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Sample records for dried blood specimens

  1. Field Study of Dried Blood Spot Specimens for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Parry, C. M.; Diallo, K.; Mwebaza, S.; Batamwita, R.; DeVos, J.; Bbosa, N.; Lyagoba, F.; Magambo, B.; Jordan, M. R.; Downing, R.; Zhang, G.; Kaleebu, P.; Bertagnolio, S.

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are an alternative specimen type for HIV drug resistance genotyping in resource-limited settings. Data relating to the impact of DBS storage and shipment conditions on genotyping efficiency under field conditions are limited. We compared the genotyping efficiencies and resistance profiles of DBS stored and shipped at different temperatures to those of plasma specimens collected in parallel from patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. Plasma and four DBS cards from anti-coagulated venous blood and a fifth card from finger-prick blood were prepared from 103 HIV patients with a median viral load (VL) of 57,062 copies/ml (range, 1,081 to 2,964,191). DBS were stored at ambient temperature for 2 or 4 weeks or frozen at −80°C and shipped from Uganda to the United States at ambient temperature or frozen on dry ice for genotyping using a broadly sensitive in-house method. Plasma (97.1%) and DBS (98.1%) stored and shipped frozen had similar genotyping efficiencies. DBS stored frozen (97.1%) or at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (93.2%) and shipped at ambient temperature also had similar genotyping efficiencies. Genotyping efficiency was reduced for DBS stored at ambient temperature for 4 weeks (89.3%, P = 0.03) or prepared from finger-prick blood and stored at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (77.7%, P < 0.001) compared to DBS prepared from venous blood and handled similarly. Resistance profiles were similar between plasma and DBS specimens. This report delineates the optimal DBS collection, storage, and shipping conditions and opens a new avenue for cost-saving ambient-temperature DBS specimen shipments for HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) surveillances in resource-limited settings. PMID:24871219

  2. Evaluation of four commercial virological assays for early infant HIV-1 diagnosis using dried blood specimens.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Patricia; Prieto, Luis; Martín, Leticia; Obiang, Jacinta; Avedillo, Pedro; Vargas, Antonio; Rojo, Pablo; Fernández McPhee, Carolina; Sanz Canalejas, Leticia; Benito, Agustín; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2017-01-01

    Early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV-1 is necessary to reduce HIV-related mortality. As maternal antibodies transferred across the placenta may persist up to 18 mo, commercial virological assays (CVAs) are needed. This study compares four CVAs for EID using dried blood specimens (DBS) from HIV-1-exposed infants. DBS from 68 infants born to HIV-1-infected women were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 in Equatorial Guinea. Four CVAs were performed: Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 kPCR assay, Roche CAP/CTM Quantitative Test v2.0, CAP/CTM Qualitative Tests v1.0 and v2.0. Definitive diagnosis was established following World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Two HIV-1-infected infants (2.9%) were detected by the four CVAs while 49 (72%) resulted negative. Discordant results were observed in 17 (25%) infants and HIV-1 infection was excluded in 14 patients when virological and serological testing was performed in additional DBS. Different false-positive rates HIV-1 were observed with Roche assays. CVAs using DBS were useful for EID, although discrepant results were common. Further research is required to reduce false-positive results that could result in wrong diagnosis and unneeded treatment. We propose caution with low viral load (VL) values when using VL assays. Clear guidelines are required for EID of HIV-exposed infants with discrepant virological results.

  3. Levels of Cotinine in Dried Blood Specimens from Newborns as a Biomarker of Maternal Smoking Close to the Time of Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juan; Pearl, Michelle; Jacob, Peyton; DeLorenze, Gerald N.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Yu, Lisa; Havel, Christopher; Kharrazi, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The precise quantitation of smoking during pregnancy is difficult in retrospective studies. Routinely collected blood specimens from newborns, stored as dried blood spots, may provide a low-cost method to objectively measure maternal smoking close to the time of delivery. This article compares cotinine levels in dried blood spots to those in umbilical cord blood to assess cotinine in dried blood spots as a biomarker of maternal smoking close to the time of delivery. The California Genetic Disease Screening Program provided dried blood spots from 428 newborns delivered in 2001–2003 with known umbilical cord blood cotinine levels. Cotinine in dried blood spots was measured in 6.35­-mm punches by using liquid chromatography­–tandem mass spectrometry (quantitation limit, 3.1 ng/mL). Repeated measures of cotinine in dried blood spots were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99, P < 0.001) among 100 dried blood spots with cotinine quantitated in 2 separate punches. Linear regression revealed that cotinine levels in dried blood spots were slightly lower than those in umbilical cord blood and predicted umbilical cord blood cotinine levels well (β = 0.95, R2 = 0.80, and P < 0.001 for both cotinine levels in log10 scale). When defining active smoking as a cotinine level of 10 ng/mL or more and using umbilical cord blood cotinine as the criterion standard, we found that measurements of cotinine in dried blood spots had high sensitivity (92.3%) and specificity (99.7%) in the prediction of maternal active smoking. Cotinine levels in dried blood spots are an accurate biomarker of maternal smoking close to the time of delivery. PMID:24068198

  4. Multicenter evaluation of a fluorometric enzyme immunocapture assay to detect toxoplasma-specific immunoglobulin M in dried blood filter paper specimens from newborns.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, R B; Petersen, E; Seppänen, H; Tuuminen, T

    1996-01-01

    An easy-to-perform fluorometric enzyme immunocapture assay (FEIA) was developed by Labsystems, Helsinki, Finland, to detect toxoplasma-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) in dried blood spots. Assay materials were distributed to two sites that have programs in place designed to identify infants born with congenital toxoplasma infection: the Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark, and the New England Regional Newborn Screening Program, Boston, Mass. Each site tested over 700 dried blood samples from healthy newborns to define a cutoff at the 99.5 percentile (5 enzyme immunounits for Copenhagen and 4 enzyme immunounits for Boston). Each site then applied its own cutoff of interpret results for dried blood spots prepared from either adults with serology suggestive of acute infection (Copenhagen) or infants determined to be congenitally infected on the basis of serological criteria (Boston). In Copenhagen, 35 of 38 adult samples were either positive to a small degree or borderline positive for IgA. These samples thus may not represent acute infection. In Boston, of 26 congenitally infected infants, 22 were positive by FEIA. The four infant specimens not positive by FEIA were either negative or borderline positive by the standard Boston assay. These results demonstrate that the IgM FEIA is a potential alternative to other filter paper assay for toxoplasma-specific IgM currently in use for newborns. PMID:8940462

  5. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M Bradford

    2014-07-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5' and 3' region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5' and 3' proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes.

  6. Comparison of Ahlstrom grade 226, Munktell TFN, and Whatman 903 filter papers for dried blood spot specimen collection and subsequent HIV-1 load and drug resistance genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Rottinghaus, Erin; Bile, Ebi; Modukanele, Mosetsanagape; Maruping, Maruping; Mine, Madisa; Nkengasong, John; Yang, Chunfu

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) collected onto filter paper have eased the difficulty of blood collection in resource-limited settings. Currently, Whatman 903 (W-903) filter paper is the only filter paper that has been used for HIV load and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing. We therefore evaluated two additional commercially available filter papers, Ahlstrom grade 226 (A-226) and Munktell TFN (M-TFN), for viral load (VL) testing and HIVDR genotyping using W-903 filter paper as a comparison group. DBS specimens were generated from 344 adult patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Botswana. The VL was measured with NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v2.0, and genotyping was performed for those specimens with a detectable VL (≥ 2.90 log(10) copies/ml) using an in-house method. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a strong concordance in quantitative VL analysis between W-903 and A-226 (bias = -0.034 ± 0.246 log(10) copies/ml [mean difference ± standard deviation]) and W-903 and M-TFN (bias = -0.028 ± 0.186 log(10) copies/ml) filter papers, while qualitative VL analysis for virological failure determination, defined as a VL of ≥ 3.00 log(10) copies/ml, showed low sensitivities for A-266 (71.54%) and M-TFN (65.71%) filter papers compared to W-903 filter paper. DBS collected on M-TFN filter paper had the highest genotyping efficiency (100%) compared to W-903 and A-226 filter papers (91.7%) and appeared more sensitive in detecting major HIVDR mutations. DBS collected on A-226 and M-TFN filter papers performed similarly to DBS collected on W-903 filter paper for quantitative VL analysis and HIVDR detection. Together, the encouraging genotyping results and the variability observed in determining virological failure from this small pilot study warrant further investigation of A-226 and M-TFN filter papers as specimen collection devices for HIVDR monitoring surveys.

  7. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  8. Measures of Viral Load using Abbott Real-Time HIV-1 Assay on Venous and Fingerstick Dried Blood Spots from Provider-Collected Specimens in Malawian District Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rutstein, Sarah E.; Kamwendo, Deborah; Lugali, Lebah; Thengolose, Isaac; Tegha, Gerald; Fiscus, Susan A.; Nelson, Julie A. E.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Gupta, Sundeep; Chimbwandira, Frank; Mwenda, Reuben; Mataya, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral suppression is a key indicator of antiretroviral therapy (ART) response among HIV-infected patients. Dried blood spots (DBS) are an appealing alternative to conventional plasma-based virologic testing, improving access to monitoring in resource-limited settings. However, validity of DBS obtained from fingerstick in field settings remains unknown. Objectives Investigate feasibility and accuracy of DBS vs plasma collected by healthcare workers in real-world settings of remote hospitals in Malawi. Compare venous DBS to fingerstick DBS for identifying treatment failure. Study design We recruited patients from ART clinics at two district hospitals in Malawi, collecting plasma, venous DBS (vDBS), and fingerstick DBS (fsDBS) cards for the first 149 patients, and vDBS and fsDBS only for the subsequent 398 patients. Specimens were tested using Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay (lower detection limit 40 copies/ml (plasma) and 550 copies/ml (DBS)). Results 21/149 (14.1%) had detectable viremia (>1.6 log copies/ml), 13 of which were detectable for plasma, vDBS, and fsDBS. Linear regression demonstrated high correlation for plasma vs. DBS (vDBS: β=1.19, R2 0.93 (p<0.0001); fsDBS β=1.20, R2 0.90 (p<0.0001)) and vDBS vs. fsDBS (β=0.88, R2 0.73, (p<0.0001)). Mean difference between plasma and vDBS was 0.51 log copies/ml [SD: 0.33] and plasma and fsDBS 0.46 log copies/ml [SD: 0.30]. At 5000 copies/ml, sensitivity was 100%, and specificity was 98.6% and 97.8% for vDBS and fsDBS, respectively, compared to plasma. Conclusions DBS from venipuncture and fingerstick perform well at the failure threshold of 5000 copies/ml. Fingerstick specimen source may improve access to virologic treatment monitoring in resource-limited settings given task-shifting in high-volume, low-resource facilities. PMID:24906641

  9. Effect of lot-to-lot variability in filter paper on the quantification of thyroxin, thyrotropin, and phenylalanine in dried-blood specimens.

    PubMed

    Slazyk, W E; Phillips, D L; Therrell, B L; Hannon, W H

    1988-01-01

    We prepared whole-blood pools to contain various concentrations of phenylalanine (Phe), thyroxin (T4), and thyrotropin (TSH) and applied them to six different lots of Schleicher & Schuell Grade 903 filter paper, two of which represented extremes for serum-absorbancy. Individual measured T4 values showed minimal overlap among all pools for each individual filter-paper lot and for all lots combined, but Phe values overlapped considerably among the high-concentration pools within and among lots. Individual TSH values also showed considerable overlap among the high-concentration pools for all lots combined, but little overlap within each lot. Maximum differences in mean observed values among lots ranged from 6% to 36% for all analytes. Assay results from hemolyzed blood specimens generally were lower than from intact-cell blood specimens for T4 and TSH, but slightly higher for Phe. Maximum among-lot differences in mean values ranged from 13% to 29% for all analytes when each tested lot was used for assay calibration. Lot-to-lot differences in measured values were not strongly related to serum absorbancy values. We conclude that routinely encountered within- and among-lot filter paper variability, as measured by serum-absorbancy, is not alone sufficient to cause gross quantification errors in neonatal screening programs.

  10. An analysis of blood specimen container leakage.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S M; Wardle, J M

    1978-01-01

    Procedures have been designed to test specimen containers for leakage, using blood and aqueous fluorescein solution as indicators. They have been used in a trial evaluation of a number of commercially available containers intended for medical specimens. Glass bijou bottles, evacuated container systems, and several types of plastic container showed no significant leakage rate with either blood or aqueous solution when they were tested at room temperature, but a large proportion of the plastic containers leaked after being subjected to -20 degrees. C. These would thus be suitable and satisfactory for blood count specimens but not for specimens of serum and other body fluids, which are usually stored frozen. With all types of container tested there was spontaneous discharge of contents (blood or aqueous solution) on opening in a proportion of them; thus no container at present available seems to be entirely free from hazard. PMID:711921

  11. Evaluation of the COBAS(®) AmpliPrep/COBAS(®) TaqMan(®) HCV Test v2.0 for HCV viral load monitoring using dried blood spot specimens.

    PubMed

    Marins, Ed G; Bodinaidu, Keerthi; Lin, Matthew; Deforest, Alison

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated the use of dried blood spot (DBS) for HCV viral load quantification using the COBAS(®) AmpliPrep/COBAS(®) Taqman(®) HCV Quantitative Test v2.0 (CAP/CTM HCV v2), and compared two different procedures for preparation of DBS samples with a Specimen Pre-Extraction (SPEX) reagent (either heated [SPEX with SH] for 10min at 56°C on a thermomixer, or incubated for 1h at room temperature [SPEX at RT]) against the standard plasma input. Whole blood specimens from 48 patients with chronic HCV infection and Whatman(®) 903 Protein Saver Cards were used to prepare 35μL DBS. An aliquot of plasma was spun and frozen from each draw. Mean DBS viral load results were compared to the corresponding results from plasma. Correlation between DBS to plasma was linear for both SPEX with SH (R(2)=0.96) and SPEX at RT (R(2)=0.97) procedures, with a constant negative offset of approximately 2.0log10IU/mL between whole blood DBS without any adjustments and plasma results. After volume corrections, the mean offset to plasma decreased to -0.39 and -0.36 for the two procedures, respectively. The study demonstrated the use of DBS for HCV viral load correlates well with plasma with a constant offset. Copyright © 2017 Roche Molecular Systems, Inc. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microwave applications to rock specimen drying in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jihwan; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Microwave heating is the process in which electromagnetic wave with 300 MHz - 300 GHz heats dielectric material. Although in the beginning microwave was mainly used in food industry to cook or heat the food, it soon became clear that microwave had a large potential for other applications. It was thus introduced in geological fields of investigation like mineral processing, oil sand and oil shale extraction, soil remediation, waste treatment. However, the drying techniques using microwave was rarely treated in geology field. According to the ISRM suggested methods, experimental rock specimens in laboratory test were dried in 105°C oven for a period of at least 24 hours. In this method, hot air transmits heats to material by means of thermal conduction, and the heat was transferred from the surface to the inside of the rock specimens. The thermal gradient and moisture gradient can deteriorate the specimens, and energy can be wasted in bulk heating the specimens. The aim of our study was to compare physical property, microstructural property, and energy efficiency between microwave drying method and conventional oven drying method, and to suggest new method for rock drying. Granite, basalt, and sandstone were selected as specimens and were made in cylinder shape with 54 mm diameter. To compare two different methods, one set of saturated specimens were dried in 105°C conventional oven and the other set of saturated specimens were dried in microwave oven. After dried, the specimens were cooled and saturated in 20°C water 48 hours. The saturation-drying were repeated 50 cycles, and the physical property and microstructural property were measured every 10 cycles. Absorption and elastic wave velocity were measured to investigate the change of physical property, and microscope image and X-ray computed tomography image were obtained to investigate the change of microstructural property of rock specimens. The electricity consumption of conventional oven and microwave oven

  13. Morphology of drying blood pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laan, Nick; Smith, Fiona; Nicloux, Celine; Brutin, David; D-Blood project Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Often blood pools are found on crime scenes providing information concerning the events and sequence of events that took place on the scene. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the drying dynamics of blood pools. This study focuses on the drying process of blood pools to determine what relevant information can be obtained for the forensic application. We recorded the drying process of blood pools with a camera and measured the weight. We found that the drying process can be separated into five different: coagulation, gelation, rim desiccation, centre desiccation, and final desiccation. Moreover, we found that the weight of the blood pool diminishes similarly and in a reproducible way for blood pools created in various conditions. In addition, we verify that the size of the blood pools is directly related to its volume and the wettability of the surface. Our study clearly shows that blood pools dry in a reproducible fashion. This preliminary work highlights the difficult task that represents blood pool analysis in forensic investigations, and how internal and external parameters influence its dynamics. We conclude that understanding the drying process dynamics would be advancement in timeline reconstitution of events. ANR funded project: D-Blood Project.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  19. Field evaluation of a broadly sensitive HIV-1 in-house genotyping assay for use with both plasma and dried blood spot specimens in a resource-limited country.

    PubMed

    Inzaule, Seth; Yang, Chunfu; Kasembeli, Alex; Nafisa, Lillian; Okonji, Jully; Oyaro, Boaz; Lando, Richard; Mills, Lisa A; Laserson, Kayla; Thomas, Timothy; Nkengasong, John; Zeh, Clement

    2013-02-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance (HIVDR) assays are important tools in clinical management of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and surveillance of drug-resistant variants at population levels. The high cost associated with commercial assays hinders their use in resource-limited settings. We adopted and validated a low-cost in-house assay using 68 matched plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) samples with a median viral load (VL) of 58,187 copies/ml, ranging from 253 to 3,264,850 against the commercial assay ViroSeq. Results indicated that the in-house assay not only had a higher plasma genotyping rate than did ViroSeq (94% versus 78%) but also was able to genotype 89.5% (51/57) of the matched DBS samples with VLs of ≥ 1,000 copies/ml. The sensitivity in detecting DR mutations by the in-house assay was 98.29% (95% confidence interval [CI], 97.86 to 98.72) on plasma and 96.54 (95% CI, 95.93 to 97.15) on DBS, and the specificity was 99.97% (95% CI, 99.91 to 100.00) for both sample types compared to ViroSeq. The minor DR mutation differences detected by the in-house assay against ViroSeq did not result in clinical significance. In addition, cost analysis showed that the in-house assay could reduce the genotyping cost by about 60% for both plasma and DBS compared to ViroSeq. This field condition evaluation highlights the potential utility of a cost-effective, subtype-independent, in-house genotyping assay using both plasma and DBS specimens for HIVDR clinical monitoring and population-based surveillance in resource-limited settings.

  20. Field Evaluation of a Broadly Sensitive HIV-1 In-House Genotyping Assay for Use with both Plasma and Dried Blood Spot Specimens in a Resource-Limited Country

    PubMed Central

    Inzaule, Seth; Yang, Chunfu; Kasembeli, Alex; Nafisa, Lillian; Okonji, Jully; Oyaro, Boaz; Lando, Richard; Mills, Lisa A.; Laserson, Kayla; Thomas, Timothy; Nkengasong, John

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance (HIVDR) assays are important tools in clinical management of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and surveillance of drug-resistant variants at population levels. The high cost associated with commercial assays hinders their use in resource-limited settings. We adopted and validated a low-cost in-house assay using 68 matched plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) samples with a median viral load (VL) of 58,187 copies/ml, ranging from 253 to 3,264,850 against the commercial assay ViroSeq. Results indicated that the in-house assay not only had a higher plasma genotyping rate than did ViroSeq (94% versus 78%) but also was able to genotype 89.5% (51/57) of the matched DBS samples with VLs of ≥1,000 copies/ml. The sensitivity in detecting DR mutations by the in-house assay was 98.29% (95% confidence interval [CI], 97.86 to 98.72) on plasma and 96.54 (95% CI, 95.93 to 97.15) on DBS, and the specificity was 99.97% (95% CI, 99.91 to 100.00) for both sample types compared to ViroSeq. The minor DR mutation differences detected by the in-house assay against ViroSeq did not result in clinical significance. In addition, cost analysis showed that the in-house assay could reduce the genotyping cost by about 60% for both plasma and DBS compared to ViroSeq. This field condition evaluation highlights the potential utility of a cost-effective, subtype-independent, in-house genotyping assay using both plasma and DBS specimens for HIVDR clinical monitoring and population-based surveillance in resource-limited settings. PMID:23224100

  1. Measurement of blood glucose: comparison between different types of specimens.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Bendix; Lindström, J; Sundvall, J; Borch-Johnsen, K; Tuomilehto, J

    2008-03-01

    To provide conversion formulae between measurements based on different specimens in use in epidemiological studies and clinical practice, and to evaluate the relative precision for the different methods. The current guidelines emphasize the use of venous plasma for determining glucose concentration. Nevertheless, the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines provide cut-off points for different specimens for the determination of the glucose concentration in circulating blood (venous plasma, whole blood, serum and capillary blood). There is a lack of data about the comparability between the values obtained by using different specimens. Eleven different combinations of specimens and methods of measurement of blood glucose were used in 294 blood samples from 74 subjects. The methods were grouped by the specimen used for analysis (venous plasma, whole blood, serum and capillary blood). The result of the analysis is a set of linear equations allowing conversion of the result from one specimen or method to another. Furthermore, it was estimated how much of the variation for each method can be attributed to laboratory variance. Measurements based on capillary blood had a very large variability compared with other methods. Measurements based on venous whole blood tended to give results 0.5 mmol/L lower than other methods. Our data indicate that the current diagnostic cut-off points, as recommended by WHO for non-plasma specimens, are not fully compatible and may differ as much as 0.5 mmol/L between specimens.

  2. Drone Transport of Microbes in Blood and Sputum Laboratory Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Street, Jeff; Carroll, Karen; Miller, Heather; Zhang, Sean X.

    2016-01-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) could potentially be used to transport microbiological specimens. To examine the impact of UAVs on microbiological specimens, blood and sputum culture specimens were seeded with usual pathogens and flown in a UAV for 30 ± 2 min. Times to recovery, colony counts, morphologies, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identifications of the flown and stationary specimens were similar for all microbes studied. PMID:27535683

  3. Drone Transport of Microbes in Blood and Sputum Laboratory Specimens.

    PubMed

    Amukele, Timothy K; Street, Jeff; Carroll, Karen; Miller, Heather; Zhang, Sean X

    2016-10-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) could potentially be used to transport microbiological specimens. To examine the impact of UAVs on microbiological specimens, blood and sputum culture specimens were seeded with usual pathogens and flown in a UAV for 30 ± 2 min. Times to recovery, colony counts, morphologies, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identifications of the flown and stationary specimens were similar for all microbes studied.

  4. Molecular sex identification of dry human teeth specimens from Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Zagga, AD; Ahmed, H. OON; Ismail, SM; Tadros, AA

    2014-01-01

    Background: The advent of molecular techniques has revolutionized the ability of scientists to estimate the sex of individuals. Forensic odontology plays an important role in establishing the sex of victims with bodies mutilated beyond recognition due to major disaster. The genetic difference between males and females is defined by the presence or absence of the Y-chromosome. The use of alphoid-repeat primers in sex estimation was first applied on dried blood. Generally, the X, Y alphoid repeats blind test attest to the accuracy of genetic testing, and also point the potential for occasional error in morphometric sexing. Aim: To estimate genetic sex of dry human teeth specimens from Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A single-blind study of DNA analysis for sex estimation of nine dry human teeth specimens from Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria, through PCR, using alphoid repeats primers, was undertaken. Results: The genetic sex of each group of the teeth samples were accurately (100%) identified. For each group of teeth, PCR Sensitivity = 100%, Specificity = 0%, Predictive value of positive test = 100%, Predictive value of negative test = 0%, False positive rate = 0%, False negative rate = 0%, Efficiency of test = 100%. Fisher's exact probability test P = 1. Z-test: z- and P values were invalid. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated the successful use of alphoid-repeat primers in genetic sex identification of human dry teeth samples from Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria. This is the first known study estimating the sex of human dry teeth specimens by means of PCR in Nigeria. There is need for further studies in Nigeria to complement the findings of this study. PMID:25125922

  5. Spectral transmission by the specimens of blood-glucose mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Elena K.; Korolevich, Alexander N.

    2006-08-01

    Influence of glucose addition to specimens of diluted blood on the transmission spectrums have been investigated by experimentally and by the simulation. The coefficients of extinction, scattering and absorption of erythrocytes were calculated with using Mie theory for spherical particles of equal volume. Transmission spectrums were measured with the spectrophotometer Cary500 in the wavelength range 460-860 nm. Specimens of liquid for imbedding of erythrocytes were preparing by mixing blood plasma and 50-% glucose solution with the different concentrations. The volume concentrations (hematocrit) of red blood cells (RBC) were maintained to have the same values in all specimens by adding equal volume of whole blood to immersion liquid of equal volumes. It has been shown that transmission is decreasing for all wavelengths with the addition of glucose solution on condition that the volume concentrations less than 0.35-0.4. The subsequent increase of the glucose concentration results in increasing of spectral transmission.

  6. Collecting factors related to the haemolysis of blood specimens.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Fang, Shu-Hui; Chung, Yun-Ho; Chien, Shang-Tao

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore the collecting factors for the haemolysis of the blood specimens in a regional hospital in South Taiwan. Blood collecting is one of the most common procedures used in hospital. However, it often faces the risk of haemolysis of blood specimens during laboratory testing and the specimens collected can be easily rejected by the laboratory. This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study. The purposive samples were collected from the blood specimens of the hospitalized patients or the emergency-room patients by using structured observational checklists which included demographic characteristics, caring factors and material factors. A total of 274 blood specimens was collected. Specimens obtained from non-antecubital sites were 3.35 times at risk of haemolysis as many as those from antecubital sites (p = 0.001). Blood collected into tubes through steel needles were 3.7 times more at risk of haemolysis as that through syringes (after removing needles) (p = 0.002). Specimens delivered by ward assistants were 8.7 times more at risk for haemolysis as those by the laboratory staff (p < 0.01). These findings suggest that nurse supervisors establish a protocol related to preventing haemolysis. Future research should explore the effectiveness of this protocol to verify the relationship between different gauges of steel needles or catheters and haemolysis. Nurse educators are encouraged to include the factors affecting and preventing haemolysis into the in service education. Therefore, findings may assist healthcare professionals in minimizing the risk of haemolysis and improve the quality of care.

  7. Innovation for reducing blood culture contamination: initial specimen diversion technique.

    PubMed

    Patton, Richard G; Schmitt, Timothy

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesized that diversion of the first milliliter of venipuncture blood-the initial specimen diversion technique (ISDT)-would eliminate incompletely sterilized fragments of skin from the culture specimen and significantly reduce our blood culture contamination rate (R). We studied our hypothesis prospectively beginning with our control culture (C) definition: one venipuncture with two sequentially obtained specimens, 10 ml each, the first specimen (M1) for aerobic and the second (M2) for anaerobic media. The test ISDT culture (D) was identical, with the exception that each was preceded by diverting a 1-ml sample (DS) from the same venipuncture. During the first of two sequential 9-month periods, we captured D versus C data (n=3,733), where DMXR and CMXR are R for D and C specimens. Our hypothesis predicted DS would divert soiled skin fragments from DM1, and therefore, CM1R would be significantly greater than DM1R. This was confirmed by CM1R (30/1,061 [2.8%]) less DM1R (37/2,672 [1.4%]; P=0.005), which equals 1.4%. For the second 9-month follow-up period, data were compiled for all cultures (n=4,143), where ADMXR is R for all (A) diversion specimens, enabling comparison to test ISDT. Our hypothesis predicted no significant differences for test ISDT versus all ISDT. This was confirmed by DM1R (37/2,672 [1.4%]) versus ADM1R (42/4,143 [1.0%]; P=0.17) and DM2R (21/2,672 [0.80%]) versus ADM2R (39/4,143 [0.94%]; P=0.50). We conclude that our hypothesis is valid: venipuncture needles soil blood culture specimens with unsterilized skin fragments and increase R, and ISDT significantly reduces R from venipuncture-obtained blood culture specimens.

  8. Assessment of viable bacteria and bacterial DNA in blood and bloodstain specimens stored under various conditions.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa-Muto, Junji; Fujinami, Yoshihito; Mizuno, Natsuko

    2013-11-01

    Microbial forensic specimens that are collected at biocrime and bioterrorism scenes include blood, tissue, cloths containing biological fluids, swabs, water, soil, and aerosols. It is preferable that pathogens in such specimens are alive and kept in a steady state. Specimens may be stored for a prolonged period before analysis; therefore, it is important to understand the effect of the storage conditions on the pathogens contained within the specimens. In this study, we prepared blood and bloodstain specimens containing Gram-negative or -positive bacteria, stored the samples for 482 days under various conditions, and measured viable bacterial counts and total bacterial contents in the samples. Viable bacteria were preserved well in the samples stored at -30 and -80 °C, but were diminished or undetectable in the samples stored at 4 °C and room temperature. The total bacterial content was maintained in the blood samples stored at -30 and -80 °C and in the bloodstain samples stored under all temperature conditions, but decreased in the blood samples stored at 4 °C and room temperature. This study showed that the storage conditions affected viable bacteria and bacterial DNA and that freezing and drying were significant for their long-term storage. We provide important information for the storage of microbial forensic specimens.

  9. Peptidomic analysis of human blood specimens: comparison between plasma specimens and serum by differential peptide display.

    PubMed

    Tammen, Harald; Schulte, Imke; Hess, Rudiger; Menzel, Christoph; Kellmann, Markus; Mohring, Thomas; Schulz-Knappe, Peter

    2005-08-01

    The human Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase aims to analyze serum and plasma specimens to elucidate specimen characteristics by various proteomic techniques to ensure sufficient sample quality for the HUPO main phase. We used our proprietary peptidomics technologies to analyze the samples distributed by HUPO. Peptidomics summarizes technologies for visualization, quantitation, and identification of the low-molecular-weight proteome (<15 kDa), the "peptidome." We analyzed all four HUPO specimens (EDTA plasma, citrate plasma, heparin plasma, and serum) from African- and Asian-American donors and compared them to in-house collected Caucasian specimens. One main finding focuses on the most suitable method of plasma specimen collection. Gentle platelet removal from plasma samples is beneficial for improved specificity. Platelet contamination or activation of platelets by low temperature prior to their removal leads to distinct and multiple peptide signals in plasma samples. Two different specimen collection protocols for platelet-poor plasma are recommended. Further emphasis is placed on the differences between plasma and serum on a peptidomic level. A large number of peptides, many of them in rather high abundance, are only present in serum and not detectable in plasma. This ex vivo generation of multiple peptides hampers discovery efforts and is caused by a variety of factors: the release of platelet-derived peptides, other peptides derived from cellular components or the clot, enzymatic activities of coagulation cascades, and other proteases. We conclude that specimen collection is a crucial step for successful peptide biomarker discovery in human blood samples. For analysis of the low-molecular-weight proteome, we recommend the use of platelet-depleted EDTA or citrate plasma.

  10. Scoring System for Detecting Spurious Hemolysis in Anticoagulated Blood Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Gilsung; Kim, Juwon; Yoon, Kwang Ro; Park, Soon Deok; Yoon, Kap Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background The identification of in vitro hemolysis (IVH) using a hematology analyzer is challenging because centrifugation of the specimens cannot be performed for cell counts. In the present study, we aimed to develop a scoring system to help identify the presence of hemolysis in anticoagulated blood specimens. Methods Thirty-seven potassium EDTA anticoagulated blood specimens were obtained, and each specimen was divided into 3 aliquots (A, B, and C). Aliquots B and C were mechanically hemolyzed by aspirating 2 and 5 times, respectively, using a 27-gauge needle and then tested; aliquot A was analyzed immediately without any hemolysis. After the cells were counted, aliquots B and C were centrifuged and the supernatants were tested for the hemolytic index and lactate dehydrogenase levels. Results The 4 hematologic parameters were selected and scored from 0 to 3 as follows:< 34.0, 34.0-36.2, 36.3-38.4, and ≥38.5 for mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC, g/dL); <0.02, 0.02, 0.03, and ≥0.04 for red blood cell ghosts (1012/L); <0.13, 0.13-0.38, 0.39-1.30, and ≥1.31 for difference value (g/dL) of measured hemoglobin and calculated hemoglobin; and <0.26, 0.26-0.95, 0.96-3.34, and ≥3.35 for difference value (g/dL) of MCHC and cell hemoglobin concentration mean. The hemolysis score was calculated by adding all the scores from the 4 parameters. At the cutoff hemolysis score of 3, the IVH of aliquots B and C were detected as 64.9% and 91.9%, respectively. Conclusions The scoring system might provide effective screening for detecting spurious IVH. PMID:25932443

  11. Therapy monitoring in congenital adrenal hyperplasia by dried blood samples.

    PubMed

    Wieacker, Isabelle; Peter, Michael; Borucki, Katrin; Empting, Susann; Roehl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Mohnike, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    Careful monitoring of the therapy is crucial for patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in order to prevent the effects of increased androgen production as well as life-threatening salt-wasting crisis. The key metabolite, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) can be detected in serum, saliva or dried blood. In clinical practice there are challenges due to discomfort of venous blood sampling and complicated retrieval of saliva during infancy. Furthermore, the immunoassay method is limited in its specificity due to cross-reactions. In this observational study we prospectively examined over a period of 5 years, 20 patients with CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency using standard immunoassays for serum samples (radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassay) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in dried blood spots. Bland-Altman plots show goodness of agreement between both the methods for the desirable therapeutic concentration range of 17-OHP. LC-MS/MS is characterized by a high accuracy in the therapeutic concentration range of 17-OHP <100 nmol/L (r=0.91). Dried blood samples are convenient and reliable specimen for 17-OHP measured by LC-MS/MS. This method could be used for home monitoring of hydrocortisone replacement therapy both in salt-waster and simple virilizer CAH.

  12. Critical point drying for scanning electron microscopy: a semi-automatic method of preparing biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Hall, D J; Skerrett, E J; Thomas, W D

    1978-08-01

    Slow, controlled, rates of critical point bomb heating and of gas venting have been shown to improve the preservation of biological specimens in critical point drying. A procedure that represents a balance between avoidance of specimen damage and speed of operation has been developed for use with CO2 as the transitional fluid. Bomb heating is automated and controlled electronically, and manual venting of the gaseous CO2 is monitored using a gas flow meter.

  13. Effects of drying conditions, admixtures and specimen size on shrinkage strains

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saleh, Saleh A. . E-mail: alsaleh@dr.com; Al-Zaid, Rajeh Z.

    2006-10-15

    The paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the effects of drying conditions, specimen size and presence of plasticizing admixture on the development of shrinkage strains. The measurements are taken in a harsh (50 deg. C and 5% R.H.) and a moderate environment (28 deg. C and 50% R.H.). The results include strain development at various levels of cross sections of concrete prisms. The drying conditions are found to be the dominant parameter affecting the shrinkage strain development particularly in specimens of smaller sizes. The effect of plasticizing admixture on shrinkage strains is negligible.

  14. Liquid substitution: a versatile procedure for SEM specimen preparation of biological materials without drying or coating.

    PubMed

    Ensikat, H J; Barthlott, W

    1993-12-01

    Certain liquids with a very low vapour pressure, such as glycerol or triethylene glycol, can be used to infiltrate biological specimens so that they may be observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) without drying. The conductive properties of the fluids allow specimens to be examined either uncoated or with very thin coatings. The advantages of liquid substitution include the retention of lipids, waxes, loose particles, and surface contaminants. Since the procedure does not require expensive equipment, it offers an alternative to critical point drying or cryopreparation. For certain types of specimens, liquid substitution may represent the best preparation procedure. In addition, the fluids themselves may be imaged directly in the SEM, or indirectly by cathodoluminescence following labelling with fluorochromes.

  15. Design and implementation of an external quality assessment program for HIV viral load measurements using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Prach, Lisa M; Puren, Adrian; Lippman, Sheri A; Carmona, Sergio; Stephenson, Sophie; Cutler, Ewalde; Barnhart, Scott; Liegler, Teri

    2015-03-01

    An external quality assurance program was developed for HIV-1 RNA viral load measurements taken from dried blood spots using a reference panel and field-collected specimens. The program demonstrated that accurate and reproducible quantitation can be obtained from field-collected specimens. Residual proviral DNA may confound interpretation in virologically suppressed subjects.

  16. Design and Implementation of an External Quality Assessment Program for HIV Viral Load Measurements Using Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Prach, Lisa M.; Puren, Adrian; Lippman, Sheri A.; Carmona, Sergio; Stephenson, Sophie; Cutler, Ewalde; Barnhart, Scott

    2014-01-01

    An external quality assurance program was developed for HIV-1 RNA viral load measurements taken from dried blood spots using a reference panel and field-collected specimens. The program demonstrated that accurate and reproducible quantitation can be obtained from field-collected specimens. Residual proviral DNA may confound interpretation in virologically suppressed subjects. PMID:25520449

  17. Cross-reactivity of tapentadol specimens with DRI methadone enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ayodele A; Merritt, A Paola; Bourland, James A

    2012-10-01

    A substantial incidence of positive methadone screens for pain management urine specimens using a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was observed in the absence of a methadone prescription, with negative methadone confirmation by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS). Tapentadol was the only common prescription among the investigated specimens. Tapentadol or one of its three major metabolites was tested at various concentrations (100-200,000 ng/mL) against the DRI EIAs for methadone and methadone metabolite, to evaluate cross-reactivity. Ninety-seven authentic tapentadol urine specimens that produced false-positive methadone EIA results (cutoff = 130 ng/mL) were analyzed for methadone and tapentadol in compound-specific UPLC-MS-MS confirmation tests. Tapentadol, tapentadol glucuronide, tapentadol sulfate and N-desmethyltapentadol exhibited cross-reactivity with the methadone EIA at 6,500 (2.2%), 25,000 (0.6%), 3,000 (4.4%) and 20,000 ng/mL (0.9%), respectively. No cross-reactivity was observed with the methadone metabolite 2-ethylidine-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine EIA. All authentic urine specimens were confirmed to be negative for methadone, but positive for tapentadol and all monitored metabolites. Individual concentrations indicated that separate or combined urinary concentrations of tapentadol and its conjugates may produce false-positive methadone screens through cross-reactivity with the methadone immunoassay. The potential for false-positive results for methadone EIA screening of urine specimens associated with tapentadol prescriptions should be considered when interpreting results.

  18. Ancient pathogens in museal dry bone specimens: analysis of paleocytology and aDNA.

    PubMed

    Gaul, Johanna Sophia; Winter, Eduard; Grossschmidt, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Bone samples investigated in this study derive from the pathologic-anatomical collection of the Natural History Museum of Vienna. In order to explore the survival of treponemes and treponemal ancient DNA in museal dry bone specimens, we analyzed three individuals known to have been infected with Treponema pallidum pallidum. No reproducible evidence of surviving pathogen's ancient DNA (aDNA) was obtained, despite the highly sensitive extraction and amplification techniques (TPP15 and arp). Additionally, decalcification fluid of bone sections was smear stained with May-Gruenwald-Giemsa. The slides were examined using direct light microscope and dark field illumination. Remnants of spirochetal structures were detectable in every smear. Our results demonstrate that aDNA is unlikely to survive, but spirochetal remains are stainable and thus detectable.

  19. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-15

    instructed not to consume any alcohol -containing beverage during the period from seven days prior to phlebotomy to the completion of the follow-up...over the heart, spleen and liver at 4 hours and 24 hours post-infusion to determine the organ distribution of the radiolabeled reconstituted red blood...cells. 4. External probe counts taken over the heart, liver and spleen to determine the distribution of the lyophilized red blood cells at 4 hours and

  20. The Clinical Significance of Patient Specimen Transport Modality: Pneumatic Tube System Impact on Blood Gas Analytes.

