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Sample records for draco dwarf spheroidal

  1. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy DRACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Dhuga, K.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a spectral analysis of X - ray sources in Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy recently observed by XMM-Newton. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with AGN, few of them possess characteristics of LMXBs and CVs. We also discuss the possibility of the existence of a central IMBH in Draco.

  2. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with LX > 3 × 1033 erg s-1 in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  3. THE CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE DRACO DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Huang Wenjin E-mail: hwenjin@astro.washington.edu

    2009-08-20

    We present an abundance analysis based on high-resolution spectra of eight stars selected to span the full range in metallicity in the Draco dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy. We find that [Fe/H] for the sample stars ranges from -1.5 to -3.0 dex. Combining our sample with previously published work for a total of 14 luminous Draco giants, we show that the abundance ratios [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], and [Si/Fe] for the Draco giants overlap those of Galactic halo giants at the lowest [Fe/H] probed, but are significantly lower for the higher Fe-metallicity Draco stars. For the explosive {alpha}-elements Ca and Ti, the abundance ratios for Draco giants with [Fe/H] > - 2.4 dex are approximately constant and slightly subsolar, well below values characteristic of Galactic halo stars. The s-process contribution to the production of heavy elements begins at significantly lower Fe metallicity than in the Galactic halo. Using a toy model we compare the behavior of the abundance ratios within the sample of Draco giants with those from the literature of Galactic globular clusters, and the Carina and Sgr dSph galaxies. The differences appear to be related to the timescale for buildup of the heavy elements, with Draco having the slowest rate. We note the presence of a Draco giant with [Fe/H] <-3.0 dex in our sample, and reaffirm that the inner Galactic halo could have been formed by early accretion of Galactic satellite galaxies and dissolution of young globular clusters, while the outer halo could have formed from those satellite galaxies accreted later.

  4. Orbit-based Dynamical Models of the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardel, John; Gebhardt, K.; Fabricius, M.; Drory, N.

    2012-01-01

    TITLE: Orbit-based Dynamical Models of the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal ABSTRACT: We construct axisymmetric Schwarzschild models of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy in an effort to determine the inner slope of the dark matter density profile. These models are also capable of determining the orbital aniostropy of the stars by fitting to kinematics in the form of line-of-sight velocity distributions (LOSVDs). We use individual radial velocities of stars to construct the LOSVDs, drawing on data from the literature as well as data taken with the VIRUS-W integral field spectrograph on the 2.7m telescope at McDonald Observatory. The advantage of this instrument is that its fibers are closely separated; this allows for simultaneous observations of many stars in the center of the galaxy. Using this technique, we observed 12 member stars within the central 20 pc of Draco. The LOSVD of these 12 stars is used to constrain the mass in the central region of the galaxy, and allows us to determine the inner dark matter density profile as well as investigate the possibility of a central black hole.

  5. XMM-Newton study of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, Sara; Sasaki, Manami; Ducci, Lorenzo

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We present the results of the analysis of five XMM-Newton observations of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). The aim of the work is the study of the X-ray population in the field of the Draco dSph. Methods: We classified the sources on the basis of spectral analysis, hardness ratios, X-ray-to-optical flux ratio, X-ray variability, and cross-correlation with available catalogues in X-ray, optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths. Results: We detected 70 X-ray sources in the field of the Draco dSph in the energy range of 0.2 - 12 keV and classified 18 AGNs, 9 galaxies and galaxy candidates, 6 sources as foreground stars, 4 low-mass X-ray binary candidates, 1 symbiotic star, and 2 binary system candidates. We also identified 9 sources as hard X-ray sources in the field of the galaxy. We derived the X-ray luminosity function of X-ray sources in the Draco dSph in the 2 - 10 keV and 0.5 - 2 keV energy bands. Using the X-ray luminosity function in the energy range of 0.5 - 2 keV, we estimate that ~10 X-ray sources are objects in the Draco dSph. We have also estimated the dark matter halo mass that would be needed to keep the low-mass X-ray binaries gravitationally bound to the galaxy. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  6. Spectroscopy of Six Red Giants in the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme H.; Siegel, Michael H.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Winnick, Rebeccah

    2006-10-01

    Keck Observatory LRIS-B (Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) spectra are reported for six red giant stars in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy and several comparison giants in the globular cluster M13. Indexes that quantify the strengths of the Ca II H and K lines, the λ3883 and λ4215 CN bands, and the λ4300 G band have been measured. These data confirm evidence of metallicity inhomogeneity within Draco obtained by previous authors. The four brightest giants in the sample have absolute magnitudes in the range -2.6Draco tip giants and that some giants have higher [C/Fe] ratios than is typical of giants in the globular clusters M13 and M92. Several suggestions are made as to why some Draco stars may have higher [C/Fe] ratios than globular cluster red giants: deep mixing might be inhibited in these Draco stars, they may formerly have been mass-transfer binaries that acquired carbon from a more massive companion, or the Draco dwarf galaxy may have experienced relatively slow chemical evolution over a period of several billion years, allowing carbon-enhanced ejecta from intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to enrich the interstellar medium while star formation was still occurring. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  7. Chemical evolution of r-process elements in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, M. N.; Tsujimoto, T.; Shigeyama, T.; Aoki, W.

    2016-08-01

    A dominant astrophysical site for r-process, which is responsible for producing heavy neutron-capture elements, is unknown. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the Milky Way halo provide ideal laboratories to investigate the origin and evolution of r-process elements. We carried out high-resolution spectroscopic observations of three giant stars in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy to estimate their europium abundances. We found that the upper-limits of [Eu/H] are very low in the range [Fe/H] < -2, while this ratio is nearly constant at higher metallicities. This trend is not well reproduced with models which assume that Eu is produced together with Fe by SNe, and may suggest the contribution from other objects such as neutron-star mergers.

  8. Chemical evolution of r-process elements in Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta Ishigaki, Miho; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Shigeyama, Toshikazu; Aoki, Wako

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way halo are ideal laboratory of nucleosynthesis and chemical enrichments in the early universe. We studied chemical compositions including r-process elements for giant stars in Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the Subaru/HDS. Draco is known to mainly consist of old (age > 10 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]<-1.5) stellar populations, which provides us an important insights about nucleosynthesis responsible for producing heavy elements in this galaxy. As reported in previous studies, we found that the Draco stars show enhanced [α/Fe] ratios at [Fe/H]<-2, decreasing at higher metallicity. This is consistent with an expectation that the chemical evolution is proceeded in a homogeneous manner initially by Type II and later by Type Ia supernovae. On the other hand, the [Eu/H] are constant over the metallicity range -2<[Fe/H]<-1 and low upper limits have been obtained at the lower [Fe/H]. The lack of increase in Eu abundance, despite the significant increase in Fe abundance by supernovae, implies that r-process elements were produced through much rarer events such as neutron-star mergers.

  9. Searching for decaying dark matter in deep XMM-Newton observation of the Draco dwarf spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Boyarsky, Alexey; Iakubovskyi, Dmytro; Bulbul, Esra; Eckert, Dominique; Franse, Jeroen; Malyshev, Denys; Markevitch, Maxim; Neronov, Andrii

    2016-08-01

    We present results of a search for the 3.5 keV emission line in our recent very long (˜ 1.4 Ms) XMM-Newton observation of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The astrophysical X-ray emission from such dark matter-dominated galaxies is faint, thus they provide a test for the dark matter origin of the 3.5 keV line previously detected in other massive, but X-ray bright objects, such as galaxies and galaxy clusters. We do not detect a statistically significant emission line from Draco; this constrains the lifetime of a decaying dark matter particle to τ > (7-9) × 1027 s at 95 per cent CL (combining all three XMM-Newton cameras; the interval corresponds to the uncertainty of the dark matter column density in the direction of Draco). The PN camera, which has the highest sensitivity of the three, does show a positive spectral residual (above the carefully modelled continuum) at E = 3.54 ± 0.06 keV with a 2.3σ significance. The two MOS cameras show less-significant or no positive deviations, consistently within 1σ with PN. Our Draco limit on τ is consistent with previous detections in the stacked galaxy clusters, M31 and the Galactic Centre within their 1 - 2σ uncertainties, but is inconsistent with the high signal from the core of the Perseus cluster (which has itself been inconsistent with the rest of the detections). We conclude that this Draco observation does not exclude the dark matter interpretation of the 3.5 keV line in those objects.

  10. Measuring Dark Matter Profiles Non-Parametrically in Dwarf Spheroidals: An Application to Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardel, John R.; Gebhardt, Karl; Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Drory, Niv; Williams, Michael J.

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a novel implementation of orbit-based (or Schwarzschild) modeling that allows dark matter density profiles to be calculated non-parametrically in nearby galaxies. Our models require no assumptions to be made about velocity anisotropy or the dark matter profile. The technique can be applied to any dispersion-supported stellar system, and we demonstrate its use by studying the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Draco. We use existing kinematic data at larger radii and also present 12 new radial velocities within the central 13 pc obtained with the VIRUS-W integral field spectrograph on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. Our non-parametric Schwarzschild models find strong evidence that the dark matter profile in Draco is cuspy for 20 <= r <= 700 pc. The profile for r >= 20 pc is well fit by a power law with slope α = -1.0 ± 0.2, consistent with predictions from cold dark matter simulations. Our models confirm that, despite its low baryon content relative to other dSphs, Draco lives in a massive halo.

  11. MEASURING DARK MATTER PROFILES NON-PARAMETRICALLY IN DWARF SPHEROIDALS: AN APPLICATION TO DRACO

    SciTech Connect

    Jardel, John R.; Gebhardt, Karl; Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Williams, Michael J.; Drory, Niv

    2013-02-15

    We introduce a novel implementation of orbit-based (or Schwarzschild) modeling that allows dark matter density profiles to be calculated non-parametrically in nearby galaxies. Our models require no assumptions to be made about velocity anisotropy or the dark matter profile. The technique can be applied to any dispersion-supported stellar system, and we demonstrate its use by studying the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Draco. We use existing kinematic data at larger radii and also present 12 new radial velocities within the central 13 pc obtained with the VIRUS-W integral field spectrograph on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. Our non-parametric Schwarzschild models find strong evidence that the dark matter profile in Draco is cuspy for 20 {<=} r {<=} 700 pc. The profile for r {>=} 20 pc is well fit by a power law with slope {alpha} = -1.0 {+-} 0.2, consistent with predictions from cold dark matter simulations. Our models confirm that, despite its low baryon content relative to other dSphs, Draco lives in a massive halo.

  12. Nine Seasons of Velocity Measurements in the Draco and Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with the MMT Echelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, Edward W.; Aaronson, Marc; Hill, John M.

    1995-11-01

    We have used the Multiple Mirror Telescope echelle spectrograph to measure 112 velocities of 42 stars in the Draco and Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxies and three velocities of three foreground stars between 1982 April and 1990 September. We used 11 A resolution spectra obtained with the MX multifiber spectrograph at the Steward 90" to find additional giant candidates; 5 UMi and 13 Draco stars were then observed at the MMT and added to the original sample of velocity members. In addition, the MX spectra were used to eliminate 74 stars in the direction of UMI and 59 stars in Draco as likely foreground dwarfs. We detected 7 velocity variables, defined as those stars whose probability of exceeding the measured X^2^ by chance is less than 1.5%. Three of these stars are Carbon (C) stars (UMi K and VA 335 and Draco C1); two have emission lines (Draco CI and UMi M). We show that the C star Draco C4, with a proper motion membership probability of 7%, has a velocity consistent with membership. It is not surprising that these C (most likely CH) stars are binaries because McClure has shown that most Galactic CH stars are in binary systems. Of the remaining 35 stars, only 4 are velocity variables, with measured velocity extrema of 29.1 km s^-1^ (UMi M), 7.2 km s^-1^ (Draco XI-2), 9.0 km s^-1^ (Draco 24), and 8.3 km s^-1^ (Draco 473). The velocity dispersions are 10.1 +/- 1.7 km s^-1^ for UMi, and 9.9 +/- 1.4 km s^-1^ for Draco. These dispersions change to 10.5 +/- 2.0 for UMi, and 8.2 +?- 1.3 for Draco if we eliminate the velocity variables. Our dispersion for UMi differs from that of Hargreaves et al. [MNRAS, 271,693 (1994b)] by 1.3σ of the combined errors. These velocities are combined with the one-component King models of Pryor & Kormendy [AJ, 100,127 (1990)] to give M/L = 73 for UMi, and 77 for Draco.

  13. Stellar Kinematics and Metallicities in the Draco and Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies from WHT/AF2-WYFFOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Irwin, M.; Tolstoy, E.; Lewis, J.; Hartke, J.

    2016-10-01

    We present preliminary results from our chemo-dynamical survey of two Milky Way dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, Draco and Ursa Minor. The two galaxies have similar radial velocities and reside in close proximity in the outskirts of the Milky Way halo, yet exhibit noteworthy differences in their morphologies. We obtained spectroscopic data with AF2-WYFFOS on the WHT for several hundred red-giant-branch (RGB) candidates in each galaxy out to its tidal radius, from which we have identified approximately 100 velocity members in each system. Metallicities are determined for the individual RGB stars using the Ca II triplet lines. Whereas Ursa Minor shows an RGB population of well-mixed metallicities, a clear gradient is observed in Draco, in which the outer regions host stars of lower [Fe/H]. Such differences may be a reflection of their differing morphologies, with Ursa Minor having been tidally stirred to give rise to both its highly elongated shape and a more mixed [Fe/H] distribution.

  14. Proper motion of the Draco dwarf galaxy from Subaru Suprime-Cam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Girard, Terrence M.

    2016-09-01

    We have measured the absolute proper motion of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy using Subaru Suprime-Cam images taken at three epochs, with time baselines of 4.4 and 7 yr. The magnitude limit of the proper-motion study is i = 25, thus allowing for thousands of background galaxies and Draco stars to be used to perform extensive astrometric tests and to derive the correction to an inertial reference frame. The derived proper motion is (μα, μδ) = (-0.284 ± 0.047, -0.289 ± 0.041) mas yr-1. This motion implies an orbit that takes Draco to a pericentre of ˜20 kpc; a somewhat disruptive orbit suggesting that tides might account for the rising velocity-dispersion profile of Draco seen in line-of-sight velocity studies. The orbit is only marginally consistent with Draco's membership to the vast polar structure of Galactic satellites, in contrast to a recent Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion measurement that finds alignment very likely. Our study is a test case to demonstrate that deep imaging with mosaic cameras of appropriate resolution can be used for high-accuracy, ground-based proper-motion measurement. As a useful by-product of the study, we also identify two faint brown-dwarf candidates in the foreground field.

  15. Gamma ray Emission Spectra from Dark matter annihilation in dwarf galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duorah, Kalpana

    2015-08-01

    The gamma ray emission from Dark Matter annihilation in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has been studied. Dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are through to be the repository of dark matter due to their high mass to light ratio. Draco is believed to emit energy due to certain dark matter candidates. One of the most motivated dark matter appears to be the neutralino as predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard model(MSSM). The mass of the neutralino is constrained to be in the range 6GeV to 100TeV by the CMB measurements and accelerator searches. Gamma Ray Spectra and fluxes have been calculated for neutral no annihilation over a mass range (10-100) GeV. The gamma ray flux from the annihilation of 100GeVneutralino in the dSph galaxy Draco is found to be ~1.6x10^(-10) cm^(-2)s^(-1)GeV^(-1) . This is found to be agreeable with the observed flux as measured from a NFW density profile for dark matter distribution in Draco. The gamma ray distribution for neutral no annihilation shows a maximum value near the centre and found to falls off as radially.

  16. Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Dragon; abbrev. Dra, gen. Draconis; area 1083 sq. deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Ursa Major and Cepheus, and encloses Ursa Minor on three sides. The center of the constellation culminates at midnight in May, though part of it is on the meridian from mid-February to late July. Draco represents the dragon Ladon in Greek mythology, which guarded the golden apple tree that was...

  17. VARIATIONS IN A UNIVERSAL DARK MATTER PROFILE FOR DWARF SPHEROIDALS

    SciTech Connect

    Jardel, John R.; Gebhardt, Karl

    2013-09-20

    Using a newly developed modeling technique, we present orbit-based dynamical models of the Carina, Draco, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. These models calculate the dark matter profiles non-parametrically without requiring any assumptions to be made about their profile shapes. By lifting this restriction, we discover a host of dark matter profiles in the dSphs that are different from the typical profiles suggested by both theorists and observers. However, when we scale these profiles appropriately and plot them on a common axis, they appear to follow an approximate r {sup –1} power law with considerable scatter.

  18. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and resonant orbital coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.; Miller, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The structural properties of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way may be strongly affected by their time-dependent interactions with the 'tidal' field of the Milky Way. A low Q resonance of the tidal driving force with collective oscillation modes of the dwarf system can produce many of the observed properties of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including large velocity dispersions that would normally be interpreted as indicating large dynamical masses.

  19. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  20. The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Andromeda I

    SciTech Connect

    Mould, J.; Kristian, J. Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    Images of Andromeda I in the visual and near-infrared show a giant branch characteristic of galactic globular clusters of intermediate metallicity. The distance of the galaxy is estimated from the tip of the giant branch to be 790 + or - 60 kpc. The physical dimensions and luminosity are similar to those of the dwarf spheroidal in Sculptor. There is no evidence for an intermediate age population in Andromeda I, and appropriate upper limits are specified. There is marginal evidence for a color gradient in the galaxy, a phenomenon not previously noted in a dwarf spheroidal. 21 refs.

  1. Mass Modelling of dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentowski, Jarosław; Łokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Prada, Francisco; Mayer, Lucio; Mamon, Gary A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the origin and properties of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high resolution N-body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. We create mock kinematic data sets by observing the dwarf in different directions. When the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails. However, most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert. We model the velocity dispersion profiles of the cleaned-up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation. We show that even for such a strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and mass-to-light ratio of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25%.

  2. ANDROMEDA XXIX: A NEW DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY 200 kpc FROM ANDROMEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Eric F.; Slater, Colin T.; Martin, Nicolas F.

    2011-11-20

    We report the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Andromeda XXIX (And XXIX), using data from the recently released Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8, and confirmed by Gemini North telescope Multi-Object Spectrograph imaging data. And XXIX appears to be a dwarf spheroidal galaxy, separated on the sky by a little more than 15 Degree-Sign from M31, with a distance inferred from the tip of the red giant branch of 730 {+-} 75 kpc, corresponding to a three-dimensional separation from M31 of 207{sup +20}{sub -2} kpc (close to M31's virial radius). Its absolute magnitude, as determined by comparison to the red giant branch luminosity function of the Draco dwarf spheroidal, is M{sub V} = -8.3 {+-} 0.4. And XXIX's stellar populations appear very similar to Draco's; consequently, we estimate a metallicity for And XXIX of [Fe/H] {approx}-1.8. The half-light radius of And XXIX is 360 {+-} 60 pc and its ellipticity is 0.35 {+-} 0.06, typical of dwarf satellites of the Milky Way and M31 at this absolute magnitude range.

  3. A XMM-Newton observation of a sample of four close dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manni, L.; Nucita, A. A.; De Paolis, F.; Testa, V.; Ingrosso, G.

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of the analysis of deep archival XMM-Newton observations towards the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Draco, Leo I, Ursa Major II (UMa II) and Ursa Minor (UMi) in the Milky Way neighbourhood. The X-ray source population is characterized and cross-correlated with available databases to infer their nature. We also investigate if intermediate-mass black holes are hosted in the centre of these galaxies. For Draco, we detect 96 high-energy sources, two of them possibly being local stars, while no evidence for any X-ray emitting central compact object is found. Towards the Leo I and UMa II fields of view, we reveal 116 and 49 X-ray sources, respectively. None of them correlates with the putative central black holes and only one is likely associated with a UMa II local source. The study of the UMi dwarf galaxy found 54 high-energy sources and a possible association with a source at the dwarf spheroidal galaxy centre. We put an upper limit on the luminosity of the central compact object of 4.02 × 1033 erg s-1. Furthermore, via the correlation with a radio source near the galactic centre, the putative black hole should have a mass of (2.76^{+32.00}_{-2.54})× 10^6 M_{{{⊙}}} and be radiatively inefficient. This confirms a previous result obtained using Chandra data alone.

  4. Is Draco II one of the faintest dwarf galaxies? First study from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Geha, Marla; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Bell, Eric F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    We present the first spectroscopic analysis of the faint and compact stellar system Draco II (Dra II, MV = -2.9 ± 0.8, r_h=19^{+8}_{-6} pc), recently discovered in the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 3π survey. The observations, conducted with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope, establish some of its basic characteristics: the velocity data reveal a narrow peak with nine member stars at a systemic heliocentric velocity < v_rrangle =-347.6^{+1.7}_{-1.8} km s^{-1}, thereby confirming Dra II is a satellite of the Milky Way; we infer a velocity dispersion with σvr = 2.9 ± 2.1 km s-1 (<8.4 km s-1 at the 95 per cent confidence level), which implies log _{10}(M_{1/2})=5.5^{+0.4}_{-0.6} and log _{10}(({M/L})_{1/2})=2.7^{+0.5}_{-0.8}, in Solar units; furthermore, very weak calcium triplet lines in the spectra of the high signal-to-noise member stars imply [Fe/H] < -2.1, whilst variations in the line strengths of two stars with similar colours and magnitudes suggest a metallicity spread in Dra II. These new data cannot clearly discriminate whether Draco II is a star cluster or amongst the faintest, most compact, and closest dwarf galaxies. However, the sum of the three - individually inconclusive - pieces of evidence presented here seems to favour the dwarf galaxy interpretation.

  5. FORMATION OF DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES VIA MERGERS OF DISKY DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Mayer, Lucio; Knebe, Alexander

    2011-10-10

    We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate whether binary mergers between rotationally supported dwarfs can lead to the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. We select merger events from a Constrained Local Universe simulation of the Local Group (LG) and record the properties of the interacting dwarf-sized halos. This information is subsequently used to seed controlled experiments of binary encounters between dwarf galaxies consisting of exponential stellar disks embedded in cosmologically motivated dark matter halos. These simulations are designed to reproduce eight cosmological merger events, with initial masses of the interacting systems in the range {approx}(5-60) x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}, occurring quite early in the history of the LG, more than 10 Gyr ago. We compute the properties of the merger remnants as a distant observer would and demonstrate that at least three of the simulated encounters produce systems with kinematic and structural properties akin to those of the classic dSphs in the LG. Tracing the history of the remnants in the cosmological simulation to z = 0, we find that two dSph-like objects remain isolated at distances {approx}> 800 kpc from either the Milky Way or M31. These systems constitute plausible counterparts of the remote dSphs Cetus and Tucana which reside in the LG outskirts, far from the tidal influence of the primary galaxies. We conclude that merging of rotationally supported dwarfs represents a viable mechanism for the formation of dSphs in the LG and similar environments.

  6. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Alan R.

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant Upsilon (also known as the "mass term'' of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant Upsilon. In the introductory Chapter 1, we present some preliminary background material to define and motivate the study of wave dark matter and describe some of the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In Chapter 2, we present several different ways of describing a spherically symmetric spacetime and the resulting metrics. We then focus our discussion on an especially useful form of the metric of a spherically symmetric spacetime in polar-areal coordinates and its properties. In particular, we show how the metric component functions chosen are extremely compatible with notions in Newtonian mechanics. We also show the monotonicity of the Hawking mass in these coordinates. Finally, we discuss how these coordinates and the metric can be used to solve the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. In Chapter 3, we explore spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, the defining equations of wave dark matter, where the scalar field is of the form f(t, r) = eiotF(r) for some constant o ∈ R and complex-valued function F(r). We show that the corresponding metric is static if and only if F( r) = h(r)eia for some constant alpha ∈ R and real-valued function h(r). We describe the

  7. Testing Modified Gravity with Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, Hosein; Amiri, Vahid

    2016-08-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light (M★/L) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units, that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis (SPS) models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σ _ph {los}) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the Modified Gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant M★/L ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters α and μ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of the THINGS catalog of galaxies. We find that the derived M★/L ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of the dSph with reasonable M★/L values we must vary α and μ on a case by case basis. A common pair of values cannot be found for all dSphs. Comparing with the values found from rotation curve fitting, it appears that μ correlates strongly with galaxy luminosity, shedding doubt on it as a universal constant.

  8. On Dark Matter in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. G.

    2011-07-01

    The small (LV ≤ 107LV,⊙) baryonic components of the Milky Way's dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites contribute small "backgrounds" with regards to estimates of dSph dark matter density profiles and any related predictions of dark matter decay/annihilation signals. As dSphs gain attention from a broad range of physicists interested in dark matter, it becomes important to examine the robustness - with respect to details like modeling assumptions and observational uncertainties - of conclusions regarding the dark matter content of dSphs and the scaling relations derived therefrom. Indeed dSphs seem to contain copious amounts of dark matter. However, the standard Jeans analysis constrains the dark mass enclosed only within the luminous scale radius, and does not reveal the internal dark matter distribution in a model-indepdendent way. Furthermore, new observational results help to identify complexities in internal dSph kinematics and cast doubt on previously apparent similarities among dSph dark matter halos. Further progress in understsanding dark matter on small scales will require consideration of dSphs more as individual galaxies and less as laboratories.

  9. Simultaneous ram pressure and tidal stripping; how dwarf spheroidals lost their gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Lucio; Mastropietro, Chiara; Wadsley, James; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2006-07-01

    We perform high-resolution N-body+SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) simulations of gas-rich dwarf galaxy satellites orbiting within a Milky Way-sized halo and study for the first time the combined effects of tides and ram pressure. The structure of the galaxy models and the orbital configurations are chosen in accordance with those expected in a Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) universe. While tidal stirring of disky dwarfs produces objects whose stellar structure and kinematics resembles that of dwarf spheroidals after a few orbits, ram pressure stripping is needed to entirely remove their gas component. Gravitational tides can aid ram pressure stripping by diminishing the overall potential of the dwarf, but tides also induce bar formation which funnels gas inwards making subsequent stripping more difficult. This inflow is particularly effective when the gas can cool radiatively. Assuming a low density of the hot Galactic corona consistent with observational constraints, dwarfs with Vpeak < 30 km s-1 can be completely stripped of their gas content on orbits with pericenters of 50 kpc or less. Instead, dwarfs with more massive dark haloes and Vpeak > 30 km s-1 lose most or all of their gas content only if a heating source keeps the gas extended, partially counteracting the bar-driven inflow. We show that the ionizing radiation from the cosmic ultraviolet (UV) background at z > 2 can provide the required heating. In these objects, most of the gas is removed or becomes ionized at the first pericenter passage, explaining the early truncation of the star formation observed in Draco and Ursa Minor. Galaxies on orbits with larger pericenters and/or falling into the Milky Way halo at lower redshift can retain significant amounts of the centrally concentrated gas. These dwarfs would continue to form stars over a longer period of time, especially close to pericenter passages, as observed in Fornax and other dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) of the Local Group. The

  10. Numerical Simulations of the Metallicity Distribution in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ripamonti, Emanuele; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Battaglia, G.; Abel, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-12-12

    Recent observations show that the number of stars with very low metallicities in the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way is low, despite the low average metallicities of stars in these systems. We undertake numerical simulations of star formation and metal enrichment of dwarf galaxies in order to verify whether this result can be reproduced with ''standard'' assumptions. The answer is likely to be negative, unless some selection bias against very low metallicity stars is present in the observations.

  11. Mergers and the outside-in formation of dwarf spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez-Llambay, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Abadi, M. G.; Gottlöber, S.; Yepes, G.; Hoffman, Y.; Steinmetz, M.

    2016-02-01

    We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of the Local Group to explore the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We find that a number of simulated dwarfs form `outside-in', with an old, metal-poor population that surrounds a younger, more concentrated metal-rich component, reminiscent of dwarf spheroidals like Sculptor or Sextans. We focus on a few examples where stars form in two populations distinct in age in order to elucidate the origin of these gradients. The spatial distributions of the two components reflect their diverse origin; the old stellar component is assembled through mergers, but the young population forms largely in situ. The older component results from a first episode of star formation that begins early but is quickly shut off by the combined effects of stellar feedback and reionization. The younger component forms when a late accretion event adds gas and reignites star formation. The effect of mergers is to disperse the old stellar population, increasing their radius and decreasing their central density relative to the young population. We argue that dwarf-dwarf mergers offer a plausible scenario for the formation of systems with multiple distinct populations and, more generally, for the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidals.

  12. Proper motion of the Draco dwarf galaxy based on Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Carlton; Piatek, Slawomir; Olszewski, Edward W. E-mail: piatek@physics.rutgers.edu

    2015-02-01

    We have measured the proper motion of the Draco dwarf galaxy using images at two epochs with a time baseline of about two years taken with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. Wide Field Channels 1 and 2 provide two adjacent fields, each containing a known QSO. The zero point for the proper motion is determined using both background galaxies and the QSOs and the two methods produce consistent measurements within each field. Averaging the results from the two fields gives a proper motion in the equatorial coordinate system of (μ{sub α},μ{sub δ})=(17.7±6.3,−22.1±6.3) mas century{sup −1} and in the Galactic coordinate system of (μ{sub ℓ},μ{sub b})=(−23.1±6.3,−16.3±6.3) mas century{sup −1}. Removing the contributions of the motion of the Sun and of the LSR to the measured proper motion yields a Galactic rest-frame proper motion of (μ{sub α}{sup Grf},μ{sub δ}{sup Grf})=(51.4±6.3,−18.7±6.3) mas century{sup −1} and (μ{sub ℓ}{sup Grf},μ{sub b}{sup Grf})=(−21.8±6.3,−50.1±6.3) mas century{sup −1}. The implied space velocity with respect to the Galactic center is (Π,Θ,Z)=(27±14,89±25,−212±20) km s{sup −1}. This velocity implies that the orbital inclination is 70{sup ∘}, with a 95% confidence interval of (59{sup ∘},80{sup ∘}), and that the plane of the orbit is consistent with that of the vast polar structure (VPOS) of Galactic satellite galaxies.

  13. Star Formation History of the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pino, A.; Aparicio, A.; Gallart, C.; Hidalgo, S.

    2011-07-01

    We present color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) reaching the oldest main sequence turn offs for three fields in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy, obtained with FORS1 at the VLT. One of them is situated at the center of the galaxy while the other two are located at a distance of 10' form the center. We determine the full star formation history (SFH) of the central field, extending to the first star formation events.

  14. VERITAS SEARCH FOR VHE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Furniss, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G.

    2010-09-10

    Indirect dark matter searches with ground-based gamma-ray observatories provide an alternative for identifying the particle nature of dark matter that is complementary to that of direct search or accelerator production experiments. We present the results of observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Draco, Ursa Minor, Booetes 1, and Willman 1 conducted by the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). These galaxies are nearby dark matter dominated objects located at a typical distance of several tens of kiloparsecs for which there are good measurements of the dark matter density profile from stellar velocity measurements. Since the conventional astrophysical background of very high energy gamma rays from these objects appears to be negligible, they are good targets to search for the secondary gamma-ray photons produced by interacting or decaying dark matter particles. No significant gamma-ray flux above 200 GeV was detected from these four dwarf galaxies for a typical exposure of {approx}20 hr. The 95% confidence upper limits on the integral gamma-ray flux are in the range (0.4-2.2) x 10{sup -12}photonscm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We interpret this limiting flux in the context of pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) and derive constraints on the thermally averaged product of the total self-annihilation cross section and the relative velocity of the WIMPs (({sigma}v) {approx}< 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} for m {sub {chi} {approx}}> 300 GeV c {sup -2}). This limit is obtained under conservative assumptions regarding the dark matter distribution in dwarf galaxies and is approximately 3 orders of magnitude above the generic theoretical prediction for WIMPs in the minimal supersymmetric standard model framework. However, significant uncertainty exists in the dark matter distribution as well as the neutralino cross sections which under favorable assumptions could further lower this limit.

  15. VERITAS deep observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Decerprit, G.; Dickherber, R.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Ferrer, F.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huan, H.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lee, K.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Ruppel, J.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Şentürk, G. D.; Skole, C.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Vivier, M.; Wagner, R. G.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2012-03-01

    The VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes has carried out a deep observational program on the nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1. We report on the results of nearly 48 hours of good quality selected data, taken between January 2010 and May 2011. No significant γ-ray emission is detected at the nominal position of Segue 1, and upper limits on the integrated flux are derived. According to recent studies, Segue 1 is the most dark matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal galaxy currently known. We derive stringent bounds on various annihilating and decaying dark matter particle models. The upper limits on the velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section are ⟨σv⟩95%CL≲10-23cm3s-1, improving our limits from previous observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies by at least a factor of 2 for dark matter particle masses mχ≳300GeV. The lower limits on the decay lifetime are at the level of τ95%CL≳1024s. Finally, we address the interpretation of the cosmic ray lepton anomalies measured by ATIC and PAMELA in terms of dark matter annihilation, and show that the VERITAS observations of Segue 1 disfavor such a scenario.

  16. Andromeda's dwarf spheroidals and the universal mass profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michelle; Rich, R. M.; Martin, N.; Ibata, R.; Chapman, S. C.; McConnachie, A. W.; PAndAS

    2014-01-01

    As the faintest, least massive galaxies we are able to observe, dwarf spheroidal galaxies represent the fundamental galactic unit. Their study in the Milky Way has led to several interesting findings and are helping us to better understand the behaviour of dark matter on the smallest scales. In this talk, I will present work from the ongoing PAndAS spectroscopic follow up survey of Andromeda, focusing on our results for its dwarf galaxy population. I will show that by including the masses measured for these objects in our analysis of the mass profiles of all dwarf galaxies, we are able to demonstrate that the notion of a universal mass profile for these most minute of galaxies is false. I will also identify several interesting objects whose properties defy our expectations, and discuss what these mean for our understanding of the physics governing galactic evolution.

  17. No WIMP mini-spikes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wanders, Mark; Bertone, Gianfranco; Weniger, Christoph; Volonteri, Marta E-mail: g.bertone@uva.nl E-mail: c.weniger@uva.nl

    2015-04-01

    The formation of black holes inevitably affects the distribution of dark and baryonic matter in their vicinity, leading to an enhancement of the dark matter density, called spike, and if dark matter is made of WIMPs, to a strong enhancement of the dark matter annihilation rate. Spikes at the center of galaxies like the Milky Way are efficiently disrupted by baryonic processes, but mini-spikes can form and survive undisturbed at the center of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We show that Fermi LAT satellite data allow to set very stringent limits on the existence of mini-spikes in dwarf galaxies: for thermal WIMPs with mass between 100 GeV and 1 TeV, we obtain a maximum black hole mass between 100 and 1000 M{sub ⊙}, ruling out black holes masses extrapolated from the M-σ relationship in a large region of the parameter space. We also performed Monte Carlo simulations of merger histories of black holes in dwarf spheroidals in a scenario where black holes form from the direct collapse of primordial gas in early halos, and found that this specific formation scenario is incompatible at the 84% CL with dark matter being in the form of thermal WIMPs.

  18. WFPC2 Observations of the URSA Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Burke, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    We present our analysis of archival Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) observations in F555W (approximately V) and F814W (approximately I) of the central region of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The V versus V - I color-magnitude diagram features a sparsely populated blue horizontal branch, a steep thin red giant branch, and a narrow subgiant branch. The main sequence reaches approximately 2 magnitudes below the main-sequence turnoff (V(sup UMi, sub TO) approximately equals 23.27 +/- 0.11 mag) of the median stellar population. We compare the fiducial sequence of the Galactic globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341). The excellent match between Ursa Minor and M92 confirms that the median stellar population of the UMi dSph galaxy is metal poor ([Fe/H](sub UMi) approximately equals [Fe/H](sub M92) approximately equals -2.2 dex) and ancient (age(sub UMi)approximately equalsage(sub M92) approximately equals 14 Gyr). The B - V reddening and the absorption in V are estimated to be E(B - V) = 0.03 +/- 0.01 mag and A(sup UMi, sub V) = 0.09 +/- 0.03 mag. A new estimate of the distance modulus of Ursa Minor, (m - M)(sup UMi, sub 0) = 19.18 +/- 0.12 mag, has been derived based on fiducial-sequence fitting M92 [DELTA.V(sub UMi - M92) = 4.60 +/- 0.03 mag and DELTA(V - I)(sub UMi - M92) = 0.010 +/- 0.005 mag] and the adoption of the apparent V distance modulus for M92 of (m - M)(sup M92, sub V) = 14.67 +/- 0.08 mag (Pont et al. 1998, A&A, 329, 87). The Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is then at a distance of 69 +/- 4 kpc from the Sun. These HST observations indicate that Ursa Minor has had a very simple star formation history consisting mainly of a single major burst of star formation about 14 Gyr ago which lasted approximately < 2 Gyr. While we may have missed minor younger stellar populations due to the small field-of-view of the WFPC2 instrument, these observations clearly show that most of the stars in the central region Ursa Minor dwarf

  19. The dark matter content of Local Group dwarf spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michelle; PAndAS Team

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most dark matter dominated objects we have observed in the Universe. By measuring the dynamics of their stellar populations, we can hope to map out the shapes of their central density profiles, and compare these to expectations from simulations. In this poster, we will present the central kinematics of a range of dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way and Andromeda, taken as part of the PAndAS Keck II DEIMOS survey. We will highlight a number of unusual objects, which have either very high mass to light ratios - indicating they may be promising candidates for indirect detection experiments - or those with exceptionally low central densities, whose kinematic profiles suggest that these systems are out of dynamical equilibrium.

  20. Structural analysis of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present wide-field g- and i-band stellar photometry of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its surrounding area out to four times its half-light radius (rh = 695 pc), based on images obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope at CTIO. We find clear evidence of stellar substructure associated with the galaxy, extending to a distance of 82 arcmin (2 kpc) from its centre. We perform a statistical analysis of the overdensities and find three distinct features, as well as an extended halo-like structure, to be significant at the 99.7 per cent confidence level or higher. Unlike the extremely elongated and extended substructures surrounding the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the overdensities seen around Sextans are distributed evenly about its centre, and do not appear to form noticeable tidal tails. Fitting a King model to the radial distribution of Sextans stars yields a tidal radius rt = 83.2 arcmin ± 7.1 arcmin (2.08 ± 0.18 kpc), which implies the majority of detected substructure is gravitationally bound to the galaxy. This finding suggests that Sextans is not undergoing significant tidal disruption from the Milky Way, supporting the scenario in which the orbit of Sextans has a low eccentricity.

  1. Dark matter annihilation and decay in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: the classical and ultrafaint dSphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnivard, V.; Combet, C.; Daniel, M.; Funk, S.; Geringer-Sameth, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Maurin, D.; Read, J. I.; Sarkar, S.; Walker, M. G.; Wilkinson, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are prime targets for present and future γ-ray telescopes hunting for indirect signals of particle dark matter. The interpretation of the data requires careful assessment of their dark matter content in order to derive robust constraints on candidate relic particles. Here, we use an optimized spherical Jeans analysis to reconstruct the `astrophysical factor' for both annihilating and decaying dark matter in 21 known dSphs. Improvements with respect to previous works are: (i) the use of more flexible luminosity and anisotropy profiles to minimize biases, (ii) the use of weak priors tailored on extensive sets of contamination-free mock data to improve the confidence intervals, (iii) systematic cross-checks of binned and unbinned analyses on mock and real data, and (iv) the use of mock data including stellar contamination to test the impact on reconstructed signals. Our analysis provides updated values for the dark matter content of 8 `classical' and 13 `ultrafaint' dSphs, with the quoted uncertainties directly linked to the sample size; the more flexible parametrization we use results in changes compared to previous calculations. This translates into our ranking of potentially-brightest and most robust targets - namely Ursa Minor, Draco, Sculptor - and of the more promising, but uncertain targets - namely Ursa Major 2, Coma - for annihilating dark matter. Our analysis of Segue 1 is extremely sensitive to whether we include or exclude a few marginal member stars, making this target one of the most uncertain. Our analysis illustrates challenges that will need to be addressed when inferring the dark matter content of new `ultrafaint' satellites that are beginning to be discovered in southern sky surveys.

  2. Why baryons matter: The kinematics of dwarf spheroidal satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Zolotov, Adi E-mail: zolotov@physics.huji.ac.il

    2014-05-10

    We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of Milky Way (MW) mass galaxies that include both baryons and dark matter (DM) to show that baryonic physics (energetic feedback from supernovae and subsequent tidal stripping) significantly reduces the DM mass in the central regions of luminous satellite galaxies. The reduced central masses of the simulated satellites reproduce the observed internal dynamics of MW and M31 satellites as a function of luminosity. We use these realistic satellites to update predictions for the observed velocity and luminosity functions of satellites around MW-mass galaxies when baryonic effects are accounted for. We also predict that field dwarf galaxies in the same luminosity range as the MW classical satellites should not exhibit velocities as low as the satellites because the field dwarfs do not experience tidal stripping. Additionally, the early formation times of the satellites compared to field galaxies at the same luminosity may be apparent in the star formation histories of the two populations. Including baryonic physics in cold dark matter (CDM) models naturally explains the observed low DM densities in the MWs dwarf spheroidal population. Our simulations therefore resolve the tension between kinematics predicted in CDM theory and observations of satellites, without invoking alternative forms of DM.

  3. Dark matter profiles and annihilation in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: prospectives for present and future γ-ray observatories - I. The classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnier, A.; Combet, C.; Daniel, M.; Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.; Maurin, D.; Power, C.; Read, J. I.; Sarkar, S.; Walker, M. G.; Wilkinson, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    Due to their large dynamical mass-to-light ratios, dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter (DM) in γ-rays. We examine their detectability by present and future γ-ray observatories. The key innovative features of our analysis are as follows: (i) we take into account the angular size of the dSphs; while nearby objects have higher γ-ray flux, their larger angular extent can make them less attractive targets for background-dominated instruments; (ii) we derive DM profiles and the astrophysical J-factor (which parametrizes the expected γ-ray flux, independently of the choice of DM particle model) for the classical dSphs directly from photometric and kinematic data. We assume very little about the DM profile, modelling this as a smooth split-power-law distribution, with and without subclumps; (iii) we use a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique to marginalize over unknown parameters and determine the sensitivity of our derived J-factors to both model and measurement uncertainties; and (iv) we use simulated DM profiles to demonstrate that our J-factor determinations recover the correct solution within our quoted uncertainties. Our key findings are as follows: (i) subclumps in the dSphs do not usefully boost the signal; (ii) the sensitivity of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to dSphs within ˜20 kpc with cored haloes can be up to ˜50 times worse than when estimated assuming them to be point-like. Even for the satellite-borne Fermi-Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT), the sensitivity is significantly degraded on the relevant angular scales for long exposures; hence, it is vital to consider the angular extent of the dSphs when selecting targets; (iii) no DM profile has been ruled out by current data, but using a prior on the inner DM cusp slope 0 ≤γprior≤ 1 provides J-factor estimates accurate to a factor of a few if an appropriate angular scale is chosen; (iv) the J-factor is best constrained at a critical

  4. The Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy - How dark is it?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Pryor, Carlton; Welch, Douglas L.; Fischer, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    Precise radial velocities obtained with a photon-counting echelle spectrograph for a sample of 17 red giants in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy are presented. The calculation of the systemic velocity and central velocity dispersion of Carina is described, the existing data constraining the structural parameters of Carina are reviewed, and an estimate of the central surface brightness of the galaxy is derived. These data are used to estimate the central mass density of Carina, as well as central and global mass-to-light ratios. It is concluded that the inferred mass densities and mass-density limits for all acceptable models imply the presence of a significant DM component in Carina. DM properties of all well-studied dSph systems are summarized and compared.

  5. The Origin of the Diversity of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revaz, Yves; Jablonka, Pascale

    2010-06-01

    We present a large sample of 166 fully self-consistent hydrodynamical N-body/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies [1]. It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. Using the recent data of the ESO Large Programme DART, we have constrained the star formation history of four Milky Way dSphs, Sextans, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax. For the first time, [Mg/Fe] vs [Fe/H] diagrams derived from high-resolution spectroscopy of hundreds of individual stars are confronted with model predictions. Global relations of dSph are successfully reproduced. Our study shows that the total initial mass of these systems is the main driver of their evolution and explains the diversity in luminosity and metallicity observed in the Local Group dSphs.

  6. The Abundance Spread in the Booetes I Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Gilmore, Gerard; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. Wyn; Zucker, Daniel B.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2008-12-20

    We present medium-resolution spectra of 16 radial velocity red-giant members of the low-luminosity Booetes I dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy that have sufficient S/N for abundance determination, based on the strength of the Ca II K line. Assuming [Ca/Fe] {approx} 0.3, the abundance range in the sample is {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.7 dex, with one star having [Fe/H] = -3.4. The dispersion is {sigma}([Fe/H]) = 0.45 {+-} 0.08-similar to those of the Galaxy's more luminous dSph systems and {omega} Centauri. This suggests that the large mass ({approx}>10{sup 7} M{sub sun}) normally assumed to foster self-enrichment and the production of chemical abundance spreads was provided by the nonbaryonic material in Booetes I.

  7. Indirect Dark Matter Detection in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies at VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucci, James; Finley, John P.; Zitzer, Ben

    2014-08-01

    Recent data and cosmological models point to a significant fraction of the Universe comprised of Cold Dark Matter (DM), though little is known about it directly. The most likely explanation for Dark Matter is a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) having a mass as low as 10 GeV to as high as 10 TeV. Many direct and indirect detection schemes have been proposed to search for the elusive particle. Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies (dSphs) orbiting the Milky Way Galaxy are suitable targets for indirect DM detection via gamma-rays because the ratio of their gravitational mass to luminous mass is high and their gamma-ray background from other astrophysical sources is low. We present preliminary results on the VERITAS observations of five dSphs. The thermally-averaged DM annihilation velocity-weighted cross-section can then computed from the gamma-ray flux upper limit.

  8. A novel multi-scale analysis to determine red giant branch metallicities of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Christopher Thomas

    , (U--R)0 color-magnitude diagram plane as a way to roughly calculate metallicities of red giant branches in old, metal poor, complex stellar populations. For MI = 0, -1, and -2, I produce histograms in a discrete multi-scale method to uncover blended sub-populations within the red giant branches. I use the massive globular cluster, o Centauri, as a test population to show the soundness of the method. Then the method is used to uncover a second possible sub-population in both the Draco and Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxies for the first time.

  9. Dark matter and gamma-rays from Draco: MAGIC, GLAST and CACTUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, Lars; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has long been considered likely to be one of the brightest point sources of gamma-rays generated through dark matter annihilations. Recent studies of this object have found that it remains largely intact from tidal striping, and may be more massive than previously thought. In this article, we revisit Draco as a source of dark matter annihilation radiation, with these new observational constraints in mind. We discuss the prospects for the experiments MAGIC and GLAST to detect dark matter in Draco, as well as constraints from the observations of EGRET. We also discuss the possibility that the CACTUS experiment has already detected gamma-rays from Draco. We find that it is difficult to generate the flux reported by CACTUS without resorting to non-thermally produced WIMPs and/or a density spike in Draco's dark matter distribution due to the presence of an intermediate mass black hole. We also find that for most annihilation modes, a positive detection of Draco by CACTUS would be inconsistent with the lack of events seen by EGRET.

  10. Dark matter and gamma rays from Draco: MAGIC, GLAST and CACTUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstroem, Lars; Hooper, Dan

    2006-03-15

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has long been considered likely to be one of the brightest point sources of gamma rays generated through dark matter annihilations. Recent studies of this object have found that it remains largely intact from tidal striping, and may be more massive than previously thought. In this article, we revisit Draco as a source of dark matter annihilation radiation, with these new observational constraints in mind. We discuss the prospects for the experiments MAGIC and GLAST to detect dark matter in Draco, as well as constraints from the observations of EGRET. We also discuss the possibility that the CACTUS experiment has already detected gamma rays from Draco. We find that it is difficult to generate the flux reported by CACTUS without resorting to nonthermally produced WIMPs and/or a density spike in Draco's dark matter distribution due to the presence of an intermediate mass black hole. We also find that for most annihilation modes, a positive detection of Draco by CACTUS would be inconsistent with the lack of events seen by EGRET.

  11. The dark matter halos of Draco and Ursa Minor

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, C.; Kormendy, J. Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria )

    1990-07-01

    Published density profiles and central velocity dispersions place important constraints on the stellar velocity ellipsoid and on the distribution of dark matter (DM) in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Draco and Ursa Minor. Central velocity dispersions of 9 km/s are adopted for Draco and 11 km/s for Ursa Minor. Then, for an isotropic stellar velocity distribution, the central DM densities are 0.8 and 1.0 solar mass/cu pc, respectively, if visible and dark matter have the same core radius. If DM has a much larger core radius than visible matter but nevertheless dominates the potential, these densities are reduced by a factor of 2. Central DM densities can be lower than this only if the stellar velocity distribution is anisotropic. Simple two-component King models are used to investigate this and to look for the smallest DM densities that are consistent with the observations. 36 refs.

  12. Search for Dark Matter Annihilations in Draco with CACTUS

    SciTech Connect

    Chertok, M.; Afonso, P.; Lizarazo, J.; Marleau, P.; Maruyama, S.; Stilley, J.; Tripathi, S. M.

    2006-07-11

    CACTUS is a ground-based Air Cherenkov Telescope (ACT) at the Solar 2 facility located near Barstow, California, and operated by UC Davis. It uses an array of 160 large solar tracking mirrors (heliostats) and a camera with 80 photomultiplier tubes, which, in a multiplexed fashion provides an effective camera with about 300 channels. By incorporating novel techniques of time projection imaging and triggering, CACTUS improves upon the first generation sampling arrays of its kind. We have recently completed observations of Draco, a dwarf spheroidal galaxy that is known to be rich in dark matter content. Supersymmetry-inspired models for dark matter predict observable annihilation rates producing gamma rays. We present the first results from our Draco campaign.

  13. METALS REMOVED BY OUTFLOWS FROM MILKY WAY DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Martin, Crystal L.; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-12-15

    The stars in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are significantly more metal-poor than would be expected from a closed box model of chemical evolution. Gas outflows likely carried away most of the metals produced by the dSphs. Based on previous Keck/DEIMOS observations and models, we calculate the mass in Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe expelled from each of eight dSphs. Essentially, these masses are the differences between the observed amount of metals present in the dSphs' stars today and the inferred amount of metals produced by supernovae. We conclude that the dSphs lost 96% to >99% of the metals their stars manufactured. We apply the observed mass function of Milky Way dSphs to the ejected mass function to determine that a single large dSph, like Fornax, lost more metals over 10 Gyr than all smaller dSphs combined. Therefore, small galaxies like dSphs are not significant contributors to the metal content of the intergalactic medium. Finally, we compare our ejected mass function to previous X-ray measurements of the metal content of the winds from the post-starburst dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569. Remarkably, the most recent starburst in that galaxy falls exactly on the ejected-mass-stellar-mass relation defined by the Milky Way dSphs.

  14. A spectroscopic binary in the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Hansen, Terese; Feltzing, Sofia; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    We present the radial velocity curve of a single-lined spectroscopic binary in the faint Hercules dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy, based on 34 individual spectra covering more than 2 yr of observations. This is the first time that orbital elements could be derived for a binary in a dSph. The system consists of a metal-poor red giant and a low-mass companion, possibly a white dwarf, with a 135 day period in a moderately eccentric (e = 0.18) orbit. Its period and eccentricity are fully consistent with metal-poor binaries in the Galactic halo, while the projected semimajor axis is small, at a{sub p} sin i = 38 R {sub ☉}. In fact, a very close orbit could inhibit the production of heavier elements through s-process nucleosynthesis, leading to the very low abundances of neutron-capture elements that are found in this star. We discuss the further implications for the chemical enrichment history of the Hercules dSph, but find no compelling binary scenario that could reasonably explain the full, peculiar abundance pattern of the Hercules dSph galaxy.

  15. STELLAR KINEMATICS OF THE ANDROMEDA II DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Nhung; Geha, M.; Tollerud, E.; Munoz, R. R.; Guhathakurta, P.; Gilbert, K. M.; Bullock, J.; Beaton, R. L.; Majewski, S. R. E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu

    2012-10-20

    We present kinematical profiles and metallicity for the M31 dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxy Andromeda II (And II) based on Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy of 531 red giant branch stars. Our kinematical sample is among the largest for any M31 satellite and extends out to two effective radii (r {sub eff} = 5.'3 = 1.1 kpc). We find a mean systemic velocity of -192.4 {+-} 0.5 km s{sup -1} and an average velocity dispersion of {sigma} {sub v} = 7.8 {+-} 1.1 km s{sup -1}. While the rotation velocity along the major axis of And II is nearly zero (<1 km s{sup -1}), the rotation along the minor axis is significant with a maximum rotational velocity of v {sub max} = 8.6 {+-} 1.8 km s{sup -1}. We find a kinematical major axis, with a maximum rotational velocity of v {sub max} = 10.9 {+-} 2.4 km s{sup -1}, misaligned by 67 Degree-Sign to the isophotal major axis. And II is thus the first dwarf galaxy with evidence for nearly prolate rotation with a v {sub max}/{sigma} {sub v} = 1.1, although given its ellipticity of {epsilon} = 0.10, this object may be triaxial. We measured metallicities for a subsample of our data, finding a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.39 {+-} 0.03 dex and an internal metallicity dispersion of 0.72 {+-} 0.03 dex. We find a radial metallicity gradient with metal-rich stars more centrally concentrated, but do not observe a significant difference in the dynamics of the two metallicity populations. And II is the only known dwarf galaxy to show minor axis rotation, making it a unique system whose existence offers important clues on the processes responsible for the formation of dSphs.

  16. TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES: ENHANCED TRANSFORMATION INTO DWARF SPHEROIDALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Mayer, Lucio

    2013-02-20

    According to the tidal stirring model, late type, rotationally supported dwarfs resembling present day dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies can transform into dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) via interactions with Milky-Way-sized hosts. We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate for the first time how tidal stirring depends on the dark matter (DM) density distribution in the central stellar region of the progenitor disky dwarf. Specifically, we explore various asymptotic inner slopes {gamma} of the dwarf DM density profiles ({rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{gamma}}). For a given orbit inside the primary galaxy, rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in DM halos with core-like distributions ({gamma} = 0.2) and mild density cusps ({gamma} = 0.6) demonstrate a substantially enhanced likelihood and efficiency of transformation into dSphs compared to their counterparts with steeper DM density profiles ({gamma} = 1). Such shallow DM distributions are akin to those of observed dIrrs highlighting tidal stirring as a plausible model for the Local Group (LG) morphology-density relation. When {gamma} < 1, a single pericentric passage can induce dSph formation and disky dwarfs on low-eccentricity or large-pericenter orbits are able to transform; these new results allow tidal stirring to explain virtually all known dSphs across a wide range of distances from their hosts. A subset of disky dwarfs initially embedded in DM halos with shallow density profiles are eventually disrupted by the primary; those that survive as dSphs are generally on orbits with lower eccentricities and/or larger pericenters compared to those of typical cold dark matter satellites. The latter could explain the peculiar orbits of several LG dSphs such as Fornax, Leo I, Tucana, and Cetus.

  17. A Deep Search for Extended Radio Continuum Emission from Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies: Implications for Particle Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkens, Kristine; Mason, Brian S.; Aguirre, James E.; Nhan, Bang

    2013-08-01

    We present deep radio observations of four nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, designed to detect extended synchrotron emission resulting from weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter annihilations in their halos. Models by Colafrancesco et al. (CPU07) predict the existence of angularly large, smoothly distributed radio halos in such systems, which stem from electron and positron annihilation products spiraling in a turbulent magnetic field. We map a total of 40.5 deg2 around the Draco, Ursa Major II, Coma Berenices, and Willman 1 dSphs with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 1.4 GHz to detect this annihilation signature, greatly reducing discrete-source confusion using the NVSS catalog. We achieve a sensitivity of σsub <~ 7 mJy beam-1 in our discrete source-subtracted maps, implying that the NVSS is highly effective at removing background sources from GBT maps. For Draco we obtained approximately concurrent Very Large Array observations to quantify the variability of the discrete source background, and find it to have a negligible effect on our results. We construct radial surface brightness profiles from each of the subtracted maps, and jackknife the data to quantify the significance of the features therein. At the ~10' resolution of our observations, foregrounds contribute a standard deviation of 1.8 mJy beam-1 <= σast <= 5.7 mJy beam-1 to our high-latitude maps, with the emission in Draco and Coma dominated by foregrounds. On the other hand, we find no significant emission in the Ursa Major II and Willman 1 fields, and explore the implications of non-detections in these fields for particle dark matter using the fiducial models of CPU07. For a WIMP mass M χ = 100 GeV annihilating into b\\bar{b} final states and B = 1 μG, upper limits on the annihilation cross-section for Ursa Major II and Willman I are log (langσvrangχ, cm3 s-1) <~ -25 for the preferred set of charged particle propagation parameters adopted by CPU07; this is comparable to

  18. The dynamical and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revaz, Y.; Jablonka, P.; Sawala, T.; Hill, V.; Letarte, B.; Irwin, M.; Battaglia, G.; Helmi, A.; Shetrone, M. D.; Tolstoy, E.; Venn, K. A.

    2009-07-01

    We present a large sample of fully self-consistent hydrodynamical Nbody/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. The initial total mass (gas + dark matter) of these galaxies is the main driver of their evolution. Star formation (SF) occurs in series of short bursts. In massive systems, the very short intervals between the SF peaks mimic a continuous star formation rate, while less massive systems exhibit well separated SF bursts, as identified observationally. The delay between the SF events is controlled by the gas cooling time dependence on galaxy mass. The observed global scaling relations, luminosity-mass and luminosity-metallicity, are reproduced with low scatter. We take advantage of the unprecedentedly large sample size and data homogeneity of the ESO Large Programme DART, and add to it a few independent studies, to constrain the star formation history of five Milky Way dSphs, Sextans, LeoII, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax. For the first time, [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams derived from high-resolution spectroscopy of hundreds of individual stars are confronted with model predictions. We find that the diversity in dSph properties may well result from intrinsic evolution. We note, however, that the presence of gas in the final state of our simulations, of the order of what is observed in dwarf irregulars, calls for removal by external processes. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. On the r-process Enrichment of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Recent observations of Reticulum II have uncovered an overabundance of r-process elements compared to similar ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UFDs). Because the metallicity and star formation history of Reticulum II appear consistent with all known UFDs, the high r-process abundance of Reticulum II suggests enrichment through a single, rare event, such as a double neutron star (NS) merger. However, we note that this scenario is extremely unlikely, as binary stellar evolution models require significant supernova natal kicks to produce NS–NS or NS–black hole (BH) mergers, and these kicks would efficiently remove compact binary systems from the weak gravitational potentials of UFDs. We examine alternative mechanisms for the production of r-process elements in UFDs, including a novel mechanism wherein NSs in regions of high dark matter (DM) density implode after accumulating a BH-forming mass of DM. We find that r-process proto-material ejection by tidal forces, when a single NS implodes into a BH, can occur at a rate matching the r-process abundance of both Reticulum II and the Milky Way. Remarkably, DM models which collapse a single NS in observed UFDs also solve the missing pulsar problem in the Milky Way Galactic Center. We propose tests specific to DM r-process production which may uncover or rule out this model.

  20. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies as degenerate gas of free fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Domcke, Valerie; Urbano, Alfredo E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a simple scenario in which Dark Matter (DM) consists of free fermions with mass m{sub f}. We assume that on galactic scales these fermions are capable of forming a degenerate Fermi gas, in which stability against gravitational collapse is ensured by the Pauli exclusion principle. The mass density of the resulting con figuration is governed by a non-relativistic Lane-Emden equation, thus leading to a universal cored profile that depends only on one free parameter in addition to m{sub f}. After reviewing the basic formalism, we test this scenario against experimental data describing the velocity dispersion of the eight classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Milky Way. We find that, despite its extreme simplicity, the model exhibits a good fit to the data and realistic predictions for the size of DM halos providing that m{sub f}≅ 200 eV. Furthermore, we show that in this setup larger galaxies correspond to the non-degenerate limit of the gas. We propose a concrete realization of this model in which DM is produced non-thermally via inflaton decay. We show that imposing the correct relic abundance and the bound on the free-streaming length constrains the inflation model in terms of inflaton mass, its branching ratio into DM and the reheating temperature.

  1. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Jing, Yi Peng

    2016-02-01

    Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW) dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH) has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH usinga simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe) as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass Mx of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of Mx depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = tsat. Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > tsat, part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  2. Comptonization of cosmic microwave background photons in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Evans, N. Wyn; Colafrancesco, S.

    2006-05-01

    We present theoretical modelling of the electron distribution produced by annihilating neutralino dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). In particular, we follow up the idea of Colafrancesco and find that such electrons distort the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For an assumed neutralino mass of 10 GeV and beam size of 1 arcsec, the SZ temperature decrement is of the order of nano-Kelvin for dSph models with a soft core. By contrast, it is of the order of micro-Kelvin for the strongly cusped dSph models favoured by some cosmological simulations. Although this is out of reach of current instruments, it may well be detectable by future mm telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimetre Array. We also show that the upscattered CMB photons have energies within reach of upcoming X-ray observatories, but that the flux of such photons is too small to be detectable now. None the less, we conclude that searching for the dark matter induced SZ effect is a promising way of constraining the dark distribution in dSphs, especially if the particles are light.

  3. Kinematics, structure and environment of three dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharina, M. E.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the environmental status of three low surface brightnessdwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) KKH65, KK180 and KK227 using the results of our long slitspectroscopic observations at the 6m telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences and surfacephotometry on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images.The objects were selected by Karachentseva in 2010 as presumably isolated galaxies.The obtained surface brightness profiles demonstrate that our sample dSphs are lesscentrally concentrated than the objects of the same morphological type in the Virgo cluster (VC).Using the derived kinematic data we searched for possible neighbours of the dSphs withinthe projected distances from them Rproj > 500 kpc and with the differences in radial velocities |Δ V| > 500 kms-1. We applied the group finding algorithm byMakarov and Karachentsev to the selected sample.Our analysis shows that the dwarf galaxies of our study are not isolated.KKH65 and KK227 belong to the groups NGC3414and NGC5371, respectively. KK180 is in the VC infall region. We conclude thatit is not possible at the moment to justify the existence of isolated dSphs outsidethe Local Volume. The searches are complicated due to the lack of the accuratedistances to the galaxies farther than 10 Mpc.

  4. On the r-process Enrichment of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Recent observations of Reticulum II have uncovered an overabundance of r-process elements compared to similar ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UFDs). Because the metallicity and star formation history of Reticulum II appear consistent with all known UFDs, the high r-process abundance of Reticulum II suggests enrichment through a single, rare event, such as a double neutron star (NS) merger. However, we note that this scenario is extremely unlikely, as binary stellar evolution models require significant supernova natal kicks to produce NS-NS or NS-black hole (BH) mergers, and these kicks would efficiently remove compact binary systems from the weak gravitational potentials of UFDs. We examine alternative mechanisms for the production of r-process elements in UFDs, including a novel mechanism wherein NSs in regions of high dark matter (DM) density implode after accumulating a BH-forming mass of DM. We find that r-process proto-material ejection by tidal forces, when a single NS implodes into a BH, can occur at a rate matching the r-process abundance of both Reticulum II and the Milky Way. Remarkably, DM models which collapse a single NS in observed UFDs also solve the missing pulsar problem in the Milky Way Galactic Center. We propose tests specific to DM r-process production which may uncover or rule out this model.

  5. An inefficient dwarf: chemical abundances and the evolution of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ural, Uğur; Cescutti, Gabriele; Koch, Andreas; Kleyna, Jan; Feltzing, Sofia; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2015-05-01

    We present detailed chemical element abundance ratios of 17 elements with eight ≤ Z ≤ 60 in three metal-poor stars in the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, which we combine with extant data from the literature to assess the predictions of a novel suite of galaxy chemical evolution models. The spectroscopic data were obtained with the Keck/High-Resolution Echelle Spectrograph instrument and revealed low metallicities of [Fe/H] = -2.12, -2.13 and -2.67 dex. While the most metal-poor star in our sample shows an overabundance of [Mn/Fe] and other Fe-peak elements, our overall findings are in agreement with previous studies of this galaxy: elevated values of the [α/Fe] ratios that are similar to, or only slightly lower than, the halo values but with SN Ia enrichment at very low metallicity, as well as an enhancement of the ratio of first to second peak neutron capture elements [Y/Ba] with decreasing metallicity. The chemical evolution models which were tailored to reproduce the metallicity distribution function of the dwarf spheroidal, indicate that Ursa Minor had an extended star formation which lasted nearly 5 Gyr with low efficiency and are able to explain the [Y/Ba] enhancement at low metallicity for the first time. In particular, we show that the present-day lack of gas is probably due to continuous loss of gas from the system, which we model as winds.

