Nickolay; Ateeq, Bushra; Cao, Xuhong; Lonigro, Robert J; Vats, Pankaj; Wang, Rui; Lin, Su-Fang; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Siddiqui, Javed; Tomlins, Scott A; Wyngaard, Peter; Sadis, Seth; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Hussain, Maha H; Feng, Felix Y; Zalupski, Mark M; Talpaz, Moshe; Pienta, Kenneth J; Rhodes, Daniel R; Robinson, Dan R; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2013-06-01

    Through a prospective clinical sequencing program for advanced cancers, four index cases were identified which harbor gene rearrangements of FGFR2, including patients with cholangiocarcinoma, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. After extending our assessment of FGFR rearrangements across multiple tumor cohorts, we identified additional FGFR fusions with intact kinase domains in lung squamous cell cancer, bladder cancer, thyroid cancer, oral cancer, glioblastoma, and head and neck squamous cell cancer. All FGFR fusion partners tested exhibit oligomerization capability, suggesting a shared mode of kinase activation. Overexpression of FGFR fusion proteins induced cell proliferation. Two bladder cancer cell lines that harbor FGFR3 fusion proteins exhibited enhanced susceptibility to pharmacologic inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Because of the combinatorial possibilities of FGFR family fusion to a variety of oligomerization partners, clinical sequencing efforts, which incorporate transcriptome analysis for gene fusions, are poised to identify rare, targetable FGFR fusions across diverse cancer types.

  5. Targeted genes and interacting proteins of hypoxia inducible factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shen, Shao-Ming; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) functions as a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis in almost all nucleated mammalian cells. The fundamental process adapted to cellular oxygen alteration largely depends on the refined regulation on its alpha subunit, HIF-1α. Recent studies have unraveled expanding and critical roles of HIF-1α, involving in a multitude of developmental, physiological, and pathophysiological processes. This review will focus on the current knowledge of HIF-1α-targeting genes and its interacting proteins, as well as the concomitant functional relationships between them. PMID:22773957

  6. Cardiac-Specific Inducible and Conditional Gene Targeting in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Doetschman, Thomas; Azhar, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Mouse genetic engineering has revolutionized our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of heart development and disease. This technology involves conditional tissue-specific and temporal transgenic and gene targeting approaches, as well as introduction of polymorphisms into the mouse genome. These approaches are increasingly used to elucidate the genetic pathways underlying tissue homeostasis, physiology, and pathophysiology of adult heart. They have also led to the development of clinically relevant models of human cardiac diseases. Here, we review the technologies and their limitations in general and the cardiovascular research community in particular. PMID:22628574

  7. Gene expression profiling in bladder cancer identifies potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed A.; Palmer, Daniel H.; Syn, Wing-Kin; Sacco, Joseph J.; Greensmith, Richard M.D.; Elmetwali, Taha; Aachi, Vijay; Lloyd, Bryony H.; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Arrand, John; Barton, Darren; Ansari, Jawaher; Sibson, D. Ross; James, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in management, bladder cancer remains a major cause of cancer related complications. Characterisation of gene expression patterns in bladder cancer allows the identification of pathways involved in its pathogenesis, and may stimulate the development of novel therapies targeting these pathways. Between 2004 and 2005, cystoscopic bladder biopsies were obtained from 19 patients and 11 controls. These were subjected to whole transcript-based microarray analysis. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was used to identify samples with similar expression profiles. Hypergeometric analysis was used to identify canonical pathways and curated networks having statistically significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes. Osteopontin (OPN) expression was validated by immunohistochemistry. Hierarchical clustering defined signatures, which differentiated between cancer and healthy tissue, muscle-invasive or non-muscle invasive cancer and healthy tissue, grade 1 and grade 3. Pathways associated with cell cycle and proliferation were markedly upregulated in muscle-invasive and grade 3 cancers. Genes associated with the classical complement pathway were downregulated in non-muscle invasive cancer. Osteopontin was markedly overexpressed in invasive cancer compared to healthy tissue. The present study contributes to a growing body of work on gene expression signatures in bladder cancer. The data support an important role for osteopontin in bladder cancer, and identify several pathways worthy of further investigation. PMID:28259975

  8. Pharmacological aspects of targeting cancer gene therapy to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, H H

    2001-03-01

    Targeting cancer gene therapy to endothelial cells seems to be a rational approach, because (a) a clear correlation exists between proliferation of tumor vessels and tumor growth and malignancy, (b) differences of cell membrane structures between tumor endothelial cells and normal endothelial cells exist which could be used for targeting of vectors and (c) tumor endothelial cells are accessible to vector vehicles in spite of the peculiarities of the transvascular and interstitial blood flow in tumors. Based on the knowledge on the pharmacokinetics of macromolecules it can be concluded that vectors targeting tumor endothelial cells should own a long blood residence time after intravascular application. This precondition seems to be fulfilled best by vectors exhibiting a slight anionic charge. A long blood residence time would allow the formation of a high amount of complexes between tumor endothelial cells and vector particles. Such high amount of complexes should enable a high transfection rate of tumor endothelial cells. In view of their pharmacokinetic behavior nonviral vectors seem to be more suitable for in vivo targeting tumor endothelial cells than viral vectors. Specific binding of nonviral vectors to tumor endothelial cells should be enhanced by multifunctional ligands and the transduction efficiency should be improved by cationic carriers. Effector genes should encode proteins potent enough to induce reactions which eliminate the tumor tissue. To be effective to that degree such proteins should induce self-amplifying antitumor reactions. Examples for proteins which have the potential to induce such self-amplifying tumor reactions are proteins endowed with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activity, enzymes which convert prodrugs into drugs and possibly also proteins which induce embolization of tumor vessels. The pharmacological data for such examples are discussed in detail.

  9. Targeting and valuing conservation investments in support of a water fund: linking upstream land management with downstream services in the Upper Tana catchment, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, B. P.; Droogers, P.; Hunink, J.; Vogl, A.; Wolny, S.

    2014-12-01

    We apply an integrated modeling framework to both target and value watershed management interventions in the Upper Tana watershed, which provides municipal water, irrigation water, and hydropower services to Nairobi and surrounding areas. The analysis begins by applying an index model approach that incorporates existing land use and land surface characteristics to prioritize the type and location of conservation investments in different subbasins, subject to budget constraints and stakeholder concerns (Resource Investment Optimization System -- RIOS). We then run the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) using the RIOS-identified investment scenarios to produce spatially explicit scenarios that simulate changes in water yield and suspended sediment. Finally, we link those biophysical outputs to monetary and non-monetary human well-being metrics for multiple benefit streams, including: Reduced water treatment costs, increased hydropower production, and crop yield benefits for upstream farmers in the conservation area. The viability of a payment for watershed services scheme is discussed, with attention to the various components of value assessed and to dependencies on water management approaches. While other studies have examined links between land use and the provision of hydrologic services, this study is novel in that it presents an integrated analysis that targets interventions in a decision context and then relies on calibrated, process-based, biophysical models to demonstrate the return on those investments considering multiple (and sometimes competing) hydrological services, doing so at a sub-annual time-scale.