    PubMed

    Carabini, Louanne M; Nouriel, Jacob; Milian, Ricardo Diaz; Glogovsky, Erin R; McCarthy, Robert J; Handler, Thomas G; Ault, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    A pneumatic tube system (PTS) is a cost-effective, rapid transport modality that utilizes induced pressure changes. We evaluated the clinical importance of 2 transport modalities, human courier and PTS, for blood gas specimens. Following open heart surgery, 35 simultaneous pairs of arterial and venous blood gas specimens were analyzed from 20 subjects. Of each pair, one specimen was transported to the blood gas laboratory via a human courier and the other via a SwissLog PTS. Transport modalities were compared using the Bland-Altman limits of agreement method. Compared with the walked specimen, the bias for PaO2 was -8.0 mm Hg (95% CI, -40.0 to 24.5 mm Hg); PaCO2 , -0.94 mm Hg (95% CI, -3.76 to 1.86 mm Hg); PvO2 , -0.60 mm Hg (95% CI, -6.90 to 5.70 mm Hg); PvCO2 , -0.58 mm Hg (95% CI, -3.12 to 1.92 mm Hg) for the PTS specimen. The difference in the PO2 and PCO2 of paired (walked vs tubed) arterial and venous blood gas specimens demonstrated a slight bias. PaO2 values demonstrated the greatest bias, however not clinically important. Thus, PTS transport does not impact clinical interpretations of blood gas values. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  1. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-15

    chromium labelled mRBC via an intravenous catheter in the peripheral saphenous vein . Following administration of labelled mRBC into each monkey, 0.2ml...with a single dose of autologous , lyophilized and reconstituted, 5 1Cr-labelled packed erythrocytes via an intravenous catheter in a peripheral vein ...study site, at which time a 25 ml aliquot of reconstituted 51-Cr labeled autologous red blood cells will be infused intravenously into a large arm vein

  2. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-12

    cells with 5 1Cr sodium chromate, collection of urine and peripheral blood samples, 5 1Cr organ uptake, whole body gamma imaging, and calculation of whole...7. Subject does not have a history of: - Renal disorders or BUN, creatinine, uric acid, sodium , potassium or chloride values outside the...uric acid, calcium, inorganic phosphorus, glucose, sodium , potassium, chloride, bicarbonate. Coagulation: prothrombin time (subject and control) and

  3. Effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in forensic drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    In forensic drug testing, it is important to immediately take biological specimens from suspects and victims to prove their drug intake. We evaluated the effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in terms of ease of sampling, drug detection sensitivity, and drug detection periods for each specimen type. After four commercially available pharmaceutical products were administered to healthy subjects, each in a single dose, their urine, blood, saliva, and fingerprints were taken at predetermined sampling times over approximately four weeks. Fourteen analytes (the administered drugs and their main metabolites) were extracted from each specimen using simple pretreatments, such as dilution and deproteinization, and were analyzed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Most of the analytes were detected in saliva and fingerprints, as well as in urine and blood. The time-courses of drug concentrations were similar between urine and fingerprints, and between blood and saliva. Compared to the other compounds, the acidic compounds, for example ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid, were more difficult to detect in all specimens. Acetaminophen, dihydrocodeine, and methylephedrine were detected in fingerprints at later sampling times than in urine. However, a relationship between the drug structures and their detection periods in each specimen was not found. Saliva and fingerprints could be easily sampled on site without using special techniques or facilities. In addition, fingerprints could be immediately analyzed after simple and rapid treatment. In cases where it would be difficult to immediately obtain urine and blood, saliva and fingerprints could be effective alternative specimens for drug testing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Surface fixation of dried blood by glutaraldehyde and peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Bloss, R; Martiny, H

    2004-06-01

    The difficulties of successful prion inactivation by chemical agents has led to changes in recommendations regarding the reprocessing of instruments including flexible endoscopes. One of the changes is the preference for peracetic acid instead of glutaraldehyde in order to avoid fixation of organic material, but the surface fixation by various active agents has not been fully investigated. We used a standardized amount of dried blood soil on metal carriers (on average 22 mg). One part of the carriers was exposed to different disinfectants (four based on peracetic acid, three based on glutaraldehyde, two based on quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC), one based on QAC and amines, one based on phenols and one cleaning agent) and air dried. The difference compared with the non-exposed soiled carrier was taken as the measure of blood removal by exposure to the disinfectants. In addition the other part of the carriers was exposed to a cleaning agent and air dried. The cleaning agent itself was capable of removing more than 99% of the dried blood and served as a control for non-fixation. The rate of fixation of dried blood was calculated as the ratio of the weight of residual soil on 'soiled, disinfected and cleaned' carriers and on 'soiled and disinfected' carriers. All experiments were repeated eight times. Blood removal varied between 90.3% +/- 1.5% (phenol-based disinfectant) and < 10% (glutaraldehyde-based preparations). Fixation of the remainder was between 76.9 +/- 8.4% and 102.5 +/- 1.1% with glutaraldehyde and between 19.2% +/- 3.3% and 78.1% +/- 2.4% with peracetic acid. No other preparations showed a potential for blood fixation (< 1.3%). Our findings underline the potential for blood fixation, not only by glutaraldehyde, but also by peracetic acid, and support the evidence that effective cleaning should precede the chemical disinfection.

  5. Impact of internal standard addition on dried blood spot analysis in bioanalytical method development.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Roland; Hooff, Gero; van Huizen, Nick; Gruters, Rob; Luider, Theo

    2011-10-01

    Addition of internal standards to dried blood spot (DBS) specimens can be complicated. Therefore, we studied the feasibility of different internal standard addition procedures. Nevirapine and its stable-isotope analogue were used as model compounds and concentrations in DBS specimen were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring. The addition procedure of the stable isotope-labeled internal standard had significant impact on observed nevirapine concentrations. Relative recovery rates depending on the internal standard addition procedure ranged between 11.4 and 107.9%. Experiments with different punch sizes (5 and 7 mm diameter) showed no significant influence on observed nevirapine concentrations. Application of internal standard prior to blood spotting provided good nevirapine recoveries and this procedure is well suited for applying DBS in infectious diseases, especially in HIV-infection treatment.

  6. Use of a pneumatic tube system for delivery of blood bank products and specimens.

    PubMed

    Tanley, P C; Wallas, C H; Abram, M C; Richardson, L D

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pneumatic tube transport on blood bank specimens and products. No important differences were found between aliquots transported in the tube system and those stored in the laboratory as controls. ABO, Rh, antibody detection or identification, direct antiglobulin testing, and elution were studied. Further, no differences in plasma hemoglobin and potassium concentration were found between units of whole blood and packed cells handled in either manner. Platelet counts in platelet concentrates were not decreased and coagulation factor levels in units of fresh-frozen plasma and cryoprecipitate did not decrease after pneumatic transport. The system tested is currently providing expeditious transport of specimens and blood between blood banks and patient care areas.

  7. Implementation of a two-specimen requirement for verification of ABO/Rh for blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence T; Viele, Maurene; Fontaine, Magali J; Jurado, Christine; Stone, Nancy; Quach, Peter; Chua, Lee; Chin, Mei-Ling; Scott, Robert; Tokareva, Irina; Tabb, Kevin; Sharek, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    This study presents our implementation of a two-specimen requirement with no prior record of ABO/Rh to verify patients' blood type before transfusion. Blood type verification was introduced, discussed, approved, and implemented over a 12-month period (May 2007 to May 2008). Potential barriers and impact on benchmark indicators were identified and tracked. Inpatient identification and/or specimen labeling for nursing and laboratory phlebotomists baseline corrected error rates were 1:467 and 1:5555, respectively. This study therefore sought and obtained approval to initiate a new policy of blood type verification before blood transfusion. Compliance in turnaround time (TAT) before and after implementation for completion of STAT type and screen/crossmatch within 60 minutes worsened marginally, from 90% to 80%. The impact on use of O-, uncrossmatched blood was found to be manageable. Seven (of 25 total) recorded electronic complaints were received after implementation. The corrected error rate for nurse phlebotomy draws after implementation was 1:630. Despite the lack of an instigating event, verification of blood type before blood transfusion was successfully implemented. An impact on resources and benchmark indicators such as TAT can be anticipated and managed. Further process improvement efforts will be needed to ensure safety (e.g., at time of blood transfusion) for patients receiving blood transfusions. ABO/Rh verification may be necessary even after future implementation of bar coding and/or RFID chips, because human errors continue to occur even with systems improvements.

  8. The stability of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine in dried-blood spot quality control materials for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Christopher A; De Jesús, Víctor R

    2015-01-01

    Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy utilizes tandem mass spectrometry to analyze dried-blood spot specimens. Quality control materials (dried-blood spots enriched with hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine) were prepared and stored at different temperatures for up to 518days to evaluate the stability of this biomarker for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Dried-blood spot storage included desiccant (45, 171, and 518days) or omitted desiccant (53days at >90% relative humidity). Specimens were stored for 171 and 518days at -20°C, 4°C, ambient temperature, and 37°C. Each weekday for 45days, a bag of specimens stored at 4°C was warmed to ambient temperature and one specimen was removed for storage at -80°C. Specimens were analyzed by high-performance liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and data was plotted as concentration (micromoles per liter) vs. time. Linear regression provided slope and y-intercept values for each storage condition. Small slope values (0.01 or less) and y-intercept values close to the enrichment indicated less than 11% loss of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine under all storage conditions tested. Quality control materials for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy are stable for at least 1year when stored with desiccant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. A device for dried blood microsampling in quantitative bioanalysis: overcoming the issues associated blood hematocrit.

    PubMed

    Spooner, Neil; Denniff, Philip; Michielsen, Luc; De Vries, Ronald; Ji, Qin C; Arnold, Mark E; Woods, Karen; Woolf, Eric J; Xu, Yang; Boutet, Valérie; Zane, Patricia; Kushon, Stuart; Rudge, James B

    2015-01-01

    A cross-laboratory experiment has been performed on a novel dried blood sampler in order to investigate whether it overcomes issues associated with blood volume and hematocrit (HCT) that are observed when taking a subpunch from dried blood spot samples. An average blood volume of 10.6 μl was absorbed by the samplers across the different HCTs investigated (20-65%). No notable change of volume absorbed was noted across the HCT range. Furthermore, the variation in blood sample volumes across six different laboratories was within acceptable limits. The novel volumetric absorptive microsampling device has the potential to deliver the advantages of dried blood spot sampling while overcoming some of the issues associated with the technology.

  10. Process for measuring low cadmium levels in blood and other biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, David P.; Huff, Edmund A.; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H.

    1994-01-01

    A process for measuring low levels of cadmium in blood and other biological specimens is provided without interference from high levels of alkali metal contaminants by forming an aqueous solution and without contamination by environmental cadmium absent the proteins from the specimen, selectively removing cadmium from the aqueous solution on an anion exchange resin, thereby removing the alkali metal contaminants, resolubilizing cadmium from the resin to form a second solution and analyzing the second solution for cadmium, the process being carried out in a cadmium-free environment.

  11. Process for measuring low cadmium levels in blood and other biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, David P.; Huff, Edmund A.; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H.

    1994-05-03

    A process for measuring low levels of cadmium in blood and other biological specimens is provided without interference from high levels of alkali metal contaminants by forming an aqueous solution and without contamination by environmental cadmium absent the proteins from the specimen, selectively removing cadmium from the aqueous solution on an anion exchange resin, thereby removing the alkali metal contaminants, resolubilizing cadmium from the resin to form a second solution and analyzing the second solution for cadmium, the process being carried out in a cadmium-free environment.

  12. Comparison of different anticoagulant associations on haemostasis and biochemical analyses in feline blood specimens.

    PubMed

    Granat, Fanny; Monzali, Céline; Jeunesse, Elisabeth; Guerlin, Maud; Trumel, Catherine; Geffré, Anne; Bourgès-Abella, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    Objectives Universal anticoagulant could be an alternative to the multiple blood sampling required for clinical pathology investigations in cats. An association of citrate, theophylline, adenosine and dipyridamole (CTAD) has been reported to be a good substitute for EDTA for haematology analysis in cats, limiting platelet clumping, and has also been shown to be valid for haematology, secondary haemostasis and some biochemical variables in humans. The aim of the study was therefore to investigate the effects of CTAD on in vitro platelet aggregation and compare results of secondary haemostasis and biochemistry tests, excluding a priori those variables not reliably measured in CTAD, such as sodium, chloride and divalent cations, in feline blood specimens collected in CTAD and paired citrate and heparin tubes. Methods Thirty blood specimens sampled in citrate and CTAD were analysed for in vitro platelet aggregation, and 60 blood specimens sampled in citrate or heparin and CTAD were analysed for plasma coagulation and a biochemistry panel. Results In vitro platelet aggregation was inhibited in CTAD compared with citrate specimens. Prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, antithrombin and fibrinogen results were similar, despite some significant differences. Measurements of triglycerides, cholesterol, glucose, urea, creatinine, phosphate, total proteins and alanine aminotransferase activity were similar and well correlated in CTAD and heparin plasmas, despite some significant differences and moderate biases. Albumin showed a marked positive proportional bias, and creatine kinase and alkaline phosphatase activities a moderate and marked negative mixed bias, respectively, but could be measured in CTAD if new reference intervals were calculated. Aspartate aminotransferase activity showed a marked negative proportional bias, along with a poor correlation and some clinical misclassifications just like the potassium concentration, and thus cannot be recommended

  13. [Diagnosis of congenital cytomegalovirus infection in newborn dried blood spots on Guthrie cards. A promissory technique].

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Angélica L; González, Cecilia A; Pardón, Fabián; Sarubi, María A; Canero Velazco, Cristina

    2008-04-01

    Laboratories play a crucial role in the diagnosis of congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus infection, considering that other viral infections in newborn infants have similar clinical characteristics. The objectives of this work are to compare the results of the polymerase reaction in blood spots and urine as well as point out the relevance of the result in the Guthrie cards to differentiate congenital from perinatal infection. A total of 148 patients suspicious of CMVH infections were studied in the Congenital Perinatal Infections and Sexual Transmission Laboratory, at the National Institute "Carlos G. Malbrán". The dry blood samples (Guthrie cards) and urine of all patients were studied through the polymerase chain reaction. From the 148 patients, 3 presented other infections, 95 tested negative and 50 positive for cytomegalovirus: 35 had congenital infection and 15 perinatal. In the congenital cases, the polymerase reaction in dry blood was positive (sensitivity 100%, specificity 98.9%, VPP 98% and VPN 100%). Four of them with tardive symptoms were studied retrospectively. The urine specimens from the remaining 15 patients that were taken 15 days after birth were analyzed through the same methods, showing a sensitivity of 100%, the retrospective analysis of this dry blood group yielded negative results, so the infection was considered perinatal. Thus, the dry blood polymerase reaction of the newborn infants makes it a reliable assay for diagnosing congenital cytomegalovirus infection and could be used as an alternative method to urine polymerase reaction. In addition, this test is able to reveal whether the infection is congenital or perinatal in those cases of late symptom or other cases of controversial origin.

  14. Standardized methods to generate mock (spiked) clinical specimens by spiking blood or plasma with cultured pathogens.

    PubMed

    Dong, M; Fisher, C; Añez, G; Rios, M; Nakhasi, H L; Hobson, J P; Beanan, M; Hockman, D; Grigorenko, E; Duncan, R

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate standardized methods for spiking pathogens into human matrices for evaluation and comparison among diagnostic platforms. This study presents detailed methods for spiking bacteria or protozoan parasites into whole blood and virus into plasma. Proper methods must start with a documented, reproducible pathogen source followed by steps that include standardized culture, preparation of cryopreserved aliquots, quantification of the aliquots by molecular methods, production of sufficient numbers of individual specimens and testing of the platform with multiple mock specimens. Results are presented following the described procedures that showed acceptable reproducibility comparing in-house real-time PCR assays to a commercially available multiplex molecular assay. A step by step procedure has been described that can be followed by assay developers who are targeting low prevalence pathogens. The development of diagnostic platforms for detection of low prevalence pathogens such as biothreat or emerging agents is challenged by the lack of clinical specimens for performance evaluation. This deficit can be overcome using mock clinical specimens made by spiking cultured pathogens into human matrices. To facilitate evaluation and comparison among platforms, standardized methods must be followed in the preparation and application of spiked specimens. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Next-Generation Molecular Testing of Newborn Dried Blood Spots for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lefterova, Martina I.; Shen, Peidong; Odegaard, Justin I.; Fung, Eula; Chiang, Tsoyu; Peng, Gang; Davis, Ronald W.; Wang, Wenyi; Kharrazi, Martin; Schrijver, Iris; Scharfe, Curt

    2017-01-01

    Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis enables early detection and management of this debilitating genetic disease. Implementing comprehensive CFTR analysis using Sanger sequencing as a component of confirmatory testing of all screen-positive newborns has remained impractical due to relatively lengthy turnaround times and high cost. Here, we describe CFseq, a highly sensitive, specific, rapid (<3 days), and cost-effective assay for comprehensive CFTR gene analysis from dried blood spots, the common newborn screening specimen. The unique design of CFseq integrates optimized dried blood spot sample processing, a novel multiplex amplification method from as little as 1 ng of genomic DNA, and multiplex next-generation sequencing of 96 samples in a single run to detect all relevant CFTR mutation types. Sequence data analysis utilizes publicly available software supplemented by an expert-curated compendium of >2000 CFTR variants. Validation studies across 190 dried blood spots demonstrated 100% sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% for single-nucleotide variants and insertions and deletions and complete concordance across the polymorphic poly-TG and consecutive poly-T tracts. Additionally, we accurately detected both a known exon 2,3 deletion and a previously undetected exon 22,23 deletion. CFseq is thus able to replace all existing CFTR molecular assays with a single robust, definitive assay at significant cost and time savings and could be adapted to high-throughput screening of other inherited conditions. PMID:26847993

  16. Evaluation of PNA FISH® Yeast Traffic Light in identification of Candida species from blood and non-blood culture specimens.

    PubMed

    Radic, Marina; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Tonkic, Marija

    2016-08-01

    PNA FISH(®) (peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization) Yeast Traffic Light (PNA FISH(®) YTL) assay is a commercially avaliable method for rapid identification of Candida spp. directly from positive blood cultures. This report provides a one-year experience in identification of yeasts from 25 specimens (15 positive blood cultures and 10 other clinically significant specimens) using PNA FISH(®) YTL and comparing it to VITEK 2 System. Overall, assay identification compatibility with VITEK 2 System was found among 21/25 (84%) isolates tested. Only 3/25 (12%) of the isolates were not identified, and one isolate was misidentified by the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay. Our results show that the assay is a reliable method in identification of Candida spp. not only from blood cultures, but even from other clinically significant specimens (urine cultures, catheter tip cultures, peritoneal fluid cultures) when compared to automated method like VITEK 2 System. This novel application of the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay could therefore contribute to cost savings and significant benefit to patients, as rapid information about isolated yeast species is provided. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Molecular Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae on Dried Blood Spots from Febrile Nigerian Children Compared to Culture.

    PubMed

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Schleiss, Mark R; Hassan-Hanga, Fatimah; Onuchukwu, Chuma; Umoru, Dominic; Obaro, Stephen K

    2016-01-01

    Nigeria has one of the highest burdens of pneumococcal disease in the world, but accurate surveillance is lacking. Molecular detection of infectious pathogens in dried blood spots (DBS) is an ideal method for surveillance of infections in resource-limited settings because of its low cost, minimal blood volumes involved, and ease of storage at ambient temperature. Our study aim was to evaluate a Streptococcus pneumoniae real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR) assay on DBS from febrile Nigerian children on Whatman 903 and FTA filter papers, compared to the gold standard of culture. Between September 2011 to May 2015, blood was collected from children 5 years of age or under who presented to six hospital study sites throughout northern and central Nigeria with febrile illness, and inoculated into blood culture bottles or spotted onto Whatman 903 or FTA filter paper. Culture and rt-PCR were performed on all samples. A total of 537 DBS specimens from 535 children were included in the study, of which 15 were culture-positive for S. pneumoniae. The rt-PCR assay detected S. pneumoniae in 12 DBS specimens (2.2%). One positive rt-PCR result was identified in a culture-negative specimen from a high-risk subject, and two positive rt-PCR results were negative on repeat testing. Six culture-confirmed cases of S. pneumoniae bacteremia were missed. Compared to culture, the overall sensitivities of Whatman 903 and FTA DBS for detection of S. pneumoniae were 57.1% (95% CI 18.4-90.1%) and 62.5% (95% CI 24.5-91.5%), respectively. Nonspecific amplification was noted in an additional 22 DBS (4.1%). Among these, six were positive for a non-S. pneumoniae pathogen on culture. Rt-PCR was able to detect S. pneumoniae from clinical DBS specimens, including from a culture-negative specimen. Our findings show promise of this approach as a surveillance diagnostic, but also raise important cautionary questions. Several DBS specimens were detected as S. pneumoniae by rt-PCR despite growth of

  18. Molecular Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae on Dried Blood Spots from Febrile Nigerian Children Compared to Culture

    PubMed Central

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Schleiss, Mark R.; Hassan-Hanga, Fatimah; Onuchukwu, Chuma; Umoru, Dominic; Obaro, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nigeria has one of the highest burdens of pneumococcal disease in the world, but accurate surveillance is lacking. Molecular detection of infectious pathogens in dried blood spots (DBS) is an ideal method for surveillance of infections in resource-limited settings because of its low cost, minimal blood volumes involved, and ease of storage at ambient temperature. Our study aim was to evaluate a Streptococcus pneumoniae real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR) assay on DBS from febrile Nigerian children on Whatman 903 and FTA filter papers, compared to the gold standard of culture. Methods Between September 2011 to May 2015, blood was collected from children 5 years of age or under who presented to six hospital study sites throughout northern and central Nigeria with febrile illness, and inoculated into blood culture bottles or spotted onto Whatman 903 or FTA filter paper. Culture and rt-PCR were performed on all samples. Results A total of 537 DBS specimens from 535 children were included in the study, of which 15 were culture-positive for S. pneumoniae. The rt-PCR assay detected S. pneumoniae in 12 DBS specimens (2.2%). One positive rt-PCR result was identified in a culture-negative specimen from a high-risk subject, and two positive rt-PCR results were negative on repeat testing. Six culture-confirmed cases of S. pneumoniae bacteremia were missed. Compared to culture, the overall sensitivities of Whatman 903 and FTA DBS for detection of S. pneumoniae were 57.1% (95% CI 18.4–90.1%) and 62.5% (95% CI 24.5–91.5%), respectively. Nonspecific amplification was noted in an additional 22 DBS (4.1%). Among these, six were positive for a non-S. pneumoniae pathogen on culture. Conclusions Rt-PCR was able to detect S. pneumoniae from clinical DBS specimens, including from a culture-negative specimen. Our findings show promise of this approach as a surveillance diagnostic, but also raise important cautionary questions. Several DBS specimens were detected as

  19. Routine preparation of air-dried negatively stained and unstained specimens on holey carbon support films: a review of applications.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin; Scheffler, Dirk

    2002-01-01

    Several representative examples are given of the successful application of negative staining across the holes of holey carbon support films using 5% (w/v) ammonium molybdate solution containing trehalose. The inclusion of 0.1% (w/v) trehalose is considered to be most satisfactory, although good data have also been obtained in the presence of 0.01 and 1.0% (w/v) trehalose. The examples given fall into the following groups: protein molecules in the absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), protein molecules in the presence of PEG (Mr 1000), lipoproteins, lipids and membranes, filaments and tubules, viruses in the absence of PEG, viruses in the presence of PEG, aqueous polymer solutions, and finally for comparison purposes, four unstained samples studied in the presence of trehalose alone. In all these cases, and many others not documented here, successful spreading of the sample across holes has been achieved, with the sample embedded within a thin film of air-dried ammonium molybdate+trehalose. These specimens can be rapidly produced and provide an alternative to negatively stained specimens on carbon support films. Specimen stability in the electron bean is good and such specimens can usually generate superior negatively stained TEM images without flattening and adsorption artefacts. The formation of 2-D arrays/crystals of protein molecules and viruses, suspended across holes in the presence of ammonium molbybdate+trehalose, and trehalose alone, is also demonstrated.

  20. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  1. Comparison of Proteins in Whole Blood and Dried Blood Spot Samples by LC/MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Andrew G.; Percy, Andrew J.; Hardie, Darryl B.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2013-09-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling methods are desirable for population-wide biomarker screening programs because of their ease of collection, transportation, and storage. Immunoassays are traditionally used to quantify endogenous proteins in these samples but require a separate assay for each protein. Recently, targeted mass spectrometry (MS) has been proposed for generating highly-multiplexed assays for biomarker proteins in DBS samples. In this work, we report the first comparison of proteins in whole blood and DBS samples using an untargeted MS approach. The average number of proteins identified in undepleted whole blood and DBS samples by liquid chromatography (LC)/MS/MS was 223 and 253, respectively. Protein identification repeatability was between 77 %-92 % within replicates and the majority of these repeated proteins (70 %) were observed in both sample formats. Proteins exclusively identified in the liquid or dried fluid spot format were unbiased based on their molecular weight, isoelectric point, aliphatic index, and grand average hydrophobicity. In addition, we extended this comparison to include proteins in matching plasma and serum samples with their dried fluid spot equivalents, dried plasma spot (DPS), and dried serum spot (DSS). This work begins to define the accessibility of endogenous proteins in dried fluid spot samples for analysis by MS and is useful in evaluating the scope of this new approach.

  2. [Blood sampling using "dried blood spot": a clinical biology revolution underway?].

    PubMed

    Hirtz, Christophe; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Blood testing using the dried blood spot (DBS) is used since the 1960s in clinical analysis, mainly within the framework of the neonatal screening (Guthrie test). Since then numerous analytes such as nucleic acids, small molecules or lipids, were successfully measured on the DBS. While this pre-analytical method represents an interesting alternative to classic blood sampling, its use in routine is still limited. We review here the different clinical applications of the blood sampling on DBS and estimate its future place, supported by the new methods of analysis as the LC-MS mass spectrometry.

  3. Negative immunomagnetic selection of T cells from peripheral blood of presentation AML specimens.

    PubMed

    Le Dieu, Rifca; Taussig, David; Lister, T Andrew; Gribben, John G

    2009-08-31

    To date, studies on T cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been limited to flow cytometric analysis of whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens or functional work looking at the impact of AML myeloblasts on normal or remission T cells. This lack of information on T cells at the time of presentation with disease is due in part to the difficulty in isolating sufficiently pure T cells from these specimens for further study. Negative immunomagnetic selection has been the method of choice for isolating immune cells for functional studies due to concerns that binding antibodies to the cell surface may induce cellular activation, block ligand-receptor interactions or result in immune clearance. In order specifically to study T cells in presentation AML specimens, we set out to develop a method of isolating highly pure CD4 and CD8 T cells by negative selection from the peripheral blood (PB) of newly diagnosed AML patients. This technique, unlike T cell selection from PB from normal individuals or from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, was extremely problematic due to properties of the leukaemic myeloblasts. A successful method was eventually optimized requiring the use of a custom antibody cocktail consisting of CD33, CD34, CD123, CD11c and CD36, to deplete myeloblasts.

  4. Quantification of multiple elements in dried blood spot samples.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lise; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Hollergaard, Mads; Nybo, Mads

    2017-08-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) is a unique matrix that offers advantages compared to conventional blood collection making it increasingly popular in large population studies. We here describe development and validation of a method to determine multiple elements in DBS. Elements were extracted from punches and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method was evaluated with quality controls with defined element concentration and blood spiked with elements to assess accuracy and imprecision. DBS element concentrations were compared with concentrations in venous blood. Samples with different hematocrit were spotted onto filter paper to assess hematocrit effect. The established method was precise and accurate for measurement of most elements in DBS. There was a significant but relatively weak correlation between measurement of the elements Mg, K, Fe, Cu, Zn, As and Se in DBS and venous whole blood. Hematocrit influenced the DBS element measurement, especially for K, Fe and Zn. Trace elements can be measured with high accuracy and low imprecision in DBS, but contribution of signal from the filter paper influences measurement of some elements present at low concentrations. Simultaneous measurement of K and Fe in DBS extracts may be used to estimate sample hematocrit. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-collected glans/meatal 'dry' swab specimen and NAAT technology detects Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae - implications for public policy changes.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Dennis V; Meyers, Holly N; Ferrero, Gina M; Schultz, Diane E

    2017-09-01

    Increasing Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) rates and ever-present Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) infections in women have given rise in the past to consideration of male screening programs in order to address the silent male reservoir. Non-medical venues (e.g. home collection, restrooms or other private locations) may be viable venues to reach certain populations that in the past have not been accessed. Effortlessly collected, non-invasive, self-collected male specimens that are stable and easy to transport would enhance the success of male screening programs. We designed a head-to-head study to consider the effectiveness of non-invasive self-collected glans/meatal dry swab (SCS) specimens to detect CT and NG nucleic acid when compared to traditional clinician-collected swab (CCS) specimens and first-catch urine (FCU) specimens. A total of 284 male patients were included in the study. Specimens were processed using the Becton Dickinson ProbeTec ET system. The overall sensitivity of SCS was 91.1% with a specificity of 99.2%. There was an overall SCS agreement of 97.7% with CCS specimens and 90.4% with FCU specimens. Dry swab specimens are easy to collect, transport and test. Non-invasive dry self-collected glans/meatal swab specimens are a viable specimen choice.

  6. Detection of Immunoglobulin Isotypes from Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nancy J; Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Preissler, Mark T.; Freed, Brian M.; Stockinger, Sabine; Bell, Erin; Druschel, Charlotte; Buck Louis, Germaine M.; Lawrence, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility of recovering immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes (IgG subclasses, IgA, IgE and IgM classes) from dried blood spots (DBS), a methodologic subcomponent of the Upstate KIDS Study. A multiplexed Luminex assay was used for IgG1/2/3/4, IgA and IgM analysis; an ELISA was used for IgE. Plasma samples from de-identified patients were used to compare the Luminex assay with nephelometry, which is routinely used to quantify IgA, IgG and IgM in clinical samples. The IgE ELISA was compared to an immunofluorescence assay. Prior to evaluation of punches from newborn dried blood spots (NDBSs), recoveries of Ig from punches of cord blood DBSs (CBDBSs) vs. plasma from the same cord bloods were compared. Although the recoveries of Ig from plasma and DBSs were not comparable, which could be due to cell lysates in the DBS samples, the analyses were reproducible. Additionally, the levels of IgA, IgG2, IgG4, and IgM recovered from CBDBSs positively correlated with those in plasma. The DBS data is a relative value since it is not equivalent to the plasma concentration. The majority of Ig concentrations recovered from 108 newborns of the Upstate KIDs Study were within the range of newborn plasma Ig levels with the exception of IgG3. The IgG4 values displayed the greatest variance with a wide range (0.01–319 mg/dl), whereas, IgG1 values had the narrowest range (85.2–960.4 mg/dl). PMID:24333851

  7. Determination of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate from dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Hernández Redondo, Ana; Schroeck, Alexandra; Kneubuehl, Beat; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2013-07-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and ethyl sulfate (EtS) are non-oxidative minor metabolites of ethanol. They are detectable in various body fluids shortly after initial consumption of ethanol and have a longer detection time frame than the parent compound. They are regarded highly sensitive and specific markers of recent alcohol uptake. This study evaluates the determination of EtG and EtS from dried blood spots (DBS), a simple and cost-effective sampling method that would shorten the time gap between offense and blood sampling and lead to a better reflectance of the actual impairment. For method validation, EtG and EtS standard and quality control samples were prepared in fresh human heparinized blood and spotted on DBS cards, then extracted and measured by an LC-ESI-MS/MS method. Additionally, 76 heparinized blood samples from traffic offense cases were analyzed for EtG and EtS as whole blood and as DBS specimens. The results from these measurements were then compared by calculating the respective mean values, by a matched-paired t test, by a Wilcoxon test, and by Bland-Altman and Mountain plots. Calibrations for EtG and EtS in DBS were linear over the studied calibration range. The precision and accuracy of the method met the requirements of the validation guidelines that were employed in the study. The stability of the biomarkers stored as DBS was demonstrated under different storage conditions. The t test showed no significant difference between whole blood and DBS in the determination of EtG and EtS. In addition, the Bland-Altman analysis and Mountain plot confirmed that the concentration differences that were measured in DBS specimens were not relevant.

  8. X-ray fluorescence analysis of Mexican varieties of dried chili peppers II: Commercial and home-grown specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Dávila, E.; Miranda, J.; Pineda, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    Elemental analyses of samples of Mexican varieties of dried chili peppers were carried out using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Several specimens of Capsicum annuum L., Capsicum chinense, and Capsicum pubescens were analyzed and the results compared to previous studies of elemental contents in other varieties of Capsicum annuum (ancho, morita, chilpotle, guajillo, pasilla, and árbol). The first set of samples was bought packaged in markets. In the present work, the study focuses on home-grown samples of the árbol and chilpotle varieties, commercial habanero (Capsicum chinense), as well as commercial and home-grown specimens of manzano (Capsicum pubescencs). Samples were freeze dried and pelletized. XRF analyses were carried out using a spectrometer based on an Rh X-ray tube, using a Si-PIN detector. The system detection calibration was performed through the analysis of the NIST certified reference materials 1547 (peach leaves) and 1574 (tomato leaves), while accuracy was checked with the reference material 1571 (orchard leaves). Elemental contents of all elements in the new set of samples were similar to those of the first group. Nevertheless, it was found that commercial samples contain high amounts of Br, while home-grown varieties do not.

  9. Contamination of dried blood spots - an underestimated risk in newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Lange, Anja; Hannemann, Anke; Nauck, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia

    2017-08-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) is an established screening procedure in many countries worldwide, aiming at the early detection of inborn errors of metabolism. For decades, dried blood spots have been the standard specimen for NBS. The procedure of blood collection is well described and standardized and includes many critical pre-analytical steps. We examined the impact of contamination of some anticipated common substances on NBS results obtained from dry spot samples. This possible pre-analytical source of uncertainty has been poorly examined in the past. Capillary blood was obtained from 15 adult volunteers and applied to 10 screening filter papers per volunteer. Nine filter papers were contaminated without visible trace. The contaminants were baby diaper rash cream, baby wet wipes, disinfectant, liquid infant formula, liquid infant formula hypoallergenic (HA), ultrasonic gel, breast milk, feces, and urine. The differences between control and contaminated samples were evaluated for 45 NBS quantities. We estimated if the contaminations might lead to false-positive NBS results. Eight of nine investigated contaminants significantly altered NBS analyte concentrations and potentially caused false-positive screening outcomes. A contamination with feces was most influential, affecting 24 of 45 tested analytes followed by liquid infant formula (HA) and urine, affecting 19 and 13 of 45 analytes, respectively. A contamination of filter paper samples can have a substantial effect on the NBS results. Our results underline the importance of good pre-analytical training to make the staff aware of the threat and ensure reliable screening results.

  10. Development of simple equations for effective screening of spurious hemolysis in whole-blood specimens.

    PubMed

    Lippi, G; Pavesi, F; Avanzini, P; Chetta, F; Aloe, R; Pipitone, S

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to identify simple but reliable indices for effective screening of spurious hemolysis in whole-blood specimens. Thirteen inpatient whole-blood samples were divided in two aliquots. The former was left untreated, whereas the latter was mechanically hemolyzed by forced aspiration with an insulin syringe. All aliquots were tested on Siemens Advia 2120 and Sysmex XE-2100. The hemolysis index (HI) was also assessed in centrifuged plasma. The mechanical hemolysis generated a 4-40% decrease in red blood cells (RBCs). A statistically significant decrease was observed for hematocrit (Ht) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV), whereas mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and platelet count were increased. The values of hemoglobin (Hb) and white blood cells remained substantially unchanged. Two specific equations ([Ht/Hb] × √MCV and [Ht/Hb] × 100) were developed. Both equations displayed an area under the curve of ≥0.99 for identifying spurious hemolysis, much greater than that of both RBC ghosts and immature platelet fraction. A highly significant correlation was also observed between results of these equations and percentage reduction in RBCs or HI increase. Provided that these results will be confirmed in further studies, these equations may provide a reliable means for screening spurious hemolysis in whole-blood samples. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Validation of Blood-Based Assays Using Dried Blood Spots for Use in Large Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    CRIMMINS, EILEEN; KIM, JUNG KI; McCREATH, HEATHER; FAUL, JESSICA; WEIR, DAVID; SEEMAN, TERESA

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of health in large population studies has increasingly incorporated measures of blood-based biomarkers based on the use of dried blood spots (DBS). The validity of DBS assessments made by labs used by large studies is addressed by comparing assay values from DBS collected using conditions similar to those used in the field with values from whole blood samples. The DBS approach generates values that are strongly related to whole blood levels of HbA1c, cystatin C, and C-reactive protein. Assessing lipid levels reliably with DBS appears to be a greater challenge. However, even when DBS values and values from venous blood are highly correlated, they are often on a different scale, and using conventional cutoffs may be misleading. PMID:24784986

  12. Maximizing Deoxyribonucleic Acid Yield from Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Julie A.; Noble, Janelle A.

    2010-01-01

    Background One source of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for genetic studies is the utilization of dried blood spots stored on paper cards (Guthrie cards) collected shortly after birth. These cards represent an important source of material for epidemiologic and population-based genetic studies. Extraction of DNA from these cards can lead to variable amounts of recovered DNA. We report here results of our efforts to maximize yield from this valuable, but nonrenewable, resource. Method Commercial methods of DNA extraction from blood cards were used, and protocol modifications were introduced that enhanced DNA yield. Results Use of a commercial solvent prior to DNA extraction steps gave greater yields than extraction without the solvent. Modification of the elution step by use of prewarmed extraction buffer and a soaking step at an elevated temperature increased yield by 6- to 10-fold. Conclusions The modified DNA extraction method yielded as much as 660 ng of DNA from a single 5-mm-diameter punch of a blood spot card. The DNA performed well in downstream, polymerase chain reaction-based applications. PMID:20307384

  13. Improved Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection by Culturing Periprosthetic Tissue Specimens in Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Peel, Trisha N.; Dylla, Brenda L.; Hughes, John G.; Lynch, David T.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Cheng, Allen C.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite known low sensitivity, culture of periprosthetic tissue specimens on agars and in broths is routine. Culture of periprosthetic tissue samples in blood culture bottles (BCBs) is potentially more convenient, but it has been evaluated in a limited way and has not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of inoculation of periprosthetic tissue specimens into blood culture bottles with standard agar and thioglycolate broth culture, applying Bayesian latent class modeling (LCM) in addition to applying the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) criteria for prosthetic joint infection. This prospective cohort study was conducted over a 9-month period (August 2013 to April 2014) at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and included all consecutive patients undergoing revision arthroplasty. Overall, 369 subjects were studied; 117 (32%) met IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection, and 82% had late chronic infection. Applying LCM, inoculation of tissues into BCBs was associated with a 47% improvement in sensitivity compared to the sensitivity of conventional agar and broth cultures (92.1 versus 62.6%, respectively); this magnitude of change was similar when IDSA criteria were applied (60.7 versus 44.4%, respectively; P = 0.003). The time to microorganism detection was shorter with BCBs than with standard media (P < 0.0001), with aerobic and anaerobic BCBs yielding positive results within a median of 21 and 23 h, respectively. Results of our study demonstrate that the semiautomated method of periprosthetic tissue culture in blood culture bottles is more sensitive than and as specific as agar and thioglycolate broth cultures and yields results faster. PMID:26733067

  14. Clinical feasibility of dried blood spots: Analytics, validation, and applications.

    PubMed

    Enderle, Yeliz; Foerster, Kathrin; Burhenne, Jürgen

    2016-10-25

    Dried blood spots (DBS) sampling and their specific advantages are becoming common in analytical and clinical routine. Being first established for metabolic disorder screening in neonates, its use emerged to a broad spectrum of clinical applications. Although DBS are easily generated, the conduction of specific analytical and clinical validation procedures should be obligatory when implementing DBS for clinical purposes, e.g. therapeutic drug monitoring or clinical drug trials. A respective recommendation has already been published by the European Bioanalysis Forum. Since no official guidelines are present, investigators are currently free in DBS procedure development and validation. This review summarizes and discusses published clinical validation procedures in relation to their applications to highlight the clinical feasibility of DBS.