  6. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Mackey, A. D.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g- and i-band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct overdensity encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Boötes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Boötes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  7. Carbon in Red Giants in Globular Clusters and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Guo, Michelle; Zhang, Andrew J.; Deng, Michelle; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Lee, Young Sun; Rizzi, Luca

    2015-03-01

    We present carbon abundances of red giants in Milky Way (MW) globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our sample includes measurements of carbon abundances for 154 giants in the clusters NGC 2419, M68, and M15 and 398 giants in the dSphs Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Draco. This sample doubles the number of dSph stars with measurements of [C/Fe]. The [C/Fe] ratio in the clusters decreases with increasing luminosity above log (L/{{L}})≃ 1.6, which can be explained by deep mixing in evolved giants. The same decrease is observed in dSphs, but the initial [C/Fe] of the dSph giants is not uniform. Stars in dSphs at lower metallicities have larger [C/Fe] ratios. We hypothesize that [C/Fe] (corrected to the initial carbon abundance) declines with increasing [Fe/H] due to the metallicity dependence of the carbon yield of asymptotic giant branch stars and due to the increasing importance of SNe Ia at higher metallicities. We also identified 11 very carbon-rich giants (eight previously known) in three dSphs. However, our selection biases preclude a detailed comparison to the carbon-enhanced fraction of the MW stellar halo. Nonetheless, the stars with [C/Fe]\\lt +1 in dSphs follow a different [C/Fe] track with [Fe/H] than the halo stars. Specifically, [C/Fe] in dSphs begins to decline at lower [Fe/H] than in the halo. The difference in the metallicity of the [C/Fe] “knee” adds to the evidence from [α/Fe] distributions that the progenitors of the halo had a shorter timescale for chemical enrichment than the surviving dSphs. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  8. Sulphur in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Including NLTE corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skúladóttir, Á.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Tolstoy, E.; Hill, V.; Salvadori, S.; Korotin, S. A.; Pettini, M.

    2015-08-01

    In Galactic halo stars, sulphur has been shown to behave like other α-elements, but until now, no comprehensive studies have been done on this element in stars of other galaxies. Here, we use high-resolution ESO VLT/FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra to determine sulphur abundances for 85 stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, covering the metallicity range -2.5 ≤ [ Fe / H ] ≤ -0.8. The abundances are derived from the S I triplet at 9213, 9228, and 9238 Å. These lines have been shown to be sensitive to departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e. NLTE effects. Therefore, we present new NLTE corrections for a grid of stellar parameters covering those of the target stars. The NLTE-corrected sulphur abundances in Sculptor show the same behaviour as other α-elements in that galaxy (such as Mg, Si, and Ca). At lower metallicities ([ Fe / H ] ≲ -2) the abundances are consistent with a plateau at [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.16, similar to what is observed in the Galactic halo, [ S / Fe ] ≈ + 0.2. With increasing [Fe/H], the [S/Fe] ratio declines, reaching negative values at [ Fe / H ] ≳ -1.5. The sample also shows an increase in [S/Mg] with [Fe/H], most probably because of enrichment from Type Ia supernovae. Based on observations made with ESO/VLT/FLAMES at the La Silla Paranal observatory under program ID 089.B-0304(B).Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. A KINEMATIC STUDY OF THE ANDROMEDA DWARF SPHEROIDAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J.; Rich, R. Michael; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Penarrubia, Jorge; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2013-05-10

    We present a homogeneous kinematic analysis of red giant branch stars within 18 of the 28 Andromeda dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, obtained using the Keck I/LRIS and Keck II/DEIMOS spectrographs. Based on their g - i colors (taken with the CFHT/MegaCam imager), physical positions on the sky, and radial velocities, we assign probabilities of dSph membership to each observed star. Using this information, the velocity dispersions, central masses, and central densities of the dark matter halos are calculated for these objects, and compared with the properties of the Milky Way dSph population. We also measure the average metallicity ([Fe/H]) from the co-added spectra of member stars for each M31 dSph and find that they are consistent with the trend of decreasing [Fe/H] with luminosity observed in the Milky Way population. We find that three of our studied M31 dSphs appear as significant outliers in terms of their central velocity dispersion, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii ({approx}> 700 pc) and low velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub v} < 5 km s{sup -1}). In addition, And XXV has a mass-to-light ratio within its half-light radius of just [M/L]{sub half}=10.3{sup +7.0}{sub -6.7}, making it consistent with a simple stellar system with no appreciable dark matter component within its 1{sigma} uncertainties. We suggest that the structure of the dark matter halos of these outliers have been significantly altered by tides.

  10. Variable Stars in the Sextans Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Mario; Fischer, Philippe; Krzeminski, Wojtek

    1995-11-01

    We describe a survey for variable stars in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy based on the analysis of 113 B and 48 V CCD images of four fields covering a total area of 18' x 18'. We have identified 44 variables: 36 RR Lyr star, 6 anomalous Cepheids, one long-period red variable, all probable members of Sextans, and one foreground contact binary. We have used the pulsating stars to derive a true distance modulus of 19.67 +/- 0.15 for Sextans (or D = 86 +/-6 kpc), where the error is primarily due to uncertainties in the luminosity-metallicity relation for RR Lyr stars. Based on our new data we conclude that [Fe/H]_Sex_ = -1.6 +/- 0.2, somewhat higher than the value from Suntzeff et al. (ApJ, 418,208(1993)] obtained from the analysis of fiber spectroscopy of the near-IR Calcium triplet. We present a new deep color- magnitude diagram for Sextans which reveals the presence of a metal-poor population containing stars as young as 2-4 Gyr, consistent with the presence of anomalous Cepheids in the galaxy. This young population may represent as much as 25% of the total stellar content of Sextans. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the frequency of anomalous Cepheids in dSph galaxies and galaxian luminosity and speculate on the possible origin of this strange effect. The RR Lyr stars in Sextans do not exhibit the Oosterhoff dichotomy observed in globular clusters and in the Galactic halo field.

  11. Using Dwarf Spheroidal Satellites as Probes of Galaxy Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Abrar; Guhathakurta, P.; Gilbert, K. M.; Beaton, R. L.; Tollerud, E. J.; SPLASH Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    We present a Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic study of fifteen dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of the Andromeda galaxy. Our aim is to understand the properties of both the dSphs and Andromeda. Previously, detailed spectroscopic studies were carried out on six of these dSphs using smaller data sets, and limited spectroscopic studies were carried out on the remaining nine. The data sets analyzed in this research include more stars and higher quality data than those of previous studies. In order to accurately study the dSphs, we have developed a method that uses the stars’ velocities, metallicities, and projected distances from the center of each dSph to separate members from non-members of the dSphs. The resulting samples are expected to have a low fraction of contamination by non-members, which makes this method critical for all future studies of Andromeda dSphs. We calculate the mean radial velocities and velocity dispersions of the dSphs, and the new dSph velocity measurements are used to estimate Andromeda's dynamical mass. This mass estimate is more accurate than previous ones because it uses more dynamical tracers. The dSph-based mass estimate is corroborated by a different mass estimate based on the kinematics of Andromeda's field halo stars. This is the first time the mass of Andromeda has been calculated using its halo stars. Future steps will include calculating the dark matter content of the dSphs and comparing their chemical abundances to those of Andromeda's halo, which is made up of former dSphs. This research was supported by the Science Internship Program (SIP) at UCSC and the National Science Foundation.

  12. A UNIVERSAL MASS PROFILE FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Matthew G.; Penarrubia, Jorge; Evans, N. Wyn; Gilmore, Gerard; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2009-10-20

    We apply the Jeans equation to estimate masses for eight of the brightest dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. For Fornax, the dSph with the largest kinematic data set, we obtain a model-independent constraint on the maximum circular velocity, V {sub max} = 20{sup +4} {sub -3} km s{sup -1}. Although we obtain only lower limits of V {sub max} approx> 10 km s{sup -1} for the remaining dSphs, we find that in all cases the enclosed mass at the projected half-light radius is well constrained and robust to a wide range of halo models and velocity anisotropies. We derive a simple analytic formula that estimates M(r {sub half}) accurately with respect to results from the full Jeans analysis. Applying this formula to the entire population of Local Group dSphs with published kinematic data, we demonstrate a correlation such that M(r {sub half}) propor to r {sup 1.4+}-{sup 0.4} {sub half}, or in terms of the mean density interior to the half-light radius, (rho) propor to r {sup -1.6+}-{sup 0.4} {sub half}. This relation is driven by the fact that the dSph data exhibit a correlation between global velocity dispersion and half-light radius. We argue that tidal forces are unlikely to have introduced this relation, but tides may have increased the scatter and/or altered the slope. While the data are well described by mass profiles ranging over a factor of approx<2 in normalization (V {sub max} approx 10-20 km s{sup -1}), we consider the hypothesis that all dSphs are embedded within a 'universal' dark matter halo. We show that in addition to the power law M propor to r {sup 1.4}, viable candidates include a cuspy 'Navarro-Frenk-White' halo with V {sub max} approx 15 km s{sup -1} and scale radius r {sub 0} approx 800 pc, as well as a cored halo with V {sub max} approx 13 km s{sup -1} and r {sub 0} approx 150 pc. Finally, assuming that their measured velocity dispersions accurately reflect their masses, the smallest dSphs now allow us to resolve dSph densities at radii as small as a

  13. THE STELLAR STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES FORMED BY TIDAL STIRRING

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio; Callegari, Simone E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.ed

    2010-01-10

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we study the stellar properties of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies resulting from the tidally induced morphological transformation of disky dwarfs on a cosmologically motivated eccentric orbit around the Milky Way. The dwarf galaxy models initially consist of an exponential stellar disk embedded in an extended spherical dark matter halo. Depending on the initial orientation of the disk with respect to the orbital plane, different final configurations are obtained. The least evolved dwarf is triaxial and retains a significant amount of rotation. The more evolved dwarfs are prolate spheroids with little rotation. We show that in this scenario the final density distribution of stars can be approximated by a simple modification of the Plummer law. The kinematics of the dwarfs is significantly different depending on the line of sight which has important implications for mapping the observed stellar velocity dispersions of dwarfs to subhalo circular velocities. When the dwarfs are observed along the long axis, the measured velocity dispersion is higher and decreases faster with radius. In the case where rotation is significant, when viewed perpendicular to the long axis, the effect of minor axis rotation is detected, as expected for triaxial systems. We model the velocity dispersion profiles and rotation curves of the dwarfs under the assumption of constant mass-to-light ratio by solving the Jeans equations for spherical and axisymmetric systems and adjusting different sets of free parameters, including the total mass. We find that the mass is typically overestimated when the dwarf is seen along the long axis and underestimated when the observation is along the short or intermediate axis. For the studied cases, the effect of non-sphericity cannot, however, bias the inferred mass by more than 60% in either direction, even for the most strongly stripped dwarf which is close to disruption.

  14. Dark Matter Searches with the Fermi-LAT in the Direction of Dwarf Spheroidals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Matthew; Anderson, Brandon; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Conrad, Jan

    2015-07-13

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are some of the most dark-matter-dominated objects known. Due to their proximity, high dark matter content, and lack of astrophysical backgrounds, dwarf spheroidal galaxies are widely considered to be among the most promising targets for the indirect detection of dark matter via gamma rays. Here we report on gamma-ray observations of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies based on 6 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass 8 reconstruction and event-level analysis. None of the dwarf galaxies are significantly detected in gamma rays, and we present upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of the 15 most promising dwarf galaxies. The constraints derived are among the strongest to date using gamma rays, and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for WIMPs of mass ≲ 100GeV annihilating via the bb-bar and τ⁺τ⁻ channels.

  15. The Elusive Old Population of the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo I.

    PubMed

    Held; Saviane; Momany; Carraro

    2000-02-20

    We report the discovery of a significant old population in the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy Leo I as a result of a wide-area search with the ESO New Technology Telescope. Studies of the stellar content of Local Group dwarf galaxies have shown the presence of an old stellar population in almost all of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The only exception was Leo I, which alone appeared to have delayed its initial star formation episode until just a few gigayears ago. The color-magnitude diagram of Leo I now reveals an extended horizontal branch, unambiguously indicating the presence of an old, metal-poor population in the outer regions of this galaxy. Yet we find little evidence for a stellar population gradient, at least outside R>2' (0.16 kpc), since the old horizontal branch stars of Leo I are radially distributed as their more numerous intermediate-age helium-burning counterparts. The discovery of a definitely old population in the predominantly young dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo I points to a sharply defined first epoch of star formation common to all of the Local Group dSph galaxies as well as to the halo of the Milky Way.

  16. Dark matter annihilation in Draco: New considerations of the expected gamma flux

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, M. A.; Prada, F.; Moles, M.; Lokas, E. L.; Wojtak, R.; Gomez, M. E.

    2007-12-15

    A new revision of the gamma flux that we expect to detect in imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes from neutralino annihilation in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy is presented in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard models compatible with the present phenomenological and cosmological constraints, and using the dark matter density profiles compatible with the latest observations. This revision also takes into account the important effect of the point spread function of the telescope, and is valid not only for Draco but also for any other dark matter target. We show that this effect is crucial in the way we will observe and interpret a possible signal detection. Finally, we discuss the prospects to detect a possible gamma signal from Draco for current or planned gamma-ray experiments, i.e., MAGIC, GLAST, and GAW. Even with the large astrophysical and particle physics uncertainties we find that the chances to detect a neutralino annihilation signal in Draco seem to be very scarce for current experiments. However, the prospects for future imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes with upgraded performances (especially lower threshold energies and higher sensitivities) such as those offered by the Cherenkov Telescope Array project, might be substantially better.

  17. Small-scale hero: Massive-star enrichment in the Hercules dwarf spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Matteucci, Francesca; Feltzing, Sofia

    2012-09-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are often conjectured to be the sites of the first stars. The best current contenders for finding the chemical imprints from the enrichment by those massive objects are the ``ultrafaint dwarfs'' (UFDs). Here we present evidence for remarkably low heavy element abundances in the metal poor Hercules UFD. Combined with other peculiar abundance patterns this indicates that Hercules was likely only influenced by very few, massive explosive events - thus bearing the traces of an early, localized chemical enrichment with only very little other contributions from other sources at later times.

  18. Leo I - The youngest Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxy?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Myung G.; Freedman, Wendy; Mateo, Mario; Thompson, Ian; Roth, Miguel; Ruiz, Maria-Teresa

    1993-01-01

    Deep CCD photometry of about 16,000 stars in the Milky Way's Leo I spheroidal galaxy satellite is reported. An account is given of the features observed in the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) derived therefrom. A very blue and well-defined red giant branch (RGB) is noted. The CMDs of Leo I shows about 50 anomalous Cepheid candidates; there are another 50 or so asymptotic giant branch stars above the tip of the RGB, including 15 known carbon stars. The mean color of the RGB is estimated at M sub I = -3.5 mag.

  19. Homogeneous Photometry VI: Variable Stars in the Leo I Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Peter B.; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Bono, Giuseppe; Bernard, Edouard J.; Monelli, Matteo; Iannicola, Giacinto; Gallart, Carme; Ferraro, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    From archival ground-based images of the Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy, we have identified and characterized the pulsation properties of 164 candidate RR Lyrae variables and 55 candidate anomalous and/or short-period Cepheids. We have also identified 19 candidate long-period variable stars and 13 other candidate variables whose physical nature is unclear, but due to the limitations of our observational material we are unable to estimate reliable periods for them. On the basis of its RR Lyrae star population, Leo I is confirmed to be an Oosterhoff-intermediate type galaxy, like several other dwarf spheroidals. From the RR Lyrae stars we have derived a range of possible distance moduli for Leo I : 22.06 ± 0.08 lsim μ0 lsim 22.25 ± 0.07 mag depending on the metallicity assumed for the old population ([Fe/H] from -1.43 to -2.15). This is in agreement with previous independent estimates. We show that in their pulsation properties, the RR Lyrae stars—representing the oldest stellar population in the galaxy—are not significantly different from those of five other nearby, isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies. A similar result is obtained when comparing them to RR Lyrae stars in recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We are able to compare the period distributions and period-amplitude relations for a statistically significant sample of ab-type RR Lyrae stars in dwarf galaxies (~1300 stars) with those in the Galactic halo field (~14,000 stars) and globular clusters (~1000 stars). Field RRLs show a significant change in their period distribution when moving from the inner (dG lsim 14 kpc) to the outer (dG gsim 14 kpc) halo regions. This suggests that the halo formed from (at least) two dissimilar progenitors or types of progenitor. Considered together, the RR Lyrae stars in classical dwarf spheroidal and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies—as observed today—do not appear to follow the well defined pulsation properties shown by those in either the inner or the outer

  20. Constraining self-interacting dark matter with the Milky Way's dwarf spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, Jesús; Vogelsberger, Mark; Walker, Matthew G.

    2013-04-01

    Self-interacting dark matter is an attractive alternative to the cold dark matter paradigm only if it is able to substantially reduce the central densities of dwarf-size haloes while keeping the densities and shapes of cluster-size haloes within current constraints. Given the seemingly stringent nature of the latter, it was thought for nearly a decade that self-interacting dark matter would be viable only if the cross-section for self-scattering was strongly velocity dependent. However, it has recently been suggested that a constant cross-section per unit mass of σT/m ˜ 0.1 cm2 g-1 is sufficient to accomplish the desired effect. We explicitly investigate this claim using high-resolution cosmological simulations of a Milky Way-size halo and find that, similarly to the cold dark matter case, such cross-section produces a population of massive subhaloes that is inconsistent with the kinematics of the classical dwarf spheroidals, in particular with the inferred slopes of the mass profiles of Fornax and Sculptor. This problem is resolved if σT/m ˜ 1 cm2 g-1 at the dwarf spheroidal scales. Since this value is likely inconsistent with the halo shapes of several clusters, our results leave only a small window open for a velocity-independent self-interacting dark matter model to work as a distinct alternative to cold dark matter.

  1. Searching for Tidal Tails in Galactic Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, David; Aparicio, A.; Gomez-Flechoso, Maria A.

    The formation of the Galactic halo is currently best explained by the combination of two scenarios which previously were regarded as competing models. Based on the kinematics of metal-poor halo field stars, Eggen, Lynden-Bell & Sandage (ELS, 1962) proposed that the halo formed during a rapid, smooth collapse from a homogeneous primordial medium. Searle & Zinn (SZ, 1978) argued a halo formation via the gradual merging of many sub-galactic fragments. The SZ scenario has been strengthened by the observational evidence accumulated during the past decade. The discovery of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Ibata, Gilmore & Irwin 1994), in a process of dissolving into the Galactic halo, argued in favour that accretion events can take place in the Milky Way. The possibility that accretion events may leave observable fossil records in the halo is also supported by theoretical models of tidally disrupted dSph satellites (Johnston, Spergel & Hernquist 1995; Oh, Lin & Aarseth 1995; Piatek & Pryor 1995). We present our preliminary results of a long-term project to investigate the process of accretion and tidal disruption of dSph satellites in the Galactic halo and, in particular, to search for new tidal tails in a sample of nearby dSph satellites of the Milky Way. The presence of a possible tidal debris in Ursa Minor and Sculptor dSphs and the results of our survey for a tidal extension along the NW semimajor axis of Saggitarius is discussed.

  2. The DART imaging and CaT survey of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M. J.; Letarte, B.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Venn, K. A.; Shetrone, M. D.; Arimoto, N.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Francois, P.; Szeifert, T.; Abel, T.; Sadakane, K.

    2006-11-01

    Aims.As part of the DART project we have used the ESO/2.2m Wide Field Imager in conjunction with the VLT/FLAMES GIRAFFE spectrograph to study the detailed properties of the resolved stellar population of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy out to and beyond its tidal radius. Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy has had a complicated evolution and contains significant numbers of young, intermediate age and old stars. We investigate the relation between these different components by studying their photometric, kinematic and abundance distributions. Methods: . We re-derived the structural parameters of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal using our wide field imaging covering the galaxy out to its tidal radius, and analysed the spatial distribution of the Fornax stars of different ages as selected from colour-magnitude diagram analysis. We have obtained accurate velocities and metallicities from spectra in the Ca II triplet wavelength region for 562 Red Giant Branch stars which have velocities consistent with membership of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal. Results: .We have found evidence for the presence of at least three distinct stellar components: a young population (few 100 Myr old) concentrated in the centre of the galaxy, visible as a Main Sequence in the colour-magnitude diagram; an intermediate age population (2-8 Gyr old); and an ancient population (>10 Gyr), which are distinguishable from each other kinematically, from the metallicity distribution and in the spatial distribution of stars found in the colour-magnitude diagram. Conclusions: . From our spectroscopic analysis we find that the "metal rich" stars ([Fe/H]> -1.3) show a less extended and more concentrated spatial distribution, and display colder kinematics than the "metal poor" stars ([Fe/H]<-1.3). There is tentative evidence that the ancient stellar population in the centre of Fornax does not exhibit equilibrium kinematics. This could be a sign of a relatively recent accretion of external material, such as the merger

  3. Effect of black holes in local dwarf spheroidal galaxies on gamma-ray constraints on dark matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2014-11-01

    Recent discoveries of optical signatures of black holes in dwarf galaxies indicates that low-mass galaxies can indeed host intermediate massive black holes. This motivates the assessment of the resulting effect on the host dark matter density profile, and the consequences for the constraints on the plane of the dark matter annihilation cross section versus mass, stemming from the nonobservation of gamma rays from local dwarf spheroidals with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We compute the density profile using three different prescriptions for the black hole mass associated with a given spheroidal galaxy, and taking into account the cutoff to the density from dark matter pair-annihilation. We find that the limits on the dark matter annihilation rate from observations of individual dwarfs are enhanced by factors of a few up to 1 06 , depending on the specific galaxy, on the black hole mass prescription, and on the dark matter particle mass. We estimate limits from combined observations of a sample of 15 dwarfs, for a variety of assumptions on the dwarf black hole mass and on the dark matter density profile prior to adiabatic contraction. We find that if black holes are indeed present in local dwarf spheroidals, then, independent of assumptions, (i) the dark matter interpretation of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess would be conclusively ruled out, (ii) wino dark matter would be excluded up to masses of about 3 TeV, and (iii) vanilla thermal relic weakly interacting massive particles must be heavier than 100 GeV.

  4. Evidence for dwarf stars at D of about 100 kiloparsecs near the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Richstone, Douglas; Flynn, Chris

    1992-04-01

    A method is presented for detecting individual, metal-poor, dwarf stars at distances less than about 150 kpc - a method specifically designed to filter out stars from among the much more numerous faint background field galaxies on the basis of broad-band colors. This technique is applied to two fields at high Galactic latitude, for which there are deep CCD data in four bands ranging from 3600 to 9000 A. The field in Sextans probably contains more than about five dwarf stars with BJ not greater than 25.5. These are consistent with being at a common distance about 100 kpc and lie about 1.7 deg from the newly discovered dwarf galaxy in Sextans whose distance is about 85 +/- 10 kpc. The stars lie near the major axis of the galaxy and are near or beyond the tidal radius. The second field, toward the south Galactic pole, may contain up to about five extra-Galactic stars, but these show no evidence for being at a common distance. Possible applications of this type technique are discussed, and it is shown that even very low surface brightness star clusters or dwarf galaxies may be detected at distances less than about 1 Mpc.

  5. Evidence for dwarf stars at D of about 100 kiloparsecs near the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Richstone, Douglas; Flynn, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for detecting individual, metal-poor, dwarf stars at distances less than about 150 kpc - a method specifically designed to filter out stars from among the much more numerous faint background field galaxies on the basis of broad-band colors. This technique is applied to two fields at high Galactic latitude, for which there are deep CCD data in four bands ranging from 3600 to 9000 A. The field in Sextans probably contains more than about five dwarf stars with BJ not greater than 25.5. These are consistent with being at a common distance about 100 kpc and lie about 1.7 deg from the newly discovered dwarf galaxy in Sextans whose distance is about 85 +/- 10 kpc. The stars lie near the major axis of the galaxy and are near or beyond the tidal radius. The second field, toward the south Galactic pole, may contain up to about five extra-Galactic stars, but these show no evidence for being at a common distance. Possible applications of this type technique are discussed, and it is shown that even very low surface brightness star clusters or dwarf galaxies may be detected at distances less than about 1 Mpc.

  6. WEAK GALACTIC HALO-DWARF SPHEROIDAL CONNECTION FROM RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentino, Giuliana; Bono, Giuseppe; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Martínez-Vásquez, Clara E.; Tolstoy, Eline; Salaris, Maurizio; Bernard, Edouard J.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role that dwarf galaxies may have played in the formation of the Galactic halo (Halo) using RR Lyrae stars (RRL) as tracers of their ancient stellar component. The comparison is performed using two observables (periods, luminosity amplitudes) that are reddening and distance independent. Fundamental mode RRL in 6 dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) and 11 ultra faint dwarf galaxies (∼1300) show a Gaussian period distribution well peaked around a mean period of (Pab) = 0.610 ± 0.001 days (σ = 0.03). The Halo RRL (∼15,000) are characterized by a broader period distribution. The fundamental mode RRL in all the dSphs apart from Sagittarius are completely lacking in High Amplitude Short Period (HASP) variables, defined as those having P ≲ 0.48 days and A{sub V} ≥ 0.75 mag. Such variables are not uncommon in the Halo and among the globular clusters and massive dwarf irregulars. To further interpret this evidence, we considered 18 globulars covering a broad range in metallicity (–2.3 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ –1.1) and hosting more than 35 RRL each. The metallicity turns out to be the main parameter, since only globulars more metal-rich than [Fe/H] ∼ –1.5 host RRL in the HASP region. This finding suggests that dSphs similar to the surviving ones do not appear to be the major building-blocks of the Halo. Leading physical arguments suggest an extreme upper limit of ∼50% to their contribution. On the other hand, massive dwarfs hosting an old population with a broad metallicity distribution (Large Magellanic Cloud, Sagittarius) may have played a primary role in the formation of the Halo.

  7. INTERGALACTIC GAS IN GROUPS OF GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL FORMATION AND THE MISSING BARYONS PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Freeland, E.; Wilcots, E. E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu

    2011-09-10

    Radio galaxies with bent jets are predominantly located in groups and clusters of galaxies. We use bent-double radio sources, under the assumption that their jets are bent by ram pressure, to probe intragroup medium (IGM) gas densities in galaxy groups. This method provides a direct measurement of the intergalactic gas density and allows us to probe intergalactic gas at large radii and in systems whose IGM is too cool to be detected by the current generation of X-ray telescopes. We find gas with densities of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} at group radii from 15 to 700 kpc. A rough estimate of the total baryonic mass in intergalactic gas is consistent with the missing baryons being located in the IGM of galaxy groups. The neutral gas will be easily stripped from dwarf galaxies with total masses of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun} in the groups studied here. Indications are that intragroup gas densities in less-massive systems like the Local Group should be high enough to strip gas from dwarfs like Leo T and, in combination with tides, produce dwarf spheroidals.

  8. The DART Imaging And CaT Survey of the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Giuseppina; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M.J.; Letarte, B.; Jablonka, P.; Hill, V.; Venn, K.A.; Shetrone, M.D.; Arimoto, N.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Francois, P.; Szeifert, T.; Abel, T.; Sadakane, K.; /Osaka Kyoiku U.

    2006-08-28

    As part of the DART project we have used the ESO/2.2m Wide Field Imager in conjunction with the VLT/FLAMES* GIRAFFE spectrograph to study the detailed properties of the resolved stellar population of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy out to and beyond its tidal radius. Fornax dSph has had a complicated evolution and contains significant numbers of young, intermediate age and old stars. We investigate the relation between these different components by studying their photometric, kinematic and abundance distributions. We re-derived the structural parameters of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal using our wide field imaging covering the galaxy out to its tidal radius, and analyzed the spatial distribution of the Fornax stars of different ages as selected from Colour-Magnitude Diagram analysis. We have obtained accurate velocities and metallicities from spectra in the Ca II triplet wavelength region for 562 Red Giant Branch stars which have velocities consistent with membership in Fornax dwarf spheroidal. We have found evidence for the presence of at least three distinct stellar components: a young population (few 100 Myr old) concentrated in the center of the galaxy, visible as a Main Sequence in the Colour-Magnitude Diagram; an intermediate age population (2-8 Gyr old); and an ancient population (> 10Gyr), which are distinguishable from each other kinematically, from the metallicity distribution and in the spatial distribution of stars found in the Colour-Magnitude Diagram. From our spectroscopic analysis we find that the ''metal rich'' stars ([Fe/H] > -1.3) show a less extended and more concentrated spatial distribution, and display a colder kinematics than the ''metal poor'' stars ([Fe/H] < -1.3). There is tentative evidence that the ancient stellar population in the center of Fornax does not exhibit equilibrium kinematics. This could be a sign of a relatively recent accretion of external material, such as the merger of another galaxy or other means of gas accretion at

  9. VLT/FLAMES spectroscopy of red giant branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasle, B.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Venn, K.; Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; François, P.; Helmi, A.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Szeifert, T.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Fornax is one of the most massive dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. The Fornax field star population is dominated by intermediate age stars but star formation was going on over almost its entire history. It has been proposed that Fornax experienced a minor merger event. Aims: Despite recent progress, only the high metallicity end of Fornax field stars ([Fe/H] > -1.2 dex) has been sampled in larger number via high resolution spectroscopy. We want to better understand the full chemical evolution of this galaxy by better sampling the whole metallicity range, including more metal poor stars. Methods: We use the VLT-FLAMES multi-fibre spectrograph in high-resolution mode to determine the abundances of several α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements in a sample of 47 individual red giant branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We combine these abundances with accurate age estimates derived from the age probability distribution from the colour-magnitude diagram of Fornax. Results: Similar to other dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the old, metal-poor stars of Fornax are typically α-rich while the young metal-rich stars are α-poor. In the classical scenario of the time delay between Type II (SNe II) and Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia), we confirm that SNe Ia started to contribute to the chemical enrichment at [Fe/H] between -2.0 and -1.8 dex. We find that the onset of SNe Ia took place between 12-10 Gyr ago. The high values of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] reflect the influence of SNe Ia and AGB stars in the abundance pattern of the younger stellar population of Fornax. Conclusions: Our findings of low [α/Fe] and enhanced [Eu/Mg] are compatible with an initial mass function that lacks the most massive stars and with star formation that kept going on throughout the whole history of Fornax. We find that massive stars kept enriching the interstellar medium in α-elements, although they were not the main contributor to the iron enrichment. Based on FLAMES

  10. Search for dark matter annihilation signatures in H.E.S.S. observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goudelis, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadsch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Serpico, P.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spieß, F.; Stawarz, L.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group are close satellites of the Milky Way characterized by a large mass-to-light ratio and are not expected to be the site of nonthermal high-energy gamma-ray emission or intense star formation. Therefore they are among the most promising candidates for indirect dark matter searches. During the last years the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes observed five of these dwarf galaxies for more than 140 hours in total, searching for TeV gamma-ray emission from annihilation of dark matter particles. The new results of the deep exposure of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, the first observations of the Coma Berenices and Fornax dwarves and the reanalysis of two more dwarf spheroidal galaxies already published by the H.E.S.S. Collaboration, Carina and Sculptor, are presented. In the absence of a significant signal new constraints on the annihilation cross section applicable to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are derived by combining the observations of the five dwarf galaxies. The combined exclusion limit depends on the WIMP mass and the best constraint is reached at 1-2 TeV masses with a cross-section upper bound of ˜ 3.9 ×10-24 cm3 s-1 at a 95% confidence level.

  11. Faint and soft X-ray binaries in three dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina

    2007-10-01

    We propose to observe three nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) companions of the Milky Way. These galaxies host old populations with little or no contamination of recent star formation, and appear to have a huge dark matter content. They are the ideal Rosetta stones to probe theories of X-ray binary formation, type Ia progenitors evolution, and dark matter halos.Recent observations of four other dSph with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revealed a large number of X-ray sources in the fields, effected by small column density of neutral hydrogen N(H).Using deep optical and UV images, archival HST and GALEX exposures, and later spectroscopic follow-up, we will be able to determine the nature of the sources and whether they belong to the galactic populations.

  12. Dark matter annihilation factors in the Milky Way’s dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnivard, V.; Combet, C.; Maurin, D.; Walker, M. G.; Geringer-Sameth, A.

    2016-05-01

    The Milky Way’s dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are among the best targets for the indirect detection of dark matter (DM) with γ-rays. The expected gamma-ray flux depends on the so-called ‘J-factor’, the integral of the squared DM density along the line-of-sight. Using a large number of simulated dSphs, we have defined an optimized Jeans analysis setup for the reconstruction of the DM density with stellar-kinematic data. Employing this setup, we provide here estimates of astrophysical J-factors for twenty-two Galactic dSphs, including the newly discovered Reticulum II. We finally identify several criteria that may indicate a contamination of a kinematic dataset by interlopers, leading to unreliable J-factors. We find that the kinematic sample of Segue I, one of the closest dSph, might be affected by this issue.

  13. Dark Matter Annihilation and Decay Profiles for the Reticulum II Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnivard, Vincent; Combet, Céline; Maurin, David; Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Bailey, John I., III

    2015-08-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph) of the Milky Way are among the most attractive targets for indirect searches of dark matter (DM). In this work, we reconstruct the DM annihilation (J-factor) and decay profiles for the newly discovered dSph Reticulum II. Using an optimized spherical Jeans analysis of kinematic data obtained from the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System, we find Reticulum II’s J-factor to be among the largest of any Milky Way dSph. We have checked the robustness of this result against several ingredients of the analysis. Unless it suffers from tidal disruption or significant inflation of its velocity dispersion from binary stars, Reticulum II may provide a unique window on DM particle properties.

  14. Internal kinematics and dynamical models of dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Giuseppina; Helmi, Amina; Breddels, Maarten

    2013-09-01

    We review our current understanding of the internal dynamical properties of the dwarf spheroidal galaxies surrounding the Milky Way. These are the most dark matter dominated galaxies, and as such may be considered ideal laboratories to test the current concordance cosmological model, and in particular provide constraints on the nature of the dominant form of dark matter. We discuss the latest observations of the kinematics of stars in these systems, and how these may be used to derive their mass distribution. We tour through the various dynamical techniques used, with emphasis on the complementarity and limitations, and discuss what the results imply also in the context of cosmological models. Finally we provide an outlook on exciting developments in this field.

  15. Revisiting the Age-Metallicity Relationship of the Fornax spheroidal dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; del Pino, A.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S.

    We present results about the Age-Metallicity Relationship (AMR) of three fields located in the central region of the spheroidal dwarf galaxy of Fornax; from the birth of the galaxy until 1 Gyr ago; independent of any other previous approach. The resulting AMRs describe the trend of the representative stellar populations in each field; namely; the dominant populations in terms of stellar density. Our results suggest that the innermost regions of Fornax does not contain very old stars (age 12 Gyr); whereas the studied outer fields do not account for star field populations younger than 3 Gyr. On the other side; the AMRs of two fields show possible metallicity bimodality during the first half of the galaxy lifetime. However; more recent star formation processes (age 1-2 Gyr) result in a intrinsic metallicity dispersion smaller than for relatively older generations of stars.

  16. Observations of MilkyWay Dwarf Spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi-LAT detector and

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /INFN, Pisa /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /IASF, Milan /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard

    2010-05-26

    We report on the observations of 14 dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope taken during the first 11 months of survey mode operations. The Fermi telescope, which is conducting an all-sky {gamma}-ray survey in the 20 MeV to >300 GeV energy range, provides a new opportunity to test particle dark matter models through the expected {gamma}-ray emission produced by pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the largest galactic substructures predicted by the cold dark matter scenario, are attractive targets for such indirect searches for dark matter because they are nearby and among the most extreme dark matter dominated environments. No significant {gamma}-ray emission was detected above 100 MeV from the candidate dwarf galaxies. We determine upper limits to the {gamma}-ray flux assuming both power-law spectra and representative spectra from WIMP annihilation. The resulting integral flux above 100 MeV is constrained to be at a level below around 10{sup -9} photons cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Using recent stellar kinematic data, the {gamma}-ray flux limits are combined with improved determinations of the dark matter density profile in 8 of the 14 candidate dwarfs to place limits on the pair annihilation cross-section ofWIMPs in several widely studied extensions of the standard model, including its supersymmetric extension and other models that received recent attention. With the present data, we are able to rule out large parts of the parameter space where the thermal relic density is below the observed cosmological dark matter density and WIMPs (neutralinos here) are dominantly produced non-thermally, e.g. in models where supersymmetry breaking occurs via anomaly mediation. The {gamma}-ray limits presented here also constrain some WIMP models proposed to explain the Fermi and PAMELA e{sup +}e{sup -} data, including low-mass wino-like neutralinos and models with TeV masses pair

  17. Discovery of true, likely and possible symbiotic stars in the dwarf spheroidal NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Denise R.; Magrini, Laura; de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; Akras, Stavros

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the photometric and spectroscopic observations of newly discovered (symbiotic) systems in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy NGC 205. The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on-off band [O III] 5007 Å emission imaging highlighted several [O III] line emitters, for which optical spectra were then obtained. The detailed study of the spectra of three objects allows us to identify them as true, likely and possible symbiotic systems (SySts), the first ones discovered in this galaxy. SySt-1 is unambiguously classified as a symbiotic star, because of the presence of unique emission lines which belong only to symbiotic spectra, the well-known O VI Raman-scattered lines. SySt-2 is only possibly a SySt because the Ne VII Raman-scattered line at 4881 Å, recently identified in a well-studied Galactic symbiotic as another very conspicuous property of symbiotic, could as well be identified as N III or [Fe III]. Finally, SySt-3 is likely a symbiotic binary because in the red part of the spectrum it shows the continuum of a late giant, and forbidden lines of moderate to high ionization, like [Fe V] 4180 Å. The main source for scepticism on the symbiotic nature of the latter systems is their location in the planetary nebula region in the [O III]4363/Hγ versus [O III]5007/Hβ diagnostic diagram. It is worth mentioning that at least another two confirmed symbiotics, one of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal IC 10 and the other of the Galaxy, are also misplaced in this diagram.

  18. The interstellar medium in Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal galaxies - I. Content and origin of the interstellar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Fritz, Jacopo; Boquien, Médéric; Cormier, Diane; Gentile, Gianfranco; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Young, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are among the most numerous galaxy population in the Universe, but their main formation and evolution channels are still not well understood. The three dwarf spheroidal satellites (NGC 147, NGC 185, and NGC 205) of the Andromeda galaxy are characterized by very different interstellar medium properties, which might suggest them being at different galaxy evolutionary stages. While the dust content of NGC 205 has been studied in detail in an earlier work, we present new Herschel dust continuum observations of NGC 147 and NGC 185. The non-detection of NGC 147 in Herschel SPIRE maps puts a strong constraint on its dust mass (≤128^{+124}_{-68} M⊙). For NGC 185, we derive a total dust mass Md = 5.1±1.0 × 103 M⊙, which is a factor of ˜2-3 higher than that derived from ISO and Spitzer observations and confirms the need for longer wavelength observations to trace more massive cold dust reservoirs. We, furthermore, estimate the dust production by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and supernovae (SNe). For NGC 147, the upper limit on the dust mass is consistent with expectations of the material injected by the evolved stellar population. In NGC 185 and NGC 205, the observed dust content is one order of magnitude higher compared to the estimated dust production by AGBs and SNe. Efficient grain growth, and potentially longer dust survival times (3-6 Gyr) are required to account for their current dust content. Our study confirms the importance of grain growth in the gas phase to account for the current dust reservoir in galaxies.

  19. Carbon and nitrogen abundances of individual stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardo, C.; Battaglia, G.; Pancino, E.; Romano, D.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Starkenburg, E.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Tosi, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] abundance ratios and CH(λ4300) and S(λ3883) index measurements for 94 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy from VLT/VIMOS MOS observations at a resolving power R = 1150 at 4020 Å. This is the first time that [N/Fe] abundances are derived for a large number of stars in a dwarf spheroidal. We found a trend for the [C/Fe] abundance to decrease with increasing luminosity on the RGB across the whole metallicity range, a phenomenon observed in both field and globular cluster giants, which can be interpreted in the framework of evolutionary mixing of partially processed CNO material. Both our measurements of [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for stars at similar luminosity and metallicity. We detected a dispersion in the carbon abundance at a given [Fe/H], which cannot be ascribed to measurement uncertainties alone. We interpret this observational evidence as the result of the contribution of different nucleosynthesis sources over time to a not well-mixed interstellar medium. We report the discovery of two new carbon-enhanced, metal-poor stars. These are likely the result of pollution from material enriched by asymptotic giant branch stars, as indicated by our estimates of [Ba/Fe] >+1. We also attempted a search for dissolved globular clusters in the field of the galaxy by looking for the distinctive C-N pattern of second population globular clusters stars in a previously detected, very metal-poor, chemodynamical substructure. We do not detect chemical anomalies among this group of stars. However, small number statistics and limited spatial coverage do not allow us to exclude the hypotheses that this substructure forms part of a tidally shredded globular cluster. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 091.D-0089

  20. A unique isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxy at D = 1.9 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Dmitry; Makarova, Lidia; Sharina, Margarita; Uklein, Roman; Tikhonov, Anton; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kirby, Evan; Terekhova, Natalya

    2012-09-01

    We present a photometric and spectroscopic study of the unique isolated nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy KKR 25. The galaxy was resolved into stars with Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 including old red giant branch and red clump. We have constructed a model of the resolved stellar populations and measured the star formation rate and metallicity as a function of time. The main star formation activity period occurred about 12.6-13.7 Gyr ago. These stars are mostly metal poor, with a mean metallicity [Fe/H] ˜ -1 to -1.6 dex. About 60 per cent of the total stellar mass was formed during this event. There are indications of intermediate-age star formation in KKR 25 between 1 and 4 Gyr with no significant signs of metal enrichment for these stars. Long-slit spectroscopy was carried out using the Russian 6-m telescope of the integrated starlight and bright individual objects in the galaxy. We have discovered a planetary nebula (PN) in KKR 25. This is the first known PN in a dSph galaxy outside the Local Group. We have measured its oxygen abundance 12 + log (O/H) = 7.60 ± 0.07 dex and a radial velocity Vh = -79 km s-1. We have analysed the stellar density distribution in the galaxy body. The galaxy has an exponential surface brightness profile with a central light depression. We discuss the evolutionary status of KKR 25, which belongs to a rare class of very isolated dwarf galaxies with spheroidal morphology.

  1. OGLE Study of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy and its M54 Globular Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamanowicz, A.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Udalski, A.; Mróz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pawlak, M.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2016-06-01

    We use the fundamental-mode RR Lyr-type variable stars (RRab) from OGLE-IV survey to draw a 3D picture of the central part of the tidally disrupted Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal (Sgr dSph) galaxy. We estimate the line-of-sight thickness of the Sgr dSph stream to be FWHMcen=2.42 kpc. Based on OGLE-IV observations collected in seasons 2011-2014 we conduct a comprehensive study of stellar variability in the field of the globular cluster M54 (NGC 6715) residing in the core of this dwarf galaxy. Among the total number of 268 detected variable stars we report the identification of 174 RR Lyr stars, four Type II Cepheids, 51 semi-regular variable red giants, three SX Phe-type stars, 18 eclipsing binary systems. Eighty-three variable stars are new discoveries. The distance to the cluster determined from RRab stars is dM54=26.7±0.03stat±1.3sys kpc. From the location of RRab stars in the period-amplitude (Bailey) diagram we confirm the presence of two old populations, both in the cluster and the Sgr dSph stream.

  2. A FAST RADIO BURST IN THE DIRECTION OF THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, V.; Shannon, R. M.; Jameson, A.

    2015-01-20

    We report the real-time discovery of a fast radio burst (FRB 131104) with the Parkes radio telescope in a targeted observation of the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The dispersion measure of the burst is 779 cm{sup –3} pc, exceeding predictions for the maximum line-of-sight Galactic contribution by a factor of 11. The temporal structure of the burst is characterized by an exponential scattering tail with a timescale of 2.0{sub −0.5}{sup +0.8} ms at 1582 MHz that scales as frequency to the power –4.4{sub −1.8}{sup +1.6} (all uncertainties represent 95% confidence intervals). We bound the intrinsic pulse width to be <0.64 ms due to dispersion smearing across a single spectrometer channel. Searches in 78 hr of follow-up observations with the Parkes telescope reveal no additional sporadic emission and no evidence for associated periodic radio emission. We hypothesize that the burst is associated with the Carina dwarf galaxy. Follow-up observations at other wavelengths are necessary to test this hypothesis.

  3. Satellite accretion in action: a tidally disrupting dwarf spheroidal around the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Martin, Nicolas F.; Morales, Gustavo; Jennings, Zachary G.; GaBany, R. Jay; Brodie, Jean P.; Grebel, Eva K.; Schedler, Johannes; Sidonio, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We report the discovery of NGC 253-dw2, a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy candidate undergoing tidal disruption around a nearby spiral galaxy, NGC 253 in the Sculptor group: the first such event identified beyond the Local Group. The dwarf was found using small-aperture amateur telescopes, and followed up with Suprime-Cam on the 8 m Subaru Telescope in order to resolve its brightest stars. Using g- and Rc-band photometry, we detect a red giant branch consistent with an old, metal-poor stellar population at a distance of ˜3.5 Mpc. From the distribution of likely member stars, we infer a highly elongated shape with a semimajor axis half-light radius of (2 ± 0.4) kpc. Star counts also yield a luminosity estimate of ˜2 × 106 L⊙,V (MV ˜ -10.7). The morphological properties of NGC 253-dw2 mark it as distinct from normal dSphs and imply ongoing disruption at a projected distance of ˜50 kpc from the main galaxy. Our observations support the hierarchical paradigm wherein massive galaxies continuously accrete less massive ones, and provide a new case study for dSph infall and dissolution dynamics. We also note the continued efficacy of small telescopes for making big discoveries.

  4. A COMPREHENSIVE, WIDE-FIELD STUDY OF PULSATING STARS IN THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Vivas, A. Katherina; Mateo, Mario E-mail: mmateo@umich.edu

    2013-12-01

    We report the detection of 388 pulsating variable stars (and some additional miscellaneous variables) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy over an area covering the full visible extent of the galaxy and extending a few times beyond its photometric (King) tidal radius along the direction of its major axis. Included in this total are 340 newly discovered dwarf Cepheids (DCs), which are mostly located ∼2.5 mag below the horizontal branch and have very short periods (<0.1 days), typical of their class and consistent with their location on the upper part of the extended main sequence of the younger populations of the galaxy. Several extra-tidal DCs were found in our survey up to a distance of ∼1° from the center of Carina. Our sample also includes RR Lyrae stars and anomalous Cepheids, some of which were found outside the galaxy's tidal radius as well. This supports past works that suggest that Carina is undergoing tidal disruption. We use the period-luminosity relationship for DCs to estimate a distance modulus of μ{sub 0} = 20.17 ± 0.10 mag, in very good agreement with the estimate from RR Lyrae stars. We find some important differences in the properties of the DCs of Carina and those in Fornax and the LMC, the only extragalactic samples of DCs currently known. These differences may reflect a metallicity spread, depth along the line of sight, and/or different evolutionary paths of the DC stars.

  5. A chemical confirmation of the faint Boötes II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-10

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = –2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of –2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  6. VLT observations of NGC 1097's ``dog-leg'' tidal stream. Dwarf spheroidals and tidal streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galianni, P.; Patat, F.; Higdon, J. L.; Mieske, S.; Kroupa, P.

    2010-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the structure and stellar population of two large stellar condensations (knots A & B) along one of the faint optical “jet-like” tidal streams associated with the spiral NGC 1097, with the goal of establishing their physical association with the galaxy and their origin. Methods: We use the VLT/FORS2 to get deep V-band imaging and low-resolution optical spectra of two knots along NGC 1097's northeast “dog-leg” tidal stream. With this data, we explore their morphology and stellar populations. Results: Spectra were obtained for eleven sources in the field surrounding the tidal stream. The great majority of them turned out to be background or foreground sources, but the redshift of knot A (and perhaps of knot B) is consistent with that of NGC 1097. Using the V-band image of the “dog-leg” tidal feature we find that the two knots match the photometric scaling relations of canonical dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph) very well. Spectral analysis shows that knot A is mainly composed of stars near G-type, with no signs of ongoing star formation. Comparing its spectrum with a library of high resolution spectra of galactic globular clusters (GCs), we find that the stellar population of this dSph-like object is most similar to intermediate to metal rich galactic GCs. We find moreover, that the tidal stream shows an “S” shaped inflection as well as a pronounced stellar overdensity at knot A's position. This suggests that knot A is being tidally stripped, and populating the stellar stream with its stars. Conclusions: We have discovered that two knots along NGC 1097's northeast tidal stream share most of their spectral and photometric properties with ordinary dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph). Moreover, we find strong indications that the “dog-leg” tidal stream arises from the tidal disruption of knot A. Since it has been demonstrated that tidally stripping dSph galaxies need to loose most of their dark matter before starting to loose stars

  7. INVESTIGATION OF THE PUZZLING ABUNDANCE PATTERN IN THE STARS OF THE FORNAX DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongjie; Cui Wenyuan; Zhang Bo

    2013-09-20

    Many works have found unusual characteristics of elemental abundances in nearby dwarf galaxies. This implies that there is a key factor of galactic evolution that is different from that of the Milky Way (MW). The chemical abundances of the stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Fornax dSph) provide excellent information for setting constraints on the models of galactic chemical evolution. In this work, adopting the five-component approach, we fit the abundances of the Fornax dSph stars, including {alpha} elements, iron group elements, and neutron-capture elements. For most sample stars, the relative contributions from the various processes to the elemental abundances are not usually in the MW proportions. We find that the contributions from massive stars to the primary {alpha} elements and iron group elements increase monotonically with increasing [Fe/H]. This means that the effect of the galactic wind is not strong enough to halt star formation and the contributions from the massive stars to {alpha} elements did not halt for [Fe/H] {approx}< -0.5. The average contribution ratios of various processes between the dSph stars and the MW stars monotonically decrease with increasing progenitor mass. This is important evidence of a bottom-heavy initial mass function (IMF) for the Fornax dSph, compared to the MW. Considering a bottom-heavy IMF for the dSph, the observed relations of [{alpha}/Fe] versus [Fe/H], [iron group/Fe] versus [Fe/H], and [neutron-capture/Fe] versus [Fe/H] for the dSph stars can be explained.

  8. THE SPLASH SURVEY: SPECTROSCOPY OF 15 M31 DWARF SPHEROIDAL SATELLITE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Bullock, James S.; Yniguez, Basilio; Cooper, Michael C. E-mail: bullock@uci.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu; and others

    2012-06-10

    We present a resolved star spectroscopic survey of 15 dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). We filter foreground contamination from Milky Way (MW) stars, noting that MW substructure is evident in this contaminant sample. We also filter M31 halo field giant stars and identify the remainder as probable dSph members. We then use these members to determine the kinematical properties of the dSphs. For the first time, we confirm that And XVIII, XXI, and XXII show kinematics consistent with bound, dark-matter-dominated galaxies. From the velocity dispersions for the full sample of dSphs we determine masses, which we combine with the size and luminosity of the galaxies to produce mass-size-luminosity scaling relations. With these scalings we determine that the M31 dSphs are fully consistent with the MW dSphs, suggesting that the well-studied MW satellite population provides a fair sample for broader conclusions. We also estimate dark matter halo masses of the satellites and find that there is no sign that the luminosity of these galaxies depends on their dark halo mass, a result consistent with what is seen for MW dwarfs. Two of the M31 dSphs (And XV, XVI) have estimated maximum circular velocities smaller than 12 km s{sup -1} (to 1{sigma}), which likely places them within the lowest-mass dark matter halos known to host stars (along with Booetes I of the MW). Finally, we use the systemic velocities of the M31 satellites to estimate the mass of the M31 halo, obtaining a virial mass consistent with previous results.

  9. Star formation history of And XVIII: a dwarf spheroidal galaxy in isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, L. N.; Makarov, D. I.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Tully, R. B.; Rizzi, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present a photometric study of the Andromeda XVIII dwarf spheroidal galaxy associated with M31, and situated well outside of the virial radius of the M31 halo. The galaxy was resolved into stars with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys revealing the old red giant branch and red clump. With the new observational data we determined the Andromeda XVIII distance to be D = 1.33_{-0.09}^{+0.06} Mpc using the tip of red giant branch method. Thus, the dwarf is situated at the distance of 579 kpc from M31. We model the star formation history of Andromeda XVIII from the stellar photometry and Padova theoretical stellar isochrones. An ancient burst of star formation occurred 12-14 Gyr ago. There is no sign of recent/ongoing star formation in the last 1.5 Gyr. The mass fractions of the ancient and intermediate age stars are 34 and 66 per cent, respectively, and the total stellar mass is 4.2 × 106 M⊙. It is probable that the galaxy has not experienced an interaction with M31 in the past. We also discuss star formation processes of dSphs KKR 25, KKs 03, as well as dTr KK 258. Their star formation histories were uniformly measured by us from HST/ACS observations. All the galaxies are situated well beyond the Local Group and the two dSphs KKR 25 and KKs 03 are extremely isolated. Evidently, the evolution of these objects has proceeded without influence of neighbours.

  10. THE LEO IV DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY: COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAM AND PULSATING STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, Maria Ida; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Ripepi, Vincenzo E-mail: dallora@na.astro.it

    2009-07-10

    We present the first V, B - V color-magnitude diagram of the Leo IV dwarf spheroidal galaxy, a faint Milky Way satellite recently discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We have obtained B, V time-series photometry reaching about half a magnitude below the Leo IV turnoff, which we detect at V = 24.7 mag, and have performed the first study of the variable star population. We have identified three RR Lyrae stars (all fundamental-mode pulsators, RRab) and one SX Phoenicis variable in the galaxy. In the period-amplitude diagram the Leo IV RR Lyrae stars are located close to the loci of Oosterhoff type I systems and the evolved fundamental-mode RR Lyrae stars in the Galactic globular cluster M3. However, their mean pulsation period, (Pab) = 0.655 days, would suggest an Oosterhoff type II classification for this galaxy. The RR Lyrae stars trace very well the galaxy's horizontal branch, setting its average magnitude at (V {sub RR}) = 21.48 {+-} 0.03 mag (standard deviation of the mean). This leads to a distance modulus of {mu}{sub 0} = 20.94 {+-} 0.07 mag, corresponding to a distance of 154 {+-} 5 kpc, by adopting for the Leo IV dSph a reddening E(B - V) = 0.04 {+-} 0.01 mag and a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.31 {+-} 0.10.

  11. A new estimation of manganese distribution for local dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Men-Quan; Wang, Zhong-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of abundance for iron-peak elements in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is important for galaxy evolution and supernova (SN) nucleosynthesis. Nowadays, manganese (Mn) is one of the most observed iron-peak elements in local dSphs. Studies of its distributions allow us to derive and understand the evolution history of these dSphs. We improve a phenomenological model by a two-curve model including a new initial condition, that includes detailed calculations of SN explosion rates and yields. We compare the results with the observed Mn distribution data for three dSphs: Fornax, Sculpture and Sextans. We find that the model can describe the observed Fe and Mn distributions well simultaneously for the three dSphs. The results also indicate that the initial conditions should be determined by the low metallicity samples in the beginning time of the galaxies and the previous assumption of metellicity-dependant Mn yield of SNIa is not needed when a wide mass range of core-collapse SNe is included. Our method is applicable to the chemical evolution of other iron-peak elements in dSphs and can be modified to provide more detailed processes for the evolution of dSphs.

  12. The Nature of the Density Clump in the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, Edward W.; Mateo, Mario; Harris, Jason; Walker, Matthew G.; Coleman, Matthew G.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2006-02-01

    We have imaged the recently discovered stellar overdensity located approximately one core radius from the center of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy using the Magellan Clay 6.5 m telescope with the Magellan Instant Camera. Superb seeing conditions allowed us to probe the stellar populations of this overdensity and of a control field within Fornax to a limiting magnitude of R=26. The color-magnitude diagram of the overdensity field is virtually identical to that of the control field, with the exception of the presence of a population arising from a very short (less than 300 Myr in duration) burst of star formation 1.4 Gyr ago. Coleman et al. have argued that this overdensity might be related to a shell structure in Fornax that was created when Fornax captured a smaller galaxy. Our results are consistent with this model, but we argue that the metallicity of this young component favors a scenario in which the gas was part of Fornax itself.

  13. Constraints on the pMSSM from LAT Observations of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.C.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Murgia, S.; Bloom, E.D.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2012-03-15

    We examine the ability for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) to constrain Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) dark matter through a combined analysis of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We examine the Lightest Supersymmetric Particles (LSPs) for a set of {approx}71k experimentally valid supersymmetric models derived from the phenomenological-MSSM (pMSSM). We find that none of these models can be excluded at 95% confidence by the current analysis; nevertheless, many lie within the predicted reach of future LAT analyses. With two years of data, we find that the LAT is currently most sensitive to light LSPs (mLSP < 50 GeV) annihilating into {tau}-pairs and heavier LSPs annihilating into b{bar b}. Additionally, we find that future LAT analyses will be able to probe some LSPs that form a sub-dominant component of dark matter. We directly compare the LAT results to direct detection experiments and show the complementarity of these search methods.

  14. Supernova-driven outflows and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong-Zhong; Wasserburg, G J

    2012-03-27

    We present a general phenomenological model for the metallicity distribution (MD) in terms of [Fe/H] for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). These galaxies appear to have stopped accreting gas from the intergalactic medium and are fossilized systems with their stars undergoing slow internal evolution. For a wide variety of infall histories of unprocessed baryonic matter to feed star formation, most of the observed MDs can be well described by our model. The key requirement is that the fraction of the gas mass lost by supernova-driven outflows is close to unity. This model also predicts a relationship between the total stellar mass and the mean metallicity for dSphs in accord with properties of their dark matter halos. The model further predicts as a natural consequence that the abundance ratios [E/Fe] for elements such as O, Mg, and Si decrease for stellar populations at the higher end of the [Fe/H] range in a dSph. We show that, for infall rates far below the net rate of gas loss to star formation and outflows, the MD in our model is very sharply peaked at one [Fe/H] value, similar to what is observed in most globular clusters. This result suggests that globular clusters may be end members of the same family as dSphs. PMID:22411827

  15. Proper Motions of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope Imaging. 3; Measurement for URSA Minor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piatek, Slawomir; Pryor, Carlton; Bristow, Paul; Olszewski, Edward W.; Harris, Hugh C.; Mateo, Mario; Minniti, Dante; Tinney, Christopher G.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a measurement of the proper motion of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy determined from images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in two distinct fields. Each field contains a quasi-stellar object that serves as the "reference point". Integrating the motion of Ursa Minor in a realistic potential for the Milky Way produces orbital elements. The perigalacticon and apogalacticon are 40 (10, 76) and 89 (78, 160) kpc, respectively, where the values in the parentheses represent the 95% confidence intervals derived from Monte Carlo experiments. The eccentricity of the orbit is 0.39 (0.09, 0.79), and the orbital period is 1.5 (1.1, 2.7) Gyr. The orbit is retrograde and inclined by 124 degrees (94 deg, 36 deg ) to the Galactic plane. Ursa Minor is not a likely member of a proposed stream of galaxies on similar orbits around the Milky Way, nor is the plane of its orbit coincident with a recently proposed planar alignment of galaxies around the Milky Way. Comparing the orbits of Ursa Minor and Carina shows no reason for the different star formation histories of these two galaxies. Ursa Minor must contain dark matter to have a high probability of having survived disruption by the Galactic tidal force until the present.

  16. The masses of local group dwarf spheroidal galaxies: The death of the universal mass profile

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the claim that all dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) reside within halos that share a common, universal mass profile as has been derived for dSphs of the galaxy. By folding in kinematic information for 25 Andromeda dSphs, more than doubling the previous sample size, we find that a singular mass profile cannot be found to fit all of the observations well. Further, the best-fit dark matter density profile measured solely for the Milky Way dSphs is marginally discrepant with that of the Andromeda dSphs (at just beyond the 1σ level), where a profile with lower maximum circular velocity, and hence mass, is preferred. The agreement is significantly better when three extreme Andromeda outliers, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (≳ 600 pc) and low-velocity dispersions (σ {sub v} < 5 km s{sup –1}), are omitted from the sample. We argue that the unusual properties of these outliers are likely caused by tidal interactions with the host galaxy.

  17. Supernova-driven outflows and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yong-Zhong; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a general phenomenological model for the metallicity distribution (MD) in terms of [Fe/H] for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). These galaxies appear to have stopped accreting gas from the intergalactic medium and are fossilized systems with their stars undergoing slow internal evolution. For a wide variety of infall histories of unprocessed baryonic matter to feed star formation, most of the observed MDs can be well described by our model. The key requirement is that the fraction of the gas mass lost by supernova-driven outflows is close to unity. This model also predicts a relationship between the total stellar mass and the mean metallicity for dSphs in accord with properties of their dark matter halos. The model further predicts as a natural consequence that the abundance ratios [E/Fe] for elements such as O, Mg, and Si decrease for stellar populations at the higher end of the [Fe/H] range in a dSph. We show that, for infall rates far below the net rate of gas loss to star formation and outflows, the MD in our model is very sharply peaked at one [Fe/H] value, similar to what is observed in most globular clusters. This result suggests that globular clusters may be end members of the same family as dSphs. PMID:22411827

  18. CHEMICAL SIGNATURES OF THE FIRST SUPERNOVAE IN THE SCULPTOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joshua D.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Jacobson, Heather R.; Frebel, Anna; Adams, Joshua J. E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: hjr@mit.edu E-mail: jja439@gmail.com

    2015-04-01

    We present a homogeneous chemical abundance analysis of five of the most metal-poor stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We analyze new and archival high resolution spectroscopy from Magellan/MIKE and VLT/UVES and determine stellar parameters and abundances in a consistent way for each star. Two of the stars in our sample, at [Fe/H] = −3.5 and [Fe/H] = −3.8, are new discoveries from our Ca K survey of Sculptor, while the other three were known in the literature. We confirm that Scl 07-50 is the lowest metallicity star identified in an external galaxy, at [Fe/H] = −4.1. The two most metal-poor stars both have very unusual abundance patterns, with striking deficiencies of the α elements, while the other three stars resemble typical extremely metal-poor Milky Way halo stars. We show that the star-to-star scatter for several elements in Sculptor is larger than that for halo stars in the same metallicity range. This scatter and the uncommon abundance patterns of the lowest metallicity stars indicate that the oldest surviving Sculptor stars were enriched by a small number of earlier supernovae, perhaps weighted toward high-mass progenitors from the first generation of stars the galaxy formed.

  19. A NEW CHEMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES BASED ON OBSERVED LONG STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Homma, Hidetomo; Murayama, Takashi; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2015-02-01

    We present a new chemical evolution model for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the local universe. Our main aim is to explain both their observed star formation histories and metallicity distribution functions simultaneously. Applying our new model for the four local dSphs, that is, Fornax, Sculptor, Leo II, and Sextans, we find that our new model reproduces the observed chemical properties of the dSphs consistently. Our results show that the dSphs have evolved with both a low star formation efficiency and a large gas outflow efficiency compared with the Milky Way, as suggested by previous works. Comparing the observed [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation of the dSphs with the model predictions, we find that our model favors a longer onset time of Type Ia supernovae (i.e., 0.5 Gyr) than that suggested in previous studies (i.e., 0.1 Gyr). We discuss the origin of this discrepancy in detail.