  10. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Huang, Sheng; Zhao, Xuefeng; Wright, David A; Carpenter, Susan; Spalding, Martin H; Weeks, Donald P; Yang, Bing

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  11. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T; Huang, S; Zhao, XF; Wright, DA; Carpenter, S; Spalding, MH; Weeks, DP; Yang, B

    2011-08-08

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  12. FGF-2 deficiency causes dysregulation of Arhgef6 and downstream targets in the cerebral cortex accompanied by altered neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine morphology.

    PubMed

    Baum, Philip; Vogt, Miriam A; Gass, Peter; Unsicker, Klaus; von Bohlen und Halbach, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is an abundant growth factor in the brain and exerts multiple functions on neural cells ranging from cell division, cell fate determination to differentiation. However, many details of the molecular mechanisms underlying the diverse functions of FGF-2 are poorly understood. In a comparative microarray analysis of motor sensory cortex (MSC) tissue of adult knockout (FGF-2(-/-)) and control (FGF-2(+/+)) mice, we found a substantial number of regulated genes, which are implicated in cytoskeletal machinery dynamics. Specifically, we found a prominent downregulation of Arhgef6. Arhgef6 mRNA was significantly reduced in the FGF-2(-/-) cortex, and Arhgef6 protein virtually absent, while RhoA protein levels were massively increased and Cdc42 protein levels were reduced. Since Arhgef6 is localized to dendritic spines, we next analyzed dendritic spines of adult FGF2(-/-) and control mouse cortices. Spine densities were significantly increased, whereas mean length of spines on dendrites of layer V of MSC neurons in adult FGF-2(-/-) mice was significantly decreased as compared to respective controls. Furthermore, neurite length in dissociated cortical cultures from E18 FGF-2(-/-) mice was significantly reduced at DIV7 as compared to wildtype neurons. Despite the fact that altered neuronal morphology and alterations in dendritic spines were observed, FGF-2(-/-) mice behave relatively unsuspicious in several behavioral tasks. However, FGF-2(-/-) mice exhibited decreased thermal pain sensitivity in the hotplate-test.

  13. SLC7A5 Functions as a Downstream Target Modulated by CRKL in Metastasis Process of Gastric Cancer SGC-7901 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weize; Chen, Xuehua; Su, Liping; Zhu, Zhenggang; Zhou, Yunyun

    2016-01-01

    SLC7A5, who is also named LAT-1, has been validated as a promoter regulated by miRNA-126 in our previous research for gastric cancer cells. However, the mechanisms driving SLC7A5 to affect the bio-function of gastric cancer cells are unclear, remaining us lots of to elucidate. The aim of this study is to investigate the regulating effect of CRKL, one of the critical genes involving with gastric cancer progression, on SLC7A5 expression. By studying the gastric cancer cell lines and clinical pathological specimens, we found that the expression of SLC7A5 was significantly correlated to CRKL. By depleting CRKL in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells, the SLC7A5 expression was impaired, and the invasion and migration of SGC-7901 cells were suppressed. Ectopic expression of SLC7A5 could drastically rescue the phenotypes induced by CRKL depletion in this study. Accordingly, we conclude that SLC7A5 functions as a promoter in gastric cancer metastasis, and CRKL could be one of its regulators modulating the expression of SLC7A5 and consequentially affect the metastatic feature of SGC-7901 cells. The findings in this study indicate a regulation relationship between CRKL and SLC7A5, and provide useful evidence for gastric cancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:27846244

  14. Targeted and random mutagenesis of Ehrlichia chaffeensis for the identification of genes required for in vivo infection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuanmin; Nair, Arathy D S; Indukuri, Vijaya V; Gong, Shanzhong; Felsheim, Roderick F; Jaworski, Deborah; Munderloh, Ulrike G; Ganta, Roman R

    2013-02-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a tick transmitted pathogen responsible for the disease human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Research to elucidate gene function in rickettsial pathogens is limited by the lack of genetic manipulation methods. Mutational analysis was performed, targeting to specific and random insertion sites within the bacterium's genome. Targeted mutagenesis at six genomic locations by homologous recombination and mobile group II intron-based methods led to the consistent identification of mutants in two genes and in one intergenic site; the mutants persisted in culture for 8 days. Three independent experiments using Himar1 transposon mutagenesis of E. chaffeensis resulted in the identification of multiple mutants; these mutants grew continuously in macrophage and tick cell lines. Nine mutations were confirmed by sequence analysis. Six insertions were located within non-coding regions and three were present in the coding regions of three transcriptionally active genes. The intragenic mutations prevented transcription of all three genes. Transposon mutants containing a pool of five different insertions were assessed for their ability to infect deer and subsequent acquisition by Amblyomma americanum ticks, the natural reservoir and vector, respectively. Three of the five mutants with insertions into non-coding regions grew well in deer. Transposition into a differentially expressed hypothetical gene, Ech_0379, and at 18 nucleotides downstream to Ech_0230 gene coding sequence resulted in the inhibition of growth in deer, which is further evidenced by their failed acquisition by ticks. Similarly, a mutation into the coding region of ECH_0660 gene inhibited the in vivo growth in deer. This is the first study evaluating targeted and random mutagenesis in E. chaffeensis, and the first to report the generation of stable mutants in this obligate intracellular bacterium. We further demonstrate that in vitro mutagenesis coupled with in vivo infection assessment is a

  15. Tomato Mosaic Virus Replication Protein Suppresses Virus-Targeted Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kenji; Tsuda, Shinya; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2003-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS), a homology-dependent RNA degradation system, has a role in defending against virus infection in plants, but plant viruses encode a suppressor to combat PTGS. Using transgenic tobacco in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is posttranscriptionally silenced, we investigated a tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)-encoded PTGS suppressor. Infection with wild-type ToMV (L strain) interrupted GFP silencing in tobacco, coincident with visible symptoms, whereas some attenuated strains of ToMV (L11 and L11A strains) failed to suppress GFP silencing. Analyses of recombinant viruses containing the L and L11A strains revealed that a single base change in the replicase gene, which causes an amino acid substitution, is responsible for the symptomless and suppressor-defective phenotypes of the attenuated strains. An agroinfiltration assay indicated that the 130K replication protein acts as a PTGS suppressor. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of 21 to 25 nucleotides accumulated during ToMV infection, suggesting that the major target of the ToMV-encoded suppressor is downstream from the production of siRNAs in the PTGS pathway. Analysis with GFP-tagged recombinant viruses revealed that the suppressor inhibits the establishment of the ToMV-targeted PTGS system in the inoculated leaves but does not detectably suppress the activity of the preexisting, sequence-specific PTGS machinery there. Taken together, these results indicate that it is likely that the ToMV-encoded suppressor, the 130K replication protein, blocks the utilization of silencing-associated small RNAs, so that a homology-dependent RNA degradation machinery is not newly formed. PMID:14512550