  15. Application of dried blood spot cards to determine olive oil phenols (hydroxytyrosol metabolites) in human blood.

    PubMed

    de Las Hazas, María Carmen López; Motilva, Maria José; Piñol, Carme; Macià, Alba

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a fast and simple blood sampling and sample pre-treatment method based on the use of the dried blood spot (DBS) cards and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the quantification of olive oil phenolic metabolites in human blood was developed and validated. After validation, the method was applied to determine hydroxytyrosol metabolites in human blood samples after the acute intake of an olive oil phenolic extract. Using the FTA DMPK-A DBS card under optimum conditions, with 20µL as the blood solution volume, 100µL of methanol/Milli-Q water (50/50, v/v) as the extraction solvent and 7 disks punched out from the card, the main hydroxytyrosol metabolites (hydroxytyrosol-3-O-sulphate and hydroxytyrosol acetate sulphate) were identified and quantified. The developed methodology allowed detecting and quantifying the generated metabolites at low μM levels. The proposed method is a significant improvement over existing methods to determine phenolic metabolites circulating in blood and plasma samples, thus making blood sampling possible with the volunteer pricking their own finger, and the subsequent storage of the blood in the DBS cards prior to chromatographic analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Endophytic fungi from Dragon's blood specimens: isolation, identification, phylogenetic diversity and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jin-long; Guo, Shun-xing; Dong, Hailing; Xiao, Peigen

    2011-08-01

    Endophytic fungi from Dragon's blood specimens of different locations of China were characterized taxonomically and investigated concerning their antimicrobial and antitumor activity against six pathogenic microbes and five tumor cells. A total of 49 endophytic fungi were obtained from Dragon's blood materials of Dracaena spp., 18 taxa were represented by 43 (87.8%) isolates and only six (12.2%) isolates were unknown. Twenty (40.8%) of the isolates displayed antimicrobial activity against at least one pathogenic microorganism. Three isolates YNDC07, BJDC06 and BJDC09 displayed significant antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigates, respectively. The results of antitumor activity by the MTT assay revealed that 26.5%, 69.4%, 48.9%, 6.1% and 42.9% of isolate fermentation broths displayed growth inhibition on HepG2 cells, SKVO3 cells, MCF7 cells, HL-60 cells and 293-T cells, respectively. HNDC09 and HNDC10 showed very strong antitumor activity against MCF7 and 293-T, respectively. The results showed that endophytic fungi in Dragon's blood samples were valuable in screening antitumor and antimicrobial bioactivity agents.

  17. RNA sequencing of archived neonatal dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Bybjerg-Grauholm, Jonas; Hagen, Christian Munch; Khoo, Sok Kean; Johannesen, Maria Louise; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Christiansen, Michael; Hougaard, David Michael; Hollegaard, Mads V

    2017-03-01

    Neonatal dried blood spots (DBS) are routinely collected on standard Guthrie cards for all-comprising national newborn screening programs for inborn errors of metabolism, hypothyroidism and other diseases. In Denmark, the Guthrie cards are stored at - 20 °C in the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank and each sample is linked to elaborate social and medical registries. This provides a unique biospecimen repository to enable large population research at a perinatal level. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility to obtain gene expression data from DBS using next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq was performed on five males and five females. Sequencing results have an average of > 30 million reads per sample. 26,799 annotated features can be identified with 64% features detectable without fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped reads (FPKM) cutoff; number of detectable features dropped to 18% when FPKM ≥ 1. Sex can be discriminated using blood-based sex-specific gene set identified by the Genotype-Tissue Expression consortium. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility to acquire biologically-relevant gene expression from DBS using RNA-seq which provide a new avenue to investigate perinatal diseases in a high throughput manner.

  18. Reducing error in feline platelet enumeration by addition of Iloprost to blood specimens: comparison to prostaglandin E1 and EDTA.

    PubMed

    Tvedten, Harold W; Bäcklund, Kerstin; Lilliehöök, Inger E

    2015-06-01

    Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and Iloprost inhibit platelet aggregation and should prevent or minimize preanalytic error with feline platelet enumeration. The objective was to compare the relative effectiveness in reducing errors in platelet enumeration by adding Iloprost to feline EDTA blood specimens in comparison to adding PGE1 or EDTA alone. In addition, a grading system for platelet aggregation in blood smears was evaluated for effectiveness in predicting prominent errors and compared to ADVIA's PLT-CLM flag. Finally, the use of plateletcrit in feline blood with platelet aggregation was evaluated. Blood specimens from 35 cats were included. Blood was collected into EDTA tubes with or without Iloprost or PGE1, and was rapidly mixed. Platelet count (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV), and platelet flags were determined with an ADVIA 2120. Manual PLT was performed with a Leucoplate stain. PLT was determined by an IDEXX VetAutoread hematology analyzer (QBC). Neither addition of Iloprost nor PGE1 to EDTA blood specimens completely prevented platelet aggregation. Iloprost-treated specimens had the least severe aggregation. PGE1 was better than EDTA alone. Significant errors in PLT results were consistently identified by the grading system. ADVIA's PLT-CL flag usually predicted significant errors in PLT. QBC PLT results showed high imprecision. Manual PLT error was smaller than ADVIA PLT in EDTA specimens with aggregation. Adding Iloprost to feline blood specimens improved platelet enumeration accuracy. A grading system for severity of platelet aggregation and usually the ADVIA's PLT-CL alarm predicted specimens with significant errors in platelet enumeration. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  19. Measurement and Comparison of Organic Compound Concentrations in Plasma, Whole Blood, and Dried Blood Spot Samples.

    PubMed

    Batterman, Stuart A; Chernyak, Sergey; Su, Feng-Chiao

    2016-01-01

    The preferred sampling medium for measuring human exposures of persistent organic compounds (POPs) is blood, and relevant sample types include whole blood, plasma, and dried blood spots (DBS). Because information regarding the performance and comparability of measurements across these sample types is limited, it is difficult to compare across studies. This study evaluates the performance of POP measurements in plasma, whole blood and DBS, and presents the distribution coefficients needed to convert concentrations among the three sample types. Blood samples were collected from adult volunteers, along with demographic and smoking information, and analyzed by GC/MS for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Regression models were used to evaluate the relationships between the sample types and possible effects of personal covariates. Distribution coefficients also were calculated using physically-based models. Across all compounds, concentrations in plasma were consistently the highest; concentrations in whole blood and DBS samples were comparable. Distribution coefficients for plasma to whole blood concentrations ranged from 1.74 to 2.26 for pesticides/CHCs, averaged 1.69 ± 0.06 for the PCBs, and averaged 1.65 ± 0.03 for the PBDEs. Regression models closely fit most chemicals (R (2) > 0.80), and whole blood and DBS samples generally showed very good agreement. Distribution coefficients estimated using biologically-based models were near one and did not explain the observed distribution. Among the study population, median concentrations of several pesticides/CHCs and PBDEs exceeded levels reported in the 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, while levels of other OCPs and PBDEs were comparable or lower. Race and smoking status appeared to slightly affect plasma/blood concentration ratios for several POPs. The experimentally

  20. CYP1A2 phenotyping in dried blood spots and microvolumes of whole blood and plasma.

    PubMed

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2014-01-01

    Phenotyping, using caffeine as probe substrate, is a proper method to assess CYP1A2 activity. We evaluated the utility of dried blood spots (DBS) for CYP1A2 phenotyping. LC-MS/MS methods were developed and validated for quantitation of caffeine and its metabolite paraxanthine in DBS, whole blood and plasma. All parameters met the pre-established criteria. While recovery, matrix effects and precision were unaffected by hematocrit (Hct), there was a Hct effect on accuracy, although for the evaluated Hct interval (0.36-0.50) it remained within acceptable limits. The phenotyping methods were successfully applied in healthy volunteers. Excellent method performance and highly comparable phenotyping indices in DBS, whole blood and plasma, combined with the benefits of DBS sampling, illustrate the suitability of DBS-based CYP1A2 phenotyping.

  1. Effect of pneumatic tube delivery system rate and distance on hemolysis of blood specimens.

    PubMed

    Evliyaoğlu, Osman; Toprak, Gülten; Tekin, Alicem; Başarali, Mustafa Kemal; Kilinç, Cumhur; Colpan, Leyla

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated the effects of pneumatic tube system (PTS) transport rates and distances on routine hematology and coagulation analysis. PTS effects on centrifuged blood samples were also examined. The study was completed at Dicle University Hospital, which has the longest pneumatic tube system in Turkey. Blood samples were collected at three different locations within the hospital and an emergency department, and delivered to the central laboratory by the PTS or a human carrier. Samples were transported at different rates and over varying distances. Each specimen's potassium (K) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, in both the serum and plasma, were tracked to monitor hemolysis. Measurements of LDH and K were obtained using heparin or citrate. A positive correlation was observed between distance and hemolysis in serum samples transported at 4.2 m/sec, and at 3.1 m/sec for more than 2200 m (r = 0.774 and r = 0.766, respectively). Distance and hemolysis were also correlated in non-centrifuged samples (r = 0.871). The alterations in plasma LDH and K levels at different rates and PTS lengths were not statistically significant. The rate of hemolysis in PTS transported samples, dependent on PTS length and rate, may seriously affect routine tests of non-centrifuged samples. © 2012 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Spinal muscular atrophy patient detection and carrier screening using dried blood spots on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Harahap, Nur Imma Fatimah; Harahap, Indra Sari Kusuma; Kaszynski, Richard Hideki; Nurputra, Dian Kesuma Pramudya; Hartomo, Tri Budi; Pham, Huyen Thi Van; Yamamoto, Tomoto; Morikawa, Satoru; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Rusdi, Imam; Widiastuti, Retno; Nishio, Hisahide

    2012-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder. It is caused by mutations in the SMN1, and its clinical severity is modified by copy number variations of the SMN2. According to previous studies, deletion of SMN1 exon 7 is the most frequently observed in patients with SMA. Therefore, molecular analyses exploiting this genetic lesion could be beneficial in the diagnosis of SMA. Unfortunately, in many geographical regions, physicians do not have the latest molecular screening technologies at their immediate disposal. Thus, to overcome this issue, we developed an SMA-diagnosing system using dried blood spots (DBS) placed on filter paper to facilitate remote diagnosis. In this study, we validate the applicability of DBS on Flinders Technology Associates (FTA) filter paper for detecting SMN1 exon 7 deletions and copy number variations of SMN1 and SMN2. To detect exon 7 deletions in SMN1, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was conducted by using DNA extracted from the DBS on FTA filter paper that had been stored at room temperature for a period of up to 4 years. To determine the copy numbers of SMN1 and SMN2, we carried out SYBR green-based real-time PCR by using the same blood specimens. The results obtained from the DBS on FTA filter paper were in complete concordance with those analyses using fresh blood specimens. This indicates that DBS on filter papers is a reliable method for SMA patient detection and carrier screenings. The SMA-diagnosing system, combined with the mailing of DBS on filter paper, will be beneficial for patients suffering from neuromuscular disorders in areas with limited or no access to diagnostic facilities with molecular capabilities.

  3. Degradation of zopiclone during storage of spiked and authentic whole blood and matching dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Jantos, Ricarda; Vermeeren, Annemiek; Sabljic, Danica; Ramaekers, Johannes G; Skopp, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    Z-drugs such as zopiclone are increasingly involved in forensic cases. Its degradation occurs in solvents and biological fluids. It is assumed that hydrolysis largely accounts for the breakdown of zopiclone in aqueous media. Therefore, a stability study in blood at different storage conditions (-20, 4, 20, and 40°C) was performed to establish changes of the drug's concentration with time, also including its degradation product 2-amino-5-chloropyridine (ACP). As removal of the aqueous phase may stabilize molecules that are prone to hydrolysis, it was assessed whether the use of dried blood spots (DBS) may be an alternative for storing and analyzing zopiclone and ACP. Spiked and authentic blood samples and corresponding DBS were analyzed using fully validated LC-MS/MS assays. There was agreement between the measurement of zopiclone from either blood or matching DBS in freshly prepared samples. Results showed that zopiclone was unstable in blood at all storage temperatures except at -20°C. Stability of zopiclone in spiked and authentic blood was increased in DBS compared to matching blood samples stored at the same condition. About 85 % of the initial concentration of zopiclone was still intact in DBS on day 8 at 20°C. ACP was formed from zopiclone in equimolar amounts in both media. Therefore, determination of both zopiclone and ACP may be helpful to estimate the initial concentration in both media. Pre-analytical conditions have a major impact on the recovery of zopiclone from blood. With respect to its known advantages, DBS can be recommended as a valuable alternative for the determination of zopiclone from blood.

  4. Malaria PCR detection in Cambodian low-transmission settings: dried blood spots versus venous blood samples.

    PubMed

    Canier, Lydie; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Eam, Rotha; Khean, Chanra; Loch, Kaknika; Ken, Malen; Pannus, Pieter; Bosman, Philippe; Stassijns, Jorgen; Nackers, Fabienne; Alipon, SweetC; Char, Meng Chuor; Chea, Nguon; Etienne, William; De Smet, Martin; Kindermans, Jean-Marie; Ménard, Didier

    2015-03-01

    In the context of malaria elimination, novel strategies for detecting very low malaria parasite densities in asymptomatic individuals are needed. One of the major limitations of the malaria parasite detection methods is the volume of blood samples being analyzed. The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of a malaria polymerase chain reaction assay, from dried blood spots (DBS, 5 μL) and different volumes of venous blood (50 μL, 200 μL, and 1 mL). The limit of detection of the polymerase chain reaction assay, using calibrated Plasmodium falciparum blood dilutions, showed that venous blood samples (50 μL, 200 μL, 1 mL) combined with Qiagen extraction methods gave a similar threshold of 100 parasites/mL, ∼100-fold lower than 5 μL DBS/Instagene method. On a set of 521 field samples, collected in two different transmission areas in northern Cambodia, no significant difference in the proportion of parasite carriers, regardless of the methods used was found. The 5 μL DBS method missed 27% of the samples detected by the 1 mL venous blood method, but most of the missed parasites carriers were infected by Plasmodium vivax (84%). The remaining missed P. falciparum parasite carriers (N = 3) were only detected in high-transmission areas.

  5. Malaria PCR Detection in Cambodian Low-Transmission Settings: Dried Blood Spots versus Venous Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Canier, Lydie; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Eam, Rotha; Khean, Chanra; Loch, Kaknika; Ken, Malen; Pannus, Pieter; Bosman, Philippe; Stassijns, Jorgen; Nackers, Fabienne; Alipon, SweetC; Char, Meng Chuor; Chea, Nguon; Etienne, William; De Smet, Martin; Kindermans, Jean-Marie; Ménard, Didier

    2015-01-01

    In the context of malaria elimination, novel strategies for detecting very low malaria parasite densities in asymptomatic individuals are needed. One of the major limitations of the malaria parasite detection methods is the volume of blood samples being analyzed. The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of a malaria polymerase chain reaction assay, from dried blood spots (DBS, 5 μL) and different volumes of venous blood (50 μL, 200 μL, and 1 mL). The limit of detection of the polymerase chain reaction assay, using calibrated Plasmodium falciparum blood dilutions, showed that venous blood samples (50 μL, 200 μL, 1 mL) combined with Qiagen extraction methods gave a similar threshold of 100 parasites/mL, ∼100-fold lower than 5 μL DBS/Instagene method. On a set of 521 field samples, collected in two different transmission areas in northern Cambodia, no significant difference in the proportion of parasite carriers, regardless of the methods used was found. The 5 μL DBS method missed 27% of the samples detected by the 1 mL venous blood method, but most of the missed parasites carriers were infected by Plasmodium vivax (84%). The remaining missed P. falciparum parasite carriers (N = 3) were only detected in high-transmission areas. PMID:25561570

  6. Validation and Application of a Dried Blood Spot Ceftriaxone Assay.

    PubMed

    Page-Sharp, Madhu; Nunn, Troy; Salman, Sam; Moore, Brioni R; Batty, Kevin T; Davis, Timothy M E; Manning, Laurens

    2015-10-05

    Dried blood spot (DBS) antibiotic assays can facilitate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies in situations where venous blood sampling is logistically and/or ethically problematic. In this study, we aimed to develop, validate, and apply a DBS ceftriaxone assay. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) DBS ceftriaxone assay was assessed for matrix effects, process efficiency, recovery, variability, and limits of quantification (LOQ) and detection (LOD). The effects of hematocrit, protein binding, red cell partitioning, and chad positioning were evaluated, and thermal stability was assessed. Plasma, DBS, and cell pellet ceftriaxone concentrations in 10 healthy adults were compared, and plasma concentration-time profiles of DBS and plasma ceftriaxone were incorporated into population PK models. The LOQ and LOD for ceftriaxone in DBS were 0.14 mg/liter and 0.05 mg/liter, respectively. Adjusting for hematocrit, red cell partitioning, and relative recovery, DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable to measured plasma concentrations (r > 0.95, P < 0.0001), and Bland-Altman plots showed no significant bias. The final population PK estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and time above threshold MICs for measured and DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were similar. At 35°C, 21°C, 4°C, -20°C, and -80°C, ceftriaxone retained >95% initial concentrations in DBS for 14 h, 35 h, 30 days, 21 weeks, and >11 months, respectively. The present DBS ceftriaxone assay is robust and can be used as a surrogate for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK and PK/PD data in a variety of clinical situations, including in studies of young children and of those in remote or resource-poor settings. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. High quality genome-wide genotyping from archived dried blood spots without DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    St Julien, Krystal R; Jelliffe-Pawlowski, Laura L; Shaw, Gary M; Stevenson, David K; O'Brodovich, Hugh M; Krasnow, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Spots of blood are routinely collected from newborn babies onto filter paper called Guthrie cards and used to screen for metabolic and genetic disorders. The archived dried blood spots are an important and precious resource for genomic research. Whole genome amplification of dried blood spot DNA has been used to provide DNA for genome-wide SNP genotyping. Here we describe a 96 well format procedure to extract DNA from a portion of a dried blood spot that provides sufficient unamplified genomic DNA for genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. We show that SNP genotyping of the unamplified DNA is more robust than genotyping amplified dried blood spot DNA, is comparable in cost, and can be done with thousands of samples. This procedure can be used for genome-wide association studies and other large-scale genomic analyses that require robust, high-accuracy genotyping of dried blood spot DNA.

  8. Use of Dried Blood Spots: An Ideal Tool for Medical Anthropology “in the Field”

    PubMed Central

    Benyshek, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    The use of dried whole blood spot samples provides medical anthropological researchers—especially those working in remote, isolated communities—with several advantages over traditional methods. Anthropological research utilizing venous-drawn blood samples can create challenges in terms of phlebotomy training, personnel needs, storage and transportation requirements, and participant discomfort. Alternatively, research utilizing dried blood spot samples, via finger stick collection techniques, eliminates or reduces these problems greatly. While the use of dried blood spots is often the best sampling option for anthropologists or other population-level researchers, the method does have some limitations. Nevertheless, as the number of dried blood spot analyte protocols continues to increase, the logistical and participant advantages of dried blood spot methods assure their increased utility in biomedical anthropological research in the future. PMID:20307385

  9. Comparison of S. stercoralis Serology Performed on Dried Blood Spots and on Conventional Serum Samples

    PubMed Central

    Formenti, Fabio; Buonfrate, Dora; Prandi, Rosanna; Marquez, Monica; Caicedo, Cintia; Rizzi, Eleonora; Guevara, Angel G.; Vicuña, Yosselin; Huerlo, Francisco R.; Perandin, Francesca; Bisoffi, Zeno; Anselmi, Mariella

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dried blood spots (DBS) are used for epidemiological surveys on infectious diseases in settings where limited resources are available. In fact, DBS can help to overcome logistic difficulties for the collection, transport and storage of biological specimens. Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of Strongyloides stercoralis serology performed on DBS. Methods: A survey was proposed to children attending a school in the village of Borbon, Ecuador, and to their parents/guardians. Each participant gave consent to the collection of both serum and DBS specimens. DBS absorbed on filter papers were analyzed with a commercially available ELISA test for S. stercoralis antibodies, as well as with standard serology. The agreement between the two methods was assessed through the Cohen’s kappa coefficient. Results: The study sample was composed of 174 children and 61 adults, for a total of 235 serum and 235 DBS samples. The serology was positive in 31/235 (13%) serum samples, and in 27/235 (11%) DBS: 4 samples resulted discordant (positive at standard serology). Cohen’s kappa coefficient was 0.921 (95% CI 0.845 – 0.998), indicating a high rate of concordance. Conclusion: DBS are suitable for in field-surveys requiring serological testing for S. stercoralis. PMID:27877170

  10. Towards reproducible MRM based biomarker discovery using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Cooper, Jason D; Lago, Santiago G; Kenny, Diarmuid; Rustogi, Nitin; Stocki, Pawel; Bahn, Sabine

    2017-03-27

    There is an increasing interest in the use of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and multiple reaction monitoring in proteomics. Although several groups have explored the utility of DBS by focusing on protein detection, the reproducibility of the approach and whether it can be used for biomarker discovery in high throughput studies is yet to be determined. We assessed the reproducibility of multiplexed targeted protein measurements in DBS compared to serum. Eighty-two medium to high abundance proteins were monitored in a number of technical and biological replicates. Importantly, as part of the data analysis, several statistical quality control approaches were evaluated to detect inaccurate transitions. After implementing statistical quality control measures, the median CV on the original scale for all detected peptides in DBS was 13.2% and in Serum 8.8%. We also found a strong correlation (r = 0.72) between relative peptide abundance measured in DBS and serum. The combination of minimally invasive sample collection with a highly specific and sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) technique allows for targeted quantification of multiple proteins in a single MS run. This approach has the potential to fundamentally change clinical proteomics and personalized medicine by facilitating large-scale studies.

  11. Dried blood spot analysis for therapeutic drug monitoring of pazopanib.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Djoeke; den Hartigh, Jan; Gelderblom, Hans; Qian, Yanwen; den Hollander, Margret; Verheul, Henk; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; van Erp, Nielka P

    2015-12-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling is potentially a more patient-friendly and flexible alternative to venous sampling of pazopanib. This study determined the agreement between pazopanib DBS and plasma concentrations to facilitate implementation of pazopanib DBS sampling into clinical practice. Paired DBS and plasma samples were collected in 12 patients. Pazopanib plasma concentrations were calculated from DBS concentrations using the formula: plasma concentration = DBSconcentration /(1 - hematocrit). Passing-Bablok and Bland-Altman analyses were used to determine the agreement between calculated and measured plasma concentrations. We predefined a clinical acceptance limit of 25% for the Bland-Altman analysis. Passing-Bablok analysis showed a small constant (intercept estimate, -8.53 [95%CI, -12.22 to -4.41]) and slightly proportional (slope estimate, 1.15 [95%CI, 1.04-1.24]) bias between calculated and measured concentrations. This bias was clinically nonrelevant, as shown by Bland-Altman analysis; the mean ratio of calculated to measured concentrations was 0.94 (95%CI, 0.65-1.23). The clinical acceptance limits were well within these 95% limits of agreement. More specifically, 92.6% of the data points were within the predefined acceptance limits. Pazopanib plasma concentrations can be accurately calculated from DBS concentrations. Although validation of DBS cards prepared by patients themselves is required, these results show that DBS sampling can be used to monitor pazopanib therapy in clinical practice.

  12. Prenatal tobacco exposure and cotinine in newborn dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Spector, Logan G; Murphy, Sharon E; Wickham, Katherine M; Lindgren, Bruce; Joseph, Anne M

    2014-06-01

    Tobacco smoking by pregnant women is a major public health hazard with both short- and long-term effects on offspring. This study describes the presence and level of the nicotine metabolite cotinine in newborn dried blood spots (DBS) and compares it with the reported maternal smoking recorded on state birth registries. We hypothesize that cotinine in DBS may be a useful measure of newborn in utero tobacco exposure. An observational, cross-sectional study of 1414 DBS obtained from California, Michigan, New York, and Washington newborn screening programs was carried out. Cotinine levels in DBS were quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis and compared with maternal smoking as reported in vital statistics data. Cotinine ≥0.3 ng/g was detected in 35% of newborn DBS, including DBS of 29% of newborns whose mothers reportedly did not smoke cigarettes during pregnancy, some of whom were presumably exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Twelve percent of the newborn DBS had cotinine levels that were ≥9.0 ng/g (equivalent to 6 ng/mL plasma, a level that indicates active smoking of the mother), although 41% of the mothers of these infants reportedly did not smoke. These data confirm that reported smoking during pregnancy is an imperfect measure of prenatal tobacco smoke exposure. Cotinine assessment in newborns may improve surveillance of tobacco use during pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Towards reproducible MRM based biomarker discovery using dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Cooper, Jason D.; Lago, Santiago G.; Kenny, Diarmuid; Rustogi, Nitin; Stocki, Pawel; Bahn, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and multiple reaction monitoring in proteomics. Although several groups have explored the utility of DBS by focusing on protein detection, the reproducibility of the approach and whether it can be used for biomarker discovery in high throughput studies is yet to be determined. We assessed the reproducibility of multiplexed targeted protein measurements in DBS compared to serum. Eighty-two medium to high abundance proteins were monitored in a number of technical and biological replicates. Importantly, as part of the data analysis, several statistical quality control approaches were evaluated to detect inaccurate transitions. After implementing statistical quality control measures, the median CV on the original scale for all detected peptides in DBS was 13.2% and in Serum 8.8%. We also found a strong correlation (r = 0.72) between relative peptide abundance measured in DBS and serum. The combination of minimally invasive sample collection with a highly specific and sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) technique allows for targeted quantification of multiple proteins in a single MS run. This approach has the potential to fundamentally change clinical proteomics and personalized medicine by facilitating large-scale studies. PMID:28345601

  14. Anatomical analysis on the lateral bone window of the sella turcica: a study on 530 adult dry skull base specimens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxin; Wang, Renzhi; Lu, Yuntao; Yao, Yong; Qi, Songtao

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the morphometric characteristics of the lateral bone window (LBW) of the sella turica. A descriptive anatomical study of LBW was performed in 530 cases of dry skull base specimens with relatively complete sella turcica. Detailed morphometric characteristics such as dimensions and classification of the LBW was studied. All data analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0 statistical software. LBW is located in the lateral bony structures of sella turcica. The mean area sizes of the LBW were 75.99 ± 25.81 mm(2) (left) and 76.00 ± 25.53 mm(2) (right). There was no significant difference and there was a ​​good positive correlation between bilateral areas of the LBWs. The area size of the LBWs is graded as follows: Grade A (< 60 mm(2)), B (60~90 mm(2)) and C (> 90 mm(2)). LBW morphology was typed as follows: Type I, II, III, IV. And Tpye III includes Type IIIa and IIIb; Type IV includes Type IVa, IVb, IVc, IVd. The lateral bone window of sella turcica is an important structure located between pituiary fossa and parasellar region. The morphological measurements and variations of LBW in this study will provide preliminary data for further anatomical study of sella turcica. Moreover, knowing detailed anatomy of this region is essential for neurosurgeons who make surgery on cranial base or for teaching about the sella turcica in the neuroanatomy lab.

  15. Anatomical Analysis on the Lateral Bone Window of the Sella Turcica: A Study on 530 Adult Dry Skull Base Specimens

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Jianxin; WANG, Renzhi; LU, Yuntao; YAO, Yong; QI, Songtao

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the morphometric characteristics of the lateral bone window (LBW) of the sella turica. Methods: A descriptive anatomical study of LBW was performed in 530 cases of dry skull base specimens with relatively complete sella turcica. Detailed morphometric characteristics such as dimensions and calssification of the LBW was studied. All data analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0 statistical software. Results: LBW is located in the lateral bony structures of sella turcica. The mean area sizes of the LBW were 75.99 ± 25.81 mm2 (left) and 76.00 ± 25.53 mm2 (right). There was no significant difference and there was a ​​good positive correlation between bilateral areas of the LBWs. The area size of the LBWs is graded as follows: Grade A (< 60 mm2), B (60~90 mm2) and C (> 90 mm2). LBW morphology was typed as follows: Type I, II, III, IV. And Tpye III includes Type IIIa and IIIb; Type IV includes Type IVa, IVb, IVc, IVd. Conclusions: The lateral bone window of sella turcica is an important structure located between pituiary fossa and parasellar region. The morphological measurements and variations of LBW in this study will provide preliminary data for further anatomical study of sella turcica. Moreover, knowing detailed anatomy of this region is essential for neurosurgeons who make surgery on cranial base or for teaching about the sella turcica in the neuroanatomy lab. PMID:24465158

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme stability in filter paper dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Flores, Sharon R; Hall, Elizabeth M; De Jesús, Víctor R

    2017-10-01

    Prior to initial distribution of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) proficiency testing (PT) materials, we evaluated G6PD enzyme stability in dried blood spots (DBS) under various temperature and humidity environments to develop storage and usage guidelines for our new materials. We prepared fresh G6PD-normal DBS materials and conducted stability evaluations of daily use and short and long-term storage under various temperature and humidity environments. G6PD DBS PT materials retained 92% of initial activity after 30days of use at 4°C. Materials stored at -20°C and 4°C with desiccant for 30days retained 95% and 90% of initial activity, respectively. When stored for one year at -20°C or six months at 4°C specimens retained >90% of initial activity. Specimens stored at 37°C with desiccant lost 10% activity in three days. At the end of 30days, specimens stored under 'Extreme'-humidity >50% without desiccant- conditions at 37°C assayed below the NSQAP cut off for G6PD. Humidity exacerbated loss of enzyme activity with increasing temperature and time duration. Data suggest that G6PD PT materials can be stored at 4°C and used for up to one month and can be stored at -20°C for one year and yield >90% enzyme activity. Exposure to warm temperatures, especially with elevated humidity, should be avoided. Desiccant should always be used to mitigate humidity effects. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Simultaneous determination of cocaine and opiates in dried blood spots by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Antelo-Domínguez, Ángel; Cocho, José Ángel; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2013-12-15

    A sample pre-treatment method based on blood spot collection filter cards was optimized as a means of using small volume samples for the screening and confirmation of cocaine and opiates abuse. Dried blood spots (DBSs) were prepared by dispersing 20 µL of whole blood specimens previously mixed with the internal standards (deuterated analogs of each target), and subjecting the whole DBS to extraction with 5 mL of methanol under orbital-horizontal shaking (180 rpm) for 10 min. Determinations were based on direct electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) by injecting the re-dissolved methanol extract with the delivery solution (acetonitrile-water-formic acid, 80:19.875:0.125) at a flow rate of 60 µL min(-1), and using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode with the m/z (precursor ion)→m/z (product ion) transitions for acquisition. Matrix effect has been found to be statistically significant (Multiple Range Test) when assessing cocaine, BZE, codeine and morphine, and the use of the standard addition method (dispersion of whole blood previously mixed with standards onto the filter papers) was needed for accurate determinations. The developed DBS-ESI-MS/MS procedure offered good intra-day and inter-day precisions (lower than 10% and 12%, respectively), as well as good intra-day and inter-day accuracies (inter-day absolute recoveries, expressed as the mean analytical recovery over three target concentration levels, of 103%, 100%, 101%, 98% and 100% for cocaine, BZE, codeine, morphine and 6-MAM, respectively). The high sensitivity inherent to MS/MS determinations combined with the minimal dilution of sample allowed low limits of quantification for all targets, and the developed method results therefore adequate for cocaine and opiates screening and confirmation purposes. The procedure was finally applied to DBSs prepared from whole blood from polydrug abusers, and results were compared with those obtained after a conventional sample pretreatment

  18. Development of a PCR Assay to Detect Low Level Trypanosoma cruzi in Blood Specimens Collected with PAXgene Blood DNA Tubes for Clinical Trials Treating Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Chen, Lei; Kibukawa, Miho; Kang, John; Waskin, Hetty; Marton, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasitic infection of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). The STOP CHAGAS clinical trial was initiated in 2011 to evaluate posaconazole in treating Chagas disease, with treatment success defined as negative qualitative PCR results of detecting the parasites in blood specimens collected post-treatment. PAXgene Blood DNA tubes were utilized as a simple procedure to collect and process blood specimens. However, the PAXgene blood specimens challenged published T. cruzi PCR methods, resulting in poor sensitivity and reproducibility. To accurately evaluate the treatment efficacy of the clinical study, we developed and validated a robust PCR assay for detecting low level T. cruzi in PAXgene blood specimens. The assay combines a new DNA extraction method with a custom designed qPCR assay, resulting in limit of detection of 0.005 and 0.01 fg/μl for K98 and CL Brener, two representative strains of two of T. cruzi's discrete typing units. Reliable qPCR standard curves were established for both strains to measure parasite loads, with amplification efficiency ≥ 90% and the lower limit of linearity ≥ 0.05 fg/μl. The assay successfully analyzed the samples collected from the STOP CHAGAS study and may prove useful for future global clinical trials evaluating new therapies for asymptomatic chronic Chagas disease.

  19. Development of a PCR Assay to Detect Low Level Trypanosoma cruzi in Blood Specimens Collected with PAXgene Blood DNA Tubes for Clinical Trials Treating Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo; Chen, Lei; Kibukawa, Miho; Kang, John; Waskin, Hetty; Marton, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasitic infection of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). The STOP CHAGAS clinical trial was initiated in 2011 to evaluate posaconazole in treating Chagas disease, with treatment success defined as negative qualitative PCR results of detecting the parasites in blood specimens collected post-treatment. PAXgene Blood DNA tubes were utilized as a simple procedure to collect and process blood specimens. However, the PAXgene blood specimens challenged published T. cruzi PCR methods, resulting in poor sensitivity and reproducibility. To accurately evaluate the treatment efficacy of the clinical study, we developed and validated a robust PCR assay for detecting low level T. cruzi in PAXgene blood specimens. The assay combines a new DNA extraction method with a custom designed qPCR assay, resulting in limit of detection of 0.005 and 0.01 fg/μl for K98 and CL Brener, two representative strains of two of T. cruzi’s discrete typing units. Reliable qPCR standard curves were established for both strains to measure parasite loads, with amplification efficiency ≥ 90% and the lower limit of linearity ≥ 0.05 fg/μl. The assay successfully analyzed the samples collected from the STOP CHAGAS study and may prove useful for future global clinical trials evaluating new therapies for asymptomatic chronic Chagas disease. PMID:27906977

  20. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status. PMID:26605791

  1. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status.

  2. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  3. Mass spectrometry in cancer biomarker research: a case for immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins from clinical tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, DaRue A; Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C; Nissley, Dwight V; Simpson, R Mark; Citrin, Deborah E; Mackall, Crystal L; Linehan, W Marston; Blonder, Josip

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of clinically relevant cancer biomarkers using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven difficult, primarily because of the enormous dynamic range of blood-derived protein concentrations and the fact that the 22 most abundant blood-derived proteins constitute approximately 99% of the total plasma protein mass. Immunodepletion of clinical body fluid specimens (e.g., serum/plasma) for the removal of highly abundant proteins is a reasonable and reproducible solution. Often overlooked, clinical tissue specimens also contain a formidable amount of highly abundant blood-derived proteins present in tissue-embedded networks of blood/lymph capillaries and interstitial fluid. Hence, the dynamic range impediment to biomarker discovery remains a formidable obstacle, regardless of clinical sample type (solid tissue and/or body fluid). Thus, we optimized and applied simultaneous immunodepletion of blood-derived proteins from solid tissue and peripheral blood, using clear cell renal cell carcinoma as a model disease. Integrative analysis of data from this approach and genomic data obtained from the same type of tumor revealed concordant key pathways and protein targets germane to clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This includes the activation of the lipogenic pathway characterized by increased expression of adipophilin (PLIN2) along with 'cadherin switching', a phenomenon indicative of transcriptional reprogramming linked to renal epithelial dedifferentiation. We also applied immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins to various tissue types (e.g., adipose tissue and breast tissue) showing unambiguously that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins represents a powerful tool for the reproducible profiling of tissue proteomes. Herein, we show that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins from solid tissue specimens is of equal importance to depletion of body fluids and recommend its routine use in the context of biological discovery and

  4. Significant Reduction in Preanalytical Errors for Nonphlebotomy Blood Draws After Implementation of a Novel Integrated Specimen Collection Module.

    PubMed

    Le, Rachel D; Melanson, Stacy E F; Petrides, Athena K; Goonan, Ellen M; Bixho, Ida; Landman, Adam B; Brogan, Anne Marie; Bates, David W; Tanasijevic, Milenko J

    2016-10-01

    Most preanalytical errors at our institution occur during nonphlebotomy blood draws. We implemented an electronic health record (EHR), interfaced the EHR to the laboratory information system, and designed a new specimen collection module. We studied the effects of the new system on nonphlebotomy preanalytical errors. We used an electronic database of preanalytical errors and calculated the number and type of the most common errors in the emergency department (ED) and inpatient nursing for 3-month periods before (August-October 2014) and after (August-October 2015) implementation. The level of staff compliance with the new system was also assessed. The average monthly preanalytical errors decreased significantly from 7.95 to 1.45 per 1,000 specimens in the ED (P < 0001) and 11.75 to 3.25 per 1,000 specimens in inpatient nursing (P < 0001). The rate of decrease was similar for mislabeled, unlabeled, wrong specimen received and no specimen received errors. Most residual errors (80% in the ED and 67% in inpatient nursing) occurred when providers did not use the new system as designed. Implementation of a customized specimen collection module led to a significant reduction in preanalytical errors. Improved compliance with the system may lead to further reductions in error rates. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Dried tube specimens: a simple and cost-effective method for preparation of HIV proficiency testing panels and quality control materials for use in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Bharat S; Anyanwu, Juliana; Patel, Hetal; Downer, Marie; Kalou, Mireille; Gichimu, Catherine; Keipkerich, Bera Steven; Clement, Nelly; Omondi, Michael; Mayer, Oren; Ou, Chin-Yih; Nkengasong, John N

    2010-02-01

    HIV testing has rapidly expanded worldwide, but proficiency testing (PT) programs to monitor and improve the quality of testing are often lacking in resource-limited settings (RLS). Traditional PT programs and quality control reagents use serum or plasma specimens requiring stringent conditions for storage and transportation. A novel, simple and easy to use approach, based on dried tube specimens (DTS), was developed that can help monitor the quality of HIV antibody testing in RLS. DTS were prepared by drying 20 microl of specimen overnight at room temperature. The addition of a green dye (0.1%) made the DTS pellets visible without affecting the test results. Before testing, the DTS were rehydrated with 200 microl of PBS-Tween buffer. A panel of 303 DTS samples (135 HIV positive and 168 HIV negative) was evaluated with two rapid tests. Sensitivity and specificity with the Determine HIV-1/2 test were 99.3% and 99.4%, respectively, and with OraQuick were 98.5% and 100%, respectively. Stability studies showed that HIV-specific antibodies in the DTS specimens were stable at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C for 4 weeks, with only marginal decline at 37 degrees C and 45 degrees C over 4 weeks. The DTS-based PT program was piloted successfully in 24 testing sites in Kenya. Results demonstrate that the DTS is a simple to use, practical method to prepare and distribute PT panels and quality control specimens to monitor HIV testing practices in RLS.

  6. Expansion of HIV screening to non-clinical venues is aided by the use of dried blood spots for Western blot confirmation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Timothy J; Antonio-Gaddy, Mara San; Richardson-Moore, April; Styer, Linda M; Bigelow-Saulsbery, Deborah; Parker, Monica M

    2013-12-01

    HIV rapid testing programs in New York State (NYS) are required to collect a specimen for confirmation of a preliminary positive result; however, some venues have limited capacity to collect venous blood, and confirmation using oral fluid is restricted by cost and availability. To evaluate the feasibility of using dried blood spots (DBS) at non-clinical HIV rapid testing sites for Western blot testing. The New York State Department of Health facilitated registration of 48 non-clinical HIV test sites and provided training on DBS procedures. Following a reactive rapid test, DBS were collected by fingerstick onto filter paper cards, dried and mailed to the NYS public health laboratory for Western blot testing. From October 2010 to December 2012, 280 DBS specimens were submitted for confirmation. Four (1.4%) were unsatisfactory for testing and 276 (98.6%) DBS were tested. Of these, 235 (85.1%) were positive, 37 (13.4%) were negative and 4 (1.4%) were indeterminate. During this period, the laboratory also received 1033 venous blood specimens for rapid test confirmation, and 35 (3.4%) were unsatisfactory. Of the 998 tested by Western blot, 784 (78.6%) were positive, 197 (19.7%) were negative and 17 (1.7%) were indeterminate. Compared to venous blood, the percentage of rapid test referral specimens with a positive Western blot was significantly greater for DBS specimens and the frequency of unsatisfactory specimens did not differ significantly. These results indicate that DBS are a suitable alternative to venous blood for confirmation of HIV rapid tests conducted at non-clinical sites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. HIV-1 infection using dried blood spots can be confirmed by Bio-Rad Geenius™ HIV 1/2 confirmatory assay.