  20. DISCOVERY OF MIRA VARIABLE STARS IN THE METAL-POOR SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2012-12-10

    We report the discovery of two Mira variable stars (Miras) toward the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). We performed optical long-term monitoring observations for two red stars in the Sextans dSph. The light curves of both stars in the I{sub c} band show large-amplitude (3.7 and 0.9 mag) and long-period (326 {+-} 15 and 122 {+-} 5 days) variations, suggesting that they are Miras. We combine our own infrared data with previously published data to estimate the mean infrared magnitudes. The distances obtained from the period-luminosity relation of the Miras (75.3{sup +12.8}{sub -10.9} and 79.8{sup +11.5}{sub -9.9} kpc, respectively), together with the radial velocities available, support memberships of the Sextans dSph (90.0 {+-} 10.0 kpc). These are the first Miras found in a stellar system with a metallicity as low as [Fe/H] {approx} -1.9 than any other known system with Miras.

  1. Supernova-driven outflows and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong-Zhong; Wasserburg, G J

    2012-03-27

    We present a general phenomenological model for the metallicity distribution (MD) in terms of [Fe/H] for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). These galaxies appear to have stopped accreting gas from the intergalactic medium and are fossilized systems with their stars undergoing slow internal evolution. For a wide variety of infall histories of unprocessed baryonic matter to feed star formation, most of the observed MDs can be well described by our model. The key requirement is that the fraction of the gas mass lost by supernova-driven outflows is close to unity. This model also predicts a relationship between the total stellar mass and the mean metallicity for dSphs in accord with properties of their dark matter halos. The model further predicts as a natural consequence that the abundance ratios [E/Fe] for elements such as O, Mg, and Si decrease for stellar populations at the higher end of the [Fe/H] range in a dSph. We show that, for infall rates far below the net rate of gas loss to star formation and outflows, the MD in our model is very sharply peaked at one [Fe/H] value, similar to what is observed in most globular clusters. This result suggests that globular clusters may be end members of the same family as dSphs.

  2. ACCURATE STELLAR KINEMATICS AT FAINT MAGNITUDES: APPLICATION TO THE BOOeTES I DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Koposov, Sergey E.; Gilmore, G.; Walker, M. G.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. Wyn; Okamoto, S.; Penarrubia, J.; Fellhauer, M.; Gieren, W.; Geisler, D.; Monaco, L.; Norris, J. E.; Wilkinson, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zucker, D. B.

    2011-08-01

    We develop, implement, and characterize an enhanced data reduction approach which delivers precise, accurate, radial velocities from moderate resolution spectroscopy with the fiber-fed VLT/FLAMES+GIRAFFE facility. This facility, with appropriate care, delivers radial velocities adequate to resolve the intrinsic velocity dispersions of the very faint dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. Importantly, repeated measurements let us reliably calibrate our individual velocity errors (0.2 kms{sup -1} {<=} {delta}{sub V} {<=} 5 km s{sup -1}) and directly detect stars with variable radial velocities. We show, by application to the Booetes I dSph, that the intrinsic velocity dispersion of this system is significantly below 6.5 km s{sup -1} reported by previous studies. Our data favor a two-population model of Booetes I, consisting of a majority 'cold' stellar component, with velocity dispersion 2.4{sup +0.9}{sub -0.5} km s{sup -1}, and a minority 'hot' stellar component, with velocity dispersion {approx}9 km s{sup -1}, although we cannot completely rule out a single component distribution with velocity dispersion 4.6{sup 0.8}{sub -0.6} km s{sup -1}. We speculate that this complex velocity distribution actually reflects the distribution of velocity anisotropy in Booetes I, which is a measure of its formation processes.

  3. HOW TO MAKE AN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY: TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio E-mail: stelios@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-05-20

    In recent years the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has unraveled a new population of ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) whose origin remains a puzzle in the vicinity of the Milky Way (MW). Using a suite of collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the formation of UFDs in the context of the tidal stirring model for the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group (LG). Our simulations are designed to reproduce the tidal interactions between MW-sized host galaxies and rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter (DM) halos. We explore a variety of inner density slopes {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -{alpha}} for the dwarf DM halos, ranging from core-like ({alpha} = 0.2) to cuspy ({alpha} = 1), and different dwarf orbital configurations. Our experiments demonstrate that UFDs can be produced via tidal stirring of disky dwarfs on relatively tight orbits, consistent with a redshift of accretion by the host galaxy of z {approx} 1, and with intermediate values for the halo inner density slopes ({rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -0.6}). The inferred slopes are in excellent agreement with those resulting from both the modeling of the rotation curves of dwarf galaxies and recent cosmological simulations of dwarf galaxy formation. Comparing the properties of observed UFDs with those of their simulated counterparts, we find remarkable similarities in terms of basic observational parameters. We conclude that tidal stirring of rotationally supported dwarfs represents a viable mechanism for the formation of UFDs in the LG environment.

  4. Decaying dark matter: the case for a deep X-ray observation of Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, Mark R.; Bertone, Gianfranco; Boyarsky, Alexey; Jenkins, Adrian; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies of M31, the Galactic Centre (GC), and galaxy clusters have made tentative detections of an X-ray line at ˜3.5 keV that could be produced by decaying dark matter. We use high-resolution simulations of the Aquarius project to predict the likely amplitude of the X-ray decay flux observed in the GC relative to that observed in M31, and also of the GC relative to other parts of the Milky Way halo and to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We show that the reported detections from M31 and the GC are compatible with each other, and with upper limits arising from high galactic latitude observations, and imply a decay time τ ˜ 1028 s. We argue that this interpretation can be tested with deep observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies: in 95 per cent of our mock observations, a 1.3 Ms pointed observation of Draco with XMM-Newton will enable us to discover or rule out at the 3σ level an X-ray feature from dark matter decay at 3.5 keV, for decay times τ < 0.8 × 1028 s.

  5. ON THE EFFICIENCY OF THE TIDAL STIRRING MECHANISM FOR THE ORIGIN OF DWARF SPHEROIDALS: DEPENDENCE ON THE ORBITAL AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF THE PROGENITOR DISKY DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio; Moustakas, Leonidas A. E-mail: lokas@camk.edu.pl E-mail: lucio@phys.ethz.ch

    2011-01-10

    The tidal stirring model posits the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) via the tidal interactions between late-type, rotationally supported dwarfs and Milky-Way-sized host galaxies. Using a comprehensive set of collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the efficiency of the tidal stirring mechanism for the origin of dSphs. In particular, we examine the degree to which the tidal field of the primary galaxy affects the sizes, masses, shapes, and kinematics of the disky dwarfs for a range of dwarf orbital and structural parameters. Our study is the first to employ self-consistent, equilibrium models for the progenitor dwarf galaxies constructed from a composite distribution function and consisting of exponential stellar disks embedded in massive, cosmologically motivated dark matter halos. Exploring a wide variety of dwarf orbital configurations and initial structures, we demonstrate that in the majority of cases the disky dwarfs experience significant mass loss and their stellar distributions undergo a dramatic morphological, as well as dynamical, transformation. Specifically, the stellar components evolve from disks to bars and finally to pressure-supported, spheroidal systems with kinematic and structural properties akin to those of the classic dSphs in the Local Group (LG) and similar environments. The self-consistency of the adopted dwarf models is crucial for confirming this complex transformation process via tidally induced dynamical instabilities and impulsive tidal heating of the stellar distribution. Our results suggest that such tidal transformations should be common occurrences within the currently favored cosmological paradigm and highlight the key factor responsible for an effective metamorphosis to be the strength of the tidal shocks at the pericenters of the orbit. We also demonstrate that the combination of short orbital times and small pericentric distances, characteristic of dwarfs being accreted by their hosts at high redshift

  6. Enrichment of r-process Elements in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies in Chemo-dynamical Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Yutaka; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Fujii, Michiko S.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2015-11-01

    The rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is a major process for the synthesis of elements heavier than iron-peak elements, but the astrophysical site(s) of the r-process has not yet been identified. Neutron star mergers (NSMs) are suggested to be a major r-process site according to nucleosynthesis studies. Previous chemical evolution studies, however, required unlikely short merger times of NSMs to reproduce the observed large star-to-star scatters in the abundance ratios of r-process elements to iron: the [Eu/Fe] of extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way (MW) halo. This problem can be solved by considering chemical evolution in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), which would be building blocks of the MW and have lower star formation efficiencies than the MW halo. We demonstrate the enrichment of r-process elements in dSphs by NSMs using an N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. Our high-resolution model reproduces the observed [Eu/Fe] due to NSMs with a merger time of 100 Myr when the effect of metal mixing is taken into account. This is because metallicity is not correlated with time ˜300 Myr from the start of the simulation due to the low star formation efficiency in dSphs. We also confirm that this model is consistent with observed properties of dSphs such as radial profiles and metallicity distribution. The merger time and the Galactic rate of NSMs are suggested to be ≲300 Myr and ˜10-4 year-1, respectively, which are consistent with the values suggested by population synthesis and nucleosynthesis studies. This study supports the argument that NSMs are the major astrophysical site of the r-process.

  7. The Structure and Dark Halo Core Properties of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.

    2015-08-01

    The structure and dark matter halo core properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are investigated. A double-isothermal (DIS) model of an isothermal, non-self-gravitating stellar system embedded in an isothermal dark halo core provides an excellent fit to the various observed stellar surface density distributions. The stellar core scale length a* is sensitive to the central dark matter density ρ0,d. The maximum stellar radius traces the dark halo core radius {r}c,d. The concentration c* of the stellar system, determined by a King profile fit, depends on the ratio of the stellar-to-dark-matter velocity dispersion {σ }*/{σ }d. Simple empirical relationships are derived that allow us to calculate the dark halo core parameters ρ0,d, {r}c,d, and σd given the observable stellar quantities σ*, a*, and c*. The DIS model is applied to the Milky Way’s dSphs. All dSphs closely follow the same universal dark halo scaling relations {ρ }0,d× {r}c,d={75}-45+85 M⊙ pc‑2 that characterize the cores of more massive galaxies over a large range in masses. The dark halo core mass is a strong function of core radius, {M}c,d∼ {r}c,d2. Inside a fixed radius of ∼400 pc the total dark matter mass is, however, roughly constant with {M}d=2.6+/- 1.4× {10}7 M⊙, although outliers are expected. The dark halo core densities of the Galaxy’s dSphs are very high, with {ρ }0,d ≈ 0.2 M⊙ pc‑3. dSphs should therefore be tidally undisturbed. Evidence for tidal effects might then provide a serious challenge for the CDM scenario.

  8. Structural parameters and blue stragglers in Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Ricardo; Jílková, Lucie; Carraro, Giovanni; Catelan, Márcio; Amigo, Pía.

    2012-04-01

    We present BV photometry of four Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy globular clusters: Arp 2, NGC 5634, Palomar 12 and Terzan 8, obtained with the Danish Telescope at ESO La Silla. We measure the structural parameters of the clusters using a King profile fitting, obtaining the first reliable measurements of the tidal radius of Arp 2 and Terzan 8. These two clusters are remarkably extended and with low concentrations; with a concentration of only c= 0.41 ± 0.02, Terzan 8 is less concentrated than any cluster in our Galaxy. Blue stragglers are identified in the four clusters, and their spatial distribution is compared to those of horizontal branch and red giant branch stars. The blue straggler properties do not provide evidence of mass segregation in Terzan 8, while Arp 2 probably shares the same status, although with less confidence. In the case of NGC 5634 and Palomar 12, blue stragglers are significantly less populous, and their analysis suggests that the two clusters have probably undergone mass segregation. References: (1) Peterson (1976); (2) Kron, Hewitt & Wasserman (1984); (3) Chernoff & Djorgovski (1989); (4) Trager, Djorgovski & King (1993); (5) Trager et al. (1995); (6) Rosenberg et al. (1998); (7) Mackey & Gilmore (2003b); (8) McLaughlin & van der Marel (2005) and (9) Carballo-Bello et al. (2012).

  9. STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF NON-SPHERICAL DARK HALOS IN MILKY WAY AND ANDROMEDA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kohei; Chiba, Masashi E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the non-spherical density structure of dark halos of the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies based on revised axisymmetric mass models from our previous work. The models we adopt here fully take into account velocity anisotropy of tracer stars confined within a flattened dark halo. Applying our models to the available kinematic data of the 12 bright dSphs, we find that these galaxies associate with, in general, elongated dark halos, even considering the effect of this velocity anisotropy of stars. We also find that the best-fit parameters, especially for the shapes of dark halos and velocity anisotropy, are susceptible to both the availability of velocity data in the outer regions and the effect of the lack of sample stars in each spatial bin. Thus, to obtain more realistic limits on dark halo structures, we require photometric and kinematic data over much larger areas in the dSphs than previously explored. The results obtained from the currently available data suggest that the shapes of dark halos in the dSphs are more elongated than those of ΛCDM subhalos. This mismatch needs to be solved by theory including baryon components and the associated feedback to dark halos as well as by further observational limits in larger areas of dSphs. It is also found that more diffuse dark halos may have undergone consecutive star formation history, thereby implying that dark-halo structure plays an important role in star formation activity.

  10. ENRICHMENT OF r-PROCESS ELEMENTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES IN CHEMO-DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Yutaka; Kajino, Toshitaka; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Fujii, Michiko S.; Hidaka, Jun

    2015-11-20

    The rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is a major process for the synthesis of elements heavier than iron-peak elements, but the astrophysical site(s) of the r-process has not yet been identified. Neutron star mergers (NSMs) are suggested to be a major r-process site according to nucleosynthesis studies. Previous chemical evolution studies, however, required unlikely short merger times of NSMs to reproduce the observed large star-to-star scatters in the abundance ratios of r-process elements to iron: the [Eu/Fe] of extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way (MW) halo. This problem can be solved by considering chemical evolution in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), which would be building blocks of the MW and have lower star formation efficiencies than the MW halo. We demonstrate the enrichment of r-process elements in dSphs by NSMs using an N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. Our high-resolution model reproduces the observed [Eu/Fe] due to NSMs with a merger time of 100 Myr when the effect of metal mixing is taken into account. This is because metallicity is not correlated with time ∼300 Myr from the start of the simulation due to the low star formation efficiency in dSphs. We also confirm that this model is consistent with observed properties of dSphs such as radial profiles and metallicity distribution. The merger time and the Galactic rate of NSMs are suggested to be ≲300 Myr and ∼10{sup −4} year{sup −1}, respectively, which are consistent with the values suggested by population synthesis and nucleosynthesis studies. This study supports the argument that NSMs are the major astrophysical site of the r-process.

  11. Dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31. I. Variable stars and stellar populations in Andromeda XIX

    SciTech Connect

    Cusano, Felice; Clementini, Gisella; Garofalo, Alessia; Federici, Luciana E-mail: gisella.clementini@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: alessia.garofalo@studio.unibo.it; and others

    2013-12-10

    We present B, V time-series photometry of Andromeda XIX (And XIX), the most extended (half-light radius of 6.'2) of Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal companions, which we observed with the Large Binocular Cameras at the Large Binocular Telescope. We surveyed a 23' × 23' area centered on And XIX and present the deepest color-magnitude diagram (CMD) ever obtained for this galaxy, reaching, at V ∼ 26.3 mag, about one magnitude below the horizontal branch (HB). The CMD shows a prominent and slightly widened red giant branch, along with a predominantly red HB, which extends to the blue to significantly populate the classical instability strip. We have identified 39 pulsating variable stars, of which 31 are of RR Lyrae type and 8 are Anomalous Cepheids (ACs). Twelve of the RR Lyrae variables and three of the ACs are located within And XIX's half light radius. The average period of the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars ((P {sub ab}) = 0.62 days, σ = 0.03 days) and the period-amplitude diagram qualify And XIX as an Oosterhoff-Intermediate system. From the average luminosity of the RR Lyrae stars ((V(RR)) = 25.34 mag, σ = 0.10 mag), we determine a distance modulus of (m – M){sub 0} = 24.52 ± 0.23 mag in a scale where the distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is 18.5 ± 0.1 mag. The ACs follow a well-defined Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation that appears to be in very good agreement with the PW relationship defined by the ACs in the LMC.

  12. The age-metallicity relationship in the Fornax spheroidal dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, Andrés E.; del Pino, Andrés; Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastián L.

    2014-09-01

    We produce a comprehensive field star age-metallicity relationship (AMR) from the earliest epoch until ˜1 Gyr ago for three fields in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy by using VI photometric data obtained with FORS1 at the VLT. We find that the innermost one does not contain dominant very old stars (age > 12 Gyr), whereas the relatively outer field does not account for representative star field populations younger than ˜3 Gyr. When focusing on the most prominent stellar populations, we find that the derived AMRs are engraved by the evidence of an outside-in star formation process. The studied fields show bimodal metallicity distributions peaked at [Fe/H] = (-0.95 ± 0.15) dex and (-1.15 or -1.25 ± 0.05) dex, respectively, but only during the first half of the entire galaxy lifetime. Furthermore, the more metal-rich population appears to be more numerous in the outer fields, while in the innermost Fornax field the contribution of both metallicity populations seems to be similar. We also find that the metallicity spread ˜6 Gyr ago is remarkable large, while the intrinsic metallicity dispersion at ˜1-2 Gyr results smaller than that for the relatively older generations of stars. We interpret these outcomes as a result of a possible merger of two galaxies that would have triggered a star formation bursting process that peaked between ˜6 and 9 Gyr ago, depending on the position of the field in the galaxy.

  13. Mass Modelling of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies: the Effect of Unbound Stars From Tidal Tails And the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Prada, Francisco; Mayer, Lucio; Mamon, Gary A.; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys. /Meudon Observ.

    2006-11-14

    We study the origin and properties of the population of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high resolution N- body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. In agreement with the tidal stirring scenario of Mayer et al., the dwarf is placed on a highly eccentric orbit, its initial stellar component is in the form of an exponential disk and it has a NFW-like dark matter halo. After 10 Gyrs of evolution the dwarf produces a spheroidal stellar component and is strongly tidally stripped so that mass follows light and the stars are on almost isotropic orbits. From this final state, we create mock kinematic data sets for 200 stars by observing the dwarf in different directions.We find that when the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails.We also study another source of possible contamination by adding stars from the Milky Way. We demonstrate that most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert and recently tested on simulated dark matter haloes. We model the cleaned up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation with constant mass-to-light ratio and velocity anisotropy parameter. We show that even for such strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and mass-to-light ratio of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25 percent and almost exactly in the case when the line of sight is perpendicular to the tidal tails. The analysis was applied to the new data for the Fornax dSph galaxy for which we find a mass-to-light ratio of 11 solar units and isotropic orbits. We demonstrate that most of the contamination in the kinematic sample of Fornax probably originates from the Milky Way.

  14. Mass modelling of dwarf spheroidal galaxies: the effect of unbound stars from tidal tails and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentowski, Jarosław; Łokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Prada, Francisco; Mayer, Lucio; Mamon, Gary A.

    2007-06-01

    We study the origin and properties of the population of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high-resolution N-body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. In agreement with the tidal stirring scenario of Mayer et al., the dwarf is placed on a highly eccentric orbit, its initial stellar component is in the form of an exponential disc and it has a NFW-like dark matter (DM) halo. After 10 Gyr of evolution the dwarf produces a spheroidal stellar component and is strongly tidally stripped so that mass follows light and the stars are on almost isotropic orbits. From this final state, we create mock kinematic data sets for 200 stars by observing the dwarf in different directions. We find that when the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails. We also study another source of possible contamination by adding stars from the Milky Way. We demonstrate that most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert and recently tested on simulated DM haloes. We model the cleaned-up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation with constant mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and velocity anisotropy parameter. We show that even for such a strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and M/L of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25 per cent and almost exactly in the case when the line of sight is perpendicular to the tidal tails. The analysis was applied to the new data for the Fornax dSph galaxy. We show that after careful removal of interlopers the velocity dispersion profile of Fornax can be reproduced by a model in which mass traces light with a M/L of 11 solar units and isotropic orbits. We demonstrate that most of the contamination in the kinematic sample of

  15. High resolution spectroscopy of Red Giant Branch stars and the chemical evolution of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasle, B.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.; Jablonka, P.; Venn, K.; Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Francois, P.; Helmi, A.; Primas, F.; Kaufer, A.; Szeifert, T.

    2014-12-01

    From VLT-FLAMES high-resolution spectra, we determine the abundances of several α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements in 47 Red Giant Branch stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We confirm that SNe Ia started to contribute to the chemical enrichment of Fornax at [Fe/H] between --2.0 and --1.8 dex. Combining these abundances with accurate age estimates, we date the onset of SNe Ia to ≈ 12--10 Gyrs ago. Our results are compatible with an initial mass function that lacks the most massive stars and with a star formation going on throughout the whole history of Fornax.

  16. A FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE PROPER MOTION OF THE LEO II DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, Sebastien; Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael; Kuijken, Konrad

    2011-11-10

    We use 14 year baseline images obtained with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to derive a proper motion for one of the Milky Way's most distant dwarf spheroidal companions, Leo II, relative to an extragalactic background reference frame. Astrometric measurements are performed in the effective point-spread function formalism using our own developed code. An astrometric reference grid is defined using 3224 stars that are members of Leo II and brighter than a magnitude of 25 in the F814W band. We identify 17 compact extragalactic sources, for which we measure a systemic proper motion relative to this stellar reference grid. We derive a proper motion [{mu}{sub {alpha},{mu}{delta}}] = [+104 {+-}113,-33 {+-} 151] {mu}as yr{sup -1} for Leo II in the heliocentric reference frame. Though marginally detected, the proper motion yields constraints on the orbit of Leo II. Given a distance of d {approx_equal} 230 kpc and a heliocentric radial velocity v{sub r} = +79 km s{sup -1}, and after subtraction of the solar motion, our measurement indicates a total orbital motion v{sub G} = 266.1 {+-} 128.7 km s{sup -1} in the Galactocentric reference frame, with a radial component v{sub r{sub G}}=21.5{+-}4.3 km s{sup -1} and tangential component v{sub t{sub G}} = 265.2 {+-} 129.4 km s{sup -1}. The small radial component indicates that Leo II either has a low-eccentricity orbit or is currently close to perigalacticon or apogalacticon distance. We see evidence for systematic errors in the astrometry of the extragalactic sources which, while close to being point sources, are slightly resolved in the HST images. We argue that more extensive observations at later epochs will be necessary to better constrain the proper motion of Leo II. We provide a detailed catalog of the stellar and extragalactic sources identified in the HST data which should provide a solid early-epoch reference for future astrometric measurements.

  17. The Metal-poor Knee in the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Benjamin; Koch, Andreas; Lanfranchi, Gustavo A.; Boeche, Corrado; Walker, Matthew; Johnson, Christian I.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Gilmore, Gerard

    2014-04-01

    We present α-element abundances of Mg, Si, and Ti for a large sample of field stars in two outer fields of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy, obtained with Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE (R ~ 16, 000). Due to the large fraction of metal-poor (MP) stars in our sample, we are able to follow the α-element evolution from [Fe/H] ≈ -2.5 continuously to [Fe/H] ≈ -0.7. For the first time we are able to resolve the turnover from the Type II supernovae (SNe) dominated, α-enhanced plateau down to subsolar [α/Fe] values, due to the onset of SNe Ia, and thus to trace the chemical enrichment efficiency of the galaxy. Our data support the general concept of an α-enhanced plateau at early epochs, followed by a well-defined "knee" caused by the onset of SNe Ia, and finally a second plateau with sub-solar [α/Fe] values. We find the position of this knee to be at [Fe/H] ≈ -1.9 and therefore significantly more MP than expected from comparison with other dSphs and standard evolutionary models. Surprisingly, this value is rather comparable to the knee in Sculptor, a dSph ~10 times less luminous than Fornax. Using chemical evolution models, we find that the position of the knee and the subsequent plateau at the sub-solar level can hardly be explained unless the galaxy experienced several discrete star formation (SF) events with a drastic variation in SF efficiency, while a uniform SF can be ruled out. One possible evolutionary scenario is that Fornax experienced one or several major accretion events from gas-rich systems in the past, so that its current stellar mass is not indicative of the chemical evolution environment at ancient times. If Fornax is the product of several smaller buildings blocks, this may also have implications for the understanding of the formation process of dSphs in general. This article is based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under program 082.B-0940(A).

  18. The metal-poor knee in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Benjamin; Koch, Andreas; Lanfranchi, Gustavo A.; Boeche, Corrado; Walker, Matthew; Johnson, Christian I.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Gilmore, Gerard

    2014-04-20

    We present α-element abundances of Mg, Si, and Ti for a large sample of field stars in two outer fields of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy, obtained with Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE (R ∼ 16, 000). Due to the large fraction of metal-poor (MP) stars in our sample, we are able to follow the α-element evolution from [Fe/H] ≈ –2.5 continuously to [Fe/H] ≈ –0.7. For the first time we are able to resolve the turnover from the Type II supernovae (SNe) dominated, α-enhanced plateau down to subsolar [α/Fe] values, due to the onset of SNe Ia, and thus to trace the chemical enrichment efficiency of the galaxy. Our data support the general concept of an α-enhanced plateau at early epochs, followed by a well-defined 'knee' caused by the onset of SNe Ia, and finally a second plateau with sub-solar [α/Fe] values. We find the position of this knee to be at [Fe/H] ≈ –1.9 and therefore significantly more MP than expected from comparison with other dSphs and standard evolutionary models. Surprisingly, this value is rather comparable to the knee in Sculptor, a dSph ∼10 times less luminous than Fornax. Using chemical evolution models, we find that the position of the knee and the subsequent plateau at the sub-solar level can hardly be explained unless the galaxy experienced several discrete star formation (SF) events with a drastic variation in SF efficiency, while a uniform SF can be ruled out. One possible evolutionary scenario is that Fornax experienced one or several major accretion events from gas-rich systems in the past, so that its current stellar mass is not indicative of the chemical evolution environment at ancient times. If Fornax is the product of several smaller buildings blocks, this may also have implications for the understanding of the formation process of dSphs in general.

  19. THE CHEMICAL SIGNATURE OF A RELIC STAR CLUSTER IN THE SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY-IMPLICATIONS FOR NEAR-FIELD COSMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Torgny; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Freeman, Ken C.; Silk, Joe

    2012-11-10

    We present tentative evidence for the existence of a dissolved star cluster at [Fe/H] = -2.7 in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We use the technique of chemical tagging to identify stars that are highly clustered in a multi-dimensional chemical abundance space (C-space). In a sample of six stars, three, possibly four, stars are identified as potential cluster stars. The initial stellar mass of the parent cluster is estimated from two independent observations to be M{sub *,init}=1.9{sup +1.5}{sub -0.9}(1.6{sup +1.2}{sub -0.8}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub sun}, assuming a Salpeter (Kroupa) initial mass function. If corroborated by follow-up spectroscopy, this star cluster is the most metal-poor system identified to date. Chemical signatures of remnant clusters in dwarf galaxies like Sextans provide us with a very powerful probe to the high-redshift universe. From available observational data, we argue that the average star cluster mass in the majority of the newly discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies was notably lower than it is in the Galaxy today and possibly lower than in the more luminous, classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Furthermore, the mean cumulative metallicity function of the dwarf spheroidals falls below that of the ultra-faints, which increases with increasing metallicity as predicted from our stochastic chemical evolution model. These two findings, together with a possible difference in the ([Mg/Fe]) ratio suggest that the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy population, or a significant fraction thereof, and the dwarf spheroidal population were formed in different environments and would thus be distinct in origin.

  20. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with Six Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Albert, A; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caputo, R; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Essig, R; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Horan, D; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Llena Garde, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Malyshev, D; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Meyer, M; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sehgal, N; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strigari, L; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ-ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. These constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DM of mass ≲100  GeV annihilating via quark and τ-lepton channels. PMID:26684107

  1. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with Six Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Essig, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Malyshev, D.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schulz, A.; Sehgal, N.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strigari, L.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ -ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. These constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DM of mass ≲100 GeV annihilating via quark and τ -lepton channels.

  2. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with Six Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Albert, A; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caputo, R; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Essig, R; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Horan, D; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Llena Garde, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Malyshev, D; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Meyer, M; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sehgal, N; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strigari, L; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ-ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. These constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DM of mass ≲100  GeV annihilating via quark and τ-lepton channels.

  3. Hubble space telescope absolute proper motions of NGC 6681 (M70) and the sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Massari, D.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.

    2013-12-10

    We have measured absolute proper motions for the three populations intercepted in the direction of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6681: the cluster itself, the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, and the field. For this, we used Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS optical imaging data separated by a temporal baseline of 5.464 yr. Five background galaxies were used to determine the zero point of the absolute-motion reference frame. The resulting absolute proper motion of NGC 6681 is (μ{sub α}cos δ, μ{sub δ}) = (1.58 ± 0.18, –4.57 ± 0.16) mas yr{sup –1}. This is the first estimate ever made for this cluster. For the Sgr dSph we obtain (μ{sub α}cos δ, μ{sub δ}) = –2.54 ± 0.18, –1.19 ± 0.16) mas yr{sup –1}, consistent with previous measurements and with the values predicted by theoretical models. The absolute proper motion of the Galaxy population in our field of view is (μ{sub α}cos δ, μ{sub δ}) = (– 1.21 ± 0.27, –4.39 ± 0.26) mas yr{sup –1}. In this study we also use background Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal stars to determine the rotation of the globular cluster in the plane of the sky and find that NGC 6681 is not rotating significantly: v {sub rot} = 0.82 ± 1.02 km s{sup –1} at a distance of 1' from the cluster center.

  4. Subclasses of Type Ia Supernovae as the Origin of [α/Fe] Ratios in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Chiaki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Hachisu, Izumi

    2015-05-01

    Recent extensive observations of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) have revealed the existence of a diversity of SNe Ia, including SNe Iax. We introduce two possible channels in the single degenerate scenario: (1) double detonations in sub-Chandrasekhar (Ch) mass CO white dwarfs (WDs), where a thin He envelope is developed with relatively low accretion rates after He novae even at low metallicities, and (2) carbon deflagrations in Ch-mass, possibly hybrid C+O+Ne WDs, where WD winds occur at [Fe/H] ˜ -2.5 at high accretion rates. These subclasses of SNe Ia are rarer than “normal” SNe Ia and do not affect the chemical evolution in the solar neighborhood, but can be very important in metal-poor systems with stochastic star formation. In dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group, the decrease of [α/Fe] ratios at [Fe/H] ˜ -2 to -1.5 can be produced depending on the star formation history. SNe Iax give high [Mn/Fe], while sub-Ch-mass SNe Ia give low [Mn/Fe], and thus a model including a mix of the two is favored by the available observations.

  5. ASSESSING THE MILKY WAY SATELLITES ASSOCIATED WITH THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Law, David R.; Majewski, Steven R. E-mail: srm4n@virginia.ed

    2010-08-01

    Numerical models of the tidal disruption of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy have recently been developed that for the first time simultaneously satisfy most observational constraints on the angular position, distance, and radial velocity trends of both leading and trailing tidal streams emanating from the dwarf. We use these dynamical models in combination with extant three-dimensional position and velocity data for Galactic globular clusters and dSph galaxies to identify those Milky Way satellites that are likely to have originally formed in the gravitational potential well of the Sgr dwarf, and have been stripped from Sgr during its extended interaction with the Milky Way. We conclude that the globular clusters Arp 2, M 54, NGC 5634, Terzan 8, and Whiting 1 are almost certainly associated with the Sgr dwarf, and that Berkeley 29, NGC 5053, Pal 12, and Terzan 7 are likely to be as well (albeit at lower confidence). The initial Sgr system therefore may have contained five to nine globular clusters, corresponding to a specific frequency S{sub N} = 5-9 for an initial Sgr luminosity M{sub V} = -15.0. Our result is consistent with the 8 {+-} 2 genuine Sgr globular clusters expected on the basis of statistical modeling of the Galactic globular cluster distribution and the corresponding false-association rate due to chance alignments with the Sgr streams. The globular clusters identified as most likely to be associated with Sgr are consistent with previous reconstructions of the Sgr age-metallicity relation, and show no evidence for a second-parameter effect shaping their horizontal branch morphologies. We find no statistically significant evidence to suggest that any of the recently discovered population of ultrafaint dwarf galaxies are associated with the Sgr tidal streams, but are unable to rule out this possibility conclusively for all systems.

  6. Assessing the Milky Way Satellites Associated with the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, David R.; Majewski, Steven R.

    2010-08-01

    Numerical models of the tidal disruption of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf galaxy have recently been developed that for the first time simultaneously satisfy most observational constraints on the angular position, distance, and radial velocity trends of both leading and trailing tidal streams emanating from the dwarf. We use these dynamical models in combination with extant three-dimensional position and velocity data for Galactic globular clusters and dSph galaxies to identify those Milky Way satellites that are likely to have originally formed in the gravitational potential well of the Sgr dwarf, and have been stripped from Sgr during its extended interaction with the Milky Way. We conclude that the globular clusters Arp 2, M 54, NGC 5634, Terzan 8, and Whiting 1 are almost certainly associated with the Sgr dwarf, and that Berkeley 29, NGC 5053, Pal 12, and Terzan 7 are likely to be as well (albeit at lower confidence). The initial Sgr system therefore may have contained five to nine globular clusters, corresponding to a specific frequency SN = 5-9 for an initial Sgr luminosity MV = -15.0. Our result is consistent with the 8 ± 2 genuine Sgr globular clusters expected on the basis of statistical modeling of the Galactic globular cluster distribution and the corresponding false-association rate due to chance alignments with the Sgr streams. The globular clusters identified as most likely to be associated with Sgr are consistent with previous reconstructions of the Sgr age-metallicity relation, and show no evidence for a second-parameter effect shaping their horizontal branch morphologies. We find no statistically significant evidence to suggest that any of the recently discovered population of ultrafaint dwarf galaxies are associated with the Sgr tidal streams, but are unable to rule out this possibility conclusively for all systems.

  7. Deep XMM observations of Draco rule out at the 99 per cent confidence level a dark matter decay origin for the 3.5 keV line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeltema, Tesla; Profumo, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    We searched for an X-ray line at energies around 3.5 keV in deep, ˜1.6 Ms XMM-Newton observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco. No line was found in either the Metal Oxide Semi-conductor (MOS) or the p-type/n-type semiconductor (PN) detectors. The data in this energy range are completely consistent with a single, unfolded power-law modelling the particle background, which dominates at these energies, plus instrumental lines; the addition of a ˜3.5 keV line feature gives no improvement to the fit. The corresponding upper limit on the line flux rules out a dark matter decay origin for the 3.5 keV line found in observations of clusters of galaxies and in the Galactic Centre at greater than 99 per cent confidence level.

  8. Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Satellites in the Common Surface-density Dark Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Yusuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the growth histories of dark matter halos associated with dwarf satellites in Local Group galaxies and the resultant evolution of the baryonic component. Our model is based on the recently proposed property that the mean surface density of a dark halo inside a radius at maximum circular velocity {V}{{\\max }} is universal over a large range of {V}{{\\max }}. Given that a surface density of 20 M ⊙ pc-2 well explains dwarf satellites in the Milky Way and Andromeda, we find that the evolution of the dark halo in this common surface-density scale is characterized by the rapid increase of the halo mass assembled by the redshift {z}{{TT}} of the tidal truncation by its host halo, at early epochs of {z}{{TT}}≳ 6 or {V}{{\\max }}≲ 22 km s-1. This mass growth of the halo is slow at lower {z}{{TT}} or larger {V}{{\\max }}. Taking into account the baryon content in this dark halo evolution, under the influence of the ionizing background radiation, we find that the dwarf satellites are divided into roughly two families: those with {V}{{\\max }}≲ 22 km s-1 having high star formation efficiency and those with larger {V}{{\\max }} having less efficient star formation. This semianalytical model is in agreement with the high-resolution numerical simulation for galaxy formation and with the observed star formation histories for Fornax and Leo II. This suggests that the evolution of a dark halo may play a key role in understanding star formation histories in dwarf satellites.

  9. Study of the X-ray Source Population and the Dark Matter Halo in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxiess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Manami; Saeedi, Sara; Ducci, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    The Local Group of galaxies consists of the large spiral galaxies Milky Way, M31, and M33, and a large number of dwarf galaxies. Most of the galaxies are dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, which are the least luminous galaxies with the largest mass-to-light ratios. In general, dSphs show no recent star formation, which means that they are ideal laboratories to study the old, pristine stellar populations formed in the earliest epochs of chemical enrichment of the Universe. Observations with today's X-ray telescopes have revealed X-ray sources in the fields of the dSphs that are satellites of our Milky Way. The study of X-ray source population in these galaxies and their X-ray luminosity function will help us to understand the source population in galaxies at the early stages of galaxy evolution. Moreover, the existence of X-ray binaries in these galaxies, if confirmed, would indicate that these galaxies are able to retain their compact objects, which are believed to obtain high kick-velocities at their birth in asymmetric supernova explosions. Therefore, the search for and the study of X-ray sources in dSph galaxies in the Local Group will enable us to constrain the mass of dark matter in these galaxies and test different models of the formation and growth of galaxies out of primordial dark-matter halos.I will discuss, how, owing to the large effective area, large field of view and high spatial and time resolution, Athena and its WFI will make it possible to obtain unprecedented observational data of the stellar populations in primordial galaxies and dark-matter halo distribution in our Local Group through the study of high-energy sources.

  10. Search for Gamma-Ray Emission from DES Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Candidates with Fermi-LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Drlica-Wagner, A.; et al.

    2015-08-04

    Due to their proximity, high dark-matter (DM) content, and apparent absence of non-thermal processes, Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) are excellent targets for the indirect detection of DM. Recently, eight new dSph candidates were discovered using the first year of data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We searched for gamma-ray emission coincident with the positions of these new objects in six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data. We found no significant excesses of gamma-ray emission. Under the assumption that the DES candidates are dSphs with DM halo properties similar to the known dSphs, we computed individual and combined limits on the velocity-averaged DM annihilation cross section for these new targets. If the estimated DM content of these dSph candidates is confirmed, they will constrain the annihilation cross section to lie below the thermal relic cross section for DM particles with masses $\\lesssim 20\\,\\mathrm{GeV}$ annihilating via the $b\\bar{b}$ or τ(+)τ(-) channels.

  11. Life and death of a hero - lessons learned from modelling the dwarf spheroidal Hercules: an incorrect orbit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaña, M.; Fellhauer, M.; Smith, R.; Candlish, G. N.; Cohen, R.; Farias, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Hercules is a dwarf spheroidal satellite of the Milky Way, found at a distance of ≈138 kpc, and showing evidence of tidal disruption. It is very elongated and exhibits a velocity gradient of 16 ± 3 km s-1 kpc-1. Using these data a possible orbit of Hercules has previously been deduced in the literature. In this study, we make use of a novel approach to find a best-fitting model that follows the published orbit. Instead of using trial and error, we use a systematic approach in order to find a model that fits multiple observables simultaneously. As such, we investigate a much wider parameter range of initial conditions and ensure we have found the best match possible. Using a dark matter free progenitor that undergoes tidal disruption, our best-fitting model can simultaneously match the observed luminosity, central surface brightness, effective radius, velocity dispersion, and velocity gradient of Hercules. However, we find it is impossible to reproduce the observed elongation and the position angle of Hercules at the same time in our models. This failure persists even when we vary the duration of the simulation significantly, and consider a more cuspy density distribution for the progenitor. We discuss how this suggests that the published orbit of Hercules is very likely to be incorrect.

  12. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamical Simulations of the Supernovae-driven Gas Loss in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Ursa Minor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caproni, A.; Lanfranchi, G. A.; da Silva, A. Luiz; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.

    2015-06-01

    As is usual in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, today the Local Group galaxy Ursa Minor is depleted of its gas content. How this galaxy lost its gas is still a matter of debate. To study the history of gas loss in Ursa Minor, we conducted the first three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of this object, assuming that the gas loss was driven by galactic winds powered only by type II supernovae (SNe II). The initial gas setup and supernova (SN) rates used in our simulations are mainly constrained by the inferred star formation history and the observed velocity dispersion of Ursa Minor. After 3 Gyr of evolution, we found that the gas removal efficiency is higher when the SN rate is increased, and also when the initial mean gas density is lowered. The derived mass-loss rates are systematically higher in the central regions (\\lt 300 pc), even though such a relationship has not been strictly linear in time and in terms of the galactic radius. The filamentary structures induced by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and the concentric shells related to the acoustic waves driven by SNe can account for the inferred mass losses from the simulations. Our results suggest that SNe II are able to transfer most of the gas from the central region outward to the galactic halo. However, other physical mechanisms must be considered in order to completely remove the gas at larger radii.

  13. Spatial dependence of the star formation history in the central regions of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino, Andrés; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Aparicio, Antonio; Gallart, Carme; Carrera, Ricardo; Monelli, Matteo; Buonanno, Roberto; Marconi, Gianni

    2013-08-01

    We present the star formation history (SFH) and the age-metallicity relation (AMR) in three fields of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. They sample a region spanning from the centre of the galaxy to beyond one core radius, which allows studying galactocentric gradients. In all the cases, we found stars as old as 12 Gyr, together with intermediate-age and young stellar populations. The last star formation events, as young as 1 Gyr old, are mainly located in the central region, which may indicate that the gas reservoir in the outer parts of the galaxy would have been exhausted earlier than in the centre or removed by tidal interactions. The AMR is smoothly increasing in the three analysed regions and similar to each other, indicating that no significant metallicity gradient is apparent within and around the core radius of Fornax. No significant traces of global UV-reionization or local SNe feedback are appreciated in the early SFH of Fornax. Our study is based on VLT photometry as deep as I ˜ 24.5 and the IAC-STAR/IAC-POP/MINNIAC suite of codes for the determination of the SFH in resolved stellar populations.

  14. Scl-1013644: a CEMP-s star in the Sculptor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, C.; Da Costa, G. S.; Yong, D.; Norris, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of the Milky Way and its satellites have paid special attention to the importance of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars due to their involvement in Galactic formation history and their possible connection with the chemical elements originating in the first stellar generation. In an ongoing study of red giants in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy we have discovered a star with extremely strong CN and CH molecular bands. This star, Scl-1013644, has previously been identified by Geisler et al. (2005) as a star with an enrichment in the heavy elements. Spectrum synthesis has been used to derive the carbon, nitrogen and barium abundances for Scl-1013644. Our findings are [C/Fe] = +0.8, [N/Fe] = -0.3 and [Ba/Fe] = +2.1 with the latter result consistent with the value found by Geisler et al. (2005). These results reveal Scl-1013644 as a CEMP-s star, the third such star discovered in this dwarf galaxy.

  15. Scl-1013644: a CEMP-s star in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, C.; Da Costa, G. S.; Yong, D.; Norris, J. E.

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies of the Milky Way and its satellites have paid special attention to the importance of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars due to their involvement in Galactic formation history and their possible connection with the chemical elements originating in the first stellar generation. In an ongoing study of red giants in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy, we have discovered a star with extremely strong CN and CH molecular bands. This star, Scl-1013644, has previously been identified by Geisler et al. as a star with an enrichment in the heavy elements. Spectrum synthesis has been used to derive the carbon, nitrogen and barium abundances for Scl-1013644. Our findings are [C/Fe] = +0.8, [N/Fe] = -0.3 and [Ba/Fe] = +2.1 with the latter result consistent with the value found by Geisler et al. These results reveal Scl-1013644 as a CEMP-s star, the third such star discovered in this dwarf galaxy.

  16. DRACO Flowpath Performance and Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, D. R.; McDonald, Jon

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Space Transportation (AST) project office has challenged NASA to design, manufacture, ground-test and flight-test an axisymmetric, hydrocarbon-fueled, flight-weight, ejector-ramjet engine system testbed no later than 2005. To accomplish this, a multi-center NASA team has been assembled. The goal of this team, led by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), is to develop propulsion technologies that demonstrate rocket and airbreathing combined-cycle operation (DRACO). Current technical activities include flowpath conceptual design, engine systems conceptual design, and feasibility studies investigating the integration and operation of the DRACO engine with a Lockheed D-21B drone. This paper focuses on the activities of the Flowpath Systems Product Development Team (PDT), led by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC) and supported by NASA-MSFC and TechLand Research, Inc. The objective of the Flowpath PDT at the start of the DRACO program was to establish a conceptual design of the flowpath aerodynamic lines, determine the preliminary performance, define the internal environments, and support the DRACO testbed concept feasibility studies. To accomplish these tasks, the PDT convened to establish a baseline flowpath concept. With the conceptual lines defined, cycle analysis tasks were planned and the flowpath performance and internal environments were defined. Additionally, sensitivity studies investigating the effects of inlet reference area, combustion performance, and combustor/nozzle materials selection were performed to support the Flowpath PDT design process. Results of these tasks are the emphasis of this paper and are intended to verify the feasibility of the DRACO flowpath and engine system as well as identify the primary technical challenges inherent in the flight-weight design of an advanced propulsion technology demonstration engine. Preliminary cycle performance decks were developed to support the testbed concept feasibility studies but are not

  17. A generic method to constrain the dark matter model parameters from Fermi observations of dwarf spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sming Tsai, Yue-Lin; Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-03-01

    Observation of γ-rays from dwarf galaxies is an effective way to search for particle dark matter. Using 4-year data of Fermi-LAT observations on a series of Milky Way satellites, we develop a general way to search for the signals from dark matter annihilation in such objects. Instead of giving prior information about the energy spectrum of dark matter annihilation, we bin the Fermi-LAT data into several energy bins and build a likelihood map in the ``energy bin - flux'' plane. The final likelihood of any spectrum can be easily derived through combining the likelihood of all the energy bins. It gives consistent result with that directly calculated using the Fermi Scientific Tool. This method is very efficient for the study of any specific dark matter models with γ-rays. We use the new likelihood map with Fermi-LAT 4 year data to fit the parameter space in three representative dark matter models: i) toy dark matter model, ii) effective dark matter operators, and iii) supersymmetric neutralino dark matter.

  18. A generic method to constrain the dark matter model parameters from Fermi observations of dwarf spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan E-mail: yuanq@ihep.ac.cn

    2013-03-01

    Observation of γ-rays from dwarf galaxies is an effective way to search for particle dark matter. Using 4-year data of Fermi-LAT observations on a series of Milky Way satellites, we develop a general way to search for the signals from dark matter annihilation in such objects. Instead of giving prior information about the energy spectrum of dark matter annihilation, we bin the Fermi-LAT data into several energy bins and build a likelihood map in the ''energy bin - flux'' plane. The final likelihood of any spectrum can be easily derived through combining the likelihood of all the energy bins. It gives consistent result with that directly calculated using the Fermi Scientific Tool. This method is very efficient for the study of any specific dark matter models with γ-rays. We use the new likelihood map with Fermi-LAT 4 year data to fit the parameter space in three representative dark matter models: i) toy dark matter model, ii) effective dark matter operators, and iii) supersymmetric neutralino dark matter.

  19. DISCOVERY OF SUPER-Li-RICH RED GIANTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Deng, Licai; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-06-10

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the {sup 7}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 4}He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants-14 of which are new discoveries-among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li){sub NLTE} = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief.

  20. A discrete chemo-dynamical model of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor: mass profile, velocity anisotropy and internal rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; van de Ven, Glenn; Watkins, Laura L.; Posti, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    We present a new discrete chemo-dynamical axisymmetric modelling technique, which we apply to the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor. The major improvement over previous Jeans models is that realistic chemical distributions are included directly in the dynamical modelling of the discrete data. This avoids loss of information due to spatial binning and eliminates the need for hard cuts to remove contaminants and to separate stars based on their chemical properties. Using a combined likelihood in position, metallicity and kinematics, we find that our models naturally separate Sculptor stars into a metal-rich and a metal-poor population. Allowing for non-spherical symmetry, our approach provides a central slope of the dark matter density of γ = 0.5 ± 0.3. The metal-rich population is nearly isotropic (with β _r^{red} = 0.0± 0.1), while the metal-poor population is tangentially anisotropic (with β _r^{blue} = -0.2± 0.1) around the half-light radius of 0.26 kpc. A weak internal rotation of the metal-rich population is revealed with vmax/σ0 = 0.15 ± 0.15. We run tests using mock data to show that a discrete data set with ˜6000 stars is required to distinguish between a core (γ = 0) and cusp (γ = 1), and to constrain the possible internal rotation to better than 1σ confidence with our model. We conclude that our discrete chemo-dynamical modelling technique provides a flexible and powerful tool to robustly constrain the internal dynamics of multiple populations, and the total mass distribution in a stellar system.

  1. Estimating the evolution of gas in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy from its star formation history: an illustrative example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Qian, Y.-Z.; Jing, Y. P.

    2016-03-01

    We propose that detailed data on the star formation history of a dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) may be used to estimate the evolution of the total mass Mg(t) for cold gas in its star-forming disc. Using Fornax as an illustrative example, we estimate its Mg(t) and the corresponding net gas flow rate ΔF(t) assuming a global star formation rate ψ(t) = λ*(t)[Mg(t)/M⊙]α consistent with observations of nearby galaxies. We identify the onset of the transition in ΔF(t) from a net inflow to a net outflow as the time tsat at which the Fornax halo became a Milky Way satellite and estimate the evolution of its total mass Mh(t) at t < tsat using the median halo growth history in the current cosmology and its present mass within the half-light radius derived from observations. We examine three different cases of α = 1, 1.5, and 2, and justify the corresponding λ*(t) by comparing the gas mass fraction fg(t) = Mg(t)/Mh(t) at t < tsat with results from simulations of gas accretion by haloes in a reionized universe. We find that the Fornax halo grew to Mh(tsat) ˜ 2 × 109 M⊙ at tsat ˜ 5 or 8 Gyr, in broad agreement with previous studies using data on its stellar kinematics and its orbital motion. We describe qualitatively the evolution of Fornax as a satellite and discuss potential extension of our approach to other dSphs.

  2. A discrete chemo-dynamical model of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor: mass profile, velocity anisotropy and internal rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; van de Ven, Glenn; Watkins, Laura L.; Posti, Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    We present a new discrete chemo-dynamical axisymmetric modeling technique, which we apply to the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor. The major improvement over previous Jeans models is that realistic chemical distributions are included directly in the dynamical modelling of the discrete data. This avoids loss of information due to spatial binning and eliminates the need for hard cuts to remove contaminants and to separate stars based on their chemical properties. Using a combined likelihood in position, metallicity and kinematics, we find that our models naturally separate Sculptor stars into a metal-rich and a metal-poor population. Allowing for non-spherical symmetry, our approach provides a central slope of the dark matter density of γ = 0.5 ± 0.3. The metal-rich population is nearly isotropic (with β _r^{red} = 0.0± 0.1) while the metal-poor population is tangentially anisotropic (with β _r^{blue} = -0.2± 0.1) around the half light radius of 0.26 kpc. A weak internal rotation of the metal-rich population is revealed with vmax/σ0 = 0.15 ± 0.15. We run tests using mock data to show that a discrete dataset with ˜6000 stars is required to distinguish between a core (γ = 0) and cusp (γ = 1), and to constrain the possible internal rotation to better than 1 σ confidence with our model. We conclude that our discrete chemo-dynamical modelling technique provides a flexible and powerful tool to robustly constrain the internal dynamics of multiple populations, and the total mass distribution in a stellar system.

  3. Searching for dwarf spheroidal galaxies and other galactic dark matter substructures with the Fermi large area telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex

    2013-08-01

    Over the past century, it has become clear that about a quarter of the known universe is composed of an invisible, massive component termed ''dark matter''. Some of the most popular theories of physics beyond the Standard Model suggest that dark matter may be a new fundamental particle that could self-annihilate to produce γ rays. Nearby over-densities in the dark matter halo of our Milky Way present some of the most promising targets for detecting the annihilation of dark matter. We used the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for γ rays produced by dark matter annihilation in Galactic dark matter substructures. We searched for γ-ray emission coincident with Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies, which trace the most massive Galactic dark matter substructures. We also sought to identify nearby dark matter substructures that lack all astrophysical tracers and would be detectable only through γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation. We found no conclusive evidence for γ-ray emission from dark matter annihilation, and we set stringent and robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. While γ-ray searches for dark matter substructure are currently the most sensitive and robust probes of dark matter annihilation, they are just beginning to intersect the theoretically preferred region of dark matter parameter space. Thus, we consider future prospects for increasing the sensitivity of γ-ray searches through improvements to the LAT instrument performance and through upcoming wide- field optical surveys.

  4. Discovery of Super-Li-rich Red Giants in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Deng, Licai

    2012-06-01

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the 7Li(p, α)4He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants—14 of which are new discoveries—among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] <~ -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li)NLTE = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Magellan/M2FS Spectroscopy of the Reticulum 2 Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Bailey, John I., III; Koposov, Sergey E.; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N. Wyn

    2015-08-01

    We present results from spectroscopic observations with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) of 182 stellar targets along the line of sight (LOS) to the newly discovered “ultrafaint” object Reticulum 2 (Ret 2). For 37 of these targets, the spectra are sufficient to provide simultaneous estimates of LOS velocity ({v}{los}, median random error {δ }{v{los}}=1.4 km s‑1), effective temperature ({T}{eff}, {δ }{T{eff}}=478 K), surface gravity ({log}g, {δ }{logg}=0.63 dex), and iron abundance ([{Fe}/{{H}}], {δ }[{Fe/{{H}}]}=0.47 dex). We use these results to confirm 17 stars as members of Ret 2. From the member sample we estimate a velocity dispersion of {σ }{v{los}}= {3.6}-0.7+1.0 km s‑1 about a mean of < {v}{los}> = {64.3}-1.2+1.2 km s‑1 in the solar rest frame (∼ -90.9 km s‑1 in the Galactic rest frame), and a metallicity dispersion of {σ }[{Fe/{{H}}]} = {0.49}-0.14+0.19 dex about a mean of < [{Fe}/{{H}}]> = -{2.58}-0.33+0.34. These estimates marginalize over possible velocity and metallicity gradients, which are consistent with zero. Our results place Ret 2 on chemodynamical scaling relations followed by the Milky Way’s dwarf-galactic satellites. Under assumptions of dynamic equilibrium and negligible contamination from binary stars—both of which must be checked with deeper imaging and repeat spectroscopic observations—the estimated velocity dispersion suggests a dynamical mass of M({R}{{h}})≈ 5{R}{{h}}{σ }{v{los}}{}2/(2G) = {2.4}-0.8+1.4× {10}5 {M}ȯ enclosed within projected halflight radius {R}{{h}}∼ 32 pc, with mass-to-light ratio ≈ 2M({R}{{h}})/{L}V = {467}-168+286 in solar units. This paper presents data gathered with the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  6. VARIABLE STARS IN THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY URSA MAJOR I

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, Alessia; Moretti, Maria Ida; Cusano, Felice; Clementini, Gisella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Coppola, Giuseppina; Musella, Ilaria; Marconi, Marcella E-mail: fcusano@na.astro.it E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it E-mail: imoretti@na.astro.it E-mail: ilaria@na.astro.it

    2013-04-10

    We have performed the first study of the variable star population of Ursa Major I (UMa I), an ultra-faint dwarf satellite recently discovered around the Milky Way (MW) by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Combining time series observations in the B and V bands from four different telescopes, we have identified seven RR Lyrae stars in UMa I, of which five are fundamental-mode (RRab) and two are first-overtone pulsators (RRc). Our V, B - V color-magnitude diagram of UMa I reaches V {approx} 23 mag (at a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}6) and shows features typical of a single old stellar population. The mean pulsation period of the RRab stars (P{sub ab}) = 0.628, {sigma} = 0.071 days (or (P{sub ab}) = 0.599, {sigma} = 0.032 days, if V4, the longest period and brightest variable, is discarded) and the position on the period-amplitude diagram suggest an Oosterhoff-intermediate classification for the galaxy. The RR Lyrae stars trace the galaxy horizontal branch (HB) at an average apparent magnitude of (V(RR)) = 20.43 {+-} 0.02 mag (average on six stars and discarding V4), giving in turn a distance modulus for UMa I of (m - M){sub 0} = 19.94 {+-} 0.13 mag, distance d = 97.3{sup +6.0}{sub -5.7} kpc, in the scale where the distance modulus of the Large Magellanic Cloud is 18.5 {+-} 0.1 mag. Isodensity contours of UMa I red giants and HB stars (including the RR Lyrae stars identified in this study) show that the galaxy has an S-shaped structure, which is likely caused by the tidal interaction with the MW. Photometric metallicities were derived for six of the UMa I RR Lyrae stars from the parameters of the Fourier decomposition of the V-band light curves, leading to an average metal abundance of [Fe/H] = -2.29 dex ({sigma} = 0.06 dex, average on six stars) on the Carretta et al. metallicity scale.

  7. BOO-1137-AN EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STAR IN THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY BOOeTES I

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2010-03-01

    We present high-resolution (R {approx} 40,000), high-signal-to-noise ratio (20-90) spectra of an extremely metal-poor giant star Boo-1137 in the 'ultra-faint' dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Booetes I, absolute magnitude M{sub V} {approx} -6.3. We derive an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -3.7, making this the most metal-poor star as yet identified in an ultra-faint dSph. Our derived effective temperature and gravity are consistent with its identification as a red giant in Booetes I. Abundances for a further 15 elements have also been determined. Comparison of the relative abundances, [X/Fe], with those of the extremely metal-poor red giants of the Galactic halo shows that Boo-1137 is 'normal' with respect to C and N, the odd-Z elements Na and Al, the iron-peak elements, and the neutron-capture elements Sr and Ba, in comparison with the bulk of the Milky Way halo population having [Fe/H] {approx}<-3.0. The alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti are all higher by DELTA[X/Fe] {approx} 0.2 than the average halo values. Monte Carlo analysis indicates that DELTA[alpha/Fe] values this large are expected with a probability {approx}0.02. The elemental abundance pattern in Boo-1137 suggests inhomogeneous chemical evolution, consistent with the wide internal spread in iron abundances we previously reported. The similarity of most of the Boo-1137 relative abundances with respect to halo values, and the fact that the alpha-elements are all offset by a similar small amount from the halo averages, points to the same underlying galaxy-scale stellar initial mass function, but that Boo-1137 likely originated in a star-forming region where the abundances reflect either poor mixing of supernova (SN) ejecta, or poor sampling of the SN progenitor mass range, or both.

  8. Clean Kinematic Samples in Dwarf Spheroidals: An Algorithm for Evaluating Membership and Estimating Distribution Parameters When Contamination is Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Sen, Bodhisattva; Woodroofe, Michael

    2009-02-01

    We develop an algorithm for estimating parameters of a distribution sampled with contamination. We employ a statistical technique known as "expectation maximization" (EM). Given models for both member and contaminant populations, the EM algorithm iteratively evaluates the membership probability of each discrete data point, then uses those probabilities to update parameter estimates for member and contaminant distributions. The EM approach has wide applicability to the analysis of astronomical data. Here we tailor an EM algorithm to operate on spectroscopic samples obtained with the Michigan-MIKE Fiber System (MMFS) as part of our Magellan survey of stellar radial velocities in nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. These samples, to be presented in a companion paper, contain discrete measurements of line-of-sight velocity, projected position, and pseudo-equivalent width of the Mg-triplet feature, for ~1000-2500 stars per dSph, including some fraction of contamination by foreground Milky Way stars. The EM algorithm uses all of the available data to quantify dSph and contaminant distributions. For distributions (e.g., velocity and Mg-index of dSph stars) assumed to be Gaussian, the EM algorithm returns maximum-likelihood estimates of the mean and variance, as well as the probability that each star is a dSph member. These probabilities can serve as weights in subsequent analyses. Applied to our MMFS data, the EM algorithm identifies more than 5000 stars as probable dSph members. We test the performance of the EM algorithm on simulated data sets that represent a range of sample size, level of contamination, and amount of overlap between dSph and contaminant velocity distributions. The simulations establish that for samples ranging from large (N ~ 3000, characteristic of the MMFS samples) to small (N ~ 30), resembling new samples for extremely faint dSphs), the EM algorithm distinguishes members from contaminants and returns accurate parameter estimates much more

  9. Insights from the outskirts: Chemical and dynamical properties in the outer parts of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Benjamin; Koch, Andreas; Walker, Matthew; Johnson, Christian I.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Gilmore, Gerard

    2014-12-01

    We present radial velocities and [Fe/H] abundances for 340 stars in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal from R ~ 16 000 spectra. The targets were obtained in the outer parts of the galaxy, a region that has been poorly studied. Our sample shows a wide range in [Fe/H], between -0.5 and -3.0 dex, in which we detect three subgroups. Removal of stars belonging to the most metal-rich population produces a truncated metallicity distribution function that is identical to Sculptor, indicating that these systems shared a similar early evolution, except that Fornax experienced a late, intense period of star formation (SF). The derived age-metallicity relation shows a fast increase in [Fe/H] at early ages, after which the enrichment flattens significantly for stars younger than ~ 8 Gyr. Additionally, the data indicate a strong population of stars around 4 Gyr, followed by a second rapid enrichment in [Fe/H]. A leaky-box chemical enrichment model generally matches the observed relation but predicts neither a significant population of young stars nor strong enrichment at late times. The young population in Fornax may therefore stem from an externally triggered SF event. Our dynamical analysis reveals an increasing velocity dispersion with decreasing [Fe/H] from σsys ≈ 7.5 km s-1 to ≥ 14 km s-1. The large velocity dispersion at low metallicities is possibly the result of a non-Gaussian velocity distribution among stars older than ~ 8 Gyr. Our sample also includes members from the Fornax globular clusters H2 and H5. In agreement with past studies we find [Fe/H] = -2.04 ± 0.04 and a mean radial velocity RV = 59.36 ± 0.31 km s-1 for H2 and [Fe/H] = -2.02 ± 0.11 and RV = 59.39 ± 0.44 km s-1 for H5. Finally, we test different calibrations of the calcium triplet over more than 2 dex in [Fe/H] and find best agreement with the calibration equations provided by Carrera et al. (2013, MNRAS, 434, 1681). Overall, we find high complexity in the chemical and dynamical properties, with

  10. Searching for dark matter annihilation from Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies with six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.

    2015-11-30

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ-ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. As a result, these constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DM of mass ≲100 GeV annihilating via quark and τ-lepton channels.

  11. Searching for dark matter annihilation from Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies with six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.

    2015-11-30

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ-ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. As a result, these constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DMmore » of mass ≲100 GeV annihilating via quark and τ-lepton channels.« less

  12. A New View of the Dwarf Spheroidal Satellites of the Milky Way From VLT/FLAMES: Where are the Very Metal Poor Stars?

    SciTech Connect

    Helmi, Amina; Irwin, M.J.; Tolstoy, E.; Battaglia, G.; Hill, V.; Jablonka, P.; Venn, K.; Shetrone, M.; Letarte, B.; Arimoto, N.; Abel, T.; Francois, P.; Kaufer, A.; Primas, F.; Sadakane, K.; Szeifert, T.; /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron. /Meudon Observ. /LASTRO Observ. /Victoria U. /Texas U., McDonald Observ. /Tokyo, Astron. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /European Southern Obs., Chile /European Southern Observ. /Osaka Kyoiku U.

    2006-11-20

    As part of the Dwarf galaxies Abundances and Radial-velocities Team (DART) Programme, we have measured the metallicities of a large sample of stars in four nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph): Sculptor, Sextans, Fornax and Carina. The low mean metal abundances and the presence of very old stellar populations in these galaxies have supported the view that they are fossils from the early Universe. However, contrary to naive expectations, we find a significant lack of stars with metallicities below [Fe/H] {approx} -3 dex in all four systems. This suggests that the gas that made up the stars in these systems had been uniformly enriched prior to their formation. Furthermore, the metal-poor tail of the dSph metallicity distribution is significantly different from that of the Galactic halo. These findings show that the progenitors of nearby dSph appear to have been fundamentally different from the building blocks of the Milky Way, even at the earliest epochs.