  16. Colorimetric biosensing of targeted gene sequence using dual nanoparticle platforms

    PubMed Central

    Thavanathan, Jeevan; Huang, Nay Ming; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a colorimetric biosensor using a dual platform of gold nanoparticles and graphene oxide sheets for the detection of Salmonella enterica. The presence of the invA gene in S. enterica causes a change in color of the biosensor from its original pinkish-red to a light purplish solution. This occurs through the aggregation of the primary gold nanoparticles–conjugated DNA probe onto the surface of the secondary graphene oxide–conjugated DNA probe through DNA hybridization with the targeted DNA sequence. Spectrophotometry analysis showed a shift in wavelength from 525 nm to 600 nm with 1 μM of DNA target. Specificity testing revealed that the biosensor was able to detect various serovars of the S. enterica while no color change was observed with the other bacterial species. Sensitivity testing revealed the limit of detection was at 1 nM of DNA target. This proves the effectiveness of the biosensor in the detection of S. enterica through DNA hybridization. PMID:25897217

  17. Endogenous Targets of Transcriptional Gene Silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Steimer, Andrea; Amedeo, Paolo; Afsar, Karin; Fransz, Paul; Scheid, Ortrun Mittelsten; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2000-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) frequently inactivates foreign genes integrated into plant genomes but very likely also suppresses an unknown subset of chromosomal information. Accordingly, RNA analysis of mutants impaired in silencing should uncover endogenous targets of this epigenetic regulation. We compared transcripts from wild-type Arabidopsis carrying a silent transgene with RNA from an isogenic transgene-expressing TGS mutant. Two cDNA clones were identified representing endogenous RNA expressed only in the mutant. The synthesis of these RNAs was found to be released in several mutants affected in TGS, implying that TGS in general and not a particular mutation controls the transcriptional activity of their templates. Detailed analysis revealed that the two clones are part of longer transcripts termed TSI (for transcriptionally silent information). Two major classes of related TSI transcripts were found in a mutant cDNA library. They are synthesized from repeats present in heterochromatic pericentromeric regions of Arabidopsis chromosomes. These repeats share sequence homology with the 3′ terminal part of the putative retrotransposon Athila. However, the transcriptional activation does not include the transposon itself and does not promote its movement. There is no evidence for a general release of silencing from retroelements. Thus, foreign genes in plants encounter the epigenetic control normally directed, at least in part, toward a subset of pericentromeric repeats. PMID:10899982

  18. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  19. AAC as a Potential Target Gene to Control Verticillium dahliae

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaofeng; Rehman, Latifur; Guo, Huiming; Li, Xiaokang; Zhang, Rui; Cheng, Hongmei

    2017-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae invades the roots of host plants and causes vascular wilt, which seriously diminishes the yield of cotton and other important crops. The protein AAC (ADP, ATP carrier) is responsible for transferring ATP from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm. When V. dahliae protoplasts were transformed with short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the VdAAC gene, fungal growth and sporulation were significantly inhibited. To further confirm a role for VdAAC in fungal development, we generated knockout mutants (ΔVdACC). Compared with wild-type V. dahliae (Vd wt), ΔVdAAC was impaired in germination and virulence; these impairments were rescued in the complementary strains (ΔVdAAC-C). Moreover, when an RNAi construct of VdAAC under the control of the 35S promoter was used to transform Nicotiana benthamiana, the expression of VdAAC was downregulated in the transgenic seedlings, and they had elevated resistance against V. dahliae. The results of this study suggest that VdAAC contributes to fungal development, virulence and is a promising candidate gene to control V. dahliae. In addition, RNAi is a highly efficient way to silence fungal genes and provides a novel strategy to improve disease resistance in plants. PMID:28075391

  20. Solanum tuberosum StCDPK1 is regulated by miR390 at the posttranscriptional level and phosphorylates the auxin efflux carrier StPIN4 in vitro, a potential downstream target in potato development.

    PubMed

    Santin, Franco; Bhogale, Sneha; Fantino, Elisa; Grandellis, Carolina; Banerjee, Anjan K; Ulloa, Rita M

    2017-02-01

    Among many factors that regulate potato tuberization, calcium and calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play an important role. CDPK activity increases at the onset of tuber formation with StCDPK1 expression being strongly induced in swollen stolons. However, not much is known about the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of StCDPK1 or its downstream targets in potato development. To elucidate further, we analyzed its expression in different tissues and stages of the life cycle. Histochemical analysis of StCDPK1::GUS (β-glucuronidase) plants demonstrated that StCDPK1 is strongly associated with the vascular system in stems, roots, during stolon to tuber transition, and in tuber sprouts. In agreement with the observed GUS profile, we found specific cis-acting elements in StCDPK1 promoter. In silico analysis predicted miR390 to be a putative posttranscriptional regulator of StCDPK1. Quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis showed ubiquitous expression of StCDPK1 in different tissues which correlated well with Western blot data except in leaves. On the contrary, miR390 expression exhibited an inverse pattern in leaves and tuber eyes suggesting a possible regulation of StCDPK1 by miR390. This was further confirmed by Agrobacterium co-infiltration assays. In addition, in vitro assays showed that recombinant StCDPK1-6xHis was able to phosphorylate the hydrophilic loop of the auxin efflux carrier StPIN4. Altogether, these results indicate that StCDPK1 expression is varied in a tissue-specific manner having significant expression in vasculature and in tuber eyes; is regulated by miR390 at posttranscriptional level and suggest that StPIN4 could be one of its downstream targets revealing the overall role of this kinase in potato development. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  1. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3′-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation. • Isorhamnetin increased Nrf2

  2. Genome-wide analysis implicates microRNAs and their target genes in the development of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Forstner, A J; Hofmann, A; Maaser, A; Sumer, S; Khudayberdiev, S; Mühleisen, T W; Leber, M; Schulze, T G; Strohmaier, J; Degenhardt, F; Treutlein, J; Mattheisen, M; Schumacher, J; Breuer, R; Meier, S; Herms, S; Hoffmann, P; Lacour, A; Witt, S H; Reif, A; Müller-Myhsok, B; Lucae, S; Maier, W; Schwarz, M; Vedder, H; Kammerer-Ciernioch, J; Pfennig, A; Bauer, M; Hautzinger, M; Moebus, S; Priebe, L; Sivalingam, S; Verhaert, A; Schulz, H; Czerski, P M; Hauser, J; Lissowska, J; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Brennan, P; McKay, J D; Wright, A; Mitchell, P B; Fullerton, J M; Schofield, P R; Montgomery, G W; Medland, S E; Gordon, S D; Martin, N G; Krasnov, V; Chuchalin, A; Babadjanova, G; Pantelejeva, G; Abramova, L I; Tiganov, A S; Polonikov, A; Khusnutdinova, E; Alda, M; Cruceanu, C; Rouleau, G A; Turecki, G; Laprise, C; Rivas, F; Mayoral, F; Kogevinas, M; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, M; Propping, P; Becker, T; Rietschel, M; Cichon, S; Schratt, G; Nöthen, M M