    PubMed

    Fernández McPhee, Carolina; Álvarez, Patricia; Prieto, Luis; Obiang, Jacinta; Avedillo, Pedro; Vargas, Antonio; Rojo, Pablo; Abad, Carlota; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, Africa

    2015-02-01

    Confirmatory assays for HIV diagnosis are not well implemented in low-income countries with limited infrastructures. Geenius™ HIV 1/2 Confirmatory Assay is a single-use immunochromatographic test for the confirmation and differentiation of individual HIV-1/2 antibodies validated in venous whole blood, serum and plasma. However, dried blood specimens (DBS) are easier to collect, store and transport than plasma/serum in remote settings from limited resource countries and mobile populations. To evaluate the confirmatory assay Geenius™ HIV 1/2 for HIV diagnosis using DBS specimens. We collected DBS from 70 Guinean women previously diagnosed as HIV-1 infected by rapid tests using whole blood samples in Equatorial Guinea and from 25 HIV-negative Guinean women and HIV-exposed infants diagnosed by molecular testing in Madrid. Geenius HIV 1/2 was performed by eluting two drops of dried blood from each patient and following the manufacturer instructions for the assay but using 40μl of the eluted blood as specimen. The results obtained were confirmed by western blot. Geenius™ HIV 1/2 successfully confirmed the HIV-1 positive and negative infection in all tested DBS specimens, providing 100% specificity [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 86.2%-100%]. No HIV 1/2 coinfections were found in the study cohort. This is the first report that proves a good performance of Geenius™ HIV 1/2 for the HIV-1 infection confirmation using only two drops of dried blood. Our results approve the utility of this confirmatory assay using DBS when a lack of adequate infrastructure to collect, store or transport plasma/serum is found. DBS are a practical alternative to plasma/serum for HIV serological diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Dried Blood Spots with a Multiplex Assay for Measuring Recent HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Kelly A.; Ambrose, Krystin M.; Kennedy, M. Susan; Owen, S. Michele

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory-based HIV tests for recent infection (TRIs), which primarily measure a specific serological biomarker(s) that distinguishes recent from long-term HIV infection, have facilitated the estimation of population-based incidence. Dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper are an attractive sample source for HIV surveillance, given the simplified and cost-effective methods of specimen collection, storage, and shipment. Here, we evaluated the use of DBS in conjunction with an in-house multiplex TRI, the HIV-1-specific Bio-Plex assay, which measures direct antibody binding and avidity to multiple HIV-1 analytes. The assay performance was comparable between matched plasma and DBS samples from HIV-1 infected individuals obtained from diverse sources. The coefficients of variation, comparing the median antibody reactivity for each analyte between plasma and DBS, ranged from 2.78% to 9.40% and the correlation coefficients between the two sample types ranged from 0.89 to 0.97, depending on the analyte. The correlation in antibody reactivity between laboratory and site-prepared DBS for each analyte ranged from 0.87 to 0.98 and from 0.90 to 0.97 between site-prepared DBS and plasma. The correlation in assay measures between plasma and DBS indicate that the sample types can be used interchangeably with the Bio-Plex format, without negatively impacting the misclassification rate of the assay. PMID:25232736

  9. Comparison of Red Blood Cell Hemolysis Using Plasma and Serum Separation Tubes for Outpatient Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Dae-Hyun; Won, Dahae; Jeong, Tae-Dong; Lee, Woochang; Chun, Sail

    2015-01-01

    Background To rapidly obtain outpatient results, we use plasma separation tubes (PST) for chemistry analysis. If lactate dehydrogenase measurement is required, serum separation tubes (SST) are used. There has been no evaluation of hemolysis with these tubes. We compared the hemolytic index (HI) obtained by using PST and SST and applied this for choosing appropriate tubes for clinical laboratories. Methods The HI of specimens obtained from outpatients visiting Asan Medical Center between July and December 2012 was analyzed. The HI was scored from 0 to 10 by using the Toshiba 200FR (Toshiba Medical Systems Co., Japan). HI was classified by sample tube type, and significant hemolysis was defined as a HI of 2 or more. For significant hemolysis cases, medical records were reviewed to identify the causes. Results Among 171,519 specimens, significant hemolysis was observed in 0.66% of specimens (0.68% of PST specimens, 0.46% of SST specimens). The mean HI in PST was 0.18 (SD: 0.43) and that in SST was 0.14 (SD: 0.37). The proportion of significant hemolysis was significantly higher in PST than in SST (P=0.001). The cause of significant hemolysis was identified as chemotherapy and prosthetic valve in 48.1% of specimens. Complex sampling errors may have caused significant hemolysis in the remaining 51.9% of specimens. Conclusions The incidence of hemolysis was slightly higher for PST than SST, although both were <1%. PST are thought to be more useful than SST in outpatient testing because of rapid turnaround time, greater sample volume, and less risk of random errors due to fibrin strands. PMID:25729720

  10. Evaluation of Amount of Blood in Dry Blood Spots: Ring-Disk Electrode Conductometry.

    PubMed

    Kadjo, Akinde F; Stamos, Brian N; Shelor, C Phillip; Berg, Jordan M; Blount, Benjamin C; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2016-06-21

    A fixed area punch in dried blood spot (DBS) analysis is assumed to contain a fixed amount of blood, but the amount actually depends on a number of factors. The presently preferred approach is to normalize the measurement with respect to the sodium level, measured by atomic spectrometry. Instead of sodium levels, we propose electrical conductivity of the extract as an equivalent nondestructive measure. A dip-type small diameter ring-disk electrode (RDE) is ideal for very small volumes. However, the conductance (G) measured by an RDE depends on the depth (D) of the liquid below the probe. There is no established way of computing the specific conductance (σ) of the solution from G. Using a COMSOL Multiphysics model, we were able to obtain excellent agreement between the measured and the model predicted conductance as a function of D. Using simulations over a large range of dimensions, we provide a spreadsheet-based calculator where the RDE dimensions are the input parameters and the procedure determines the 99% of the infinite depth conductance (G99) and the depth D99 at which this is reached. For typical small diameter probes (outer electrode diameter ∼ <2 mm), D99 is small enough for dip-type measurements in extract volumes of ∼100 μL. We demonstrate the use of such probes with DBS extracts. In a small group of 12 volunteers (age 20-66), the specific conductance of 100 μL aqueous extracts of 2 μL of spotted blood showed a variance of 17.9%. For a given subject, methanol extracts of DBS spots nominally containing 8 and 4 μL of blood differed by a factor of 1.8-1.9 in the chromatographically determined values of sulfate and chloride (a minor and major constituent, respectively). The values normalized with respect to the conductance of the extracts differed by ∼1%. For serum associated analytes, normalization of the analyte value by the extract conductance can thus greatly reduce errors from variations in the spotted blood volume/unit area.

  11. Automatic disease screening method using image processing for dried blood microfluidic drop stain pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Sikarwar, Basant S; Roy, Mukesh; Ranjan, Priya; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines programmed automatic recognition of infection from samples of dried stains of micro-scale drops of patient blood. This technique has the upside of being low-cost and less-intrusive and not requiring puncturing the patient with a needle for drawing blood, which is especially critical for infants and the matured. It also does not require expensive pathological blood test laboratory equipment. The method is shown in this work to be successful for ailment identification in patients suffering from tuberculosis and anaemia. Illness affects the physical properties of blood, which thus influence the samples of dried micro-scale blood drop stains. For instance, if a patient has a severe drop in platelet count, which is often the case of dengue or malaria patients, the blood's physical property of viscosity drops substantially, i.e. the blood is thinner. Thus, the blood micro-scale drop stain samples can be utilised for diagnosing maladies. This paper presents programmed automatic examination of the dried micro-scale drop blood stain designs utilising an algorithm based on pattern recognition. The samples of micro-scale blood drop stains of ordinary non-infected people are clearly recognisable as well as the samples of micro-scale blood drop stains of sick people, due to key distinguishing features. As a contextual analysis, the micro-scale blood drop stains of patients infected with tuberculosis have been contrasted with the micro-scale blood drop stains of typical normal healthy people. The paper dives into the fundamental flow mechanics behind how the samples of the dried micro-scale blood drop stain is shaped. What has been found is a thick ring like feature in the dried micro-scale blood drop stains of non-ailing people and thin shape like lines in the dried micro-scale blood drop stains of patients with anaemia or tuberculosis disease. The ring like feature at the periphery is caused by an outward stream conveying suspended particles to the edge

  12. Do the skills acquired by novice surgeons using anatomic dry models transfer effectively to the task of diagnostic knee arthroscopy performed on cadaveric specimens?

    PubMed

    Butler, Aaron; Olson, Tyson; Koehler, Ryan; Nicandri, Gregg

    2013-02-06

    The use of surgical simulation in orthopaedic education is increasing; however, its ideal place within the training curriculum remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of training novice surgeons on an anatomic dry model of the knee prior to training them to perform diagnostic arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens. Fourteen medical students were randomly assigned to two groups. The experimental group was trained to perform diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee on anatomic dry models prior to training on cadaveric specimens. The control group was trained only on cadaveric specimens. Proficiency was assessed with use of a modified version of a previously validated objective assessment of arthroscopic skill, the Basic Arthroscopic Knee Skill Scoring System (BAKSSS). The mean number of trials required to attain minimal proficiency when performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy was compared between the groups. The cumulative transfer effectiveness ratio (CTER) was calculated to measure the transfer of skills acquired by the experimental group. The mean number of trials to demonstrate minimum proficiency was significantly lower in the experimental group (2.57) than in the control group (4.57) (p < 0.01). The mean time to demonstrate proficiency was also significantly less in the experimental group (37.51 minutes) than in the control group (60.48 minutes) (p < 0.01). The CTER of dry-model training for the task of performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens was 0.2. Previous training utilizing an anatomic dry knee model resulted in improved proficiency for novice surgeons learning to perform diagnostic knee arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens. A CTER of 0.2 suggests that dry models can serve as a useful adjunct to cadaveric training for diagnostic knee arthroscopy but cannot entirely replace it within the orthopaedic curriculum. Further work is necessary to determine the optimal amount of training on anatomic dry models

  13. Collecting in collections: a PCR strategy and primer set for DNA barcoding of decades-old dried museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Natural history museums are vastly underutilized as a source of material for DNA analysis because of perceptions about the limitations of DNA degradation in older specimens. Despite very few exceptions, most DNA barcoding projects, which aim to obtain sequence data from all species, generally use specimens collected specifically for that purpose, instead of the wealth of identified material in museums, constrained by the lack of suitable PCR methods. Any techniques that extend the utility of museum specimens for DNA analysis therefore are highly valuable. This study first tested the effects of specimen age and PCR amplicon size on PCR success rates in pinned insect specimens, then developed a PCR primer set and amplification strategy allowing greatly increased utilization of older museum specimens for DNA barcoding. PCR success rates compare favourably with the few published studies utilizing similar aged specimens, and this new strategy has the advantage of being easily automated for high-throughput laboratory workflows. The strategy uses hemi-nested, degenerate, M13-tailed PCR primers to amplify two overlapping amplicons, using two PCRs per amplicon (i.e. four PCRs per DNA sample). Initial PCR products are reamplified using an internal primer and a M13 primer. Together the two PCR amplicons yield 559 bp of the COI gene from Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Odonata and presumably also other insects. BARCODE standard-compliant data were recovered from 67% (56 of 84) of specimens up to 25 years old, and 51% (102 of 197) of specimens up to 55 years old. Given the time, cost and specialist expertise required for fieldwork and identification, 'collecting in collections' is a viable alternative allowing researchers to capitalize on the knowledge captured by curation work in decades past.

  14. Nursing blood specimen collection techniques and hemolysis rates in an emergency department: analysis of venipuncture versus intravenous catheter collection techniques.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Glynnis; Stike, Rose; Pollack, Marc; Bosley, Jenny; O'Brien, Patti; Hake, Amy; Landis, Greta; Billings, Natalie; Gordon, Pam; Manzella, Steve; Stover, Tina

    2008-02-01

    Re-collection of hemolyzed blood specimens delays patient care in overcrowded emergency departments. Our emergency department was unable to meet a benchmark of a 2% hemolysis rate for the collection of blood samples. Our hypothesis was that hemolysis rates of blood specimens differ dependent on the blood collection technique by venipuncture or intravenous catheter draw. A prospective, cross-over study of blood collection techniques in a 64,000 annual visit, community teaching hospital emergency department was conducted. Eleven experienced registered nurses with more than 2 years' ED experience completed a standardized phlebotomy retraining session. Registered nurses were randomly assigned to collect samples via intravenous catheters or venipuncture. After nurses collected 70 samples, they then collected samples via the other method. A standardized data collection form was completed. Blood samples were processed and assessed for hemolysis using standard procedures by laboratory technicians who were blinded to the collection method. A total of 853 valid samples were collected; 355 samples (41.6%) were drawn via venipuncture and 498 samples (58.4%) were drawn through an intravenous catheter. Of these, 28 intravenous catheter samples (5.6%) were found to be hemolyzed, whereas only 1 venipuncture sample (0.3%) was hemolyzed. This finding was significant (x2 < 0.001). Experienced ED nurses can reduce the number of hemolyzed specimens by collecting via venipuncture instead of through intravenous catheters. This practice should be considered as standard of care in the ED setting. Total samples by nurse were affected by EMS patients arriving with existing intravenous lines, and nurse schedules affected total samples per nurse.

  15. Zika Virus Infection and Prolonged Viremia in Whole-Blood Specimens.

    PubMed

    Mansuy, Jean Michel; Mengelle, Catherine; Pasquier, Christophe; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Delobel, Pierre; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Izopet, Jacques

    2017-05-01

    We tested whole-blood and plasma samples from immunocompetent patients who had had benign Zika virus infections and found that Zika virus RNA persisted in whole blood substantially longer than in plasma. This finding may have implications for diagnosis of acute symptomatic and asymptomatic infections and for testing of blood donations.

  16. DNA methylome profiling using neonatal dried blood spot samples: a proof-of-principle study.

    PubMed

    Hollegaard, Mads Vilhelm; Grauholm, Jonas; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Hougaard, David Michael

    2013-04-01

    DNA methylation is the most common DNA modification and perhaps the best described epigenetic modification. It is believed to be important for genomic imprinting and gene regulation and has been associated with the development of diseases such as schizophrenia and some types of cancer. Neonatal dried blood spot samples, commonly known as Guthrie cards, are routinely collected worldwide to screen newborns for diseases. Some countries, including Denmark, have been storing the excess neonatal dried blood spot samples in biobanks for decades. Representing a high percentage of the population under a certain age, the neonatal dried blood spot samples are a potential alternative to collecting new samples to study diseases. As such, neonatal dried blood spot samples have previously been used for DNA genotyping studies with excellent results. However, the amount of material available for research is often limited, challenging researchers to generate the most data from a limited quantity of material. In this proof-of-principle study, we address whether two 3.2mm disks punched from a neonatal dried blood spot sample contain enough DNA for genome-wide methylome profiling, measuring 27,578 loci at the same time. We selected two subjects and carried out the following with each: 1) collected an adult whole-blood sample as reference, 2) spotted a fraction of the whole-blood sample onto a similar type of filter paper as used in the newborn screening and stored it for 3years to serve as a dried blood spot reference, and 3) identified the archived neonatal dried blood spot samples, stored for 26-28years, in the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank as a representative of the archived samples. For comparison, we used two different kits for DNA extraction. The DNA, extracted using the Extract-N-Amp Blood PCR kit, was analyzed, and no statistically significant differences were observed (P<0.001) when we compared the methylation profile of the reference whole-blood samples to the dried blood

  17. Active tracking of rejected dried blood samples in a large program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Inalegwu, Auchi; Phillips, Sunny; Datir, Rawlings; Chime, Christopher; Ozumba, Petronilla; Peters, Samuel; Ogbanufe, Obinna; Mensah, Charles; Abimiku, Alash’Le; Dakum, Patrick; Ndembi, Nicaise

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the impact of rejection at different levels of health care by retrospectively reviewing records of dried blood spot samples received at the molecular laboratory for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) early infant diagnosis (EID) between January 2008 and December 2012. METHODS: The specimen rejection rate, reasons for rejection and the impact of rejection at different levels of health care was examined. The extracted data were cleaned and checked for consistency and then de-duplicated using the unique patient and clinic identifiers. The cleaned data were ciphered and exported to SPSS version 19 (SPSS 2010 IBM Corp, New York, United States) for statistical analyses. RESULTS: Sample rejection rate of 2.4% (n = 786/32552) and repeat rate of 8.8% (n = 69/786) were established. The mean age of infants presenting for first HIV molecular test among accepted valid samples was 17.83 wk (95%CI: 17.65-18.01) vs 20.30 wk (95%CI: 16.53-24.06) for repeated samples. HIV infection rate was 9.8% vs 15.9% for accepted and repeated samples. Compared to tertiary healthcare clinics, secondary and primary clinics had two-fold and three-fold higher likelihood of sample rejection, respectively (P < 0.05). We observed a significant increase in sample rejection rate with increasing number of EID clinics (r = 0.893, P = 0.041). The major reasons for rejection were improper sample collection (26.3%), improper labeling (16.4%) and insufficient blood (14.8%). CONCLUSION: Programs should monitor pre-analytical variables and incorporate continuous quality improvement interventions to reduce errors associated with sample rejection and improve patient retention. PMID:27175352

  18. Bisoprolol, ramipril and simvastatin determination in dried blood spot samples using LC-HRMS for assessing medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Graham; Cocks, Elizabeth; Tanna, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    The use of dried blood spot (DBS) collection cards was investigated for the quantification of three therapeutic drugs used in cardiovascular therapy for assessing medication adherence. A liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) method was developed and validated for the determination of bisoprolol, ramipril and simvastatin. Whole blood spiked with target analytes was used to produce 30 μl blood spots on specimen collection cards. An 8mm disc was cut from the dried blood spot and extracted using methanol: water (70:30, v/v) containing the internal standard, atenolol. Extracts were vortexed, sonicated and then centrifuged. Gradient chromatographic elution was achieved using a Zorbax Eclipse C18 HD 100 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 μm pore size column and a mobile phase flow rate of 0.6 ml/min and the column oven temperature at 40 °C with a run time of 3 min. MS detection was carried out in electrospray positive ion mode for the three target drugs and for the IS. Drug recoveries from spiked blood spots were ≥ 92% for bisoprolol and ramipril and ~43% for simvastatin and the drugs were stable in DBS for at least 12 weeks. Validation of the LC-HRMS method showed good linearity and the accuracy (relative error) and precision (coefficient of variation) values were within the pre-defined limits of ≤ 15% at all concentrations. Matrix effects and the effects of different volumes of blood applied to the collection card were investigated. The LC-HRMS method successfully identified control volunteers who were known to be either adherent or non-adherent. There were no false positives from volunteers taking other cardiovascular drugs or from volunteers receiving no medication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. State-of-the-art dried blood spot analysis: an overview of recent advances and future trends.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Roland Jw; Hooff, Gero P

    2013-09-01

    Dried blood spots have become a popular method in a variety of micro blood-sampling techniques in the life sciences sector, consequently competing with the field of conventional, invasive blood sampling by venepuncture. Dried blood spots are widely applied in numerous bioanalytical assays and have gained a significant role in the screening of inherited metabolic diseases, in PK and PD modeling; in the treatment and diagnosis of infectious diseases; and in therapeutic drug monitoring. Recent technological developments such as automation, online extraction, mass spectrometric direct analysis and also conventional dried blood spot bioanalysis, as well as future developments in dried blood spot bioanalysis are highlighted and presented in this article.

  20. Comparison of a PCR assay in whole blood and serum specimens for canine brucellosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Keid, L B; Soares, R M; Vasconcellos, S A; Salgado, V R; Megid, J; Richtzenhain, L J

    2010-07-17

    The performance of a serum PCR assay was compared with that of a blood PCR assay for the diagnosis of canine brucellosis caused by Brucella canis in 72 dogs. The dogs were classified into three groups (infected, non-infected and suspected brucellosis) according to the results of blood culture and serological tests. The sensitivities of blood PCR and serum PCR were, respectively, 97.14 per cent and 25.71 per cent. The specificities of both were 100 per cent. In the group of dogs with suspected brucellosis, three were positive by blood PCR and none was positive by serum PCR. Serum PCR showed little value for the direct diagnosis of canine brucellosis as the assay had low diagnostic sensitivity and fewer positive dogs were detected by this test than by blood culture, blood PCR, rapid slide agglutination test (RSAT) and RSAT with 2-mercaptoethanol.

  1. Product characteristics and quality of bovine blood-enriched dried vegetable paste.

    PubMed

    Faria da Rocha, Silvia; Kappaun Rodrigues, Marla Cristina; Legemann Monte, Micheli; Quites Larrosa, Ana Paula; de Almeida Pinto, Luiz Antonio

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a preparation of vegetable paste with bovine blood in order to maximize the protein content using linear programming, and to analyze the product characteristics and quality of bovine blood-enriched vegetable paste dried in a spouted bed. The drying experiments were performed by evaluating the effects of inlet air temperature, paste flow rate and paste solids concentration on the dried product characteristics and quality (functional and nutritional properties). The vegetable paste enriched with bovine blood was a good source of protein (∼0.20 g g(-1) , dry basis), and the linear programming was adequate to select the constituents (carrot, onion, potato, kale, tomato, soybean oil and bovine blood) and optimize their quantities. The drying conditions of bovine blood-enriched vegetable paste in the spouted bed that gave the best product characteristics were an air temperature of 110 °C and a paste flow rate of 600 mL h(-1) with 0.07 g g(-1) solids concentration. The addition of bovine blood to vegetable paste by linear programming increased the protein content of the paste and improved its functional properties and digestibility. The powder obtained from the spouted bed drier showed suitable functional and nutritional properties and was also a good source of antioxidant compounds. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Some mechanical properties of small specimens cut from 1.79-inch-thick southern pine dried for 6 hours at 300°F or for 5 days at 180°F- A Comparison

    Treesearch

    P. Koch; W.L. Wellford

    1978-01-01

    Small specimens cut from 1.79-inch-thick southern pine dried from green condition for 6 hours at a dry-bulb temperature of 300 F suffered no diminution in the mechanical properties determined, when compared to matched wood dried for 5 days at 180 F.

  3. Quantitation of pregabalin in dried blood spots and dried plasma spots by validated LC-MS/MS methods.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Nađa; Dotsikas, Yannis; Jović, Nebojša; Stevanović, Galina; Malenović, Anđelija; Medenica, Mirjana

    2015-05-10

    In this paper, novel LC-MS/MS methods for the determination of antiepileptic drug pregabalin in dried matrix spots (DMS) are presented. This attractive technique of sample collection in micro amount was utilized in the form of dried blood spots (DBS) and dried plasma spots (DPS). Following a pre-column derivatization procedure, using n-propyl chloroformate in the presence of n-propanol, and consecutive liquid-liquid extraction, derivatized pregabalin and its internal standard, 4-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid, were detected in positive ion mode by applying two SRM transitions per analyte. A YMC-Pack Octyl column (50mm×4.0mm, 3μm particle size) maintained at 30°C, was utilized with running mobile phase composed of acetonitrile: 0.15% formic acid (85:15, v/v). Flow rate was 550μL/min and total run time 2min. Established methods were fully validated over the concentration range of 0.200-20.0μg/mL for DBS and 0.400-40.0μg/mL for DPS, respectively, while specificity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix-effect, stability, dilution integrity and spot homogeneity were found within acceptance criteria. Validated methods were applied for the determination of pregabalin levels in dried blood and plasma samples obtained from patients with epilepsy, after per os administration of commercial capsules. Comparison of drug level in blood and plasma, as well as correction steps undertaken in order to overcome hematocrit issue, when analyzing DBS, are also given. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in Dry State Hemoglobin over Time Do Not Increase the Potential for Oxidative DNA Damage in Dried Blood

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, April; Ballantyne, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin (Hb) is the iron-containing oxygen transport protein present in the red blood cells of vertebrates. Ancient DNA and forensic scientists are particularly interested in Hb reactions in the dry state because both regularly encounter aged, dried bloodstains. The DNA in such stains may be oxidatively damaged and, in theory, may be deteriorated by the presence of Hb. To understand the nature of the oxidative systems potentially available to degrade DNA in the presence of dried Hb, we need to determine what molecular species Hb forms over time. These species will determine what type of iron (i.e. Fe2+/Fe3+/Fe4+) is available to participate in further chemical reactions. The availability of “free” iron will affect the ability of the system to undergo Fenton-type reactions which generate the highly reactive hydroxyl radical (OH•). The OH• can directly damage DNA. Methodology/Principal Findings Oxygenated Hb (oxyHb) converts over time to oxidized Hb (metHb), but this happens more quickly in the dry state than in the hydrated state, as shown by monitoring stabilized oxyHb. In addition, dry state oxyHb converts into at least one other unknown species other than metHb. Although “free” iron was detectable as both Fe2+ and Fe3+ in dry and hydrated oxyHb and metHb, the amount of ions detected did not increase over time. There was no evidence that Hb becomes more prone to generating OH• as it ages in either the hydrated or dry states. Conclusions The Hb molecule in the dried state undergoes oxidative changes and releases reactive Fe(II) cations. These changes, however, do not appear to increase the ability of Hb to act as a more aggressive Fenton reagent over time. Nevertheless, the presence of Hb in the vicinity of DNA in dried bloodstains creates the opportunity for OH•-induced oxidative damage to the deoxyribose sugar and the DNA nucleobases. PMID:19352435

  5. Dried-blood spots: a cost-effective field method for the detection of Chikungunya virus circulation in remote areas.

    PubMed

    Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Rafisandratantsoa, Jean Théophile; Andriamamonjy, Seta; Richard, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, there were outbreaks of febrile polyarthritis due to Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in the Comoros Islands. CHIKV then spread to other islands in the Indian Ocean: La Réunion, Mauritius, Seychelles and Madagascar. These outbreaks revealed the lack of surveillance and preparedness of Madagascar and other countries. Thus, it was decided in 2007 to establish a syndrome-based surveillance network to monitor dengue-like illness. This study aims to evaluate the use of capillary blood samples blotted on filter papers for molecular diagnosis of CHIKV infection. Venous blood samples can be difficult to obtain and the shipment of serum in appropriate temperature conditions is too costly for most developing countries. Venous blood and dried-blood blotted on filter paper (DBFP) were collected during the last CHIKV outbreak in Madagascar (2010) and as part of our routine surveillance of dengue-like illness. All samples were tested by real-time RT-PCR and results with serum and DBFP samples were compared for each patient. The sensitivity and specificity of tests performed with DBFP, relative to those with venous samples (defined as 100%) were 93.1% (95% CI:[84.7-97.7]) and 94.4% (95% CI:[88.3-97.7]), respectively. The Kappa coefficient 0.87 (95% CI:[0.80-0.94]) was excellent. This study shows that DBFP specimens can be used as a cost-effective alternative sampling method for the surveillance and monitoring of CHIKV circulation and emergence in developing countries, and probably also for other arboviruses. The loss of sensitivity is insignificant and involved a very small number of patients, all with low viral loads. Whether viruses can be isolated from dried blood spots remains to be determined.

  6. Experimental microbial contamination and disinfection of dry (vapour) shipper dewars designed for short-term storage and transportation of cryopreserved germplasm and other biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Bielanski, A

    2005-04-15

    Cryopreservation, storage and transport of cryopreserved germplasm without the risk of disease transmission is of great concern to animal and human health authorities. Here we report on the efficacy of microbial decontamination of the liquid nitrogen (LN) dry (vapour) shippers used for short-term storage and transportation of germplasm and other biological specimens. Dry shippers containing either a hydrophobic or a non-hydrophobic LN absorbent were experimentally contaminated with high titers of cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococus aureus, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1). Biocidals with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and gas vapours of formalin and ethylene oxide were used for disinfection of the dewars. Among the biocidals used, treatment with sodium hypochlorite solution, the quaternary ammonium-based disinfectants and peracetic acid were the most effective and useful for dry shippers with a hydrophobic LN absorbent. None of the bacterial or viral microorganisms were detected in samples of semen and embryos stored in dry shippers following their disinfection with these biocides. An application of some other disinfectants, due to their foaming properties or to the permeability of the absorbent hydrophobic membrane (HM) was not effective or may have caused irreversible damage to the LN absorbent. Gas sterilization by ethylene oxide in contrast to formalin was fully effective for both types of dry shippers.

  7. δ18O values of Sus scrofa blood water and bone phosphate; a marked discrepancy between domestic and wild specimens.

    PubMed

    Longinelli, Antonio; Selmo, Enrico

    2011-12-30

    δ¹⁸O analyses of water in the blood of domestic and wild pigs indicated that large isotopic differences exist between domestic and wild specimens of the same species (Sus scrofa) living in the same area. Similar isotopic differences are found between the δ¹⁸O(PO₄³⁻) values of bones from the two groups of animals. When δ¹⁸O values obtained from recent wild boar bones are introduced in the equation of the isotopic scale determined for domestic pigs, totally unreliable δ¹⁸O values of local meteoric water are obtained. The δ¹⁸O(PO₄³⁻) values measured in three groups of modern wild boar specimens allow the calculation of a first approximate equation which is quite different from that of domestic pigs. This isotopic scale should be accurately re-calibrated for wild animals.

  8. Stable isotope dilution microquantification of creatine metabolites in plasma, whole blood and dried blood spots for pharmacological studies in mouse models of creatine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tran, C; Yazdanpanah, M; Kyriakopoulou, L; Levandovskiy, V; Zahid, H; Naufer, A; Isbrandt, D; Schulze, A

    2014-09-25

    To develop an accurate stable isotope dilution assay for simultaneous quantification of creatine metabolites ornithine, arginine, creatine, creatinine, and guanidinoacetate in very small blood sample volumes to study creatine metabolism in mice. Liquid-chromatography (C18) tandem mass spectrometry with butylation was performed in positive ionization mode. Stable isotope dilution assay with external calibration was applied to three different specimen types, plasma, whole blood and dried blood spot (DBS). Analytical separation, sensitivity, accuracy, and linearity of the assay were adequate. The stable isotope dilution assay in plasma revealed no significant bias to gold standard methods for the respective analytes. Compared to plasma, we observed an overestimate of creatine and creatinine (2- to 5-fold and 1.2- to 2-fold, respectively) in whole-blood and DBS, and an underestimate of arginine (2.5-fold) in DBS. Validation of the assay in mouse models of creatine deficiency revealed plasma creatine metabolite pattern in good accordance with those observed in human GAMT and AGAT deficiency. Single dose intraperitoneal application of ornithine in wild-type mice lead to fast ornithine uptake (Tmax ≤ 10 min) and elimination (T1/2=24 min), and a decline of guanidinoacetate. The assay is fast and reliable to study creatine metabolism and pharmacokinetics in mouse models of creatine deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Advantages and Challenges of Dried Blood Spot Analysis by Mass Spectrometry Across the Total Testing Process

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Rosita; Allen, Katrina J.; Koplin, Jennifer J.; Roche, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Through the introduction of advanced analytical techniques and improved throughput, the scope of dried blood spot testing utilising mass spectrometric methods, has broadly expanded. Clinicians and researchers have become very enthusiastic about the potential applications of dried blood spot based mass spectrometric applications. Analysts on the other hand face challenges of sensitivity, reproducibility and overall accuracy of dried blood spot quantification. In this review, we aim to bring together these two facets to discuss the advantages and current challenges of non-newborn screening applications of dried blood spot quantification by mass spectrometry. Methods To address these aims we performed a key word search of the PubMed and MEDLINE online databases in conjunction with individual manual searches to gather information. Keywords for the initial search included; “blood spot” and “mass spectrometry”; while excluding “newborn”; and “neonate”. In addition, databases were restricted to English language and human specific. There was no time period limit applied. Results As a result of these selection criteria, 194 references were identified for review. For presentation, this information is divided into: 1) clinical applications; and 2) analytical considerations across the total testing process; being pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical considerations. Conclusions DBS analysis using MS applications is now broadly applied, with drug monitoring for both therapeutic and toxicological analysis being the most extensively reported. Several parameters can affect the accuracy of DBS measurement and further bridge experiments are required to develop adjustment rules for comparability between dried blood spot measures and the equivalent serum/plasma values. Likewise, the establishment of independent reference intervals for dried blood spot sample matrix is required. PMID:28149263

  10. Biobanking human endometrial tissue and blood specimens: standard operating procedure and importance to reproductive biology research and diagnostic development.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Elizabeth; Vo, Kim Chi; McIntire, Ramsey A; Aghajanova, Lusine; Zelenko, Zara; Irwin, Juan C; Giudice, Linda C

    2011-05-01

    To develop a standard operating procedure (SOP) for collection, transport, storage of human endometrial tissue and blood samples, subject and specimen annotation, and establishing sample priorities. The SOP synthesizes sound scientific procedures, the literature on ischemia research, sample collection and gene expression profiling, good laboratory practices, and the authors' experience of workflow and sample quality. The National Institutes of Health, University of California, San Francisco, Human Endometrial Tissue and DNA Bank. Women undergoing endometrial biopsy or hysterectomy for nonmalignant indications. Collecting, processing, storing, distributing endometrial tissue and blood samples under approved institutional review board protocols and written informed consent from participating subjects. Standard operating procedure. The SOP addresses rigorous and consistent subject annotation, specimen processing and characterization, strict regulatory compliance, and a reference for researchers to track collection and storage times that may influence their research. The comprehensive and systematic approach to the procurement of human blood and endometrial tissue in this SOP ensures the high quality, reliability, and scientific usefulness of biospecimens made available to investigators by the National Institutes of Health, University of California, San Francisco, Human Endometrial Tissue and DNA Bank. The detail and perspective in this SOP also provides a blueprint for implementation of similar collection programs at other institutions. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dried Blood Spots for Viral Load Monitoring in Malawi: Feasible and Effective

    PubMed Central

    Rutstein, Sarah E.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kamwendo, Deborah; Soko, Alice; Mkandawire, Memory; Biddle, Andrea K.; Miller, William C.; Weinberger, Morris; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Gupta, Sundeep; Chimbwandira, Frank; Mwenda, Reuben; Kamiza, Steve; Hoffman, Irving; Mataya, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of dried blood spots (DBS) use for viral load (VL) monitoring, describing patient outcomes and programmatic challenges that are relevant for DBS implementation in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We recruited adult antiretroviral therapy (ART) patients from five district hospitals in Malawi. Eligibility reflected anticipated Ministry of Health VL monitoring criteria. Testing was conducted at a central laboratory. Virological failure was defined as >5000 copies/ml. Primary outcomes were program feasibility (timely result availability and patient receipt) and effectiveness (second-line therapy initiation). Results We enrolled 1,498 participants; 5.9% were failing at baseline. Median time from enrollment to receipt of results was 42 days; 79.6% of participants received results within 3 months. Among participants with confirmed elevated VL, 92.6% initiated second-line therapy; 90.7% were switched within 365 days of VL testing. Nearly one-third (30.8%) of participants with elevated baseline VL had suppressed (<5,000 copies/ml) on confirmatory testing. Median period between enrollment and specimen testing was 23 days. Adjusting for relevant covariates, participants on ART >4 years were more likely to be failing than participants on therapy 1–4 years (RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.8); older participants were less likely to be failing (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.98). There was no difference in likelihood of failure based on clinical symptoms (RR 1.17, 95% CI 0.65-2.11). Conclusions DBS for VL monitoring is feasible and effective in real-world clinical settings. Centralized DBS testing may increase access to VL monitoring in remote settings. Programmatic outcomes are encouraging, especially proportion of eligible participants switched to second-line therapy. PMID:25898365

  12. [Determination of blood constituents with dry reagent carriers. Comparison with wet chemical tests (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thomas, L; Appel, W; Storz, G; Plischke, W

    1981-08-28

    Quantitative measurement of blood constituents (glucose, uric acid, urea-N) on dry reagent carriers was compared with corresponding wet-chemical methods. There was a good correlation (r greater than 0.95) and excellent linear regression with small scatter between the two methods for the three constituents. The dry test has proved to be a precise, simple, rapid and economic method, especially suitable for the practitioner and emergency laboratory.

  13. The utility of peripheral blood smear review for identifying specimens for flow cytometric immunophenotyping.

    PubMed

    Craig, F E

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory professionals are in an ideal situation to identify CBC and peripheral blood smear findings that raise the possibility of a hematolymphoid neoplasm, and based on this information make recommendations for additional studies, such as flow cytometric immunophenotyping. In some circumstances a definitive diagnosis can be established from the combined peripheral blood morphologic and immunophenotypic findings obviating the need for bone marrow evaluation, such as for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Occasionally flow cytometric studies are superior to morphologic assessment, such as in screening for hairy cell leukemia or identifying lymphocytic-variant hypereosinophilia. However, there is increasing recognition of small immunophenotypically unusual or abnormal populations of peripheral blood cells, particularly in older patients, which are of uncertain clinical significance, such as monoclonal B lymphocytosis and T-cell clonopathy. Therefore, it is important to integrate peripheral blood smear review findings with the clinical and other information before recommending flow cytometry. In addition, it is important to recognize situations where the results of peripheral blood smear review and flow cytometric immunophenotyping do not explain the clinical findings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Hemoglobin precipitation greatly improves 4-methylumbelliferone-based diagnostic assays for lysosomal storage diseases in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Oemardien, L F; Boer, A M; Ruijter, G J G; van der Ploeg, A T; de Klerk, J B C; Reuser, A J J; Verheijen, F W

    2011-01-01

    Derivatives of 4-methylumbelliferone (4MU) are favorite substrates for the measurement of lysosomal enzyme activities in a wide variety of cell and tissue specimens. Hydrolysis of these artificial substrates at acidic pH leads to the formation of 4-methylumbelliferone, which is highly fluorescent at a pH above 10. When used for the assay of enzyme activities in dried blood spots the light emission signal can be very low due to the small sample size so that the patient and control ranges are not widely separated. We have investigated the hypothesis that quenching of the fluorescence by hemoglobin leads to appreciable loss of signal and we show that the precipitation of hemoglobin with trichloroacetic acid prior to the measurement of 4-methylumbelliferone increases the height of the output signal up to eight fold. The modified method provides a clear separation of patients' and controls' ranges for ten different lysosomal enzyme assays in dried blood spots, and approaches the conventional leukocyte assays in outcome quality.

  15. Oxyhemoglobin measurement of whole blood specimens in a silicon microfabricated cuvette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Caicai; Holl, Mark R.; Kenny, Margaret; Yager, Paul

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a miniaturized CO- oximeter for hemoglobin derivative measurement using microfabrication technology. A microcuvette (volume equals 507 nl) was fabricated for analysis of percent oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb%) in whole blood. A cuvette of 50 micrometer pathlength produced optimal absorbance sensitivity to changes in O2Hb%. The pressure differential for a nominal blood flow rate of approximately 1 microliter/second was 4.1 kPa (16.6 in water, 0.6 psi). Entrained bubbles were easily discharged at these pressures. Spectral measurements were made using an ocean optics miniaturized spectrophotometer (500 - 700 nm). A fiber optic probe with one receiving and six emitting fibers (200 micrometer core and 0.22 NA) was used for spectral measurement. Heparinized fresh blood from a healthy volunteer was tonometered with N2, CO2, and O2 mixtures to produce six samples with O2Hb% from 22 - 97%. Chemometrics was used for data analysis. The second derivatives of spectra were taken to eliminate baseline changes caused by RBC light scattering. Indirect calibration by principal component regression was applied to the second derivative. Four factor cross validation showed a correlation coefficient of 0.9994 between measured O2Hb% of lysed blood using an OSM3 CO- oximeter (Radiometer America, Ohio) and whole blood using the microfabricated cuvette. The linear relationship is: O2Hb%micro-cuvette equals 0.8411% plus 0.9882 multiplied by O2Hb%OSM3. We conclude that O2Hb% measurement on unlysed whole blood using a silicon microfabricated cuvette is practical and that results are similar to traditional CO- oximetry.