  13. LAMOST 1: A Disrupted Satellite in the Constellation Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, John J.; Smith, Martin C.; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Using Large Sky Area Multi-object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope spectroscopic data, we find a strong signal of a comoving group of stars in the constellation of Draco. The group, observed near the apocenter of its orbit, is 2.6 kpc from the Sun with a metallicity of -0.64 dex. The system is observed as a streaming population of unknown provenance with mass of about 2.1+/- 0.4\\cdot {10}4 {M}⊙ and brightness of about {M}V˜ -3.6. Its high metallicity, diffuse physical structure, and eccentric orbit may indicate that the progenitor satellite was a globular cluster rather than a dwarf galaxy or an open cluster.

  14. The Metamorphosis of Tidally Stirred Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Lucio; Governato, Fabio; Colpi, Monica; Moore, Ben; Quinn, Thomas; Wadsley, James; Stadel, Joachim; Lake, George

    2001-10-01

    We present results from high-resolution N-body/SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamic) simulations of rotationally supported dwarf irregular galaxies moving on bound orbits in the massive dark matter halo of the Milky Way. The dwarf models span a range in disk surface density and the masses and sizes of their dark halos are consistent with the predictions of cold dark matter cosmogonies. We show that the strong tidal field of the Milky Way determines severe mass loss in their halos and disks and induces bar and bending instabilities that transform low surface brightness dwarfs (LSBs) into dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) and high surface brightness dwarfs (HSBs) into dwarf ellipticals (dEs) in less than 10 Gyr. The final central velocity dispersions of the remnants are in the range 8-30 km s-1 and their final v/σ falls to values less than 0.5, matching well the kinematics of early-type dwarfs. The transformation requires the orbital time of the dwarf to be <~3-4 Gyr, which implies a halo as massive and extended as predicted by hierarchical models of galaxy formation to explain the origin of even the farthest dSph satellites of the Milky Way, Leo I, and Leo II. We show that only dwarfs with central dark matter densities as high as those of Draco and Ursa Minor can survive for 10 Gyr in the proximity of the Milky Way. A correlation between the central density and the distance of the dwarfs from the primary galaxy is indeed expected in hierarchical models, in which the densest objects should have small orbital times because of their early formation epochs. Part of the gas is stripped and part is funneled to the center because of the bar, generating one strong burst of star formation in HSBs and smaller, multiple bursts in LSBs. Therefore, the large variety of star formation histories observed in Local Group dSphs arises because different types of dIrr progenitors respond differently to the external perturbation of the Milky Way. Our evolutionary model naturally explains the

  15. MEASURING DETAILED CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES FROM CO-ADDED MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. I. TESTS USING MILKY WAY DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Lei; Peng, Eric W.; Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2013-05-01

    The ability to measure metallicities and {alpha}-element abundances in individual red giant branch (RGB) stars using medium-resolution spectra (R Almost-Equal-To 6000) is a valuable tool for deciphering the nature of Milky Way dwarf satellites and the history of the Galactic halo. Extending such studies to more distant systems like Andromeda is beyond the ability of the current generation of telescopes, but by co-adding the spectra of similar stars, we can attain the necessary signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to make detailed abundance measurements. In this paper, we present a method to determine metallicities and {alpha}-element abundances using the co-addition of medium-resolution spectra. We test the method of spectral co-addition using high-S/N spectra of more than 1300 RGB stars from Milky Way globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies obtained with the Keck II telescope/DEIMOS spectrograph. We group similar stars using photometric criteria and compare the weighted ensemble average abundances ([Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) of individual stars in each group with the measurements made on the corresponding co-added spectrum. We find a high level of agreement between the two methods, which permits us to apply this co-added spectra technique to more distant RGB stars, like stars in the M31 satellite galaxies. This paper outlines our spectral co-addition and abundance measurement methodology and describes the potential biases in making these measurements.

  16. Sagittarius II, Draco II and Laevens 3: Three New Milky Way Satellites Discovered in the Pan-STARRS 1 3 Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Slater, Colin T.; Sweeney, William E.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Huxor, Avon P.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Draper, Peter W.; Hodapp, Klaus A.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Magnier, Eugene A.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Tonry, John L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    We present the discovery of three new Milky Way satellites from our search for compact stellar overdensities in the photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS 1, or PS1) 3π survey. The first satellite, Laevens 3, is located at a heliocentric distance of d = 67 ± 3 kpc. With a total magnitude of MV = ‑4.4 ± 0.3 and a half-light radius of rh = 7 ± 2 pc, its properties resemble those of outer halo globular clusters. The second system, Draco II/Laevens 4, is a closer and fainter satellite (d ∼ 20 kpc, MV = ‑2.9 ± 0.8), whose uncertain size ({r}h={19}-6+8 {pc}) renders its classification difficult without kinematic information; it could either be a faint and extended globular cluster or a faint and compact dwarf galaxy. The third satellite, Sagittarius II/Laevens 5 (Sgr II), has an ambiguous nature, as it is either the most compact dwarf galaxy or the most extended globular cluster in its luminosity range ({r}h={37}-8+9 {pc} and MV = ‑5.2 ± 0.4). At a heliocentric distance of 67 ± 5 kpc, this satellite lies intriguingly close to the expected location of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream behind the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr dSph). If confirmed through spectroscopic follow up, this connection would locate this part of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream that has so far gone undetected. It would further suggest that Sgr II was brought into the Milky Way halo as a satellite of the Sgr dSph.

  17. Sagittarius II, Draco II and Laevens 3: Three New Milky Way Satellites Discovered in the Pan-STARRS 1 3π Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Slater, Colin T.; Sweeney, William E.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Huxor, Avon P.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Draper, Peter W.; Hodapp, Klaus A.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Magnier, Eugene A.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Tonry, John L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    We present the discovery of three new Milky Way satellites from our search for compact stellar overdensities in the photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS 1, or PS1) 3π survey. The first satellite, Laevens 3, is located at a heliocentric distance of d = 67 ± 3 kpc. With a total magnitude of MV = -4.4 ± 0.3 and a half-light radius of rh = 7 ± 2 pc, its properties resemble those of outer halo globular clusters. The second system, Draco II/Laevens 4, is a closer and fainter satellite (d ˜ 20 kpc, MV = -2.9 ± 0.8), whose uncertain size ({r}h={19}-6+8 {pc}) renders its classification difficult without kinematic information; it could either be a faint and extended globular cluster or a faint and compact dwarf galaxy. The third satellite, Sagittarius II/Laevens 5 (Sgr II), has an ambiguous nature, as it is either the most compact dwarf galaxy or the most extended globular cluster in its luminosity range ({r}h={37}-8+9 {pc} and MV = -5.2 ± 0.4). At a heliocentric distance of 67 ± 5 kpc, this satellite lies intriguingly close to the expected location of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream behind the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr dSph). If confirmed through spectroscopic follow up, this connection would locate this part of the trailing arm of the Sagittarius stellar stream that has so far gone undetected. It would further suggest that Sgr II was brought into the Milky Way halo as a satellite of the Sgr dSph.

  18. Spectroscopic Confirmation of the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy d0994+71 as a Member of the M81 Group of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Chiboucas, Kristin; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.

    2016-10-01

    We use Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to measure the first velocity and metallicity of a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy beyond the Local Group using resolved stars. Our target, d0944+71, is a faint dSph found in the halo of the massive spiral galaxy M81 by Chiboucas et al. We coadd the spectra of 27 individual stars and measure a heliocentric radial velocity of ‑38 ± 10 km s‑1. This velocity is consistent with d0944+71 being gravitationally bound to M81. We coadd the spectra of the 23 stars that are consistent with being red giant branch stars and measure an overall metallicity of [Fe/H] = ‑1.3 ± 0.3 based on the calcium triplet lines. This metallicity is consistent with d0944+71 following the metallicity‑luminosity relation for Local Group dSphs. We investigate several potential sources of observational bias but find that our sample of targeted stars is representative of the metallicity distribution function of d0944+71 and any stellar contamination due to seeing effects is negligible. The low ellipticity of the galaxy and its position in the metallicity‑luminosity relation suggest that d0944+71 has not been affected by strong tidal stripping.

  19. OBSERVATIONS OF MILKY WAY DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES WITH THE FERMI-LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTOR AND CONSTRAINTS ON DARK MATTER MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S. E-mail: cohen@slac.stanford.ed E-mail: Eric.NUSS@lpta.in2p3.f

    2010-03-20

    We report on the observations of 14 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope taken during the first 11 months of survey mode operations. The Fermi telescope, which is conducting an all-sky gamma-ray survey in the 20 MeV to >300 GeV energy range, provides a new opportunity to test particle dark matter models through the expected gamma-ray emission produced by pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Local Group dSphs, the largest galactic substructures predicted by the cold dark matter scenario, are attractive targets for such indirect searches for dark matter because they are nearby and among the most extreme dark matter dominated environments. No significant gamma-ray emission was detected above 100 MeV from the candidate dwarf galaxies. We determine upper limits to the gamma-ray flux assuming both power-law spectra and representative spectra from WIMP annihilation. The resulting {integral} flux above 100 MeV is constrained to be at a level below around 10{sup -9} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Using recent stellar kinematic data, the gamma-ray flux limits are combined with improved determinations of the dark matter density profile in eight of the 14 candidate dwarfs to place limits on the pair-annihilation cross section of WIMPs in several widely studied extensions of the standard model, including its supersymmetric extension and other models that received recent attention. With the present data, we are able to rule out large parts of the parameter space where the thermal relic density is below the observed cosmological dark matter density and WIMPs (neutralinos here) are dominantly produced non-thermally, e.g., in models where supersymmetry breaking occurs via anomaly mediation. The gamma-ray limits presented here also constrain some WIMP models proposed to explain the Fermi and PAMELA e {sup +} e {sup -} data, including low-mass wino-like neutralinos and models with TeV masses pair annihilating into

  20. TURNING THE TIDES ON THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES: COMA BERENICES AND URSA MAJOR II

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Ricardo R.; Geha, Maria; Willman, Beth E-mail: marla.geha@yale.ed

    2010-07-15

    We present deep CFHT/MegaCam photometry of the ultra-faint Milky Way satellite galaxies: Coma Berenices (ComBer) and Ursa Major II (UMa II). These data extend to r {approx} 25, corresponding to 3 mag below the main-sequence turn-offs in these galaxies. We robustly calculate a total luminosity of M{sub V} = -3.8 {+-} 0.6 for ComBer and M{sub V} = -3.9 {+-} 0.5 for UMa II, in agreement with previous results and confirming that these galaxies are among the faintest of the known dwarf satellites of the Milky Way. ComBer shows a fairly regular morphology with no signs of active tidal stripping down to a surface brightness limit of 32.4 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Using a maximum likelihood analysis, we calculate the half-light radius of ComBer to be r{sub half} = 74 {+-} 4 pc (5.8 {+-} 0.'3) and its ellipticity {epsilon} = 0.36 {+-} 0.04. In contrast, UMa II shows signs of ongoing disruption. We map its morphology down to {mu}{sub V} = 32.6 mag arcsec{sup -2} and found that UMa II is larger than previously determined, extending at least {approx}600 pc (1.{sup 0}1 on the sky) and it is also quite elongated with an overall ellipticity of {epsilon} = 0.50 {+-} 0.2. However, our estimate for the half-light radius, 123 {+-} 3 pc (14.1 {+-} 0.'3) is similar to previous results. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of potential indirect dark matter detections and galaxy formation. We conclude that while ComBer appears to be a stable dwarf galaxy, UMa II shows signs of ongoing tidal interaction.

  1. Improved Photometry of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Crowded-Field Images: Structure and Dark Matter Content in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolčić, V.; Zucker, D. B.; Bell, E. F.; Coleman, M. G.; Rix, H. W.; Schinnerer, E.; Ivezić, Ž.; Kniazev, A.

    2007-11-01

    We explore how well crowded-field point-source photometry can be accomplished with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. For this purpose, we present a photometric pipeline based on DoPHOT and tuned for analyzing crowded-field images from the SDSS. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that the completeness of source extraction is above 80% to an i-band AB magnitude of lesssim21 and a stellar surface density of ~200 arcmin-2. Hence, a specialized data pipeline can be efficiently used for, e.g., nearby resolved galaxies in SDSS images, where the standard SDSS photometric package Photo, when applied in normal survey mode, gives poor results. We apply our pipeline to an area of ~3.55 deg2 around the dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Leo I and construct a high signal-to-noise ratio star count map of Leo I via an optimized filter in color-magnitude space (g, r, i). This filter reduces the foreground contamination by ~80% and enhances the central stellar surface density contrast of the dwarf by a factor of gtrsim4, making this study the deepest wide-field study of the Leo I dSph based on accurate CCD photometry. Although the radial surface density profile deviates from the best-fit empirical King model toward outer radii, we find no evidence for tidal debris out to a stellar surface density of 4 × 10-3 of the central value. We determine the total luminosity of Leo I and model its mass using the spherical and isotropic Jeans equation. Assuming that mass follows light, we constrain a lower limit on the total mass of the dSph to be (1.7 ± 0.2) × 107 Modot. On the other hand, if the mass in Leo I is dominated by a constant-density dark matter (DM) halo, then the mass within the central 12‧ is (2 ± 0.6) × 108 Modot. This leads to a mass-to-light ratio of Gt6 in I-band solar units, and possibly >75 if the DM halo dominates the mass and extends further out than 12‧. In summary, our results show that Leo I is a symmetric, relaxed, and bound system; this supports the idea

  2. Binary populations in Milky Way satellite galaxies: Constraints from multi-epoch data in the Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Quinn E.

    2013-12-20

    We introduce a likelihood analysis of multi-epoch stellar line-of-sight velocities to constrain the binary fractions and binary period distributions of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. This method is applied to multi-epoch data from the Magellan/MMFS survey of the Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dSph galaxies, after applying a model for the measurement errors that accounts for binary orbital motion. We find that the Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dSphs are consistent with having binary populations similar to that of Milky Way field binaries to within 68% confidence limits, whereas the Carina dSph is remarkably deficient in binaries with periods less than ∼10 yr. If Carina is assumed to have a period distribution identical to that of the Milky Way field, its best-fit binary fraction is 0.14{sub −0.05}{sup +0.28}, and is constrained to be less than 0.5 at the 90% confidence level; thus it is unlikely to host a binary population identical to that of the Milky Way field. By contrast, the best-fit binary fraction of the combined sample of all four galaxies is 0.46{sub −0.09}{sup +0.13}, consistent with that of Milky Way field binaries. More generally, we infer probability distributions in binary fraction, mean orbital period, and dispersion of periods for each galaxy in the sample. Looking ahead to future surveys, we show that the allowed parameter space of binary fraction and period distribution parameters in dSphs will be narrowed significantly by a large multi-epoch survey. However, there is a degeneracy between the parameters that is unlikely to be broken unless the measurement error is of order ∼0.1 km s{sup –1} or smaller, presently attainable only by a high-resolution spectrograph.

  3. Binary Populations in Milky Way Satellite Galaxies: Constraints from Multi-epoch Data in the Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, Quinn E.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a likelihood analysis of multi-epoch stellar line-of-sight velocities to constrain the binary fractions and binary period distributions of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. This method is applied to multi-epoch data from the Magellan/MMFS survey of the Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dSph galaxies, after applying a model for the measurement errors that accounts for binary orbital motion. We find that the Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dSphs are consistent with having binary populations similar to that of Milky Way field binaries to within 68% confidence limits, whereas the Carina dSph is remarkably deficient in binaries with periods less than ~10 yr. If Carina is assumed to have a period distribution identical to that of the Milky Way field, its best-fit binary fraction is 0.14^{+0.28}_{-0.05}, and is constrained to be less than 0.5 at the 90% confidence level; thus it is unlikely to host a binary population identical to that of the Milky Way field. By contrast, the best-fit binary fraction of the combined sample of all four galaxies is 0.46^{+0.13}_{-0.09}, consistent with that of Milky Way field binaries. More generally, we infer probability distributions in binary fraction, mean orbital period, and dispersion of periods for each galaxy in the sample. Looking ahead to future surveys, we show that the allowed parameter space of binary fraction and period distribution parameters in dSphs will be narrowed significantly by a large multi-epoch survey. However, there is a degeneracy between the parameters that is unlikely to be broken unless the measurement error is of order ~0.1 km s-1 or smaller, presently attainable only by a high-resolution spectrograph.

  4. Limits on the significant mass-loss scenario based on the globular clusters of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaj, P.; Baumgardt, H.

    2016-03-01

    Many of the scenarios proposed to explain the origin of chemically peculiar stars in globular clusters (GCs) require significant mass loss (≥95 per cent) to explain the observed fraction of such stars. In the GCs of the Fornax dwarf galaxy, significant mass loss could be a problem. Larsen et al. showed that there is a large ratio of GCs to metal-poor field stars in Fornax and about 20-25 per cent of all the stars with [Fe/H] < -2 belong to the four metal-poor GCs. This imposes an upper limit of ˜80 per cent mass loss that could have happened in Fornax GCs. In this paper, we propose a solution to this problem by suggesting that stars can leave the Fornax galaxy. We use a series of N-body simulations to determine the limit of mass loss from Fornax as a function of the initial orbital radii of GCs and the speed with which stars leave Fornax GCs. We consider a set of cored and cuspy density profiles for Fornax. Our results show that with a cuspy model for Fornax, the fraction of stars that leave the galaxy can be as high as ˜90 per cent, when the initial orbital radii of GCs are R = 2-3 kpc and the initial speed of stars is v > 20 km s-1. We show that such large velocities can be achieved by mass loss induced by gas expulsion but not mass loss induced by stellar evolution. Our results imply that one cannot interpret the metallicity distribution of Fornax field stars as evidence against significant mass loss in Fornax GCs, if mass loss is due to gas expulsion.

  5. Dark subhalo accretion onto dwarf galaxies in CDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Chervin Fabien Pierre; Penarrubia, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Baryonic feedback at high redshifts has been proposed to explain the inference of dark matter (DM) cores in low-surface brightness and dwarf spheroidal galaxies. However, in the currently favoured cosmological model, structure grows hierarchically and CDM predicts a myriad of small substructures orbiting dwarf galaxies, some luminous (which habe been observationally identified in recent years), some dark. If such dark subhalos get close enough to the centre of cored dwarfs, they could potentially lead to cusp regrowth.In this talk, I will present the evolution of the DM profiles of dwarf galaxies driven by the accretion of DM substructures through controlled N-body experiments. The initial conditions assume that supernova feedback erases the primordial DM cusps at high redshift of halos with final masses $10^{9}-10^{10} \\rm{M_{\\odot}}$ by z=0. The orbits and masses of the infalling substructures are borrowed from the {\\it Aquarius} cosmological simulations. I will show that some halos that undergo 1:3 down to 1:30 mergers are susceptible to reform a DM cusp by $z\\approx 0$ and how this depends on the internal structure of the infalling substructures. I will show that within CDM a non-negligible level of scatter in the mass profiles of dwarfs is to be expected given their stochastic mass accretion histories and their diverse (observed) star formation histories and that this effect could possibly explain the existence of dense dwarfs like Draco, Ursa Minor or Tucana. I will argue how this process is unique to CDM and may be falsifiable. If time allows, I will show preliminary results from suites of cosmological N-body simulations designed to address the statistics of this effect.

  6. Phytochemical and anti-staphylococcal biofilm assessment of Dracaena draco L. Spp. draco resin

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, V. Di; Pitonzo, R.; Schillaci, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dracaena draco L. ssp. draco is known as the “dragon's blood tree” and it is endemic from the Canary Islands and Morocco. Objective: Carry out phytochemical investigation of acetonic extracts of red resin obtained from the trunk of D. draco, to obtain to the isolation of the most abundant resin constituents, belonging to the class of flavonoids: flavans, along with homoisoflavans and homoisoflavanones. Materials and Methods: The structures of the isolated compounds were established by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry data and comparison with literature data. The acetonic extract was evaluated for its anti-staphylococcal properties against two reference strains. Results: The acetonic extracts resulted inactive at the maximum tested concentration of 1000 μg/ml against free living forms of tested staphylococci, but they showed a very interesting activity in the prevention of a biofilm formation at a concentration equal to 200 μg/ml against S. aureus ATCC 25923. PMID:24991124

  7. A MegaCam Survey of Outer Halo Satellites. VI. The Spatially Resolved Star-formation History of the Carina Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Felipe A.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Simon, Joshua D.; Geha, Marla; Côté, Patrick; Guzmán, Andrés E.; Stetson, Peter; Djorgovski, S. G.

    2016-10-01

    We present the spatially resolved star-formation history (SFH) of the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy, obtained from deep, wide-field g and r imaging and a metallicity distribution from the literature. Our photometry covers ˜2 deg2, reaching up to ˜10 times the half-light radius of Carina with a completeness higher than 50% at g ˜ 24.5, more than one magnitude fainter than the oldest turnoff. This is the first time a combination of depth and coverage of this quality has been used to derive the SFH of Carina, enabling us to trace its different populations with unprecedented accuracy. We find that Carina’s SFH consists of two episodes well separated by a star-formation temporal gap. These episodes occurred at old (\\gt 10 Gyr) and intermediate (2-8 Gyr) ages. Our measurements show that the old episode comprises the majority of the population, accounting for 54 ± 5% of the stellar mass within 1.3 times the King tidal radius, while the total stellar mass derived for Carina is 1.60+/- 0.09× {10}6 {M}⊙ , and the stellar mass-to-light ratio is 1.8 ± 0.2. The SFH derived is consistent with no recent star formation, which hints that the observed blue plume is due to blue stragglers. We conclude that the SFH of Carina evolved independently of the tidal field of the Milky Way, since the frequency and duration of its star-formation events do not correlate with its orbital parameters. This result is supported by the age-metallicity relation observed in Carina and the gradients calculated indicating that outer regions are older and more metal-poor. Based on observations obtained with the MegaCam imager on the Magellan II-Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory in the Atacama Region, Chile. This telescope is operated by a consortium consisting of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Harvard University, MIT, the University of Michigan, and the University of Arizona.

  8. THE SPLASH SURVEY: INTERNAL KINEMATICS, CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES, AND MASSES OF THE ANDROMEDA I, II, III, VII, X, AND XIV DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J.; Geha, Marla C.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kirby, Evan N.

    2010-03-10

    We present new Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations of hundreds of individual stars along the sightline to the first three of the Andromeda (M31) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies to be discovered, And I, II, and III, and combine them with recent spectroscopic studies by our team of three additional M31 dSphs, And VII, X, and XIV, as a part of the SPLASH Survey (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo). Member stars of each dSph are isolated from foreground Milky Way dwarf stars and M31 field contamination using a variety of photometric and spectroscopic diagnostics. Our final spectroscopic sample of member stars in each dSph, for which we measure accurate radial velocities with a median uncertainty (random plus systematic errors) of 4-5 km s{sup -1}, includes 80 red giants in And I, 95 in And II, 43 in And III, 18 in And VII, 22 in And X, and 38 in And XIV. The sample of confirmed members in the six dSphs is used to derive each system's mean radial velocity, intrinsic central velocity dispersion, mean abundance, abundance spread, and dynamical mass. This combined data set presents us with a unique opportunity to perform the first systematic comparison of the global properties (e.g., metallicities, sizes, and dark matter masses) of one-third of Andromeda's total known dSph population with Milky Way counterparts of the same luminosity. Our overall comparisons indicate that the family of dSphs in these two hosts have both similarities and differences. For example, we find that the luminosity-metallicity relation is very similar between L {approx} 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7} L{sub sun}, suggesting that the chemical evolution histories of each group of dSphs are similar. The lowest luminosity M31 dSphs appear to deviate from the relation, possibly suggesting tidal stripping. Previous observations have noted that the sizes of M31's brightest dSphs are systematically larger than Milky Way satellites of similar luminosity. At lower luminosities

  9. DRACO development for 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, Milad; Moses, Gregory

    2006-10-01

    The DRACO (r-z) lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics laser fusion simulation code is being extended to model 3D hydrodynamics in (x-y-z) coordinates with hexahedral cells on a structured grid. The equation of motion is solved with a lagrangian update with optional rezoning. The fluid equations are solved using an explicit scheme based on (Schulz, 1964) while the SALE-3D algorithm (Amsden, 1981) is used as a template for computing cell volumes and other quantities. A second order rezoner has been added which uses linear interpolation of the underlying continuous functions to preserve accuracy (Van Leer, 1976). Artificial restoring force terms and smoothing algorithms are used to avoid grid distortion in high aspect ratio cells. These include alternate node couplers along with a rotational restoring force based on the Tensor Code (Maenchen, 1964). Electron and ion thermal conduction is modeled using an extension of Kershaw's method (Kershaw, 1981) to 3D geometry. Test problem simulations will be presented to demonstrate the applicability of this new version of DRACO to the study of fluid instabilities in three dimensions.

  10. Three new flavans in dragon's blood from Daemonorops draco.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qian; Saito, Yoshinori; Matsuo, Yosuke; Li, Hai-Zhou; Takashi, Tanaka

    2015-01-01

    Three new flavans were isolated from chloroform extracts of dragon's blood from Daemonorops draco, together with eight known compounds. The structures of the new flavans were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis. These compounds are the first examples of 2-methoxyflavans from D. draco and regarded as derivatives of biogenetic intermediates from flavans to chalcones, which are characteristic of the dragon's blood. PMID:25601087

  11. Three new flavans in dragon's blood from Daemonorops draco.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qian; Saito, Yoshinori; Matsuo, Yosuke; Li, Hai-Zhou; Takashi, Tanaka

    2015-01-01

    Three new flavans were isolated from chloroform extracts of dragon's blood from Daemonorops draco, together with eight known compounds. The structures of the new flavans were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis. These compounds are the first examples of 2-methoxyflavans from D. draco and regarded as derivatives of biogenetic intermediates from flavans to chalcones, which are characteristic of the dragon's blood.

  12. CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT IN THE FAINTEST GALAXIES: THE CARBON AND IRON ABUNDANCE SPREADS IN THE BOOeTES I DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY AND THE SEGUE 1 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Gilmore, Gerard; Belokurov, V.; Zucker, Daniel B.; Frebel, Anna; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2010-11-10

    We present an AAOmega spectroscopic study of red giants in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Booetes I (M{sub V} {approx} -6) and the Segue 1 system (M{sub V} {approx} -1.5), either an extremely low luminosity dwarf galaxy or an unusually extended globular cluster. Both Booetes I and Segue 1 have significant abundance dispersions in iron and carbon. Booetes I has a mean abundance of [Fe/H] = -2.55 {+-} 0.11 with an [Fe/H] dispersion of {sigma} = 0.37 {+-} 0.08, and abundance spreads of {Delta}[Fe/H] = 1.7 and {Delta}[C/H] = 1.5. Segue 1 has a mean of [Fe/H] = -2.7 {+-} 0.4 with [Fe/H] dispersion of {sigma} = 0.7 {+-} 0.3, and abundances spreads of {Delta}[Fe/H] = 1.6 and {Delta}[C/H] = 1.2. Moreover, Segue 1 has a radial-velocity member at four half-light radii that is extremely metal-poor and carbon-rich, with [Fe/H] = -3.5, and [C/Fe] = +2.3. Modulo an unlikely non-member contamination, the [Fe/H] abundance dispersion confirms Segue 1 as the least-luminous ultra-faint dwarf galaxy known. For [Fe/H] < -3.0, stars in the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites exhibit a dependence of [C/Fe] on [Fe/H] similar to that in Galactic field halo stars. Thus, chemical evolution proceeded similarly in the formation sites of the Galaxy's extremely metal-poor halo stars and in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We confirm the correlation between (decreasing) luminosity and both (decreasing) mean metallicity and (increasing) abundance dispersion in the Milky Way dwarf galaxies at least as faint as M{sub V} = -5. The very low mean iron abundances and the high carbon and iron abundance dispersions in Segue 1 and Booetes I are consistent with highly inhomogeneous chemical evolution starting in near zero-abundance gas. These ultra-faint dwarf galaxies are apparently surviving examples of the very first bound systems.

  13. Dark matter signals from Draco and Willman 1: prospects for MAGIC II and CTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bringmann, Torsten; Doro, Michele; Fornasa, Mattia E-mail: michele.doro@pd.infn.it

    2009-01-15

    The next generation of ground-based Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes will play an important role in indirect dark matter searches. In this article, we consider two particularly promising candidate sources for dark matter annihilation signals, the nearby dwarf galaxies Draco and Willman 1, and study the prospects of detecting such a signal for the soon-operating MAGIC II telescope system as well as for the planned installation of CTA, taking special care of describing the experimental features that affect the detectional prospects. For the first time in such studies, we fully take into account the effect of internal bremsstrahlung, which has recently been shown to considerably enhance, in some cases, the gamma-ray flux in the high energies domain where Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes operate, thus leading to significantly harder annihilation spectra than traditionally considered. While the detection of the spectral features introduced by internal bremsstrahlung would constitute a smoking gun signature for dark matter annihilation, we find that for most models the overall flux still remains at a level that will be challenging to detect, unless one adopts somewhat favorable descriptions of the smooth dark matter distribution in the dwarfs.

  14. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhi, Jayashri; Duorah, H. L.; Barua, A. G.; Duorah, K.

    2016-09-01

    Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are thought to be good candidates for dark matter search due to their high mass-to-light (M/L) ratio. One of the most favored dark matter candidates is the lightest neutralino (neutral χ particle) as predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). In this study, we model the gamma ray emission from dark matter annihilation coming from the nearby dSph galaxies Draco, Segue 1, Ursa Minor and Willman 1, taking into account the contribution from prompt photons and photons produced from inverse Compton scattering off starlight and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons by the energetic electrons and positrons from dark matter annihilation. We also compute the energy spectra of electrons and positrons from the decay of dark matter annihilation products. Gamma ray spectra and fluxes for both prompt and inverse Compton emission have been calculated for neutralino annihilation over a range of masses and found to be in agreement with the observed data. It has been found that the ultra faint dSph galaxy Segue 1 gives the largest gamma ray flux limits while the lowest gamma ray flux limits has been obtained from Ursa Minor. It is seen that for larger M/L ratio of dwarf galaxies the intensity pattern originating from e + e - pairs scattering off CMB photons is separated by larger amount from that off the starlight photons for the same neutralino mass. As the e + e - energy spectra have an exponential cut off at high energies, this may allow to discriminate some dark matter scenarios from other astrophysical sources. Finally, some more detailed study about the effect of inverse Compton scattering may help constrain the dark matter signature in the dSph galaxies.

  15. Dark matter annihilation and decay from non-spherical dark halos in galactic dwarf satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kohei; Ichikawa, Koji; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Ibe, Masahiro; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Sugai, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the Milky Way are the primary targets in the indirect searches for particle dark matter. To set robust constraints on candidate dark matter particles, understanding the dark halo structure of these systems is of substantial importance. In this paper, we first evaluate the astrophysical factors for dark matter annihilation and decay for 24 dSphs, taking into account a non-spherical dark halo, using generalized axisymmetric mass models based on axisymmetric Jeans equations. First, from a fitting analysis of the most recent kinematic data available, our axisymmetric mass models are a much better fit than previous spherical ones, thus, our work should be the most realistic and reliable estimator for astrophysical factors. Secondly, we find that among analysed dSphs, the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Triangulum II and Ursa Major II are the most promising but large uncertain targets for dark matter annihilation while the classical dSph Draco is the most robust and detectable target for dark matter decay. It is also found that the non-sphericity of luminous and dark components influences the estimate of astrophysical factors, even though these factors largely depend on the sample size, the prior range of parameters and the spatial extent of the dark halo. Moreover, owing to these effects, the constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross-section are more conservative than those of previous spherical works. These results are important for optimizing and designing dark matter searches in current and future multi-messenger observations by space and ground-based telescopes.

  16. Stellar kinematics and dark matter in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Giuseppina

    2016-08-01

    In this review I will discuss the current status on determinations of the dark matter content and distribution in Milky Way dwarf spheroidals, for which the available data-sets allow the application of sophisticated mass modeling techniques.

  17. Carbon stars in the outer spheroid of NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, S.; Battinelli, P.; Artigau, E.

    2006-09-01

    Context: .From a 2°× 2° of NGC 6822 survey we have previously established that this Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy possesses a huge spheroid having more than one degree in length. This spheroid is in rotation but its rotation curve is known only within ~ 15' from the center. It is therefore critical to identify bright stars belonging to the spheroid to characterize, as far as possible, its outer kinematics. Aims: .We use the new wide field near infrared imager CPAPIR, operated by the SMARTS consortium, to acquire J, Ks images of two 34.8'× 34.8' areas in the outer spheroid to search for C stars. Methods: .The colour diagram of the fields allows the identification of 192 C stars candidates but a study of the FWHM of the images permits the rejection of numerous non-stellar objects with colours similar to C stars. Results: . We are left with 75 new C stars, their mean Ks magnitude and mean colour are similar to the bulk of known NGC 6822 C stars. Conclusions: .This outer spheroid survey confirms that the intermediate-age AGB stars are a major contributor to the stellar populations of the spheroid. The discovery of some 50 C stars well beyond the limit of the previously known rotation curve calls for a promising spectroscopic follow-up to a major axis distance of 40'.

  18. Light Scattering by Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-Ming; Ji, Xia

    Nowadays, with the development of technology, particles with size at nanoscale have been synthesized in experiments. It is noticed that anisotropy is an unavoidable problem in the production of nanospheres. Besides, nonspherical nanoparticles have also been extensively used in experiments. Comparing with spherical model, spheroidal model can give a better description for the characteristics of nonspherical particles. Thus the study of analytical solution for light scattering by spheroidal particles has practical implications. By expanding incident, scattered, and transmitted electromagnetic fields in terms of appropriate vector spheroidal wave functions, an analytic solution is obtained to the problem of light scattering by spheroids. Unknown field expansion coefficients can be determined with the combination of boundary conditions and rotational-translational addition theorems for vector spheroidal wave functions. Based on the theoretical derivation, a Fortran code has been developed to calculate the extinction cross section and field distribution, whose results agree well with those obtain by FDTD simulation. This research is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 91230203.

  19. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): the stellar mass budget of galaxy spheroids and discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Lange, Rebecca; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Andrews, Stephen K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Cluver, Michelle E.; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Luke J. M.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kafle, Prajwal R.; Liske, Jochen; Meyer, Martin

    2016-11-01

    We build on a recent photometric decomposition analysis of 7506 Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey galaxies to derive stellar mass function fits to individual spheroid and disc component populations down to a lower mass limit of log(M*/M⊙) = 8. We find that the spheroid/disc mass distributions for individual galaxy morphological types are well described by single Schechter function forms. We derive estimates of the total stellar mass densities in spheroidsspheroid = 1.24 ± 0.49 × 108 M⊙ Mpc -3h0.7) and discs (ρdisc = 1.20 ± 0.45 × 108 M⊙ Mpc -3h0.7), which translates to approximately 50 per cent of the local stellar mass density in spheroids and 48 per cent in discs. The remaining stellar mass is found in the dwarf `little blue spheroid' class, which is not obviously similar in structure to either classical spheroid or disc populations. We also examine the variation of component mass ratios across galaxy mass and group halo mass regimes, finding the transition from spheroid to disc mass dominance occurs near galaxy stellar mass ˜1011 M⊙ and group halo mass ˜1012.5 M⊙h-1. We further quantify the variation in spheroid-to-total mass ratio with group halo mass for central and satellite populations as well as the radial variation of this ratio within groups.

  20. GALEX OBSERVATIONS OF DIFFUSE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM DRACO

    SciTech Connect

    Sujatha, N. V.; Murthy, Jayant; Suresh, Rahul; Henry, Richard Conn; Bianchi, Luciana E-mail: murthy@iiap.res.i E-mail: rch@pha.jhu.ed

    2010-11-10

    We have studied small-scale (2') spatial variation of the diffuse ultraviolet (UV) radiation using a set of 11 Galaxy Evolution Explorer deep observations in the constellation of Draco. We find a good correlation between the observed UV background and the infrared (IR) 100 {mu}m flux, indicating that the dominant contributor of the diffuse background in the field is scattered starlight from the interstellar dust grains. We also find strong evidence of additional emission in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) band which is absent in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band. This is most likely due to Lyman band emission from molecular hydrogen in a ridge of dust running through the field and to line emissions from species such as C IV (1550 A) and Si II (1533 A) in the rest of the field. A strong correlation exists between the FUV/NUV ratio and the FUV intensity in the excess emission regions in the FUV band irrespective of the optical depth of the region. The optical depth increases more rapidly in the UV than the IR and we find that the UV/IR ratio drops off exponentially with increasing IR due to saturation effects in the UV. Using the positional details of Spitzer extragalactic objects, we find that the contribution of extragalactic light in the diffuse NUV background is 49 {+-} 13 photons cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1} s{sup -1} A{sup -1} and is 30 {+-} 10 photons cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1} s{sup -1} A{sup -1} in the FUV band.

  1. ANDROMEDA DWARFS IN LIGHT OF MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    McGaugh, Stacy; Milgrom, Mordehai

    2013-03-20

    We compare the recently published velocity dispersions for 17 Andromeda dwarf spheroidals with estimates of the modified Newtonian dynamics predictions, based on the luminosities of these dwarfs, with reasonable stellar mass-to-light values and no dark matter. We find that the two are consistent within the uncertainties. We further predict the velocity dispersions of another 10 dwarfs for which only photometric data are currently available.

  2. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    SciTech Connect

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone

    2015-04-15

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  3. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone

    2015-04-01

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  4. Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Le-Wei; Kang, Xiao-Kang; Leong, Mook-Seng

    2001-11-01

    The flagship monograph addressing the spheroidal wave function and its pertinence to computational electromagnetics Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory presents in detail the theory of spheroidal wave functions, its applications to the analysis of electromagnetic fields in various spheroidal structures, and provides comprehensive programming codes for those computations. The topics covered in this monograph include: Spheroidal coordinates and wave functions Dyadic Green's functions in spheroidal systems EM scattering by a conducting spheroid EM scattering by a coated dielectric spheroid Spheroid antennas SAR distributions in a spheroidal head model The programming codes and their applications are provided online and are written in Mathematica 3.0 or 4.0. Readers can also develop their own codes according to the theory or routine described in the book to find subsequent solutions of complicated structures. Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory is a fundamental reference for scientists, engineers, and graduate students practicing modern computational electromagnetics or applied physics.

  5. The Draco Nebula, a Molecular Cloud Associated with a High Velocity Cloud?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P. W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV = 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: XMM spectral analysis of Draco dSph (Sonbas+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I.

    2016-06-01

    The 87ks image of Draco (Figure 1; RA=17:20:12.4 and DEC=+57:54:55.3 (J2000)) was obtained by the European Space Agency's (ESA) X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton (XMM-Newton) between 2009 August 4 and 28 (PI: K. Dhuga). We used the 3XMM-DR54 (3XMM) catalog (Rosen et al. 2015, IX/46) for the automated multiwavelength (MW) classification described in Section 3.1. The parameters obtained from the 3XMM catalog are the source coordinates and X-ray fluxes in four different energy bands. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) partly observed Draco with the WFPC2, ACS/WFC, and WFC3/UVIS cameras between 2001 Aug 18 and 2013 Oct 14. (1 data file).

  7. Sequencing and analysis of complete mitochondrial genome of Apodemus draco (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).

    PubMed

    Wei, Haixue; Jia, Qiang; Li, Fengjun; Liu, Yongcheng; Chen, Shunde; Yong, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The genus Apodemus are the most common small rodents in fields. They are also one of the best species for biogeographic study and understanding the environmental changes. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Apodemus draco is determined. The mitogenome is 16 220 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a control region, with a base composition of 35.1% A, 29.0% T, 23.8% C and 12.1% G. The nucleotide sequence data of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of Apodemus draco and other 23 rodents were used for mitochondrial genome phylogenetic analyses. The monophyly of the genus Apodemus was well supported with sister to the genus Mus. Bayesian analysis also suggested that Apodemus draco was a sister to Apodemus latronum. The present study may facilitate further investigation of the molecular evolution and biogeographic study of the genus Apodemus.

  8. Sequencing and analysis of complete mitochondrial genome of Apodemus draco (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).

    PubMed

    Wei, Haixue; Jia, Qiang; Li, Fengjun; Liu, Yongcheng; Chen, Shunde; Yong, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The genus Apodemus are the most common small rodents in fields. They are also one of the best species for biogeographic study and understanding the environmental changes. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Apodemus draco is determined. The mitogenome is 16 220 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a control region, with a base composition of 35.1% A, 29.0% T, 23.8% C and 12.1% G. The nucleotide sequence data of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of Apodemus draco and other 23 rodents were used for mitochondrial genome phylogenetic analyses. The monophyly of the genus Apodemus was well supported with sister to the genus Mus. Bayesian analysis also suggested that Apodemus draco was a sister to Apodemus latronum. The present study may facilitate further investigation of the molecular evolution and biogeographic study of the genus Apodemus. PMID:27158789

  9. Stellar kinematics and dark matter in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Giuseppina

    2015-08-01

    In this review I will tour through the most recent findings on the internal kinematic properties of Local Group dwarf galaxies, as determined from extensive spectroscopic surveys of their stellar component.I will also discuss the current status on determinations of the dark matter content and distribution in these objects, with particular focus on the Milky Way dwarf spheroidals, for which the available data-sets allow the application of sophisticated mass modeling techniques.

  10. Local Group dwarf galaxies: nature and nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, Till; Scannapieco, Cecilia; White, Simon

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in a high-resolution, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of a Milky Way sized halo and its environment. Our simulation includes gas cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, metal enrichment and ultraviolet heating. In total, 90 satellites and more than 400 isolated dwarf galaxies are formed in the simulation, allowing a systematic study of the internal and environmental processes that determine their evolution. We find that 95 per cent of satellite galaxies are gas free at z= 0, and identify three mechanisms for gas loss: supernova feedback, tidal stripping and photoevaporation due to re-ionization. Gas-rich satellite galaxies are only found with total masses above ˜5 × 109 M⊙. In contrast, for isolated dwarf galaxies, a total mass of ˜109 M⊙ constitutes a sharp transition; less massive galaxies are predominantly gas free at z= 0, more massive, isolated dwarf galaxies are often able to retain their gas. In general, we find that the total mass of a dwarf galaxy is the main factor which determines its star formation, metal enrichment and its gas content, but that stripping may explain the observed difference in gas content between field dwarf galaxies and satellites with total masses close to 109 M⊙. We also find that a morphological transformation via tidal stripping of infalling, luminous dwarf galaxies whose dark matter is less concentrated than their stars cannot explain the high total mass-to-light ratios of the faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  11. Axisymmetric scattering of scalar waves by spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lekner, John; Boyack, Rufus

    2011-06-01

    A phase shift formulation of scattering by oblate and prolate spheroids is presented, in parallel with the partial-wave theory of scattering by spherical obstacles. The crucial step is application of a finite Legendre transform to the Helmholtz equation in spheroidal coordinates. In the long-wavelength limit the spheroidal analog of the spherical scattering length immediately gives the cross section. Analytical results are readily obtained for scattering of Schrödinger particle waves by impenetrable spheroids, and for scattering of sound waves by acoustically soft spheroidal objects. The method is restricted to scattering by spheroids whose symmetry axis is coincident with the direction of the incident plane wave. PMID:21682372

  12. Axisymmetric scattering of scalar waves by spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lekner, John; Boyack, Rufus

    2011-06-01

    A phase shift formulation of scattering by oblate and prolate spheroids is presented, in parallel with the partial-wave theory of scattering by spherical obstacles. The crucial step is application of a finite Legendre transform to the Helmholtz equation in spheroidal coordinates. In the long-wavelength limit the spheroidal analog of the spherical scattering length immediately gives the cross section. Analytical results are readily obtained for scattering of Schrödinger particle waves by impenetrable spheroids, and for scattering of sound waves by acoustically soft spheroidal objects. The method is restricted to scattering by spheroids whose symmetry axis is coincident with the direction of the incident plane wave.

  13. Dark Matter in Draco: new considerations of the expected gamma flux in IACTs

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Prada, Francisco; Lokas, Ewa L.

    2006-11-28

    A new revision of the gamma flux that we expect to detect in Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) from SUSY dark matter annihilation in the Draco dSph is presented using the dark matter density profiles compatible with the latest observations. This revision takes also into account the important effect of the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the Cherenkov telescope. We show that this effect is crucial in the way we will observe and interpret a possible signal profile in the telescope. Given these new considerations, some light can be shed oe recent signal excess reported by the CACTUS experiment.

  14. The Magnetospheric Constellation Mission. Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (DRACO): Understanding the Global Dynamics of the Structured Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetospheric Constellation Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (DRACO) is the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) designed to understand the nonlinear dynamics, responses, and connections within the Earth's structured magnetotail, using a constellation of approximately 50 to 100 distributed vector measurement spacecraft. DRACO will reveal magnetotail processes operating within a domain extending 20 Earth radii (R(sub E)) across the tail and 40 R(sub E)down the tail, on spatial and time scales accessible to global circulation models, i.e., approximately 2 R(sub E) and 10 seconds.

  15. HI in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana; Putman, M. E.; Peek, J. E. G.

    2007-12-01

    The HI content of the newly discovered satellites of the Milky Way has not been previously studied. We use HIPASS (HI Parkes All Sky Survey), LAB (Leiden/Argentine/Bonn), and GALFA (Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array) survey data to explore HI in the environment of the newly discovered dwarf galaxies and add this information to what was previously known about HI in the dwarf spheroidal and lower mass dwarf irregular galaxies of the Local Group. All of the new satellites discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data have limits on their HI masses which range from < 13 M⊙ to 3 x 104 M⊙ except for Leo T, which has an HI mass of approximately 105 M⊙. We find that galaxies within 300 kpc of the Milky Way or Andromeda are all undetected in HI to low limits, or have ambiguous detections, while those further than 300 kpc are predominantly detected with masses > 105 M⊙. The most favored explanation for the lack of HI in dwarf galaxies at small galactocentric distances is ram pressure stripping of the gas in the dwarf galaxy by the larger galaxy's hot halo gas. The HI content will also be discussed in terms of the fuel it provides to the Milky Way and the star formation history of the dwarfs. Finally, we discuss the discovery in the GALFA data of discrete HI clouds with dynamical characteristics similar to known dwarf galaxies.

  16. Spheroidizing of medium carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James Michael

    2000-11-01

    An investigation has been made of spheroidization of medium carbon steels used in the bolt industry. Two process cycles were considered. One was the intercritical cycle, widely used in industry, in which the steel was heated above the A1 temperature for approximately 2 hours and then cooled to 688°C (1270°F) and held for various periods. The other was a subcritical cycle that involved heating to 704°C (1300°F) for various times. Wire samples were 0.4-in. diameter AISI 1541, considered high in manganese and difficult to spheroidize. Although AISI 4037 is considered easier to spheroidize, this alloy was also tested due to its extensive industrial use. It was found that the intercritical cycle produced a somewhat faster drop in hardness. However, one hour of the subcritical cycle yielded greater ductility than 32 hours of the intercritical process, as measured by tensile tests. Similar ductility results were achieved using a new flare test. The level of spheroidization was defined in this study to be the percentage of carbide particles with aspect ratios less than 3. The subcritical cycle produced the same level of spheroidization in 1/2 hour as that reached by the intercritical cycle in 32 hours. Faster spheroidization of cementite plates in the subcritical process appears to be due to the fine pearlite generated by the current practice of rapid cooling off the hot mill. This advantage is lost in the intercritical process because the original pearlite is dissolved above the A1 temperature.

  17. Integrated Two-Dimensional DRACO Simulations of Cryogenic DT Target Performance on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated simulations of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) target implosions on OMEGA have been performed using the radiation-hydrodynamic code DRACO. Taking into account the known nonuniformities of target and laser irradiation, 2-D simulations examine the target performance of a variety of ignition-relevant implosions. The effects of cross-beam energy transfer and nonlocal heat transport are mimicked by a time-dependent flux limiter. DRACO simulations show good agreement with experiments in ρR , neutron yield, Ti, neutron rate, and x-ray images for the mid-adiabat (α ~ 4 ) implosions. For low-adiabat (α ~ 2) and high in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR > 24) implosions, the integrated simulations with the known nonuniformity sources cannot fully explain the reduction in target performance. Examinations of other possible nonuniformity sources and the thermal conductivity model will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Dwarf novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladous, Constanze

    1993-01-01

    Dwarf novae are defined on grounds of their semi-regular brightness variations of some two to five magnitudes on time scales of typically 10 to 100 days. Historically several different classification schemes have been used. Today, dwarf novae are divided into three sub-classes: the U Geminorum stars, the SU Ursae Majoris stars, and the Z Camelopardalis stars. Outbursts of dwarf novae occur at semi-periodic intervals of time, typically every 10 to 100 days; amplitudes range from typically 2 to 5 mag. Within certain limits values are characteristic for each object. Relations between the outburst amplitude, or the total energy released during outburst, and the recurrence time have been found, as well as relations between the orbital period and the outburst decay time, the absolute magnitude during outburst maximum, and the widths of long and short outbursts, respectively. Some dwarf novae are known to have suspended their normal outburst activity altogether for a while. They later resumed it without having undergone any observable changes. The optical colors of dwarf novae all are quite similar during outburst, considerably bluer than during the quiescent state. During the outburst cycle, characteristic loops in the two color diagram are performed. At a time resolution on the order of minutes, strictly periodic photometric changes due to orbital motion become visible in the light curves of dwarf novae. These are characteristic for each system. Remarkably little is known about orbital variations during the course of an outburst. On time-scales of minutes and seconds, further more or less periodic types of variability are seen in dwarf novae. Appreciable flux is emitted by dwarf novae at all wavelengths from the X-rays to the longest IR wavelengths, and in some cases even in the radio. Most dwarf novae exhibit strong emission line spectra in the optical and UV during quiescence, although some have only very weak emissions in the optical and/or weak absorptions at UV

  19. HI in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary; Peek, Joshua E. G.

    2008-08-01

    The HI content of the newly discovered satellites of the Milky Way has not been previously studied. We use HIPASS (HI Parkes All Sky Survey), LAB (Leiden/Argentine/Bonn), and GALFA (Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array) survey data to explore HI in the environment of the newly discovered dwarf galaxies and add this information to what was previously known about HI in the dwarf spheroidal and lower mass dwarf irregular galaxies of the Local Group. All of the new satellites discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data have limits on their HI masses which range from <13 Msolar to 3×104 Msolar except for Leo T, which has and HI mass of approximately 105 Msolar. We find that galaxies within 300 kpc of the Milky Way or Andromeda are all undetected in HI to low limits, or have ambiguous detections, while those further than 300 kpc are predominantly detected with masses >105 Msolar. The most favored explanation for the lack of HI in dwarf galaxies at small galactocentric distances is ram pressure stripping of the gas in the dwarf galaxy by the larger galaxy's hot halo gas. Finally, we discuss the discovery in the GALFA data of discrete HI clouds with characteristics similar to known dwarf galaxies.

  20. EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TIDALLY STIRRED DISKY DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2011-09-20

    Using collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the tidal evolution of late-type, rotationally supported dwarfs inside Milky Way sized host galaxies. Our study focuses on a wide variety of dwarf orbital configurations and initial structures. During the evolution, the disky dwarfs undergo strong mass loss, the stellar disks are transformed into spheroids, and rotation is replaced by random motions of the stars. Thus, the late-type progenitors are transformed into early-type dwarfs as envisioned by the tidal stirring model for the formation of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Local Group. We determine the photometric properties of the dwarfs, including the total visual magnitude, the half-light radius, and the central surface brightness as they would be measured by an observer near the galactic center. Special emphasis is also placed on studying their kinematics and shapes. We demonstrate that the measured values are biased by a number of observational effects including the increasing angle of the observation cone near the orbital pericenter, the fact that away from the pericenter the tidal tails are typically oriented along the line of sight, and the fact that for most of the evolution the stellar components of the dwarfs are triaxial ellipsoids whose major axis tumbles with respect to the line of sight. Finally, we compare the measured properties of the simulated dwarfs to those of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. The evolutionary tracks of the dwarfs in different parameter planes and the correlations between their different properties, especially the total magnitude and the surface brightness, strongly suggest that present-day dSph galaxies may have indeed formed from late-type progenitors as proposed by the tidal stirring scenario.

  1. [Spheroid body myopathy: case report].

    PubMed

    Scola, Rosana Hermínia; Trentin, Alcides Júnior; Vaez, Rodrigo; Gignon, Vinicius de Faria; Costa, Thaís Gurgel; Werneck, Lineu Cesar

    2005-06-01

    Spheroid body myopathy is a rare illness classified in the group of the congenital myopathies as a desmin-related neuromuscular disorder, presenting dominant autosomical origin with the beginning of the symptoms in the adult phase. We report on a seven years old girl with facial paresia, generalized muscular hypotrophy and hypotony, generalized deep areflexia, proximal upper and lower limbs muscular strengh and distal upper limbs grade 3 and distal lower limbs grade 1. Needle electromyography evidenced increased conscription and potentials of motor unit of short duration and low amplitude, characterizing a myopathic standard. The muscle biopsy disclosed mixed standard to myopathy, denervation and inclusion bodies that are consistent to spheroid body myopathy. In this case, the patient presented, in advance, early beginning of the symptoms and there are no similar cases in the family.

  2. Advanced Technology Inlet Design, NRA 8-21 Cycle II: DRACO Flowpath Hypersonic Inlet Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Bobby W.; Weir, Lois J.

    1999-01-01

    The report outlines work performed in support of the flowpath development for the DRACO engine program. The design process initiated to develop a hypersonic axisymmetric inlet for a Mach 6 rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine is discussed. Various design parametrics were investigated, including design shock-on-lip Mach number, cone angle, throat Mach number, throat angle. length of distributed compression, and subsonic diffuser contours. Conceptual mechanical designs consistent with installation into the D-21 vehicle were developed. Additionally, program planning for an intensive inlet development program to support a Critical Design Review in three years was performed. This development program included both analytical and experimental elements and support for a flight-capable inlet mechanical design.

  3. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  4. Dwarf galaxies in multistate scalar field dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Robles, V. H.; Matos, T.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the velocity dispersion for eight of the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellites in the context of finite temperature scalar field dark matter. In this model the finite temperature allows the scalar field to be in configurations that possess excited states, a feature that has proved to be necessary in order to explain the asymptotic rotational velocities found in low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. In this work we show that excited states are not only important in large galaxies but also have visible effects in dwarf spheroidals. Additionally, we stress that contrary to previous works where the scalar field dark matter halos are consider to be purely Bose-Einstein condensates, the inclusion of excited states in these halo configurations provides a consistent framework capable of describing LSB and dwarf galaxies of different sizes without arriving to contradictions within the scalar field dark matter model. Using this new framework we find that the addition of excited states accounts very well for the raise in the velocity dispersion in Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies improving the fit compared to the one obtained assuming all the dark matter to be in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  5. Seeking footprints of the primeval Universe in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Sebastian L.

    2015-03-01

    We present the star formation histories (SFHs) of four isolated dwarf galaxies, Cetus, Tucana, LGS-3, and Phoenix, as a function of galactocentric radius. Our results suggest that beyond some distance from the center, there are no significative differences in fundamental properties of these galaxies, such as the star formation rate (SFR) or age-metallicity relation (AMR). The stellar content of this region would be composed of old (>~ 10.5 Gyr) metal-poor stars only. In the innermost regions, dwarf galaxies appear to have formed stars during time intervals which duration varies from galaxy to galaxy. This extended star formation produces the dichotomy between dwarf spheroidal (dSph) and dwarf Transition (dTr) galaxy types.

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinase targeting in multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Susan; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    While growing cells as a monolayer is the traditional method for cell culture, the incorporation of multicellular spheroids into experimental design is becoming increasingly popular. This is due to the understanding that cells grown as spheroids tend to replicate the in vivo situation more reliably than monolayer cells. Thus, the use of multicellular spheroids may be more clinically relevant than monolayer cell cultures. Here, we describe methods for multicellular 3D spheroid generation that may be used to provide samples for receptor tyrosine kinase (and other protein) detection. Methods described include the forced-floating poly-HEMA method, the hanging-drop method, and the use of ECM to form multicellular 3D spheroids. PMID:25319898

  7. DARK SATELLITES AND THE MORPHOLOGY OF DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Helmi, Amina; Starkenburg, E.; Starkenburg, T. K.; Vera-Ciro, C. A.; Sales, L. V.; De Lucia, G.; Li, Y.-S.

    2012-10-10

    One of the strongest predictions of the {Lambda}CDM cosmological model is the presence of dark satellites orbiting all types of galaxies. We focus here on the dynamical effects of such satellites on disky dwarf galaxies, and demonstrate that these encounters can be dramatic. Although mergers with M{sub sat} > M{sub d} are not very common, because of the lower baryonic content they occur much more frequently on the dwarf scale than for L{sub *} galaxies. As an example, we present a numerical simulation of a 20% (virial) mass ratio merger between a dark satellite and a disky dwarf (akin to the Fornax dwarf galaxy in luminosity) that shows that the merger remnant has a spheroidal morphology. Perturbations by dark satellites thus provide a plausible path for the formation of dSph systems. The transition from disky to the often amorphous, irregular, or spheroidal morphologies of dwarfs could be a natural consequence of the dynamical heating of hitherto unobservable dark satellites.

  8. Elucidation of spheroid formation with and without the extrusion step.

    PubMed

    Liew, Celine V; Chua, Siang Meng; Heng, Paul W S

    2007-01-01

    Spheroid formation mechanisms were investigated using extrusion-spheronization (ES) and rotary processing (RP). Using ES (cross-hatch), ES (teardrop), and RP (teardrop), spheroids with similar mass median diameter (MMD) and span were produced using equivalent formulation and spheronization conditions. During spheronization, the teardrop-studded rotating frictional surface, with increased peripheral tip speed and duration, produced spheroids of equivalent MMD and span to those produced by the cross-hatch rotating frictional plate surface. The roundness of these spheroids was also similar. RP required less water to produce spheroids of MMD similar to that of spheroids produced by ES. However, these RP spheroids were less spherical. Image analysis of 625 spheroids per batch indicated that the size distribution of RP spheroids had significantly greater SD, positive skewness, and kurtosis. Morphological examination of time-sampled spheroids produced by ES indicated that spheroid formation occurred predominantly by attrition and layering, while RP spheroids were formed by nucleation, agglomeration, layering, and coalescence. RP produced spheroids with higher crushing strength than that of ES-produced spheroids. The amount of moisture lost during spheronization for spheroids produced by ES had minimal influence on their eventual size. Differences in process and formulation parameters, in addition to size distribution and observed morphological changes, enabled a greater understanding of spheroid formation and methods to optimize spheroid production. PMID:17408210

  9. GIANT GALAXIES, DWARFS, AND DEBRIS SURVEY. I. DWARF GALAXIES AND TIDAL FEATURES AROUND NGC 7331

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, Johannes; Pasquali, Anna; Grebel, Eva K.; Gallagher, John S. III

    2012-12-01

    The Giant GAlaxies, Dwarfs, and Debris Survey (GGADDS) concentrates on the nearby universe to study how galaxies have interacted in groups of different morphology, density, and richness. In these groups, we select the dominant spiral galaxy and search its surroundings for dwarf galaxies and tidal interactions. This paper presents the first results from deep wide-field imaging of NGC 7331, where we detect only four low-luminosity candidate dwarf companions and a stellar stream that may be evidence of a past tidal interaction. The dwarf galaxy candidates have surface brightnesses of {mu}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 23-25 mag arcsec{sup -2} with (g - r){sub 0} colors of 0.57-0.75 mag in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey filter system, consistent with their being dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. A faint stellar stream structure on the western edge of NGC 7331 has {mu}{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 27 mag arcsec{sup -2} and a relatively blue color of (g - r){sub 0} = 0.15 mag. If it is tidal debris, then this stream could have formed from a rare type of interaction between NGC 7331 and a dwarf irregular or transition-type dwarf galaxy. We compare the structure and local environments of NGC 7331 to those of other nearby giant spirals in small galaxy groups. NGC 7331 has a much lower ({approx}2%) stellar mass in the form of early-type satellites than found for M31 and lacks the presence of nearby companions like luminous dwarf elliptical galaxies or the Magellanic Clouds. However, our detection of a few dSph candidates suggests that it is not deficient in low-luminosity satellites.

  10. Light scattering by a spheroidal particle.

    PubMed

    Asano, S; Yamamoto, G

    1975-01-01

    The solution of electromagnetic scattering by a homogeneous prolate (or oblate) spheroidal particle with an arbitrary size and refractive index is obtained for any angle of incidence by solving Maxwell's equations under given boundary conditions. The method used is that of separating the vector wave equations in the spheroidal coordinates and expanding them in terms of the spheroidal wavefunctions. The unknown coefficients for the expansion are determined by a system of equations derived from the boundary conditions regarding the continuity of tangential components of the electric and magnetic vectors across the surface of the spheroid. The solutions both in the prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinate systems result in a same form, and the equations for the oblate spheroidal system can be obtained from those for the prolate one by replacing the prolate spheroidal wavefunctions with the oblate ones and vice versa. For an oblique incidence, the polarized incident wave is resolved into two components, the TM mode for which the magnetic vector vibrates perpendicularly to the incident plane and the TE mode for which the electric vector vibrates perpendicularly to this plane. For the incidence along the rotation axis the resultant equations are given in the form similar to the one for a sphere given by the Mie theory. The physical parameters involved are the following five quantities: the size parameter defined by the product of the semifocal distance of the spheroid and the propagation constant of the incident wave, the eccentricity, the refractive index of the spheroid relative to the surrounding medium, the incident angle between the direction of the incident wave and the rotation axis, and the angles that specify the direction of the scattered wave.

  11. Spheroidization of medium-carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.M.; Hosford, W.F.

    1997-02-01

    Spheroidization experiments were made on a medium-carbon AISI 4037 steel, using both intercritical and subcritical annealing cycles. The results indicate that in the subcritical cycle the spheroidization occurred much more quickly than expected, so that shorter times were sufficient to achieve high formability. On the other hand, the hardness dropped faster in the intercritical cycle. Although more work needs to be done, these results suggest that using a subcritical spheroidization process instead of an intercritical process could achieve considerable savings in time, energy, and cost.

  12. On the formation of dwarf galaxies and stellar haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Pontzen, A. P.; Viel, M.

    2006-09-01

    Using analytic arguments and a suite of very high resolution (~103Msolar per particle) cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we argue that high-redshift, z ~ 10, M ~ 108Msolar haloes, form the smallest `baryonic building block' (BBB) for galaxy formation. These haloes are just massive enough to efficiently form stars through atomic line cooling and to hold on to their gas in the presence of supernova (SN) winds and reionization. These combined effects, in particular that of the SN feedback, create a sharp transition: over the mass range 3-10 × 107Msolar, the BBBs drop two orders of magnitude in stellar mass. Below ~2 × 107Msolar, galaxies will be dark with almost no stars and no gas. Above this scale is the smallest unit of galaxy formation: the BBB. We show that the BBBs have stellar distributions which are spheroidal, of low rotational velocity, old and metal poor: they resemble the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) of the Local Group (LG). Unlike the LG dSphs, however, they contain significant gas fractions. We connect these high-redshift BBBs to the smallest dwarf galaxies observed at z = 0 using linear theory. A small fraction (~100) of these gas-rich BBBs at high redshift fall in to a galaxy the size of the Milky Way (MW). We suggest that 10 per cent of these survive to become the observed LG dwarf galaxies at the present epoch. This is consistent with recent numerical estimates. Those infalling haloes on benign orbits which keep them far away from the MW or Andromeda manage to retain their gas and slowly form stars - these become the smallest dwarf irregular galaxies; those on more severe orbits lose their gas faster than they can form stars and become the dwarf spheroidals. The remaining 90 per cent of the BBBs will be accreted. We show that this gives a metallicity and total stellar mass consistent with the MW old stellar halo.