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 1%. Molecular genetic studies have identified the first BD susceptibility genes. However, the disease pathways remain largely unknown. Accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, contribute to basic mechanisms underlying brain development and plasticity, suggesting their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders, including BD. In the present study, gene-based analyses were performed for all known autosomal microRNAs using the largest genome-wide association data set of BD to date (9747 patients and 14 278 controls). Associated and brain-expressed microRNAs were then investigated in target gene and pathway analyses. Functional analyses of miR-499 and miR-708 were performed in rat hippocampal neurons. Ninety-eight of the six hundred nine investigated microRNAs showed nominally significant P-values, suggesting that BD-associated microRNAs might be enriched within known microRNA loci. After correction for multiple testing, nine microRNAs showed a significant association with BD. The most promising were miR-499, miR-708 and miR-1908. Target gene and pathway analyses revealed 18 significant canonical pathways, including brain development and neuron projection. For miR-499, four Bonferroni-corrected significant target genes were identified, including the genome-wide risk gene for psychiatric disorder CACNB2. First results of functional analyses in rat hippocampal neurons neither revealed nor excluded a major contribution of miR-499 or miR-708 to dendritic spine morphogenesis. The present results suggest that research is warranted to elucidate the precise involvement of microRNAs and their downstream pathways in BD. PMID:26556287

  3. Genome-wide analysis implicates microRNAs and their target genes in the development of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Forstner, A J; Hofmann, A; Maaser, A; Sumer, S; Khudayberdiev, S; Mühleisen, T W; Leber, M; Schulze, T G; Strohmaier, J; Degenhardt, F; Treutlein, J; Mattheisen, M; Schumacher, J; Breuer, R; Meier, S; Herms, S; Hoffmann, P; Lacour, A; Witt, S H; Reif, A; Müller-Myhsok, B; Lucae, S; Maier, W; Schwarz, M; Vedder, H; Kammerer-Ciernioch, J; Pfennig, A; Bauer, M; Hautzinger, M; Moebus, S; Priebe, L; Sivalingam, S; Verhaert, A; Schulz, H; Czerski, P M; Hauser, J; Lissowska, J; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Brennan, P; McKay, J D; Wright, A; Mitchell, P B; Fullerton, J M; Schofield, P R; Montgomery, G W; Medland, S E; Gordon, S D; Martin, N G; Krasnov, V; Chuchalin, A; Babadjanova, G; Pantelejeva, G; Abramova, L I; Tiganov, A S; Polonikov, A; Khusnutdinova, E; Alda, M; Cruceanu, C; Rouleau, G A; Turecki, G; Laprise, C; Rivas, F; Mayoral, F; Kogevinas, M; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, M; Propping, P; Becker, T; Rietschel, M; Cichon, S; Schratt, G; Nöthen, M M

    2015-11-10

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 1%. Molecular genetic studies have identified the first BD susceptibility genes. However, the disease pathways remain largely unknown. Accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, contribute to basic mechanisms underlying brain development and plasticity, suggesting their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders, including BD. In the present study, gene-based analyses were performed for all known autosomal microRNAs using the largest genome-wide association data set of BD to date (9747 patients and 14 278 controls). Associated and brain-expressed microRNAs were then investigated in target gene and pathway analyses. Functional analyses of miR-499 and miR-708 were performed in rat hippocampal neurons. Ninety-eight of the six hundred nine investigated microRNAs showed nominally significant P-values, suggesting that BD-associated microRNAs might be enriched within known microRNA loci. After correction for multiple testing, nine microRNAs showed a significant association with BD. The most promising were miR-499, miR-708 and miR-1908. Target gene and pathway analyses revealed 18 significant canonical pathways, including brain development and neuron projection. For miR-499, four Bonferroni-corrected significant target genes were identified, including the genome-wide risk gene for psychiatric disorder CACNB2. First results of functional analyses in rat hippocampal neurons neither revealed nor excluded a major contribution of miR-499 or miR-708 to dendritic spine morphogenesis. The present results suggest that research is warranted to elucidate the precise involvement of microRNAs and their downstream pathways in BD.

  4. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  5. Targeted disruption of the mouse Lipoma Preferred Partner gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vervenne, Hilke B.V.K.; Crombez, Koen R.M.O.; Delvaux, Els L.; Janssens, Veerle; Ven, Wim J.M. van de Petit, Marleen M.R.

    2009-02-06

    LPP (Lipoma Preferred Partner) is a zyxin-related cell adhesion protein that is involved in the regulation of cell migration. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Lpp gene and analysed the importance of Lpp for embryonic development and adult functions. Aberrant Mendelian inheritance in heterozygous crosses suggested partial embryonic lethality of Lpp{sup -/-} females. Fertility of Lpp{sup -/-} males was proven to be normal, however, females from Lpp{sup -/-} x Lpp{sup -/-} crosses produced a strongly reduced number of offspring, probably due to a combination of female embryonic lethality and aberrant pregnancies. Apart from these developmental and reproductive abnormalities, Lpp{sup -/-} mice that were born reached adulthood without displaying any additional macroscopic defects. On the other hand, Lpp{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited reduced migration capacity, reduced viability, and reduced expression of some Lpp interaction partners. Finally, we discovered a short nuclear form of Lpp, expressed mainly in testis via an alternative promoter.

  6. Transcription factors and target genes of pre-TCR signaling.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa

    2015-06-01

    Almost 30 years ago pioneering work by the laboratories of Harald von Boehmer and Susumo Tonegawa provided the first indications that developing thymocytes could assemble a functional TCRβ chain-containing receptor complex, the pre-TCR, before TCRα expression. The discovery and study of the pre-TCR complex revealed paradigms of signaling pathways in control of cell survival and proliferation, and culminated in the recognition of the multifunctional nature of this receptor. As a receptor integrated in a dynamic developmental process, the pre-TCR must be viewed not only in the light of the biological outcomes it promotes, but also in context with those molecular processes that drive its expression in thymocytes. This review article focuses on transcription factors and target genes activated by the pre-TCR to drive its different outcomes.

  7. Il2rg gene-targeted severe combined immunodeficiency pigs.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Iwamoto, Masaki; Saito, Yoriko; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Misae; Mikawa, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Michiko; Aoki, Yuki; Najima, Yuho; Takagi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Nahoko; Suzuki, Emi; Kubo, Masanori; Mimuro, Jun; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Madoiwa, Seiji; Sakata, Yoichi; Perry, Anthony C F; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Onishi, Akira

    2012-06-14

    A porcine model of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) promises to facilitate human cancer studies, the humanization of tissue for xenotransplantation, and the evaluation of stem cells for clinical therapy, but SCID pigs have not been described. We report here the generation and preliminary evaluation of a porcine SCID model. Fibroblasts containing a targeted disruption of the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene, Il2rg, were used as donors to generate cloned pigs by serial nuclear transfer. Germline transmission of the Il2rg deletion produced healthy Il2rg(+/-) females, while Il2rg(-/Y) males were athymic and exhibited markedly impaired immunoglobulin and T and NK cell production, robustly recapitulating human SCID. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, donor cells stably integrated in Il2rg(-/Y) heterozygotes and reconstituted the Il2rg(-/Y) lymphoid lineage. The SCID pigs described here represent a step toward the comprehensive evaluation of preclinical cellular regenerative strategies.