  16. Use of dried blood spots and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for multi-element determination in blood.

    PubMed

    Vacchina, Véronique; Huin, Vincent; Hulo, Sébastien; Cuny, Damien; Broly, Franck; Renom, Gilles; Perini, Jean-Marc

    2014-07-01

    The paper describes the development of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) method for multitrace element determination in dried blood spots (DBSs). The analytical conditions were optimized using Seronorm™ L-3 and L-1 Certified Reference Materials. The best results were obtained by sampling blood drops on a decontaminated PVDF filter membrane. After drying under metal-free conditions, the DBSs underwent acidic digestion and were analyzed with ICP MS. The method was then validated for As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mo, Se and Zn. Using a matrix-matched calibration curve, the recovery levels ranged from 96% to 117%. The repeatability and reproducibility were generally below 15%. Limits of quantification ranging from 0.5 to 50 μg/L. In order to investigate the analytical procedure under real sampling conditions, the results obtained from DBSs and liquid blood aliquots (less subject to contamination) from two adult subjects were compared.

  17. RESIDUES AND METABOLITES OF SELECTED PERSISTENT HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS IN BLOOD SPECIMENS FROM A GENERAL POPULATION SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Health Statistics collaborated with the National Human Monitoring Program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in a four-year study to assess the exposure of the general population to selected pesticides through analysis of blood serum and uri...

  18. RESIDUES AND METABOLITES OF SELECTED PERSISTENT HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS IN BLOOD SPECIMENS FROM A GENERAL POPULATION SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Health Statistics collaborated with the National Human Monitoring Program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in a four-year study to assess the exposure of the general population to selected pesticides through analysis of blood serum and uri...

  19. Stability Study of Cervical Specimens Collected by Swab and Stored Dry Followed by Human Papillomavirus DNA Detection Using the cobas 4800 Test.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Qing; Zeng, Xi; Cui, Jian-Feng; Liao, Guang-Dong; Wu, Ze-Ni; Gao, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Xun; Yu, Xiu-Zhang; Chen, Wen; Xi, Ming-Rong; Qiao, You-Lin

    2017-02-01

    Safer, more convenient methods for cervical sample collection and storage are necessary to facilitate human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing in low-resource settings. Our study aimed to evaluate the stability of cervical specimens collected with dry swabs and stored dry, compared to liquid-based cytology (LBC) samples, as detected by HPV DNA testing. Women with abnormal cytological findings or HPV-positive results at colposcopy were recruited from the West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, between October 2013 and March 2014. From each woman, physicians collected cervical specimens with a swab placed into a Sarstedt tube and a CytoBrush placed into LBC medium. Samples were randomly assigned to be stored at uncontrolled ambient temperature for 2, 7, 14, or 28 days and then were tested for 14 high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) types using the cobas HPV test. The rates of agreement between dry swab and LBC samples for any HR-HPV type, HPV16, HPV18, and the 12 pooled HR-HPV types were 93.8%, 97.8%, 99.4%, and 93.2%, respectively, with kappa values of 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83 to 0.91), 0.94 (95% CI, 0.91 to 0.97), 0.94 (95% CI, 0.87 to 1.00), and 0.86 (95% CI, 0.82 to 0.90). The performance of swab samples for detection of cervical precancerous lesions by means of cobas HPV testing was equal to that of LBC samples, even with stratification by storage time. Dry storage of swab-collected cervical samples can last for 1 month without loss of test performance by cobas HPV testing, compared to LBC samples, which may offer a simple inexpensive approach for cervical cancer screening in low-resource settings.

  20. Evaluation of the One-Step ELISA kit for the detection of buprenorphine in urine, blood, and hair specimens.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Etienne, S; Villain, M; Ludes, B; Kintz, P

    2004-07-16

    A solid-phase enzyme immunoassay involving microtiter plates was recently proposed by International Diagnostic Systems corporation (IDS) to screen for buprenorphine in human serum. The performance of the kit led us to investigate its applicability in other biological matrices such as urine or blood, and also hair specimens. Low concentrations of buprenorphine were detected with the ELISA test and confirmed by HPLC/MS (buprenorphine concentrations measured by HPLC/MS: 0.3 ng/mL in urine, 0.2 ng/mL in blood, and 40 pg/mg in hair). The intra-assay precision values were 8.7% at 1 ng/mL of urine (n = 8), 11.5% at 2 ng/mL in serum (n = 8), and 11.5% at 250 pg/mg of hair (n = 8), respectively. The immunoassay had no cross-reactivity with dihydrocodeine, ethylmorphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, pholcodine, propoxyphene, dextromoramide, dextrometorphan at 1 and 10 mg/L, or codeine, morphine, methadone, and its metabolite EDDP. A 1% cross-reactivity was measured for a norbuprenorphine concentration of 50 ng/mL. Finally, the immunoassay was validated by comparing authentic specimens results with those of a validated HPLC/MS method. From the 136 urine samples tested, 93 were positive (68.4%) after the ELISA screening test (cutoff: 0.5 ng/mL) and confirmed by HPLC/MS (buprenorphine concentrations: 0.3-2036 ng/mL). From the 108 blood or serum samples screened, 27 were positive (25%) after the ELISA test with a cutoff value of 0.5 ng/mL (buprenorphine concentrations: 0.2-13.3 ng/mL). Eighteen hair specimens were positive (72%) after the screening (cutoff: 10 pg/mg) and confirmed by LC/MS (buprenorphine concentrations: 40-360 pg/mg). The ELISA method produced false positive results in less than 21% of the cases, but no false negative results were observed with the immunological test. Four potential adulterants (hypochloride 50 mL/L, sodium nitrite 50 g/L, liquid soap 50 mL/L, and sodium chloride 50 g/L) that were added to 10 positive urine specimens (buprenorphine concentrations in

  1. A Pyrosequencing-Based Assay for the Rapid Detection of the 22q11.2 Deletion in DNA from Buccal and Dried Blood Spot Samples

    PubMed Central

    Koontz, Deborah; Baecher, Kirsten; Kobrynski, Lisa; Nikolova, Stanimila; Gallagher, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is one of the most common deletion syndromes in newborns. Some affected newborns may be diagnosed shortly after birth because of the presence of heart defects, palatal defects, or severe immune deficiencies. However, diagnosis is often delayed in patients presenting with other associated conditions that would benefit from early recognition and treatment, such as speech delays, learning difficulties, and schizophrenia. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the gold standard for deletion detection, but it is costly and time consuming and requires a whole blood specimen. Our goal was to develop a suitable assay for population-based screening of easily collectible specimens, such as buccal swabs and dried blood spots (DBS). We designed a pyrosequencing assay and validated it using DNA from FISH–confirmed 22q11 deletion syndrome patients and normal controls. We tested DBS from nine patients and paired buccal cell and venous blood specimens from 20 patients. Results were 100% concordant with FISH assay results. DNA samples from normal controls (n = 180 cell lines, n = 15 DBS, and n = 88 buccal specimens) were negative for the deletion. Limiting dilution experiments demonstrated that accurate results could be obtained from as little as 1 ng of DNA. This method represents a reliable and low-cost alternative for detection of the common 22q11.2 microdeletions and can be adapted to high-throughput population screening. PMID:24973633

  2. [Trehalose loading red blood cells and freeze-drying preservation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Lu, Zhi-Gang; Han, Ying

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the feasibility of cryopreserving red blood cells (RBCs) by loading with trehalose and to evaluate the effect of trehalose on lyophilized RBCs. Based on the thermal properties of RBC plasma membrane, the RBCs were incubated in 0.8 mol/L trehalose solution at 37 degrees C for 7 hours, and RBCs incubated in phosphate-buffered saline were used as control. The morphology of RBCs was observed by light and scanning electron microscopy, the hemolysis rate of loaded RBCs was detected by using cyanohemoglobin kit, the intracellular trehalose levels were assayed by sulfate anthrone method, the intracellular ATP and 2, 3-DPG levels were determined by bioluminescence assay and 2, 3-DPG kit respectively, meanwhile the deformation and osmotic fragility of RBCs were measured. The results showed that the intracellular trehalose concentration was 36.56 +/- 7.95 mmol/L, the electronical microscopic images of trehalose-loaded RBCs showed the membrane integrity, the hemolysis rate in trehalose-loaded RBCs was 15.663 +/- 3.848%, while hemolysis rate in controlled RBC was 5.03 +/- 1.85% (P < 0.05). Maximum index of deformation in trehalose-loaded RBC was 0.0289 +/- 0.00738, while maximum index of deformation in control group was 0.1200 +/- 0.0121 (P < 0.05), The level of ATP in trehalose-loaded RBC was 2.67 +/- 0.54 micromol/gHb, while the level of ATP in control group was 5.22 +/- 1.10 micromol/gHb (P > 0.05). Osmotic fragility data showed that trehalose exerted osmotic protection on RBC. During loading period the level of 2, 3-DPG in trehalose-loaded RBC was maintained close to the level in control. When trehalose-loaded RBCs were lyophilized and rehydrated, the recovery rate of hemoglobin was about 46.44 +/- 4.14% and that in control was 8.33 +/- 2.34% (P < 0.001). The recovery rate of hemoglobin of trehalose-loaded RBC was higher than that of control. It is concluded that trehalose can be integrated in the membrane of RBC in lyophilization state

  3. Differential fluorescent staining method for detection of bacteria in blood cultures, cerebrospinal fluid and other clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Fazii, P; Ciancaglini, E; Riario Sforza, G

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a differential staining method to distinguish gram-positive from gram-negative bacteria in fluorescence. The method is based on two fluorochromes, one acting in the wavelength of red, i.e. the acridine orange, and another acting in the wavelength of green, i.e. the fluorescein. With this method, gram-positive bacteria appear yellow and gram-negative bacteria appear green. In view of the importance of a rapid aetiological diagnosis in cases of septicaemia, the differential staining method in fluorescence was compared with Gram stain for the detection of bacteria in blood. Of 5,820 blood cultures entered into the study and identified by the Bactec 9120 fluorescent series instrument (Becton Dickinson Europe, France), 774 were positive. Of the 774 positive cultures, 689 yielded only a single organism. The differential staining method in fluorescence detected 626 of the 689 cultures, while Gram stain detected 468. On the basis of these results, the sensitivity of the differential staining method in fluorescence was 90.9%, while that of Gram stain was 67.9%. The difference between the two methods was statistically significant ( P<0.001). The differential fluorescent staining method was more sensitive than Gram stain in the detection of bacteria in blood cultures during the incubation period. This technique provides a rapid, simple and highly sensitive staining method that can be used in conjunction with subculture methods. Whereas subculture requires an incubation period of 18-24 h, the fluorescent staining technique can detect bacteria on the same day that smears are prepared and examined. The differential fluorescent staining method was also evaluated for its ability to detect microorganisms in cerebrospinal fluid and other clinical specimens. The microorganisms were easily detected, even when bacterial counts in the specimens were low.

  4. Freeze-Drying of Mononuclear Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood Followed by Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Natan, Dity; Nagler, Arnon; Arav, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Background We recently showed that freeze-dried cells stored for 3 years at room temperature can direct embryonic development following cloning. However, viability, as evaluated by membrane integrity of the cells after freeze-drying, was very low; and it was mainly the DNA integrity that was preserved. In the present study, we improved the cells' viability and functionality after freeze-drying. Methodology/Principal Findings We optimized the conditions of directional freezing, i.e. interface velocity and cell concentration, and we added the antioxidant EGCG to the freezing solution. The study was performed on mononuclear cells (MNCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. After freeze-drying, we tested the viability, number of CD34+-presenting cells and ability of the rehydrated hematopoietic stem cells to differentiate into different blood cells in culture. The viability of the MNCs after freeze-drying and rehydration with pure water was 88%–91%. The total number of CD34+-presenting cells and the number of colonies did not change significantly when evaluated before freezing, after freeze-thawing, and after freeze-drying (5.4×104±4.7, 3.49×104±6 and 6.31×104±12.27 cells, respectively, and 31±25.15, 47±45.8 and 23.44±13.3 colonies, respectively). Conclusions This is the first report of nucleated cells which have been dried and then rehydrated with double-distilled water remaining viable, and of hematopoietic stem cells retaining their ability to differentiate into different blood cells. PMID:19381290

  5. Utility of dried blood spots for measurement of cholesterol and triglycerides in a surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Gupta, Ruby; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Snehi, Uma; Reddy, K Srinath

    2010-03-01

    Developing countries are facing a rise in noncommunicable diseases (NCD), which is a cause for concern. The World Health Organization has recommended a stepwise approach for NCD risk factor surveillance. Screening for risk factors in remote populations is difficult due to lack of resources and technical expertise, including standardized laboratory facilities. The collection of samples on filter paper for the assessment of risk factors circumvents the need for blood processing, storage, and shipment at ultralow temperatures. Samples were collected on 3-mm Whatman filter paper from one industry (National Thermal Power Corporation) located in the periphery of Delhi as part of a surveillance carried out in industries from different parts of India. Total cholesterol was measured in serum and dried blood by the cholesterol oxidase/p-aminophenazone method and triglycerides by the glycerophosphate oxidase-peroxidase/aminophenazone method. Values obtained by the two methods were compared using Pearson correlation, and Bland-Altman plots were prepared to assess bias. The correlation coefficient "r" was 0.78 for cholesterol and 0.94 for triglycerides between dried blood spots and serum. Bland-Altman plots suggest that differences in values obtained by the two methods were within two standard deviations for most of the samples. Blood samples dried on filter paper can be a successful option for population screening in remote areas, provided preanalytical variations arising due to the method of blood spot preparation and storage are well controlled. (c) 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  6. Utility of Dried Blood Spots for Measurement of Cholesterol and Triglycerides in a Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Gupta, Ruby; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Snehi, Uma; Reddy, K. Srinath

    2010-01-01

    Background Developing countries are facing a rise in noncommunicable diseases (NCD), which is a cause for concern. The World Health Organization has recommended a stepwise approach for NCD risk factor surveillance. Screening for risk factors in remote populations is difficult due to lack of resources and technical expertise, including standardized laboratory facilities. The collection of samples on filter paper for the assessment of risk factors circumvents the need for blood processing, storage, and shipment at ultralow temperatures. Method Samples were collected on 3-mm Whatman filter paper from one industry (National Thermal Power Corporation) located in the periphery of Delhi as part of a surveillance carried out in industries from different parts of India. Total cholesterol was measured in serum and dried blood by the cholesterol oxidase/p-aminophenazone method and triglycerides by the glycerophosphate oxidase–peroxidase/aminophenazone method. Values obtained by the two methods were compared using Pearson correlation, and Bland–Altman plots were prepared to assess bias. Results The correlation coefficient “r” was 0.78 for cholesterol and 0.94 for triglycerides between dried blood spots and serum. Bland–Altman plots suggest that differences in values obtained by the two methods were within two standard deviations for most of the samples. Conclusions Blood samples dried on filter paper can be a successful option for population screening in remote areas, provided preanalytical variations arising due to the method of blood spot preparation and storage are well controlled. PMID:20307386

  7. The stability of iso-α-acids and reduced iso-α-acids in stored blood specimens.

    PubMed

    Rodda, Luke N; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Drummer, Olaf H

    2014-06-01

    The long-term stability of the iso-α-acids, and three structurally similar but chemically altered iso-α-acids (known as 'reduced iso-α-acids' and consisting of the rho-, tetrahydro- and hexahydro-iso-α-acid groups) were investigated in whole blood. Pools of blank blood spiked with the four beer-specific ingredient congener groups at two different concentration levels were stored at 20°C, 4°C and -20°C; and extracted in duplicate in weeks 1, 3, 5 and 8, using a previously published method. A loss of 15% of the initial concentration was considered to indicate possible instability and losses greater than 30% demonstrated significant losses. The individual analytes within the four iso-α-acid groups were also measured to determine which iso-α-acids were subject to greater degradation and were responsible for the overall group instability. All four iso-α-acid groups showed significant losses after 8 weeks of storage under room temperature conditions in particularly the natural iso-α-acid group where major losses were observed (96% and 85% losses for low and high concentrations, respectively). Some degradation in all iso-α-acid groups were seen at 4°C samples predominantly due to the 'n' analogs of the groups showing an increased instability in blood. The -20°C storage conditions resulted in minimal changes in concentrations of all analytes. Higher than frozen storage temperatures can result in substantial changes on the stability of the iso-α-acid type groups in blood. The aim of this study was to highlight the stabilities of the IAA analytes in order to assist in the interpretation of IAA in stored blood specimens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dry film preparation from whole blood, plasma and serum for quantitative infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, A.; Heise, H. M.

    1998-06-01

    The potential of infrared spectroscopy in the analysis of biotic fluids for the determination of important clinical parameters such as glucose and other blood substrates has been investigated. For this purpose dried films from whole blood, blood plasma and serum were prepared on diffusely reflecting gold-coated substrates from sandpaper of different grades. This enabled measurements in the mid and near infrared spectral ranges by using special diffuse reflectance accessories. The removal of water leads to a considerable enrichment of the fluid constituents. Due to the reduced sample complexity a considerable gain in spectral information is obtained. This is especially valid for measurements in the near infrared where the problems associated with variability in the spectra of aqueous samples due to several parameters, i.e., temperature, electrolyte content etc., are well known. Additionally, mid infrared studies were carried out into the stability of dried samples.

  9. Biotinidase determination in serum and dried blood spots--high sensitivity fluorimetric ultramicro-assay.

    PubMed

    Broda, E; Baumgartner, E R; Scholl, S; Stopsack, M; Horn, A; Rhode, H

    2001-12-01

    A miniaturized quantitative biotinidase assay has been developed using biotin 6-amidoquinoline as substrate and the 100-fold enhanced fluorescence of 6-amidoquinoline measured using apolar solvents. Amidoquinoline is measured after deproteinization by ethanol/acetone using individual standardisation and solvent resistant microtiter plates. The assay was optimized for end point determinations of biotinidase activities in serum and for newborn screening using dried blood spots. Serum activities obtained are closely correlated with values obtained using a quantitative validation method (r=0.96). Analytical sensitivity is around 2% of the mean activity (7.01+/-1.92 nmol/min/ml, mean+/-SD) of a healthy control population. With dried blood spots, a close correlation with values obtained using the Wallac-test kit (r=0.92) was found. Biotinidase activities of a healthy population of 651 newborns amount to 0.2429+/-0.07 nmol/min/ml blood. The analytical sensitivity is close to 1% of the mean activity.

  10. Use of dried blood samples for monitoring hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Rosalia; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Angelica; Rojas-Montes, Othon; Ruiz-Tachiquin, Martha; Torres-Ibarra, Rocio; Cano-Dominguez, Carlos; Valdez-Salazar, Hilda; Gomez-Delgado, Alejandro; Muñoz, Onofre; Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma-Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a problem in several regions of the world with limited resources. Blood samples dried on filter paper (DBS) have been successfully used to diagnose and monitor several infectious diseases. In Mexico there is an urgent need for an affordable and easy sampling method for viral load (VL) testing and monitoring of chronic HBV infection. The purpose of this work was to validate the utility of DBS samples for monitoring HBV infection in patients from Mexico City. Methods Matched samples of plasma and DBS on filter paper from 47 HBV infected patients from the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), were included. To evaluate the DNA stability and purity from DBS stored at different temperature conditions, samples from ten patients were stored at 4 degree, 25 degree, and 37 degree C for 7 days. After DBS elution and DNA extraction, the purity of these samples was determined measuring the O.D. rate 260/280. The DBS utility for molecular studies was assessed with PCR assays to amplify a 322 bp fragment from the "a" determinant region of the HBV "S" gene. The VL from all samples was determined to evaluate the correlation between plasma and DBS matched samples. Results The quality of the DNA from DBS specimen is not adversely affected by storage at 4 degree, 25 degree and 37 degree C for up 7 days. Statistical ANOVA analyses did not show any significant difference. The same amplification efficiency was observed between DNA templates from samples stored at different temperatures. The Pearson correlation between the VL from DBS and plasma matched samples was 0.93 (p = 0.01). The SD was 1.48 for DBS vs.1.32 for Plasma, and an average of log10 copies/mL of 5.32 vs. 5.53. ANOVA analysis did not show any statistically significant difference between the analyzed groups (p = 0.92). Conclusion The results provide strong evidence that the isolation and quantification of DNA-HBV from DBS is a viable alternative for patient monitoring

  11. Comparison of cross-sectional HIV incidence assay results from dried blood spots and plasma

    PubMed Central

    Schlusser, Katherine E.; Pilcher, Christopher; Kallas, Esper G.; Santos, Breno R.; Deeks, Steven G.; Facente, Shelley; Keating, Sheila M.; Busch, Michael P.; Murphy, Gary; Welte, Alex; Quinn, Thomas; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Assays have been developed for cross-sectional HIV incidence estimation using plasma samples. Large scale surveillance programs are planned using dried blood spot (DBS) specimens for incidence assessment. However, limited information exists on the performance of HIV cross-sectional incidence assays using DBS. Methods The assays evaluated were: Maxim HIV-1 Limiting Antigen Avidity EIA (LAg-Avidity), Sedia HIV-1 BED-Capture EIA (BED-CEIA), and CDC modified BioRad HIV-1/2 Plus O Avidity-based Assay (CDC-BioRad Avidity) using pre-determined cutoff values. 100 matched HIV-1 positive plasma and DBS samples, with known duration of infection, from the Consortium for the Evaluation and Performance of HIV Incidence Assays repository were tested. All assays were run in duplicate. To examine the degree of variability within and between results for each sample type, both categorical and continuous results were analyzed. Associations were assessed with Bland Altman, R2 values and Cohen’s kappa coefficient (ĸ). Results Intra-assay variability using the same sample type was similar for all assays (R2 0.96 to 1.00). The R2 values comparing DBS and plasma results for LAg-Avidity, BED-CEIA, and CDC-BioRad Avidity were 0.96, 0.94, and 0.84, respectively. The concordance and ĸ values between DBS and plasma for all three assays were >87% and >0.64, respectively. The Bland-Altman analysis showed significant differences between plasma and DBS samples. For all three assays, a higher number of samples were classified as recent infections using DBS samples. Conclusions DBS and plasma sample results were highly correlated. However, when compared to plasma, each assay performed somewhat differently in DBS at the lower and higher ends of the dynamic range. DBS samples were more likely to be classified as recently infected by all three assays, which may lead to overestimation of incidence in surveys using performance criteria derived for plasma samples. PMID:28231277

  12. Dried blood spots perform well in viral load monitoring of patients who receive antiretroviral treatment in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Asgeir; Garrido, Carolina; Zahonero, Natalia; Sandvik, Leiv; Naman, Ezra; Kivuyo, Sokoine L; Kasubi, Mabula J; Gundersen, Svein G; Bruun, Johan N; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2009-09-15

    Monitoring of antiretroviral treatment (ART) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral loads, as recommended in industrialized countries, is rarely available in resource-limited settings because of the high costs and stringent requirements for storage and transport of plasma. Dried blood spots (DBS) can be an alternative to plasma, but the use of DBS has not been assessed under field conditions in rural Africa. The present study investigates the performance of DBS in HIV viral load monitoring of patients who received ART in rural Tanzania. From November 2007 through June 2008, parallel plasma and DBS specimens were obtained from patients who received ART at Haydom Lutheran Hospital in rural Tanzania. DBS specimens were stored at tropical room temperature for 3 weeks before testing with the NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 assay. Results obtained with DBS were compared with results obtained with use of a gold-standard plasma assay. Ninety-eight plasma-DBS pairs were compared, and plasma viral loads ranged from <40 to >1,000,000 copies/mL. The correlation between plasma and DBS viral load was strong (R(2) = 0.75). The mean difference (+/- standard deviation) was 0.04 +/ 0.57 log(10) copies/mL, and only 8 samples showed >1 log(10) copies/mL difference. HIV type 1 RNA was detected in 7%, 60%, and 100% of DBS specimens with corresponding plasma viral loads of 40-999, 1000-2999, and 3000 copies/mL, respectively. DBS, in combination with the NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v1.2 asay, performed well in monitoring HIV viral loads in patients who received ART in rural Tanzania, although the sensitivity was reduced when viral burden was low. The use of DBS can simplify virological monitoring in resource-limited settings.

  13. Urine as a biological specimen for forensic analysis of alcohol and variability in the urine-to-blood relationship.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan W

    2006-01-01

    This article concerns the use of urine as a biological specimen for determination of alcohol in clinical and forensic toxicology and discusses factors that might influence variability in the urine/blood concentration ratio of alcohol. A large number of human drinking experiments were conducted to determine the time course of urine-alcohol concentrations (UAC) in relation to blood-alcohol concentrations (BAC). The UAC and BAC curves were shifted in time and the BAC curve always began to decrease before the UAC started to decline. During the early absorption phase the UAC/BAC ratio was less than unity, whereas in the late absorption/distribution period the ratio was between 1.0-1.2. On reaching the post-absorptive phase, the UAC always exceeded BAC and UAC/BAC ratios averaged 1.3-1.4, increasing appreciably as BAC decreased towards zero. Alcohol-induced diuresis was most pronounced during the rising portion of the BAC curve and near to the peak value. After about 2 hours post-drinking, the production rate of urine diminished to the pre-drinking rate of about 0.5-1 mL/min. Drinking water during the post-absorptive phase of the alcohol curve produced dilute urine, as reflected in lower creatinine content and osmolality, although the concentration of ethanol remained unchanged. After subjects drank a moderate dose of ethanol (0.54-0.85 g/kg) about 2% of the dose was recoverable in the urine after 7 hours. Ethyl glucuronide, a minor metabolite of ethanol, was measured in urine samples from drunk drivers. The UAC/BAC ratio of ethanol in drunk drivers did not depend on the creatinine content of the urine and therefore the relative dilution of the specimens. When alcohol-free urine was spiked with glucose and infected with the yeast species Candida albicans, ethanol was produced by fermentation after approximately 24 hours storage at room temperature. This post-sampling synthesis of ethanol was prevented by sodium fluoride (1% weight by volume) in the urine tubes or by

  14. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of losartan and its active metabolite on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Raju, S Satyanarayana; Vali, R Mastan; Sankar, G Girija

    2012-08-01

    A simple and rapid quantitative bioanalytical liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous determination of losartan and its active metabolite, losartan carboxylic acid on rat dried blood spots was developed and validated as per regulatory guidelines. Losartan and its metabolite were extracted from dried blood spots using 50% aqueous methanol and separated on Waters XTerra(®) RP18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) column using mobile phase composed of 40% acetonitrile and 60% aqueous ammonium acetate (10mM). The eluents were monitored using ESI tandem mass spectrometric detection with negative polarity in MRM mode using ion transitions m/z 421.2→179.0, m/z 435.3→157.0 and m/z 427.3→193.0 for losartan, losartan carboxylic acid and Irbesartan (internal standard), respectively. The method was validated over the linear range of 1-200 ng/mL and 5-1000 ng/mL with lower limits of quantification of 1.0 ng/mL and 5.0 ng/mL for losartan and losartan carboxylic acid, respectively. Inter and intra-day precision and accuracy (Bias) were below 5.96% and between -2.8 and 1.5%, respectively. The mean recoveries of the analytes from dried blood spots were between 89% and 97%. No significant carry over and matrix effects were observed. The stability of stock solution, whole blood, dried blood spot and processed samples were tested under different conditions and the results were found to be well within the acceptable limits. Additional validation parameters such as influence of hematocrit and spot volume were also evaluated and found to be well within the acceptable limits.

  15. Development of an UPLC-MS/MS method for the determination of antibiotic ertapenem on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Giocaliere, Elisa; Villanelli, Fabio; Malvagia, Sabrina; Funghini, Silvia; Ombrone, Daniela; Filippi, Luca; De Gaudio, Marina; De Martino, Maurizio; Galli, Luisa

    2012-03-05

    Ertapenem (Invanz) is a newly developed carbapenem β-lactam antimicrobial agent. The drug usage in pediatric age needs an accurate drug monitoring for effective patient management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of dried blood spot (DBS) specimens to measure ertapenem concentration during treatment. The analysis was performed by UPLC-MS/MS operating in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve in matrix was linear in the concentration range of 0.5-100 mg/L with correlation coefficient value higher than 0.997. Performance parameters of this method like lower limit of detection (LLOD, 0.2 mg/L), lower limit of quantification (LLOQ, 0.5 mg/L), matrix effect (20%), intra- and inter-day imprecision (CV within than 15%) and accuracy (between 94 and 155%) of drug concentrations have been evaluated. The drug stability at different temperatures was tested for one month, to evaluate the risks of sample delivery at different climatic conditions. The reported method allows now ertapenem analysis and offers many advantages for patients including the possibility of collecting samples at home. This new assay is both precise and accurate and is especially suitable for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies in neonates in whom obtaining larger blood samples is not convenient or possible.

  16. Validation and Modification of Dried Blood Spot-Based Glycosylated Hemoglobin Assay for the Longitudinal Aging Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peifeng; Edenfield, Michael; Potter, Alan; Kale, Varsha; Risbud, Arun; Williams, Sharon; Lee, Jinkook; Bloom, David E.; Crimmins, Eileen; Seeman, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to validate a modified dried blood spot (DBS)-based glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) assay protocol, after a pretest in India showed poor correlation between the original DBS-based protocol and venous results. Methods The original protocol was tested on different chemistry analyzers and then simplified at the University of Washington (UW). A second pretest was conducted in India to validate the modified assay protocol, using 44 quality control specimens. Results Data from UW indicated that, using the original protocol, the correlation coefficients between DBS and venous results were above 0.98 on both Bio-Rad and Olympus chemistry analyzers. The protocol worked equally well on filter paper, with or without pre-treatment, and when the recommended amount of blood spot material, or less, was used. A second pretest of the modified protocol confirmed that DBS-based levels from both Olympus and Roche chemistry analyzers were well correlated with DBS results from UW (correlation coefficients were above 0.96), as well as with venous values (correlation coefficients were above 0.94). Conclusions The DBS-based HbA1c values are highly correlated with venous results. The pre-treatment of filter paper does not appear to be necessary. The poor results from the first pretest are probably due to factors unrelated to the protocol, such as problems with the chemistry analyzer or assay reagents. PMID:25472916

  17. Rapid assay of rufinamide in dried blood spots by a new liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Malvagia, Sabrina; Filippi, Luca; Innocenti, Marzia; Rosati, Anna; Falchi, Melania; Pellacani, Simona; Moneti, Gloriano; Guerrini, Renzo

    2011-01-05

    Rufinamide (RUF) is a new antiepileptic drug with efficacy in several types of seizures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of dried blood spot (DBS) specimens to determinate RUF levels during treatment. Therapeutic drug monitoring of RUF could be useful in routine clinical practice. Advantages of DBS include short collection time, low invasiveness, ease and low cost of sample collection, transport and storage. The analysis was performed in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The calibration curve in matrix was linear in the concentration range of 0.008-0.8 mg/L (0.48-47.60 mg/L in DBS) of rufinamide with correlation coefficient value of 0.996. In the concentration range of 0.48-47.6 mg/L, the coefficients of variation in DBS were in the range 1.58-4.67% and the accuracy ranged from 89.73% to 107.32%. The sensitivity and specificity of tandem mass spectrometry allow now high throughput rufinamide analysis. This new assay has favourable characteristics being highly precise and accurate. The published HPLC-UV methods also proved to be precise and accurate, but required not less than 0.2-0.5 mL of plasma and are therefore unsuitable for sample collection in neonates in whom obtaining larger blood samples is not convenient or possible. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A modified serial blood sampling technique and utility of dried-blood spot technique in estimation of blood concentration: application in mouse pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Kurawattimath, Vishwanath; Pocha, Krishna; Mariappan, T Thanga; Trivedi, Ravi Kumar; Mandlekar, Sandhya

    2012-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in mice usually require discrete and parallel blood sampling owing to a restriction on the volume of blood that can be withdrawn. This results in dosing large number of animals and generating composite PK profile. To reduce the number of animals and generate individual animal PK profiles, we developed a serial sampling technique via tail vein bleeding in mice, in which only 20-30 μL blood was withdrawn per time point. Due to the small blood volume, a dried-blood spot (DBS) technique was applied for sample processing. The utility of this technique was demonstrated using three test compounds (amodiaquine, chloroquine and chlorthalidone), with varying degrees of blood-to-plasma partition ratios. The PK studies were carried out in male Balb/c mouse weighing 25-30 g. The compounds were administered intravenously via the saphenous vein. Blood was collected by composite (retro-orbital plexus) or serial (tail vein bleeding) sampling techniques at different time points. Blood samples were processed as blood lysate or DBS. Blood or plasma samples were analyzed by sensitive and rapid UPLC-MS/MS methods. The blood concentrations (both from blood lysate and DBS) obtained from serial sampling matched with those from composite sampling. The ratio of blood AUC to plasma AUC correlated well with the in vitro blood-to-plasma partition ratio of the compounds. The systemic clearance and volume of distribution at steady state calculated from blood or plasma AUCs were in proportion to the respective AUCs. Our results indicated that the serial sampling technique would reduce the number of animals and also compound usage, as well as improve the quality of pharmacokinetic data. Also, the serial sampling technique does not require the use of anesthesia and allows estimation of inter-animal variability in PK. A small volume serial sampling is possible due to the availability of the DBS technique.

  19. Rapid DNA extraction protocol for detection of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency from dried blood spots by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Struniawski, R; Szpechcinski, A; Poplawska, B; Skronski, M; Chorostowska-Wynimko, J

    2013-01-01

    The dried blood spot (DBS) specimens have been successfully employed for the large-scale diagnostics of α1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency as an easy to collect and transport alternative to plasma/serum. In the present study we propose a fast, efficient, and cost effective protocol of DNA extraction from dried blood spot (DBS) samples that provides sufficient quantity and quality of DNA and effectively eliminates any natural PCR inhibitors, allowing for successful AAT genotyping by real-time PCR and direct sequencing. DNA extracted from 84 DBS samples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients was genotyped for AAT deficiency variants by real-time PCR. The results of DBS AAT genotyping were validated by serum IEF phenotyping and AAT concentration measurement. The proposed protocol allowed successful DNA extraction from all analyzed DBS samples. Both quantity and quality of DNA were sufficient for further real-time PCR and, if necessary, for genetic sequence analysis. A 100% concordance between AAT DBS genotypes and serum phenotypes in positive detection of two major deficiency S- and Z- alleles was achieved. Both assays, DBS AAT genotyping by real-time PCR and serum AAT phenotyping by IEF, positively identified PI*S and PI*Z allele in 8 out of the 84 (9.5%) and 16 out of 84 (19.0%) patients, respectively. In conclusion, the proposed protocol noticeably reduces the costs and the hand-on-time of DBS samples preparation providing genomic DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for further real-time PCR or genetic sequence analysis. Consequently, it is ideally suited for large-scale AAT deficiency screening programs and should be method of choice.

  20. Rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of antibiotic linezolid on dried blood spot.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Villanelli, Fabio; Malvagia, Sabrina; Ombrone, Daniela; Funghini, Silvia; De Gaudio, Marina; Fallani, Stefania; Cassetta, Maria Iris; Novelli, Andrea; Chiappini, Elena; de Martino, Maurizio; Galli, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Linezolid is a new drug from the oxazolidinone class of antibiotics used against mycobacteria and multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-positive bacterial infections, which may are also glycopeptide-resistant. The drug usage in pediatric age needs an accurate drug monitoring for effective patient management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of dried blood spot (DBS) specimens to determinate linezolid levels during treatment. Advantages of DBS include short collection time, low invasiveness, ease and low cost of sample collection, transport and storage. The analysis was performed in LC-MS/MS operating in positive ion mode and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve in matrix was linear in the concentration range of 1-100 mg/L with correlation coefficient value of 0.9987. Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were within 3.6% and 13.0%, respectively. We also tested the thermal and temporal drug stability in dried blood spots at four different temperatures to evaluate the risks of sample delivery in different conditions. The short term stability studies showed that linezolid concentration remained stable for at least one month under all the conditions tested. This new assay has favorable characteristics being highly precise and accurate and allows a fast linezolid analysis with a total run time 22 min long, in gradient analysis. Concentration data for plasma and DBS samples from patients after treatment were compared showing a good correlation. Correlation between DBS data and serum samples measured by HPLC-UV was satisfactory. The benefit for patients is the ability to monitor the treatment with a simple and convenient sample collection at home.

  1. Emerging liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technologies improving dried blood spot analysis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ramisetti Nageswara

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS), a micro blood sampling technique, has recently gained interest in drug discovery and development due to its inherent advantages over the conventional whole blood, plasma or serum sample collection. Since the regulatory authorities have agreed to the use of blood as an acceptable biological matrix for drug exposure measurements, its applications have been extended not only to therapeutic drug monitoring but also to toxicokinetic and pharmacokinetic studies. The pharmaceutical industry is keen to promote DBS as a prominent tool in bioanalytical applications due to the financial, ethical and organizational issues involved in clinical trials. This could be accomplished due to the latest advances in modern analytical technology, particularly liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The present review discusses some of the emerging liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technologies in improving DBS analysis for its innovative applications in the development of new drugs.

  2. Direct detection of hepatitis B virus from dried blood spots by polymerase chain reaction amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, B P; Jayasuryan, N; Jameel, S

    1992-01-01

    The presence of hepatitis B virus DNA in the sera of individuals is the most definitive marker of an active viral infection. We have used polymerase chain reaction detection of hepatitis B virus DNA directly on whole blood dried as a spot on filter paper. The method is rapid, specific, and sensitive and has the ability to detect as little as 10 virus particles by ethidium bromide staining of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified products. The method is cost-effective, and the stability of the spots makes the collection and transportation of potentially infectious blood safe. Images PMID:1500493

  3. Use of Dried Capillary Blood Sampling for Islet Autoantibody Screening in Relatives: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Bingley, Polly J; Rafkin, Lisa E; Matheson, Della; Steck, Andrea K; Yu, Liping; Henderson, Courtney; Beam, Craig A; Boulware, David C

    2015-12-01

    Islet autoantibody testing provides the basis for assessment of risk of progression to type 1 diabetes. We set out to determine the feasibility and acceptability of dried capillary blood spot-based screening to identify islet autoantibody-positive relatives potentially eligible for inclusion in prevention trials. Dried blood spot (DBS) and venous samples were collected from 229 relatives participating in the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention Study. Both samples were tested for glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen 2, and zinc transporter 8 autoantibodies, and venous samples were additionally tested for insulin autoantibodies and islet cell antibodies. We defined multiple autoantibody positive as two or more autoantibodies in venous serum and DBS screen positive if one or more autoantibodies were detected. Participant questionnaires compared the sample collection methods. Of 44 relatives who were multiple autoantibody positive in venous samples, 42 (95.5%) were DBS screen positive, and DBS accurately detected 145 of 147 autoantibody-negative relatives (98.6%). Capillary blood sampling was perceived as more painful than venous blood draw, but 60% of participants would prefer initial screening using home fingerstick with clinic visits only required if autoantibodies were found. Capillary blood sampling could facilitate screening for type 1 diabetes prevention studies.

  4. Elevation of guanidinoacetate in newborn dried blood spots and impact of early treatment in GAMT deficiency.

    PubMed

    El-Gharbawy, Areeg H; Goldstein, Jennifer L; Millington, David S; Vaisnins, Amie E; Schlune, Andrea; Barshop, Bruce A; Schulze, Andreas; Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P

    2013-06-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is a good candidate disorder for newborn screening because early treatment appears to improve outcomes. We report elevation of guanidinoacetate in archived newborn dried blood spots for 3 cases (2 families) of GAMT deficiency compared with an unaffected carrier and controls. We also report a new case of a patient treated from birth with normal developmental outcome at the age of 42 months.