  13. Equilibrium figures of dwarf planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaux, Nicolas; Chambat, Frederic; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Baguet, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Dwarf planets including transneptunian objects (TNO) and Ceres are >500 km large and display a spheroidal shape. These protoplanets are left over from the formation of the solar System about 4.6 billion years ago and their study could improve our knowledge of the early solar system. They could be formed in-situ or migrated to their current positions as a consequence of large-scale solar system dynamical evolution. Quantifying their internal composition would bring constraints on their accretion environment and migration history. That information may be inferred from studying their global shapes from stellar occultations or thermal infrared imaging. Here we model the equilibrium shapes of isolated dwarf planets under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium that forms the basis for interpreting shape data in terms of interior structure. Deviations from hydrostaticity can shed light on the thermal and geophysical history of the bodies. The dwarf planets are generally fast rotators spinning in few hours, so their shape modeling requires numerically integration with Clairaut's equations of rotational equilibrium expanded up to third order in a small parameter m, the geodetic parameter, to reach an accuracy better than a few kilometers depending on the spin velocity and mean density. We also show that the difference between a 500-km radius homogeneous model described by a MacLaurin ellipsoid and a stratified model assuming silicate and ice layers can reach several kilometers in the long and short axes, which could be measurable. This type of modeling will be instrumental in assessing hydrostaticity and thus detecting large non-hydrostatic contributions in the observed shapes.

  14. Chemodynamic subpopulations of the Carina dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopatis, G.; Amorisco, N. C.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Koposov, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    We study the chemodynamical properties of the Carina dwarf spheroidal by combining an intermediate spectroscopic resolution data set of more than 900 red giant and red clump stars, with high-precision photometry to derive the atmospheric parameters, metallicities and age estimates for our targets. Within the red giant branch population, we find evidence for the presence of three distinct stellar subpopulations with different metallicities, spatial distributions, kinematics and ages. As in the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals, the subpopulation with the lowest average metallicity is more extended and kinematically hotter than all other populations. However, we identify an inversion in the parallel ordering of metallicity, kinematics and characteristic length-scale in the two most metal-rich subpopulations, which therefore do not contribute to a global negative chemical gradient. Contrary to common trends in the chemical properties with radius, the metal richest population is more extended and mildly kinematically hotter than the main component of intermediate metallicity. More investigations are required to ascertain the nature of this inversion, but we comment on the mechanisms that might have caused it.

  15. Light scattering by a multilayered spheroidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farafonov, Victor G.; Voshchinnikov, Nikolai V.

    2012-04-01

    The light scattering problem for a confocal multilayered spheroid has been solved by the extended boundary condition method (EBCM) with a corresponding spheroidal basis. The solution preserves the advantages of the approach applied previously to homogeneous and core-mantle spheroids, i.e. the separation of the radiation fields into two parts and a special choice of scalar potentials for each of the parts. The method is known to be useful in a wide range of the particle parameters. It is particularly efficient for strongly prolate and oblate spheroids. Numerical tests are described. Illustrative calculations have shown that the extinction factors to converge to average values with a growing number of layers and how the extinction vary with a growth of particle porosity.

  16. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  17. Organ printing: tissue spheroids as building blocks.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Visconti, Richard P; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J; Markwald, Roger R

    2009-04-01

    Organ printing can be defined as layer-by-layer additive robotic biofabrication of three-dimensional functional living macrotissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids as building blocks. The microtissues and tissue spheroids are living materials with certain measurable, evolving and potentially controllable composition, material and biological properties. Closely placed tissue spheroids undergo tissue fusion - a process that represents a fundamental biological and biophysical principle of developmental biology-inspired directed tissue self-assembly. It is possible to engineer small segments of an intraorgan branched vascular tree by using solid and lumenized vascular tissue spheroids. Organ printing could dramatically enhance and transform the field of tissue engineering by enabling large-scale industrial robotic biofabrication of living human organ constructs with "built-in" perfusable intraorgan branched vascular tree. Thus, organ printing is a new emerging enabling technology paradigm which represents a developmental biology-inspired alternative to classic biodegradable solid scaffold-based approaches in tissue engineering.

  18. Self-electrophoresis of spheroidal electrocatalytic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourhani, Amir; Crespi, Vincent H.; Lammert, Paul E.; Borhan, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Using the method of matched asymptotic expansions, we derive a general expression for the speed of a prolate spheroidal electrocatalytic nanomotor in terms of interfacial potential and physical properties of the motor environment in the limit of small Debye length and Péclet number. This greatly increases the range of geometries that can be handled without resorting to numerical simulations, since a wide range of shapes from spherical to needle-like, and in particular the common cylindrical shape, can be well-approximated by prolate spheroids. For piecewise-uniform distribution of surface cation flux with fixed average absolute value, the mobility of a prolate spheroidal motor with a symmetric cation source/sink configuration is a monotonically decreasing function of eccentricity. A prolate spheroidal motor with an asymmetric sink/source configuration moves faster than its symmetric counterpart and can exhibit a non-monotonic dependence of motor speed on eccentricity for a highly asymmetric design.

  19. Ontogenetic growth of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, C. A.; Menchón, S. A.

    2006-11-01

    In ontogenetic growth models, the basal metabolic rate is usually assumed to depend on the individual mass following a power law. Here it is shown that, in the case of multicellular tumor spheroids, the emergence of a necrotic core invalidates this assumption. The implications of this result for spheroid growth are discussed, and a procedure to determine the growth parameters using macroscopic measurements is proposed.

  20. Approximating spheroid inductive responses using spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank

    2003-12-12

    The response of high permeability ({mu}{sub r} {ge} 50) conductive spheroids of moderate aspect ratios (0.25 to 4) to excitation by uniform magnetic fields in the axial or transverse directions is approximated by the response of spheres of appropriate diameters, of the same conductivity and permeability, with magnitude rescaled based on the differing volumes, D.C. magnetizations, and high frequency limit responses of the spheres and modeled spheroids.

  1. Naming Disney's Dwarfs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidwell, Robert T.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses Disney's version of the folkloric dwarfs in his production of "Snow White" and weighs the Disney rendition of the dwarf figure against the corpus of traits and behaviors pertaining to dwarfs in traditional folklore. Concludes that Disney's dwarfs are "anthropologically true." (HOD)

  2. The Hunt for Missing Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    galaxies that resemble the UDGs found in Virgo and Coma clusters, verifying that such objects exist in environments beyond only massive clusters.And at the faint end of the sample, the authors find additional extremely low-surface-brightness dwarfs that are several orders of magnitude fainter even than classical UDGs.The authors describe the properties of these galaxies and compare them to systems like classical UDGs and dwarf spheroidal galaxies in our own Local Cluster. The next step is to determine which of the differences between the sample of NGFS dwarfs and previously known systems are explained by the environmental factors of their host cluster, and which are simply due to sample biases.With much more data from the NGFS still to come, it seems likely that we will soon be able to examine an even larger sample of no-longer-missing dwarfs!CitationRoberto P. Muoz et al 2015 ApJ 813 L15. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/813/1/L15

  3. The mass dependence of dwarf satellite galaxy quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2014-09-10

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M {sub *} ≲ 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}) dwarfs are quenched, at higher masses the quenched fraction decreases to approximately 40%-50%. This change in the quenched fraction is large and suggests a sudden change in the effectiveness of quenching that correlates with satellite mass. We combine this observation with models of satellite infall and ram pressure stripping to show that the low-mass satellites must quench within 1-2 Gyr of pericenter passage to maintain a high quenched fraction, but that many more massive dwarfs must continue to form stars today even though they likely fell into their host >5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  4. The Mass Dependence of Dwarf Satellite Galaxy Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.

    2014-09-01

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M sstarf <~ 107 M ⊙) dwarfs are quenched, at higher masses the quenched fraction decreases to approximately 40%-50%. This change in the quenched fraction is large and suggests a sudden change in the effectiveness of quenching that correlates with satellite mass. We combine this observation with models of satellite infall and ram pressure stripping to show that the low-mass satellites must quench within 1-2 Gyr of pericenter passage to maintain a high quenched fraction, but that many more massive dwarfs must continue to form stars today even though they likely fell into their host >5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  5. Semiautomatic growth analysis of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rodday, Bjoern; Hirschhaeuser, Franziska; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are routinely employed as three-dimensional in vitro models to study tumor biology. Cultivation of MCTS in spinner flasks provides better growing conditions, especially with regard to the availability of nutrients and oxygen, when compared with microtiter plates. The main endpoint of drug response experiments is spheroid size. It is common practice to analyze spheroid size manually with a microscope and an ocular micrometer. This requires removal of some spheroids from the flask, which entails major limitations such as loss of MCTS and the risk of contamination. With this new approach, the authors present an efficient and highly reproducible method to analyze the size of complete MCTS populations in culture containers with transparent, flat bottoms. MCTS sediments are digitally scanned and spheroid volumes are calculated by computerized image analysis. The equipment includes regular office hardware (personal computer, flatbed scanner) and software (Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Excel, ImageJ). The accuracy and precision of the method were tested using industrial precision steel beads with known diameter. In summary, in comparison with other methods, this approach provides benefits in terms of semiautomation, noninvasiveness, and low costs.

  6. Sulphur isotope ratios in the Canyon Diablo metallic spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwing, C. E.; Rees, C. E.; Thode, H. G.

    1983-09-01

    Nininger (1956) has discovered metallic spheroids in the soil surrounding Meteor Crater in Arizona. Nininger suggested that the spheroids condensed from the center of a homogeneous explosion-produced metallic vapor cloud. The present investigation is concerned with measurements of sulfur contents and delta S-34 values of metallic spheroids from the vicinity of Meteor Crater. It is found that the small metallic spheroids have lower sulfur contents and higher delta S-34 values than do the large spheroids. It is concluded that the observed isotopic patterns are unlikely to have arisen during desulfurization of the metallic liquid from which the spheroids were formed or during high temperature oxidation or the spheroids. The most likely process for the production of the observed delta S-34 values and sulfur contents is low temperature oxidation reactions experienced by the spheroids during their surface exposure following formation.

  7. Screening of charged spheroidal colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Carlos; Téllez, Gabriel

    2010-10-01

    We study the effective screened electrostatic potential created by a spheroidal colloidal particle immersed in an electrolyte, within the mean field approximation, using Poisson-Boltzmann equation in its linear and nonlinear forms, and also beyond the mean field by means of Monte Carlo computer simulation. The anisotropic shape of the particle has a strong effect on the screened potential, even at large distances (compared to the Debye length) from it. To quantify this anisotropy effect, we focus our study on the dependence of the potential on the position of the observation point with respect with the orientation of the spheroidal particle. For several different boundary conditions (constant potential, or constant surface charge) we find that, at large distance, the potential is higher in the direction of the large axis of the spheroidal particle.

  8. Prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    As a modification of the oblate spheroidal case, a recursive method is developed to compute the point value and a few low-order derivatives of the prolate spheroidal harmonics of the second kind, Q{sub nm} (y), namely the unnormalized associated Legendre function (ALF) of the second kind with its argument in the domain, 1 < y < ∞. They are required in evaluating the prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of the gravitational field in addition to the point value and the low-order derivatives of P-bar {sub nm}(t), the 4π fully normalized ALF of the first kind with its argument in the domain, |t| ≤ 1. The new method will be useful in the gravitational field computation of elongated celestial objects.

  9. Cold storage of rat hepatocyte spheroids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongling; Yu, Yue; Glorioso, Jaime; Mao, Shennen; Rodysil, Brian; Amiot, Bruce P; Rinaldo, Piero; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapies for liver disease rely on a high-quality supply of hepatocytes and a means for storage during transportation from site of isolation to site of usage. Unfortunately, frozen cryopreservation is associated with unacceptable loss of hepatocyte viability after thawing. The purpose of this study was to optimize conditions for cold storage of rat hepatocyte spheroids without freezing. Rat hepatocytes were isolated by a two-step perfusion method; hepatocyte spheroids were formed during 48 h of rocked culture in serum-free medium (SFM). Spheroids were then maintained in rocked culture at 37 °C (control condition) or cold stored at 4 °C for 24 or 48 h in six different cold storage solutions: SFM alone; SFM + 1 mM deferoxamine (Def); SFM + 1 μM cyclosporin A (CsA); SFM + 1 mM Def + 1 μM CsA, University of Wisconsin (UW) solution alone, UW + 1 mM Def. Performance metrics after cold storage included viability, gene expression, albumin production, and functional activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes and urea cycle proteins. We observed that cold-induced injury was reduced significantly by the addition of the iron chelator (Def) to both SFM and UW solution. Performance metrics (ammonia detoxification, albumin production) of rat hepatocyte spheroids stored in SFM + Def for 24 h were significantly increased from SFM alone and approached those in control conditions, while performance metrics after cold storage in SFM alone or cold storage for 48 h were both significantly reduced. A serum-free medium supplemented with Def allowed hepatocyte spheroids to tolerate 24 h of cold storage with less than 10% loss in viability and functionality. Further research is warranted to optimize a solution for extended cold storage of hepatocyte spheroids.

  10. Stress Clamp Experiments on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, Fabien; Delarue, Morgan; Elgeti, Jens; Malaquin, Laurent; Basan, Markus; Risler, Thomas; Cabane, Bernard; Vignjevic, Danijela; Prost, Jacques; Cappello, Giovanni; Joanny, Jean-François

    2011-10-01

    The precise role of the microenvironment on tumor growth is poorly understood. Whereas the tumor is in constant competition with the surrounding tissue, little is known about the mechanics of this interaction. Using a novel experimental procedure, we study quantitatively the effect of an applied mechanical stress on the long-term growth of a spheroid cell aggregate. We observe that a stress of 10 kPa is sufficient to drastically reduce growth by inhibition of cell proliferation mainly in the core of the spheroid. We compare the results to a simple numerical model developed to describe the role of mechanics in cancer progression.

  11. THE ACS LCID PROJECT: ON THE ORIGIN OF DWARF GALAXY TYPES—A MANIFESTATION OF THE HALO ASSEMBLY BIAS?

    SciTech Connect

    Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo; Aparicio, Antonio; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Drozdovsky, Igor; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Mayer, Lucio; Bernard, Edouard J.; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Navarro, Julio F.; Salvadori, Stefania; Skillman, Evan D.; Stetson, Peter B.; Weisz, Daniel R.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss how knowledge of the whole evolutionary history of dwarf galaxies, including details on the early star formation events, can provide insight on the origin of the different dwarf galaxy types. We suggest that these types may be imprinted by the early conditions of formation rather than only being the result of a recent morphological transformation driven by environmental effects. We present precise star formation histories of a sample of Local Group dwarf galaxies, derived from color–magnitude diagrams reaching the oldest main-sequence turnoffs. We argue that these galaxies can be assigned to two basic types: fast dwarfs that started their evolution with a dominant and short star formation event and slow dwarfs that formed a small fraction of their stars early and have continued forming stars until the present time (or almost). These two different evolutionary paths do not map directly onto the present-day morphology (dwarf spheroidal versus dwarf irregular). Slow and fast dwarfs also differ in their inferred past location relative to the Milky Way and/or M31, which hints that slow dwarfs were generally assembled in lower-density environments than fast dwarfs. We propose that the distinction between a fast and slow dwarf galaxy primarily reflects the characteristic density of the environment where they form. At a later stage, interaction with a large host galaxy may play a role in the final gas removal and ultimate termination of star formation.

  12. Theoretical lower limits on sizes of ultrafaint dwarf galaxies from dynamical friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, X.

    2016-11-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are the smallest known stellar systems where under Newtonian interpretations, a significant amount of dark matter is required to explain observed kinematics. In fact, they are, in this sense, the most heavily dark matter-dominated objects known. That, plus the increasingly small sizes of the newly discovered ultrafaint dwarfs, puts these systems in the regime where dynamical friction on individual stars starts to become relevant. We calculate the dynamical friction time-scales for pressure-supported isotropic spherical dark matter-dominated stellar systems, yielding τDF = 0.93(rh/10 pc)2(σ/km s-1) Gyr, where rh is the half-light radius. For a stellar velocity dispersion value of 3 km s-1, as typical for the smallest of the recently detected ultrafaint dwarf spheroidals, dynamical friction time-scales become smaller than the 10 Gyr typical of the stellar ages for these systems, for rh < 19 pc. Thus, this becomes a theoretical lower limit below which dark matter-dominated stellar systems become unstable to dynamical friction. We present a comparison with structural parameters of the smallest ultrafaint dwarf spheroidals known, showing that these are already close to the stability limit derived, any future detection of yet smaller such systems would be inconsistent with a particle dark matter hypothesis.

  13. Significance of brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    The significance of brown dwarfs for resolving some major problems in astronomy is discussed. The importance of brown dwarfs for models of star formation by fragmentation of molecular clouds and for obtaining independent measurements of the ages of stars in binary systems is addressed. The relationship of brown dwarfs to planets is considered.

  14. THE PRIMEVAL POPULATIONS OF THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C. E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu E-mail: avila@stsci.edu; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, using deep photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A galaxy class recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the UFDs appear to be an extension of the classical dwarf spheroidals to low luminosities, offering a new front in efforts to understand the missing satellite problem. They are the least luminous, most dark-matter-dominated, and least chemically evolved galaxies known. Our HST survey of six UFDs seeks to determine if these galaxies are true fossils from the early universe. We present here the preliminary analysis of three UFD galaxies: Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Classical dwarf spheroidals of the Local Group exhibit extended star formation histories, but these three Milky Way satellites are at least as old as the ancient globular cluster M92, with no evidence for intermediate-age populations. Their ages also appear to be synchronized to within {approx}1 Gyr of each other, as might be expected if their star formation was truncated by a global event, such as reionization.

  15. Astrometria diferencial de precision con VLBI el triangulo de Draco (y estudios de SN1993J)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, E.

    1997-11-01

    The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique provides unprecedented resolutions in astronomy. In this PhD we show progress in the study of high precision phase-delay differential astrometry through observations of the radio source triangle formed by the BL-Lac objects 1803+784 and 2007+777, and the QSO 1928+738, in the Northern constellation of Draco (the Dragon), from observations carried out on 20/21 November 1991 with an intercontinental interferometric array simultaneously at the frequencies of 2.3 and 8.4 GHz. We have determined the angular separations among the three radio sources with submilliarcsecond accuracy from a weighted least squares analysis of the differential phase delay from the three celestial bodies. Our present work introduces important advances with respect to previous astrometric studies, carried out over radio source pairs separated by smaller angular distances. We have consistently modeled the parameters involved in an astrometric VLBI observation, in order to reproduce the differential phase observed for radio sources separated by almost 7o on the sky. We have demonstrated the possibility of phase-connection over these angular distances at 8.4 GHz, even at an epoch of a maximum in the solar activity. After the phase-connection we have corrected the effects of the extended structure of the radio source and of the ionosphere. This last correction is one of the main technical achievements of this thesis: it is possible to remove the ionospheric contribution with independent measurements of the ionosphere total electron content obtained at Global Positioning Systems (GPS) sites the VLBI observing stations. The triangular geometry introduces constraints in parameter space that allow a better estimation of the angular separations among the radio sources. It is possible to test the consistency of the astrometric results through the Sky-Closure, defined as the circular sum of the angular separations of the three radio sources, determined

  16. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF FOUR LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J. E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu

    2015-06-15

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color–color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color–color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%–50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution.

  17. Plasmon Resonances of Nanoshells of Spheroidal Shape

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Stephen J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2009-01-01

    Plasmon resonances are computed for nanoshells of prolate and oblate spheroidal shape. Both longitudinal and transverse resonances are investigated as a function of aspect ratio and shell thickness. Formulas for the surface charge density on the outside and inside shell surfaces are derived. PMID:23976876

  18. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  19. Evaluation of Consistency in Spheroid Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros Castillo, Liliana R.; Oancea, Andrei-Dumitru; Stüllein, Christian; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids embedded in a matrix represent invaluable tools to analyze cell invasion. Spheroid sizes and invasiveness are the main observables easily measurable to evaluate effects of biological or pharmaceutical manipulations on invasion. They largely account for these 3-D platforms variability, leading to flaws in data interpretation. No method has been established yet that characterizes this variability and guarantees a reliable use of 3-D platforms. Spheroid initial/end sizes and invasiveness were systematically analyzed and compared in spheroids of U87MG cells generated by three different methods and embedded at different times in a collagen matrix. A normality test was used to characterize size distribution. We introduced the linearity-over-yield analysis as a novel mathematical tool to assess end sizes and invasion reproducibility. We further provide a proof of concept by applying these tools to the analysis of a treatment known to be effective beforehand. We demonstrate that implementation of these statistical and mathematical tools warranted a confident quantification and interpretation of in 3-D conducted assays. We propose these tools could be incorporated in a guideline for generation and use of 3-D platforms. PMID:27334575

  20. Transformation properties of spheroidal multipole moments and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Georg

    2000-02-01

    Introducing definitions of solid spheroidal harmonics which contain those of solid spherical harmonics as special cases for vanishing ellipticity it is shown that the formalism of the multipole expansion of a 1/R -potential can be consistently extended to incorporate prolate and oblate spheroidal multipole moments. For finite ellipticity one can transform between regular solid spheroidal and spherical harmonics and multipole moments through simple relations given before and independently proven here. Corresponding relations between irregular solid spheroidal and spherical harmonics are presented for the first time, together with an investigation of the convergence properties of the resulting series expansions. Explicit formulae are derived for the transformations between spheroidal multipoles calculated in coordinate systems of different ellipticity, origin and orientation. These fromulae can be utilized to calculate the energy of interaction between two arbitrarily oriented spheroidal charge or mass distributions of different ellipticity. The performance of spheroidal multipole expansions is illustrated with some numerical examples.

  1. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Coral Rose

    2016-06-01

    The high dark matter content and the shallow potential wells of low mass galaxies (10^3 Msun < Mstar < 10^9.5 Msun) make them excellent testbeds for differing theories of galaxy formation. Additionally, the recent up-tick in the number and detail of Local Group dwarf galaxy observations provides a rich dataset for comparison to simulations that attempt to answer important questions in near field cosmology: why are there so few observed dwarfs compared to the number predicted by simulations? What shuts down star formation in ultra-faint galaxies? Why do dwarfs have inverted age gradients and what does it take to convert a dwarf irregular (dIrrs) into a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy?We to attempt to answer these questions by running ultra-high resolution cosmological FIRE simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies. We predict that many ultra-faint dwarfs should exist as satellites of more massive isolated Local Group dwarfs. The ultra-faints (Mstar < 10^4 Msun) formed in these simulations have uniformly ancient stellar populations (> 10 Gyr), having had their star formation shut down by reionization. Additionally, we show that the kinematics and ellipticities of isolated simulated dwarf centrals are consistent with observed dSphs satellites without the need for harassment from a massive host. We further show that most (but not all) observed *isolated* dIrrs in the Local Volume also have dispersion-supported stellar populations, contradicting the previous view that these objects are rotating. Finally, we investigate the stellar age gradients in dwarfs — showing that early mergers and strong feedback can create an inverted gradient, with the older stars occupying larger galactocentric radii.These results offer an interesting direction in testing models that attempt to solve dark matter problems via explosive feedback episodes. Can the same models that create large cores in simulated dwarfs preserve the mild stellar rotation that is seen in a minority of isolated d

  2. Footprints of the early Universe in the SFHs of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, S. L.; LCID Group

    We present the star formation histories (SFHs) as a function of galactocentric radius of four isolated dwarf galaxies, Cetus, Tucana, LGS-3, and Phoenix. Our results suggest that beyond some distance from the center, there are no significative differences in fundamental properties of these galaxies. In the innermost regions, dwarf galaxies appear to have formed stars during time intervals which duration varies from galaxy to galaxy. This extended star formation produces the dichotomy between dwarf spheroidal (dSph) and dwarf Transition (dTr) galaxy types. This behavior is compatible with a scenario in which global reionization stops the star formation in the outer galaxy regions and self-shielding allows extended star formation in the inner regions.

  3. ANDROMEDA XXVIII: A DWARF GALAXY MORE THAN 350 kpc FROM ANDROMEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Martin, Nicolas F.

    2011-11-20

    We report the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Andromeda XXVIII, using data from the recently released Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8. The galaxy is a likely satellite of Andromeda, and, at a separation of 365{sup +17}{sub -1} kpc, would be one of the most distant of Andromeda's satellites. Its heliocentric distance is 650{sup +150}{sub -80} kpc, and analysis of its structure and luminosity shows that it has an absolute magnitude of M{sub V} = -8.5{sup +0.4}{sub -1.0} and half-light radius of r{sub h} = 210{sup +60}{sub -50} pc, similar to many other faint Local Group dwarfs. With presently available imaging we are unable to determine whether there is ongoing or recent star formation, which prevents us from classifying it as a dwarf spheroidal or a dwarf irregular.

  4. Discovery of new dwarf galaxies around NGC4631 with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi; Komiyama, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    We have observed on-going interacting galaxies (NGC4631 and NGC4656) using Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam and reduced the data using HSC pipeline and conducted photometry based on DAOphot. Then, we have detected 8 new dwarf galaxy candidates in the outer region of NGC4631 and confirmed the three candidates previously reported by Karachentsev et al. 2014. The 3 or 4 candidates detected in this study may be a star-forming dwarf irregular galaxy and the other 7 candidates may be an old dwarf spheroidal galaxy based on these stellar populations. It looks like that the effective radius - absolute magnitude relation of dwarf galaxies in NGC4631 group is similar to the relation of the Local Group and the other galaxy systems.

  5. Predicting the Velocity Dispersions of the Dwarf Satellite Galaxies of Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.

    2016-05-01

    Dwarf Spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group are the faintest and most diffuse stellar systems known. They exhibit large mass discrepancies, making them popular laboratories for studying the missing mass problem. The PANDAS survey of M31 revealed dozens of new examples of such dwarfs. As these systems were discovered, it was possible to use the observed photometric properties to predict their stellar velocity dispersions with the modified gravity theory MOND. These predictions, made in advance of the observations, have since been largely confirmed. A unique feature of MOND is that a structurally identical dwarf will behave differently when it is or is not subject to the external field of a massive host like Andromeda. The role of this "external field effect" is critical in correctly predicting the velocity dispersions of dwarfs that deviate from empirical scaling relations. With continued improvement in the observational data, these systems could provide a test of the strong equivalence principle.

  6. Globular Clusters in the Milky Way and Dwarf Galaxies: A Distribution-Free Statistical Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Saptarshi; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka

    2008-08-01

    It has been found that globular clusters (GCs) in dwarf galaxies and those in the Milky Way (MW) outer halo mostly have the same parent distributions, while GCs in the MW disk and inner halo have a different origin from those in dwarf galaxies. Thus, these dwarf galaxies did not play a crucial role in the formation of the Galactic disk or inner halo. In order to investigate this phenomenon in a more objective manner, a statistical comparison of the GCs of our Galaxy and those of neighboring dwarf galaxies has been carried out by a multivariate nonparametric method. For the various parameters of GCs in the MW and in dwarf galaxies, the multivariate Gaussian assumption fails, so a nonparametric method of comparison (instead of multivariate analysis of variance [MANOVA]) has been chosen. The test is performed on GCs of the MW disk, inner halo, and outer halo separately, with GCs from neighboring dwarf galaxies Canis Major, Fornax, and Sculptor, and the LMC dwarf irregular galaxy. The test is also performed for GCs from dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the neighborhood of M31: M33, NGC 147, NGC 185, and NGC 205.

  7. A Dwarf Dissolving? - A Kinematic Analysis of Andromeda XXVII and the Northern Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michelle; Rich, R. M.; Chapman, S. C.; Ibata, R.; Irwin, M.; McConnachie, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    We report internal kinematics for an unusual M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxy, And XXVII, which is superposed against the Northern Arc Stream feature, isolated in the PandAS (Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey). In contrast to the coherent, cold velocity fields of most Andromeda dwarf spheroidals, And XXVII has a trimodal velocity distribution spanning 100 km/sec, with a relatively cold central peak at -530 km/sec , and a velocity dispersion of sigma= 8 km/sec. While all of the candidate members are < 2' (or approximately one half light radii, ~600 pc) from the core, the full velocity range is not consistent with a system of luminosity Mv=-7.9. We propose that And XXVII may be in the process of dissolving into the Northern Arc.

  8. Phase behavior of shape-changing spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P. I. C.; Masters, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a simple model for a biaxial nematic liquid crystal. This consists of hard spheroids that can switch shape between prolate (rodlike) and oblate (platelike) subject to an energy penalty Δ ɛ . The spheroids are approximated as hard Gaussian overlap particles and are treated at the level of Onsager's second-virial description. We use both bifurcation analysis and a numerical minimization of the free energy to show that, for additive particle shapes, (i) there is no stable biaxial phase even for Δ ɛ =0 (although there is a metastable biaxial phase in the same density range as the stable uniaxial phase) and (ii) the isotropic-to-nematic transition is into either one of two degenerate uniaxial phases, rod rich or plate rich. We confirm that even a small amount of shape nonadditivity may stabilize the biaxial nematic phase.

  9. Dynamics of spheroid particles in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenbin; Alexeev, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The effect of inertia on the dynamics of rigid spheroid microparticles in a pressure-driven channel flow is studied using a hybrid lattice Boltzmann and lattice spring method. We find distinctive behaviors of particles depending on the particle shape, initial orientation, and ratio of particle size to the channel size. Two possible stable modes of motion are found for prolate spheroids. Particles either tumble in a shear plane or spin with the axis parallel to the vortex direction. We present a phase diagram showing the transition between these two modes. Cross-stream migration and equilibrium trajectories of particles are also investigated and found to depend on the particle shape and mode of motion. The simulations results are compared with experimental data showing favorable agreement. Our results will be useful for separating biological and synthetic particles by size and shape.

  10. Impact of NLTE on research of early chemical enrichment of the dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila; Jablonka, Pascale; North, Pierre; Sitnova, Tatyana

    2016-08-01

    Based on high-resolution observed spectra, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation, and precise stellar atmosphere parameters, we present the first complete sample of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) with accurate chemical abundances in the very metal-poor (VMP) regime. The obtained stellar elemental ratios are compared with chemical enrichment models, and we show that NLTE is a major step forward for studies of the dSph and the Milky Way (MW) chemical evolution.

  11. Dipolophoresis of dielectric spheroids under asymmetric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Itzchak; Yossifon, Gilad; Miloh, Touvia

    2012-01-01

    Non-spherical particles are common in colloidal science. Spheroidal shapes are particularly convenient for the analysis of the pertinent electrostatic and hydrodynamic problems and are thus widely used to model the manipulation of biological cells as well as deformed drops and bubbles. We study the rotary motion of a dielectric spheroidal micro-particle which is freely suspended in an unbounded electrolyte solution in the presence of a uniform applied electric field, assuming a thin Debye layer. For the common case of a uniform distribution of the native surface-charge density, the rotary motion of the particle is generated by the contributions of the induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) slip and the dielectrophoresis associated with the distribution of the Maxwell stress, respectively. Series solutions are obtained by using spheroidal (prolate or oblate) coordinates. Explicit results are presented for the angular velocity of particles spanning the entire spectrum from rod-like to disk-like shapes. These results demonstrate the non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the eccentricity of particle shape and the singularity of the multiple limits corresponding to conducting (ideally polarizable) particles of extreme eccentricity (e ≈ 1). The non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the particle dielectric permittivity is related to the induced-charge contribution. We apply these results to describe the motion of particles subject to a uniform field rotating in the plane. For a sufficiently slow rotation rate, prolate particles eventually become "locked" to the external field with their stationary relative orientation in the plane of rotation being determined by the particle eccentricity and dielectric constant. This effect may be of potential use in the manipulation of poly-disperse suspensions of dielectric non-spherical particles. Oblate spheroids invariably approach a uniform orientation with their symmetry axes directed normal to the external

  12. Cancer cell spheroids as a model to evaluate chemotherapy protocols.

    PubMed

    Perche, Federico; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether the spheroid culture can be used to evaluate drug efficacy, we have evaluated the toxicity of free or carrier-associated doxorubicin as a single drug or in combination with other antineoplastic agents using the spheroid cultures of drug-resistant cancer cells. Paclitaxel, cisplatin, dexamethasone, mitoxantrone, sclareol or methotrexate were used in combination with doxorubicin. The effect of the treatment protocols on free, micellar and liposomal doxorubicin accumulation in spheroids and on resulting toxicity was evaluated by fluorescence and lactate dehydrogenase release, respectively. Enhanced doxorubicin accumulation and toxicity were observed after spheroid pretreatment with mitoxantrone or paclitaxel. Effects of the drug combination with doxorubicin were sequence dependent, use of doxorubicin as the first drug being the least inducer of toxicity. Finally, spheroids were recognized by a cancer cell-specific antibody. Our results suggest the usefulness of spheroids to evaluate chemotherapy combinations. PMID:22892843

  13. Cancer cell spheroids as a model to evaluate chemotherapy protocols

    PubMed Central

    Perche, Federico; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the spheroid culture can be used to evaluate drug efficacy, we have evaluated the toxicity of free or carrier-associated doxorubicin as a single drug or in combination with other antineoplastic agents using the spheroid cultures of drug-resistant cancer cells. Paclitaxel, cisplatin, dexamethasone, mitoxantrone, sclareol or methotrexate were used in combination with doxorubicin. The effect of the treatment protocols on free, micellar and liposomal doxorubicin accumulation in spheroids and on resulting toxicity was evaluated by fluorescence and lactate dehydrogenase release, respectively. Enhanced doxorubicin accumulation and toxicity were observed after spheroid pretreatment with mitoxantrone or paclitaxel. Effects of the drug combination with doxorubicin were sequence dependent, use of doxorubicin as the first drug being the least inducer of toxicity. Finally, spheroids were recognized by a cancer cell-specific antibody. Our results suggest the usefulness of spheroids to evaluate chemotherapy combinations. PMID:22892843

  14. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, Amy E.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brogan, Crystal L.

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first `seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids.

  15. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10.

    PubMed

    Reines, Amy E; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Johnson, Kelsey E; Brogan, Crystal L

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first 'seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize 2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize 2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids.

  16. Astrophysics: Illuminating brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.

    2016-05-01

    Objects known as brown dwarfs are midway between stars and planets in mass. Observations of a hot brown dwarf irradiated by a nearby star will help to fill a gap in our knowledge of the atmospheres of fluid planetary objects. See Letter p.366

  17. WISE and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; WISE Team

    2009-05-01

    The search for the nearest and coolest brown dwarfs will use WISE's two short-wavelength channels (W1 and W2), which are optimized for brown dwarf detection. W1 samples the methane fundamental absorption band at 3.3 microns, and W2 measures the relatively opacity-free portion of the brown dwarf atmosphere near 4.7 microns. Cool brown dwarfs will thus have very red [W1]-[W2] colors, maximizing our chances of identifying them. Extrapolating preferred mass functions to very low masses and assuming that the star formation rate has been constant over the last 10 Gyr, we can predict the number of brown dwarfs WISE is expected to image. At spectral types later than T7 (Teff > 850K), WISE is expected to find 500 brown dwarfs, which makes WISE uniquely suited among future surveys to measure the low-mass limit of star formation for the first time. This sample will also show whether a new spectral class beyond T, dubbed "Y", is needed at the lowest temperatures. Although the primary six-month WISE mission will cover the entire sky once, WISE should have sufficient cryogen to perform a second, complete pass of the sky. In this case, the identification of nearby brown dwarfs need not rely solely on color selection. Kinematics (proper motion) and geometry (parallax) can also be used to distinguish our closest brown dwarf neighbors, one of which may lie less distant than Proxima Centauri or even fall within our own Oort Cloud.

  18. A search for HI in some peculiar faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Ayesha; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2005-09-01

    We present a deep Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) search for HI 21-cm emission from three dwarf galaxies, viz. POX 186, SC 24 and KKR 25. Based, in part, on previous single-dish HI observations, these galaxies have been classified as a blue compact dwarf (BCD), a dwarf irregular and a transition galaxy, respectively. However, in conflict with previous single-dish detections, we do not detect HI in SC 24 or KKR 25. We suggest that the previous single-dish measurements were probably confused with the local Galactic emission. In the case of POX 186, we confirm the previous non-detection of HI but with substantially improved limits on its HI mass. Our derived upper limits on the HI mass of SC 24 and KKR 25 are similar to the typical HI mass limit for dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, whereas in the case of POX 186, we find that its gas content is somewhat smaller than is typical of BCD galaxies.

  19. Janus magnetic cellular spheroids for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mattix, Brandon M.; Olsen, Timothy R.; Casco, Megan; Reese, Laura; Poole, John T.; Zhang, Jing; Visconti, Richard P.; Simionescu, Agneta; Simionescu, Dan T.; Alexis, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Cell aggregates, or spheroids, have been used as building blocks to fabricate scaffold-free tissues that can closely mimic the native three-dimensional in vivo environment for broad applications including regenerative medicine and high throughput testing of drugs. The incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into spheroids permits the manipulation of spheroids into desired shapes, patterns, and tissues using magnetic forces. Current strategies incorporating MNPs often involve cellular uptake, and should therefore be avoided because it induces adverse effects on cell activity, viability, and phenotype. Here, we report a Janus structure of magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCS) with spatial control of MNPs to form two distinct domains: cells and extracellular MNPs. This separation of cells and MNPs within magnetic cellular spheroids was successfully incorporated into cellular spheroids with various cellular and extracellular compositions and contents. The amount of cells that internalized MNPs was quantified and showed that JMCSs resulted in significantly lower internalization (35%) compared to uptake spheroids (83%, p < 0.05). Furthermore, the addition of MNPs to cellular spheroids using the Janus method has no adverse effects on cellular viability up to seven weeks, with spheroids maintaining at least 82% viability over 7 weeks when compared to control spheroids without MNPs. By safely incorporating MNPs into cellular spheroids, results demonstrated that JMCSs were capable of magnetic manipulation, and that magnetic forces used during magnetic force assembly mediate fusion into controlled patterns and complex tissues. Finally, JMCSs were assembled and fused into a vascular tissue construct 5 mm in diameter using magnetic force assembly. PMID:24183699

  20. Global Landslides on Rapidly Spinning Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, Daniel J.; Sanchez, P.

    2013-10-01

    The angle of repose and conditions for global landslides on the surfaces of small, rapidly spinning, spheroidal asteroids are studied. Applying techniques of soil mechanics, we develop a theory for, and examples of, how regolith will fail and flow in this microgravity environment. Our motivation is to develop an understanding of the "top-shaped" class of asteroids based on analytical soil mechanics. Our analysis transforms the entire asteroid surface into a local frame where we can model it as a conventional granular pile with a surface slope, acceleration and height variations as a function of the body's spin rate, shape and density. A general finding is that the lowest point on a rapidly spinning spheroid is at the equator with the effective height of surface material monotonically increasing towards the polar regions, where the height can be larger than the physical radius of the body. We study the failure conditions of both cohesionless and cohesive regolith, and develop specific predictions of the surface profile as a function of the regolith angle of friction and the maximum spin rate experienced by the body. The theory also provides simple guidelines on what the shape may look like, although we do not analyze gravitationally self-consistent evolution of the body shape. The theory is tested with soft-sphere discrete element method granular mechanics simulations to better understand the dynamical aspects of global asteroid landslides. We find significant differences between failure conditions for cohesive and cohesionless regolith. In the case of cohesive regolith, we show that extremely small values of strength (much less than that found in lunar regolith) can stabilize a surface even at very rapid spin rates. Cohesionless surfaces, as expected, fail whenever their surface slopes exceed the angle of friction. Based on our analysis we propose that global landslides and the flow of material towards the equator on spheroidal bodies are precipitated by exogenous

  1. Star Formation in Dwarf-Dwarf Mergers: Fueling Hierarchical Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stierwalt, Sabrina; Johnson, K. E.; Kallivayalil, N.; Patton, D. R.; Putman, M. E.; Besla, G.; Geha, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We present early results from the first systematic study a sample of isolated interacting dwarf pairs and the mechanisms governing their star formation. Low mass dwarf galaxies are ubiquitous in the local universe, yet the efficiency of gas removal and the enhancement of star formation in dwarfs via pre-processing (i.e. dwarf-dwarf interactions occurring before the accretion by a massive host) are currently unconstrained. Studies of Local Group dwarfs credit stochastic internal processes for their complicated star formation histories, but a few intriguing examples suggest interactions among dwarfs may produce enhanced star formation. We combine archival UV imaging from GALEX with deep optical broad- and narrow-band (Halpha) imaging taken with the pre- One Degree Imager (pODI) on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope and with the 2.3-m Bok telescope at Steward Observatory to confirm the presence of stellar bridges and tidal tails and to determine whether dwarf-dwarf interactions alone can trigger significant levels of star formation. We investigate star formation rates and global galaxy colors as a function of dwarf pair separation (i.e. the dwarf merger sequence) and dwarf-dwarf mass ratio. This project is a precursor to an ongoing effort to obtain high spatial resolution HI imaging to assess the importance of sequential triggering caused by dwarf-dwarf interactions and the subsequent affect on the more massive hosts that later accrete the low mass systems.

  2. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis.

  3. Attenuation of microwaves by poly-disperse small spheroid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peichang; Wang, Zhenhui

    1998-08-01

    Expressions for calculating the attenuation cross sections of poly-disperse, small spheroids, whose rotatory axes are in specific status, have been derived from a universal formula for calculating the attenuation cross section of a particle of arbitrary shape. Attenuation cross sections of liquid, ice, and spongy spheroidal droplets in different size and eccentricity at different wave lengths have been computed and analyzed.

  4. On The gamma-ray emission from Reticulum II and other dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim E-mail: trlinden@uchicago.edu

    2015-09-01

    The recent discovery of ten new dwarf galaxy candidates by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) could increase the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope's sensitivity to annihilating dark matter particles, potentially enabling a definitive test of the dark matter interpretation of the long-standing Galactic Center gamma-ray excess. In this paper, we compare the previous analyses of Fermi data from the directions of the new dwarf candidates (including the relatively nearby Reticulum II) and perform our own analysis, with the goal of establishing the statistical significance of any gamma-ray signal from these sources. We confirm the presence of an excess from Reticulum II, with a spectral shape that is compatible with the Galactic Center signal. The significance of this emission is greater than that observed from 99.84% of randomly chosen high-latitude blank-sky locations, corresponding to a local detection significance of 3.2σ. We caution that any dark matter interpretation of this excess must be validated through observations of additional dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and improved calculations of the relative J-factor of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We improve upon the standard blank-sky calibration approach through the use of multi-wavelength catalogs, which allow us to avoid regions that are likely to contain unresolved gamma-ray sources.

  5. On the use of X-ray and γ-ray telescopes for identifying the origin of electrons and positrons observed by ATIC, Fermi, and PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvez, Antoine; Essey, Warren; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Kusenko, Alexander; Loewenstein, Michael

    2011-11-01

    X-ray and γ-ray observations can help understand the origin of the electron and positron signals reported by ATIC, PAMELA, PPB-BETS, and Fermi. It remains unclear whether the observed high-energy electrons and positrons are produced by relic particles, or by some astrophysical sources. To distinguish between the two possibilities, one can compare the electron population in the local neighborhood with that in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies, which are not expected to host as many pulsars and other astrophysical sources. This can be accomplished using X-ray and γ-ray observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. Assuming the signal detected by Fermi and ATIC comes from dark matter and using the inferred dark matter profile of the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy as an example, we calculate the photon spectrum produced by electrons via inverse Compton scattering. Since little is known about the magnetic fields in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, we consider the propagation of charged particles with and without diffusion. Extending the analysis of Fermi collaboration for Draco, we find that for a halo mass ˜10 9 M ⊙, even in the absence of diffusion, the γ-ray signal would be above the upper limits. This conclusion is subject to uncertainties associated with the halo mass. If dwarf spheroidal galaxies host local magnetic fields, the diffusion of the electrons can result in a signal detectable by future X-ray telescopes.

  6. Scattering of polarized Gaussian light by a spheroidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xianming; Xiao, Sai; Ma, Lixiu; Su, Baochen

    2015-02-01

    Light scattering by a small particle can produce light with polarization characteristics different from those of the incident beam. In this article, we studied the polarized Gaussian beam scattered by a spheroidal particle within the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory framework. A theoretical procedure is given to expand an incident Gaussian beam in terms of spheroidal vector wave functions. We studied the single scattering properties of a single spheroidal particle with varying aspect ratios and size parameters. Exact analytic solutions are obtained for computing the amplitude matrix and single scattering Muller matrix for a single spheroid with normal illumination. The Muller scattering matrix elements of a single spheroid are compared between plane wave and Gaussian light beam as incident light source.

  7. Method to measure the radio and chemosensitivity of human spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, J.; Nederman, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method based on the spontaneous outgrowth of cells from spheroids was tested. Different outgrowth patterns were seen depending on the types of spheroids and on the radiation or drug doses. The method allowed dose-effect relations to be determined. Spheroid survival was defined as when the outgrowing monolayers contained at least thousand cells within five weeks. The method was used as an alternative to cloning of isolated single cells. The glioma and osteosarcoma spheroids could not be disintegrated to single cell suspensions since they resisted enzymatic and mechanical treatments for cell separation. Detection of differences in radio and chemosensitivity between different types of spheroids of human origin might be valuable for the understanding of the large variations in therapeutical response often seen between different types of tumors.

  8. When White Dwarfs Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Wendy Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    3D models of white dwarf collisions are used to assess the likelihood of double-degenerate mergers as progenitors for Type Ia supernovae (henceforth SNIa) and to identify observational signatures of double-degenerate collisions. Observations of individual SNIa, SNIa rates in different galaxy types, and double white dwarf binary systems suggest that mergers or collisions between two white dwarfs play a role in the overall SNIa population. Given the possibility of two progenitor systems (single-degenerate and double-degenerate), the sample of SNIa used in cosmological calcula- tions needs to be carefully examined. To improve calculations of cosmological parameters, the development of calibrated diagnostics for double-degenerate progenitor SNIa is essential. Head-on white dwarf collision simulations are used to provide an upper limit on the 56Ni production in white dwarf collisions. In chapter II, I explore zero impact parameter collisions of white dwarfs using the Eulerian grid code FLASH. The initial 1D white dwarf profiles are created assuming hydrostatic equilibrium and a uniform composition of 50% 12C and 50% 16O. The masses range from 0.64 to 0.81 solar masses and have an isothermal temperature of 107 K. I map these 1D models onto a 3D grid, where the dimensions of the grid are each eight times the white dwarf radius, and the dwarfs are initially placed four white dwarf radii apart (center to center). To provide insight into a larger range of physical possibilities, I also model non-zero impact parameter white dwarf collisions (Chapter III). Although head-on white dwarf collisions provide an upper limit on 56Ni production, non-zero impact parameter collisions provide insight into a wider range of physical scenarios. The initial conditions (box size, initial separation, composition, and initial temperature) are identical to those used for the head-on collisions (Chapter II) for the same range of masses. For each mass pair- ing, collision simulations are carried

  9. M dwarfs: Theoretical work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, Dermott J.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical work on the atmospheres of M dwarfs has progressed along lines parallel to those followed in the study of other classes of stars. Such models have become increasingly sophisticated as improvements in opacities, in the equation of state, and in the treatment of convection were incorporated during the last 15 to 20 years. As a result, spectrophotometric data on M dwarfs can now be fitted rather well by current models. The various attempts at modeling M dwarf photospheres in purely thermal terms are summarized. Some extensions of these models to include the effects of microturbulence and magnetic inhomogeneities are presented.

  10. On Convergence Aspects of Spheroidal Monogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, S.; Morais, J.

    2011-09-01

    Orthogonal polynomials have found wide applications in mathematical physics, numerical analysis, and other fields. Accordingly there is an enormous amount of variety of such polynomials and relations that describe their properties. The paper's main results are the discussion of approximation properties for monogenic functions over prolate spheroids in R3 in terms of orthogonal monogenic polynomials and their interdependences. Certain results are stated without proof for now. The motivation for the present study stems from the fact that these polynomials play an important role in the calculation of the Bergman kernel and Green's monogenic functions in a spheroid. Once these functions are known, it is possible to solve both basic boundary value and conformal mapping problems. Interestingly, most of the used methods have a n-dimensional counterpart and can be extended to arbitrary ellipsoids. But such a procedure would make the further study of the underlying ellipsoidal monogenics somewhat laborious, and for this reason we shall not discuss these general cases here. To the best of our knowledge, this does not appear to have been done in literature before.

  11. Design of a Uranium Dioxide Spheroidization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavender, Daniel P.; Mireles, Omar R.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2013-01-01

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) fuel cermets. The PSS process improves particle spherocity and surface morphology for coating by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Angular fully dense particles melt in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet at between 32-36 kW, and become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Particles range in size from 100 - 50 microns in diameter. Student s t-test and hypothesis testing of two proportions statistical methods were applied to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders show great than 800% increase in the number of spherical particles over the stock powder with the mean spherocity only mildly improved. It is recommended that powders be processed two-three times in order to reach the desired spherocity, and that process parameters be optimized for a more narrow particles size range. Keywords: spherocity, spheroidization, plasma, uranium-dioxide, cermet, nuclear, propulsion

  12. Bounds on cross sections and lifetimes for dark matter annihilation and decay into charged leptons from gamma-ray observations of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Sehgal, Neelima; Strigari, Louis E.

    2009-07-15

    We provide conservative bounds on the dark matter cross section and lifetime from final state radiation produced by annihilation or decay into charged leptons, either directly or via an intermediate particle {phi}. Our analysis utilizes the experimental gamma-ray flux upper limits from four Milky Way dwarf satellites: HESS observations of Sagittarius and VERITAS observations of Draco, Ursa Minor, and Willman 1. Using 90% confidence level lower limits on the integrals over the dark matter distributions, we find that these constraints are largely unable to rule out dark matter annihilations or decays as an explanation of the PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS excesses. However, if there is an additional Sommerfeld enhancement in dwarfs, which have a velocity dispersion {approx}10 to 20 times lower than that of the local Galactic halo, then the cross sections for dark matter annihilating through {phi}'s required to explain the excesses are very close to the cross-section upper bounds from Willman 1. Dark matter annihilation directly into {tau}'s is also marginally ruled out by Willman 1 as an explanation of the excesses, and the required cross section is only a factor of a few below the upper bound from Draco. Finally, we make predictions for the gamma-ray flux expected from the dwarf galaxy Segue 1 for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We find that for a sizeable fraction of the parameter space in which dark matter annihilation into charged leptons explains the PAMELA excess, Fermi has good prospects for detecting a gamma-ray signal from Segue 1 after 1 yr of observation.

  13. Bounds on cross sections and lifetimes for dark matter annihilation and decay into charged leptons from gamma-ray observations of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essig, Rouven; Sehgal, Neelima; Strigari, Louis E.

    2009-07-01

    We provide conservative bounds on the dark matter cross section and lifetime from final state radiation produced by annihilation or decay into charged leptons, either directly or via an intermediate particle ϕ. Our analysis utilizes the experimental gamma-ray flux upper limits from four Milky Way dwarf satellites: HESS observations of Sagittarius and VERITAS observations of Draco, Ursa Minor, and Willman 1. Using 90% confidence level lower limits on the integrals over the dark matter distributions, we find that these constraints are largely unable to rule out dark matter annihilations or decays as an explanation of the PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS excesses. However, if there is an additional Sommerfeld enhancement in dwarfs, which have a velocity dispersion ˜10 to 20 times lower than that of the local Galactic halo, then the cross sections for dark matter annihilating through ϕ’s required to explain the excesses are very close to the cross-section upper bounds from Willman 1. Dark matter annihilation directly into τ’s is also marginally ruled out by Willman 1 as an explanation of the excesses, and the required cross section is only a factor of a few below the upper bound from Draco. Finally, we make predictions for the gamma-ray flux expected from the dwarf galaxy Segue 1 for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We find that for a sizeable fraction of the parameter space in which dark matter annihilation into charged leptons explains the PAMELA excess, Fermi has good prospects for detecting a gamma-ray signal from Segue 1 after 1 yr of observation.

  14. Bounds on Cross-sections and Lifetimes for Dark Matter Annihilation and Decay into Charged Leptons from Gamma-ray Observations of Dwarf Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Essig, Rouven; Sehgal, Neelima; Strigari, Louis E.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2009-06-19

    We provide conservative bounds on the dark matter cross-section and lifetime from final state radiation produced by annihilation or decay into charged leptons, either directly or via an intermediate particle {phi}. Our analysis utilizes the experimental gamma-ray flux upper limits from four Milky Way dwarf satellites: HESS observations of Sagittarius and VERITAS observations of Draco, Ursa Minor, and Willman 1. Using 90% confidence level lower limits on the integrals over the dark matter distributions, we find that these constraints are largely unable to rule out dark matter annihilations or decays as an explanation of the PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS excesses. However, if there is an additional Sommerfeld enhancement in dwarfs, which have a velocity dispersion {approx} 10 to 20 times lower than that of the local Galactic halo, then the cross-sections for dark matter annihilating through {phi}'s required to explain the excesses are very close to the cross-section upper bounds from Willman 1. Dark matter annihilation directly into {tau}'s is also marginally ruled out by Willman 1 as an explanation of the excesses, and the required cross-section is only a factor of a few below the upper bound from Draco. Finally, we make predictions for the gamma-ray flux expected from the dwarf galaxy Segue 1 for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We find that for a sizeable fraction of the parameter space in which dark matter annihilation into charged leptons explains the PAMELA excess, Fermi has good prospects for detecting a gamma-ray signal from Segue 1 after one year of observation.

  15. Understanding Brown Dwarf Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Surveys of brown dwarf variability continue to find that roughly half of all brown dwarfs are variable. While variability is observed amongst all types of brown dwarfs, amplitudes are typically greatest for L-T transition objects. In my talk I will discuss the possible physical mechanisms that are responsible for the observed variability. I will particularly focus on comparing and contrasting the effects of changes in atmospheric thermal profile and cloud opacity. The two different mechanisms will produce different variability signatures and I will discuss the extent to which the current datasets constrain both mechanisms. By combining constraints from studies of variability with existing spectral and photometric datasets we can begin to construct and test self-consistent models of brown dwarf atmospheres. These models not only aid in the interpretation of existing objects but also inform studies of directly imaged giant planets.

  16. Dwarfs in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Chahira

    2006-02-15

    Ancient Egypt was one of the most advanced and productive civilizations in antiquity, spanning 3000 years before the "Christian" era. Ancient Egyptians built colossal temples and magnificent tombs to honor their gods and religious leaders. Their hieroglyphic language, system of organization, and recording of events give contemporary researchers insights into their daily activities. Based on the record left by their art, the ancient Egyptians documented the presence of dwarfs in almost every facet of life. Due to the hot dry climate and natural and artificial mummification, Egypt is a major source of information on achondroplasia in the old world. The remains of dwarfs are abundant and include complete and partial skeletons. Dwarfs were employed as personal attendants, animal tenders, jewelers, and entertainers. Several high-ranking dwarfs especially from the Old Kingdom (2700-2190 BCE) achieved important status and had lavish burial places close to the pyramids. Their costly tombs in the royal cemeteries and the inscriptions on their statutes indicate their high-ranking position in Egyptian society and their close relation to the king. Some of them were Seneb, Pereniankh, Khnumhotpe, and Djeder. There were at least two dwarf gods, Ptah and Bes. The god Ptah was associated with regeneration and rejuvenation. The god Bes was a protector of sexuality, childbirth, women, and children. He was a favored deity particularly during the Greco-Roman period. His temple was recently excavated in the Baharia oasis in the middle of Egypt. The burial sites and artistic sources provide glimpses of the positions of dwarfs in daily life in ancient Egypt. Dwarfs were accepted in ancient Egypt; their recorded daily activities suggest assimilation into daily life, and their disorder was not shown as a physical handicap. Wisdom writings and moral teachings in ancient Egypt commanded respect for dwarfs and other individuals with disabilities.

  17. Dwarfs in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Chahira

    2006-02-15

    Ancient Egypt was one of the most advanced and productive civilizations in antiquity, spanning 3000 years before the "Christian" era. Ancient Egyptians built colossal temples and magnificent tombs to honor their gods and religious leaders. Their hieroglyphic language, system of organization, and recording of events give contemporary researchers insights into their daily activities. Based on the record left by their art, the ancient Egyptians documented the presence of dwarfs in almost every facet of life. Due to the hot dry climate and natural and artificial mummification, Egypt is a major source of information on achondroplasia in the old world. The remains of dwarfs are abundant and include complete and partial skeletons. Dwarfs were employed as personal attendants, animal tenders, jewelers, and entertainers. Several high-ranking dwarfs especially from the Old Kingdom (2700-2190 BCE) achieved important status and had lavish burial places close to the pyramids. Their costly tombs in the royal cemeteries and the inscriptions on their statutes indicate their high-ranking position in Egyptian society and their close relation to the king. Some of them were Seneb, Pereniankh, Khnumhotpe, and Djeder. There were at least two dwarf gods, Ptah and Bes. The god Ptah was associated with regeneration and rejuvenation. The god Bes was a protector of sexuality, childbirth, women, and children. He was a favored deity particularly during the Greco-Roman period. His temple was recently excavated in the Baharia oasis in the middle of Egypt. The burial sites and artistic sources provide glimpses of the positions of dwarfs in daily life in ancient Egypt. Dwarfs were accepted in ancient Egypt; their recorded daily activities suggest assimilation into daily life, and their disorder was not shown as a physical handicap. Wisdom writings and moral teachings in ancient Egypt commanded respect for dwarfs and other individuals with disabilities. PMID:16380966

  18. Ultra-light dark matter in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models struggle to match the observations at galactic scales. The tension can be reduced either by dramatic baryonic feedback effects or by modifying the particle physics of CDM. Here, we consider an ultra-light scalar field DM particle manifesting a wave nature below a DM particle mass-dependent Jeans scale. For DM mass m ˜ 10-22 eV, this scenario delays galaxy formation and avoids cusps in the centre of the dark matter haloes. We use new measurements of half-light mass in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Draco II and Triangulum II to estimate the mass of the DM particle in this model. We find that if the stellar populations are within the core of the density profile then the data are in agreement with a Wave Dark Matter model having a DM particle with m ˜ 3.7-5.6 × 10-22 eV. The presence of this extremely light particle will contribute to the formation of a central solitonic core replacing the cusp of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and bringing predictions closer to observations of cored central density in dwarf galaxies.

  19. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing; Governato, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ΛCDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M {sub *} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}. The {sup D}M core mass removal efficiency{sup —}dark mass ejected per unit stellar mass—ranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M{sub vir}{sup 5/3}, the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, Γ ≡ dlog M/dlog R ≅ 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s{sup –1} in the inner 1 kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos.

  20. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Taylor, Matthew A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W.; Peng, Eric W.; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range 0.7 ≲ reff/kpc ≲ 1.5 with luminosities of -11.65 ≲ MU ≲ -9.42 and -12.79 ≲ MI ≲ -10.58 mag, corresponding to a color range of (U - I)0 ≃ 1.1 - 2.2 mag and surface brightness levels of μU ≃ 28.1 mag/arcsec2 and μI ≃ 27.4 mag/arcsec2. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z⊙ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range M_*|_{Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{odot } and M_*|_{0.02 Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{6.3-8} M_{odot }. Three dwarfs are older than 1 Gyr, while the other two significantly bluer dwarfs are younger than ˜2 Gyr at any mass/metallicity combination. Altogether, the new LSB dwarf galaxy candidates share properties with dwarf galaxies found throughout the Local Volume and in nearby galaxy clusters such as Fornax. We find a pair of candidates with ˜2 kpc projected separation, which may represent one of the closest dwarf galaxy pairs found. We also find a nucleated dwarf candidate, with a nucleus size of reff ≃ 46 - 63 pc and magnitude MU, 0 = -7.42 mag and (U - I)0 = 1.51 mag, which is consistent with a nuclear stellar disc with a stellar mass in the range 104.9 - 6.5 M⊙.

  1. THE SPLASH SURVEY: KINEMATICS OF ANDROMEDA's INNER SPHEROID

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, Claire E.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; and others

    2012-06-20

    The combination of large size, high stellar density, high metallicity, and Sersic surface brightness profile of the spheroidal component of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) within R{sub proj} {approx} 20 kpc suggests that it is unlike any subcomponent of the Milky Way. In this work we capitalize on our proximity to and external view of M31 to probe the kinematical properties of this 'inner spheroid'. We employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of resolved stellar kinematics from Keck/DEIMOS spectra of 5651 red giant branch stars to disentangle M31's inner spheroid from its stellar disk. We measure the mean velocity and dispersion of the spheroid in each of five spatial bins after accounting for a locally cold stellar disk as well as the Giant Southern Stream and associated tidal debris. For the first time, we detect significant spheroid rotation (v{sub rot} {approx} 50 km s{sup -1}) beyond R{sub proj} {approx} 5 kpc. The velocity dispersion decreases from about 140 km s{sup -1} at R{sub proj} = 7 kpc to 120 km s{sup -1} at R{sub proj} = 14 kpc, consistent to 2{sigma} with existing measurements and models. We calculate the probability that a given star is a member of the spheroid and find that the spheroid has a significant presence throughout the spatial extent of our sample. Lastly, we show that the flattening of the spheroid is due to velocity anisotropy in addition to rotation. Though this suggests that the inner spheroid of M31 more closely resembles an elliptical galaxy than a typical spiral galaxy bulge, it should be cautioned that our measurements are much farther out (2-14r{sub eff}) than for the comparison samples.

  2. [Reparative and neoplastic spheroid cellular structures and their mathematical model].

    PubMed

    Kogan, E A; Namiot, V A; Demura, T A; Faĭzullina, N M; Sukhikh, G T

    2014-01-01

    Spheroid cell structures in the cell cultures have been described and are used for studying cell-cell and cell- matrix interactions. At the same time, spheroid cell structure participation in the repair and development of cancer in vivo remains unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular composition of spherical structures and their functional significance in the repair of squamous epithelium in human papilloma virus-associated cervical pathology--chronic cervicitis and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1-3 degree, and also construct a mathematical model to explain the development and behavior of such spheroid cell structure.

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of spheroidized steel using magnetoacoustic and Barkhausen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.C.H.; Jakubovics, J.P.; Scruby, C.B.

    1997-09-01

    Magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) and Barkhausen emission (BE) measurements have been made on pearlitic steel samples annealed to produce spheroidized microstructures with various sizes and distributions of carbides. It was found that spheroidization of the pearlitic structure and coarsening of carbide particles result in a decrease in the peak height ratio of the MAE profile and the formation of a second peak in the BE profile. These results can be interpreted from observations of the domain structure by Lorentz microscopy. The sensitivity of the MAE and BE profiles to the carbide size and morphology makes both techniques useful for monitoring the microstructure of spheroidized steels.

  4. The HST Snapshot Survey of Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Candidates. III. Resolved Dwarf Galaxies In and Beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebel, E. K.; Seitzer, P.; Dolphin, A. E.; Geisler, D.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hodge, P. W.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Sarajedini, A.; Sharina, M. E.

    1999-12-01

    We present results for several nearby, resolved dwarf galaxies imaged with WFPC2 in the framework of our HST snapshot survey of nearby dwarf galaxy candidates (Seitzer et al., paper I in this series). All data presented here were analyzed with the automated photometry package HSTPHOT (Dolphin et al., paper IV in this series). Our closest target is the recently discovered Cassiopeia dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy (Karachentsev & Karachentseva 1999, A&A, 341, 355), a new Local Group member and companion of M31 (Grebel & Guhathakurta 1999, ApJ, 511, 101). Our WFPC2 snapshot data reveal a pronounced red horizontal branch in Cas dSph. IC 5152 is a dwarf irregular (dIrr) just beyond the Local Group. Our data show a significant intermediate-age population with a strongly tilted asymptotic giant branch (AGB), a substantial young population, and a wide giant branch. Other nearby galaxies to be discussed include NGC 1560, ESO 471-G006, ESO 470-G018, and KK 035. Most of these galaxies are being resolved into stars for the first time. We describe their properties in detail and derive distances for all dwarfs with a well-defined tip of the red giant branch. Membership of these galaxies in nearby groups is discussed. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant GO-08192.97A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. EKG acknowledges support by NASA through grant HF-01108.01-98A from the Space Telescope Science Institute. EKG and IDK are supported by the Henri Chrétien International Research Grant administered by the American Astronomical Society. PG is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  5. MULTI-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS FROM MEDIUM-RESOLUTION SPECTRA. II. CATALOG OF STARS IN MILKY WAY DWARF SATELLITE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; Geha, Marla C.; Sneden, Christopher; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Majewski, Steven R.; Siegel, Michael

    2010-12-15

    We present a catalog of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances for 2961 stars in eight dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way (MW): Sculptor, Fornax, Leo I, Sextans, Leo II, Canes Venatici I, Ursa Minor, and Draco. For the purposes of validating our measurements, we also observed 445 red giants in MW globular clusters and 21 field red giants in the MW halo. The measurements are based on Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectroscopy (MRS) combined with spectral synthesis. We estimate uncertainties in [Fe/H] by quantifying the dispersion of [Fe/H] measurements in a sample of stars in monometallic globular clusters (GCs). We estimate uncertainties in Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti abundances by comparing to high-resolution spectroscopic abundances of the same stars. For this purpose, a sample of 132 stars with published high-resolution spectroscopy in GCs, the MW halo field, and dwarf galaxies has been observed with MRS. The standard deviations of the differences in [Fe/H] and ([{alpha}/Fe]) (the average of [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) between the two samples is 0.15 and 0.16, respectively. This catalog represents the largest sample of multi-element abundances in dwarf galaxies to date. The next papers in this series draw conclusions on the chemical evolution, gas dynamics, and star formation histories from the catalog presented here. The wide range of dwarf galaxy luminosity reveals the dependence of dwarf galaxy chemical evolution on galaxy stellar mass.