  8. The HPV E6 oncoprotein targets histone methyltransferases for modulating specific gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, C-H; Peng, K-L; Jhang, H-C; Lin, C-H; Wu, S-Y; Chiang, C-M; Lee, S-C; Yu, W C Y; Juan, L-J

    2012-01-01

    Expression of viral proteins causes important epigenetic changes leading to abnormal cell growth. Whether viral proteins directly target histone methyltransferases (HMTs), a key family enzyme for epigenetic regulation, and modulate their enzymatic activities remains elusive. Here we show that the E6 proteins of both low-risk and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) interact with three coactivator HMTs, CARM1, PRMT1 and SET7, and downregulate their enzymatic activities in vitro and in HPV-transformed HeLa cells. Furthermore, these three HMTs are required for E6 to attenuate p53 transactivation function. Mechanistically, E6 hampers CARM1- and PRMT1-catalyzed histone methylation at p53-responsive promoters, and suppresses the binding of p53 to chromatinized DNA independently of E6-mediated p53 degradation. p53 pre-methylated at lysine-372 (p53K372 mono-methylation) by SET7 protects p53 from E6-induced degradation. Consistently, E6 downregulates p53K372 mono-methylation and thus reduces p53 protein stability. As a result of the E6-mediated inhibition of HMT activity, expression of p53 downstream genes is suppressed. Together, our results not only reveal a clever approach for the virus to interfere with p53 function, but also demonstrate the modulation of HMT activity as a novel mechanism of epigenetic regulation by a viral oncoprotein. PMID:21963854

  9. The HPV E6 oncoprotein targets histone methyltransferases for modulating specific gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C-H; Peng, K-L; Jhang, H-C; Lin, C-H; Wu, S-Y; Chiang, C-M; Lee, S-C; Yu, W C Y; Juan, L-J

    2012-05-03

    Expression of viral proteins causes important epigenetic changes leading to abnormal cell growth. Whether viral proteins directly target histone methyltransferases (HMTs), a key family enzyme for epigenetic regulation, and modulate their enzymatic activities remains elusive. Here we show that the E6 proteins of both low-risk and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) interact with three coactivator HMTs, CARM1, PRMT1 and SET7, and downregulate their enzymatic activities in vitro and in HPV-transformed HeLa cells. Furthermore, these three HMTs are required for E6 to attenuate p53 transactivation function. Mechanistically, E6 hampers CARM1- and PRMT1-catalyzed histone methylation at p53-responsive promoters, and suppresses the binding of p53 to chromatinized DNA independently of E6-mediated p53 degradation. p53 pre-methylated at lysine-372 (p53K372 mono-methylation) by SET7 protects p53 from E6-induced degradation. Consistently, E6 downregulates p53K372 mono-methylation and thus reduces p53 protein stability. As a result of the E6-mediated inhibition of HMT activity, expression of p53 downstream genes is suppressed. Together, our results not only reveal a clever approach for the virus to interfere with p53 function, but also demonstrate the modulation of HMT activity as a novel mechanism of epigenetic regulation by a viral oncoprotein.

  10. Inhibition of Nod2 Signaling and Target Gene Expression by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shurong; Zhao, Ling; Kim, Kihoon; Lee, Dong Seok; Hwang, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Nod2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that detects a conserved moiety of bacterial peptidoglycan and subsequently activates proinflammatory signaling pathways. Mutations in Nod2 have been implicated to be linked to inflammatory granulomatous disorders, such as Crohn's disease and Blau syndrome. Many phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is not known whether any of these phytochemicals might modulate Nod2-mediated immune responses and thus might be of therapeutic value for the intervention of these inflammatory diseases. In this report, we demonstrate that curcumin, a polyphenol found in the plant Curcuma longa, and parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone, suppress both ligand-induced and lauric acid-induced Nod2 signaling, leading to the suppression of nuclear factor-κB activation and target gene interleukin-8 expression. We provide molecular and biochemical evidence that the suppression is mediated through the inhibition of Nod2 oligomerization and subsequent inhibition of downstream signaling. These results demonstrate for the first time that curcumin and parthenolide can directly inhibit Nod2-mediated signaling pathways at the receptor level and suggest that Nod2-mediated inflammatory responses can be modulated by these phytochemicals. It remains to be determined whether these phytochemicals possess protective or therapeutic efficacy against Nod2-mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:18413660

  11. Targeted insertion of foreign genes into the tobacco plastid genome without physical linkage to the selectable marker gene

    SciTech Connect

    Carrer, H.; Maliga, P.

    1995-08-01

    To determine whether targeted DNA insertion into the tobacco plastid genome can be obtained without physical linkage to a selectable marker gene, we carried out biolistic transformation of chloroplasts in tobacco leaf segments with a 1:1 mix of two independently targeted antibiotic resistance genes. Plastid transformants were selected by spectinomycin resistance due to expression of an integrated aadA gene. Integration of the unselected kanamycin resistance (kan) gene into the same plastid genome was established by Southern probing in {approx}20% of the spectinomycin-selected clones. Efficient cotransformation will facilitate targeted plastid genome modification without physical linkage to a marker gene. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Highly efficient gene silencing using perfect complementary artificial miRNA targeting AP1 or heteromeric artificial miRNA targeting AP1 and CAL genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene silencing is a useful technique for elucidating biological function of genes by knocking down their expression. Recently developed artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) exploit an endogenous gene silencing mechanism that processes natural miRNA precursors to small silencing RNAs that target transcript...

  13. Stress sensor Gadd45 genes as therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cretu, Alexandra; Sha, Xiaojin; Tront, Jennifer; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2009-01-01

    Gadd45 genes have been implicated in stress signaling responses to various physiological or environmental stressors, resulting in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, cell survival and senescence, or apoptosis. Evidence accumulated up to date suggests that Gadd45 proteins function as stress sensors, mediating their activity through a complex interplay of physical interactions with other cellular proteins that are implicated in cell cycle regulation and the response of cells to stress. These include PCNA, p21, cdc2/cyclinB1, and the p38 and JNK stress response kinases. Disregulated expression of Gadd45 has been observed in multiple types of solid tumors as well as in hematopoietic malignancies. Also, evidence has accumulated that Gadd45 proteins are intrinsically associated with the response of tumor cells to a variety of cancer therapeutic agents. Thus, Gadd45 proteins may represent a novel class of targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. Additional research is needed to better understand which of the Gadd45 stress response functions may be targeted for chemotherapeutic drug design in cancer therapy.

  14. Rationale for stimulator of interferon genes-targeted cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rivera Vargas, Thaiz; Benoit-Lizon, Isis; Apetoh, Lionel

    2017-02-17

    The efficacy of checkpoint inhibitor therapy illustrates that cancer immunotherapy, which aims to foster the host immune response against cancer to achieve durable anticancer responses, can be successfully implemented in a routine clinical practice. However, a substantial proportion of patients does not benefit from this treatment, underscoring the need to identify alternative strategies to defeat cancer. Despite the demonstration in the 1990's that the detection of danger signals, including the nucleic acids DNA and RNA, by dendritic cells (DCs) in a cancer setting is essential for eliciting host defence, the molecular sensors responsible for recognising these danger signals and eliciting anticancer immune responses remain incompletely characterised, possibly explaining the disappointing results obtained so far upon the clinical implementation of DC-based cancer vaccines. In 2008, STING (stimulator of interferon genes), was identified as a protein that is indispensable for the recognition of cytosolic DNA. The central role of STING in controlling anticancer immune responses was exemplified by observations that spontaneous and radiation-induced adaptive anticancer immunity was reduced in the absence of STING, illustrating the potential of STING-targeting for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we will discuss the relevance of manipulating the STING signalling pathway for cancer treatment and integrating STING-targeting based strategies into combinatorial therapies to obtain long-lasting anticancer immune responses.