  5. Prenatal Education of Parents About Newborn Screening and Residual Dried Blood Spots: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Botkin, Jeffrey R; Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca A; Rose, Nancy C; Dolan, Siobhan M; Kuppermann, Miriam; Stark, Louisa A; Goldenberg, Aaron; Wong, Bob

    2016-06-01

    Research clearly indicates that current approaches to newborn blood spot screening (NBS) education are ineffective. Incorporating NBS education into prenatal care is broadly supported by lay and professional opinion. To determine the efficacy and effect of prenatal education about newborn screening and use of residual dried blood spots (DBS) in research on parental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. A randomized clinical trial of prenatal educational interventions, with outcomes measured by survey at 2 to 4 weeks postpartum. Participants were recruited from obstetric clinics in Salt Lake City, Utah; San Francisco, California; and the Bronx, New York. Eligible women were English- or Spanish-speaking adults and did not have a high-risk pregnancy. A total of 901 women were enrolled. Participants who completed the follow-up survey included 212 women in the usual care group (70% retention), 231 in the NBS group (77% retention), and 221 women in the NBS + DBS group (75% retention). Those who completed the survey were similar across the 3 groups with respect to age, ethnicity, race, education, marital status, income, obstetric history, and language. Participants were randomized into 1 of 3 groups: usual care (n = 305), those viewing an NBS movie and brochure (n = 300), and those viewing both the NBS and DBS movies and brochures (n = 296). Two to four weeks postpartum, women completed a 91-item survey by telephone, addressing knowledge, attitudes, and behavior with respect to opting out of NBS or DBS for their child. A total of 901 women (mean age, 31 years) were randomized and 664 completed the follow-up survey. The total correct responses on the knowledge instrument in regard to NBS were 69% in the usual care group, 79% in the NBS group, and 75% in the NBS + DBS group, a significant between-group difference (P < .05). Although all groups showed strong support for NBS, the percentage of women who were "very supportive" was highest in the NBS

  6. Systematic review of the use of dried blood spots for monitoring HIV viral load and for early infant diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Smit, Pieter W; Sollis, Kimberly A; Fiscus, Susan; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Essajee, Shaffiq; Barnett, David; Cheng, Ben; Crowe, Suzanne M; Denny, Thomas; Landay, Alan; Stevens, Wendy; Habiyambere, Vincent; Perriens, Joseph H; Peeling, Rosanna W

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) have been used as alternative specimens to plasma to increase access to HIV viral load (VL) monitoring and early infant diagnosis (EID) in remote settings. We systematically reviewed evidence on the performance of DBS compared to plasma for VL monitoring and EID. Thirteen peer reviewed HIV VL publications and five HIV EID papers were included. Depending on the technology and the viral load distribution in the study population, the percentage of DBS samples that are within 0.5 log of VL in plasma ranged from 52-100%. Because the input sample volume is much smaller in a blood spot, there is a risk of false negatives with DBS. Sensitivity of DBS VL was found to be 78-100% compared to plasma at VL below 1000 copies/ml, but this increased to 100% at a threshold of 5000 copies/ml. Unlike a plasma VL test which measures only cell free HIV RNA, a DBS VL also measures proviral DNA as well as cell-associated RNA, potentially leading to false positive results when using DBS. The systematic review showed that specificity was close to 100% at DBS VL above 5000 copies/ml, and this threshold would be the most reliable for predicting true virologic failure using DBS. For early infant diagnosis, DBS has a sensitivity of 100% compared to fresh whole blood or plasma in all studies. Although limited data are available for EID, DBS offer a highly sensitive and specific sampling strategy to make viral load monitoring and early infant diagnosis more accessible in remote settings. A standardized approach for sampling, storing, and processing DBS samples would be essential to allow successful implementation. PROSPERO Registration #: CRD42013003621.

  7. Systematic Review of the Use of Dried Blood Spots for Monitoring HIV Viral Load and for Early Infant Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Pieter W.; Sollis, Kimberly A.; Fiscus, Susan; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Essajee, Shaffiq; Barnett, David; Cheng, Ben; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Denny, Thomas; Landay, Alan; Stevens, Wendy; Habiyambere, Vincent; Perriens, Joseph H.; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dried blood spots (DBS) have been used as alternative specimens to plasma to increase access to HIV viral load (VL) monitoring and early infant diagnosis (EID) in remote settings. We systematically reviewed evidence on the performance of DBS compared to plasma for VL monitoring and EID. Methods and Findings Thirteen peer reviewed HIV VL publications and five HIV EID papers were included. Depending on the technology and the viral load distribution in the study population, the percentage of DBS samples that are within 0.5 log of VL in plasma ranged from 52–100%. Because the input sample volume is much smaller in a blood spot, there is a risk of false negatives with DBS. Sensitivity of DBS VL was found to be 78–100% compared to plasma at VL below 1000 copies/ml, but this increased to 100% at a threshold of 5000 copies/ml. Unlike a plasma VL test which measures only cell free HIV RNA, a DBS VL also measures proviral DNA as well as cell-associated RNA, potentially leading to false positive results when using DBS. The systematic review showed that specificity was close to 100% at DBS VL above 5000 copies/ml, and this threshold would be the most reliable for predicting true virologic failure using DBS. For early infant diagnosis, DBS has a sensitivity of 100% compared to fresh whole blood or plasma in all studies. Conclusions Although limited data are available for EID, DBS offer a highly sensitive and specific sampling strategy to make viral load monitoring and early infant diagnosis more accessible in remote settings. A standardized approach for sampling, storing, and processing DBS samples would be essential to allow successful implementation. Trial Registration PROSPERO Registration #: CRD42013003621. PMID:24603442

  8. Japanese reference panel of blood specimens for evaluation of hepatitis C virus RNA and core antigen quantitative assays.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Asako; Sugiyama, Nao; Watashi, Koichi; Masaki, Takahiro; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Aizaki, Hideki; Mizuochi, Toshiaki; Wakita, Takaji; Kato, Takanobu

    2012-06-01

    An accurate and reliable quantitative assay for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is essential for measuring viral propagation and the efficacy of antiviral therapy. There is a growing need for domestic reference panels for evaluation of clinical assay kits because the performance of these kits may vary with region-specific genotypes or polymorphisms. In this study, we established a reference panel by selecting 80 donated blood specimens in Japan that tested positive for HCV. Using this panel, we quantified HCV viral loads using two HCV RNA kits and five core antigen (Ag) kits currently available in Japan. The data from the two HCV RNA assay kits showed excellent correlation. All RNA titers were distributed evenly across a range from 3 to 7 log IU/ml. Although the data from the five core Ag kits also correlated with RNA titers, the sensitivities of individual kits were not sufficient to quantify viral load in all samples. As calculated by the correlation with RNA titers, the theoretical lower limits of detection by these core Ag assays were higher than those for the detection of RNA. Moreover, in several samples in our panel, core Ag levels were underestimated compared to RNA titers. Sequence analysis in the HCV core region suggested that polymorphisms at amino acids 47 to 49 of the core Ag were responsible for this underestimation. The panel established in this study will be useful for estimating the quality of currently available and upcoming HCV assay kits; such quality control is essential for clinical usage of these kits.

  9. Measurement of HIV-1 viral load for drug resistance surveillance using dried blood spots: literature review and modeling of contribution of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Neil T

    2014-01-01

    World Health Organization-recommended surveys of acquired HIV-1 drug resistance include assessment of HIV-1 viral load suppression to levels below 1,000 copies/ml and drug resistance-associated mutation patterns in subjects on antiretroviral therapy. Surveys are being conducted in regions of the world that cannot support the collection, storage, and shipping of frozen plasma. Therefore, dried blood spots are often the specimen type of choice for both genotyping and viral load measurement. Furthermore, viral load testing for individual patient management in these regions is being scaled-up in accordance with WHO 2013 Guidelines for Antiretroviral Treatment. Technical issues related to the adaptation of viral load assays to dried blood spots, especially with respect to sensitivity (limit of detection), specificity (cell-free RNA vs. cell-associated DNA or RNA), and assay method, affect the interpretation of a viral load result from dried blood spots. Amongst published studies of commercial assay performance with dried blood spots, the bioMérieux EasyQ® and Abbott RealTime assays tended to show high (> 90%) specificity and sensitivity; the Biocentric Generic or Roche TaqMan® assays tended to show high sensitivity but lower specificity, using a 1,000 copies/ml threshold. The relative contribution of cell-associated DNA or RNA to a viral load measurement is likely to vary between patients, depending on clinical parameters and treatment status. A model was developed that predicts that in patients on antiretroviral therapy with low plasma viral load, cellular DNA is the predominant source of non-plasma virus-derived nucleic acid in dried blood spots. The extent of viral load overestimation from dried blood spots becomes less important when plasma viral load is over about 5,000 copies/ml. To avoid misclassifying subjects with plasma viral load suppression, the World Health Organization-recommended threshold of 1,000 copies/ml can be applied only when an assay that can

  10. Dried blood spots, valid screening for viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus in real-life

    PubMed Central

    Mössner, Belinda K; Staugaard, Benjamin; Jensen, Janne; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Christensen, Peer B; Holm, Dorte Kinggaard

    2016-01-01

    AIM To detect chronic hepatitis B (CHB), chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in dried blood spot (DBS) and compare these samples to venous blood sampling in real-life. METHODS We included prospective patients with known viral infections from drug treatment centers, a prison and outpatient clinics and included blood donors as negative controls. Five drops of finger capillary blood were spotted on filter paper, and a venous blood sample was obtained. The samples were analyzed for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV levels as well as subjected to a combined nucleic acid test (NAT) for HBV DNA, HCV RNA and HIV RNA. RESULTS Samples from 404 subjects were screened (85 CHB, 116 CHC, 114 HIV and 99 blood donors). DBS had a sensitivity of > 96% and a specificity of > 98% for the detection of all three infections. NAT testing did not improve sensitivity, but correctly classified 95% of the anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic and past infections. Anti-HBc and anti-HBS showed low sensitivity in DBS (68% and 42%). CONCLUSION DBS sampling, combined with an automated analysis system, is a feasible screening method to diagnose chronic viral hepatitis and HIV infections outside of the health care system. PMID:27672281

  11. Effect of temperature on lysosomal enzyme activity during preparation and storage of dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Supriya, Manjunath; De, Tanima; Christopher, Rita

    2017-03-27

    The use of dried blood spots (DBS) for the assay of lysosomal enzymes has facilitated the implementation of pilot studies for newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders in various developed countries. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of ambient temperature during DBS preparation and storage on lysosomal enzyme activity in a developing, tropical country. Blood samples from 12 healthy subjects collected on a S&S 903 filter paper were dried and stored at different temperatures for different periods of time. Activities of five lysosomal enzymes (acid α-glucosidase, acid α-galactosidase, acid β-glucocerebrosidase, acid sphingomyelinase, and galactocerebrosidase) were determined by tandem mass spectrometric and fluorimetric (acid α-glucosidase and acid β-glucocerebrosidase only) assays. The mean activities of all five enzymes decreased significantly when DBS was dried at temperatures above 24°C (P<.0001). DBS stored at 4°C, 24°C, 30°C, 37°C, and 45°C for 10 days and more, also showed significant reduction in activities of all five enzymes (P<.0001). The results highlight the importance of maintaining the correct ambient temperature during DBS preparation and storage to avoid false positive results when screening for lysosomal storage disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The development and validation of a fast and robust dried blood spot based lipid profiling method to study infant metabolism.

    PubMed

    Koulman, Albert; Prentice, Philippa; Wong, Max C Y; Matthews, Lee; Bond, Nicholas J; Eiden, Michael; Griffin, Julian L; Dunger, David B

    2014-01-01

    Early life exposures and metabolic programming are associated with later disease risk. In particular lipid metabolism is thought to play a key role in the development of the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in later life. Investigative studies of metabolic programming are limited by the ethics and practicalities of sample collection in small infants. Dried blood spots on filter paper, derived from heel pricks are considered as the most suitable option for this age group. We validated a novel lipid profiling method, based on high resolution mass spectrometry to successfully determine the lipid composition of infants using dried blood spots. The spotting and air drying of blood on paper has noticeable effects on many of the lipids, leading to lipid oxidation and hydrolysis, which demand careful interpretation of the obtained data. We compared the lipid profiles from plasma or whole blood samples and the results from dried blood spots to determine if these revealed the same inter-subject differences. The results from dried blood spots were no less reproducible than other lipid profiling methods which required comparatively larger sample volumes. Therefore, lipid profiles obtained from dried blood spots can be successfully used to monitor infancy lipid metabolism and we show significant differences in the lipid metabolism of infants at age 3 versus 12 months.

  13. Effects of cold dry air nasal stimulation on airway mucosal blood flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Le Merre, C; Isber, J; Chediak, A D; Wanner, A

    2003-10-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that nasal challenges can induce reflex responses in the respiratory system. Some authors have described bronchoconstriction and modification of the pattern of breathing following nasal challenges by irritants and cold air. We propose to determine the effect of nasal stimulation with cold dry air on airway mucosal blood flow (Qaw) in the proximal tracheal bronchial tree of healthy humans. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Baseline measurement Qaw, nasal airway resistance (NAR) and airway caliber by specific airways conductance (SGaw) were followed by nasal challenge with cold dry air. Qaw, NAR and Sgaw were determined after the challenge. In those subjects in which a significant decline in Qaw was recorded the protocol was repeated after pretreatment with nasal anesthesia using topical lidocaine. Cold dry air challenge produced a significant decrease in mean Qaw for the nine subjects and this response was abolished by pretreatment with nasal anesthesia using topical lidocaine. There was no significant change in Sgaw and NAR after the challenge and topical lidocaine anesthesia. Our data indicates that nasal stimulation with cold dry air leads to a reduction in Qaw and that this effect may be mediated by a nasal reflex.

  14. Performance evaluation of the FDA-approved Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo assay using plasma and whole blood specimens.

    PubMed

    Masciotra, Silvina; Luo, Wei; Westheimer, Emily; Cohen, Stephanie E; Gay, Cynthia L; Hall, Laura; Pan, Yi; Peters, Philip J; Owen, S Michele

    2017-06-01

    The Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo (DC) rapid test can identify HIV-1 infection earlier than rapid antibody-only tests in plasma specimens. We compared the performance of DC with a laboratory-based antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combo assay in plasma and evaluated antigen reactivity in whole blood specimens. We tested by DC 508 plasma specimens collected in a prospective study and 107 sequential plasma and simulated whole blood specimens from 20 seroconversion panels. Previous results using the ARCHITECT (ARC) Ag/Ab combo assay were compared to DC results. In seroconversion panels, the days from the first HIV1 RNA-positive test to first DC-reactive in plasma and whole blood was compared. McNemar's and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used for statistical analysis. Of 415 HIV-positive samples, ARC detected 396 (95.4%) and DC 337 (81.2%) (p<0.0001). DC was reactive in 50.0% of ARC-reactive/MS-negative, 78.6% of ARC-reactive/MS-indeterminate, and 99.6% of ARC-reactive/MS-HIV-1-positive or -undifferentiated specimens. DC antigen reactivity was higher among ARC-reactive/MS-negative than MS-indeterminate samples. In 20 HIV-1 seroconversion panels, there was a significant difference between DC reactivity in plasma (91.1%) and whole blood (56.4%) (p<0.0001). DC with whole blood showed a significant delay in reactivity compared to plasma (p=0.008). In plasma, DC was significantly less sensitive than an instrumented laboratory-based Ag/Ab combo assay. DC in plasma was significantly more sensitive compared to whole blood in early HIV-1 infections. With the U.S. laboratory-based diagnostic algorithm, DC as the first step would likely miss a high proportion of HIV-1 infections in early stages of seroconversion. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Ebola Virus Disease Diagnostics, Sierra Leone: Analysis of Real-time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Values for Clinical Blood and Oral Swab Specimens.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Bobbie R; Sealy, Tara K; Flietstra, Tim; Morgan, Laura; Kargbo, Brima; Matt-Lebby, Victor E; Gibbons, Aridth; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Graziano, James; Presser, Lance; Flint, Mike; Bird, Brian H; Brown, Shelley; Klena, John D; Blau, Dianna M; Brault, Aaron C; Belser, Jessica A; Salzer, Johanna S; Schuh, Amy J; Lo, Michael; Zivcec, Marko; Priestley, Rachael A; Pyle, Meredith; Goodman, Christin; Bearden, Scott; Amman, Brian R; Basile, Alison; Bergeron, Éric; Bowen, Michael D; Dodd, Kimberly A; Freeman, Molly M; McMullan, Laura K; Paddock, Christopher D; Russell, Brandy J; Sanchez, Angela J; Towner, Jonathan S; Wang, David; Zemtsova, Galina E; Stoddard, Robyn A; Turnsek, Maryann; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Emery, Shannon L; Stovall, Janae; Kainulainen, Markus H; Perniciaro, Jamie L; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Shakirova, Gulchekhra; Winter, Jörn; Sexton, Christopher; Liu, Feng; Slater, Kimetha; Anderson, Raydel; Andersen, Lauren; Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Crowe, Samuel J; Maenner, Matthew J; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Nichol, Stuart T; Ströher, Ute

    2016-10-15

    During the Ebola virus outbreak of 2013-2016, the Viral Special Pathogens Branch field laboratory in Sierra Leone tested approximately 26 000 specimens between August 2014 and October 2015. Analysis of the B2M endogenous control Ct values showed its utility in monitoring specimen quality, comparing results with different specimen types, and interpretation of results. For live patients, blood is the most sensitive specimen type and oral swabs have little diagnostic utility. However, swabs are highly sensitive for diagnostic testing of corpses. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Silica coated paper substrate for paper-spray analysis of therapeutic drugs in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiping; Xu, Wei; Manicke, Nicholas E; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2012-01-17

    Paper spray is a newly developed ambient ionization method that has been applied for direct qualitative and quantitative analysis of biological samples. The properties of the paper substrate and spray solution have a significant impact on the release of chemical compounds from complex sample matrices, the diffusion of the analytes through the substrate, and the formation of ions for mass spectrometry analysis. In this study, a commercially available silica-coated paper was explored in an attempt to improve the analysis of therapeutic drugs in dried blood spots (DBS). The dichloromethane/isopropanol solvent has been identified as an optimal spray solvent for the analysis. The comparison was made with paper spray using chromatography paper as substrate with methanol/water as solvent for the analysis of verapamil, citalopram, amitriptyline, lidocaine, and sunitinib in dried blood spots. It has been demonstrated that the efficiency of recovery of the analytes was notably improved with the silica coated paper and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) for the drug analysis was 0.1 ng mL(-1) using a commercial triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The use of silica paper substrate also resulted in a sensitivity improvement of 5-50-fold in comparison with chromatography papers, including the Whatman ET31 paper used for blood cards. Analysis using a hand-held miniature mass spectrometer Mini 11 gave LOQs of 10-20 ng mL(-1) for the tested drugs, which is sufficient to cover the therapeutic ranges of these drugs.

  17. Silica Coated Paper Substrate for Paper-Spray Analysis of Therapeutic Drugs in Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiping; Xu, Wei; Manicke, Nicholas E.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Paper spray is a newly developed ambient ionization method that has been applied for direct qualitative and quantitative analysis of biological samples. The properties of the paper substrate and spray solution have a significant impact on the release of chemical compounds from complex sample matrices, the diffusion of the analytes through the substrate, and the formation of ions for mass spectrometry analysis. In this study, a commercially available silica-coated paper was explored in an attempt to improve the analysis of therapeutic drugs in dried blood spots (DBS). The dichloromethane/isopropanol solvent has been identified as an optimal spray solvent for the analysis. The comparison was made with paper spray using chromatography paper as substrate with methanol/water as solvent for the analysis of verapamil, citalopram, amitriptyline, lidocaine and sunitinib in dried blood spots. It has been demonstrated the efficiency of recovery of the analytes was notably improved with the silica coated paper and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) for the drug analysis was 0.1 ng mL−1 using a commercial triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The use of silica paper substrate also resulted in a sensitivity improvement of 5-50 fold in comparison with chromatography papers, including the Whatmann ET31 paper used for blood card. Analysis using a handheld miniature mass spectrometer Mini 11 gave LOQs of 10~20 ng mL−1 for the tested drugs, which is sufficient to cover the therapeutic ranges of these drugs. PMID:22145627

  18. Quantitative Analytical Method for the Determination of Biotinidase Activity in Dried Blood Spot Samples.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Eszter; Szatmári, Ildikó; Szőnyi, László; Takáts, Zoltán

    2015-10-20

    Biotinidase activity assay is included in most newborn screening protocols, and the positive results are confirmed by quantitative enzyme activity measurements. In our study, we describe a new quantitative analytical method for the determination of biotinidase activity using the blood sample deposited onto filter paper as the assay medium, by predepositing N-biotinyl-p-aminobenzoic acid onto the standard sample collection paper. The analysis of the assay mixture requires a simple extraction step from a dried blood spot followed by the quantification of product by LC-MS. The method provides a simple and reliable enzyme assay method that enables the rapid diagnosis of biotinidase deficiency (BD). Out of the measured 36 samples, 13 were healthy with lower enzyme activities, 16 were patients with partial BD, and 7 were patients with profound BD with residual activity below 10%. Expression of enzyme activity in percentage of mean activity of negative controls allows comparison of the different techniques. The obtained results are in good agreement with activity data determined from both dried blood spots and serum samples, giving an informative diagnostic value.

  19. Real-time polymerase chain reaction optimised for hepatitis C virus detection in dried blood spots from HIV-exposed infants, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Anneta; Parboosing, Raveen; Moodley, Pravi

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data on the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in children, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. A major obstacle in resource-limited settings for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing is the necessity for specimen transportation and storage at low temperatures. There are numerous recent studies of using real-time HCV PCR for diagnosis and screening of plasma and serum, but few have looked at using dried blood spot (DBS) specimens. The aim of this study was to optimise a real-time HCV PCR method to detect HCV RNA from infant DBS specimens for use as a tool for HCV surveillance in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The LightCycler(®) 2.0 instrument was used for the HCV PCR using the LightCycler(®) RNA Master SYBR Green I kit. Template volume, primer concentration and primer annealing temperatures were optimised and the method was used on 179 DBS specimens from HIV-exposed infants in KwaZulu-Natal. Primer concentrations adjusted to 0.25 µM and a template volume of 10 µL improved the PCR amplification. Primer annealing temperatures lowered from 65 °C to 58 °C resulted in higher quantities of amplified PCR product. The limit of detection of the optimised HCV PCR assay was between 1200 IU/mL and 3580 IU/mL of HCV RNA. HCV was not detected in any of the 179 DBS specimens. The optimised real-time HCV PCR on infant DBS specimens performed well, but HCV was not found in this surveillance study. HIV infection may have little impact on the vertical transmission of HCV in this region.

  20. Feline reference intervals for the Sysmex XT-2000iV and the ProCyte DX haematology analysers in EDTA and CTAD blood specimens.

    PubMed

    Granat, Fanny; Geffré, Anne; Bourgès-Abella, Nathalie; Mortier, Jeremy; Théron, Marie-Laure; Fauchon, Emilie; Braun, Jean-Pierre; Trumel, Catherine

    2014-06-01

    Laser-based haematology analysers are routinely used in veterinary clinical pathology laboratories, and are available to practitioners. However, feline haematological reference intervals (RIs) determined according to international recommendations are, to our knowledge, not available. Furthermore, platelet count RI is difficult to establish in cats because of the frequent occurrence of platelet aggregation in blood specimens. The purpose of this study was to establish feline haematological RIs with the Sysmex XT-2000iV and ProCyte DX analysers, in ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) and in citrate, theophylline, adenosine and dipyridamole (CTAD), which is a combination of anticoagulants limiting platelet aggregation. Blood specimens from 120 healthy cats were analysed in duplicate, and the degree of platelet aggregation was assessed on blood smears. After exclusion of inadequate specimens, 81 sets of results (from 44 males and 37 females, aged from 6 to 116 months) were available for the determination of RIs by the non-parametric method. The effects of the anticoagulant, analyser and aggregation score were assessed. When the aggregation effect was significant, the RIs were determined using the subgroup of blood specimens with no or little aggregation. The effects of sex, age and weight were also investigated, but were moderate. The different RIs obtained with the Sysmex XT-2000iV and ProCyte DX analysers, and the two anticoagulants, were very similar to previous RIs established in EDTA with the ADVIA 120, another laser-based analyser, except for the platelet count in CTAD specimens. Its lower reference limit was higher in CTAD vs EDTA specimens, which confirms the interest in this anticoagulant in cats.

  1. Direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from human whole blood and filter-paper-dried blood by using a PCR buffer with a higher pH.

    PubMed

    Bu, Ying; Huang, Huan; Zhou, Guohua

    2008-04-15

    We described a novel approach to directly amplify genomic DNA from whole blood and dried blood spotted on filter paper without any DNA isolation by using the PCR buffer with a higher pH, which was optimized as pH 9.1-9.6. Direct PCR on blood treated with various anticoagulants showed that the buffer worked well with the blood treated by citrate, EDTA, or heparinate. DNA fragments with different lengths could be efficiently amplified directly from various forms of blood samples. By coupling the buffer with tetra-PCR, a "true" single-tube genotyping was realized by using whole blood or paper-dried blood as starting material.

  2. Direct multiplex assay of lysosomal enzymes in dried blood spots for newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Scott, C Ronald; Chamoles, Nestor A; Ghavami, Ahmad; Pinto, B Mario; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H

    2004-10-01

    Newborn screening for deficiency in the lysosomal enzymes that cause Fabry, Gaucher, Krabbe, Niemann-Pick A/B, and Pompe diseases is warranted because treatment for these syndromes is now available or anticipated in the near feature. We describe a multiplex screening method for all five lysosomal enzymes that uses newborn-screening cards containing dried blood spots as the enzyme source. We used a cassette of substrates and internal standards to directly quantify the enzymatic activities, and tandem mass spectrometry for enzymatic product detection. Rehydrated dried blood spots were incubated with the enzyme substrates. We used liquid-liquid extraction followed by solid-phase extraction with silica gel to remove buffer components. Acarbose served as inhibitor of an interfering acid alpha-glucosidase present in neutrophils, which allowed the lysosomal enzyme implicated in Pompe disease to be selectively analyzed. We analyzed dried blood spots from 5 patients with Gaucher, 5 with Niemann-Pick A/B, 11 with Pompe, 5 with Fabry, and 12 with Krabbe disease, and in all cases the enzyme activities were below the minimum activities measured in a collection of heterozygous carriers and healthy noncarrier individuals. The enzyme activities measured in 5-9 heterozygous carriers were approximately one-half those measured with 15-32 healthy individuals, but there was partial overlap of each condition between the data sets for carriers and healthy individuals. For all five diseases, the affected individuals were detected. The assay can be readily automated, and the anticipated reagent and supply costs are well within the budget limits of newborn-screening centers.

  3. Direct Multiplex Assay of Lysosomal Enzymes in Dried Blood Spots for Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Scott, C. Ronald; Chamoles, Nestor A.; Ghavami, Ahmad; Pinto, B. Mario; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Newborn screening for deficiency in the lysosomal enzymes that cause Fabry, Gaucher, Krabbe, Niemann–Pick A/B, and Pompe diseases is warranted because treatment for these syndromes is now available or anticipated in the near feature. We describe a multiplex screening method for all five lysosomal enzymes that uses newborn-screening cards containing dried blood spots as the enzyme source. Methods We used a cassette of substrates and internal standards to directly quantify the enzymatic activities, and tandem mass spectrometry for enzymatic product detection. Rehydrated dried blood spots were incubated with the enzyme substrates. We used liquid-liquid extraction followed by solid-phase extraction with silica gel to remove buffer components. Acarbose served as inhibitor of an interfering acid α-glucosidase present in neutrophils, which allowed the lysosomal enzyme implicated in Pompe disease to be selectively analyzed. Results We analyzed dried blood spots from 5 patients with Gaucher, 5 with Niemann–Pick A/B, 11 with Pompe, 5 with Fabry, and 12 with Krabbe disease, and in all cases the enzyme activities were below the minimum activities measured in a collection of heterozygous carriers and healthy noncarrier individuals. The enzyme activities measured in 5–9 heterozygous carriers were approximately one-half those measured with 15–32 healthy individuals, but there was partial overlap of each condition between the data sets for carriers and healthy individuals. Conclusion For all five diseases, the affected individuals were detected. The assay can be readily automated, and the anticipated reagent and supply costs are well within the budget limits of newborn-screening centers. PMID:15292070

  4. A Simple Method to Quantitate IP-10 in Dried Blood and Plasma Spots

    PubMed Central

    Aabye, Martine G.; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Werlinrud, Anne Marie; Holm, Line Lindebo; Tuuminen, Tamara; Ravn, Pernille; Ruhwald, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Background Antigen specific release of IP-10 is an established marker for infection with M.tuberculosis. Compared to IFN-γ, IP-10 is released in 100-fold higher concentrations enabling the development of novel assays for detection. Dried blood spots are a convenient sample for high throughput newborn screening. Aim To develop a robust and sensitive ELISA-based assay for IP-10 detection in plasma, dried blood spots (DBS) and dried plasma spots (DPS); to validate the ELISA in clinically relevant samples; and to assess the performance of the assay for detection of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and M.tuberculosis specific immune responses. Method We raised mice and rat monoclonal antibodies against human IP-10 and developed an ELISA. The assay was validated and applied to the detection of CMV and M.tuberculosis specific responses in 18 patients with immune reactivity towards M.tuberculosis and 32 healthy controls of which 22 had immune reactivity towards CMV and none towards M.tuberculosis. We compared the performance of this new assay to IFN-γ. Results The ELISA was reliable for IP-10 detection in both plasma and filter paper samples. The linear range of the ELISA was 2.5–600 pg/ml. IFN-γ was not readily detectable in DPS samples. IP-10 was stabile in filter paper samples for at least 4 weeks at 37°C. The correlation between IP-10 detected in plasma, DPS and DBS samples was excellent (r2>0.97). Conclusions This newly developed assay is reliable for IP-10 quantification in plasma, DBS and DPS samples from antigen stimulated and non-stimulated whole blood. The filter paper assays enable easy sample acquisition and transport at ambient temperature e.g. via the postal system. The system can potentially simplify diagnostic assays for M.tuberculosis and CMV infection. PMID:22761744

  5. Dried Blood Spot Proteomics: Surface Extraction of Endogenous Proteins Coupled with Automated Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spots offer many advantages as a sample format including ease and safety of transport and handling. To date, the majority of mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots have focused on small molecules or hemoglobin. However, dried blood spots are a potentially rich source of protein biomarkers, an area that has been overlooked. To address this issue, we have applied an untargeted bottom-up proteomics approach to the analysis of dried blood spots. We present an automated and integrated method for extraction of endogenous proteins from the surface of dried blood spots and sample preparation via trypsin digestion by use of the Advion Biosciences Triversa Nanomate robotic platform. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the resulting digests enabled identification of 120 proteins from a single dried blood spot. The proteins identified cross a concentration range of four orders of magnitude. The method is evaluated and the results discussed in terms of the proteins identified and their potential use as biomarkers in screening programs.

  6. [Investigation into vegetative regulation of blood circulation during 7-day dry immersion].

    PubMed

    Eshmanova, A K; Luchinskaia, E S; Baevskiĭ, R M

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations into vegetative regulation of blood circulation and regulation modification by peroral amlodipine and myostimulation during 7-d dry immersion. It was shown that in immersion vegetative regulation readjusted towards predominance of the sympathetic mechanisms. Myostimulation and peroral amlodipine modified regulation substantially mobilizing high level suprasegmentary structures. It should be noted that amlodipine and myostimulation differ in mechanisms of their action on central regulation. Pharmaceutical intervention seems to have a more complex and varying effect on people including side-effects. Presumably, it was the cause of poor orthostatic tolerance of several test-subjects.

  7. Cryopreservation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity inside red blood cells: developing a specimen repository in support of development and evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency tests.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Maria; LaRue, Nicole; Bansil, Pooja; Kalnoky, Michael; McGray, Sarah; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2013-08-20

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzyme deficiency. It is characterized by abnormally low levels of G6PD activity. Individuals with G6PD deficiency are at risk of undergoing acute haemolysis when exposed to 8‒aminoquinoline-based drugs, such as primaquine. For this reason it is imperative to identify individuals with G6PD deficiency prior to administering these anti-malarial drugs. There is a need for the development and evaluation of point-of-care G6PD deficiency screening tests suitable for areas of the developing world where malarial treatments are frequently administered. The development and evaluation of new G6PD tests will be greatly assisted with the availability of specimen repositories. Cryopreservation of erythrocytes was evaluated as a means to preserve G6PD activity. Blood specimens from 31 patients including ten specimens with normal G6PD activity, three with intermediate activity, and 18 with deficient activity were cryopreserved for up to six months. Good correlation in G6PD activity between fresh and cryopreserved specimens (R2 = 0.95). The cryopreserved specimens show an overall small drop in mean G6PD activity of 0.23 U/g Hb (P=0.23). Cytochemical staining showed that intracellular G6PD activity distribution within the red blood cell populations is preserved during cryopreservation. Furthermore, the mosaic composition of red blood cells in heterozygous women is also preserved for six months or more. The fluorescent spot and the BinaxNOW qualitative tests for G6PD deficiency also showed high concordance in G6PD status determination between cryopreserved specimens and fresh specimens. A methodology for establishing a specimen panel for evaluation of G6PD tests is described. The approach is similar to that used in several malaria research facilities for the cryopreservation of parasites in clinical specimens and axenic cultures. Specimens stored in this manner will aid both the development and evaluation of

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Macrolide-Resistant Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae Collected from Blood and Respiratory Specimens in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Littauer, P.; Sangvik, M.; Caugant, D. A.; Høiby, E. A.; Simonsen, G. S.; Sundsfjord, A.

    2005-01-01

    Norway has a low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, including macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MRSP). In a nationwide surveillance program, a total of 2,200 S. pneumoniae isolates were collected from blood cultures and respiratory tract specimens. Macrolide resistance was detected in 2.7%. M-type macrolide resistance was found in 60% of resistant isolates, and these were mainly mef(A)-positive, serotype-14 invasive isolates. The erm(B)-encoded macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) type dominated among the noninvasive isolates. One strain had an A2058G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. Coresistance to other antibiotics was seen in 96% of the MLSB-type isolates, whereas 92% of the M-type isolates were susceptible to other commonly used antimicrobial agents. Serotypes 14, 6B, and 19F accounted for 84% of the macrolide-resistant isolates, with serotype 14 alone accounting for 67% of the invasive isolates. A total of 29 different sequence types (STs) were detected by multilocus sequence typing. Twelve STs were previously reported international resistant clones, and 75% of the macrolide-resistant isolates had STs identical or closely related to these clones. Eleven isolates displayed 10 novel STs, and 7/11 of these “Norwegian strains” coexpressed MLSB and tetracycline resistance, indicating the presence of Tn1545. The invasive serotype-14 isolates were all classified as ST9 or single-locus variants of this clone. ST9 is a mef-positive M-type clone, commonly known as England14-9, reported from several European countries. These observations suggest that the import of major international MRSP clones and the local spread of Tn1545 are the major mechanisms involved in the evolution and dissemination of MRSP in Norway. PMID:15872231

  9. Fibrinogen measurements in plasma and whole blood: a performance evaluation study of the dry-hematology system.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi A; Nakajima, Yasufumi; Nakayama, Yoshinobu; Takeshita, Jun; Arai, Masatoshi; Mizobe, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    An accurate and rapid determination of fibrinogen level is important during hemorrhage to establish a timely hemostatic intervention. The accuracy of fibrinogen measurements may be affected by the specific methodology for its determination, fluid therapies, and anticoagulant agents. The dry-hematology method (DRIHEMATO®) is a novel approach to determine fibrinogen levels in plasma and whole blood based on thrombin-activated coagulation time. We hypothesized that plasma or whole blood fibrinogen level using the dry-hematology method would be similar to those measured with conventional plasma fibrinogen assays. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia was modeled by serial dilutions of blood samples obtained from 12 healthy volunteers. Citrated whole blood samples were diluted with either normal saline, 5% human albumin, or 6% hydroxyethyl starch to achieve 25%, 50%, and 75% volume replacement. The dry-hematology method, the Clauss method, the prothrombin time (PT)-derived method, determination of antigen levels, and thromboelastometric fibrin formation were compared in plasma or whole blood samples. The effect of heparin on each assay was examined (0 to 6 IU/mL). Comparisons of dry-hematology and other methods were also conducted using ex vivo samples obtained from cardiac surgical patients (n = 60). In plasma samples, there were no significant differences between dry-hematology and the Clauss method, while dry-hematology showed lower fibrinogen levels compared with PT-derived and antigen level methods. The dry-hematology method yielded acceptable concordance correlation coefficients (Pc) with the Clauss method, the PT-derived method, and fibrinogen antigen levels (Pc = 0.91-0.99). The type of diluents and heparin affected the results of the PT-derived method and thromboelastometric assay, but not the dry-hematology method. In cardiac surgical patients, the overall correlation in fibrinogen levels between dry-hematology and the other methods was comparable to the results from

  10. Pneumatic tube transport of blood-stained cerebrospinal fluid specimens has no clinically relevant effect on rates of haemolysis compared to manual transport.

    PubMed

    Jones, Liz; Isbister, Geoff; Chesher, Douglas; Gillett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Pneumatic tube transport of pathology specimens from the emergency department to the laboratory for analysis is a widely used practice. When compared to manual specimen transport, it results in savings in both time and labour. Sampling of cerebrospinal fluid still forms part of the workup of patients with suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage. There are claims in the literature that transport of cerebrospinal fluid samples by pneumatic tube results in excess haemolysis, which interferes with cerebrospinal fluid analysis for the presence of bilirubin. The aim of our study was to ascertain whether pneumatic tube transport of blood-stained cerebrospinal fluid to the laboratory, results in clinically significantly higher levels of haemolysis compared with manual transport of the same specimens. Stored cerebrospinal fluid was spiked with varying amounts of red blood cells creating 72 specimens of varying red cell concentration. Half of these specimens were transported to the laboratory manually while the other half were sent by pneumatic tube transport. The rates of haemolysis were compared between the pneumatic tube and manual transport samples. There was no clinically significant difference in the rates of haemolysis between the samples transported to the laboratory by pneumatic tube compared with those moved manually. Pneumatic tube transport of cerebrospinal fluid to the laboratory is not associated with clinically significantly higher rates of haemolysis when compared to manual transport. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Diagnostic analysis of veterinary dried blood spots for toxic heavy metals exposure.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Andreas F; Rumbeiha, Wilson; Shlosberg, Alan; Stuart, Kirk; Johnson, Margaret; Domenech, Robert; Langner, Heiko

    2013-09-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper have been used in human medicine since the 1960s, predominantly for screening in-borne metabolic disorders and more recently, for toxicology. Despite its 50-year existence, this technology has not been adopted by veterinarians for routine diagnoses and research. We have validated a novel DBS analytical procedure for the routine measurement of toxic heavy metals using 50 µL of whole blood on a single DBS by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Targeted heavy metals are arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead, selenium and thallium. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) on DBS are: arsenic 1.7 µg/L, cadmium 4.0 µg/L, mercury 13.7 µg/L, lead 13.3 µg/L, selenium 6.3 µg/L and thallium 1.5 µg/L. These LOQs suffice for routine diagnoses of heavy metal intoxication in domesticated and wildlife species as well as for basic, applied and epidemiological studies. The technique is ideal for population studies involving investigations of wildlife exposure to heavy metals and other environmental pollutants. The small blood volume involved (50 µL) makes it feasible to study small animals (birds, reptiles, amphibians and small mammals) that were previously excluded, or difficult to study due to the relatively large sample volumes required by current gold standard blood collection techniques.