  6. An oxygen-permeable spheroid culture system for the prevention of central hypoxia and necrosis of spheroids.

    PubMed

    Anada, Takahisa; Fukuda, Junji; Sai, Yuko; Suzuki, Osamu

    2012-11-01

    Since oxygen is one of the critical limiting factors for maintaining cell viability and function, a great deal of effort is being focused on improving the oxygen supply to three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs. Here, we report a technique to construct spheroids utilizing 3D culture chips with a rapid and simple method for the replication of the surface structures of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. The resultant spheroid culture chip made it possible to rapidly yield high numbers of the spheroids at a time as well as to obtain uniform spheroids with a narrow size distribution and to collect the spheroids easily and noninvasively. The most important feature of this spheroid culture chip is that it enables direct oxygen supply to the cells because the chip is made with only gas-permeable PDMS. When human hepatoma HepG2 cells were grown on the oxygen-permeable chips as a model for liver cells, the cellular growth was remarkably enhanced, and the anaerobic glycolysis was significantly reduced compared to the non-oxygen-permeable chips. Furthermore, the oxygen-permeable chip improved the albumin secretion rates compared to the conventional spheroid culture system after 10 days. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the oxygen-permeable chip dramatically prevented hypoxia in the core of the spheroids and subsequent central necrosis. Surprisingly, the diameters of approximately 400 and 600 μm were estimated to be the threshold of the hypoxic and survival size, respectively, for the HepG2 spheroids in the oxygenated chip. These results indicate that this chip is useful for engineering 3D cellular constructs with high viability and functionality for tissue engineering.

  7. Increased nanoparticle penetration in collagenase-treated multicellular spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Thomas T; Olive, Peggy L; Pun, Suzie H

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix of solid tumors presents a transport barrier that restricts nanoparticle penetration, thereby limiting the efficacy of nanosized delivery vehicles for cancer imaging and therapy. In this study, the effect of nanoparticle size and collagenase treatment on penetration of carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles was systematically assessed in a multicellular spheroid model. Penetration of the nanoparticles into the spheroid core was limited to particles smaller than 100 nm. Collagenase treatment of spheroids resulted in significantly increased penetration of nanoparticles up to 100 nm with only a minor increase in particle penetration observed for particles larger than 100 nm. Collagenase was immobilized onto the surface of nanoparticles for site-specific degradation of ECM proteins. Collagenase-coated, 100 nm nanoparticles demonstrated a 4-fold increase in the number of particles delivered to the spheroid core compared with control nanoparticles. Thus, nanoparticle delivery to solid tumors may be substantially improved by the incorporation of ECM-modulating enzymes in the delivery formulation. PMID:17722554

  8. Effects of photodynamic therapy on human glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Chu, Eugene A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1999-07-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with malignant brain neoplasm has led to a search for better treatment modalities. Although gliomas are considered to be disseminated tumors in the brain, most recur at the site of the previous tumor resection. Improved local control would thus be of clear benefit. The utility of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of brain neoplasms is investigated using a human glioma spheroid model. Specifically, the effects of PDT on human glioma spheroids are investigated using PhotofrinTM and 56-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The effects of various irradiation schemes were monitored using a simple growth assay. A growth delay was observed at an optical fluence of approximately 35 J cm-2 for spheroids incubated in Photofrin. Spheroids incubated in ALA were unaffected by the PDT treatment regimens examined in this study. This was most likely a result of inadequate photosensitizer concentration.

  9. The search for brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of brown dwarfs is summarized and observational findings regarding brown dwarfs are reviewed. The equation of state, the thermal properties, the interior transport properties, the boundary conditions, and the initial conditions are examined. Indirect observations, IR speckle interferometry, IR photometry, and field observations of brown dwarfs are discussed.

  10. Asteroseismology of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Carl J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation has been to study various aspects of multimode pulsations in variable white dwarfs. In particular, nonlinear interactions among pulsation modes in white dwarfs (and, to some extent, in other variable stars), analysis of recent observations where such interactions are important, and preliminary work on the effects of crystallization in cool white dwarfs are reported.

  11. Non-parametric star formation histories for four dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, X.; Gilmore, Gerard; Valls-Gabaud, David

    2000-10-01

    We use recent Hubble Space Telescope colour-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar populations of a sample of local dSph galaxies (Carina, Leo I, Leo II and Ursa Minor) to infer the star formation histories of these systems, SFR(t). Applying a new variational calculus maximum likelihood method, which includes a full Bayesian analysis and allows a non-parametric estimate of the function one is solving for, we infer the star formation histories of the systems studied. This method has the advantage of yielding an objective answer, as one need not assume a priori the form of the function one is trying to recover. The results are checked independently using Saha's W statistic. The total luminosities of the systems are used to normalize the results into physical units and derive SN type II rates. We derive the luminosity-weighted mean star formation history of this sample of galaxies.

  12. Electrostatic potential of point charges inside dielectric oblate spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shaozhong

    2009-01-01

    As a sequel to a previous paper on electrostatic potential of point charges inside dielectric prolate spheroids [J. Electrostatics 66 (2008) 549-560], this note further presents the exact solution to the electrostatic problem of finding the electric potential of point charges inside a dielectric oblate spheroid that is embedded in a dissimilar dielectric medium. Numerical experiments have demonstrated the convergence of the proposed series solutions. PMID:20160934

  13. Cusp diffraction catastrophe from spheroids: generalized rainbows and inverse scattering.

    PubMed

    Marston, P L

    1985-12-01

    The angular location of the recently discovered cusp pattern in the far-field scattering from an oblate spheroid is calculated as a function of the aspect ratio D/H. The calculation assumes the diameter D > lambda and is limited to illumination perpendicular to the short axis of the spheroid. It agrees with observations for water drops in the range 1.22 < D/H < 1.37 with D ~ 1 mm. PMID:19730494

  14. Antlia B: A Faint Dwarf Galaxy Member of the NGC 3109 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Crnojević, D.; Hargis, J. R.; Willman, B.; Strader, J.; Grillmair, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report the discovery of Antlia B, a faint dwarf galaxy at a projected distance of ˜72 kpc from NGC 3109 ({M}V ˜ -15 {mag}), the primary galaxy of the NGC 3109 dwarf association at the edge of the Local Group. The tip of the red giant branch distance to Antlia B is D = 1.29 ± 0.10 Mpc, which is consistent with the distance to NGC 3109. A qualitative analysis indicates the new dwarf's stellar population has both an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳ 10 {{Gyr}}, [Fe/H] ˜ -2), and a younger blue population with an age of ˜200-400 Myr, analogous to the original Antlia dwarf, another likely satellite of NGC 3109. Antlia B has H i gas at a velocity of {v}{helio,{{H}} {{I}}} = 376 km s-1, confirming the association with NGC 3109 (vhelio = 403 km s-1). The H i gas mass (MH i = 2.8 ± 0.2 × 105 {M}⊙ ), stellar luminosity (MV = -9.7 ± 0.6 mag) and half light radius (rh = 273 ± 29 pc) are all consistent with the properties of dwarf irregular and dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Volume, and is most similar to the Leo P dwarf galaxy. The discovery of Antlia B is the initial result from a Dark Energy Camera survey for halo substructure and faint dwarf companions to NGC 3109 with the goal of comparing observed substructure with expectations from the Λ+Cold Dark Matter model in the sub-Milky Way regime.

  15. Biological magnetic cellular spheroids as building blocks for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mattix, Brandon; Olsen, Timothy R.; Gu, Yu; Casco, Megan; Herbst, Austin; Simionescu, Dan T.; Visconti, Richard P.; Kornev, Konstantin G.; Alexis, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), primarily iron oxide nanoparticles, have been incorporated into cellular spheroids to allow for magnetic manipulation into desired shapes, patterns and 3-D tissue constructs using magnetic forces. However, the direct and long-term interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with cells and biological systems can induce adverse effects on cell viability, phenotype and function, and remain a critical concern. Here we report the preparation of biological magnetic cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin, a biological MNP, capable of serving as a biological alternative to iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids as tissue engineered building blocks. Magnetoferritin NPs were incorporated into 3-D cellular spheroids with no adverse effects on cell viability up to 1 week. Additionally, cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin NPs were magnetically patterned and fused into a tissue ring to demonstrate its potential for tissue engineering applications. These results present a biological approach that can serve as an alternative to the commonly used iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids, which often require complex surface modifications of iron oxide NPs to reduce the adverse effects on cells. PMID:24176725

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Carbon in red giants in GCs and dSph galaxies (Kirby+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, E. N.; Guo, M.; Zhang, A. J.; Deng, M.; Cohen, J. G.; Guhathakurta, P.; Shetrone, M. D.; Lee, Y. S.; Rizzi, L.

    2015-07-01

    We obtained Keck/DEIMOS spectra of the carbon G band in red giants in Milky Way (MW) globular clusters (GCs) and dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) between 2011 Jul 29 and 2012 Mar 19. The GCs are NGC 2419, NGC 4590 (M68), and NGC 7078 (M15). The dSphs are Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Draco. See table 1. (3 data files).

  17. Cleaning spectroscopic samples of stars in nearby dwarf galaxies. The use of the nIR Mg I line to weed out Milky Way contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, G.; Starkenburg, E.

    2012-03-01

    Dwarf galaxies provide insight into the processes of star formation and chemical enrichment at the low end of the galaxy mass function, as well as into the clustering of dark matter on small scales. In studies of Local Group dwarf galaxies, spectroscopic samples of individual stars are used to derive the internal kinematics and abundance properties of these galaxies. It is therefore important to clean these samples from Milky Way stars, which are not related to the dwarf galaxy, since they can contaminate analysis of the properties of these objects. Here we introduce a new diagnostic for separating Milky Way contaminant stars, which mainly consist of dwarf stars, and red giant branch stars targeted in dwarf galaxies. As discriminator we use the trends in the equivalent width of the nIR Mg I line at 8806.8 Å as a function of the equivalent width of Ca II triplet lines. This method is particularly useful for works dealing with multi-object, intermediate-resolution spectroscopy focusing in the region of the nIR Ca II triplet. We use synthetic spectra to explore how the equivalent width of these lines changes for stars with different properties (gravity, effective temperature, metallicity) and find that a distinction among giants above the horizontal branch and dwarfs can be made with this method at [Fe/H] > -2 dex. For -2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ -1, this method is also valid for distinguishing dwarfs and giants down to approximately one magnitude below the horizontal branch. Using a foreground model we make predictions on the use of this new discrimination method for nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including the ultra-faints. We subsequently use VLT/FLAMES data for the Sextans, Sculptor, and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies to verify the predicted theoretical trends. Based on FLAMES observations collected at the ESO, proposals 171.B-0588, 076.B-0391, 079.B-0435.

  18. R-process enrichment from a single event in an ancient dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Alexander P.; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua D.

    2016-03-01

    Elements heavier than zinc are synthesized through the rapid (r) and slow (s) neutron-capture processes. The main site of production of the r-process elements (such as europium) has been debated for nearly 60 years. Initial studies of trends in chemical abundances in old Milky Way halo stars suggested that these elements are produced continually, in sites such as core-collapse supernovae. But evidence from the local Universe favours the idea that r-process production occurs mainly during rare events, such as neutron star mergers. The appearance of a plateau of europium abundance in some dwarf spheroidal galaxies has been suggested as evidence for rare r-process enrichment in the early Universe, but only under the assumption that no gas accretes into those dwarf galaxies; gas accretion favours continual r-process enrichment in these systems. Furthermore, the universal r-process pattern has not been cleanly identified in dwarf spheroidals. The smaller, chemically simpler, and more ancient ultrafaint dwarf galaxies assembled shortly after the first stars formed, and are ideal systems with which to study nucleosynthesis events such as the r-process. Reticulum II is one such galaxy. The abundances of non-neutron-capture elements in this galaxy (and others like it) are similar to those in other old stars. Here, we report that seven of the nine brightest stars in Reticulum II, observed with high-resolution spectroscopy, show strong enhancements in heavy neutron-capture elements, with abundances that follow the universal r-process pattern beyond barium. The enhancement seen in this ‘r-process galaxy’ is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that detected in any other ultrafaint dwarf galaxy. This implies that a single, rare event produced the r-process material in Reticulum II. The r-process yield and event rate are incompatible with the source being ordinary core-collapse supernovae, but consistent with other possible sources, such as neutron star mergers.

  19. R-process enrichment from a single event in an ancient dwarf galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Alexander P; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua D

    2016-03-31

    Elements heavier than zinc are synthesized through the rapid (r) and slow (s) neutron-capture processes. The main site of production of the r-process elements (such as europium) has been debated for nearly 60 years. Initial studies of trends in chemical abundances in old Milky Way halo stars suggested that these elements are produced continually, in sites such as core-collapse supernovae. But evidence from the local Universe favours the idea that r-process production occurs mainly during rare events, such as neutron star mergers. The appearance of a plateau of europium abundance in some dwarf spheroidal galaxies has been suggested as evidence for rare r-process enrichment in the early Universe, but only under the assumption that no gas accretes into those dwarf galaxies; gas accretion favours continual r-process enrichment in these systems. Furthermore, the universal r-process pattern has not been cleanly identified in dwarf spheroidals. The smaller, chemically simpler, and more ancient ultrafaint dwarf galaxies assembled shortly after the first stars formed, and are ideal systems with which to study nucleosynthesis events such as the r-process. Reticulum II is one such galaxy. The abundances of non-neutron-capture elements in this galaxy (and others like it) are similar to those in other old stars. Here, we report that seven of the nine brightest stars in Reticulum II, observed with high-resolution spectroscopy, show strong enhancements in heavy neutron-capture elements, with abundances that follow the universal r-process pattern beyond barium. The enhancement seen in this 'r-process galaxy' is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that detected in any other ultrafaint dwarf galaxy. This implies that a single, rare event produced the r-process material in Reticulum II. The r-process yield and event rate are incompatible with the source being ordinary core-collapse supernovae, but consistent with other possible sources, such as neutron star mergers. PMID

  20. R-process enrichment from a single event in an ancient dwarf galaxy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Alexander P; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua D

    2016-03-31

    Elements heavier than zinc are synthesized through the rapid (r) and slow (s) neutron-capture processes. The main site of production of the r-process elements (such as europium) has been debated for nearly 60 years. Initial studies of trends in chemical abundances in old Milky Way halo stars suggested that these elements are produced continually, in sites such as core-collapse supernovae. But evidence from the local Universe favours the idea that r-process production occurs mainly during rare events, such as neutron star mergers. The appearance of a plateau of europium abundance in some dwarf spheroidal galaxies has been suggested as evidence for rare r-process enrichment in the early Universe, but only under the assumption that no gas accretes into those dwarf galaxies; gas accretion favours continual r-process enrichment in these systems. Furthermore, the universal r-process pattern has not been cleanly identified in dwarf spheroidals. The smaller, chemically simpler, and more ancient ultrafaint dwarf galaxies assembled shortly after the first stars formed, and are ideal systems with which to study nucleosynthesis events such as the r-process. Reticulum II is one such galaxy. The abundances of non-neutron-capture elements in this galaxy (and others like it) are similar to those in other old stars. Here, we report that seven of the nine brightest stars in Reticulum II, observed with high-resolution spectroscopy, show strong enhancements in heavy neutron-capture elements, with abundances that follow the universal r-process pattern beyond barium. The enhancement seen in this 'r-process galaxy' is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that detected in any other ultrafaint dwarf galaxy. This implies that a single, rare event produced the r-process material in Reticulum II. The r-process yield and event rate are incompatible with the source being ordinary core-collapse supernovae, but consistent with other possible sources, such as neutron star mergers.

  1. Origins, Evolution, and Fate of Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Research related to the origins, evolution and fate of brown dwarfs is presented. The topics include: 1) Imaging surveys for brown dwarfs; 2) Companion detection techniques; 3) Measurements of fundamental properties of brown dwarfs; 4) Classification schemes for ultracool dwarfs; 5) Origins and evolution of brown dwarfs; 6) Ultracool atmospheres and interiors; 7) Time variable phenomena in brown dwarfs; 8) Comparisons between brown dwarfs and planets; 9) Substellar mass functions; and 10) Future facilities.

  2. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by spheroidal particles: a novel approach exploiting the scr(T) matrix computed in spheroidal coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, F. Michael; Stamnes, Knut Stamnes, Jakob A.

    1998-11-01

    A method other than the extended-boundary-condition method (EBCM) to compute the {ital T} matrix for electromagnetic scattering is presented. The separation-of-variables method (SVM) is used to solve the electromagnetic scattering problem for a spheroidal particle and to derive its scr(T) matrix in spheroidal coordinates. A transformation is developed for transforming the scr(T) matrix in spheroidal coordinates into the corresponding T matrix in spherical coordinates. The T matrix so obtained can be used for analytical calculation of the optical properties of ensembles of randomly oriented spheroids of arbitrary shape by use of an existing method to average over orientational angles. The optical properties obtained with the SVM and the EBCM are compared for different test cases. For mildly aspherical particles the two methods yield indistinguishable results. Small differences appear for highly aspherical particles. The new approach can be used to compute optical properties for arbitrary values of the aspect ratio. To test the accuracy of the expansion coefficients of the spheroidal functions for arbitrary arguments, a new testing method based on the completeness relation of the spheroidal functions is developed. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  3. Suites of dwarfs around Nearby giant galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisina, Elena I.; Makarov, Dmitry I. E-mail: kei@sao.ru

    2014-01-01

    The Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog (UNGC) contains the most comprehensive summary of distances, radial velocities, and luminosities for 800 galaxies located within 11 Mpc from us. The high density of observables in the UNGC makes this sample indispensable for checking results of N-body simulations of cosmic structures on a ∼1 Mpc scale. The environment of each galaxy in the UNGC was characterized by a tidal index Θ{sub 1}, depending on the separation and mass of the galaxy's main disturber (MD). We grouped UNGC galaxies with a common MD in suites, and ranked suite members according to their Θ{sub 1}. All suite members with positive Θ{sub 1} are assumed to be physical companions of the MD. About 58% of the sample are members of physical groups. The distribution of suites by the number of members, n, follows a relation N(n) ∼ n {sup –2}. The 20 most populated suites contain 468 galaxies, i.e., 59% of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at M{sub B} = –18{sup m}. We discuss various properties of MDs, as well as galaxies belonging to their suites. The suite abundance practically does not depend on the morphological type, linear diameter, or hydrogen mass of the MD, the tightest correlation being with the MD dynamical mass. Dwarf galaxies around MDs exhibit well-known segregation effects: the population of the outskirts has later morphological types, richer H I contents, and higher rates of star formation activity. Nevertheless, there are some intriguing cases where dwarf spheroidal galaxies occur at the far periphery of the suites, as well as some late-type dwarfs residing close to MDs. Comparing simulation results with galaxy groups, most studies assume the Local Group is fairly typical. However, we recognize that the nearby groups significantly differ from each other and there is considerable variation in their properties. The suites of companions around the Milky Way and M31, consisting of the

  4. Analytic approximation to randomly oriented spheroid extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. T. N.; Fournier, G. R.

    1993-12-01

    The estimation of electromagnetic extinction through dust or other nonspherical atmospheric aerosols and hydrosols is an essential first step in the evaluation of the performance of all electro-optic systems. Investigations were conducted to reduce the computational burden in calculating the extinction from nonspherical particles. An analytic semi-empirical approximation to the extinction efficiency Q(sub ext) for randomly oriented spheroids, based on an extension of the anomalous diffraction formula, is given and compared with the extended boundary condition or T-matrix method. This will allow for better and more general modeling of obscurants. Using this formula, Q(sub ext) can be evaluated over 10,000 times faster than with previous methods. This approximation has been verified for complex refractive indices m=n-ik, where n ranges from one to infinity and k from zero to infinity, and aspect ratios of 0.2 to 5. It is believed that the approximation is uniformly valid over all size parameters and aspect ratios. It has the correct Rayleigh, refractive index, and large particle asymptotic behaviors. The accuracy and limitations of this formula are extensively discussed.

  5. Hunting the Coolest Substellar Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, Ben; Rodriguez, David; Song, Inseok; Melis, Carl

    2010-06-01

    The few lowest mass substellar objects discovered in previous imaging surveys are found to have large semi-major axes, typically hundreds of AU. We show that at such large separations and toward old stars one has the best chance to detect the coolest brown dwarf companions, with effective temperatures of <500 K (the so-called 'Y dwarfs''). Effective temperatures of 500 K represent a region of temperature space that is only recently being probed for free floating brown dwarfs. The discovery of such cool objects will illuminate their physics and chemistry and will provide observational data to test planetary models. To discover one or more Y dwarfs, we are conducting a survey of white dwarfs with ages >2 Gyr that lie within 35 pc of Earth. As companions to white dwarfs, we will be able to determine the ages of any cool brown dwarfs we find and thus constrain their masses.

  6. Dwarf Eye Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Johns Hopkins researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute have discovered what appears to be the first human gene mutation that causes extreme farsightedness. The researchers report that nanophthalmos, Greek for "dwarf eye," is a rare, potentially blinding disorder caused by an alteration in a gene called MFRP that helps control eye growth and…

  7. VERITAS limits on dark matter annihilation from dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, J.; VERITAS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Current cosmological models and data suggest the existence of a Cold Dark Matter (DM) component, however the nature of DM particles remains unknown. A favored candidate for DM is a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) in the mass range from 50 GeV to greater than 10 TeV. Nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph) are expected to contain a high density of Dark Matter with a low gamma-ray background, and are thus promising targets for the detection of secondary gamma rays at very high energies (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) through the annihilation of WIMPS into SM particles. Presented here are recent VERITAS observations of dSph, including a deep exposure on Segue 1. Limits are derived for various annihilating and decaying dark matter particle models.

  8. Dark Matter in γ lines: Galactic Center vs. dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefranc, Valentin; Moulin, Emmanuel; Panci, Paolo; Sala, Filippo; Silk, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide CTA sensitivities to Dark Matter (DM) annihilation in γ-ray lines, from the observation of the Galactic Center (GC) as well as, for the first time, of dwarf Spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). We compare the GC reach with that of dSphs as a function of a putative core radius of the DM distribution, which is itself poorly known. We find that the currently best dSph candidates constitute a more promising target than the GC, for core radii of one to a few kpc. We use the most recent instrument response functions and background estimations by CTA, on top of which we add the diffuse photon component. Our analysis is of particular interest for TeV-scale electroweak multiplets as DM candidates, such as the supersymmetric Wino and the Minimal Dark Matter fiveplet, whose predictions we compare with our projected sensitivities.

  9. The distribution of alpha elements in Andromeda dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Luis C.; Geha, Marla C.; Tollerud, Erik J.

    2014-07-20

    We present alpha to iron abundance ratios for 226 individual red giant branch stars in nine dwarf galaxies of the Andromeda (M31) satellite system. The abundances are measured from the combined signal of Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti lines in Keck/DEIMOS medium-resolution spectra. This constitutes the first large sample of alpha abundance ratios measured in the M31 satellite system. The dwarf galaxies in our sample exhibit a variety of alpha abundance ratios, with the average values in each galaxy ranging from approximately solar ([α/Fe] ∼ + 0.0) to alpha-enhanced ([α/Fe] ∼ + 0.5). These variations do not show a correlation with internal kinematics, environment, or stellar density. We confirm radial gradients in the iron abundance of two galaxies out of the five with sufficient data (NGC 185 and And II). There is only tentative evidence for an alpha abundance radial gradient in NGC 185. We homogeneously compare our results to the Milky Way classical dwarf spheroidals, finding evidence for wider variation in average alpha abundance. In the absence of chemical abundances for the M31 stellar halo, we compare to the Milky Way stellar halo. A stellar halo comprised of disrupted M31 satellites is too metal-rich and inconsistent with the Milky Way halo alpha abundance distribution even if considering only satellites with predominantly old stellar populations. The M31 satellite population provides a second system in which to study chemical abundances of dwarf galaxies and reveals a wider variety of abundance patterns than the Milky Way.

  10. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    White dwarfs are the evolutionary endpoint for nearly 95% of all stars born in our Galaxy, the final stages of evolution of all low- and intermediate mass stars, i.e., main sequence stars with masses below (8.5± 1.5) M_{odot}, depending on metallicity of the progenitor, mass loss and core overshoot. Massive white dwarfs are intrinsically rare objects, tand produce a gap in the determination of the initial vs. final mass relation at the high mass end (e.g. Weidemann 2000 A&A, 363, 647; Kalirai et al. 2008, ApJ, 676, 594; Williams, Bolte & Koester 2009, ApJ, 693, 355). Main sequences stars with higher masses will explode as SNII (Smartt S. 2009 ARA&A, 47, 63), but the limit does depend on the metallicity of the progenitor. Massive white dwarfs are probably SNIa progenitors through accretion or merger. They are rare, being the final product of massive stars (less common) and have smaller radius (less luminous). Kepler et al. 2007 (MNRAS, 375, 1315), Kleinman et al. 2013 (ApJS, 204, 5) estimate only 1-2% white dwarfs have masses above 1 M_{odot}. The final stages of evolution after helium burning are a race between core growth and loss of the H-rich envelope in a stellar wind. When the burning shell is exposed, the star rapidly cools and burning ceases, leaving a white dwarf. As they cool down, the magnetic field freezes in, ranging from a few kilogauss to a gigagauss. Peculiar type Ia SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg suggest progenitors in the range 2.4-2.8 M_{odot}, and Das U. & Mukhopadhyay B. (2012, Phys. Rev. D, 86, 042001) estimate that the Chandrasekhar limit increases to 2.3-2.6 M_{odot} for extremely high magnetic field stars, but differential rotation induced by accretion could also increase it, according to Hachisu I. et al. 2012 (ApJ, 744, 69). García-Berro et al. 2012, ApJ, 749, 25, for example, proposes double degenerate mergers are the progenitors of high-field magnetic white dwarfs. We propose magnetic fields enhance the line broadening in

  11. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Donato; Gregoletto, Luca; Reano, Simone; Pietronave, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Talmon, Maria; Novelli, Eugenio; Diena, Marco; Nicoletti, Carmine; Musarò, Antonio; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Follenzi, Antonia; Prat, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM). We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol. PMID:26375957

  12. Phylogeography of the South China Field Mouse (Apodemus draco) on the Southeastern Tibetan Plateau Reveals High Genetic Diversity and Glacial Refugia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liao, Lihuan; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2012-01-01

    The southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (SEMTP) is a particularly interesting region due to its topographic complexity and unique geologic history, but phylogeographic studies that focus on this region are rare. In this study, we investigated the phylogeography of the South China field mouse, Apodemus draco, in order to assess the role of geologic and climatic events on the Tibetan Plateau in shaping its genetic structure. We sequenced mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) sequences in 103 individuals from 47 sampling sites. In addition, 23 cyt b sequences were collected from GenBank for analyses. Phylogenetic, demographic and landscape genetic methods were conducted. Seventy-six cyt b haplotypes were found and the genetic diversity was extremely high (π = 0.0368; h = 0.989). Five major evolutionary clades, based on geographic locations, were identified. Demographic analyses implied subclade 1A and subclade 1B experienced population expansions at about 0.052-0.013 Mya and 0.014-0.004 Mya, respectively. The divergence time analysis showed that the split between clade 1 and clade 2 occurred 0.26 Mya, which fell into the extensive glacial period (EGP, 0.5-0.17 Mya). The divergence times of other main clades (2.20-0.55 Mya) were congruent with the periods of the Qingzang Movement (3.6-1.7 Mya) and the Kun-Huang Movement (1.2-0.6 Mya), which were known as the most intense uplift events in the Tibetan Plateau. Our study supported the hypothesis that the SEMTP was a large late Pleistocene refugium, and further inferred that the Gongga Mountain Region and Hongya County were glacial refugia for A. draco in clade 1. We hypothesize that the evolutionary history of A. draco in the SEMTP primarily occurred in two stages. First, an initial divergence would have been shaped by uplift events of the Tibetan Plateau. Then, major glaciations in the Pleistocene added complexity to its demographic history and genetic structure. PMID:22666478

  13. M dwarfs, microlensing, and the mass budget of the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Flynn, Chris; Gould, Andrew; Kirhakos, Sofia

    1994-01-01

    We show that faint red stars do not contribute significantly to the mass budget of the Galaxy or to microlensing statistics. Our results are obtained by analyzing two long exposures of a high-latitude field taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on the newly repaired Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Stars are easily distinguished from galaxies essentially to the limiting magnitudes of the images. We find five stars with 2.0 less than V - I less than 3.0 and I less than 25.3 and no stars with V - I greater than 3.0. Therefore, main-sequence stars with M(sub I) greater than 10 that are above the hydrogen-burning limit in the dark halo or the spheroid contribute less than 6% of the unseen matter. Faint red disk stars, M-dwarfs, contribute at most 15% to the mass of the disk. We parameterize the faint end of the cumulative distribution of stars, Phi, as a function of luminosity L(sub V), d Phi/d ln L(sub V) proportional to L(sub V exp -gamma). For spheroid stars, gamma less than 0.32 over the range 6 less than M(sub V) less than 17, with 98% confidence. The disk luminosity function falls, gamma less than 0, for 15 approximately less than M(sub V) approximately less than 19. Faint red stars in the disk or thick disk, and stars with M(sub V) less than 16 in the spheroid contribute tau less than 10(exp -8) to the optical depth to microlensing toward the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  14. The white dwarf luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Berro, Enrique; Oswalt, Terry D.

    2016-06-01

    White dwarfs are the final remnants of low- and intermediate-mass stars. Their evolution is essentially a cooling process that lasts for ∼ 10 Gyr. Their observed properties provide information about the history of the Galaxy, its dark matter content and a host of other interesting astrophysical problems. Examples of these include an independent determination of the past history of the local star formation rate, identification of the objects responsible for the reported microlensing events, constraints on the rate of change of the gravitational constant, and upper limits to the mass of weakly interacting massive particles. To carry on these tasks the essential observational tools are the luminosity and mass functions of white dwarfs, whereas the theoretical tools are the evolutionary sequences of white dwarf progenitors, and the corresponding white dwarf cooling sequences. In particular, the observed white dwarf luminosity function is the key manifestation of the white dwarf cooling theory, although other relevant ingredients are needed to compare theory and observations. In this review we summarize the recent attempts to empirically determine the white dwarf luminosity function for the different Galactic populations. We also discuss the biases that may affect its interpretation. Finally, we elaborate on the theoretical ingredients needed to model the white dwarf luminosity function, paying special attention to the remaining uncertainties, and we comment on some applications of the white dwarf cooling theory. Astrophysical problems for which white dwarf stars may provide useful leverage in the near future are also discussed.

  15. Coulomb energy of uniformly charged spheroidal shell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, Vikram; Yao, Zhenwei; Thomas, Creighton K.; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2015-03-01

    We provide exact expressions for the electrostatic energy of uniformly charged prolate and oblate spheroidal shells. We find that uniformly charged prolate spheroids of eccentricity greater than 0.9 have lower Coulomb energy than a sphere of the same area. For the volume-constrained case, we find that a sphere has the highest Coulomb energy among all spheroidal shells. Further, we derive the change in the Coulomb energy of a uniformly charged shell due to small, area-conserving perturbations on the spherical shape. Our perturbation calculations show that buckling-type deformations on a sphere can lower the Coulomb energy. Finally, we consider the possibility of counterion condensation on the spheroidal shell surface. We employ a Manning-Oosawa two-state model approximation to evaluate the renormalized charge and analyze the behavior of the equilibrium free energy as a function of the shell's aspect ratio for both area-constrained and volume-constrained cases. Counterion condensation is seen to favor the formation of spheroidal structures over a sphere of equal area for high values of shell volume fractions.

  16. Coulomb energy of uniformly charged spheroidal shell systems.

    PubMed

    Jadhao, Vikram; Yao, Zhenwei; Thomas, Creighton K; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2015-03-01

    We provide exact expressions for the electrostatic energy of uniformly charged prolate and oblate spheroidal shells. We find that uniformly charged prolate spheroids of eccentricity greater than 0.9 have lower Coulomb energy than a sphere of the same area. For the volume-constrained case, we find that a sphere has the highest Coulomb energy among all spheroidal shells. Further, we derive the change in the Coulomb energy of a uniformly charged shell due to small, area-conserving perturbations on the spherical shape. Our perturbation calculations show that buckling-type deformations on a sphere can lower the Coulomb energy. Finally, we consider the possibility of counterion condensation on the spheroidal shell surface. We employ a Manning-Oosawa two-state model approximation to evaluate the renormalized charge and analyze the behavior of the equilibrium free energy as a function of the shell's aspect ratio for both area-constrained and volume-constrained cases. Counterion condensation is seen to favor the formation of spheroidal structures over a sphere of equal area for high values of shell volume fractions. PMID:25871108

  17. The transitional wake behind an inclined prolate spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fengjian; Gallardo, José P.; Andersson, Helge I.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-09-01

    The wake behind a 6:1 prolate spheroid at 45° incidence has been studied by means of direct numerical simulations (DNSs). The Reynolds number based on the minor axis of the spheroid was 3000 as compared to 1000 in our preceding study [Jiang et al., "The laminar wake behind a 6:1 prolate spheroid at 45° incidence angle," Phys. Fluids 26, 113602 (2014)]. The resulting wake is no longer laminar and the transitional wake is fundamentally unsteady and highly asymmetric from the very beginning. A substantial side force resulted from the asymmetric pressure field. No signs of vortex shedding could be observed. The forces and the flow field around the spheroid exhibited a dominant periodicity with a surprisingly low Strouhal number of 0.0733. One part of the counter-rotating vortex pair which dominated the near-wake broke down into small-scale vortices as soon as the vortex left the shadow behind the spheroid. The other part appeared as a helical vortex inside which the mechanical energy was conserved over a substantial length. The axial flow within this vortex tube experienced a sudden change from having maximum to minimum at the vortex center while maintaining the sign of the circulation. The severe asymmetry of the wake is ascribed to a global instability and may impact on submarine maneuverability.

  18. [Characteristics of biodegradation of triphenyltin by Rhodopseudomonos spheroids].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo-Na; Ye, Jin-Shao; Yin, Hu; Peng, Hui; Zhang, Na; He, Bao-Yan

    2011-02-01

    The biodegradation of triphenyltin (TPT) by Rhodopseudomonos spheroids was investigated in this study. The results illuminated that R. spheroids was an effective strain for the biodegradation of TPT. The maximum removal ratio was attained when the growth temperature of R. spheroids was 30 degrees C. After treating for 3 hours, the removal ratios of 3 mg x L(-1) TPT were 13.82% to 47.29% using 0.49 g x L(-1) (based on dry weight) biomass of R. spheroids. The experiments on biodegradation of TPT were carried out in double-distilled water, simulated seawater,culture medium and river water, respectively. The results demonstrated that river water was optimal for the biodegradation since the indigenous microorganisms in water synergistically increased the removal ratios of TPT. Extracellular enzyme produced by R. spheroids was also effective on the degradation of TPT, and 71.64% of TPT was degraded by this way within 24 hours. The experiments also revealed that the biodegradation process of TPT included biosorption by cell wall, TPT entering cells, and initial degradation by intracellular enzyme, then the TPT and intermediate products backing out of cells to be degraded by extracellular enzyme. PMID:21528580

  19. Detection of the White Dwarf Companions of Barium Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, C. J.; Griffin, E.; McGahee, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Barium dwarfs are chemically peculiar F- and G-type stars that show enhanced abundances of s-process elements such as strontium and barium. They are believed to have derived their chemical peculiarities via mass transfer from a former AGB companion, now a white dwarf. These WD companions should be detectable in the far-ultraviolet if their effective temperatures exceed 10,000K. However, despite dedicated IUE searches, no WD companion has been directly detected. We have observed 4 Ba dwarfs with the GALEX ultraviolet space telescope (2 newly discovered Ba dwarfs have archival observations), and report here on the first unequivocal direct detection of a WD companion of a Ba dwarf, HD 15306, the hottest Ba dwarf known (F4 V). This WD companion is detected through a clear far-ultraviolet excess. Detection of the putative WD companions of the other observed Ba dwarfs is somewhat more problematical, as those stars have cooler effective temperatures and chromospheric activity can significantly affect their FUV fluxes. The disentanglement of WD FUV fluxes from FUV emission due to chromospheric activity requires comparison of the observed Ba dwarfs with F- and G-type dwarfs with archival GALEX photometry. We have selected a set of 68 F- and G-type dwarfs from the NStars program (Gray et al. 2003, 2006) that have good quality archival GALEX photometry and show a wide range of chromospheric activity. A comparison of these stars with the 5 remaining GALEX-observed Ba dwarfs suggests that one and perhaps two of these Ba dwarfs have detectable WD companions.

  20. METALLICITY EVOLUTION OF THE SIX MOST LUMINOUS M31 DWARF SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Nhung; Geha, Marla; Tollerud, Erik J.; Zinn, Robert; Vargas, Luis C.; Guhathakurta, Puragra E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu

    2015-01-10

    We present global metallicity properties, metallicity distribution functions (MDFs), and radial metallicity profiles for the six most luminous M31 dwarf galaxy satellites: M32, NGC 205, NGC 185, NGC 147, Andromeda VII, and Andromeda II. The results presented are the first spectroscopic MDFs for dwarf systems surrounding a host galaxy other than the Milky Way (MW). Our sample consists of individual metallicity measurements for 1243 red giant branch member stars spread across these six systems. We determine metallicities based on the strength of the Ca II triplet lines using the empirical calibration of Carrera et al., which is calibrated over the metallicity range –4 < [Fe/H] <+0.5. We find that these M31 satellites lie on the same luminosity-metallicity relationship as the MW dwarf satellites. We do not find a trend between the internal metallicity spread and galaxy luminosity, contrary to previous studies. The MDF widths of And II and And VII are similar to the MW dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of comparable luminosity; however, our four brightest M31 dwarf satellites are more luminous than any of the MW dSphs and have broader MDFs. The MDFs of our six M31 dwarf satellites are consistent with the leaky box model of chemical evolution, although our metallicity errors allow a wide range of evolution models. We find a significant radial gradient in metallicity in only two of our six systems, NGC 185 and Andromeda II, and flat radial metallicity gradients in the rest of our sample with no observed correlation between rotational support and radial metallicity gradients. Although the average properties and radial trends of the M31 dwarf galaxies agree with their MW counterparts at similar luminosity, the detailed MDFs are different, particularly at the metal-rich end.

  1. Constraints on First-Stars Models From Observations of Local Low-Mass Dwarf Galaxies and Galactic Metal-Poor Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Long Yan; Venkatesan, A.

    2014-01-01

    The first metal-free stars in the universe had hard ionizing photon spectra and unique element yields from their supernovae, leaving signatures in the reionization of the intergalactic medium and in the metal enrichment of gas in the early universe. Here, we examine the metal abundances in a variety of systems in the local universe, from very metal-poor Galactic halo stars to ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and compare them with the latest theoretical models of massive stars with and without rotation. We confirm the similar abundance patterns found in the ultra-faint dwarfs and metal-poor halo stars by recent studies, and find new trends of interest in a variety of individual elements spanning metallicity values of [Fe/H] from about -2 to -5. We also compare our results with the abundances found in the very metal-deficient nearby dwarf irregular galaxy Leo P, which was recently discovered in the Arecibo ALFALFA survey. We comment on the similarities and differences between abundance trends in gas-rich dwarf galaxy systems like Leo P versus gas-poor ones like the ultra-faint dwarf spheroidals, and on the possibility of such systems hosting populations of the first stars. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and by Research Corporation through the Cottrell College Science Award.

  2. White dwarf heating and the ultraviolet flux in dwarf novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pringle, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The heating of the outer layers of the white dwarf which is likely to occur during a dwarf nova outburst is investigated. It is shown that the decline in IUE flux, observed during quiescent intervals in the dwarf novae VW Hydri and WX Hydri, may be due to the outer layers cooling off once the heat source is removed. The calculations here assume uniformity of the heat source over the white dwarf surface. This is unlikely to be realized from disk accretion, and discussion is made of what further calculations are required.

  3. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gómez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  4. Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gomez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  5. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Jose M; Basheer, Haneen A; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC-19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC-19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  6. Response of multicell spheroids to 1-MHz ultrasonic irradiation: cavitation-related damage

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, P.G.; Miller, M.W.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1983-03-01

    The response of EMT6/Ro single cells and multicell spheroids (150-800 ..mu..m diameter) to 1-MHz ultrasonic irradiation was determined for intensities of 0-5W/cm/sup 2/ for 1-5 min. Damage was assessed by evaluating both lysis and survival of individual spheroid cells, growth of whole spheroids, and the physical integrity of whole spheroids by histological and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The surviving fraction of spheroids cells was higher than that of single cells, and several of the intensity-duration combinations showed a statistically significant correlation between resistace to ultrasound and increased spheroid size. This resistance with size was also found in spheroid growth experiments. Histological sections showed that both peripheral and internal damage occur. The relationship of spheroid damage to studies of effects on tissues and possible therapeutic use of nonthermal ultrasound are discussed.

  7. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Basheer, Haneen A.; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D.; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC–19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC–19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  8. A microfluidic device for uniform-sized cell spheroids formation, culture, harvesting and flow cytometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Chen, Ying-Hua; Peng, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Culture of cells as three-dimensional (3D) aggregates, named spheroids, possesses great potential to improve in vitro cell models for basic biomedical research. However, such cell spheroid models are often complicated, cumbersome, and expensive compared to conventional Petri-dish cell cultures. In this work, we developed a simple microfluidic device for cell spheroid formation, culture, and harvesting. Using this device, cells could form uniformly sized spheroids due to strong cell-cell interactions and the spatial confinement of microfluidic culture chambers. We demonstrated cell spheroid formation and culture in the designed devices using embryonic stem cells, carcinoma cells, and fibroblasts. We further scaled up the device capable of simultaneously forming and culturing 5000 spheroids in a single chip. Finally, we demonstrated harvesting of the cultured spheroids from the device with a simple setup. The harvested spheroids possess great integrity, and the cells can be exploited for further flow cytometry assays due to the ample cell numbers. PMID:24396525

  9. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Detachment energies of spheroidal particles from fluid-fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Gary B.; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V.; Harting, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The energy required to detach a single particle from a fluid-fluid interface is an important parameter for designing certain soft materials, for example, emulsions stabilised by colloidal particles, colloidosomes designed for targeted drug delivery, and bio-sensors composed of magnetic particles adsorbed at interfaces. For a fixed particle volume, prolate and oblate spheroids attach more strongly to interfaces because they have larger particle-interface areas. Calculating the detachment energy of spheroids necessitates the difficult measurement of particle-liquid surface tensions, in contrast with spheres, where the contact angle suffices. We develop a simplified detachment energy model for spheroids which depends only on the particle aspect ratio and the height of the particle centre of mass above the fluid-fluid interface. We use lattice Boltzmann simulations to validate the model and provide quantitative evidence that the approach can be applied to simulate particle-stabilized emulsions, and highlight the experimental implications of this validation.

  11. Optical caustics observed in light scattered by an oblate spheroid.

    PubMed

    Lock, James A; Xu, Feng

    2010-03-10

    The electromagnetic fields scattered when a plane wave is incident on an oblate spheroid in the side-on orientation may be calculated using a generalization of Mie theory, and the results may be decomposed in a Debye series expansion. A number of optical caustics are observed in the computed scattered intensity for the one internal reflection portion of the Debye series for scattering angles in the vicinity of the first-order rainbow, and are analyzed in terms of the rainbow, transverse cusp, and hyperbolic umbilic caustics of catastrophe optics. The specific features of these three caustics are described, as is their assembly into the global structure of the observed caustics for spheroid scattering. It is found that, for a spheroid whose radius is an order of magnitude larger than the wavelength of the incident light, the interference structure accompanying the transverse cusp and hyperbolic umbilic caustics is only partially formed.

  12. Spheroidization of glass powders for glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y W; Yap, A U J; Cheang, P; Kumar, R

    2004-08-01

    Commercial angular glass powders were spheroidized using both the flame spraying and inductively coupled radio frequency plasma spraying techniques. Spherical powders with different particle size distributions were obtained after spheroidization. The effects of spherical glass powders on the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. Results showed that the particle size distribution of the glass powders had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of GICs. Powders with a bimodal particle size distribution ensured a high packing density of glass ionomer cements, giving relatively high mechanical properties of GICs. GICs prepared by flame-spheroidized powders showed low strength values due to the loss of fine particles during flame spraying, leading to a low packing density and few metal ions reacting with polyacrylic acid to form cross-linking. GICs prepared by the nano-sized powders showed low strength because of the low bulk density of the nano-sized powders and hence low powder/liquid ratio of GICs.

  13. A numerical study of separation on a spheroid at incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, M.; Israeli, M.; Wolfshtein, M.

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional incompressible, steady and laminar flow field around a prolate spheroid at incidence is considered. The parabolized Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically. The method can handle vortex types as well as bubble type flow separation because the pressure is one of the dependent variables. Here, the distribution of the skin friction is reported for two test cases. The first test case is a prolate spheroid of aspect ratio of 4:1 at 6 degrees incidence and Reynolds number of 1 million (based on half the major axis). The second case is a spheroid with a 6:1 aspect ratio at 10 degrees incidence and Reynolds number of 0.8 x 1 million. The properties of the flow field near the body are discussed on the basis of the pattern of the skin friction lines, and the shape of the separation lines. Favorable agreement with experimental results is obtained.

  14. Collapsing white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, E.; Cooperstein, J.; Kahana, S.; Nomoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the hydrodynamic collapse of an accreting C + O white dwarf are presented. Collapse is induced by electron captures in the iron core behind a conductive deflagration front. The shock wave produced by the hydrodynamic bounce of the iron core stalls at about 115 km, and thus a neutron star formed in such a model would be formed as an optically quiet event.

  15. Chemistry of Stars in the Sculptor Dwarf Galaxy from VLT-FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Hill, V.

    The chemical composition of 91 stars in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy is presented as determined from spectra taken with the FLAMES multiobject spectrograph in the Medusa mode. The analysis methods are outlined. The [α/Fe] ratios are shown for Mg, Ca, and Ti, and compared with those of Galactic stars. Heavy element abundance ratios (Y, Ba, and Eu) are also presented. Since the Sculptor dwarf galaxy has had a significantly different star formation history and chemical evolution than the Galaxy, then comparison of Sculptor's metal-poor (old) stars to similar metallicity stars in the Galaxy can be used to discuss galaxy formation scenarios, as well as test some of our fundamental assumptions in stellar nucleosynthesis.

  16. COMPLEXITY ON DWARF GALAXY SCALES: A BIMODAL DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION IN SCULPTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Breddels, Maarten A.; Helmi, Amina

    2014-08-10

    In our previous work, we presented Schwarzschild models of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy demonstrating that this system could be embedded in dark matter halos that are either cusped or cored. Here, we show that the non-parametric distribution function recovered through Schwarzschild's method is bimodal in energy and angular momentum space for all of the best-fitting mass models explored. We demonstrate that this bimodality is directly related to the two components known to be present in Sculptor through stellar population analysis, although our method is purely dynamical in nature and does not use this prior information. It therefore constitutes independent confirmation of the existence of two physically distinct dynamical components in Sculptor and suggests a rather complex assembly history for this dwarf galaxy.

  17. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  18. Modeling light scattering by mineral dust particles using spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikallio, Sini; Nousiainen, Timo

    Suspended dust particles have a considerable influence on light scattering in both terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and can therefore have a large effect on the interpretation of remote sensing measurements. Assuming dust particles to be spherical is known to produce inaccurate results when modeling optical properties of real mineral dust particles. Yet this approximation is widely used for its simplicity. Here, we simulate light scattering by mineral dust particles using a distribution of model spheroids. This is done by comparing scattering matrices calculated from a dust optical database of Dubovik et al. [2006] with those measured in the laboratory by Volten et al. [2001]. Wavelengths of 441,6 nm and 632,8 nm and refractive indexes of Re = 1.55 -1.7 and Im = 0.001i -0.01i were adopted in this study. Overall, spheroids are found to fit the measurements significantly better than Mie spheres. Further, we confirm that the shape distribution parametrization developed in Nousiainen et al. (2006) significantly improves the accuracy of simulated single-scattering for small mineral dust particles. The spheroid scheme should therefore yield more reliable interpretations of remote sensing data from dusty planetary atmospheres. While the spheroidal scheme is superior to spheres in remote sensing applications, its performance is far from perfect especially for samples with large particles. Thus, additional advances are clearly possible. Further studies of the Martian atmosphere are currently under way. Dubovik et al. (2006) Application of spheroid models to account for aerosol particle nonspheric-ity in remote sensing of desert dust, JGR, Vol. 111, D11208 Volten et al. (2001) Scattering matrices of mineral aerosol particles at 441.6 nm and 632.8 nm, JGR, Vol. 106, No. D15, pp. 17375-17401 Nousiainen et al. (2006) Light scattering modeling of small feldspar aerosol particles using polyhedral prisms and spheroids, JQSRT 101, pp. 471-487

  19. Optical properties of core-mantle spheroidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsikov, Vadim V.; Farafonov, Victor G.

    1994-12-01

    The new solution of the problem of light scattering by coated spheroids was used to calculate the optical properties of prolate and oblate particles. The solution was obtained by the method of separation of variables for confocal spheroids. We consider the silicate core ice mantle particles and present the extinction cross-sections for prolate and oblate spheroids with the refractive indices mcore equals 1.7 + Oi, 1.7 + 0.1i and mmantle equals 1.3, the aspect ratio (a/b)mantle equals 2 and various volume ratios Vcore/Vtotal. The results are plotted for different size parameters xv equals 2(pi) rv/(lambda) , where rv is the radius of equivolume sphere and (lambda) is the wavelength of incident radiation. The main conclusions are: (a) if Vcore/Vtotal equals 0.5, the optical properties of a core-mantle particle are determined mainly by its core: for prolate non-absorbing spheroids when xv spheroids when xv 10, for oblate absorbing and non-absorbing spheroids when xv

  20. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D

  1. Polarization of cosmic dust simulated with the rough spheroid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Das, Himadri Sekhar; Dubovik, Oleg; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Yang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic dust is a polydisperse mixture of irregular, often aggregated, particles. Previous attempts have tried to simulate polarimetric properties of this dust using aggregate dust models, but it has not been possible to consider particle sizes larger than a couple of microns due to limitations of computer memory and processing power. Attempts have also been made to replace aggregates by polydisperse regular particles (spheres, spheroids, cylinders), but those models could not consistently reproduce the observed photopolarimetric characteristics. In this study, we introduce to the astronomical community the software package developed by Dubovik et al. (2006) for modeling light scattering by a polydisperse mixture of randomly oriented smooth and rough spheroids of a variety of aspect ratios. The roughness of spheroids is defined by a normal distribution of the surface slopes, and its degree depends on the standard deviation of the distribution (which is zero for smooth surface and greater than zero for rough surface). The pre-calculated kernels in the software package allow for fast, accurate, and flexible modeling of different size and shape distributions. We present our results of a systematic investigation of polarization obtained with the rough and smooth spheroid models; we study differences in their phase angle dependence and how those differences change with the particle size distribution. We found that the difference between smooth and rough particles increases with increasing effective size parameter and affects mainly the value and position of the maximum polarization. Negative polarization was found to be typical only for silicate-like refractive indexes and only when the particles have size parameters within 2.5-25. As an example of an application of the rough spheroid model, we made computations for rough spheroids that have a size distribution and composition typical for cometary dust. We found that a mixture of porous rough spheroids made of absorbing

  2. Satellite dwarf galaxies in a hierarchical universe: the prevalence of dwarf-dwarf major mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Alis; Wetzel, Andrew; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea

    2014-10-20

    Mergers are a common phenomenon in hierarchical structure formation, especially for massive galaxies and clusters, but their importance for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains poorly understood. We investigate the frequency of major mergers between dwarf galaxies in the Local Group using the ELVIS suite of cosmological zoom-in dissipationless simulations of Milky Way- and M31-like host halos. We find that ∼10% of satellite dwarf galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} that are within the host virial radius experienced a major merger of stellar mass ratio closer than 0.1 since z = 1, with a lower fraction for lower mass dwarf galaxies. Recent merger remnants are biased toward larger radial distance and more recent virial infall times, because most recent mergers occurred shortly before crossing within the virial radius of the host halo. Satellite-satellite mergers also occur within the host halo after virial infall, catalyzed by the large fraction of dwarf galaxies that fell in as part of a group. The merger fraction doubles for dwarf galaxies outside of the host virial radius, so the most distant dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are the most likely to have experienced a recent major merger. We discuss the implications of these results on observable dwarf merger remnants, their star formation histories, the gas content of mergers, and massive black holes in dwarf galaxies.

  3. DWARFS GOBBLING DWARFS: A STELLAR TIDAL STREAM AROUND NGC 4449 AND HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION ON SMALL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Delgado, David; Rix, Hans-Walter; Maccio, Andrea V.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Annibali, Francesca; Fliri, Juergen; Zibetti, Stefano; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Chonis, Taylor S.; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Gallego-Laborda, J.; Merrifield, Michael R.

    2012-04-01

    A candidate diffuse stellar substructure was previously reported in the halo of the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4449 by Karachentsev et al. We map and analyze this feature using a unique combination of deep integrated-light images from the BlackBird 0.5 m telescope, and high-resolution wide-field images from the 8 m Subaru Telescope, which resolve the nebulosity into a stream of red giant branch stars, and confirm its physical association with NGC 4449. The properties of the stream imply a massive dwarf spheroidal progenitor, which after complete disruption will deposit an amount of stellar mass that is comparable to the existing stellar halo of the main galaxy. The stellar mass ratio between the two galaxies is {approx}1:50, while the indirectly measured dynamical mass ratio, when including dark matter, may be {approx}1:10-1:5. This system may thus represent a 'stealth' merger, where an infalling satellite galaxy is nearly undetectable by conventional means, yet has a substantial dynamical influence on its host galaxy. This singular discovery also suggests that satellite accretion can play a significant role in building up the stellar halos of low-mass galaxies, and possibly in triggering their starbursts.

  4. Population gradients and photometric metallicities in early- and transition-type dwarf galaxies: Clues from the Sculptor group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lianou, S.; Grebel, E. K.; Da Costa, G. S.; Rejkuba, M.; Jerjen, H.; Koch, A.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: We focus on the resolved stellar populations of one early-type and four transition-type dwarf galaxies in the Sculptor group, with the aim to examine the potential presence of population gradients and place constraints on their mean metallicities. Methods: We use deep Hubble Space Telescope images to construct color-magnitude diagrams, from which we select stellar populations that trace different evolutionary phases in order to constrain their range of ages and metallicities, as well as to examine their spatial distribution. In addition, we use the resolved stars in the red giant branch in order to derive photometric metallicities. Results: All studied dwarfs contain intermediate-age stars with ages of ~1 Gyr and older as traced by the luminous asymptotic giant branch and red clump stars, while the transition-type dwarfs contain also stars younger than ~1 Gyr as traced by a young main sequence and vertical red clump stars. Moreover, the spatial distribution of the stars that trace different evolutionary phases shows a population gradient in all transition-type dwarfs. The derived error-weighted mean metallicities, assuming purely old stellar populations, range from -1.5 dex for ESO294-G010 to -1.9 dex for Scl-dE1, and should be considered as lower limits to their true metallicities. Assuming intermediate-age stellar populations to dominate the dwarfs, we derive upper limits for the metallicities that are 0.3 to 0.2 dex higher than the metallicities derived assuming purely old populations. We discuss how photometric metallicity gradients are affected by the age-metallicity degeneracy, which prevents strong conclusions regarding their actual presence. Finally, the transition-type dwarfs lie beyond the virial radius of their closest bright galaxy, as also observed for the Local Group transition-type dwarfs. Scl-dE1 is the only dwarf spheroidal in our sample and is an outlier in a potential morphology-distance relation, similar as the two isolated dwarf

  5. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  6. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color.

  7. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs

    PubMed Central

    Luyten, Willem J.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the “normal” white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  8. Which Way Is Jerusalem? Navigating on a Spheroid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Murray

    2007-01-01

    Given two points on a spheroidal planet, what is the direction from the first to the second? The answer depends, of course, on what path you take. This paper compares two paths which suggest themselves, namely, the loxodrome, which is the path in which the direction stays constant, and the geodesic, which is the shortest path. The geodesic does…

  9. Glycine decarboxylase in Rhodopseudomonas spheroides and in rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Tait, G. H.

    1970-01-01

    1. Glycine decarboxylase and glycine–bicarbonate exchange activities were detected in extracts of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides and in rat liver mitochondria and their properties were studied. 2. The glycine decarboxylase activity from both sources is stimulated when glyoxylate is added to the assay system. 3. Several proteins participate in these reactions and a heat-stable low-molecular-weight protein was purified from both sources. 4. These enzyme activities increase markedly when R. spheroides is grown in the presence of glycine, glyoxylate, glycollate, oxalate or serine. 5. All the enzymes required to catalyse the conversion of glycine into acetyl-CoA via serine and pyruvate were detected in extracts of R. spheroides; of these glycine decarboxylase has the lowest activity. 6. The increase in the activity of glycine decarboxylase on illumination of R. spheroides in a medium containing glycine, and the greater increase when ATP is also present in the medium, probably accounts for the increased incorporation of the methylene carbon atom of glycine into fatty acids found previously under these conditions (Gajdos, Gajdos-Török, Gorchein, Neuberger & Tait, 1968). 7. The results are compared with those obtained by other workers on the glycine decarboxylase and glycine–bicarbonate exchange activities in other systems. PMID:5476725

  10. In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Marley, Garry M.

    1993-01-01

    Cinostatic bioreactor promotes formation of relatively large solid tumor spheroids exhibiting diameters from 750 to 2,100 micrometers. Process useful in studying efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and of interactions between cells not constrained by solid matrices. Two versions have been demonstrated; one for anchorage-independent cells and one for anchorage-dependent cells.

  11. Chromosome Conformation of Human Fibroblasts Grown in 3-Dimensional Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Comment, Nicholas; Chen, Jie; Ronquist, Scott; Hero, Alfred; Ried, Thomas; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    In the study of interphase chromosome organization, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) maps are often generated using 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. These 2D cells have morphological deviations from cells that exist in 3-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo, and may not maintain the same chromosome conformation. We used Hi-C maps to test the extent of differences in chromosome conformation between human fibroblasts grown in 2D cultures and those grown in 3D spheroids. Significant differences in chromosome conformation were found between 2D cells and those grown in spheroids. Intra-chromosomal interactions were generally increased in spheroid cells, with a few exceptions, while inter-chromosomal interactions were generally decreased. Overall, chromosomes located closer to the nuclear periphery had increased intra-chromosomal contacts in spheroid cells, while those located more centrally had decreased interactions. This study highlights the necessity to conduct studies on the topography of the interphase nucleus under conditions that mimic an in vivo environment. PMID:25738643

  12. Void nucleation in spheroidized steels during tensile deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jr, J R

    1980-04-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of various mechanical and material parameters on void formation at cementite particles in axisymmetric tensile specimens of spheroidized plain carbon steels. Desired microstructures for each of three steel types were obtained. Observations of void morphology with respect to various microstructural features were made using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Bulgeless dwarf galaxies and dark matter cores from supernova-driven outflows.

    PubMed

    Governato, F; Brook, C; Mayer, L; Brooks, A; Rhee, G; Wadsley, J; Jonsson, P; Willman, B; Stinson, G; Quinn, T; Madau, P

    2010-01-14

    For almost two decades the properties of 'dwarf' galaxies have challenged the cold dark matter (CDM) model of galaxy formation. Most observed dwarf galaxies consist of a rotating stellar disk embedded in a massive dark-matter halo with a near-constant-density core. Models based on the dominance of CDM, however, invariably form galaxies with dense spheroidal stellar bulges and steep central dark-matter profiles, because low-angular-momentum baryons and dark matter sink to the centres of galaxies through accretion and repeated mergers. Processes that decrease the central density of CDM halos have been identified, but have not yet reconciled theory with observations of present-day dwarfs. This failure is potentially catastrophic for the CDM model, possibly requiring a different dark-matter particle candidate. Here we report hydrodynamical simulations (in a framework assuming the presence of CDM and a cosmological constant) in which the inhomogeneous interstellar medium is resolved. Strong outflows from supernovae remove low-angular-momentum gas, which inhibits the formation of bulges and decreases the dark-matter density to less than half of what it would otherwise be within the central kiloparsec. The analogues of dwarf galaxies-bulgeless and with shallow central dark-matter profiles-arise naturally in these simulations.

  14. COMPARING THE OBSERVABLE PROPERTIES OF DWARF GALAXIES ON AND OFF THE ANDROMEDA PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M.; Irwin, Michael J.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2015-01-20

    The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.

  15. Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Spheroidized 1045 Steel by Induction Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwook; Shin, Jung-Ho; Choi, Young; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2016-04-01

    The effects of induction heat treatment on the formation of carbide particles and mechanical properties of spheroidized 1045 steel were investigated by means of microstructural analysis and tensile testing. The induction spheroidization accelerated the formation of spherical cementite particles and effectively softened the steel. The volume fraction of cementite was found to be a key factor that affected the mechanical properties of spheroidized steels. Further tests showed that sequential spheroidization by induction and furnace heat treatments enhanced elongation within a short spheroidization time, resulting in better mechanical properties. This was due to the higher volume fraction of spherical cementite particles that had less diffusion time for particle coarsening.

  16. A spatial characterization of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal tails

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Matthew; Cole, Nathan; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Willett, Benjamin; Desell, Travis; Magdon-Ismail, Malik; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Varela, Carlos; Yanny, Brian E-mail: heidi@rpi.edu

    2013-06-01

    We measure the spatial density of F turnoff stars in the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream, from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, using statistical photometric parallax. We find a set of continuous, consistent parameters that describe the leading Sgr stream's position, direction, and width for 15 stripes in the north Galactic cap, and three stripes in the south Galactic cap. We produce a catalog of stars that has the density characteristics of the dominant leading Sgr tidal stream that can be compared with simulations. We find that the width of the leading (north) tidal tail is consistent with recent triaxial and axisymmetric halo model simulations. The density along the stream is roughly consistent with common disruption models in the north, but possibly not in the south. We explore the possibility that one or more of the dominant Sgr streams has been misidentified, and that one or more of the ''bifurcated'' pieces is the real Sgr tidal tail, but we do not reach definite conclusions. If two dwarf progenitors are assumed, fits to the planes of the dominant and ''bifurcated'' tidal tails favor an association of the Sgr dwarf spheroidal galaxy with the dominant southern stream and the ''bifurcated'' stream in the north. In the north Galactic cap, the best fit Hernquist density profile for the smooth component of the stellar halo is oblate, with a flattening parameter q = 0.53, and a scale length of r {sub 0} = 6.73. The southern data for both the tidal debris and the smooth component of the stellar halo do not match the model fits to the north, although the stellar halo is still overwhelmingly oblate. Finally, we verify that we can reproduce the parameter fits on the asynchronous MilkyWay@home volunteer computing platform.