  15. Dataset of the human homologues and orthologues of lipid-metabolic genes identified as DAF-16 targets their roles in lipid and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lavender Yuen-Nam; Saavedra-García, Paula; Lam, Eric Wing-Fai

    2017-04-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the review article entitled 'Unravelling the role of fatty acid metabolism in cancer through the FOXO3-FOXM1 axis' (Saavedra-Garcia et al., 2017) [24]. Here, we have matched the DAF-16/FOXO3 downstream genes with their respective human orthologues and reviewed the roles of these targeted genes in FA metabolism. The list of genes listed in this article are precisely selected from literature reviews based on their functions in mammalian FA metabolism. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans gene orthologues of the genes are obtained from WormBase, the online biological database of C. elegans. This dataset has not been uploaded to a public repository yet.

  16. Preparation and characterization of magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S. W.; Liu, G.; Hong, R. Y.; Li, H. Z.; Li, Y. G.; Wei, D. G.

    2012-10-01

    The PEI-CMD-MNPs were successfully prepared by the surface modification of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) and polyethyleneimine (PEI). The PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes exhibited a typical superparamagnetic behavior and were well stable over the entire range of pH and NaCl concentration. These PEI-CMD-MNPs were used as magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery. The prepared MNPs at different surface modification stages were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emissions canning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) analysis. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). To evaluate the performance of the magnetic nanoparticles as gene transfer vector, the PEI-CMD-MNPs were used to delivery green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into BHK21 cells. The expression of GFP gene was detected by fluorescence microscope. DNA-PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes absorbed by the cells were also monitored by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The transfection efficiency and gene expression efficiency of that transfected with a magnet were much higher than that of standard transfection.

  17. Reduction of Nfia gene expression and subsequent target genes by binge alcohol in the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hyung Tae; Seo, Hyemyung; Chung, Il Yup; Choi, Ihn Geun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-06-26

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the changes in gene expression in the fetal brain (forebrain and hippocampus) caused by maternal binge alcohol consumption. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were treated intragastrically with distilled phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or ethanol (2.9 g/kg) from embryonic day (ED) 8-12. Microarray analysis revealed that a significant number of genes were altered at ED 18 in the developing brain. Specifically, in hippocampus, nuclear factor one alpha (Nfia) and three N-methyl-D-aspartate (Nmda) receptors (Nmdar1, Nmdar2b, and Nmdar2d) were down-regulated. The transcription factor Nfia controls gliogenesis, cell proliferation and Nmda-induced neuronal survival by regulating the expression of target genes. Some of the Nfia-target gene (Aldh1a, Folh1, Gjb6, Fgf1, Neurod1, Sept4, and Ntsr2) expressions were also altered as expected. These results suggest that the altered expression of Nfia and Nmda receptors may be associated with the etiology of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The data presented in this report will contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of alcohol in FASD individuals.

  18. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Transdisciplinary Research in Epigenetics and Cancer Journal Clubs and Transdisciplinary Science Meetings, biweekly and monthly 3. To gain expertise...Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Lamb CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Washington University...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genes in

  19. Impact of non-homologous end-joining deficiency on random and targeted DNA integration: implications for gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    Iiizumi, Susumu; Kurosawa, Aya; So, Sairei; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Chikaraishi, Yuichi; Ishii, Ayako; Adachi, Noritaka

    2008-01-01

    In higher animal cells, the principal limitation of gene-targeting technology is the extremely low efficiency of targeted integration, which occurs three to four orders of magnitude less frequently than random integration. Assuming that random integration mechanistically involves non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), inactivation of this pathway should reduce random integration and may enhance gene targeting. To test this possibility, we examined the frequencies of random and targeted integration in NHEJ-deficient chicken DT40 and human Nalm-6 cell lines. As expected, loss of NHEJ resulted in drastically reduced random integration in DT40 cells. Unexpectedly, however, this was not the case for Nalm-6 cells, indicating that NHEJ is not the sole mechanism of random integration. Nevertheless, we present evidence that NHEJ inactivation can lead to enhanced gene targeting through a reduction of random integration and/or an increase in targeted integration by homologous recombination. Most intriguingly, our results show that, in the absence of functional NHEJ, random integration of targeting vectors occurs more frequently than non-targeting vectors (harboring no or little homology to the host genome), implying that suppression of NHEJ-independent random integration events is needed to greatly enhance gene targeting in animal cells. PMID:18835848

  20. Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy with AFP driving Apoptin gene shows potent antitumor effect in hepatocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene therapy and viral therapy are used for cancer therapy for many years, but the results are less than satisfactory. Our aim was to construct a new recombinant adenovirus which is more efficient to kill hepatocarcinoma cells but more safe to normal cells. Methods By using the Cancer Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy strategy, Apoptin, a promising cancer therapeutic gene was inserted into the double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus AD55 in which E1A gene was driven by alpha fetoprotein promoter along with a 55 kDa deletion in E1B gene to form AD55-Apoptin. The anti-tumor effects and safety were examined by western blotting, virus yield assay, real time polymerase chain reaction, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Hoechst33342 staining, Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, xenograft tumor model, Immunohistochemical assay, liver function analysis and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assay. Results The recombinant virus AD55-Apoptin has more significant antitumor effect for hepatocelluar carcinoma cell lines (in vitro) than that of AD55 and even ONYX-015 but no or little impair on normal cell lines. Furthermore, it also shows an obvious in vivo antitumor effect on the Huh-7 liver carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with bigger beginning tumor volume till about 425 mm3 but has no any damage on the function of liver. The induction of apoptosis is involved in AD55-Apoptin induced antitumor effects. Conclusion The AD55-Apoptin can be a potential anti-hepatoma agent with remarkable antitumor efficacy as well as higher safety in cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy system. PMID:22321574

  1. Genes essential for morphological development and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor are targets of BldD during vegetative growth.

    PubMed

    den Hengst, Chris D; Tran, Ngat T; Bibb, Maureen J; Chandra, Govind; Leskiw, Brenda K; Buttner, Mark J

    2010-10-01

    BldD is a transcriptional regulator essential for morphological development and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here we identify the BldD regulon by means of chromatin immunoprecipitation-microarray analysis (ChIP-chip). The BldD regulon encompasses ~167 transcriptional units, of which more than 20 are known to play important roles in development (e.g. bldA, bldC, bldH/adpA, bldM, bldN, ssgA, ssgB, ftsZ, whiB, whiG, smeA-ssfA) and/or secondary metabolism (e.g. nsdA, cvn9, bldA, bldC, leuA). Strikingly, 42 BldD target genes (~25% of the regulon) encode regulatory proteins, stressing the central, pleiotropic role of BldD. Almost all BldD binding sites identified by ChIP-chip are present in the promoters of the target genes. An exception is the tRNA gene bldA, where BldD binds within the region encoding the primary transcript, immediately downstream of the position corresponding to the processed, mature 3 end of the tRNA. Through gene overexpression, we identified a novel BldD target gene (cdgA) that influences differentiation and antibiotic production. cdgA encodes a GGDEF domain protein, implicating c-di-GMP in the regulation of Streptomyces development. Sequence analysis of the upstream regions of the complete regulon identified a 15 bp inverted repeat that functions as a high-affinity binding site for BldD, as was shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting analysis. High-scoring copies of the BldD binding site were found at relevant positions in the genomes of other bacteria containing a BldD homologue, suggesting the role of BldD is conserved in sporulating actinomycetes.