  12. A dried blood spot mass spectrometry metabolomic approach for rapid breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingjun; Sun, Tao; Cao, Yunfeng; Gao, Peng; Dong, Jun; Fang, Yanhua; Fang, Zhongze; Sun, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Zhitu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer (BC) is still a lethal threat to women worldwide. An accurate screening and diagnosis strategy performed in an easy-to-operate manner is highly warranted in clinical perspective. Besides the routinely focused protein markers, blood is full of small molecular metabolites with diverse structures and properties. This study aimed to screen metabolite markers with BC diagnosis potentials. Methods A dried blood spot-based direct infusion mass spectrometry (MS) metabolomic analysis was conducted for BC and non-BC differentiation. The targeted analytes included 23 amino acids and 26 acylcarnitines. Results Multivariate analysis screened out 21 BC-related metabolites in the blood. Regression analysis generated a diagnosis model consisting of parameters Pip, Asn, Pro, C14:1/C16, Phe/Tyr, and Gly/Ala. Tested with another set of BC and non-BC samples, this model showed a sensitivity of 92.2% and a specificity of 84.4%. Compared to the routinely used protein markers, this model exhibited distinct advantage with its higher sensitivity. Conclusion Blood metabolites screening is a more plausible approach for BC detection. Furthermore, this direct MS analysis could be finished within few minutes, which means that its throughput is higher than the currently used imaging techniques. PMID:27042107

  13. Determination of tafenoquine in dried blood spots and plasma using LC and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Römsing, Susanne; Lindegardh, Niklas; Bergqvist, Yngve

    2011-08-01

    The growing problem of parasites developing resistance to the traditional antimalarial drugs makes the development of new effective and safe drugs crucial. Tafenoquine is a new promising antimalarial drug for prophylaxis and treatment. A bioanalytical method for the determination of tafenoquine in 100 µl of capillary blood applied onto sampling paper and in 100 µl of plasma has been developed and validated. The Whatman 31 ET Chr paper was treated with 0.6 mol/l tartaric acid to improve the extraction recovery and solid-phase extraction was used for cleanup procedure of the blood samples. Plasma samples were precipitated with methanol. Tafenoquine and internal standard were separated on a Zorbax SB-CN column by reversed-phase LC and detected with fluorescence detection at 262 and 470 nm. The within- and between-day variations were below 10 and 14%, respectively, over the range 50-200 nmol/l for capillary blood on sampling paper and below 6 and 10% for plasma samples. The LLOQ of the method was 50 nmol/l. The developed method has adequate sensitivity and is highly suitable for clinical studies in dried blood spots and plasma.

  14. Adapting dried blood spot sampling for an anti-therapeutic antibody immunogenicity assay.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuhong; Welch, Mackenzie; Amaravadi, Lakshmi; Stebbins, Christopher

    2013-07-31

    Dried blood spot sampling is a microvolume sampling technique with many potential advantages. It allows for easier handling and less expensive shipment and storage of biological samples. Additionally, it can provide ethical benefits in the pre-clinical setting through a reduction in animal usage by allowing intensive serial sample collection from the same animals. In the clinical setting, ease of sample collection, greater flexibility of sample storage, and shipping are distinct advantages. These advantages can enhance preclinical and clinical data quality, where immunogenicity monitoring plays an important role in the interpretation of pharmacokinetic data. To date, a method for usage of dried blood spot sampling with an immunogenicity assay has not been published. Herein we demonstrate that the measurement of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) using DBS was comparable to traditional methods in terms of reproducibility, assay sensitivity and drug tolerance. The data demonstrate that DBS is a viable sample collection method, and in some cases may be preferred, over classic serum or plasma sampling for antidrug antibody assays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dried Blood Spot Collection of Health Biomarkers to Maximize Participation in Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ostler, Michael W.; Porter, James H.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers are directly-measured biological indicators of disease, health, exposures, or other biological information. In population and social sciences, biomarkers need to be easy to obtain, transport, and analyze. Dried Blood Spots meet this need, and can be collected in the field with high response rates. These elements are particularly important in longitudinal study designs including interventions where attrition is critical to avoid, and high response rates improve the interpretation of results. Dried Blood Spot sample collection is simple, quick, relatively painless, less invasive then venipuncture, and requires minimal field storage requirements (i.e. samples do not need to be immediately frozen and can be stored for a long period of time in a stable freezer environment before assay). The samples can be analyzed for a variety of different analytes, including cholesterol, C-reactive protein, glycosylated hemoglobin, numerous cytokines, and other analytes, as well as provide genetic material. DBS collection is depicted as employed in several recent studies. PMID:24513728

  16. Specimen shipment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian

    1987-01-01

    Procedures for shipping specimens vary with different disease diagnostic laboratories. Therefore, it is important to contact the receiving laboratory and obtain specific instructions. This will facilitate processing of specimens when they reach the laboratory and assure that the quality of the specimens is not compromised. Time spent on field investigation, specimen collection, and obtaining an adequate history will be of little clue is specimens become contaminated, decomposed, or otherwise spoiled enroute to the diagnostic laboratory. There are five bases of proper specimen shipment: (1) prevent cross-contamination from specimen to specimen, (2) prevent decomposition of the specimen, (3) prevent leakage of fluids, (4) preserve individual specimen identity, and (5) properly label the package. Basic supplies needed for specimen shipment are shown in Fig. 3.1.

  17. Assessment of the Accuracy of Whole Blood/Serum Rapid Point-of-Care HIV Three Dot Test for Oral Fluid Specimens.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, N; Shetty, Shakilla; Sujatha, S; Sharma, Shivani; Saxena, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Saliva rapid point of care HIV tests have proven advantages over blood-based HIV tests in terms of quality, rapidity and convenience. To assess the sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility of saliva samples using the serum/ whole blood rapid test and to compare it with serum specimens. 52 seropositive and 52 seronegative patients were included in the study. Stimulated and unstimulated saliva samples were collected and tested using the serum/ whole blood signal HIV THREE DOT rapid test (span diagnostics). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the test was found to be 100% for saliva samples. Saliva samples can be used as a substitute to serum/whole blood for HIV testing. It can be done using the serum/whole blood kits which are cheaper and readily available thus broadening the reach of testing programs in resource limited settings.

  18. Comparative evaluation of the role of single and multiple blood specimens in the outcome of blood cultures using BacT/ALERT 3D (automated) blood culture system in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Elantamilan, D.; Lyngdoh, Valarie Wihiwot; Khyriem, Annie B.; Rajbongshi, Jyotismita; Bora, Ishani; Devi, Surbala Thingujam; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Barman, Himesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a leading cause of mortality in critically ill patients. The mortality directly attributable to BSI has been estimated to be around 16% and 40% in general hospital population and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) population, respectively. The detection rate of these infections increases with the number of blood samples obtained for culture. The newer continuous monitoring automated blood culture systems with enhanced culture media show increased yield and sensitivity. Hence, we aimed at studying the role of single and multiple blood specimens from different sites at the same time in the outcome of automated blood culture system. Materials and Methods and Results: A total of 1054 blood culture sets were analyzed over 1 year, the sensitivity of one, two, and three samples in a set was found to be 85.67%, 96.59%, and 100%, respectively, which showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.0001). Similar findings were seen in few more studies, however, among individual organisms in contrast to other studies, the isolation rates of Gram-positive bacteria were less than that of Gram-negative Bacilli with one (or first) sample in a blood culture set. In our study, despite using BacT/ALERT three-dimensional continuous culture monitoring system with FAN plus culture bottles, 15% of positive cultures would have been missed if only a single sample was collected in a blood culture set. Conclusion: The variables like the volume of blood and number of samples collected from different sites still play a major role in the outcome of these automated blood culture systems. PMID:27688629

  19. Sr/Ca proxy sea-surface temperature reconstructions from modern and holocene Montastraea faveolata specimens from the Dry Tortugas National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flannery, Jennifer A.; Poore, Richard Z.

    2013-01-01

    Sr/Ca ratios from skeletal samples from two Montastraea faveolata corals (one modern, one Holocene, ~6 Ka) from the Dry Tortugas National Park were measured as a proxy for sea-surface temperature (SST). We sampled coral specimens with a computer-driven triaxial micromilling machine, which yielded an average of 15 homogenous samples per annual growth increment. We regressed Sr/Ca values from resulting powdered samples against a local SST record to obtain a calibration equation of Sr/Ca = -0.0392 SST + 10.205, R = -0.97. The resulting calibration was used to generate a 47-year modern (1961-2008) and a 7-year Holocene (~6 Ka) Sr/Ca subannually resolved proxy record of SST. The modern M. faveolata yields well-defined annual Sr/Ca cycles ranging in amplitude from ~0.3 and 0.5 mmol/mol. The amplitude of ~0.3 to 0.5 mmol/mol equates to a 10-15°C seasonal SST amplitude, which is consistent with available local instrumental records. Summer maxima proxy SSTs calculated from the modern coral Sr/ Ca tend to be fairly stable: most SST maxima from 1961–2008 are 29°C ± 1°C. In contrast, winter minimum SST calculated in the 47-year modern time-series are highly variable, with a cool interval in the early to mid-1970s. The Holocene (~6 Ka) Montastraea faveolata coral also yields distinct annual Sr/Ca cycles with amplitudes ranging from ~0.3 to 0.6 mmol/mol. Absolute Sr/Ca values and thus resulting SST estimates over the ~7-year long record are similar to those from the modern coral. We conclude that Sr/Ca from Montastraea faveolata has high potential for developing subannually resolved Holocene SST records.

  20. Diagnosis of Morquio Syndrome in Dried Blood Spots Based on a New MRM-MS Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cozma, Claudia; Eichler, Sabrina; Wittmann, Gyula; Flores Bonet, Alba; Kramp, Guido Johannes; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A disease) is an autosomal recessive disease caused and characterized by a decreased activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), resulting in accumulation of keratan sulfate and chondroitin-6-sulfate in tissues and secondary organ damage. Recently approved enzyme replacement therapy renders the easy and early identification of MPS IVA of out-most importance. Methodology We propose a completely new assay for the stable and reproducible detection of GALNS deficiency in dry blood spots (DBS). For the validation blood samples were taken from 59 healthy individuals and 24 randomly selected genetically confirmed MPS IVA patients. The material extracted from DBS was incubated with a 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-galactopyranoside-6-sulfate as a specific substrate. Final enzymatic product, 4-methylumbelliferone, obtained after adding exogenous beta-galactosidase, was quantified by LC/MRM-MS (liquid-chromatography/multiple-reaction-monitoring mass-spectrometry). 4-propyl-5-hydroxy-7-methyl-2h-chromen-2-one was used as internal standard, a compound with a similar molecular structure and fragmentation pattern in negative ion mode as 4-methylumbelliferone. Findings The enzymatic assay yielded a positive and negative predictive value of 1.0 for genetically confirmed MPS IVA patients (GALNS activity of 0.35 ± 0.21 μmol/L/h) and for controls with normal GALNS activity (23.1 ± 5.3 μmol/L /h). With present enzymatic conditions, the reaction yield in dried blood spots is at least 20 fold higher than any previously reported data with other assays. Interpretation The present LC/MRM-MS based assay for MPS IVA diagnosis provides an easy, highly-standardized, accurate and innovative quantification of the enzymatic product in vitro and distinguishes perfectly between MPS IVA affected patients and normal controls. This technique will significantly simplify the early detection of MPS IVA patients. PMID:26147980

  1. Rapid screening assay of congenital adrenal hyperplasia by measuring 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone with high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry from dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chien-Chen; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Lin, Wei-De; Lee, Cheng-Chun

    2002-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and specific method was developed for the diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) from dried blood spots on newborn screening cards based on high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS). The usefulness of 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17 OH-P) determination on dried filter-paper blood samples from patients with CAH caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency was evaluated. The LC/MS/MS detection of 17 OH-P was rapid, <4 min. The intra- and interday accuracy and precision of the method were <7%. Our procedure maintained good linearities (R(2) > 0.992) and recovery rate (>83%). We used this new method to directly determine the 17 OH-P levels in dried blood specimens from abnormal children of various ages, with a detection limit of 20 ng/ml (approximately 240 pg), to avoid the time-consuming derivatization steps required by the gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method. Four dried filter-paper blood samples of CAH patients (three girls and one boy, 1-14 years old) were all quantified in an LC/MS/MS study and revealed high 17 OH-P levels (>90 ng/ml). After treatment, all of the elevated 17 OH-P levels either decreased or disappeared. Compared with CAH patients, 17 OH-P was nearly undetectable (<20 ng/ml) in the normal infants by LC/MS/MS. This LC/MS/MS assay is not only useful for both diagnosis and monitoring of treatment of CAH in all other age groups, it also can be used as a screening test for CAH infants. In this study, we provided the first data on 17 OH-P in dried blood specimens affected with CAH using HPLC/ESI-MS/MS.

  2. Application of automated serial blood sampling and dried blood spot technique with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for pharmacokinetic studies in mice.

    PubMed

    Wong, Philip; Pham, Roger; Whitely, Carl; Soto, Marcus; Salyers, Kevin; James, Christopher; Bruenner, Bernd A

    2011-11-01

    The goal of this work was to obtain full pharmacokinetic profiles from individual mice with the use of an automated blood sampling system and dried blood spot (DBS) technique. AMG 517, a potent and selective vanilloid receptor (VR1) antagonist, was dosed to mice (n=3) intravenously and blood samples were collected using the automated blood sampling system with the "no blood waste" method. The collected blood samples were a mixture of 25 μL blood and 50 μL of heparinized saline solution. Two 15 μL aliquots were manually spotted onto a DBS card and dried at room temperature for at least 2h before being stored in zip bags with desiccant. The remaining samples (45 μL) were stored at -70°C until analysis. Both the DBS and the whole blood samples (diluted with saline (1:2, v/v)) were extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The overall extraction recovery of the analyte from the dried blood spots was determined to be about 90%. The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated using the whole blood or the DBS concentration data were comparable, and were obtained from only 3 mice, whereas conventional sampling and analysis would have required up to 27 mice to achieve the same result. The analyte was shown to be stable in the diluted whole blood (blood:saline 1:2) at room temperature for at least 4h and in the DBS for at least 34 days when stored at room temperature. These results indicated that the automated blood sampling system and DBS collection are promising techniques to obtain full pharmacokinetic profiles from individual mice and reduce the use of animals. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Dry skin conditions are related to the recovery rate of skin temperature after cold stress rather than to blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshida-Amano, Yasuko; Nomura, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Iwata, Kayoko; Higaki, Yuko; Tanahashi, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    Cutaneous blood flow plays an important role in the thermoregulation, oxygen supply, and nutritional support necessary to maintain the skin. However, there is little evidence for a link between blood flow and skin physiology. Therefore, we conducted surveys of healthy volunteers to determine the relationship(s) between dry skin properties and cutaneous vascular function. Water content of the stratum corneum, transepidermal water loss, and visual dryness score were investigated as dry skin parameters. Cutaneous blood flow in the resting state, the recovery rate (RR) of skin temperature on the hand after a cold-stress test, and the responsiveness of facial skin blood flow to local cooling were examined as indices of cutaneous vascular functions. The relationships between dry skin parameters and cutaneous vascular functions were assessed. The RR correlated negatively with the visual dryness score of skin on the leg but correlated positively with water content of the stratum corneum on the arm. No significant correlation between the resting state of blood flow and dry skin parameters was observed. In both the face and the body, deterioration in skin dryness from summer to winter was significant in subjects with low RR. The RR correlated well with the responsiveness of facial skin blood flow to local cooling, indicating that the RR affects systemic dry skin conditions. These results suggest that the RR but not blood flow at the resting state is associated with dry skin conditions and is involved in skin homeostasis during seasonal environmental changes. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Dermatology.

  4. Multi-Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Profiling of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates from Blood Cultures and Gallbladder Specimens from Makassar, South-Sulawesi, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Mochammad; Pastoor, Rob; Scheelbeek, Pauline F. D.; Sultan, Andi R.; Dwiyanti, Ressy; Labeda, Ibrahim; Smits, Henk L.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis differentiated 297 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi blood culture isolates from Makassar in 76 genotypes and a single unique S. Typhi genotype was isolated from the cholecystectomy specimens of four patients with cholelithiasis. The high diversity in S. Typhi genotypes circulating in Makassar indicates that the number of carriers could be very large, which may complicate disease prevention and control. PMID:21949819

  5. Examination of periodontal pathogens in stenotic valve specimens and in whole blood samples in patients affected by aortic valve stenosis and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Raffaelli, L; Santangelo, R; Falchetti, P; Galluccio, F; Luciani, N; Anselmi, A; Nowzari, H; Verdugo, F; Fadda, G; D'Addona, A

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis may be a risk factor for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The influence of periodontal pathogens in cardiovascular diseases needs further investigation. Therefore, the aims of this clinical study are: to test the presence of periodontal bacteria DNA in aortic valves and to assess the concomitant presence of the same periodontal bacteria DNA in whole blood samples in patients affected by aortic valve stenosis and chronic periodontitis. Nineteen consecutive patients (12 males and 7 females, age: 49-85 years) were enrolled in this study after having been subjected to a complete periodontal evaluation to confirm the diagnosis of chronic periodontitis. All patients were scheduled for aortic valve replacement surgery. After clinical and microbial periodontal examination, the aortic valve tissue specimens were obtained by excision during valve replacement surgery and the patients were subjected to the whole blood sampling before the surgery. The polymerase chain reaction technology was used to detect the putative periodontal pathogens Tannerella forshytia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, Eikenella corrodens and Treponema denticola. Neither the 19 aortic valve specimens nor the blood samples were positive for the genoma of the selected periodontal pathogens. The selected periodontal pathogens did not colonize the aortic valve of patients affected by stenosis and bacterial genoma was not present in whole blood samples. A high blood pressure at the aortic valve may prevent the adhesion and proliferation of bacterial colonies.

  6. The screening of forensic blood, urine, and tissue specimens for xenobiotics using ion-trap liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert D; Botch, Sabra R

    2011-03-01

    During the investigation of aviation accidents, postmortem specimens from accident victims including blood, urine, and tissue are submitted to the Federal Aviation Administration's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) for toxicological analysis. The first, and perhaps most important, step in the analysis process is the initial screening of biological specimens for illicit, medically prescribed, and over-the-counter compounds that may be present and potentially be a cause and/or factor in the accident. Currently, our general unknown screening (GUS) procedure involves, in part, both gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography (LC) with both diode-array detection (DAD) and fluorescence detection. Both GC and LC techniques have inherent limitations that prevent the detection of certain types of compounds. The decreased specificity and sensitivity of LC-DAD has been an impediment to the existing GUS procedure. Therefore, our laboratory set out to develop and validate an LC-MS-MS procedure that is superior to LC-DAD. The limits of detection of 359 forensically important xenobiotics have been established following solid-phase extraction from whole blood and analysis by LC-MS-MS. Although whole blood was used as the matrix during instrument validation, the method has been successfully applied to both forensic urine and tissue specimens as well.

  7. Rapid genotyping of cytomegalovirus in dried blood spots by multiplex real-time PCR assays targeting the envelope glycoprotein gB and gH genes.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jutte J C; Wessels, Els; Korver, Anna M H; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Rusman, Lisette G; Kroes, Aloys C M; Vossen, Ann C T M

    2012-02-01

    Genotyping of cytomegalovirus (CMV) is useful to examine potential differences in the pathogenicity of strains and to demonstrate coinfection with multiple strains involved in CMV disease in adults and congenitally infected newborns. Studies on genotyping of CMV in dried blood spots (DBS) are rare and have been hampered by the small amount of dried blood available. In this study, two multiplex real-time PCR assays for rapid gB and gH genotyping of CMV in DBS were developed. Validation of the assays with 39 CMV-positive plasma samples of transplant recipients and 21 urine specimens of congenitally infected newborns was successful in genotyping 100% of the samples, with gB1 and gB3 being the most prevalent genotypes. Multiple gB and gH genotypes were detected in 36% and 33% of the plasma samples, respectively. One urine sample from a newborn with symptomatic congenital CMV was positive for gB1 and gB2. DBS of congenitally infected newborns (n = 41) were tested using 9 μl of dried blood, and genotypes were detected in 81% (gB) and 73% (gH) of the samples, with gB3 being the most prevalent genotype. No clear association of specific genotypes with clinical outcome was observed. In conclusion, the CMV gB and gH PCR assays were found to be rapid, sensitive for detecting mixed infections, and suitable for direct usage on DBS. These assays are efficient tools for genotyping of CMV in DBS of congenitally infected newborns.

  8. Dried blood spots PCR assays to screen congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Huiping; Qian, Jihong; Zhu, Jianxing

    2015-04-14

    The performance of dried blood spots (DBS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays in screening for congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection varies between different studies. To determine whether the DBS PCR assay has sufficient accuracy to be used as a screening test for cCMV infection, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 studies (n = 26007 neonates) that evaluated the performance of DBS PCR tests in screening for cCMV infection and that met our inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.844 (95% CI = 0.812-0.872) and 0.999 (95% CI = 0.998-0.999), respectively, and the diagnostic odds ratio was 1362.10 (95%CI = 566.91-3272.60). As sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust. In conclusion, the performance of DBS PCR assays for testing cCMV was more suitable for retrospective diagnosis than screening.

  9. Spot them in the spot: analysis of abused substances using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Sadones, Nele; Capiau, Sara; De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and DBS analysis have increasingly received attention during recent years. Furthermore, a substantial number of DBS methods has recently become available in clinical, forensic and occupational toxicology. In this review, we provide an overview of the different DBS-based methods that have been developed for detecting (markers of) abused substances. These include both legal and illegal drugs belonging to different categories, including cannabinoids, cocaine and metabolites, opioids, benzodiazepines and Z-drugs, amphetamines and analogs, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, ketamine and novel psychoactive substances such as cathinones. Markers of ethanol consumption and tobacco use are also covered in this review. Since the majority of published methods has shown promising results overall, an interesting role for DBS analysis in diverse toxicological applications can be envisaged. For the distinct applications, we discuss the specific potential and benefits of DBS, the associated limitations and challenges, as well as recent developments and future perspectives.

  10. Bridging the gap between sample collection and laboratory analysis: using dried blood spots to identify human exposure to chemical agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I.; Blake, Thomas A.; Perez, Jonas W.; Crow, Brian S.; Shaner, Rebecca L.; Coleman, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-05-01

    Public health response to large scale chemical emergencies presents logistical challenges for sample collection, transport, and analysis. Diagnostic methods used to identify and determine exposure to chemical warfare agents, toxins, and poisons traditionally involve blood collection by phlebotomists, cold transport of biomedical samples, and costly sample preparation techniques. Use of dried blood spots, which consist of dried blood on an FDA-approved substrate, can increase analyte stability, decrease infection hazard for those handling samples, greatly reduce the cost of shipping/storing samples by removing the need for refrigeration and cold chain transportation, and be self-prepared by potentially exposed individuals using a simple finger prick and blood spot compatible paper. Our laboratory has developed clinical assays to detect human exposures to nerve agents through the analysis of specific protein adducts and metabolites, for which a simple extraction from a dried blood spot is sufficient for removing matrix interferents and attaining sensitivities on par with traditional sampling methods. The use of dried blood spots can bridge the gap between the laboratory and the field allowing for large scale sample collection with minimal impact on hospital resources while maintaining sensitivity, specificity, traceability, and quality requirements for both clinical and forensic applications.

  11. Bridging the Gap between Sample Collection and Laboratory Analysis: Using Dried Blood Spots to Identify Human Exposure to Chemical Agents.

    PubMed

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I; Blake, Thomas A; Perez, Jonas W; Crow, Brian S; Shaner, Rebecca L; Coleman, Rebecca M; Johnson, Rudolph C

    2016-05-13

    Public health response to large scale chemical emergencies presents logistical challenges for sample collection, transport, and analysis. Diagnostic methods used to identify and determine exposure to chemical warfare agents, toxins, and poisons traditionally involve blood collection by phlebotomists, cold transport of biomedical samples, and costly sample preparation techniques. Use of dried blood spots, which consist of dried blood on an FDA-approved substrate, can increase analyte stability, decrease infection hazard for those handling samples, greatly reduce the cost of shipping/storing samples by removing the need for refrigeration and cold chain transportation, and be self-prepared by potentially exposed individuals using a simple finger prick and blood spot compatible paper. Our laboratory has developed clinical assays to detect human exposures to nerve agents through the analysis of specific protein adducts and metabolites, for which a simple extraction from a dried blood spot is sufficient for removing matrix interferents and attaining sensitivities on par with traditional sampling methods. The use of dried blood spots can bridge the gap between the laboratory and the field allowing for large scale sample collection with minimal impact on hospital resources while maintaining sensitivity, specificity, traceability, and quality requirements for both clinical and forensic applications.

  12. Brazilian reference values for MPS II screening in dried blood spots--a fluorimetric assay.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Marina Mastelaro; Müller, Karen Barbosa; Pereira, Vanessa Gonçalves; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II), or Hunter Syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disorder that is caused by the deficiency or absence of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) enzyme; in this disease, early diagnosis is essential to provide higher life expectancy for patients. This study validates a fluorimetric assay that is used to assess IDS enzyme activity using dried blood spot (DBS) samples and presents the reference interval for the Brazilian population. Venous blood sample was collected in heparin tubes for leukocyte extraction and DBS preparation. IDS activity in the leukocytes was analyzed, and the results were considered the gold standard reference for the categorization of volunteers as positive or negative controls (PC and NC, respectively). IDS activity in the DBS was analyzed using an adapted version of the leukocyte assay. Statistical analyses were performed using a ROC curve to determine cutoff values and using a parametric Student's t test to compare values between genders. To verify that the assay yielded consistent results, a Bland-Altman plot was prepared. Leukocyte IDS activity values ranged between 2.71 and 17.36 nmol/mg protein/h in the NC group and between 0 and 0.11 nmol/mg protein/h in the PC group. Based on the DBS assay, activities ranged between 1.83 and 16.86 μmol/L blood/h in the NC group and between 0.58 and 4.32 μmol/L blood/h in the PC group. Reference values of IDS activity were determined in DBS with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, the DBS assay described in this work may be a useful tool to screen MPS II patients in the Brazilian population. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sulfatide Analysis by Mass Spectrometry for Screening of Metachromatic Leukodystrophy in Dried Blood and Urine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Spacil, Zdenek; Kumar, Arun Babu; Liao, Hsuan-Chieh; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Stark, Samantha; Suhr, Teryn R.; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency in arylsulfatase A activity, leading to accumulation of sulfatide substrates. Diagnostic and monitoring procedures include demonstration of reduced arylsulfatase A activity in peripheral blood leukocytes or detection of sulfatides in urine. However, the development of a screening test is challenging because of instability of the enzyme in dried blood spots (DBS), the widespread occurrence of pseudodeficiency alleles, and the lack of available urine samples from newborn screening programs. METHODS We measured individual sulfatide profiles in DBS and dried urine spots (DUS) from MLD patients with LC-MS/MS to identify markers with the discriminatory power to differentiate affected individuals from controls. We also developed a method for converting all sulfatide molecular species into a single species, allowing quantification in positive-ion mode upon derivatization. RESULTS In DBS from MLD patients, we found up to 23.2-fold and 5.1-fold differences in total sulfatide concentrations for early- and late-onset MLD, respectively, compared with controls and pseudodeficiencies. Corresponding DUS revealed up to 164-fold and 78-fold differences for early- and late-onset MLD patient samples compared with controls. The use of sulfatides converted to a single species simplified the analysis and increased detection sensitivity in positive-ion mode, providing a second option for sulfatide analysis. CONCLUSIONS This study of sulfatides in DBS and DUS suggests the feasibility of the mass spectrometry method for newborn screening of MLD and sets the stage for a larger-scale newborn screening pilot study. PMID:26585924

  14. Detection of TPN contamination of dried blood spots used in newborn and metabolic screening and its impact on quantitative measurement of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Chace, Donald H; De Jesús, Víctor R; Lim, Timothy H; Hannon, W Harry; Clark, Reese H; Spitzer, Alan R

    2011-07-15

    Markers derived from dextrose (d-glucose) are observed in the MS/MS-based acylcarnitine profiles from dried-blood spots of some premature infants receiving intravenous nutrition. The presence of these markers at m/z 325, 399 and 473 are thought to arise from contamination of blood by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions during specimen collection from premature infants. These solutions contain high concentrations of amino acids and as a result, false-positive screening results for amino acid disorders may occur. This study investigates quantitative parameters of dextrose and amino acids in blood samples enriched with different TPN solutions. Whole blood collected in heparin was enriched with three different TPN solutions containing 5, 10 or 12.5% dextrose and amino acids that were originally prepared for delivery of 2.5, 3 or 4 g/kg/day of Premasol® then spotted onto filter paper cards. Acylcarnitine and amino acid profiles using MS/MS were obtained. Ion ratios of dextrose relative to specific acylcarnitine stable isotope internal standards and amino acid concentrations were obtained. The ion ratios for each of the dextrose markers at m/z 325, 399 and 473 exhibit linearity with the concentration of the dextrose component of TPN added to blood. The lowest detectable dextrose concentration added to blood was 7.6 mmol/l at 1:80 v/v TPN in blood. Furthermore, the concentrations of amino acids were linear with the concentration of the amino acid component of TPN added to blood. At the lowest detectable concentrations of dextrose marker, the amino acid concentrations were at or above the values considered abnormal in newborn screening laboratories. The molar ratios of amino acids approached the relative quantity of amino acid in the TPN solution with increasing enrichments in blood. Detection of the combinations of dextrose markers, very high elevations of amino acids and unusual molar ratios can be used to reject a specimen as improperly collected rather than

  15. p24 antigen detection on dried blood spots is a feasible and reliable test for infant HIV infection in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kivuyo, S L; Johannessen, A; Trøseid, M; Kasubi, M J; Gundersen, S G; Naman, E; Mushi, D; Ngowi, B J; Mfinanga, G S; Bruun, J N

    2011-12-01

    The difficulty of diagnosing HIV in infants is a major obstacle to early antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings. As serological tests are unreliable during the first 18 months of life, and the cost and complexity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays limit their access in resource-limited settings, p24 antigen detection has emerged as an alternative diagnostic tool. In this study, the performance of an ultrasensitive p24 antigen assay on dried blood spots was evaluated under field conditions in rural Tanzania. Specimens were stored and shipped at tropical room temperature, and analysed within six weeks. In total, 27 consecutive children aged <18 months and exposed to vertical HIV transmission were enrolled. Overall sensitivity and specificity was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 47.8-100) and 95.5% (95% CI, 77.2-99.9), respectively. Our findings suggest that detection of p24 antigen on dried blood spots can be a reliable and feasible diagnostic tool for infant HIV infection in rural resource-limited settings.

  16. Dried blood spots as a sampling technique for the quantitative determination of guanfacine in clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Henion, Jack; Abbott, Richard; Wang, Phillip

    2011-11-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) technology was evaluated for the quantitative determination of guanfacine in human blood in clinical studies. A very sensitive DBS assay has been developed using HPLC coupled with an AB Sciex 5500 QTRAP® (Applied Biosystems/MDS Sciex, ON, Canada) MS system (LC-MS/MS) with a linear calibration range of 0.05 to 25 ng/ml. High-resolution MS using an Exactive Orbitrap® (ThermoFisher, LLC., CA, USA) was compared with the QTRAP using extracted exact mass ion current profiles for guanfacine and its stable-isotope-incorporated internal standard. The sample preparation employed liquid-liquid extraction with methyl t-butyl ether of 5 mm punched DBS card disks, followed by reversed-phase HPLC separation coupled with either MS/MS or high-resolution MS. Routine experiments were performed to establish the robustness of the DBS assay, including precision, accuracy, linearity, selectivity, sensitivity and long-term stability of up to 76 days. In addition, several factors that potentially affect quantitation were investigated, including blood volume for DBS spotting, punch size and punch location. A sensitive research assay with a LLOQ of 0.05 ng/ml was developed and subjected to several components of a method validation common to a regulated bioanalysis procedure employing DBS. This method development and partial validation study determined that spot volume, punch size or punch location do not affect assay accuracy and precision. The DBS approach was successfully applied to a clinical study (a Phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to assess the effect of varying multiple oral doses of guanfacine on the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, safety, and tolerability profiles in healthy adult subjects). The pharmacokinetic profiles for 12 volunteers generated from the DBS assay and from a previously validated plasma assay were compared and were found to be comparable. DBS incurred samples collected from finger prick blood and

  17. The effect of zeolite A supplementation in the dry period on blood mineral status around calving.

    PubMed

    Thilsing-Hansen, T; Jørgensen, R J; Enemark, J M; Zelvyte, R; Sederevicius, A

    2003-01-01

    This article summarizes the results obtained in 6 separate studies concerned with the effect of zeolite A supplementation in the dry period on blood calcium, magnesium and phosphorus status around calving. The experiments were conducted on 5 different farms, and comprised a total of 117 cows. Two of the experiments (exp. 5 and 6) were conducted under extensive farming conditions whereas the rest (exp. 1-4) were conducted on intensively driven farms. All cows included in the experiments had completed at least 2 lactations. The cows were allocated as either untreated control cows or zeolite treated experimental cows according to expected date of calving and parity. The experimental cows were fed between 0.5 and 1.0 kg of zeolite A per day during the last 2 to 4 weeks of the dry period. Blood samples were drawn on the day of calving and day one and two after calving (all experiments), three weeks before the expected date of calving (exp. 1 and 2) and one week after calving (exp. 3 and 4). The zeolite supplementation significantly increased the mean serum Ca level on the day of calving. The efficiency of the zeolite supplementation to prevent hypocalcaemia (serum Ca < 2.00 mmol/l) on the day of calving was calculated. Efficiencies varied ranging from 3 to 100%, with a mean efficiency of 58%. The zeolite-calcium ratio (g of zeolite per cow per day/g of dietary calcium per cow per day) was calculated in each experiment. From the results it seemed, that zeolite-calcium ratios below 5 did not effectively prevent parturient hypocalcaemia, whereas ratios of 10 to 20 proved very efficient in preventing hypocalcaemia. There was apparently no additional effect from feeding zeolite for 4 instead of 2 weeks prepartum. Feeding zeolite in the dry period significantly decreased plasma phosphate before as well as after calving. The phosphate level was normalized within one week after calving. Plasma magnesium was significantly lower among the experimental cows on the day of calving

  18. Analysis of ochratoxin A in dried blood spots - Correlation between venous and finger-prick blood, the influence of hematocrit and spotted volume.

    PubMed

    Osteresch, Bernd; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    We report the improvement of a method for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) and its thermal degradation product 2'R-ochratoxin A in dried blood spots (DBS) by high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The DBS technique was advanced for the analysis of these two compounds in DBS with unknown amounts of blood as well as varying hematocrit values. Furthermore the comparability of venous vs. capillary blood was investigated. Human whole blood samples were spotted, dried, and extracted with a solvent consisting of acetone, acetonitrile and water for analysis by HPLC-MS/MS. Quantification was carried out by stable isotope labelled internal standards. Blood samples of volunteers (n=50) were used to further optimize and simplify the procedure. Ochratoxin A and 2'R-ochratoxin A concentrations found in the entire spots (approx. 100 μL blood) were compared with punched DBS discs of 8.8mm size containing approximately 20 μL blood. As a result the amounts of both toxins in a punched 8.8mm disc correlate well with the entire DBS. Also the use of capillary blood from finger-pricks versus venous blood was evaluated. The analyte levels correlate as well indicating that the less invasive finger-prick sampling gives also reliable results. The influence of hematocrit was investigated in a range of 25-55% according to the hematocrit in the used real blood samples (34-46% hematocrit). However no significant hematocrit effect was observed for the utilized real blood samples. Moreover different blood volumes were spotted and punched as a minimal spot size is usually recommended for accurate analysis. In this experiment finger-prick samples typically consist of about 90 μL blood. Therefore spots of 75, 100 and 125 μL blood were prepared and analyzed. Similar to the hematocrit effect, no considerable influence was observed.

  19. Use of dried blood spots in doping control analysis of anabolic steroid esters.

    PubMed

    Tretzel, Laura; Thomas, Andreas; Geyer, Hans; Gmeiner, Günter; Forsdahl, Guro; Pop, Valentin; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-08-05

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling, a technique for whole blood sampling on a piece of filter paper, has more than 50-years tradition, particularly in the diagnostic analysis of metabolic disorders in neonatal screening. Due to the minimal invasiveness, straightforwardness, robustness against manipulation and fastness DBS sampling recommends itself as an advantageous technique in doping control analysis. The present approach highlights the development of a screening assay for the analysis of eight anabolic steroid esters (nandrolone phenylpropionate, trenbolone enanthate, testosterone acetate, testosterone cypionate, testosterone isocaproate, testosterone phenylpropionate, testosterone decanoate and testosterone undecanoate) and nandrolone in DBS. The detection of the intact esters allows an unequivocal proof of the administration of conjugates of exogenous testosterone and its derivatives. Precise, specific and linear conditions were obtained by means of liquid chromatography high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry. Sensitivity in the low ppb range was accomplished by the preparation of the methyloxime derivatives of the target compounds. Labeled internal standards (d3-nandrolone, d3-nandrolone caproate and d3-nandrolone undecanoate) were applied to compensate for the broad range in chain length of the esters. The assay presented here outlines the application of DBS for the analysis of anabolic steroid esters in doping controls for the first time providing great potential to simplify the proof of exogenous administration of testosterone.

  20. Dried blood spot assay for the quantification of phenytoin using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Villanelli, Fabio; Giocaliere, Elisa; Malvagia, Sabrina; Rosati, Anna; Forni, Giulia; Funghini, Silvia; Shokry, Engy; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Guerrini, Renzo; la Marca, Giancarlo

    2015-02-02

    Phenytoin (PHT) is one of the most commonly used anticonvulsant drugs for the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorders. The large amount of plasma required by conventional methods for drug quantification makes mass spectrometry combined with dried blood spot (DBS) sampling crucial for pediatric patients where therapeutic drug monitoring or pharmacokinetic studies may be difficult to realize. DBS represents a new convenient sampling support requiring minimally invasive blood drawing and providing long-term stability of samples and less expensive shipment and storage. The aim of this study was to develop a LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of PHT on DBS. This analytical method was validated and gave good linearity (r(2)=0.999) in the range of 0-100mg/l. LOQ and LOD were 1.0mg/l and 0.3mg/l, respectively. The drug extraction from paper was performed in a few minutes using a mixture composed of organic solvent for 80%. The recovery ranged from 85 to 90%; PHT in DBS showed to be stable at different storage temperatures for one month. A good correlation was also obtained between PHT plasma and DBS concentrations. This method is both precise and accurate and appears to be particularly suitable to monitor treatment with a simple and convenient sample collection procedure.