  17. Testing gravity using dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    Generic scalar-tensor theories of gravity predict deviations from Newtonian physics inside astrophysical bodies. In this paper, we point out that low mass stellar objects, red and brown dwarf stars, are excellent probes of these theories. We calculate two important and potentially observable quantities: the radius of brown dwarfs and the minimum mass for hydrogen burning in red dwarfs. The brown dwarf radius can differ significantly from the general relativity prediction, and upcoming surveys that probe the mass-radius relation for stars with masses dwarf stars. This places a new and extremely stringent constraint on the parameters that appear in the effective field theory of dark energy and rules out several well-studied dark energy models.

  18. Brown dwarfs detections through microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranc, C.; Cassan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gravitational microlensing is known to be a powerful method to hunt for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. Recently, several brown dwarfs companions to stars have been detected through microlensing, as well as brown dwarfs binaries. We present the discovery of a new ˜ 40 M_{J} brown dwarf orbiting a K-dwarf at ˜ 4 AU, located at ˜ 4 kpc from the Earth. Besides using the standard photometric light curves gathered from different round-the-world observatories, its characterization involved high-resolution adaptative optics measurements from NaCo at VLT which allowed to break the degeneracies between the physical parameters and provide the exact mass and projected separation of the system.

  19. Seeing Baby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible/DSS Click on image for larger version Ultraviolet/GALEX Click on image for larger version Poster Version Click on image for larger version

    The unique ultraviolet vision of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveals, for the first time, dwarf galaxies forming out of nothing more than pristine gas likely leftover from the early universe. Dwarf galaxies are relatively small collections of stars that often orbit around larger galaxies like our Milky Way.

    The forming dwarf galaxies shine in the far ultraviolet spectrum, rendered as blue in the call-out on the right hand side of this image. Near ultraviolet light, also obtained by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, is displayed in green, and visible light from the blue part of the spectrum here is represented by red. The clumps (in circles) are distinctively blue, indicating they are primarily detected in far ultraviolet light.

    The faint blue overlay traces the outline of the Leo Ring, a huge cloud of hydrogen and helium that orbits around two massive galaxies in the constellation Leo (left panel). The cloud is thought likely to be a primordial object, an ancient remnant of material that has remained relatively unchanged since the very earliest days of the universe. Identified about 25 years ago by radio waves, the ring cannot be seen in visible light.

    Only a portion of the Leo Ring has been imaged in the ultraviolet, but this section contains the telltale ultraviolet signature of recent massive star formation within this ring of pristine gas. Astronomers have previously only seen dwarf galaxies form out of gas that has already been cycled through a galaxy and enriched with metals elements heavier than helium produced as stars evolve.

    The visible data come from the Digitized Sky Survey of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md. The

  20. Spatio-temporal cell dynamics in tumour spheroid irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, H.; Bleicher, M.; Meyer-Hermann, M.

    2010-10-01

    Multicellular tumour spheroids are realistic in vitro systems in radiation research that integrate cell-cell interaction and cell cycle control by factors in the medium. The dynamic reaction inside a tumour spheroid triggered by radiation is not well understood. Of special interest is the amount of cell cycle synchronisation which could be triggered by irradiation, since this would allow follow-up irradiations to exploit the increased sensitivity of certain cell cycle phases. In order to investigate these questions we need to support irradiation experiments with mathematical models. In this article a new model is introduced combining the dynamics of tumour growth and irradiation treatments. The tumour spheroid growth is modelled using an agent-based Delaunay/Voronoi hybrid model in which the cells are represented by weighted dynamic vertices. Cell properties like full cell cycle dynamics are included. In order to be able to distinguish between different cell reactions in response to irradiation quality we introduce a probabilistic model for damage dynamics. The overall cell survival from this model is in agreement with predictions from the linear-quadratic model. Our model can describe the growth of avascular tumour spheroids in agreement to experimental results. Using the probabilistic model for irradiation damage dynamics the classic ‘four Rs’ of radiotherapy can be studied in silico. We found a pronounced reactivation of the tumour spheroid in response to irradiation. A majority of the surviving cells is synchronized in their cell cycle progression after irradiation. The cell synchronisation could be actively triggered and should be exploited in an advanced fractionation scheme. Thus it has been demonstrated that our model could be used to understand the dynamics of tumour growth after irradiation and to propose optimized fractionation schemes in cooperation with experimental investigations.

  1. Comparative analysis of tumor spheroid generation techniques for differential in vitro drug toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Shreya; Rowley, Katelyn R.; Mehta, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are powerful in vitro models to perform preclinical chemosensitivity assays. We compare different methodologies to generate tumor spheroids in terms of resultant spheroid morphology, cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. We used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and OVCAR8) to generate spheroids using i) hanging drop array plates; ii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates; iii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates with rotating mixing (nutator plates). Analysis of spheroid morphometry indicated that cellular compaction was increased in spheroids generated on nutator and hanging drop array plates. Collagen staining also indicated higher compaction and remodeling in tumor spheroids on nutator and hanging drop arrays compared to conventional liquid overlay. Consequently, spheroids generated on nutator or hanging drop plates had increased chemoresistance to cisplatin treatment (20-60% viability) compared to spheroids on ultra low attachment plates (10-20% viability). Lastly, we used a mathematical model to demonstrate minimal changes in oxygen and cisplatin diffusion within experimentally generated spheroids. Our results demonstrate that in vitro methods of tumor spheroid generation result in varied cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. PMID:26918944

  2. Surface acoustic streaming in microfluidic system for rapid multicellular tumor spheroids generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlHasan, Layla; Qi, Aisha; Al-Aboodi, Aswan; Rezk, Amged; Shilton, Richie R.; Chan, Peggy P. Y.; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we developed a novel and rapid method to generate in vitro three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. A SAW device with single-phase unidirectional transducer electrodes (SPUTD) on lithium niobate substrate was fabricated using standing UV photolithography and wet-etching techniques. To generate spheroids, the SAW device was loaded with medium containing human breast carcinoma (BT474) cells, an oscillating electrical signal at resonant frequency was supplied to the SPUDT to generate acoustic radiation in the medium. Spheroids with uniform size and shape can be obtained using this method in less than 1 minute, and the size of the spheroids can be controlled through adjusting the seeding density. The resulting spheroids were used for further cultivation and were monitored using an optical microscope in real time. The viability and actin organization of the spheroids were assessed using live/dead viability staining and actin cytoskeleton staining, respectively. Compared to spheroids generated using the liquid overlay method, the SAW generated spheroids exhibited higher circularity and higher viability. The F-actin filaments of spheroids appear to aggregate compared to that of untreated cells, indicating that mature spheroids can be obtained using this method. This spheroid generating method can be useful for a variety of biological studies and clinical applications.

  3. Reproducibility of Uniform Spheroid Formation in 384-Well Plates: The Effect of Medium Evaporation.

    PubMed

    Das, Viswanath; Fürst, Tomáš; Gurská, Soňa; Džubák, Petr; Hajdúch, Marián

    2016-10-01

    Spheroid cultures of cancer cells reproduce the spatial dimension-induced in vivo tumor traits more effectively than the conventional two-dimensional cell cultures. With growing interest in spheroids for high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, there is an increasing demand for cost-effective miniaturization of reproducible spheroids in microtiter plates (MPs). However, well-to-well variability in spheroid size, shape, and growth is a frequently encountered problem with almost every culture method that has prevented the transfer of spheroids to the HTS platform. This variability partly arises due to increased susceptibility of MPs to edge effects and evaporation-induced changes in the growth of spheroids. In this study, we examined the effect of evaporation on the reproducibility of spheroids of tumor and nontumor cell lines in 384-well plates, and show that culture conditions that prevent evaporation-induced medium loss result in the formation of uniform spheroids across the plate. Additionally, we also present a few technical improvements to increase the scalability of the liquid-overlay spheroid culturing technique in MPs, together with a simple software routine for the quantification of spheroid size. We believe that these cost-effective improvements will aid in further improvement of spheroid cultures for HTS drug discovery.

  4. Plasma spheroidization of iron powders in a non-transferred DC thermal plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Selvarajan, V

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, the results of plasma spheroidization of iron powders using a DC non-transferred plasma spray torch are presented. The morphology of the processed powders was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The percentages of spheroidized powders were calculated by the shape factors such as the Irregularity Parameter (IP) and Roundness (RN). A maximum of 83% of spheroidization can be achieved. The spheroidization results are compared with the theoretical estimation and they are found to be in good agreement. The phase composition of the spheroidized powder was analyzed by XRD. The effect of plasma jet temperature and plasma gas flow rate on spheroidization is discussed. At low plasma gas flow rates and at high plasma jet temperatures, the percentage of spheroidization is high.

  5. PAndAS' CUBS: DISCOVERY OF TWO NEW DWARF GALAXIES IN THE SURROUNDINGS OF THE ANDROMEDA AND TRIANGULUM GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Nicolas F.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Mike; Chapman, Scott; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Dubinski, John; Babul, Arif; Navarro, Julio; Fardal, Mark; Lewis, Geraint F.; Rich, R. Michael

    2009-11-01

    We present the discovery of two new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXI and Andromeda XXII, located in the surroundings of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies (M31 and M33). These discoveries stem from the first year data of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey, a photometric survey of the M31/M33 group conducted with the Megaprime/MegaCam Wide-Field Camera mounted on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Both satellites appear as spatial overdensities of stars which, when plotted in a color-magnitude diagram, follow metal-poor, [Fe/H] = -1.8, red giant branches at the distance of M31/M33. Andromeda XXI is a moderately bright dwarf galaxy (M{sub V} = -9.9 +- 0.6), albeit with low surface brightness, emphasizing again that many relatively luminous M31 satellites still remain to be discovered. It is also a large satellite, with a half-light radius close to 1 kpc, making it the fourth largest Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy after the recently discovered Andromeda XIX, Andromeda II, and Sagittarius around the Milky Way, and supports the trend that M31 satellites are larger than their Milky Way counterparts. Andromeda XXII is much fainter (M{sub V} = -6.5 +- 0.8) and lies a lot closer in projection to M33 than it does to M31 (42 versus 224 kpc), suggesting that it could be the first Triangulum satellite to be discovered. Although this is a very exciting possibility in the context of a past interaction of M33 with M31 and the fate of its satellite system, a confirmation will have to await a good distance estimate to confirm its physical proximity to M33. Along with the dwarf galaxies found in previous surveys of the M31 surroundings, these two new satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 20.

  6. Infrared Colors of Dwarf-Dwarf Galaxy Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Sandra; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Johnson, Kelsey; Patton, Dave; Kallivayalil, Nitya

    2015-10-01

    We request Spitzer Warm Mission IRAC Channel 1 & 2 imaging for a sample of 60 isolated dwarf galaxy pairs as a key component of a larger, multi-wavelength effort to understand the role low-mass mergers play in galaxy evolution. A systematic study of dwarf-dwarf mergers has never been done, and we wish to characterize the impact such interactions have on fueling star formation in the nearby universe. The Spitzer imaging proposed here will allow us to determine the extent to which the 3.6 and 4.5 mum bands are dominated by stellar light and investigate a) the extent to which interacting pairs show IR excess and b) whether the excess is related to the pair separation. Second, we will use this IR photometry to constrain the processes contributing to the observed color excess and scatter in each system. We will take advantage of the wealth of observations available in the Spitzer Heritage Archive for 'normal' non-interacting dwarfs by comparing the stellar populations of those dwarfs with the likely interacting dwarfs in our sample. Ultimately, we can combine the Spitzer imaging proposed here with our current, ongoing efforts to obtain groundbased optical photometry to model the star formation histories of these dwarfs and to help constrain the timescales and impact dwarf-dwarf mergers have on fueling star formation. The sensitivity and resolution offered by Spitzer are necessary to determine the dust properties of these interacting systems, and how these properties vary as a function of pair separation, mass ratio, and gas fraction.

  7. Habitability of planets around red dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Heath, M J; Doyle, L R; Joshi, M M; Haberle, R M

    1999-08-01

    Recent models indicate that relatively moderate climates could exist on Earth-sized planets in synchronous rotation around red dwarf stars. Investigation of the global water cycle, availability of photosynthetically active radiation in red dwarf sunlight, and the biological implications of stellar flares, which can be frequent for red dwarfs, suggests that higher plant habitability of red dwarf planets may be possible.

  8. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the

  9. PROPERTIES OF THE COOLEST DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    SAUMON, DIDIER; LEGGETT, SANDY K.; FREEDMAN, RICHARD S.; GEBALLE, THOMAS R.; GOLIMOWSKI, DAVID A.; LODIEU, NICOLAS; MARLEY, MARK S.; STEPHENS, DENISE; PINFIELD, DAVID J.; WARREN, STEPHEN J.

    2007-01-18

    Eleven years after the discovery of the first T dwarf, we have a population of ultracool L and T dwarfs that is large enough to show a range of atmospheric properties, as well as model atmospheres advanced enough to study these properties in detail. Since the last Cool Stars meeting, there have been observational developments which aid in these studies. they present recent mid-infrared photometry and spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope which confirms the prevalence of vertical mixing in the atmospheres of L and T dwarfs. Hence, the 700 K to 2200 K L and t dwarf photspheres require a large number of parameters for successful modeling: effective temperature, gravity, metallicity, grain sedimentation and vertical mixing efficiency. They also describe initial results of a search for ultracool dwarfs in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, and present the latest T dwarf found to date. They conclude with a discussion of the definition of the later-than-T spectral type, the Y dwarf.

  10. PAndAS' PROGENY: EXTENDING THE M31 DWARF GALAXY CABAL

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Jenny C.; Irwin, Mike J.; Chapman, Scott C.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Dotter, Aaron L.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, R. Michael

    2011-05-10

    We present the discovery of five new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXIII-XXVII, located in the outer halo of M31. These galaxies were discovered during the second year of data from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), a photometric survey of the M31/M33 subgroup conducted with the MegaPrime/MegaCam wide-field camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The current PAndAS survey now provides an almost complete panoramic view of the M31 halo out to an average projected radius of {approx}150 kpc. Here we present for the first time the metal-poor stellar density map for this whole region, not only as an illustration of the discovery space for satellite galaxies, but also as a birds-eye view of the ongoing assembly process of an L{sub *} disk galaxy. Four of the newly discovered satellites appear as well-defined spatial overdensities of stars lying on the expected locus of metal-poor (-2.5 < [Fe/H] < -1.3) red giant branch stars at the distance of M31. The fifth overdensity, And XXVII, is embedded in an extensive stream of such stars and is possibly the remnant of a strong tidal disruption event. Based on distance estimates from horizontal branch magnitudes, all five have metallicities typical of dwarf spheroidal galaxies ranging from [Fe/H] =-1.7 {+-} 0.2 to [Fe/H] =-1.9 {+-} 0.2 and absolute magnitudes ranging from M{sub V} = -7.1 {+-} 0.5 to M{sub V} = -10.2 {+-} 0.5. These five additional satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 25 and continue the trend whereby the brighter dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31 generally have much larger half-light radii than their Milky Way counterparts. With an extended sample of M31 satellite galaxies, we also revisit the spatial distribution of this population and in particular we find that, within the current projected limits of the PAndAS survey, the surface density of satellites is essentially constant out to 150 kpc. This corresponds to a radial density distribution of satellites

  11. PAndAS' Progeny: Extending the M31 Dwarf Galaxy Cabal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jenny C.; Irwin, Mike J.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Dotter, Aaron L.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, R. Michael

    2011-05-01

    We present the discovery of five new dwarf galaxies, Andromeda XXIII-XXVII, located in the outer halo of M31. These galaxies were discovered during the second year of data from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), a photometric survey of the M31/M33 subgroup conducted with the MegaPrime/MegaCam wide-field camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The current PAndAS survey now provides an almost complete panoramic view of the M31 halo out to an average projected radius of ~150 kpc. Here we present for the first time the metal-poor stellar density map for this whole region, not only as an illustration of the discovery space for satellite galaxies, but also as a birds-eye view of the ongoing assembly process of an L * disk galaxy. Four of the newly discovered satellites appear as well-defined spatial overdensities of stars lying on the expected locus of metal-poor (-2.5 < [Fe/H] < -1.3) red giant branch stars at the distance of M31. The fifth overdensity, And XXVII, is embedded in an extensive stream of such stars and is possibly the remnant of a strong tidal disruption event. Based on distance estimates from horizontal branch magnitudes, all five have metallicities typical of dwarf spheroidal galaxies ranging from [Fe/H] =-1.7 ± 0.2 to [Fe/H] =-1.9 ± 0.2 and absolute magnitudes ranging from MV = -7.1 ± 0.5 to MV = -10.2 ± 0.5. These five additional satellites bring the number of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in this region to 25 and continue the trend whereby the brighter dwarf spheroidal satellites of M31 generally have much larger half-light radii than their Milky Way counterparts. With an extended sample of M31 satellite galaxies, we also revisit the spatial distribution of this population and in particular we find that, within the current projected limits of the PAndAS survey, the surface density of satellites is essentially constant out to 150 kpc. This corresponds to a radial density distribution of satellites varying as r -1, a result

  12. Chemical Analysis of the Fornax Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letarte, Bruno

    2007-03-01

    This thesis is entitled “Chemical Analysis of the Fornax Dwarf Galaxy”, and it’s main goal is to determine what are the chemical elements present in the stars of this galaxy in order to try and understand it’s evolution. Galaxies are not “static” objects, they move, form stars and can interact with other galaxies. Studying the stars composing a galaxy can in principle, inform us about its past. Some stars can be as old as the galaxy itself, some can be much younger and we can use this information to study how the stellar spectra have varied with time over the entire history of star formation in this galaxy. Dwarf galaxies are in principle the most simple and straightforward type of galaxy and their study can be used to test numerous theories of the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies in a range of environments. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are small, roughly spherical galaxies that are typically found in the vicinity of larger galaxies, such as the Milky Way. They typically do not have any ongoing star formation, nor do they appear to have any gas associated to them. The abundance ratios of different elements in individual stars with a range of ages provide a detailed insight into the various chemical enrichment processes (e.g., supernovae, stellar winds) which in turn improves our understanding of the global processes of formation and evolution of a galaxy as a whole. An important aspect of this thesis is the pipeline developed to analyse a large number of stellar spectra (~100) in a consistent and statistically robust manner, using tools that are typically used on spectra with twice the resolution and larger wavelength coverage. This required bringing together several complex tasks, including accurate stellar atmospheric models, atomic data for the absorption lines, codes of line formation, EW measurements and signal extraction methods, all of which need to be properly included and treated in order to obtain accurate results. The pipeline

  13. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  14. PHL 5038: a spatially resolved white dwarf + brown dwarf binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, P. R.; Burleigh, M. R.; Farihi, J.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Jameson, R. F.; Dobbie, P. D.; Barstow, M. A.

    2009-06-01

    A near-infrared excess is detected at the white dwarf PHL 5038 in UKIDSS photometry, consistent with the presence of a cool, substellar companion. We have obtained H- and K-grism spectra and images of PHL 5038 using NIRI on Gemini North. The target is spatially and spectrally resolved into two components: an 8000 K DA white dwarf, and a likely L8 brown dwarf companion, separated by 0.94 arcsec. The spectral type of the secondary was determined using standard spectral indices for late L and T dwarfs. The projected orbital separation of the binary is 55 AU, so it becomes only the second known wide WD+dL binary to be found after GD 165AB. This object could potentially be used as a benchmark for testing substellar evolutionary models at intermediate to older ages.

  15. Transplantation of insulin-secreting multicellular spheroids for the treatment of type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Kusamori, Kosuke; Nishikawa, Makiya; Mizuno, Narumi; Nishikawa, Tomoko; Masuzawa, Akira; Shimizu, Kazunori; Konishi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-10

    The efficacy of cell-based therapy depends on the function and survival of transplanted cells, which have been suggested to be enhanced by spheroid formation. However, few attempts at spheroid generation from insulin-secreting cells, which may be used to treat type 1 diabetes, have been reported. We therefore developed spheroids from the mouse insulinoma cell line NIT-1 by using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microwells with a coating of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm). The prepared NIT-1 spheroids or dissociated NIT-1 cells were transplanted into the subrenal capsule in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. NIT-1 spheroids prepared using the PNIPAAm-coated PDMS-based microwells had a uniformly sized spherical structure with a diameter of 200-300μm. The PNIPAAm coating increased cell survival in the spheroids and the recovery of the spheroids from the microwells. In diabetic mice, the transplanted NIT-1 spheroids reduced blood glucose levels to normal values faster than dissociated NIT-1 cells did. Additionally, survival was higher among NIT-1 cells in spheroids than among dissociated NIT-1 cells 24h after transplantation. These results indicate that insulin-secreting NIT-1 spheroids prepared using PNIPAAm-coated PDMS-based microwells are more effective for the treatment of type 1 diabetes than dissociated cells in suspension. PMID:24184345

  16. Manipulation of cellular spheroid composition and the effects on vascular tissue fusion

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, T.R.; Mattix, B.; Casco, M.; Herbst, A.; Williams, C.; Tarasidis, A.; Simionescu, D.; Visconti, R.P.; Alexis, F.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular spheroids were investigated as tissue-engineered building blocks that can be fused to form functional tissue constructs. While spheroids can be assembled using passive contacts for the fusion of complex tissues, physical forces can be used to promote active contacts to improve tissue homogeneity and accelerate tissue fusion. Understanding the mechanisms affecting the fusion of spheroids is critical to fabricating tissues. Here, manipulation of the spheroid composition was used to accelerate the fusion process mediated by magnetic forces. The Janus structure of magnetic cellular spheroids spatially controls iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to form two distinct domains: cells and extracellular MNPs. Studies were performed to evaluate the influence of extracellular matrix (ECM) content and cell number on the fusion of Janus magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCSs). Results showed that the integration of iron oxide MNPs into spheroids increased the production of collagen over time when compared to spheroids without MNPs. The results also showed that ring tissues composed of JMCSs with high ECM concentrations and high cell numbers fused together, but exhibited less contraction when compared to their lower concentration counterparts. Results from spheroid fusion in capillary tubes showed that low ECM concentrations and high cell numbers experienced more fusion and cellular intermixing over time when compared to their higher counterparts. These findings indicate that cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions play an important role in regulating fusion, and this understanding sets the rationale of spheroid composition to fabricate larger and more complex tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:25463485

  17. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, P.-A.; Mirabel, I. F.; Brinks, E.

    The life and evolution of galaxies are dramatically affected by environmental effects. Interactions with the intergalactic medium and collisions with companions cause major perturbations in the morphology and contents of galaxies: in particular stars and gas clouds may be gravitationally pulled out from their parent galaxies during tidal encounters, forming rings, tails and bridges. This debris of collisions lies at the origin of a new generation of small galaxies, the so-called "tidal dwarf galaxies" (TDGs). The authors have carried out multi-wavelength observations of some 20 TDGs. These systems are made of two stellar components: young stars, formed from the recent collapse of expelled H I clouds, and an older stellar population, tidally pulled out from the disks of their interacting parent galaxies. In the observed TDGs, the current star formation episode is fuelled by a large reservoir of H I gas and is younger than 10 Myr.

  18. Exclusion of canonical weakly interacting massive particles by joint analysis of Milky Way dwarf galaxies with data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Koushiappas, Savvas M

    2011-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are known to be excellent targets for the detection of annihilating dark matter. We present new limits on the annihilation cross section of weakly interacting massive particles based on the joint analysis of seven Milky Way dwarfs using a frequentist Neyman construction and Pass 7 data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. We exclude generic weakly interacting massive particle candidates annihilating into bb with a mass less than 40 GeV that reproduce the observed relic abundance. To within 95% systematic errors on the dark matter distribution within the dwarfs, the mass lower limit can be as low as 19 GeV or as high as 240 GeV. For annihilation into τ+ τ-, these limits become 19, 13, and 80 GeV, respectively.

  19. Exclusion of canonical weakly interacting massive particles by joint analysis of Milky Way dwarf galaxies with data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Geringer-Sameth, Alex; Koushiappas, Savvas M

    2011-12-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are known to be excellent targets for the detection of annihilating dark matter. We present new limits on the annihilation cross section of weakly interacting massive particles based on the joint analysis of seven Milky Way dwarfs using a frequentist Neyman construction and Pass 7 data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. We exclude generic weakly interacting massive particle candidates annihilating into bb with a mass less than 40 GeV that reproduce the observed relic abundance. To within 95% systematic errors on the dark matter distribution within the dwarfs, the mass lower limit can be as low as 19 GeV or as high as 240 GeV. For annihilation into τ+ τ-, these limits become 19, 13, and 80 GeV, respectively. PMID:22242988

  20. White Dwarf Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Work on NAG5-3288 ("White Dwarf Pulsars") has been fully integrated with the identically titled project NAG5-4734. The final report below is the same, since the data analysis and interpretative work are integrated, as are the resulting (previous and in-pipeline) publications. The proposal was designed to study pulse and orbital modulations in candidate DQ Herculis stars. Data on 5 stars were obtained. The best results were obtained on YY Draconis, which exhibited a strongly pulsed hard X-ray flux, and even suggested a transition between one-pole and two-pole emission during the course of the observation. This result is being readied for inclusion in a comprehensive study of YY Draconis. A strong pulsation appeared to be present also in H0857-242, but with a period of - 50 minutes, confusion with the first harmonic of the satellite's orbital frequency is possible. So that result is uncertain and is "on ice". A negative result was obtained on 4UO608-49 (V347 Pup), suggesting either that the X-ray identification is incorrect, or that the source is very transient. Finally, data was obtained on V1432 Aql and WZ Sge, respectively the slowest and fastest of these stars. Combined with the ASCA data, the high-energy data demonstrates the latter to contain a white dwarf rotating with P = 27.87 s (Patterson et al. 1998, PASP, 110, 403). Optical photometry contemporaneous with the X-ray data was obtained of V1432 Aql, in order to study the variations in the eclipse waveform. As anticipated, the width and centroid of the eclipse appeared to vary with the 50-day "supercycle".

  1. Hoarding decisions by Edward's long-tailed rats (Leopoldamys edwardsi) and South China field mice (Apodemus draco): the responses to seed size and germination schedule in acorns.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gang; Xiao, Zhishu; Zhang, Zhibin

    2009-09-01

    Co-varying traits in acorns such as seed size and germination schedule are important to influence the behavioural decisions of hoarding rodents. Using acorn pairs from cork oak (Quercus variabilis) (large size and short germination schedules) serrate oak (Q. serrata) (small size and short germination schedule) and qinggang (Cyclobalanopsis glauca) (small size and long germination schedule) with contrasting seed size and germination schedule, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate hoarding preferences in response to seed size and germination schedule by Edward's long-tailed rats (Leopoldamys edwardsi) and South China field mice (Apodemus draco) in semi-natural enclosures. We found that the seed size hypothesis was consistently supported: both rodent species ate more small acorns but hoarded more large ones regardless of germination schedules. However, the germination schedule hypothesis was also supported when similar sized acorns were simultaneously provided, e.g. Q. serrata versus C. glauca or germinating versus non-germinating Q. variabilis. Our results, contrary to the studies from North America, indicate that seed size is more important than germination schedules in determining whether the tested animals eat or hoard a given seed.

  2. Spheroid and Tissue Assembly via Click Chemistry in Microfluidic Flow.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Paul J; Luo, Wei; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Chen, Jean; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2015-09-16

    Proper cell-cell contact and communication are essential for the correct development and survival of higher order organisms. In order to study complex cell interactions that occur in vivo, model systems that are able to recapitulate 3D cell-cell interactions in vitro are key to advancing new biotechnologies, therapeutics, and tissue engineering applications. Herein, we show a new strategy to rapidly and efficiently generate complex multiple cell line containing spheroids and tissues in microfluidic flow without the use of scaffolds, molecular biology, or metabolic biosynthesis. The method relies on the integration of microfluidics, liposome fusion, bio-orthogonal chemistry, and cell surface engineering to rapidly click coculture cell assemblies in flow. We demonstrate this strategy by assembling various combinations of cell types with an interfacial cell to cell click chemistry in microfluidic flow to generate a range of spheroid types and oriented tissue multilayers.

  3. Survivin isoform Delta Ex3 regulates tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Magali; Ceballos-Cancino, Gisela; Callaghan, Richard; Maldonado, Vilma; Patiño, Nelly; Ruíz, Víctor; Meléndez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    Survivin is an important member of the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) family and has essential roles in apoptosis and cell cycle progression. This gene is commonly upregulated in human cancer and provides an exciting diagnostic and therapeutic target. Survivin is expressed as several isoforms that are generated by alternative splicing, and some of these present antagonistic activities. Currently, information regarding the regulation of these isoforms is lacking. In this study, we sought to analyze survivin Delta Ex3 expression in a three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and its overexpression effects in processes such as proliferation, clonogenicity and apoptosis. We found a positive correlation between spheroid growth and survivin Delta Ex3 expression during the exponential phase. We demonstrated that this isoform not only decreased apoptosis but also inhibited tumor spheroid formation by decreasing proliferation and clonogenic survival. These results point toward a dual and antagonistic effect of this spliced survivin isoform in cancer development.

  4. The Dark Halo - Spheroid Conspiracy Reloaded: Evolution with Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The total density profiles of elliptical galaxies can be fit by a single power law, i.e., ρtot ~ r γ with γ ~ -2. While strong lensing observations show a tendency for the slopes to become flatter with increasing redshift, simulations indicate an opposite trend. To understand this discrepancy, we study a set of simulated spheroids formed within the cosmological framework. From our simulations we find that the steepness of the total density slope correlates with the compactness of the stellar component within the half-mass radius, and that spheroidal galaxies tend to be more compact at high redshifts than their present-day counterparts. While both these results are in agreement with observations, the observed trend of the total density slope with redshift remains in contradiction to the results from simulations.

  5. A method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics using spheroidal kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Benz, Willy; Davies, Melvyn B.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) designed to model systems dominated by deformation along a preferential axis. These systems cause severe problems for SPH codes using spherical kernels, which are best suited for modeling systems which retain rough spherical symmetry. Our method allows the smoothing length in the direction of the deformation to evolve independently of the smoothing length in the perpendicular plane, resulting in a kernel with a spheroidal shape. As a result the spatial resolution in the direction of deformation is significantly improved. As a test case we present the one-dimensional homologous collapse of a zero-temperature, uniform-density cloud, which serves to demonstrate the advantages of spheroidal kernels. We also present new results on the problem of the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

  6. Adhesive Wear Behavior of Heat Treated Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, M.; Shama, S.; Mozumder, Y. H.; Behera, R. K.; P, Sindhoora L.; Pattanaik, A.; Mishra, S. C.; Sen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Spheroidal graphite cast iron is one of the most favorable materials in cast iron family due to its wide range of mechanical and tribological properties. In the current research priority is given towards the investigation of wear system response of spheroidal graphite cast iron subjected to various heat treatment conditions. Pearlitic/ferritic and upper bainitic matrix was obtained through normalizing and austempering treatment for an austenitizing temperature of 1000°C. Dry sliding wear test was performed at 10N, 20N, 30N for a sliding distance of 7.54m. With increase in load weight loss was observed for as-cast specimen whereas normalized specimen showed very less weight loss with increasing load. On the other hand the austempered specimen observed to lose weight when operated at 10N, whereas at 20N and 30N drastic gain in weight was observed.

  7. Two step continuous method to synthesize colloidal spheroid gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Chandra, S; Doran, J; McCormack, S J

    2015-12-01

    This research investigated a two-step continuous process to synthesize colloidal suspension of spheroid gold nanorods. In the first step; gold precursor was reduced to seed-like particles in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone and ascorbic acid. In continuous second step; silver nitrate and alkaline sodium hydroxide produced various shape and size Au nanoparticles. The shape was manipulated through weight ratio of ascorbic acid to silver nitrate by varying silver nitrate concentration. The specific weight ratio of 1.35-1.75 grew spheroid gold nanorods of aspect ratio ∼1.85 to ∼2.2. Lower weight ratio of 0.5-1.1 formed spherical nanoparticle. The alkaline medium increased the yield of gold nanorods and reduced reaction time at room temperature. The synthesized gold nanorods retained their shape and size in ethanol. The surface plasmon resonance was red shifted by ∼5 nm due to higher refractive index of ethanol than water.

  8. Quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Grünebaum, Jonas; Moosmann, Aline; Mulac, Dennis; Söbbing, Judith; Niehaus, Rebecca; Buchholz, Rebecca; Kröger, Sabrina; Wiehe, Arno; Wagner, Sylvia; Sperling, Michael; von Briesen, Hagen; Langer, Klaus; Karst, Uwe

    2016-09-28

    Limited drug penetration into tumor tissue is a significant factor to the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Tumor spheroids, a 3D cell culture model system, can be used to study drug penetration for pharmaceutical development. In this study, a method for quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements by laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. Different matrix-matched standards were used to develop a quantitative LA-ICP-MS method with high spatial resolution. To investigate drug penetration, tumor spheroids were incubated with platinum complexes (Pt(II)acetylacetonate, cisplatin) and the palladium tagged photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (mTHPP). Distribution and accumulation of the pharmaceuticals were determined with the developed method. PMID:27619092

  9. Quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Grünebaum, Jonas; Moosmann, Aline; Mulac, Dennis; Söbbing, Judith; Niehaus, Rebecca; Buchholz, Rebecca; Kröger, Sabrina; Wiehe, Arno; Wagner, Sylvia; Sperling, Michael; von Briesen, Hagen; Langer, Klaus; Karst, Uwe

    2016-09-28

    Limited drug penetration into tumor tissue is a significant factor to the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Tumor spheroids, a 3D cell culture model system, can be used to study drug penetration for pharmaceutical development. In this study, a method for quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements by laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. Different matrix-matched standards were used to develop a quantitative LA-ICP-MS method with high spatial resolution. To investigate drug penetration, tumor spheroids were incubated with platinum complexes (Pt(II)acetylacetonate, cisplatin) and the palladium tagged photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (mTHPP). Distribution and accumulation of the pharmaceuticals were determined with the developed method.

  10. Structure of molecular liquids: closure relations for hard spheroids.

    PubMed

    Cheung, David L; Anton, Lucian; Allen, Michael P; Masters, Andrew J

    2007-10-01

    We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of hard spheroids of revolution of different elongations. Both prolate and oblate shapes are examined. A systematic study of the bridge function b(1,2), and direct comparison with the indirect correlation function gamma(1,2)=h(1,2)-c(1,2) at densities spanning the isotropic fluid range, allow us to evaluate the accuracy of various proposed closure relations for integral equations.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  12. Are ancient dwarf satellites the building blocks of the Galactic halo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitoni, E.; Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; Romano, D.

    2016-05-01

    According to the current cosmological cold dark matter paradigm, the Galactic halo could have been the result of the assemblage of smaller structures. Here we explore the hypothesis that the classical and ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way have been the building blocks of the Galactic halo by comparing their [α/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] versus [Fe/H] patterns with the ones observed in Galactic halo stars. The α elements deviate substantially from the observed abundances in the Galactic halo stars for [Fe/H] values larger than -2 dex, while they overlap for lower metallicities. On the other hand, for the [Ba/Fe] ratio, the discrepancy is extended at all [Fe/H] values, suggesting that the majority of stars in the halo are likely to have been formed in situ. Therefore, we suggest that [Ba/Fe] ratios are a better diagnostic than [α/Fe] ratios. Moreover, for the first time we consider the effects of an enriched infall of gas with the same chemical abundances as the matter ejected and/or stripped from dwarf satellites of the Milky Way on the chemical evolution of the Galactic halo. We find that the resulting chemical abundances of the halo stars depend on the assumed infall time-scale, and the presence of a threshold in the gas for star formation. In particular, in models with an infall time-scale for the halo around 0.8 Gyr coupled with a threshold in the surface gas density for the star formation (4 M⊙ pc-2), and the enriched infall from dwarf spheroidal satellites, the first halo stars formed show [Fe/H]>-2.4 dex. In this case, to explain [α/Fe] data for stars with [Fe/H]<-2.4 dex, we need stars formed in dSph systems.

  13. Is Sextans dwarf galaxy in a scalar field dark matter halo?

    SciTech Connect

    Lora, V.; Magaña, Juan E-mail: juan.magana@uv.cl

    2014-09-01

    The Bose-Einstein condensate/scalar field dark matter model, considers that the dark matter is composed by spinless-ultra-light particles which can be described by a scalar field. This model is an alternative model to the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm, and therefore should be studied at galactic and cosmological scales. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies have been very useful when studying any dark matter theory, because the dark matter dominates their dynamics. In this paper we study the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy, embedded in a scalar field dark matter halo. We explore how the dissolution time-scale of the stellar substructures in Sextans, constrain the mass, and the self-interacting parameter of the scalar field dark matter boson. We find that for masses in the range (0.12< m{sub φ}<8) ×10{sup -22} eV, scalar field dark halos without self-interaction would have cores large enough to explain the longevity of the stellar substructures in Sextans, and small enough mass to be compatible with dynamical limits. If the self-interacting parameter is distinct to zero, then the mass of the boson could be as high as m{sub φ}≈2×10{sup -21} eV, but it would correspond to an unrealistic low mass for the Sextans dark matter halo . Therefore, the Sextans dwarf galaxy could be embedded in a scalar field/BEC dark matter halo with a preferred self-interacting parameter equal to zero.

  14. THRESHING IN ACTION: THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A DWARF GALAXY BY THE HYDRA I CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Burkert, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael; Black, Christine S.; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Hilker, Michael; Benson, Andrew J.

    2012-08-10

    We report on the discovery of strong tidal features around a dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the Hydra I galaxy cluster, indicating its ongoing tidal disruption. This very low surface brightness object, HCC-087, was originally classified as an early-type dwarf in the Hydra Cluster Catalogue (HCC), but our re-analysis of the ESO-VLT/FORS images of the HCC unearthed a clear indication of an S-shaped morphology and a large spatial extent. Its shape, luminosity (M{sub V} = -11.6 mag), and physical size (at a half-light radius of 3.1 kpc and a full length of {approx}5.9 kpc) are comparable to the recently discovered NGC 4449B and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal, all of which are undergoing clear tidal disruption. Aided by N-body simulations we argue that HCC-087 is currently at its first apocenter, at 150 kpc, around the cluster center and that it is being tidally disrupted by the galaxy cluster's potential itself. An interaction with the nearby (50 kpc) S0 cluster galaxy HCC-005, at M{sub *} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} is rather unlikely, as this constellation requires a significant amount of dynamical friction and thus low relative velocities. The S-shaped morphology and large spatial extent of the satellite would, however, also appear if HCC-087 would orbit the cluster center. These features appear to be characteristic properties of satellites that are seen in the process of being tidally disrupted, independent of the environment of the destruction. An important finding of our simulations is an orientation of the tidal tails perpendicular to the orbit.

  15. Random sequential adsorption of spheroidal particles: Kinetics and jamming limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł

    1996-10-01

    Localized adsorption of hard (noninteracting) spheroidal particles on homogeneous interfaces was analyzed theoretically. In contrast to previous studies concentrated on flat (side on) adsorption in the present approach an unoriented (quasi-three-dimensional) adsorption of prolate and oblate spheroids was considered. By applying the random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach asymptotic analytic expressions were derived for the available surface function (surface blocking parameter) and adsorption kinetics in the limit of low and moderate surface concentrations. The range of validity of the approximate analytical results was determined by numerical simulations of adsorption kinetics performed using the Monte Carlo RSA technique. It was revealed by this comparison that the analytical approximation can be used with a good accuracy for the dimensionless adsorption time τ smaller than two. The numerical calculations also enabled us to determine the maximum (jamming) surface concentrations for unoriented adsorption of spheroids as a function of the elongation or flattening parameter A. It was demonstrated that these jamming concentrations θ∞ are approached for long adsorption times as τ-1/4, therefore deviating considerably from the Langmuir model used often in the literature.

  16. Centrifugal force induced by relativistically rotating spheroids and cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph; Lynden Bell, Donald; Bičák, Jiří

    2011-03-01

    Starting from the gravitational potential of a Newtonian spheroidal shell we discuss electrically charged rotating prolate spheroidal shells in the Maxwell theory. In particular we consider two confocal charged shells which rotate oppositely in such a way that there is no magnetic field outside the outer shell. In the Einstein theory we solve the Ernst equations in the region where the long prolate spheroids are almost cylindrical; in equatorial regions the exact Lewis 'rotating cylindrical' solution is so derived by a limiting procedure from a spatially bound system. In the second part we analyze two cylindrical shells rotating in opposite directions in such a way that the static Levi-Civita metric is produced outside and no angular momentum flux escapes to infinity. The rotation of the local inertial frames in flat space inside the inner cylinder is thus exhibited without any approximation or interpretational difficulties within this model. A test particle within the inner cylinder kept at rest with respect to axes that do not rotate as seen from infinity experiences a centrifugal force. Although in suitably chosen axes the spacetime there is exactly Minkowskian out to the inner cylinder, nevertheless, those inertial frame axes rotate with respect to infinity, so relative to the inertial frame inside the inner cylinder a test particle is traversing a circular orbit.

  17. Magnetic Flattening of Stem-Cell Spheroids Indicates a Size-Dependent Elastocapillary Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuel, Francois; Reffay, Myriam; Du, Vicard; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Rieu, Jean-Paul; Wilhelm, Claire

    2015-03-01

    Cellular aggregates (spheroids) are widely used in biophysics and tissue engineering as model systems for biological tissues. In this Letter we propose novel methods for molding stem-cell spheroids, deforming them, and measuring their interfacial and elastic properties with a single method based on cell tagging with magnetic nanoparticles and application of a magnetic field gradient. Magnetic molding yields spheroids of unprecedented sizes (up to a few mm in diameter) and preserves tissue integrity. On subjecting these spheroids to magnetic flattening (over 150 g ), we observed a size-dependent elastocapillary transition with two modes of deformation: liquid-drop-like behavior for small spheroids, and elastic-sphere-like behavior for larger spheroids, followed by relaxation to a liquidlike drop.

  18. Sound scattering by rigid oblate spheroids, with implication to pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.; Seiner, J.; Norum, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The frequency limit below which sound scattering by a microphone body is sufficiently small to permit accurate pressure gradient measurements was determined. The sound pressure was measured at various points on the surface of a rigid oblate spheroid illuminated by spherical waves generated by a point source at a large distance from the spheroid, insuring an essentially plane sound field. The measurements were made with small pressure microphones flush mounted from the inside of the spheroid model. Numerical solutions were obtained for a variety of spheroid shapes, including that of the experimental model. Very good agreement was achieved between the experimental and theoretical results. It was found that scattering effects are insignificant if the ratio of the major circumference of the spheroid to the wavelength of the incident sound is less than about 0.7, this number being dependent upon the shape of the spheroid. This finding can be utilized in the design of pressure gradient microphones.

  19. A Tidally Disrupting Dwarf Galaxy in the Halo of NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson; McLeod, Brian; Seth, Anil C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Scl-MM-Dw2, a new dwarf galaxy at a projected separation of ˜50 kpc from NGC 253, as part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor project (PISCeS). We measure a tip of the red giant branch (RGB) distance of 3.12 ± 0.30 Mpc, suggesting that Scl-MM-Dw2 is likely a satellite of NGC 253. We qualitatively compare the distribution of RGB stars in the color-magnitude diagram with theoretical isochrones and find that it is consistent with an old, ˜12 Gyr, and metal-poor, -2.3 \\lt [Fe/H] \\lt -1.1, stellar population. We also detect a small number of asymptotic giant branch stars consistent with a metal-poor 2-3 Gyr population in the center of the dwarf. Our non-detection of HI in a deep Green Bank Telescope spectrum implies a gas fraction {M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.02 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ . The stellar and gaseous properties of Scl-MM-Dw2 suggest that it is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Scl-MM-Dw2 has a luminosity of {M}V=-12.1+/- 0.5 mag and a half-light radius of rh =2.94+/- 0.46 {{kpc}}, which makes it moderately larger than dwarf galaxies in the Local Group of the same luminosity. However, Scl-MM-Dw2 is very elongated (ɛ =0.66+/- 0.06), and it has an extremely low surface brightness ({μ }0,V=27.7+/- 0.6 mag arcsec-2). Its elongation and diffuseness make it an outlier in the ellipticity-luminosity and surface brightness-luminosity scaling relations. These properties suggest that this dwarf is being tidally disrupted by NGC 253.

  20. A Tidally Disrupting Dwarf Galaxy in the Halo of NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson; McLeod, Brian; Seth, Anil C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Scl-MM-Dw2, a new dwarf galaxy at a projected separation of ∼50 kpc from NGC 253, as part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor project (PISCeS). We measure a tip of the red giant branch (RGB) distance of 3.12 ± 0.30 Mpc, suggesting that Scl-MM-Dw2 is likely a satellite of NGC 253. We qualitatively compare the distribution of RGB stars in the color–magnitude diagram with theoretical isochrones and find that it is consistent with an old, ∼12 Gyr, and metal-poor, -2.3 \\lt [Fe/H] \\lt -1.1, stellar population. We also detect a small number of asymptotic giant branch stars consistent with a metal-poor 2–3 Gyr population in the center of the dwarf. Our non-detection of HI in a deep Green Bank Telescope spectrum implies a gas fraction {M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.02 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ . The stellar and gaseous properties of Scl-MM-Dw2 suggest that it is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Scl-MM-Dw2 has a luminosity of {M}V=-12.1+/- 0.5 mag and a half-light radius of rh =2.94+/- 0.46 {{kpc}}, which makes it moderately larger than dwarf galaxies in the Local Group of the same luminosity. However, Scl-MM-Dw2 is very elongated (ε =0.66+/- 0.06), and it has an extremely low surface brightness ({μ }0,V=27.7+/- 0.6 mag arcsec‑2). Its elongation and diffuseness make it an outlier in the ellipticity–luminosity and surface brightness–luminosity scaling relations. These properties suggest that this dwarf is being tidally disrupted by NGC 253.

  1. The mass distribution and the law of gravity in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, George; Skillman, Evan D.

    1989-10-01

    Results are presented on the H I spectral-line distribution and velocity field of the Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 1613, which were obtained using VLA of the NRAO. The rotation curve of IC 1613 was determined, and Newtonian and non-Newtonian mass models were built. It was found that the H I is lumpy in the inner parts, but H I contours in the outer parts of the galaxy are smooth. The velocity field is regular, and the line of nodes is coincident with the major axis of the gas distribution. The rotation curve of IC 1613 shows evidence of dark matter in the outer parts. However, the maximum density of a dark halo that can be tolerated is an order of magnitude lower than that needed to explain the velocity dispersions of the extreme dwarf spheroidals.

  2. Scattering of Gaussian Beam by a Conducting Spheroidal Particle with Confocal Dielectric Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xianming; Wang, Haihua; Zhang, Huayong

    2010-09-01

    An analytic solution to the scattering by a coated spheroidal particle, for arbitrary incidence of a Gaussian beam, is constructed by expanding the incident and scattered electromagnetic fields in terms of spheroidal vector wave functions. The unknown expansion coefficients are determined by a system of linear equations derived from the appropriate boundary conditions. Numerical results of the normalized differential scattering cross section of the conducting and coated spheroidal particle are evaluated, and the scattering characteristics are discussed concisely.

  3. Spheroidal models of the exterior gravitational field of Asteroids Bennu and Castalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebera, Josef; Bezděk, Aleš; Pešek, Ivan; Henych, Tomáš

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational field of small bodies can be modeled e.g. with mascons, a polyhedral model or in terms of harmonic functions. If the shape of a body is close to the spheroid, it is advantageous to employ the spheroidal basis functions for expressing the gravitational field. Spheroidal harmonic models, similarly to the spherical ones, may be used in navigation and geophysical tasks. We focus on modeling the exterior gravitational field of oblate-like Asteroid (101955) Bennu and prolate-like Asteroid (4769) Castalia with spheroidal harmonics. Using the Gauss-Legendre quadrature and the spheroidal basis functions, we converted the gravitational potential of a particular polyhedral model of a constant density into the spheroidal harmonics. The results consist of (i) spheroidal harmonic coefficients of the exterior gravitational field for the Asteroids Bennu and Castalia, (ii) spherical harmonic coefficients for Bennu, and (iii) the first and second-order Cartesian derivatives in the local spheroidal South-East-Up frame for both bodies. The spheroidal harmonics offer biaxial flexibility (compared with spherical harmonics) and low computational costs that allow high-degree expansions (compared with ellipsoidal harmonics). The obtained spheroidal models for Bennu and Castalia represent the exterior gravitational field valid on and outside the Brillouin spheroid but they can be used even under this surface. For Bennu, 5 m above the surface the agreement with point-wise integration was 1% or less, while it was about 10% for Castalia due to its more irregular shape. As the shape models may produce very high frequencies, it was crucial to use higher maximum degree to reduce the aliasing. We have used the maximum degree 360 to achieve 9-10 common digits (in RMS) when reconstructing the input (the gravitational potential) from the spheroidal coefficients. The physically meaningful maximum degree may be lower (≪ 360) but its particular value depends on the distance and/or on the

  4. The Effect of Feedback and Reionization on Star Formation in Low-mass Dwarf Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Christine M.; Bryan, G.; Johnston, K. V.; Smith, B. D.; Mac Low, M.; Sharma, S.; Tumlinson, J.

    2013-01-01

    I will present a set of high resolution simulations of a 109 M⊙ dark matter halo in a cosmological setting done with an adaptive-mesh refinement code as a mass analogue to local low-luminosity dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The primary goal of our simulations is to investigate the roles of reionization and supernova feedback in determining the star formation histories of low mass dwarf galaxies. We include a wide range of physical effects, including metal cooling, molecular hydrogen formation and cooling, photoionization and photodissociation from a metagalactic (but not local) background, a simple prescription for self-shielding, star formation, and a simple model for supernova driven energetic feedback. We find that reionization is primarily responsible for expelling most of the gas in our simulations, but that supernova feedback is required to disperse the dense, cold gas in the core of the halo. Moreover, we show that the timing of reionization can produce an order of magnitude difference in the final stellar mass of the system. For our full physics run with reionization at z=9, we find a stellar mass of about 105 M⊙ at z=0, and a mass-to-light ratio within the half-light radius of approximately 130 M⊙/L⊙, consistent with observed low-luminosity dwarfs. However, the resulting median stellar metallicity is 0.06 Z⊙, considerably larger than observed systems. In addition, we find star formation is truncated between redshifts 4 and 7, at odds with the observed late time star formation in isolated dwarf systems but in agreement with Milky Way ultrafaint dwarf spheroidals. We investigate the efficacy of energetic feedback in our simple thermal-energy driven feedback scheme, and suggest that it may still suffer from excessive radiative losses, despite reaching stellar particle masses of about 100 M⊙, and a comoving spatial resolution of 11 pc. This has led us to pursue improvements in our supernova feedback model to include kinetic as well as thermal energy in

  5. THE INNER STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF GALAXY AS A PRODUCT OF TIDAL STIRRING

    SciTech Connect

    Lokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Majewski, Steven R.; Law, David R.; Mayer, Lucio; Frinchaboy, Peter M. E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.ed E-mail: drlaw@astro.ucla.ed E-mail: p.frinchaboy@tcu.ed

    2010-12-20

    The tidal stirring model envisions the formation of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies in the Local Group and similar environments via the tidal interaction of disky dwarf systems with a larger host galaxy like the Milky Way. These progenitor disks are embedded in extended dark halos and during the evolution both components suffer strong mass loss. In addition, the disks undergo the morphological transformation into spheroids and the transition from ordered to random motion of their stars. Using collisionless N-body simulations, we construct a model for the nearby and highly elongated Sagittarius (Sgr) dSph galaxy within the framework of the tidal stirring scenario. Constrained by the present orbit of the dwarf, which is fairly well known, the model suggests that in order to produce the majority of tidal debris observed as the Sgr stream, but not yet transform the core of the dwarf into a spherical shape, Sgr must have just passed the second pericenter of its current orbit around the Milky Way. In the model, the stellar component of Sgr is still very elongated after the second pericenter and morphologically intermediate between the strong bar formed at the first pericenter and the almost spherical shape existing after the third pericenter. This is thus the first model of the evolution of the Sgr dwarf that accounts for its observed very elliptical shape. At the present time, there is very little intrinsic rotation left and the velocity gradient detected along the major axis is almost entirely of tidal origin. We model the recently measured velocity dispersion profile for Sgr assuming that mass traces light and estimate its current total mass within 5 kpc to be 5.2 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}. To have this mass at present, the model requires that the initial virial mass of Sgr must have been as high as 1.6 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, comparable to that of the Large Magellanic Cloud, which may serve as a suitable analog for the pre-interaction, Sgr progenitor.

  6. Scattering of a focused Laguerre-Gaussian beam by a spheroidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuesong; Shao, Yuwei; Qu, Xiaosheng; Ou, Jun; Hua, Houqiang

    2012-12-01

    A focused Laguerre-Gaussian beam scattered by a homogeneous prolate spheroidal particle is studied for on-axis incidence. An approach to expanding a focused Laguerre-Gaussian beam in terms of the spheroidal wavefunctions in spheroidal coordinates is presented. By using the localized approximations method, the beam-shape coefficients are evaluated and the results agree with the cases of on-axis incidence. Calculations of the far-field scattering intensity are performed to study the shaped beam scattered by a spheroid, which has different size parameters and eccentricities.

  7. Methods: Using Three-Dimensional Culture (Spheroids) as an In Vitro Model of Tumour Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Leek, Russell; Grimes, David Robert; Harris, Adrian L; McIntyre, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Regions of hypoxia in tumours can be modelled in vitro in 2D cell cultures with a hypoxic chamber or incubator in which oxygen levels can be regulated. Although this system is useful in many respects, it disregards the additional physiological gradients of the hypoxic microenvironment, which result in reduced nutrients and more acidic pH. Another approach to hypoxia modelling is to use three-dimensional spheroid cultures. In spheroids, the physiological gradients of the hypoxic tumour microenvironment can be inexpensively modelled and explored. In addition, spheroids offer the advantage of more representative modelling of tumour therapy responses compared with 2D culture. Here, we review the use of spheroids in hypoxia tumour biology research and highlight the different methodologies for spheroid formation and how to obtain uniformity. We explore the challenge of spheroid analyses and how to determine the effect on the hypoxic versus normoxic components of spheroids. We discuss the use of high-throughput analyses in hypoxia screening of spheroids. Furthermore, we examine the use of mathematical modelling of spheroids to understand more fully the hypoxic tumour microenvironment. PMID:27325267

  8. The GEA method for light scattering by dielectric spheroids and ellipsoids with fixed and random orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei Ming

    The GEA method is employed to study light scattering by dielectric spheroids and ellipsoids with either fixed or random orientations. A simple formula is obtained for a dielectric ellipsoid. The results from a dielectric spheroid with fixed or random orientations are compared numerically and found to agree well with the T-matrix method for small angle scattering. The numerical results for an ellipsoid are obtained. The validity region for the equal-volume sphere method for a dielectric spheroid and equal-volume spheroid method for a dielectric ellipsoid are also discussed.

  9. White Dwarf Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    This proposal was designed to study pulse and orbital modulations in candidate DQ Herculis stars. Data on 5 stars were obtained. The best results were obtained on YY Draconis, which exhibited a strongly pulsed hard X-ray flux, and even suggested a transition between one-pole and two-pole emission during the course of the observation. This result is being readied for inclusion in a comprehensive study of YY Draconis. A strong pulsation appeared to be present also in H0857-242, but with a period of about 50 minutes, confusion with the first harmonic of the satellite's orbital frequency is possible. So that result is uncertain. A negative result was obtained on 4UO608-49 (V347 Pup), suggesting either that the X-ray identification is incorrect, or that the source is very transient. Finally, data was obtained on V1432 Aql and WZ Sge, respectively the slowest and fastest of these stars. Combined with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data, the high-energy data demonstrates the latter to contain a white dwarf rotating with P = 27.87 s. Optical photometry contemporaneous with the X-ray data was obtained of V1432 Aql, in order to study the variations in the eclipse waveform. As anticipated, the width and centroid of the eclipse appeared to vary with the 50-day "supercycle". A paper reporting this study is now in preparation.

  10. The universal stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Bullock, James S.; Cohen, Judith G.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gallazzi, Anna

    2013-12-20

    We present spectroscopic metallicities of individual stars in seven gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrrs), and we show that dIrrs obey the same mass-metallicity relation as the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of both the Milky Way and M31: Z{sub ∗}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 0.30±0.02}. The uniformity of the relation is in contradiction to previous estimates of metallicity based on photometry. This relationship is roughly continuous with the stellar mass-stellar metallicity relation for galaxies as massive as M {sub *} = 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}. Although the average metallicities of dwarf galaxies depend only on stellar mass, the shapes of their metallicity distributions depend on galaxy type. The metallicity distributions of dIrrs resemble simple, leaky box chemical evolution models, whereas dSphs require an additional parameter, such as gas accretion, to explain the shapes of their metallicity distributions. Furthermore, the metallicity distributions of the more luminous dSphs have sharp, metal-rich cut-offs that are consistent with the sudden truncation of star formation due to ram pressure stripping.

  11. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES OF SEVEN IRREGULAR AND THREE TIDAL DWARF GALAXIES IN THE M81 GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Van Zee, Liese; Lee, Henry; Miller, Bryan W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Lee, Janice C.; Cote, Stephanie; Kennicutt, Robert C. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.ed E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.ed E-mail: stephanie.cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.c E-mail: bmiller@gemini.ed

    2009-11-01

    We have derived nebular abundances for 10 dwarf galaxies belonging to the M81 Group, including several galaxies which do not have abundances previously reported in the literature. For each galaxy, multiple H II regions were observed with GMOS-N at the Gemini Observatory in order to determine abundances of several elements (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, neon, and argon). For seven galaxies, at least one H II region had a detection of the temperature sensitive [O III] lambda4363 line, allowing a 'direct' determination of the oxygen abundance. No abundance gradients were detected in the targeted galaxies, and the observed oxygen abundances are typically in agreement with the well-known metallicity-luminosity relation. However, three candidate 'tidal dwarf' galaxies lie well off this relation: UGC 5336, Garland, and KDG 61. The nature of these systems suggests that UGC 5336 and Garland are indeed recently formed systems, whereas KDG 61 is most likely a dwarf spheroidal galaxy which lies along the same line of sight as the M81 tidal debris field. We propose that these H II regions formed from previously enriched gas which was stripped from nearby massive galaxies (e.g., NGC 3077 and M81) during a recent tidal interaction.

  12. Brown dwarfs as close companions to white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringfellow, Guy S.; Bodenheimer, Peter; Black, David C.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the radiation flux emitted by a white dwarf primary on the evolution of a closely orbiting brown dwarf (BD) companion is investigated. Full stellar evolutionary calculations are presented for both isolated and thermal bath cases, including effects of large variations in the atmospheric grain opacities. High grain opacities significantly increase the radii of the BDs, but the thermal bath does not. The major influence of the thermal bath is to increase substantially the surface temperature and luminosity of the BD at a given age. These results are compared with the observational properties of the possible BD companion of the white dwarf G29-38. Inclusion of both physical effects, high grain opacities and thermal bath, increases the mass range (0.034-0.063 solar masses) of viable models significantly, yet the final determination of whether the object is indeed a BD requires improvements in the observations of the system's properties.

  13. Star formation in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shawfeng

    In this thesis, we examine the star formation history and stellar feedback effects of dwarf galaxies under the influence of extragalactic ultraviolet radiation, as well as the evolution of residual gas within tidally-limited dwarf galaxies and globular clusters. Previous work has indicated that the background UV flux can easily ionize the gas within typical dwarf galaxies, delaying or even preventing cooling and star formation within them. Many dwarf galaxies within the Local Group are, however, observed to contain multiple generations of stars, the oldest of which formed in the early epochs of cosmic evolution, when the background UV flux was intense. In order to address this paradox, we consider the dynamical evolution of gas in dwarf galaxies using a one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, Lagrangian numerical scheme which also computes the effects of radiative transfer and photoionization. We include in the scheme a physically-motivated star formation recipe and consider the effects of feedback. This scheme allows us to follow the history of the gas and of star formation within dwarf galaxies, as influenced by both external and internal UV radiation. Our results indicate that star formation in the severe environment of dwarf galaxies is a difficult and inefficient process. In potentials with total mass less than a few 106 M⊙ , and velocity dispersion less than a few km s-1 , residual gas is efficiently photoionized by cosmic background UV radiation. For intermediate mass systems, such as the dSphs around the Galaxy, star formation can proceed within early cosmic epochs despite the intense background UV flux. Triggering processes such as merger events, collisions, and tidal disturbance can lead to density enhancements, reducing the recombination timescale, allowing gas to cool and star formation to proceed. However, the star formation and gas retention efficiency may vary widely in galaxies with similar dark matter potentials, because they depend on many

  14. The Origin of Dwarf Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa

    2012-10-01

    Abridge. We have conducted a spectrophotometric study of dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in regions of lower density. We have found that these galaxies show many properties in common with late-type galaxies but not with more massive early-types (E/S0). The properties of the dEs in Virgo show gradients within the cluster. dEs in the outer parts of the Virgo cluster are kinematically supported by rotation, while those in the center are supported by the random motions of their stars (i.e. pressure supported). The rotationally supported dEs have disky isophotes and faint underlying spiral/irregular substructures, they also show younger ages than those pressure supported, which have boxy isophotes and are smooth and regular, without any substructure. We compare the position of these dEs with massive early-type galaxies in the Faber-Jackson and Fundamental Plane relations, and we find that, although there is no difference between the position of rotationally and pressure supported dEs, both deviate from the relations of massive early-type galaxies in the direction of dwarf spheroidal systems (dSphs). We have used their offset with respect to the Fundamental Plane of E/S0 galaxies to estimate their dark matter fraction. All the properties studied in this work agree with a ram pressure stripping scenario, where late-type galaxies infall into the cluster, their interaction with the intergalactic medium blows away their gas and, as a result, they are quenched in a small amount of time. However, those dEs in the center of the cluster seem to have been fully transformed leaving no trace of their possible spiral origin, thus, if that is the case, they must have experienced a more violent mechanism in combination with ram pressure stripping.

  15. THE EXTENSIVE AGE GRADIENT OF THE CARINA DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, G.; Irwin, M.; Tolstoy, E.; De Boer, T.; Mateo, M.

    2012-12-20

    The evolution of small systems such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is likely to have been a balance between external environmental effects and internal processes within their own relatively shallow potential wells. Assessing how strong such environmental interactions may have been is therefore an important element in understanding the baryonic evolution of dSphs and their derived dark matter distribution. Here we present results from a wide-area CTIO/MOSAIC II photometric survey of the Carina dSph, reaching down to about two magnitudes below the oldest main-sequence turnoff (MSTO). This data set enables us to trace the structure of Carina in detail out to very large distances from its center, and as a function of stellar age. We observe the presence of an extended structure made up primarily of ancient MSTO stars, at distances between 25' and 60' from Carina's center, confirming results in the literature that Carina extends well beyond its nominal tidal radius. The large number statistics of our survey reveals features such as isophote twists and tails that were undetected in other previous, shallower surveys. This is the first time that such unambiguous signs of tidal disruption have been found in a Milky Way 'classical' dwarf other than Sagittarius. We also demonstrate the presence of a negative age gradient in Carina directly from its MSTOs, and trace it out to very large distances from the galaxy center. The signs of interaction with the Milky Way make it unclear whether the age gradient was already in place before Carina underwent tidal disruption.

  16. Ejection of Supernova-Enriched Gas From Dwarf Disk Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Fragile, P C; Murray, S D; Lin, D C

    2004-06-15

    We examine the efficiency with which supernova-enriched gas may be ejected from dwarf disk galaxies, using a methodology previously employed to study the self-enrichment efficiency of dwarf spheroidal systems. Unlike previous studies that focused on highly concentrated starbursts, in the current work we consider discrete supernova events spread throughout various fractions of the disk. We model disk systems having gas masses of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} with supernova rates of 30, 300, and 3000 Myr{sup -1}. The supernova events are confined to the midplane of the disk, but distributed over radii of 0, 30, and 80% of the disk radius, consistent with expectations for Type II supernovae. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that the enriched material from supernovae is largely lost when the supernovae are concentrated near the nucleus, as expected for a starburst event. In contrast, we find the loss of enriched material to be much less efficient (as low as 21%) when the supernovae occur over even a relatively small fraction of the disk. The difference is due to the ability of the system to relax following supernova events that occur over more extended regions. Larger physical separations also reduce the likelihood of supernovae going off within low-density ''chimneys'' swept out by previous supernovae. We also find that, for the most distributed systems, significant metal loss is more likely to be accompanied by significant mass loss. A comparison with theoretical predications indicates that, when undergoing self-regulated star formation, galaxies in the mass range considered shall efficiently retain the products of Type II supernovae.