  2. A gene with major phenotypic effects as a target for selection vs. homogenizing gene flow.

    PubMed

    Raeymaekers, Joost A M; Konijnendijk, Nellie; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Hellemans, Bart; De Meester, Luc; Volckaert, Filip A M

    2014-01-01

    Genes with major phenotypic effects facilitate quantifying the contribution of genetic vs. plastic effects to adaptive divergence. A classical example is Ectodysplasin (Eda), the major gene controlling lateral plate phenotype in three-spined stickleback. Completely plated marine stickleback populations evolved repeatedly towards low-plated freshwater populations, representing a prime example of parallel evolution by natural selection. However, many populations remain polymorphic for lateral plate number. Possible explanations for this polymorphism include relaxation of selection, disruptive selection or a balance between divergent selection and gene flow. We investigated 15 polymorphic stickleback populations from brackish and freshwater habitats in coastal North-western Europe. At each site, we tracked changes in allele frequency at the Eda gene between subadults in fall, adults in spring and juveniles in summer. Eda genotypes were also compared for body size and reproductive investment. We observed a fitness advantage for the Eda allele for the low morph in freshwater and for the allele for the complete morph in brackish water. Despite these results, the differentiation at the Eda gene was poorly correlated with habitat characteristics. Neutral population structure was the best predictor of spatial variation in lateral plate number, suggestive of a substantial effect of gene flow. A meta-analysis revealed that the signature of selection at Eda was weak compared to similar studies in stickleback. We conclude that a balance between divergent selection and gene flow can maintain stickleback populations polymorphic for lateral plate number and that ecologically relevant genes may not always contribute much to local adaptation, even when targeted by selection.

  3. The Riboflavin analog roseoflavin targets an FMN-riboswitch and blocks Listeria monocytogenes growth, but also stimulates virulence gene-expression and infection

    PubMed Central

    Mansjö, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    During recent years, riboswitches have emerged as potential targets for novel antibacterial substances. In this study, we investigated how one flavin analog, roseoflavin, affected the gene-expression, growth and infectivity of the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to determine the potential of this analog to function as an antibacterial substance. The results indicate that roseoflavin has a profound inhibiting effect on the growth of L. monocytogenes at very low concentrations. Also, expression of the gene located downstream of the FMN riboswitch, a riboflavin transporter, was blocked by the addition of roseoflavin. Base-substitution mutations in the FMN riboswitch allowed the bacteria to grow in the presence of roseoflavin, showing that roseoflavin targeted the FMN riboswitch directly. Surprisingly, we found that roseoflavin stimulated L. monocytogenes virulence gene expression and infection abilities in a mechanism independent of the FMN riboswitch. Our results suggest that roseoflavin can block growth but also enhance Listeria virulence. PMID:21593602

  4. TCDD dysregulation of 13 AHR-target genes in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, John D.; Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Smith, Ashley B.; Okey, Allan B.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2014-02-01

    Despite several decades of research, the complete mechanism by which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other xenobiotic agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) cause toxicity remains unclear. While it has been shown that the AHR is required for all major manifestations of toxicity, the specific downstream changes involved in the development of toxic phenotypes remain unknown. Here we examine a panel of 13 genes that are AHR-regulated in many species and tissues. We profiled their hepatic mRNA abundances in two rat strains with very different sensitivities to TCDD: the TCDD-sensitive Long–Evans (Turku/AB; L–E) and the TCDD-resistant Han/Wistar (Kuopio; H/W). We evaluated doses ranging from 0 to 3000 μg/kg at 19 h after TCDD exposure and time points ranging from 1.5 to 384 h after exposure to 100 μg/kg TCDD. Twelve of 13 genes responded to TCDD in at least one strain, and seven of these showed statistically significant inter-strain differences in the time course analysis (Aldh3a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2a1, Fmo1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1). Cyp2s1 did not respond to TCDD in either rat strain. Five genes exhibited biphasic responses to TCDD insult (Ahrr, Aldh3a1, Cyp1b1, Nfe2l2 and Nqo1), suggesting a secondary event, such as association with additional transcriptional modulators. Of the 12 genes that responded to TCDD during the dose–response analysis, none had an ED{sub 50} equivalent to that of Cyp1a1, the most sensitive gene in this study, while nine genes responded to doses at least 10–100 fold higher, in at least one strain (Ahrr (L–E), Aldh3a1 (both), Cyp1a2 (both), Cyp1b1 (both), Cyp2a1 (L–E), Inmt (both), Nfe2l2 (L–E), Nqo1 (L–E) and Tiparp (both)). These data shed new light on the association of the AHR target genes with TCDD toxicity, and in particular the seven genes exhibiting strain-specific differences represent strong candidate mediators of Type-II toxicities. - Highlights: • NanoString measured hepatic mRNA molecules

  5. BRAF gene alterations and enhanced mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in gangliogliomas.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Majumdar, Atreye; Pathak, Pankaj; Kumar, Anupam; Kumari, Kalpana; Tripathi, Manjari; Sharma, Mehar C; Suri, Vaishali; Tandon, Vivek; Chandra, Sarat P; Sarkar, Chitra

    2017-01-01

    Gangliogliomas (GGs) are slow-growing glioneuronal tumors seen in children and young adults. They are associated with intractable epilepsy, and have recently been found to harbor BRAF (B- rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma) gene mutations. However, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, downstream of BRAF, has not been evaluated extensively in GGs. GG cases were retrieved, clinical data obtained, and histopathological features reviewed. Sequencing for BRAF V600E mutation, analysis of BRAF copy number by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry for mTOR pathway markers p-S6 and p-4EBP1 were performed. Sixty-four cases of GG were identified (0.9% of central nervous system tumors). Of these, 28 had sufficient tumor tissue for further evaluation. Mixed glial and neuronal morphology was the commonest (64%) type. Focal cortical dysplasia was identified in the adjacent cortex (6 cases). BRAF V600E mutation was identified in 30% of GGs; BRAF copy number gain was observed in 50% of them. p-S6 and p-4EBP1 immunopositivity was seen in 57% cases each. Thus, mTOR pathway activation was seen in 81% cases, and was independent of BRAF alterations. 87% patients had Engel grade I outcome, while 13% had Engel grade II outcome. Both the Engel grade II cases analyzed showed BRAF V600E mutation. BRAF V600E mutation is frequent in GGs, as is BRAF gain; the former may serve as a target for personalized therapy in patients with residual tumors, necessitating its assessment in routine pathology reporting of these tumors. Evidence of mTOR pathway activation highlights similarities in the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying GG and focal cortical dysplasia, and suggests that mTOR inhibitors may be of utility in GG patients with persistent seizures after surgery.

  6. Sex- and Tissue-specific Functions of Drosophila Doublesex Transcription Factor Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Jimenez, Erin; Kim, Yoo-Ah; Whitworth, Cale; Neville, Megan C.; Hempel, Leonie; Pavlou, Hania J.; Chen, Zhen-Xia; Sturgill, David; Dale, Ryan; Smith, Harold E.; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Goodwin, Stephen F.; Van Doren, Mark; Oliver, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Primary sex determination “switches” evolve rapidly, but Doublesex (DSX) related transcription factors (DMRTs) act downstream of these switches to control sexual development in most animal species. Drosophila dsx encodes female- and male-specific isoforms (DSXF and DSXM), but little is known about how dsx controls sexual development, whether DSXF and DSXM bind different targets, or how DSX proteins direct different outcomes in diverse tissues. We undertook genome-wide analyses to identify DSX targets using in vivo occupancy, binding site prediction, and evolutionary conservation. We find that DSXF and DSXM bind thousands of the same targets in multiple tissues in both sexes, yet these targets have sex- and tissue-specific functions. Interestingly, DSX targets show considerable overlap with targets identified for mouse DMRT1. DSX targets include transcription factors and signaling pathway components providing for direct and indirect regulation of sex-biased expression. PMID:25535918

  7. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  8. Splicing of the large intron present in the nonstructural gene of minute virus of mice is governed by TIA-1/TIAR binding downstream of the nonconsensus donor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Young; Pintel, David

    2009-06-01

    The essential proteins NS1 and NS2 of minute virus of mice are encoded by mRNAs R1 and R2, respectively. R2 is derived from R1 by excision of a large intron and thus splicing governs the relative ratios of NS1 and NS2. Excision of the large intron utilizes a nonconsensus 5' donor site. We identified a U-rich and A-rich intronic sequence immediately downstream of the nonconsensus 5' donor site that functions as an intronic splicing enhancer (ISE) required for efficient large-intron excision. The ISE binds the cellular RNA-processing proteins TIA-1 and TIAR, which enhance usage of the nonconsensus donor.

  9. 'Energy expenditure genes' or 'energy absorption genes': a new target for the treatment of obesity and Type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Braud, Sandrine; Ciufolini, Marco; Harosh, Itzik

    2010-12-01

    Several hundred genes associated or linked to obesity have been described in the scientific literature. Whereas many of these genes are potential targets for the treatment of obesity and associated conditions, none of them have permitted the developement of an efficient drug therapy. As proposed by the 'thrifty genotype' theory, obesity genes may have conferred an evolutionary advantage in times of food shortage through efficient energy exploitation, while 'lean' or 'energy expenditure' genes may have become very rare during the same periods. It is therefore a challenge to identify 'energy expenditure genes' or 'energy absorption genes,' whose mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms do result in reduced energy intake. We submit that such 'energy absorption' or 'energy expenditure' genes (crucial genes) are potential new targets for the treatment of obesity. These genes can be identified in rare genetic diseases that produce a lean, failure-to-thrive, energy malabsorption or starvation phenotype.

  10. The Selective Activation of p53 Target Genes Regulated by SMYD2 in BIX-01294 Induced Autophagy-Related Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jia-Dong; Lei, Pin-Ji; Zheng, Jun-Yi; Wang, Xiang; Li, Shangze; Liu, Huan; He, Yi-Lei; Wang, Zhao-Ning; Wei, Gang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Lian-Yun; Wu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Transcription regulation emerged to be one of the key mechanisms in regulating autophagy. Inhibitors of H3K9 methylation activates the expression of LC3B, as well as other autophagy-related genes, and promotes autophagy process. However, the detailed mechanisms of autophagy regulated by nuclear factors remain elusive. In this study, we performed a drug screen of SMYD2-/- cells and discovered that SMYD2 deficiency enhanced the cell death induced by BIX01294, an inhibitor of histone H3K9 methylation. BIX-01294 induces accumulation of LC3 II and autophagy-related cell death, but not caspase-dependent apoptosis. We profiled the global gene expression pattern after treatment with BIX-01294, in comparison with rapamycin. BIX-01294 selectively activates the downstream genes of p53 signaling, such as p21 and DOR, but not PUMA, a typical p53 target gene inducing apoptosis. BIX-01294 also induces other autophagy-related genes, such as ATG4A and ATG9A. SMYD2 is a methyltransferase for p53 and regulates its transcription activity. Its deficiency enhances the BIX-01294-induced autophagy-related cell death through transcriptionally promoting the expression of p53 target genes. Taken together, our data suggest BIX-01294 induces autophagy-related cell death and selectively activates p53 target genes, which is repressed by SMYD2 methyltransferase. PMID:25562686

  11. Gene targeting, genome editing: from Dolly to editors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenfang; Proudfoot, Chris; Lillico, Simon G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    One of the most powerful strategies to investigate biology we have as scientists, is the ability to transfer genetic material in a controlled and deliberate manner between organisms. When applied to livestock, applications worthy of commercial venture can be devised. Although initial methods used to generate transgenic livestock resulted in random transgene insertion, the development of SCNT technology enabled homologous recombination gene targeting strategies to be used in livestock. Much has been accomplished using this approach. However, now we have the ability to change a specific base in the genome without leaving any other DNA mark, with no need for a transgene. With the advent of the genome editors this is now possible and like other significant technological leaps, the result is an even greater diversity of possible applications. Indeed, in merely 5 years, these 'molecular scissors' have enabled the production of more than 300 differently edited pigs, cattle, sheep and goats. The advent of genome editors has brought genetic engineering of livestock to a position where industry, the public and politicians are all eager to see real use of genetically engineered livestock to address societal needs. Since the first transgenic livestock reported just over three decades ago the field of livestock biotechnology has come a long way-but the most exciting period is just starting.

  12. Ndrg2 is a PGC-1α/ERRα target gene that controls protein synthesis and expression of contractile-type genes in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Foletta, Victoria C; Brown, Erin L; Cho, Yoshitake; Snow, Rod J; Kralli, Anastasia; Russell, Aaron P

    2013-12-01

    The stress-responsive, tumor suppressor N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (Ndrg2) is highly expressed in striated muscle. In response to anabolic and catabolic signals, Ndrg2 is suppressed and induced, respectively, in mouse C2C12 myotubes. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating Ndrg2 expression in muscle, as well as the biological role for Ndrg2 in differentiated myotubes. Here, we show that Ndrg2 is a target of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) transcriptional program and is induced in response to endurance exercise, a physiological stress known also to increase PGC-1α/ERRα activity. Analyses of global gene and protein expression profiles in C2C12 myotubes with reduced levels of NDRG2, suggest that NDRG2 affects muscle growth, contractile properties, MAPK signaling, ion and vesicle transport and oxidative phosphorylation. Indeed, suppression of NDRG2 in myotubes increased protein synthesis and the expression of fast glycolytic myosin heavy chain isoforms, while reducing the expression of embryonic myosin Myh3, other contractile-associated genes and the MAPK p90 RSK1. Conversely, enhanced expression of NDRG2 reduced protein synthesis, and furthermore, partially blocked the increased protein synthesis rates elicited by a constitutively active form of ERRα. In contrast, suppressing or increasing levels of NDRG2 did not affect mRNA expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis that are regulated by PGC-1α or ERRα. This study shows that in C2C12 myotubes Ndrg2 is a novel PGC-1α/ERRα transcriptional target, which influences protein turnover and the regulat