  17. The late-M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Bessell, M.S. )

    1991-02-01

    Far-red spectra and VRIJHK photometry have been obtained for a sample of late-M dwarfs selected on the basis of large reduced red magnitudes from the LHS Catalog. Half of the stars in the three faintest 1 mag bins are late-M stars, the other red stars are metallic-hydride subdwarfs. Relations between various colors for the late-M dwarfs are investigated. Of all the colors I - K most reliably correlates with spectral type. FeH bands near 9900 A are clearly seen in the spectra of all dwarf stars later than M5. Two stars cooler than VB10, and similar in temperature to LHS2924 have been identified; both have H-alpha in emission and appear variable in magnitude and R - I color; one is a flare star. The other stars are of earlier spectral type and resemble W359 and VB8. The observed MI, I - K main sequence is in good agreement with the IG theoretical main sequence of Stringfellow, and the faintest stars could be about 0.09 solar mass red dwarfs or lower mass brown dwarfs. 65 refs.

  18. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hindlimb ischemia mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Su; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2014-02-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted ASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) spheroid in a hindlimb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hindlimbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) of spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The spheroid + LLLT group enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with other groups. The spheroid contributed tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs was increased by the decreased apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hindlimb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs group and spheroid group. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hindlimb.

  19. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Langan, Laura M.; Dodd, Nicholas J. F.; Owen, Stewart F.; Purcell, Wendy M.; Jackson, Simon K.; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  20. Spheroid formation and enhanced cardiomyogenic potential of adipose-derived stem cells grown on chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing-Hsien; Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Lin, Yu-Chun; Wang, Min-Hsiung; Chen, David C; Lee, Bo-Hua; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2013-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells may differentiate into cardiomyocytes and participate in local tissue repair after heart injury. In the current study, rat adipose-derived adult stem cells (ASCs) grown on chitosan membranes were observed to form cell spheroids after 3 days. The cell seeding density and surface modification of chitosan with Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide had an influence on the sizes of ASC spheroids. In the absence of induction, these spheroids showed an increased level of cardiac marker gene expression (Gata4, Nkx2-5, Myh6, and Tnnt2) more than 20-fold versus cells on the tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) dish. Induction by 5-azacytidine or p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (SB202190) did not further increase the cardiac marker gene expression of these spheroids. Moreover, the enhanced cardiomyogenic potential of the spheroids was highly associated with the chitosan substrates. When ASC spheroids were plated onto TCPS with either basal or cardiac induction medium for 9 days, the spheroids spread into a monolayer and the positive effect on cardiomyogenic marker gene expression disappeared. The possible role of calcium ion and the up-regulation of adhesion molecule P-selectin and chemokine receptor Cxcr4 were demonstrated in ASC spheroids. Applying these spheroids to the chronic myocardial infarction animal model showed better functional recovery versus single cells after 12 weeks. Taken together, this study suggested that the ASC spheroids on chitosan may form as a result of calcium ion signaling, and the transplantation of these spheroids may offer a simple method to enhance the efficiency of stem cell-based therapy in myocardial infarction. PMID:23514754

  1. The relation between stellar populations, structure and environment for dwarf elliptical galaxies from the MAGPOP-ITP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, D.; Boselli, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Toloba, E.; Whiley, I. M.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Balcells, M.; Cardiel, N.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Peletier, R. F.; Vazdekis, A.

    2008-04-01

    Dwarf galaxies, as the most numerous type of galaxy, offer the potential to study galaxy formation and evolution in detail in the nearby universe. Although they seem to be simple systems at first view, they remain poorly understood. In an attempt to alleviate this situation, the MAGPOP EU Research and Training Network embarked on a study of dwarf galaxies named MAGPOP-ITP. In this paper, we present the analysis of a sample of 24 dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in the field, using optical long-slit spectroscopy. We examine their stellar populations in combination with their light distribution and environment. We confirm and strengthen previous results that dEs are, on average, younger and more metal-poor than normal elliptical galaxies, and that their [α/Fe] abundance ratios scatter around solar. This is in accordance with the downsizing picture of galaxy formation where mass is the main driver for the star formation history. We also find new correlations between the luminosity-weighted mean age, the large-scale asymmetry, and the projected Virgocentric distance. We find that environment plays an important role in the termination of the star formation activity by ram-pressure stripping of the gas in short time-scales, and in the transformation of discy dwarfs to more spheroidal objects by harassment over longer time-scales. This points towards a continuing infalling scenario for the evolution of dEs.

  2. OVCAR-3 Spheroid-Derived Cells Display Distinct Metabolic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A.; Wang, Lijuan; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells. Methods To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines. Results These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrate for the

  3. Maximum likelihood fitting of tidal streams with application to the Sagittarius dwarf tidal tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Nathan

    2009-06-01

    = 4.2 value to estimate stellar distances. Fifteen stripes were extracted and used to trace the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy tidal stream. These analyses characterize the Sagittarius tidal stream in both the trailing tidal tail and the leading tidal tail. Comparing these detections with that of the current models for the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy disruption shows that there is considerable disagreement. The positions along the trailing tidal tail correspond well with the model disruption; however, the leading tidal tail positions differ greatly from those seen in the model disruptions indicating that new models need to be created to better fit the observations. A new orbital plane of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy has been calculated, using the fifteen detections of the Sgr stream, with equation -0.207 X + 0.925 Y + 0.319 Z - 1.996 = 0. The leading tidal tail lies along this plane while the Sgr core and the trailing tail do not. A second plane was fit to the three southern detections and the Sagittarius dwarf position and is described by equation 0.024 X + 03990 Y + 0.136 Z - 1.801 = 0. The leading and trailing tails are fit well with these two planes, respectively. There is approximately a 17° difference in orientation of these two planes and may imply a strong precession of the orbit of the Sagittarius dwarf. The separation technique was applied to the analyzed data to successfully create a catalog of stars matching the density profile of the Sagittarius tidal streams; however, these stars do not explicitly represent stars drawn from the Sagittarius tidal stream. The stream was then successfully extracted from the data resulting in a much smoother spheroid. Therefore, through the fitting and extraction of all tidal debris in the data using this method, the smooth component of the spheroid may be recovered for uncontaminated study to determine the true structure of the smooth spheroid. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. How, Now, Brown Dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    The vocabulary of astronomy is riddled with colorful names for stars, from red giants to blue stragglers. Objects with masses between roughly .01 and .1 solar masses are called "brown dwarfs". Do they - could they - ever actually appear brown? Color is not a one-dimensional physical parameter like wavelength. It is a complex, psychophysical phenomenon involving not only three degrees of freedom - hue (often incorrectly equated with "color"), saturation and brightness - but also observational context. The perceptual nature of color has been known since Newton wrote in his "Opticks” in 1704: "For the Rays to speak properly are not coloured. In them there is nothing else than a certain Power and disposition to stir up a Sensation of this or that Colour.” To most observers, the 2000 or so naked eye stars observable from the northern hemisphere all appear white, with the half dozen exceptions which look reddish/orange like Betelgeuse, Arcturus and Antares. But what color would Betelgeuse (effective temperature 3600 K) appear at a distance of, say, 100 times the Earth-Sun separation? Not red. In fact, it has a temperature about 40% higher than that of an ordinary incandescent light bulb. It would appear white (or yellowish)! Can a very cool radiating (emissive) object ever appear brown? What is brown anyway? It is not a primary or even secondary color. In this presentation, we will explore the nature and meaning of "brown” by the use of several physical and computer demonstrations developed as part of "Project LITE- Light Inquiry Through Experiments", an educational materials development project. These demonstrations show that an isolated thermally radiating object will never appear brown. Hence the term "Brown Dwarf” is as nonsensical as the phrase "How, Now, Brown Cow?". Project LITE is supported by the NSF through DUE Grant # 0715975.

  5. Pluto: Dwarf planet 134340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, L. V.

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, investigations of Pluto with up-to-date astronomical instruments yielded results that have been generally confirmed by the New Horizons mission. In 2006, in Prague, the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) reclassified Pluto as a member of the dwarf planet category according to the criteria defined by the IAU for the term "planet". At the same time, interest in studies of Pluto was increasing, while the space investigations of Pluto were delayed. In 2006, the New Horizons Pluto spacecraft started its journey to Pluto. On July 14, 2015, the spacecraft, being in fly-by mode, made its closest approach to Pluto. The heterogeneities and properties of the surface and rarified atmosphere were investigated thoroughly. Due to the extreme remoteness of the spacecraft and the energy limitations, it will take 18 months to transmit the whole data volume. Along with the preliminary results of the New Horizons Pluto mission, this paper reviews the basics on Pluto and its moons acquired from the ground-based observations and with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). There are only a few meteorite craters on the surfaces of Pluto and Charon, which distinctly marks them apart from such satellites of the giant planets as Ganymede and Callisto. The explanation is that the surface of Pluto is young: its age is estimated at less than 100 Myr. Ice glaciers of apparently a nitrogen nature were found. Nitrogen is also the main component of the atmosphere of Pluto. The planet demonstrates the signs of strong geologic activity, though the energy sources of these processes are unknown.

  6. Hyperbolic umbilic diffraction catastrophe and rainbow scattering from spheroidal drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, P. L.; Trinh, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    Short-wavelength scattering from drops whose shapes closely approximate that of an oblate spheroid with a vertical short or symmetry axis have been studied. The drops were illuminated by a horizontally propagating gaussian beam with a wavelength of 633 nm. The drops were observed to scatter in the horizontal rainbow region with patterns like those of hyperbolic-umblic (classification D4(+)) diffraction catastrophes. Visible D4(+) diffraction patterns observed previously include light transmitted by frosted glass surfaces and by liquid lenses clinging to tilted glass plates.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) to surface molecules involved in the cell-cell interactions of mammalian cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). MCS are highly organized 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics in vivo tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. They also provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. In brief, MCS combine the relevance of organized tissues with the accuracy of in vitro methodology. Further, one can manipulate these MCS experimentally to discern important information about their biology.

  8. Note: 3D printed spheroid for uniform magnetic field generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Y.; Aktaş, B.

    2016-10-01

    This article is focused on a novel and practical production method for a uniform magnetic field generator. The method involves building of a surface coil template using a desktop 3D printer and winding of a conducting wire onto the structure using surface grooves as a guide. Groove pattern was based on the parametric spheroidal helical coil formula. The coil was driven by a current source and the magnetic field inside was measured using a Hall probe placed into the holes on the printed structure. The measurements are found to be in good agreement with our finite element analysis results and indicate a fairly uniform field inside.

  9. Influence of ionizing radiation on oxygen profiles in different types of multicellular spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Nylen, T.; Acker, H.; Boelling, B.H.; Holterman, G.; Carlsson, J. )

    1989-11-01

    Human glioma (U-118 MG and U-138 MG), human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29), human thyroid carcinoma (HTh 7), and hamster embryonic lung (V79-379A) spheroids were irradiated with either single doses of 16 or 40 Gy or fractionated doses of eight times 5 Gy. Oxygen profiles in the spheroids were measured with microelectrodes at different times following irradiation, and these profiles were then compared with the oxygen profiles measured in parallel cultured nonirradiated spheroids. No significant radiation-induced changes in the oxygen profiles were seen in any of the spheroids within the first few days after irradiation. The glioma spheroids did not show any significant increase in oxygen tension even after longer times; however, they were growth inhibited, and the number of S-phase cells was strongly suppressed. Increases in oxygen tension did occur in the HT-29 and V79-379A spheroids but only appeared more than a week after irradiation, when degeneration had started. Histological changes and decrease in diameter were seen in the spheroids that started to degenerate about 5 days after irradiation. Thus radiation doses in the therapeutic range did not, for the spheroids studied, produce rapid increases in the oxygen tension. When a change occurred, it appeared rather late and was probably a consequence of cell degeneration.

  10. Trigonometric potentials arising from the spheroidal equation: Supersymmetric partners and integral formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel

    2016-06-01

    We construct supersymmetric partners of a quantum system featuring a class of trigonometric potentials that emerge from the spheroidal equation. Examples of both standard and confluent supersymmetric transformations are presented. Furthermore, we use integral formulas arising from the confluent supersymmetric formalism to derive new representations for single and multiple integrals of spheroidal functions.

  11. Surface chemistry-mediated penetration and gold nanorod thermotherapy in multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shubin; Ma, Xiaowei; Ma, Huili; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liu, Juan; Hou, Shuai; Meng, Jie; Wang, Paul C; Wu, Xiaochun; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit.

  12. Abnormal hepatic copper accumulation of spheroid composed of liver cells from LEC rats in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ueno, K; Yoshizawa, M; Satoh, T; Yoneda, S; Ohmichi, M; Yamazaki, M; Mori, Y; Suzuki, K T

    1995-11-01

    The LEC rat is a mutant strain displaying hereditary hepatitis, and shows abnormal accumulation of copper (Cu) similar to that occurring in Wilson's disease. We prepared a multicellular spheroid composed of LEC rat liver cells to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu. These multicellular spheroids were prepared by detaching the monolayer on the collagen-conjugated thermo-responsive polymer coated culture dish at a temperature below the critical solution temperature and culturing on the non-adhesive substratum. Long-term cultured spheroids of LEC rat liver cells as well as SD rat liver cells were attempted. Non-parenchymal cells obtained by collagenase perfusion from the LEC liver were fewer than those from the SD liver. Cells from the LEC rat, over 11 weeks of age, did not form a cell sheet; however, a mixture of parenchymal cells from LEC rats over aged 11 weeks and non-parenchymal cells from SD rats of any age yielded intact spheroids. We examined the toxicity, the accumulation and distribution of Cu in spheroids. The accumulation of Cu in LEC spheroids was higher than that in SD spheroids. Results suggest that spheroids consisting of LEC liver cells are useful as an alternative model to in vivo tests to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu in liver.

  13. Unveiling the Secret of a Virgo Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    case of the seemingly inconspicuous dwarf galaxy IC 3382 , the astronomers made an amazing discovery. When the best fitting model was removed from the observed image, a neat and regular spiral structure appeared in the residual image, cf. PR Photo 11/00 ! Nothing like this has ever been seen before in a dwarf elliptical galaxy. The light associated with the spiral constitutes a 3% modulation of the surface brightness. To see this effect at all, requires the excellent image quality of FORS1 and ANTU. The origin of the spiral structure What is the cause for this faintest and smallest spiral ever discovered in a galaxy? Two possible explanations have been proposed by the astronomers. It has been known for several decades that the spiral patterns seen in disk galaxies, like for instance in the Milky Way galaxy, are "density waves". The patterns are due to collective oscillations in the gravitational field that moves the stars and gas back and forth. The presence of a spiral pattern in IC3328 implies that it harbours a thin disk. The available data do not allow to distinguish between a pure disk galaxy, or a disk embedded in a spheroidal mass distribution. Both configurations are known to exist. Transient spiral patterns, as that seen in the well-known, nearby galaxy Messier 51, can be generated by tidal interactions . In the present case, there are two close and faint dwarf galaxies which may have disturbed IC3328 in the past and thereby produced the spiral pattern we now see. If what we see is a pure disk galaxy, the exceptionally small amplitude of the spiral pattern suggests another possibility: it could be swing-amplified noise . A modest amount of cold lumpy gas in the disk may have provided some initial "graininess" which was then gradually amplified by a shearing effect of the stellar orbits in the disk to produce the striking spiral pattern we now see. More information about this project A research article about this discovery is being published in the European

  14. Switchable water-adhesive, superhydrophobic palladium-layered silicon nanowires potentiate the angiogenic efficacy of human stem cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jungmok; Lee, Jung Seung; Lee, Kihong; Kim, Dayeong; Yang, Kisuk; Shin, Sera; Mahata, Chandreswar; Jung, Hwae Bong; Lee, Wooyoung; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Taeyoon

    2014-11-01

    A switchable water-adhesive, super-hydrophobic nanowire surface is developed for the formation of functional stem cell spheroids. The sizes of hADSC spheroids are readily controllable on the surface. Our surface increases cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction, which improves viability and paracrine secretion of the spheroids. Accordingly, the hADSC spheroids produced on the surface exhibit significantly enhanced angiogenic efficacy.

  15. Multiplexing Spheroid Volume, Resazurin and Acid Phosphatase Viability Assays for High-Throughput Screening of Tumour Spheroids and Stem Cell Neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Delyan P.; Parker, Terry L.; Walker, David A.; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B.; Gellert, Paul R.; Garnett, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  16. Scattering of an oblique incident focused Gaussian beam by a spheroidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenjuan; Han, Yiping; Han, Lu

    2014-09-01

    Based on the expansion of a Gaussian beam in spheroidal coordinates in general case of oblique illumination, a theoretical procedure to determine the scattered fields of spheroid obliquely illuminated by a Gaussian beam is presented. Specific attention is paid to the study of scattering properties of a spheroidal particle from an obliquely incident Gaussian beam. The calculated results for spheroid are compared with those from the surface integral equation method, and very good agreements are observed. Numerical results concerning the influences of shaped beam parameters (beam waist radius, incident angle) as well as spheroid parameters (major axis, minor axis, refractive index, size parameter) on the scattering properties are presented. These results can be used as a reference for other numerical methods to analyze the light scattering by non-spherical particles illuminated by Gaussian beam.

  17. Diffusion and binding of monoclonal antibody TNT-1 in multicellular tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.M.; Hansen, E.B.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1991-02-06

    Tumor spheroids of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma and A375 melanoma were established to investigate the uptake and clearance kinetics of TNT-1, a monoclonal antibody that targets necrotic cells of tumors. Our data reveal that there was rapid uptake of TNT-1 and its F(ab')2 fragment in both spheroid models, whereas an antibody of irrelevant specificity, Lym-1, and its F(ab')2 fragment bound poorly to the spheroids. Unlike previously reported monoclonal antibodies to tumor cell-surface antigens, TNT-1 showed (1) a linear uptake that increased over time without saturation in tumor spheroids and (2) an unexpected uptake by a subpopulation of cells in the viable outer rim of the spheroids. These preclinical studies provide important information concerning the therapeutic potential of TNT monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer and micrometastases.

  18. Development of controlled release spheroids using natural polysaccharide as release modifier.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Giriraj T; Gowthamarajan, K; Dhobe, Rohan R; Yohanan, Fenni; Suresh, B

    2005-01-01

    A polysaccharide hydrogel was isolated from the seeds of Tamarindus indica (tamarind) and was used as release modifier for the preparation of diclofenac sodium spheroids, using extrusion-spheronization technique. The process was studied for the effect of variables to arrive at spheroids with satisfactory particle shape, size and size-distribution. The prepared spheroids were characterized for surface morphology, qualitative surface porosity, friability, bulk density, and flow properties. The in vitro release studies exhibited a zero-order release kinetics that was confirmed by Higuchi's and Peppas' models. A credible correlation was obtained among swelling index, viscosity, surface roughness of the polysaccharide, and in vitro dissolution profile of the spheroids. In the comparative bioavailability study, we found that the developed spheroids were able to sustain the drug release over 8 hr and could improve the extent of absorption and bioavailability of the drug. PMID:16036714

  19. Brown dwarfs as dark galactic halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Walker, Terry P.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that the dark matter in galactic halos can consist of brown dwarf stars is considered. The radiative signature for such halos consisting solely of brown dwarfs is calculated, and the allowed range of brown dwarf masses, the initial mass function (IMF), the stellar properties, and the density distribution of the galactic halo are discussed. The prediction emission from the halo is compared with existing observations. It is found that, for any IMF of brown dwarfs below the deuterium burning limit, brown dwarf halos are consistent with observations. Brown dwarf halos cannot, however, explain the recently observed near-IR background. It is shown that future satellite missions will either detect brown dwarf halos or place tight constraints on the allowed range of the IMF.

  20. Microlensing, brown dwarfs and Gaia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. W.

    The GAIA satellite can precisely measure the masses of nearby brown dwarfs and lower main sequence stars by the microlensing effect. The scientific yield is maximised if the microlensing event is also followed with ground-based telesecopes to provide densely sampled photometry. There are two possible strategies. First, ongoing events can be triggered by photometric or astrometric alerts by GAIA. Second, events can be predicted using known high proper motion stars as lenses. This is much easier, as the location and time of an event can be forecast. Using the GAIA source density, we estimate that the sample size of high proper motion (>300 mas yr-1) brown dwarfs needed to provide predictable events during the 5 year mission lifetime is surprisingly small, only of the order of tens. This is comparable to the number of high proper motion brown dwarfs already known from the work of the UKIDSS Large Area Survey and the all-sky WISE satellite. Provided the relative parallax of the lens and the angular Einstein radius can be recovered from astrometric data, then the mass of the lens can be found. Microlensing provides the only way of measuring the masses of individual objects irrespective of their luminosity. So, microlensing with GAIA is the best way to carry out an inventory of masses in the solar neighbourhood in the brown dwarf regime.

  1. White dwarfs in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaensicke, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Cataclysmic variables (CVs) provide excellent laboratories to study the effect that the accretion of matter, energy and angular momentum has on the structure of white dwarfs, with important implications on the evolution of these compact binaries, the ignition of thermonuclear surface burning, and potentially their explosion as SNIa. I will provide an overview of our current understanding of CV white dwarfs, with a particular emphasis on the results of a recent large HST program. I will review our knowledge regarding the mass distribution of CV white dwarfs, as well as the secular mean accretion rates that can be inferred from their effective temperatures, and compare those statistics with predictions from CV population models. I will also discuss a sub-set of CVs which underwent thermal-time scale mass transfer, one of the channels that is often discussed as a pathway to SN Ia, and I will illustrate how the study of these "failed SNIa" can contribute to the discussion of SNIa progenitors. Finally, I will discuss the occurrence of non-radial pulsations in white dwarfs, both in CVs and their detached progenitors.

  2. The Physics of White Dwarfs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Hugh M.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the current understanding of the structure and evolution of the white dwarf stars that was gained as a result of the increasingly sensitive and detailed astronomical observations coupled with calculations of the properties of matter under extreme conditions. (Author/GA)

  3. Pulsating Helium Atmosphere White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Judith; Montgomery, Michael H.; Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Shipman, Harry; Nitta, Atsuko; Whole Earth Telescope Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars currently on the main sequence as well as those from earlier generations will or have ended their stellar lives as white dwarf stars. White dwarfs are rich forensic laboratories linking the history and future evolution of our Galaxy. Their structure and atmospheric composition provide evidence of how the progenitors lived, how they evolved, and how they died. This information reveals details of processes governing the behavior of contemporary main sequence stars. Combined with their distribution in luminosity/temperature, white dwarfs strongly constrain models of galactic and cosmological evolution.GD358 is among the brightest (mv =13.7) and best studied of the pulsating white dwarfs. This helium atmoshere pulsator (DBV) has an extensive photometric database spanning 30 years, including nine multisite Whole Earth Telescope campaigns. GD358 exhibits a range of behaviors, from drastic changes in excited pulsation modes to variable multiplet splittings. We use GD358 as a template for an examination of the DBV class, combining photometric results with recent COS spectroscopy. The results present new questions concerning DB formation and evolution.

  4. A Search for Dark Matter Annihilation from Dwarf Galaxies using VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitzer, Ben; VERITAS Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    Current cosmological models and data suggest the existence of a Cold Dark Matter (DM) component, however the nature of DM particles remains unknown. A favored candidate for DM is a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) in the mass range of 50 GeV to greater than 10 TeV. Nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (Dsph) are expected to contain a high density of Dark Matter with a low gamma-ray background, and are thus promising targets for the detection of secondary gamma rays at very high energies (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) through the annihilation of WIMPs into standard model particles. The VERITAS array of Cherenkov Telescopes, sensitive to gamma rays in the 100GeV to 10 TeV range, carries out an extensive observation program of Dsphs. Presented here are results of the observations and new statistical techniques for constraining the dark matter physics from these objects.

  5. Results of two multichord stellar occultations by dwarf planet (1) Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Giacchini, B. L.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Assafin, M.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Sicardy, B.; Timerson, B.; George, T.; Broughton, J.; Blank, T.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Brooks, J.; Dantowitz, R. F.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J. B.; Ellington, C. K.; Emilio, M.; Herpich, F. R.; Jacques, C.; Maley, P. D.; Mehret, L.; Mello, A. J. T.; Milone, A. C.; Pimentel, E.; Schoenell, W.; Weber, N. S.

    2015-08-01

    We report the results of two multichord stellar occultations by the dwarf planet (1) Ceres that were observed from Brazil on 2010 August 17, and from the USA on 2013 October 25. Four positive detections were obtained for the 2010 occultation, and nine for the 2013 occultation. Elliptical models were adjusted to the observed chords to obtain Ceres' size and shape. Two limb-fitting solutions were studied for each event. The first one is a nominal solution with an indeterminate polar aspect angle. The second one was constrained by the pole coordinates as given by Drummond et al. Assuming a Maclaurin spheroid, we determine an equatorial diameter of 972 ± 6 km and an apparent oblateness of 0.08 ± 0.03 as our best solution. These results are compared to all available size and shape determinations for Ceres made so far, and shall be confirmed by the NASA's Dawn space mission.

  6. DISTANCE TO THE SAGITTARIUS DWARF GALAXY USING MACHO PROJECT RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunder, Andrea; Chaboyer, Brian E-mail: brian.chaboyer@dartmouth.edu

    2009-05-15

    We derive the distance to the northern extension of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal galaxy from 203 Sgr RR0 Lyrae stars found in the MACHO database. Their distances are determined differentially with respect to 288 Galactic bulge RR0 Lyrae stars also found in the MACHO data. We find a distance modulus difference of 2.41 mag at l = 5{sup 0} and b = -8{sup 0} and that the extension of the Sgr galaxy toward the galactic plane is inclined toward us. Assuming R {sub GC} = 8 kpc, this implies the distance to these stars is (m - M){sub 0} = 16.97 {+-} 0.07 mag, which corresponds to D = 24.8 {+-} 0.8 kpc. Although this estimate is smaller than previous determinations for this galaxy and agrees with previous suggestions that Sgr's body is truly closer to us, this estimate is larger than studies at comparable galactic latitudes.

  7. A DEEP STUDY OF THE DWARF SATELLITES ANDROMEDA XXVIII AND ANDROMEDA XXIX

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Ho, Nhung

    2015-06-20

    We present the results of a deep study of the isolated dwarf galaxies Andromeda XXVIII and Andromeda XXIX with Gemini/GMOS and Keck/DEIMOS. Both galaxies are shown to host old, metal-poor stellar populations with no detectable recent star formation, conclusively identifying both of them as dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). And XXVIII exhibits a complex horizontal branch morphology, which is suggestive of metallicity enrichment and thus an extended period of star formation in the past. Decomposing the horizontal branch into blue (metal-poor, assumed to be older) and red (relatively more metal-rich, assumed to be younger) populations shows that the metal-rich are also more spatially concentrated in the center of the galaxy. We use spectroscopic measurements of the calcium triplet, combined with the improved precision of the Gemini photometry, to measure the metallicity of the galaxies, confirming the metallicity spread and showing that they both lie on the luminosity–metallicity relation for dwarf satellites. Taken together, the galaxies exhibit largely typical properties for dSphs despite their significant distances from M31. These dwarfs thus place particularly significant constraints on models of dSph formation involving environmental processes such as tidal or ram pressure stripping. Such models must be able to completely transform the two galaxies into dSphs in no more than two pericentric passages around M31, while maintaining a significant stellar population gradient. Reproducing these features is a prime requirement for models of dSph formation to demonstrate not just the plausibility of environmental transformation but the capability of accurately recreating real dSphs.

  8. A Deep Study of the Dwarf Satellites Andromeda XXVIII and Andromeda XXIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Ho, Nhung

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of a deep study of the isolated dwarf galaxies Andromeda XXVIII and Andromeda XXIX with Gemini/GMOS and Keck/DEIMOS. Both galaxies are shown to host old, metal-poor stellar populations with no detectable recent star formation, conclusively identifying both of them as dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). And XXVIII exhibits a complex horizontal branch morphology, which is suggestive of metallicity enrichment and thus an extended period of star formation in the past. Decomposing the horizontal branch into blue (metal-poor, assumed to be older) and red (relatively more metal-rich, assumed to be younger) populations shows that the metal-rich are also more spatially concentrated in the center of the galaxy. We use spectroscopic measurements of the calcium triplet, combined with the improved precision of the Gemini photometry, to measure the metallicity of the galaxies, confirming the metallicity spread and showing that they both lie on the luminosity-metallicity relation for dwarf satellites. Taken together, the galaxies exhibit largely typical properties for dSphs despite their significant distances from M31. These dwarfs thus place particularly significant constraints on models of dSph formation involving environmental processes such as tidal or ram pressure stripping. Such models must be able to completely transform the two galaxies into dSphs in no more than two pericentric passages around M31, while maintaining a significant stellar population gradient. Reproducing these features is a prime requirement for models of dSph formation to demonstrate not just the plausibility of environmental transformation but the capability of accurately recreating real dSphs.

  9. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS AND THE INHOMOGENEOUS CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE CARINA DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Venn, Kim A.; Divell, Mike; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Irwin, Mike J.; Hill, Vanessa; Jablonka, Pascale; Tolstoy, Eline; Lemasle, Bertrand; Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Letarte, Bruno; Baldner, Charles; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Primas, Francesca; Kaufer, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    The detailed abundances of 23 chemical elements in nine bright red giant branch stars in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy are presented based on high-resolution spectra gathered at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and Magellan telescopes. A spherical model atmospheres analysis is applied using standard methods (local thermodynamic equilibrium and plane-parallel radiative transfer) to spectra ranging from 380 to 680 nm. Stellar parameters are found to be consistent between photometric and spectroscopic analyses, both at moderate and high resolution. The stars in this analysis range in metallicity from -2.9 < [Fe/H] <-1.3, and adopting the ages determined by Lemasle et al., we are able to examine the chemical evolution of Carina's old and intermediate-aged populations. One of the main results from this work is the evidence for inhomogeneous mixing in Carina and therefore for a poor statistical sampling of the supernova contributions when forming stars; a large dispersion in [Mg/Fe] indicates poor mixing in the old population, an offset in the [{alpha}/Fe] ratios between the old and intermediate-aged populations (when examined with previously published results) suggests that the second star formation event occurred in {alpha}-enriched gas, and one star, Car-612, seems to have formed in a pocket enhanced in SN Ia/II products. This latter star provides the first direct link between the formation of stars with enhanced SN Ia/II ratios in dwarf galaxies to those found in the outer Galactic halo (Ivans et al.). Another important result is the potential evidence for SN II driven winds. We show that the very metal-poor stars in Carina have not been enhanced in asymptotic giant branch or SN Ia products, and therefore their very low ratios of [Sr/Ba] suggests the loss of contributions from the early SNe II. Low ratios of [Na/Fe], [Mn/Fe], and [Cr/Fe] in two of these stars support this scenario, with additional evidence from the low [Zn/Fe] upper limit for one star. It is

  10. THREE NEW ECLIPSING WHITE-DWARF-M-DWARF BINARIES DISCOVERED IN A SEARCH FOR TRANSITING PLANETS AROUND M-DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Nicholas M.; Kraus, Adam L.; Street, Rachel; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Shporer, Avi; Lister, Tim; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Baranec, Christoph; Bui, Khanh; Davis, Jack T. C.; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nugent, Peter; and others

    2012-10-01

    We present three new eclipsing white-dwarf/M-dwarf binary systems discovered during a search for transiting planets around M-dwarfs. Unlike most known eclipsing systems of this type, the optical and infrared emission is dominated by the M-dwarf components, and the systems have optical colors and discovery light curves consistent with being Jupiter-radius transiting planets around early M-dwarfs. We detail the PTF/M-dwarf transiting planet survey, part of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based box-least-squares search for transits that runs approximately 8 Multiplication-Sign faster than similar algorithms implemented on general purpose systems. For the discovered systems, we decompose low-resolution spectra of the systems into white-dwarf and M-dwarf components, and use radial velocity measurements and cooling models to estimate masses and radii for the white dwarfs. The systems are compact, with periods between 0.35 and 0.45 days and semimajor axes of approximately 2 R{sub Sun} (0.01 AU). The M-dwarfs have masses of approximately 0.35 M{sub Sun }, and the white dwarfs have hydrogen-rich atmospheres with temperatures of around 8000 K and have masses of approximately 0.5 M{sub Sun }. We use the Robo-AO laser guide star adaptive optics system to tentatively identify one of the objects as a triple system. We also use high-cadence photometry to put an upper limit on the white-dwarf radius of 0.025 R{sub Sun} (95% confidence) in one of the systems. Accounting for our detection efficiency and geometric factors, we estimate that 0.08%{sub -0.05%}{sup +0.10%} (90% confidence) of M-dwarfs are in these short-period, post-common-envelope white-dwarf/M-dwarf binaries where the optical light is dominated by the M-dwarf. The lack of detections at shorter periods, despite near-100% detection efficiency for such systems, suggests that binaries including these relatively low-temperature white dwarfs are preferentially found at

  11. Early Gas Stripping as the Origin of the Darkest Galaxies in the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Lucio; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mastropietro, Chiara; Wadsley, James; /McMaster U.

    2007-02-28

    The known galaxies most dominated by dark matter (Draco, Ursa Minor and Andromeda IX) are satellites of the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies. They are members of a class of faint galaxies, devoid of gas, known as dwarf spheroidals, and have by far the highest ratio of dark to luminous matter. None of the models proposed to unravel their origin can simultaneously explain their exceptional dark matter content and their proximity to a much larger galaxy. Here we report simulations showing that the progenitors of these galaxies were probably gas-dominated dwarf galaxies that became satellites of a larger galaxy earlier than the other dwarf spheroidals. We find that a combination of tidal shocks and ram pressure swept away the entire gas content of such progenitors about ten billion years ago because heating by the cosmic ultraviolet background kept the gas loosely bound: a tiny stellar component embedded in a relatively massive dark halo survived until today. All luminous galaxies should be surrounded by a few extremely dark-matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal satellites, and these should have the shortest orbital periods among dwarf spheroidals because they were accreted early.

  12. Early gas stripping as the origin of the darkest galaxies in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Mayer, L; Kazantzidis, S; Mastropietro, C; Wadsley, J

    2007-02-15

    The known galaxies most dominated by dark matter (Draco, Ursa Minor and Andromeda IX) are satellites of the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies. They are members of a class of faint galaxies, devoid of gas, known as dwarf spheroidals, and have by far the highest ratio of dark to luminous matter. None of the models proposed to unravel their origin can simultaneously explain their exceptional dark matter content and their proximity to a much larger galaxy. Here we report simulations showing that the progenitors of these galaxies were probably gas-dominated dwarf galaxies that became satellites of a larger galaxy earlier than the other dwarf spheroidals. We find that a combination of tidal shocks and ram pressure swept away the entire gas content of such progenitors about ten billion years ago because heating by the cosmic ultraviolet background kept the gas loosely bound: a tiny stellar component embedded in a relatively massive dark halo survived until today. All luminous galaxies should be surrounded by a few extremely dark-matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal satellites, and these should have the shortest orbital periods among dwarf spheroidals because they were accreted early.

  13. Faint dwarfs in nearby groups

    SciTech Connect

    Speller, Ryan; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2014-06-20

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to Δm{sub r} ≡ (m{sub r,} {sub sat} – m{sub r,} {sub main}) ∼ 6-8, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead, we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down to Δm{sub r} = 12, 4 mag fainter than most recent studies. We detect an overdensity of objects at separations <400 kpc, corresponding to about 4.6 ± 0.5 satellites per central galaxy, consistent with the satellite abundance expected from the Local Group, given our selection function. Although the sample of satellites detected is incomplete by construction, since it excludes the least and most compact dwarfs, this detection provides a lower bound on the average satellite luminosity function, down to luminosities corresponding to the faintest ''classical'' dwarfs of the Local Group.

  14. RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF A BROWN DWARF BINARY AT THE T DWARF/Y DWARF TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.

    2012-01-20

    We report resolved near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the T8.5 binary WISEP J045853.90+643452.6AB obtained with Keck/NIRC2, Keck/OSIRIS, and the Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. These data confirm common proper and radial motion for the two components, and we see the first indications of orbital motion (mostly radial) for this system. H-band spectroscopy identifies both components as very late type brown dwarfs with strong H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} absorption. The spectrum of WISE J0458+6434B also exhibits a compelling signature of NH{sub 3} absorption over 1.52-1.54 {mu}m when compared to the T9 dwarf UGPS J072227.51-054031.2. Comparison to T8-Y0 spectral standards and H-band spectral indices indicate classifications of T8.5 and T9.5 for these two components, approaching the boundary between the T dwarf and Y dwarf spectral classes.

  15. RADIAL VELOCITY VARIABILITY OF FIELD BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, L.; Mace, G. N.; Rice, E. L.; McLean, I. S.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Burgasser, A. J.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2015-07-20

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity (RV) precision of ∼2 km s{sup −1}, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1σ upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included seven known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant RV variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant fraction of the orbital period. Specialized techniques are required to reach the high precisions sensitive to motion in orbits of very low-mass systems. For eight objects, including six T dwarfs, we present the first published high-resolution spectra, many with high signal to noise, that will provide valuable comparison data for models of brown dwarf atmospheres.

  16. Rotation, oscillation and hydrodynamic synchronization of optically trapped oblate spheroidal microparticles.

    PubMed

    Arzola, Alejandro V; Jákl, Petr; Chvátal, Lukáš; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-06-30

    While the behavior of optically trapped dielectric spherical particles has been extensively studied, the behavior of non-spherical particles remains mainly unexplored. In this work we focus on the dynamics of oblate spheroidal particles trapped in a tightly focused elliptically-polarized vortex beam. In our experiments we used polystyrene spheroids of aspect ratio of major to minor axes equal to 2.55 and of a volume equal to a sphere of diameter 1.7μm. We demonstrate that such particles can be trapped in three dimensions, with the minor axis oriented perpendicular to both the beam polarization (linear) and the beam propagation, can spin in a circularly polarized beam and an optical vortex beam around the axis parallel with the beam propagation. We also observed that these particles can exhibit a periodic motion in the plane transversal to the beam propagation. We measured that the transfer of the orbital angular momentum from the vortex beam to the spheroid gives rise to torques one order of magnitude stronger comparing to the circularly polarized Gaussian beam. We employed a phase-only spatial light modulator to generate several vortex beam traps with one spheroid in each of them. Due to independent setting of beams parameters we controlled spheroids frequency and sense of rotation and observed hydrodynamic phase and frequency locking of rotating spheroids. These optically driven spheroids offer a simple alternative approach to the former techniques based on birefringent, absorbing or chiral microrotors. PMID:24977872

  17. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2014-06-15

    During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  18. Anti-gastric cancer activity in three-dimensional tumor spheroids of bufadienolides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jixia; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Yun; Hou, Tao; Wei, Lai; Qu, Lala; Shi, Liying; Liu, Yanfang; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of cancer cells have been increasingly used to screen anti-tumor compounds, owing to their in vivo like microenvironment and structure as well as compatibility to high-throughput/high-content screening. Here we report the potency and efficacy of a family of bufadienolides to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cell line HGC-27 in three-dimensional (3D) spheroidal models. Examining the morphological and growth patterns of several cell lines in round-bottomed ultra-low attachment microplate suggested that HGC-27 cells formed reproducibly multicellular spheroidal structures. Profiling of 15 natural bufadienolides isolated from toad skin indicated that 8 14-hydroxy bufadienolides displayed inhibitory activity of the growth of HGC-27 spheroids in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, compared to clinical drugs taxol and epirubicin, active bufadienolides were found to penetrate more effectively into the HGC-27 spheroids, but with a narrower effective concentration range and a shorter lasting inhibitory effect. Furthermore, compared to two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer assays, active bufadienolides exhibited weaker efficacy and different potency in 3D spheroid model, demonstrating the great potential of 3D multicellular cell spheroid models in anti-cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:27098119

  19. Anti-gastric cancer activity in three-dimensional tumor spheroids of bufadienolides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jixia; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Yun; Hou, Tao; Wei, Lai; Qu, Lala; Shi, Liying; Liu, Yanfang; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of cancer cells have been increasingly used to screen anti-tumor compounds, owing to their in vivo like microenvironment and structure as well as compatibility to high-throughput/high-content screening. Here we report the potency and efficacy of a family of bufadienolides to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cell line HGC-27 in three-dimensional (3D) spheroidal models. Examining the morphological and growth patterns of several cell lines in round-bottomed ultra-low attachment microplate suggested that HGC-27 cells formed reproducibly multicellular spheroidal structures. Profiling of 15 natural bufadienolides isolated from toad skin indicated that 8 14-hydroxy bufadienolides displayed inhibitory activity of the growth of HGC-27 spheroids in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, compared to clinical drugs taxol and epirubicin, active bufadienolides were found to penetrate more effectively into the HGC-27 spheroids, but with a narrower effective concentration range and a shorter lasting inhibitory effect. Furthermore, compared to two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer assays, active bufadienolides exhibited weaker efficacy and different potency in 3D spheroid model, demonstrating the great potential of 3D multicellular cell spheroid models in anti-cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:27098119

  20. An injectable spheroid system with genetic modification for cell transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Itaka, Keiji; Nomoto, Takahiro; Endo, Taisuke; Matsumoto, Yu; Ishii, Takehiko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    The new methodology to increase a therapeutic potential of cell transplantation was developed here by the use of three-dimensional spheroids of transplanting cells subsequent to the genetic modification with non-viral DNA vectors, polyplex nanomicelles. Particularly, spheroids in regulated size of 100-μm of primary hepatocytes transfected with luciferase gene were formed on the micropatterned culture plates coated with thermosensitive polymer, and were recovered in the form of injectable liquid suspension simply by cooling the plates. After subcutaneously transplanting these hepatocyte spheroids, efficient transgene expression was observed in host tissue for more than a month, whereas transplantation of a single-cell suspension from a monolayer culture resulted in an only transient expression. The spheroid system contributed to the preservation of innate functions of transplanted hepatocytes in the host tissue, such as albumin expression, thereby possessing high potential for expressing transgene. Intravital observation of transplanted cells showed that those from spheroid cultures had a tendency to localize in the vicinity of blood vessels, making a favorable microenvironment for preserving cell functionality. Furthermore, spheroids transfected with erythropoietin-expressing DNA showed a significantly higher hematopoietic effect than that of cell suspensions from monolayer cultures, demonstrating high potential of this genetically-modified spheroid transplantation system for therapeutic applications. PMID:24388386

  1. Fully Automated One-Step Production of Functional 3D Tumor Spheroids for High-Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Monjaret, François; Fernandes, Mathieu; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Argento, Amelie; Degot, Sébastien; Young, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of spheroids within high-content screening (HCS) has lagged behind high-throughput screening (HTS) due to issues with running complex assays on large three-dimensional (3D) structures.To enable multiplexed imaging and analysis of spheroids, different cancer cell lines were grown in 3D on micropatterned 96-well plates with automated production of nine uniform spheroids per well. Spheroids achieve diameters of up to 600 µm, and reproducibility was experimentally validated (interwell and interplate CV(diameter) <5%). Biphoton imaging confirmed that micropatterned spheroids exhibit characteristic cell heterogeneity with distinct microregions. Furthermore, central necrosis appears at a consistent spheroid size, suggesting standardized growth.Using three reference compounds (fluorouracil, irinotecan, and staurosporine), we validated HT-29 micropatterned spheroids on an HCS platform, benchmarking against hanging-drop spheroids. Spheroid formation and imaging in a single plate accelerate assay workflow, and fixed positioning prevents structures from overlapping or sticking to the well wall, augmenting image processing reliability. Furthermore, multiple spheroids per well increase the statistical confidence sufficiently to discriminate compound mechanisms of action and generate EC50 values for endpoints of cell death, architectural change, and size within a single-pass read. Higher quality data and a more efficient HCS work chain should encourage integration of micropatterned spheroid models within fundamental research and drug discovery applications.

  2. Spheroid Formation and Evaluation of Hepatic Cells in a Three-Dimensional Culture Device.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ikeuchi, Masashi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Yagi, Tohru; Hayashi, Shuji

    2015-12-17

    In drug discovery, it is very important to evaluate liver cells within an organism. Compared to 2D culture methods, the development of 3D culture techniques for liver cells has been successful in maintaining long-term liver functionality with the formation of a hepatic-specific structure. The key to performing drug testing is the establishment of a stable in vitro evaluation system. In this article, we report a Tapered Stencil for Cluster Culture (TASCL) device developed to create liver spheroids in vitro. The TASCL device will be applied as a toxicity evaluation system for drug discovery. The TASCL device was created with an overall size of 10 mm × 10 mm, containing 400 microwells with a top aperture (500 µm × 500 µm) and a bottom aperture (300 µm diameter circular) per microwell. We evaluated the formation, recovery, and size of HepG2 spheroids in the TASCL device. The formation and recovery were both nearly 100%, and the size of the HepG2 spheroids increased with an increase in the initial cell seeding density. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the spheroids among the microwells. In addition, the HepG2 spheroids obtained using the TASCL device were alive and produced albumin. The morphology of the HepG2 spheroids was investigated using FE-SEM. The spheroids in the microwells exhibited perfectly spherical aggregation. In this report, by adjusting the size of the microwells of the TASCL device, uniform HepG2 spheroids were created, and the device facilitated more precise measurements of the liver function per HepG2 spheroid. Our TASCL device will be useful for application as a toxicity evaluation system for drug testing. PMID:26858908

  3. Stellar mass functions of galaxies, discs and spheroids at z ˜ 0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanjavur, Karun; Simard, Luc; Bluck, Asa F. L.; Mendel, Trevor

    2016-06-01

    We present the stellar mass functions (SMFs) and mass densities of galaxies, and their spheroid and disc components in the local (z ˜ 0.1) Universe over the range 8.9 ≤ log(M/M⊙) ≤ 12 from spheroid+disc decompositions and corresponding stellar masses of a sample of over 600 000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven spectroscopic sample. The galaxy SMF is well represented by a single Schechter function (M* = 11.116 ± 0.011, α = -1.145 ± 0.008), though with a hint of a steeper faint end slope. The corresponding stellar mass densities are (2.670 ± 0.110), (1.687 ± 0.063) and (0.910 ± 0.029)× 108 M⊙ Mpc-3 for galaxies, spheroids and discs, respectively. We identify a crossover stellar mass of log(M/M⊙) = 10.3 ± 0.030 at which the spheroid and disc SMFs are equal. Relative contributions of four distinct spheroid/disc dominated sub-populations to the overall galaxy SMF are also presented. The mean disc-to-spheroid stellar mass ratio shows a five-fold disc dominance at the low-mass end, decreasing monotonically with a corresponding increase in the spheroidal fraction till the two are equal at a galaxy stellar mass, log(M/M⊙) = 10.479 ± 0.013; the dominance of spheroids then grows with increasing stellar mass. The relative numbers of composite disc and spheroid-dominated galaxies show peaks in their distributions, perhaps indicative of a preferred galaxy mass. Our characterization of the low-redshift galaxy population provides stringent constraints for numerical simulations to reproduce.

  4. TGFβ signaling regulates epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in ovarian cancer ascites-derived spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rafehi, Samah; Ramos Valdes, Yudith; Bertrand, Monique; McGee, Jacob; Préfontaine, Michel; Sugimoto, Akira; DiMattia, Gabriel E; Shepherd, Trevor G

    2016-03-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) serves as a key mechanism driving tumor cell migration, invasion, and metastasis in many carcinomas. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) signaling is implicated in several steps during cancer pathogenesis and acts as a classical inducer of EMT. Since epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells have the potential to switch between epithelial and mesenchymal states during metastasis, we predicted that modulation of TGFβ signaling would significantly impact EMT and the malignant potential of EOC spheroid cells. Ovarian cancer patient ascites-derived cells naturally underwent an EMT response when aggregating into spheroids, and this was reversed upon spheroid re-attachment to a substratum. CDH1/E-cadherin expression was markedly reduced in spheroids compared with adherent cells, in concert with an up-regulation of several transcriptional repressors, i.e., SNAI1/Snail, TWIST1/2, and ZEB2. Treatment of EOC spheroids with the TGFβ type I receptor inhibitor, SB-431542, potently blocked the endogenous activation of EMT in spheroids. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with SB-431542 upon re-attachment enhanced the epithelial phenotype of dispersing cells and significantly decreased cell motility and Transwell migration. Spheroid formation was significantly compromised by exposure to SB-431542 that correlated with a reduction in cell viability particularly in combination with carboplatin treatment. Thus, our findings are the first to demonstrate that intact TGFβ signaling is required to control EMT in EOC ascites-derived cell spheroids, and it promotes the malignant characteristics of these structures. As such, we show the therapeutic potential for targeted inhibition of this pathway in ovarian cancer patients with late-stage disease. PMID:26647384

  5. Spheroid Formation and Evaluation of Hepatic Cells in a Three-Dimensional Culture Device

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ikeuchi, Masashi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Yagi, Tohru; Hayashi, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    In drug discovery, it is very important to evaluate liver cells within an organism. Compared to 2D culture methods, the development of 3D culture techniques for liver cells has been successful in maintaining long-term liver functionality with the formation of a hepatic-specific structure. The key to performing drug testing is the establishment of a stable in vitro evaluation system. In this article, we report a Tapered Stencil for Cluster Culture (TASCL) device developed to create liver spheroids in vitro. The TASCL device will be applied as a toxicity evaluation system for drug discovery. The TASCL device was created with an overall size of 10 mm × 10 mm, containing 400 microwells with a top aperture (500 µm × 500 µm) and a bottom aperture (300 µm diameter circular) per microwell. We evaluated the formation, recovery, and size of HepG2 spheroids in the TASCL device. The formation and recovery were both nearly 100%, and the size of the HepG2 spheroids increased with an increase in the initial cell seeding density. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the spheroids among the microwells. In addition, the HepG2 spheroids obtained using the TASCL device were alive and produced albumin. The morphology of the HepG2 spheroids was investigated using FE-SEM. The spheroids in the microwells exhibited perfectly spherical aggregation. In this report, by adjusting the size of the microwells of the TASCL device, uniform HepG2 spheroids were created, and the device facilitated more precise measurements of the liver function per HepG2 spheroid. Our TASCL device will be useful for application as a toxicity evaluation system for drug testing. PMID:26858908

  6. A Search for Close Red Dwarf-White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Mark R.; Henry, Todd J.; Subasavage, John P.

    2011-08-01

    We propose to observe 59 objects suspected to be red dwarf-white dwarf (RD-WD) binaries with separations < 3 arcsec using the CTIO 1.0m. Our goals are to use images of these objects to both resolve the systems and to obtain accurate BVRI photometry. The systems have been selected based on positions in three different color-color plots using SuperCOSMOS BRI plate photometry and 2MASS JHK photometry in accordance with the positions of known RD-WD binaries. This effort will identify candidates for detailed observations as part of the RECONS astrometric program on the CTIO 0.9m to yield accurate parallaxes and photocentric orbits. The parallaxes will then be used to determine the ages of the systems from WD cooling curves, and the orbits will eventually be used to measure dynamical masses. Ultimately, we aim to increase significantly the number of dynamical masses for white dwarfs because currently only three have been determined to 5% accuracy. The first observational step outlined here will allow us to identify appropriate systems for long-term work. This 1.0m project is likely to become the undergraduate senior thesis work of the PI.

  7. Quantitative Microfluidic Dynamics Of Spheroidal Particles Within Periodic Optical Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Brandon Lee

    2011-12-01

    Over the past 4 decades, research and development of optical manipulation techniques has been primarily focused on observable phenomena. Trapping, sorting, mixing, aligning, and organizing particles---often times spheres on the order of 1 -- 100mum---has been shown by several groups using many different optical trapping and optical potential techniques. However, relatively little been reported on either the quantification of the various forces on the particles or on the theoretical aspects of the motion of the particles. Even less has been reported regarding the theoretical aspects of the motion of non-spherical particles within optical traps and landscapes. It is the objective of this dissertation to address these deficits by means of modeling and experimentally verifying the behavior of particles within periodic optical landscapes. First, we report on our development of a quantifiable analysis of these phenomena by means of a form factor model of spheroidal particle motion in periodic optical landscapes. Using this model, we show that shape does indeed have a quantifiable impact on a particle's motion in an optical landscape. We conclude that a collection of particles will all traverse an optical landscape differently based directly on their respective sizes, refractive indices, and shapes, sometimes with a high degree of dispersion. Next, we report on our development of a second model of spheroidal particle motion in periodic optical landscapes. Based on the T-matrix scattering approach, this model addresses the scattering forces and the electric field polarization effects on the particles' motion. We conclude that as the particle size gets larger, the scattering forces become greater and very quickly rise above an order of magnitude larger than the gradient forces of the optical landscape. Our conclusions provide quantifiable conditions for when scattering forces and electric field-induced torques within an optical landscape are significant and should not be

  8. Electron optics of spheroid charged particle energy analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubric, D.; Kholine, N.; Konishi, I.

    2011-07-01

    A new class of charged particle energy analyzers, spheroid energy analyzers (SEA) that are characterized with very high energy resolution and transmission, is presented. A prototype analyzer was built that has achieved a relative energy resolution of 0.05% at a transmission of 21% out of a 2π steradian. A very high order of focusing of these analyzers is presented via simulation that indicates the existence of 13th order focusing in one of our models. This promises further improvements in energy resolution in future practical analyzer embodiments. A novel geometrical framework is presented, which describes SEA analyzers in general terms within which well known types of analyzers CMA and CHA appear to be only particular examples.

  9. Landslides and Mass shedding on spinning spheroidal asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    Conditions for regolith landslides to occur on spinning, gravitating spheroidal asteroids and their aftermath are studied. These conditions are developed by application of classical granular mechanics stability analysis to the asteroid environment. As part of our study we determine how slopes evolve across the surface of these bodies as a function of spin rate, the dynamical fate of material that exceeds the angle of repose, and an analysis of how the shape of the body may be modified based on these results. We find specific characteristics for body surfaces and shapes when spun near the surface disruption limit and develop what their observable implications are. The small, oblate and rapidly spinning asteroids such as 1999 KW4 Alpha and 2008 EV5 exhibit some of these observable traits. The detailed mechanisms outlined here can also provide insight and constraints on the recently observed active asteroids such as P/2013 P5, and the creation of asteroidal meteor streams.

  10. Spherical and spheroidal shells as models in magnetic detection

    SciTech Connect

    Frumkis, L.; Kaplan, B.Z.

    1999-09-01

    Magnetic detection is a widespread technique utilizing the Earth's magnetic field anomaly measurements in geophysics, in submarine detection, in environmental cleanup, and in detection of other hidden objects. The expressions for the scalar potentials of prolate and oblate spheroidal shells immersed in a dc uniform magnetic field are obtained. The expressions for the induced dipole moment of the shells are also evaluated. The problem is solved by finding solutions for the Laplace equation that satisfy boundary conditions at the shell surfaces. The shell thickness effect on the induced dipole moment and on its orientation are evaluated. The results appear to be useful for the analysis and for the prediction of magnetic signatures of hidden ferromagnetic objects belonging to a relatively large family.

  11. Nonlinear stability analysis of the diffusional spheroidization of rods

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, J.; Hackney, S.A.; Lee, J.K.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental observations have revealed a significant scatter in the spheroidization wavelength in solid rods and rod-shaped inclusions. Using a finite difference method, the role of multiharmonic initial conditions, where the wavelength and amplitude vary with position, is investigated as a cause of the scatter. When the initial amplitude of the radius perturbation is small relative to the radius of the perturbation, the waves with their wavelengths at the maximum growth rate are shown to evolve with little scatter. As the initial amplitude increases, however, a large magnitude of scatter in the growing wavelength is observed due to wave/wave interactions. A simplified, analytical model is also proposed to describe the nonlinear wave/wave interaction between two waves. Based on this model, it is found that the stability of one wave can be affected by the other, and that a new wave can be generated. A wave stability diagram is constructed to predict the stability of a given wave.

  12. Regulation of Multicellular Spheroids by MAPK and FYN Kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey; Ramos, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not progressed significantly in the past 60 years, with 5-year survival remaining at approximately 50%. The epidemic of Human Papilloma Virus and its associated SCC warrants a renewed emphasis on fully understanding this disease. We previously used the 3-dimensional multicellular spheroid (MCS) model system to evaluate SCC behavior more accurately. In this study, we determined that SCC growth in MCS approximates epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Organization of an MCS requires the full-length β6 integrin subunit and its maintenance requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Limiting FYN kinase activation results in the down-regulation of E-cadherin, β-catenin and an increase in expression of N-cadherin and SNAIL. These results indicate that the microenvironment and growth patterns in an MCS are complex and require MAPK and FYN kinase. PMID:27466485

  13. Tensile Forces Originating from Cancer Spheroids Facilitate Tumor Invasion.

    PubMed

    Kopanska, Katarzyna S; Alcheikh, Yara; Staneva, Ralitza; Vignjevic, Danijela; Betz, Timo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tumors and the tumor environment provide important information for the progression and characterization of cancer. Tumors are surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM) dominated by collagen I. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the ECM play an important role for the initial step in the formation of metastasis, presented by the migration of malignant cells towards new settlements as well as the vascular and lymphatic system. The extent of this cell invasion into the ECM is a key medical marker for cancer prognosis. In vivo studies reveal an increased stiffness and different architecture of tumor tissue when compared to its healthy counterparts. The observed parallel collagen organization on the tumor border and radial arrangement at the invasion zone has raised the question about the mechanisms organizing these structures. Here we study the effect of contractile forces originated from model tumor spheroids embedded in a biomimetic collagen I matrix. We show that contractile forces act immediately after seeding and deform the ECM, thus leading to tensile radial forces within the matrix. Relaxation of this tension via cutting the collagen does reduce invasion, showing a mechanical relation between the tensile state of the ECM and invasion. In turn, these results suggest that tensile forces in the ECM facilitate invasion. Furthermore, simultaneous contraction of the ECM and tumor growth leads to the condensation and reorientation of the collagen at the spheroid's surface. We propose a tension-based model to explain the collagen organization and the onset of invasion by forces originating from the tumor. PMID:27271249

  14. Optical forces on a spheroidal microparticle using a classical optics approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa-Martínez, Héctor; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C.

    2009-08-01

    In this study we report a detailed description of the trapping forces exerted on an arbitrary oriented micron-sized dielectric spheroid by means of a counterpropagating dual-beam optical trap with a Gaussian transverse field pattern, using a classical optics approximation. Our analysis includes the calculation of the transverse and axial trapping efficiencies as function of the normalized beam waist separation distance, normalized spheroid size, effective index of refraction of the microparticle and ellipticity of the spheroid. The trapping forces produced are compared with those obtained for spheres.

  15. Motion of a rigid prolate spheroid in a sound wave field.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongkun; Hong, Lianjin

    2014-08-01

    The motions of a rigid and unconstrained prolate spheroid subjected to plane sound waves are computed using preliminary analytic derivation and numerical approach. The acoustically induced motions are found comprising torsional motion as well as translational motion in the case of acoustic oblique incidence and present great relevance to the sound wavelength, body geometry, and density. The relationship between the motions and acoustic particle velocity is obtained through finite element simulation in terms of sound wavelengths much longer than the overall size of the prolate spheroid. The results are relevant to the design of inertial acoustic particle velocity sensors based on prolate spheroids.

  16. A theoretical study of the spheroidal droplet evaporation in forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    In many applications, the shape of a droplet may be assumed to be an oblate spheroid. A theoretical study is conducted on the evaporation of an oblate spheroidal droplet under forced convection conditions. Closed-form analytical expressions of the mass evaporation rate for an oblate spheroid are derived, in the regime of controlled mass-transfer and heat-transfer, respectively. The variation of droplet size during the evaporation process is presented in the regime of shrinking dynamic model. Comparing with the droplets having the same surface area, an increase in the aspect ratio enhances the mass evaporation rate and prolongs the burnout time.

  17. Shape effects on dynamics of inertia-free spheroids in wall turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy; Zhao, Lihao; Andersson, Helge I.

    2015-06-15

    The rotational motion of inertia-free spheroids has been studied in a numerically simulated turbulent channel flow. Although inertia-free spheroids were translated as tracers with the flow, neither the disk-like nor the rod-like particles adapted to the fluid rotation. The flattest disks preferentially aligned their symmetry axes normal to the wall, whereas the longest rods were parallel with the wall. The shape-dependence of the particle orientations carried over to the particle rotation such that the mean spin was reduced with increasing departure from sphericity. The streamwise spin fluctuations were enhanced due to asphericity, but substantially more for prolate than for oblate spheroids.

  18. A theoretical study of hot plasma spheroids in the presence of low-frequency electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadizadeh, Y.; Jazi, B.; Barjesteh, S.

    2016-07-01

    While taking into account thermal motion of electrons, scattering of electromagnetic waves with low frequency from hot plasma spheroids is investigated. In this theoretical research, ions are heavy to respond to electromagnetic fluctuations. The solution of scalar wave equation in spheroidal coordinates for electric potential inside the plasma spheroids are obtained. The variations of resonance frequencies vs. Debye length are studied and consistency between the obtained results in this paper and the results for the well-known plasma objects such as plasma column and spherical plasma have been proved.

  19. Spheroid formation of mesenchymal stem cells on chitosan and chitosan-hyaluronan membranes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Shiang; Dai, Lien-Guo; Yen, Betty L; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2011-10-01

    Stem cells can lose their primitive properties during in vitro culture. The culture substrate may affect the behavior of stem cells as a result of cell-substrate interaction. The maintenance of self-renewal for adult human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by a biomaterial substrate, however, has not been reported in literature. In this study, MSCs isolated from human adipose (hADAS) and placenta (hPDMC) were cultured on chitosan membranes and those further modified by hyaluronan (chitosan-HA). It was observed that the MSCs of either origin formed three-dimensional spheroids that kept attached on the membranes. Spheroid formation was associated with the increased MMP-2 expression. Cells on chitosan-HA formed spheroids more quickly and the size of spheroids were larger than on chitosan alone. The expression of stemness marker genes (Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog) for MSCs on the materials was analyzed by the real-time RT-PCR. It was found that formation of spheroids on chitosan and chitosan-HA membranes helped to maintain the expression of stemness marker genes of MSCs compared to culturing cells on polystyrene dish. The maintenance of stemness marker gene expression was especially remarkable in hPDMC spheroids (vs. hADAS spheroids). Blocking CD44 by antibodies prevented the spheroid formation and decreased the stemness gene expression moderately; while treatment by Y-27632 compound inhibited the spheroid formation and significantly decreased the stemness gene expression. Upon chondrogenic induction, the MSC spheroids showed higher levels of Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II gene expression and were stained positive for glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II. hPDMC had better chondrogenic differentiation potential than hADAS upon induction. Our study suggested that the formation of adhered spheroids on chitosan and chitosan-HA membranes may sustain the expression of stemness marker genes of MSCs and increase their chondrogenic differentiation capacity. The Rho

  20. Differential penetration of targeting agents into multicellular spheroids derived from human neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mairs, R.J.; Angerson, W.J.; Babich, J.W.; Murray, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have used a multicellular tumour spheroid model for determination of the penetration of various targeting agents of potential use in the treatment of neuroblastoma. Both the radiopharmaceutical meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) and the {beta} subunit of nerve growth factor ({beta}-NGF) distributed uniformly throughout spheroids, though the latter was poorly concentrated relative to mIBG. In contrast, the anti-neuroectodermal monoclonal antibody. UJ13A bound only to peripheral cell layers with little accumulation in the spheroid interior. Differential penetration of targeting agents may influence the choice of conjugated radionuclide which is likely to achieve maximum therapeutic benefit.