  1. Use of Dried Blood Spots to Elucidate Full-Length Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Tully, Damien C.; Ogilvie, Colin B.; Learn, Gerald H.; Allen, Todd M.; Heath, Sonya L.; Goepfert, Paul; Bar, Katharine J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of HIV-1 genomes responsible for establishing clinical infection in newly infected individuals is fundamental to prevention and pathogenesis research. Processing, storage, and transportation of the clinical samples required to perform these virologic assays in resource-limited settings requires challenging venipuncture and cold chain logistics. Here, we validate the use of dried-blood spots (DBS) as a simple and convenient alternative to collecting and storing frozen plasma. Methods We performed parallel nucleic acid extraction, single genome amplification (SGA), next generation sequencing (NGS), and phylogenetic analyses on plasma and DBS. Results We demonstrated the capacity to extract viral RNA from DBS and perform SGA to infer the complete nucleotide sequence of the transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 envelope gene and full-length genome in two acutely infected individuals. Using both SGA and NGS methodologies, we showed that sequences generated from DBS and plasma display comparable phylogenetic patterns in both acute and chronic infection. SGA was successful on samples with a range of plasma viremia, including samples as low as 1,700 copies/ml and an estimated ∼50 viral copies per blood spot. Further, we demonstrated reproducible efficiency in gp160 env sequencing in DBS stored at ambient temperature for up to three weeks or at -20°C for up to five months. Conclusions These findings support the use of DBS as a practical and cost-effective alternative to frozen plasma for clinical trials and translational research conducted in resource-limited settings. PMID:27819061

  2. The Use of Dried Blood Spot Sampling in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes the methods used for and issues associated with collection and analysis of dried blood spot (DBS) samples for the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project and provides the basic distributions of the resulting analytes. Methods DBSs from capillary finger sticks were collected by nonmedically trained interviewers from 2,044 individuals, aged 57–85 years. The quality and quantity of DBS samples were evaluated to allow for analysis of interviewer performance. Levels of C-reactive protein, antibodies to the Epstein–Barr virus, hemoglobin, and glycosylated hemoglobin were assayed using various analytic methods. Results Cooperation rate for DBS collection was 84.5%, with 99% of the cards yielding enough sample for at least one analysis. The distribution, mean, and standard deviation of the analytes obtained from DBSs are also presented in this paper. Conclusions The high cooperation rate and quality of the spots collected suggest that the collection of DBSs in population-based research is a feasible and viable alternative to venous blood draws. The relative ease of sample collection, transport, and storage are significant benefits. Care should be taken, however, when comparing results from analysis of DBS samples with those obtained from serum or plasma samples. PMID:19244547

  3. An Integrated Strategy for Implementation of Dried Blood Spots in Clinical Development Programs.

    PubMed

    Kothare, Prajakti A; Bateman, Kevin P; Dockendorf, Marissa; Stone, Julie; Xu, Yang; Woolf, Eric; Shipley, Lisa A

    2016-03-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection has gained increased interest across the pharmaceutical industry as a potential alternative to plasma for pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluations. However, regulatory guidelines and examples of late-stage clinical trial applications in the literature are lacking. This paper communicates Merck's strategy for the implementation of DBS exemplified by experience on a late-stage program (MK-8931). In this program, DBS was proposed as the sole matrix for phase 3 studies to decrease logistical burden in an aging target patient population (Alzheimer's disease). In vitro and bioanalytical tests demonstrated initial method feasibility and suitability for further evaluations in the clinic. An in vivo dataset was developed initially in healthy subjects (phase 1 study) and then in patients (phase 2/3 study) to establish a quantitative relationship between the blood and plasma concentrations (bridging dataset) using descriptive and population PK analyses. This allowed for PK conclusions to be seamlessly drawn across the clinical program without impact from the choice of matrix. This integrated information package (in vitro, bioanalytical and clinical) was presented to major regulatory agencies (FDA and EMA) for regulatory input. Based on this package, regulatory concurrence was gained on accepting DBS as the sole matrix in late-stage clinical trials.

  4. Quantitation of brinzolamide in dried blood spots by a novel LC-QTOF-MS/MS method.

    PubMed

    Foivas, Anargyros; Malenović, Anđelija; Kostić, Nađa; Božić, Marija; Knežević, Miroslav; Loukas, Yannis L; Dotsikas, Yannis

    2016-02-05

    In the current study, a rapid and sensitive LC-QTOF-MS/MS method for the determination of brinzolamide in dried blood spots (DBS) was developed and validated. This novel sample collection, storage and transfer technique was suitable for analyzing a drug with high distribution into red blood cells and negligible plasma levels. The method included an isocratic mobile phase consisting of methanol and 10mM ammonium formate (90:10, v/v) and detection in positive electrospray mode (ESI+). The flow rate was adjusted to 0.350mL/min yielding retention times of 1.7min for both brinzolamide and internal standard (IS) rabeprazole on a Cyano analytical column, respectively. The validation of the proposed method over the concentration range 0.500-20.0μg/mL was performed in compliance with EMEA and FDA guidelines, assessing all major performance characteristics. Inter- and intra- assay precisions were less than 14%, while inter- and intra- assay accuracies varied from 92.2 to 111%. No matrix effect was observed and the mean brinzolamide extraction recovery was 93.5%. The method was successfully applied to real DBS samples from patients in steady state condition, receiving brinzolamide ophthalmic suspension 1% (w/v) for several months. Initial concentrations were corrected due to hematocrit effect, using image processing algorithm written in Matlab.

  5. Optimized DNA extraction from neonatal dried blood spots: application in methylome profiling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal dried blood spots (DBS) represent an inexpensive method for long-term biobanking worldwide and are considered gold mines for research for several human diseases, including those of metabolic, infectious, genetic and epigenetic origin. However, the utility of DBS is restricted by the limited amount and quality of extractable biomolecules (including DNA), especially for genome wide profiling. Degradation of DNA in DBS often occurs during storage and extraction. Moreover, amplifying small quantities of DNA often leads to a bias in subsequent data, particularly in methylome profiles. Thus it is important to develop methodologies that maximize both the yield and quality of DNA from DBS for downstream analyses. Results Using combinations of in-house-derived and modified commercial extraction kits, we developed a robust and efficient protocol, compatible with methylome studies, many of which require stringent bisulfite conversion steps. Several parameters were tested in a step-wise manner, including blood extraction, cell lysis, protein digestion, and DNA precipitation, purification and elution. DNA quality was assessed based on spectrophotometric measurements, DNA detectability by PCR, and DNA integrity by gel electrophoresis and bioanalyzer analyses. Genome scale Infinium HumanMethylation450 and locus-specific pyrosequencing data generated using the refined DBS extraction protocol were of high quality, reproducible and consistent. Conclusions This study may prove useful to meet the increased demand for research on prenatal, particularly epigenetic, origins of human diseases and for newborn screening programs, all of which are often based on DNA extracted from DBS. PMID:24980254

  6. Optimized DNA extraction from neonatal dried blood spots: application in methylome profiling.

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Akram; Saffery, Richard; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Hirschfeld, Steven; Kasten, Carol; Dwyer, Terence; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector

    2014-07-01

    Neonatal dried blood spots (DBS) represent an inexpensive method for long-term biobanking worldwide and are considered gold mines for research for several human diseases, including those of metabolic, infectious, genetic and epigenetic origin. However, the utility of DBS is restricted by the limited amount and quality of extractable biomolecules (including DNA), especially for genome wide profiling. Degradation of DNA in DBS often occurs during storage and extraction. Moreover, amplifying small quantities of DNA often leads to a bias in subsequent data, particularly in methylome profiles. Thus it is important to develop methodologies that maximize both the yield and quality of DNA from DBS for downstream analyses. Using combinations of in-house-derived and modified commercial extraction kits, we developed a robust and efficient protocol, compatible with methylome studies, many of which require stringent bisulfite conversion steps. Several parameters were tested in a step-wise manner, including blood extraction, cell lysis, protein digestion, and DNA precipitation, purification and elution. DNA quality was assessed based on spectrophotometric measurements, DNA detectability by PCR, and DNA integrity by gel electrophoresis and bioanalyzer analyses. Genome scale Infinium HumanMethylation450 and locus-specific pyrosequencing data generated using the refined DBS extraction protocol were of high quality, reproducible and consistent. This study may prove useful to meet the increased demand for research on prenatal, particularly epigenetic, origins of human diseases and for newborn screening programs, all of which are often based on DNA extracted from DBS.

  7. Dried blood spots versus plasma for the quantitation of HIV-1 RNA using a real-Time PCR, m2000rt assay.

    PubMed

    Vidya, Madhavan; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Rifkin, Samara; Solomon, Sunil S; Waldrop, Greer; Mayer, Kenneth H; Solomon, Suniti; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu

    2012-05-01

    High costs and stringent requirements for storage and transport of plasma, often prohibit the availability of HIV viral load quantification in resource-limited settings. Dried blood spots (DBS) represent a better method of specimen collection that removes many of these logistical and technical limitations. The present study aimed to assess the performance of the Abbott m2000rt assay for quantitation of HIV-1 RNA in DBS specimens using plasma as a "gold standard" for comparison. One hundred paired DBS and plasma specimens were collected from patients infected with HIV, who were 18 years and older during routine visits to a private tertiary-care clinic in Chennai, India. HIV-1 RNA was extracted manually and then detected using the m2000rt assay. The mean plasma and DBS viral loads were 4.27 (95% CI: 2.65, 5.88) and 4.14 (95% CI: 1.96, 6.32) log copies/mL, respectively. The overall sensitivity of DBS reached 95%; with sensitivities of 62%, 88% and 100% when stratified by viral load ranges of ≤1000, 1000-3000 and >3000 copies/mL, respectively. An over quantitation of the viral load with DBS was observed in pairs with plasma viral load<3000 copies/mL [d=-0.3 log copies/mL (ranging from -0.1 to 0.6 log copies/mL)]. The study showed a strong concordance in RNA levels between plasma and DBS. The use of DBS specimens should be considered for HIV monitoring and for detection of virologic failure in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dried blood spots for HIV-1 drug resistance and viral load testing: A review of current knowledge and WHO efforts for global HIV drug resistance surveillance.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolio, Silvia; Parkin, Neil T; Jordan, Michael; Brooks, James; García-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping is an essential component of the World Health Organization global HIV Drug Resistance (HIVDR) prevention and assessment strategy. Plasma is considered to be the most appropriate specimen type for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping. However, use of plasma may not be feasible in rural, remote areas in resource-limited settings since its preparation and storage requires personnel and laboratory infrastructure that is often lacking. An alternative specimen type for HIVDR genotyping is dried blood spots (DBS). DBS can be made from blood drawn for routine clinical or surveillance purposes without special laboratory processing. The filter paper used is relatively inexpensive, easily obtained and stored, and although procedures for making DBS must be followed precisely, the training required is less intensive than that required for plasma separation. HIV nucleic acids are generally stable over long periods of time and freezing is not required unless storage over two weeks is planned. In addition, DBS are more easily transported than plasma because they can be shipped as non-hazardous materials using regular mail or courier services. Many studies have reported the successful genotyping of HIV-1 from DBS and some have shown a high genotypic concordance with plasma genotypes despite potential DNA interferences. During the past few years DBS have started to be widely used for HIV-1 drug resistance testing, and an increased number of reports from resource-limited areas have indicated DBS as the preferred specimen type for transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance surveillance where plasma collection is not feasible. The World Health Organization has brought together a group of experts (WHO HIVResNet DBS working group) to review current data on DBS preparation, storage, and transport conditions, and provide a reference protocol, which is also summarized in this article.

  9. Performance and Storage Integrity of Dried Blood Spots for PCB, BFR and Pesticide Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Chernyak, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) can provide accurate and valuable estimates of exposure to environmental toxicants, and the use of information derived from archived newborn DBS information has enormous potential to open up new research on the impacts of early chemical exposure on disease. Broad application of DBS for the purpose of quantitative exposure estimation requires robust and validated methods. This study investigates the suitability of DBS analyses for population studies of exposure to three chemical groups: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants (BFRs), and chlorinated pesticides. It examines background (matrix) contamination, recovery and extraction variability, sensitivity, and storage stability. DBS samples prepared using 50 μL of adult blood were analyzed by GC/MS, and method performance was confirmed by using certified materials and paired DBS-blood samples from six volunteers. Several of the target compounds and their degradation products have not been previously measured in DBS. All target compounds were detected in DBS samples collected from the volunteers. Sample DBS cards showed background contamination of several compounds. When stored at room temperature, target compounds, excluding PBDEs, were stable for up to one month. When refrigerated or frozen, stability was acceptable for all compounds up to one year, and multiyear storage appears acceptable at colder (e.g., −80 °C) temperatures. Multicompartment models may be used to estimate or correct for storage losses. Considering concentrations of contaminants for adults and children reported in the literature, and experimental values of detection limits and background contamination, DBS samples are suitable for quantifying exposures to many PCBs, BFRs and persistent pesticides. PMID:25058892

  10. Single Lysis-Salting Out Method of Genomic DNA Extraction From Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Muntaj; Shivanna, Devaraju Kuramkote; Kamate, Mahesh; Ab, Vedamurthy; Tp, Kruthika-Vinod

    2016-11-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are an important form of bio-sampling and valuable approach for storing blood samples for genetic studies. This has necessitated in developing an effective protocol to isolate genomic DNA (gDNA) from DBS samples.In this study, we have elucidated a dependable and non-hazardous "single lysis-salting out" (SLSO) protocol of gDNA extraction from DBS and compared against the available commercial kits. For the purpose of this study, blood spots were collected on S&S 903 filter cards from 10 healthy volunteers and 30 patients with glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I). The gDNA was extracted from theseDBS samples by SLSO, QIAamp® gDNA Micro kit and innuPREP forensic kit methods. The quantity and quality of gDNA obtained from these methods were determined by measuring the absorbance using a Nanodrop spectrophotometer. The SLSO method showed four-fold and eight-fold increased yield of gDNA in healthy volunteers and patient samples, respectively, compared to commercial kits (p<0.0001). The protocol was also found to be cost efficient, reducing the per sample cost to almost half. The suitability of this method for genetic studies was confirmed by performing R402W genotyping by RFLP in GA-I patients. The genotyping results showed the presence of R402W mutation in 20% (6/30) of patients. The SLSO method was found to be inexpensive, non-hazardous and a suitable technique for isolating gDNA from DBS samples for genetic studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Tenofovir, Emtricitabine, and Tenofovir Diphosphate in Dried Blood Spots for Determining Recent and Cumulative Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R.; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Rower, Joseph E.; Meditz, Amie; Gardner, Edward M.; Predhomme, Julie; Fernandez, Caitlin; Langness, Jacob; Kiser, Jennifer J.; Bushman, Lane R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tenofovir (TFV) disoproxil fumarate (TDF)±emtricitabine (FTC) are widely used for HIV treatment and chemoprophylaxis, but variable adherence may lead to suboptimal responses. Methods that quantify adherence would allow for interventions to improve treatment and prevention outcomes. Our objective was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP) and FTC-triphosphate (FTC-TP) in red blood cells (RBCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs); to extend the RBC analysis to dried blood spots (DBSs); and to model how RBC/DBS monitoring could inform recent and cumulative drug exposure/adherence. Blood samples were collected from 17 HIV-negative adults at 5 visits over a 30-day pharmacokinetics study of daily oral TDF/FTC. Dosing was discontinued on day 30 and blood was collected on days 35, 45, and 60 during the washout period. Plasma/RBCs/PBMCs/DBSs were all quantified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. DBSs were paired with RBCs and plasma for comparisons. The median (interquartile range) RBC TFV-DP half-life was 17.1 (15.7–20.2) versus 4.2 (3.7–5.2) days in PBMCs. At steady state, TFV-DP was 130 fmol/106 RBCs versus 98 fmol/106 PBMCs. FTC-TP was not quantifiable in most RBC samples. TFV-DP in RBCs versus DBSs yielded an r2=0.83. TFV-DP in DBSs was stable at −20°C. Simulations of TFV-DP in RBCs/DBSs, when dosed from one to seven times per week, demonstrated that each dose per week resulted in an average change of approximately 19 fmol/106 RBCs and 230 fmol/punch. TFV and FTC in plasma versus DBSs was defined by y=1.4x; r2=0.96 and y=0.8x; r2=0.99, respectively. We conclude that DBSs offer a convenient measure of recent (TFV/FTC) and cumulative (TFV-DP in RBCs) drug exposure with potential application to adherence monitoring. PMID:22935078

  12. Evaluation of the Broad-Range PCR/ESI-MS Technology in Blood Specimens for the Molecular Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Giménez, Montserrat; Quesada, M Dolores; Rivaya, Belén; Marcó, Clara; Domínguez, M Jesús; Arméstar, Fernando; Martró, Elisa; Ausina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of the etiological agent in bloodstream infections is of vital importance for the early administration of the most appropriate antibiotic therapy. Molecular methods may offer an advantage to current culture-based microbiological diagnosis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of IRIDICA, a platform based on universal genetic amplification followed by mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) for the molecular diagnosis of sepsis-related pathogens directly from the patient's blood. A total of 410 whole blood specimens from patients admitted to Emergency Room (ER) and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with clinical suspicion of sepsis were tested with the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay (broad identification of bacteria and Candida spp.). Microorganisms grown in culture and detected by IRIDICA were compared considering blood culture as gold standard. When discrepancies were found, clinical records and results from other cultures were taken into consideration (clinical infection criterion). The overall positive and negative agreement of IRIDICA with blood culture in the analysis by specimen was 74.8% and 78.6%, respectively, rising to 76.9% and 87.2% respectively, when compared with the clinical infection criterion. Interestingly, IRIDICA detected 41 clinically significant microorganisms missed by culture, most of them from patients under antimicrobial treatment. Of special interest were the detections of one Mycoplasma hominis and two Mycobacterium simiae in immunocompromised patients. When ICU patients were analyzed separately, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values compared with blood culture were 83.3%, 78.6%, 33.9% and 97.3% respectively, and 90.5%, 87.2%, 64.4% and 97.3% respectively, in comparison with the clinical infection criterion. IRIDICA is a promising technology that offers an early and reliable identification of a wide variety of pathogens directly from the patient's blood within 6h, which brings the opportunity to

  13. Diagnosis of Human Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection by Amplification of Viral DNA from Dried Blood Spots on Perinatal Cards

    PubMed Central

    Scanga, Lori; Chaing, Shu; Powell, Cynthia; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Harrell, Lizzie J.; Henshaw, Nancy G.; Civalier, Chris J.; Thorne, Leigh B.; Weck, Karen; Booker, Jessica; Gulley, Margaret L.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection affects 1% of children and is the most common infectious cause of sensorineural hearing loss. Due to the difficulty of diagnosing deafness and other neurological disorders in infants, affected individuals may not be recognized until much later when active infection has resolved and culture is no longer informative. To overcome this problem, congenital HCMV infection was diagnosed retrospectively by testing residual blood samples collected from newborns and dried on perinatal cards as part of the North Carolina Newborn Screening Program. We modified the Qiagen method for purifying DNA from dried blood spots to increase the sample size and recovery of the lysate. A multiplex, real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction assay on an ABI 7900 instrument measured a highly conserved segment of the HCMV polymerase gene and the APOB human control gene. HCMV DNA was detected in blood dried on perinatal cards from all seven infants with culture-proven congenital infection, and all 24 negative control cases lacked detectable HCMV DNA. Our findings suggest that it is possible to diagnose congenital HCMV infection using dried blood collected up to 20 months earlier. Further studies are warranted on patients with hearing loss or other neurological deficits to determine the percentage that is attributable to congenital HCMV infection. PMID:16645211

  14. Rapid Identification of Psychoactive Drugs in Drained Gastric Lavage Fluid and Whole Blood Specimens of Drug Overdose Patients Using Ambient Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Wei; Su, Hung; Cai, You-Da; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Wu, Den-Chyang; Shiea, Jentaie

    2017-01-01

    Psychoactive drug overdoses are life-threatening and require prompt and proper treatment in the emergency room to minimize morbidity and mortality. Prompt identification of the ingested psychoactive drugs is challenging, since witness recall is unreliable and patients’ symptoms do not necessarily explain their loss of consciousness. Gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometric analyses have been the traditionally employed methods to detect and identify abused substances; however, these techniques are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, thermal desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, an ambient mass spectrometric technique, was applied to rapidly characterize flunitrazepam, lysergic acid diethylamide, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine in drained gastric lavage fluid, and ketamine, cocaine, amphetamine and norketamine in whole blood samples. No pretreatment of the gastric lavage fluid specimens was required and the entire analytical process took less than 30 s per specimen. Liquid–liquid extraction, followed by centrifugation, was performed on the whole blood samples. The corresponding compounds were identified through matching the obtained mass spectrometric data with those provided by commercial databases. The limits-of-detection of the tested drugs in both drained gastric lavage fluid and whole blood samples are at sub ppm levels. This is sensitive enough for emergency medical application, since the quantities of medications ingested by overdosed abusers are much higher than the amounts that were tested. PMID:28573080

  15. Rapid Identification of Psychoactive Drugs in Drained Gastric Lavage Fluid and Whole Blood Specimens of Drug Overdose Patients Using Ambient Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Wei; Su, Hung; Cai, You-Da; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Wu, Den-Chyang; Shiea, Jentaie

    2017-01-01

    Psychoactive drug overdoses are life-threatening and require prompt and proper treatment in the emergency room to minimize morbidity and mortality. Prompt identification of the ingested psychoactive drugs is challenging, since witness recall is unreliable and patients' symptoms do not necessarily explain their loss of consciousness. Gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometric analyses have been the traditionally employed methods to detect and identify abused substances; however, these techniques are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, thermal desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, an ambient mass spectrometric technique, was applied to rapidly characterize flunitrazepam, lysergic acid diethylamide, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine in drained gastric lavage fluid, and ketamine, cocaine, amphetamine and norketamine in whole blood samples. No pretreatment of the gastric lavage fluid specimens was required and the entire analytical process took less than 30 s per specimen. Liquid-liquid extraction, followed by centrifugation, was performed on the whole blood samples. The corresponding compounds were identified through matching the obtained mass spectrometric data with those provided by commercial databases. The limits-of-detection of the tested drugs in both drained gastric lavage fluid and whole blood samples are at sub ppm levels. This is sensitive enough for emergency medical application, since the quantities of medications ingested by overdosed abusers are much higher than the amounts that were tested.

  16. A gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method for helium detection in postmortem blood and tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Schaff, Jason E; Karas, Roman P; Marinetti, Laureen

    2012-03-01

    In cases of death by inert gas asphyxiation, it can be difficult to obtain toxicological evidence supporting assignment of a cause of death. Because of its low mass and high diffusivity, and its common use as a carrier gas, helium presents a particular challenge in this respect. We describe a rapid and simple gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method to qualitatively screen a variety of postmortem biological specimens for the presence of helium. Application of this method is demonstrated with three case examples, encompassing an array of different biological matrices.

  17. Current and future applications of dried blood spots in viral disease management.

    PubMed

    Snijdewind, Ingrid J M; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; Fraaij, Pieter L A; van der Ende, Marchina E; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Gruters, Rob A

    2012-03-01

    Almost five decades after their first application in diagnostics, dried blood spot (DBS) cards remain to be of key interest in many research areas and clinical applications. The advantages of sample stability during transport and storage, can now be combined with the high sensitivity of novel diagnostic techniques for the measurement and analysis of nucleic acids, proteins and small molecules which may overcome the limitations of the small samples sizes in DBS cards. Here we present a survey of the literature on the use of DBS cards for diagnosis, monitoring and epidemiological studies of virus infections other than HIV, including CMV, HBV, HCV, HAV, HEV, HTLV, EBV, HSV, measles-, rubella- and dengue-virus. The minimal invasiveness of sampling and the relative ease of handling and storing DBS cards is expected to offer additional opportunities to measure and analyze biomarkers of viral disease in resource poor settings or when limited amount of blood can be obtained. Large retrospective studies of virus infections in newborns using stored DBS cards have already been undertaken for screening of congenital infections. In addition, DBS cards have been used prospectively for prevalence studies, outbreak surveillance, mass screening for viral infections, follow-up of chronic infection and its treatment in resource-limited areas. We do not expect that current wet sampling techniques of plasma or serum will be replaced by DBS sampling but it allows extension of sampling in persons and settings that are currently difficult to access or that lack suitable storage facilities. In conclusion, DBS card sampling and storage will aid adequate outbreak management of existing and emerging viral diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Novel, Nondestructive, Dried Blood Spot-Based Hematocrit Prediction Method Using Noncontact Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Capiau, Sara; Wilk, Leah S; Aalders, Maurice C G; Stove, Christophe P

    2016-06-21

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling is recognized as a valuable alternative sampling strategy both in research and in clinical routine. Although many advantages are associated with DBS sampling, its more widespread use is hampered by several issues, of which the hematocrit effect on DBS-based quantitation remains undoubtedly the most widely discussed one. Previously, we developed a method to derive the approximate hematocrit from a nonvolumetrically applied DBS based on its potassium content. Although this method yielded good results and was straightforward to perform, it was also destructive and required sample preparation. Therefore, we now developed a nondestructive method which allows to predict the hematocrit of a DBS based on its hemoglobin content, measured via noncontact diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The developed method was thoroughly validated. A linear calibration curve was established after log/log transformation. The bias, intraday and interday imprecision of quality controls at three hematocrit levels and at the lower and upper limit of quantitation (0.20 and 0.67, respectively) were less than 11%. In addition, the influence of storage and the volume spotted was evaluated, as well as DBS homogeneity. Application of the method to venous DBSs prepared from whole blood patient samples (n = 233) revealed a good correlation between the actual and the predicted hematocrit. Limits of agreement obtained after Bland and Altman analysis were -0.076 and +0.018. Incurred sample reanalysis demonstrated good method reproducibility. In conclusion, mere scanning of a DBS suffices to derive its approximate hematocrit, one of the most important variables in DBS analysis.

  19. Islet Autoantibody Measurements from Dried Blood Spots on Filter Paper Strongly Correlate to Serum Levels

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Kimber M.; Alkanani, Aimon K.; McDaniel, Kristen A.; Goyne, Christopher; Miao, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Yu, Liping; Michels, Aaron W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is increasing in incidence and predictable with measurement of serum islet autoantibodies (iAb) years prior to clinical disease onset. Identifying iAb positive individuals reduces diabetic ketoacidosis and identifies individuals for T1D prevention trials. However, large scale screening for iAb remains challenging as assays have varying sensitivities and specificities, insulin autoantibodies remain difficult to measure and venipuncture is generally required to obtain serum. We developed an approach to reliably measure all four major iAb, including insulin autoantibodies, from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter-paper. By spiking iAb positive serum into iAb negative whole blood in a dose titration, we optimized the conditions for autoantibody elution from filter paper as measured by fluid phase radioimmunoassays. After assessing stability of measuring iAb from DBS over time, we then screened iAb from DBS and the corresponding serum in new-onset T1D (n = 52), and controls (n = 72) which included first-degree relatives of T1D patients. iAb measured from eluted DBS in new-onset T1D strongly correlated with serum measurements (R2 = 0.96 for mIAA, GADA = 0.94, IA-2A = 0.85, ZnT8A = 0.82, p<0.01 for each autoantibody). There were no false positives in control subjects, and 5/6 with previously unknown iAb positivity in sera were detected using DBS. With further validation, measuring iAb from DBS can be a reliable method to screen for T1D risk. PMID:27846247

  20. Screening of neonatal UK dried blood spots using a duplex TREC screening assay.

    PubMed

    Adams, Stuart P; Rashid, Samina; Premachandra, Tharindu; Harvey, Katie; Ifederu, Adeboye; Wilson, Melanie C; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2014-04-01

    Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) is considered to be a paediatric emergency and unless identified promptly can be life-threatening. Frequently, infants are not diagnosed with SCID until they have become seriously ill with infection leading to treatment complications and a poorer prognosis. We aimed to test a newly available commercial duplex assay to measure T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) to establish if this would be suitable for newborn screening for SCID in the UK. Over 5000 anonymous retrospective dried blood spots (DBS) were used alongside 18 confirmed SCID positive DBS with a newly available duplex assay to measure TRECs levels and control gene levels. We also included testing of premature babies and babies from neonatal intensive care units (NICU) as these have been shown to have high false positive rates in other TREC screening assays. All 18 SCID DBS samples were successfully identified as SCID positives in the study. The number of presumptive positives detected was dependent on the TREC cut-off threshold settings. When analysed with five different TRECs cut-off values (20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 TREC copies/μl blood) the presumptive positive rate ranged from 0.04 to 1.00 % of samples tested. Premature infants and neonates from NICU did not show high presumed false positive rates in this assay. The study demonstrated that this duplex assay kit will identify all newborns with SCID as presumptive positives. The data also shows that with suitable TREC cut-off settings the number of presumptive positives from non-SCID newborns will be manageable in the context of a national screening service.

  1. Multiple Reaction Monitoring Enables Precise Quantification of 97 Proteins in Dried Blood Spots*

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Andrew G.; Percy, Andrew J.; Yang, Juncong; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2015-01-01

    The dried blood spot (DBS) methodology provides a minimally invasive approach to sample collection and enables room-temperature storage for most analytes. DBS samples have successfully been analyzed by liquid chromatography multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC/MRM-MS) to quantify a large range of small molecule biomarkers and drugs; however, this strategy has only recently been explored for MS-based proteomics applications. Here we report the development of a highly multiplexed MRM assay to quantify endogenous proteins in human DBS samples. This assay uses matching stable isotope-labeled standard peptides for precise, relative quantification, and standard curves to characterize the analytical performance. A total of 169 peptides, corresponding to 97 proteins, were quantified in the final assay with an average linear dynamic range of 207-fold and an average R2 value of 0.987. The total range of this assay spanned almost 5 orders of magnitude from serum albumin (P02768) at 18.0 mg/ml down to cholinesterase (P06276) at 190 ng/ml. The average intra-assay and inter-assay precision for 6 biological samples ranged from 6.1–7.5% CV and 9.5–11.0% CV, respectively. The majority of peptide targets were stable after 154 days at storage temperatures from −20 °C to 37 °C. Furthermore, protein concentration ratios between matching DBS and whole blood samples were largely constant (<20% CV) across six biological samples. This assay represents the highest multiplexing yet achieved for targeted protein quantification in DBS samples and is suitable for biomedical research applications. PMID:26342038

  2. Field Evaluation of the InBios Chagas Detect Plus Rapid Test in Serum and Whole-Blood Specimens in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vishal; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Gilman, Robert H.; Ramirez, Margot; Saenza, Eliana; Malaga, Edith; Sanchez, Gerardo; Okamoto, Emi E.; Sherbuck, Jacqueline E.; Clark, Eva H.; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Bozo, Ricardo; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Colanzi, Rony; Verastegui, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which affects an estimated 7 million to 8 million people. Chagas disease is endemic throughout Latin America, with the highest prevalence in Bolivia. Conventional diagnosis requires a well-equipped laboratory with experienced personnel. We evaluated the Chagas Detect Plus (CDP) (InBios, Seattle, WA), a rapid immunochromatographic assay for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi. CDP performance was compared to infection status based on results obtained by indirect hemagglutination assay, immunofluorescent-antibody test, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Confirmed infection required positive results by at least 2 conventional assays. We used specimens from adults of both sexes in a general hospital in the city of Santa Cruz and from pregnant women in a hospital and children in villages in the Bolivian Chaco, an area of hyperendemicity. CDP was performed in paired whole-blood and serum specimens from 385 individuals in the two hospital studies and in 200 serum specimens from the community study. CDP showed sensitivities/specificities of 96.2% (95% confidence interval, 92.7 to 98.4)/98.8% (95.9 to 99.9) in whole blood and 99.3% (97.5 to 99.9)/96.9% (94.2 to 98.6) in serum, with no differences by sex, age group, or study site. CDP showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in our study population, comparable to those of conventional serology. The test is reliable for field surveys, requires no laboratory equipment, and performed well in serum and whole blood. The CDP could also be used for accurate maternal screening to identify neonates at risk of congenital transmission. CDP performance data in diverse geographic areas are needed to strengthen the evidence base for its use. PMID:25274804

  3. Field evaluation of the InBios Chagas detect plus rapid test in serum and whole-blood specimens in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vishal; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Gilman, Robert H; Ramirez, Margot; Saenza, Eliana; Malaga, Edith; Sanchez, Gerardo; Okamoto, Emi E; Sherbuck, Jacqueline E; Clark, Eva H; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Bozo, Ricardo; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Colanzi, Rony; Verastegui, Manuela; Bern, Caryn

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which affects an estimated 7 million to 8 million people. Chagas disease is endemic throughout Latin America, with the highest prevalence in Bolivia. Conventional diagnosis requires a well-equipped laboratory with experienced personnel. We evaluated the Chagas Detect Plus (CDP) (InBios, Seattle, WA), a rapid immunochromatographic assay for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi. CDP performance was compared to infection status based on results obtained by indirect hemagglutination assay, immunofluorescent-antibody test, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Confirmed infection required positive results by at least 2 conventional assays. We used specimens from adults of both sexes in a general hospital in the city of Santa Cruz and from pregnant women in a hospital and children in villages in the Bolivian Chaco, an area of hyperendemicity. CDP was performed in paired whole-blood and serum specimens from 385 individuals in the two hospital studies and in 200 serum specimens from the community study. CDP showed sensitivities/specificities of 96.2% (95% confidence interval, 92.7 to 98.4)/98.8% (95.9 to 99.9) in whole blood and 99.3% (97.5 to 99.9)/96.9% (94.2 to 98.6) in serum, with no differences by sex, age group, or study site. CDP showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in our study population, comparable to those of conventional serology. The test is reliable for field surveys, requires no laboratory equipment, and performed well in serum and whole blood. The CDP could also be used for accurate maternal screening to identify neonates at risk of congenital transmission. CDP performance data in diverse geographic areas are needed to strengthen the evidence base for its use. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Impact of the phlebotomy training based on CLSI/NCCLS H03-a6 - procedures for the collection of diagnostic blood specimens by venipuncture.

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    The activities involving phlebotomy, a critical task for obtaining diagnostic blood samples, are poorly studied as regards the major sources of errors and the procedures related to laboratory quality control. The aim of this study was to verify the compliance with CLSI documents of clinical laboratories from South America and to assess whether teaching phlebotomists to follow the exact procedure for blood collection by venipuncture from CLSI/NCCLS H03-A6 - Procedures for the Collection of Diagnostic Blood Specimens by Venipuncture might improve the quality of the process. A survey was sent by mail to 3674 laboratories from South America to verify the use of CLSI documents. Thirty skilled phlebotomists were trained with the CLSI H03-A6 document to perform venipuncture procedures for a period of 20 consecutive working days. The overall performances of the phlebotomists were further compared before and after the training program. 2622 from 2781 laboratories that did answer our survey used CLSI documents to standardize their procedures and process. The phlebotomists' training for 20 days before our evaluation completely eliminated non-conformity procedures for: i) incorrect friction of the forearm, during the cleaning of the venipuncture site to ease vein location; ii) incorrect sequence of vacuum tubes collection; and iii) inadequate mixing of the blood in primary vacuum tubes containing anticoagulants or clot activators. Unfortunately the CLSI H03-A6 document does not caution against both unsuitable tourniquet application time (i.e., for more than one minute) and inappropriate request to clench the fist repeatedly. These inadequate procedures were observed for all phlebotomists. We showed that strict observance of the CLSI H03-A6 document can remarkably improve quality, although the various steps for collecting diagnostic blood specimens are not a gold standard, since they may still permit errors. Tourniquet application time and forearm clench should be verified by

  5. Direct Blood Dry LAMP: A Rapid, Stable, and Easy Diagnostic Tool for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Kyoko; Kajino, Kiichi; Hachaambwa, Lottie; Namangala, Boniface; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a rapid and sensitive tool used for the diagnosis of a variety of infectious diseases. One of the advantages of this method over the polymerase chain reaction is that DNA amplification occurs at a constant temperature, usually between 60–65°C; therefore, expensive devices are unnecessary for this step. However, LAMP still requires complicated sample preparation steps and a well-equipped laboratory to produce reliable and reproducible results, which limits its use in resource-poor laboratories in most developing countries. In this study, we made several substantial modifications to the technique to carry out on-site diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) in remote areas using LAMP. The first essential improvement was that LAMP reagents were dried and stabilized in a single tube by incorporating trehalose as a cryoprotectant to prolong shelf life at ambient temperature. The second technical improvement was achieved by simplifying the sample preparation step so that DNA or RNA could be amplified directly from detergent-lysed blood samples. With these modifications, diagnosis of HAT in local clinics or villages in endemic areas becomes a reality, which could greatly impact on the application of diagnosis not only for HAT but also for other tropical diseases. PMID:25769046

  6. Dried Blood Spot Thyroglobulin as a Biomarker of Iodine Status in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Stinca, Sara; Andersson, Maria; Weibel, Sandra; Herter-Aeberli, Isabelle; Fingerhut, Ralph; Gowachirapant, Sueppong; Hess, Sonja Y; Jaiswal, Nidhi; Jukic, Tomislav; Kusic, Zvonko; Mabapa, Ngoako Solomon; Nepal, Ashwini Kumar; San Luis, Teofilo O L; Zhen, Jia Qing; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) could be a sensitive biomarker of iodine nutrition in pregnant women (PW). A dried blood spot (DBS) assay would simplify collection and transport in field studies. Our aims were to (1) establish and test a reference range for DBS-Tg in PW; (2) determine whether co-measurement of Tg antibodies (Abs) is necessary to define population iodine status. Standardized cross-sectional studies of 3870 PW from 11 countries. For the DBS-Tg reference range, we included TgAb-negative PW (n = 599) from 3 countries with sufficient iodine intake. We measured the urinary iodine concentration and DBS thyroid-stimulating hormone, total thyroxin, Tg, and TgAb. In the reference population, the median DBS-Tg was 9.2 μg/L (95% confidence interval, 8.7 to 9.8 μg/L) and was not significantly different among trimesters. The reference range was 0.3 to 43.5 μg/L. Over a range of iodine intake, the Tg concentrations were U-shaped. Within countries, the median DBS-Tg and the presence of elevated DBS-Tg did not differ significantly between all PW and PW who were TgAb-negative. A median DBS-Tg of ∼10 μg/L with <3% of values ≥44 μg/L indicated population iodine sufficiency. Concurrent measurement of TgAb did not appear necessary to assess the population iodine status.

  7. Dried blood spot analysis by digital microfluidics coupled to nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shih, Steve C C; Yang, Hao; Jebrail, Mais J; Fobel, Ryan; McIntosh, Nathan; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2012-04-17

    Dried blood spot (DBS) samples on filter paper are surging in popularity as a sampling and storage vehicle for a wide range of clinical and pharmaceutical applications. For example, a DBS sample is collected from every baby born in the province of Ontario, Canada, for quantification of approximately one hundred analytes that are used to screen for 28 conditions, including succinylacetone (SA), a marker for hepatorenal tyrosinemia. Unfortunately, the conventional methods used to evaluate DBS samples for newborn screening and other applications are tedious and slow, with limited options for automated analysis. In response to this challenge, we have developed a method to couple digital microfluidics (DMF) to nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nESI-MS) for SA quantification in DBS samples. The new system is formed by sandwiching a pulled glass capillary emitter between the two DMF substrates such that the capillary emitter is immobilized without external seals or gaskets. Moreover, we introduce a new feedback control system that enables high-fidelity droplet manipulation across DBS samples without manual intervention. The system was validated by application to on-chip extraction, derivatization, and analysis of SA and other analytes from DBS samples, with comparable performance to gold-standard methods. We propose that the new methods described here can potentially contribute to a new generation of analytical techniques for quantifying analytes in DBS samples for a wide range of applications.

  8. [Direct proteome profiling of human blood serum in the experiment with 5-day dry immersion].

    PubMed

    Pastushkova, L Kh; Pakharukova, N A; Trifonova, O P; Dobrokhotov, I V; Valeeva, O A; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the investigation was to determine changes in blood plasma proteome in healthy human subjects (n = 14, 19 to 26 y.o.) in an experiment with dry immersion (DI). Plasma samples were drawn 7 and 2 days before the exposure, on DI days 2, 3 and 5, and on days 1, 3, 7 and 15 after the experiment. Previous to direct MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometric profiling, serum samples were pre-fractionated and enriched with magnetic particles MB WCX (WCX--a weak cation exchanger) on ClinProt (Bruker Daltonics). In each spectrum, 175 MS-peaks were detected on average within the mass range from 1000 to 17,000 Da with the signal/noise ratio = 5. Student's criterion (p < 0.05) was used to define reliable differences between DI and baseline samples from 48 peaks (27.4 % of all the proteome profile peaks). On DI days 2 and 3, growth of peak areas was observed in fragments of complement system proteins C3 and C4, high-molecular kininogen and fibrinogen that can be attributed to organism adaptation to conditions of the experiment. Significant increases of the peak area of apolipoprotein CI (reduced form with segregated threonine and proline) and C4 enzymes of the complement system, and fibrinogen on the first day after the experiment can be related to changes in motor activities of the subjects.

  9. Dried Blood Spot sampling in psychiatry: Perspectives for improving therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Martial, Lisa C; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Mulder, Martina; Schellekens, Arnt; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Burger, David M; Schene, Aart H; Batalla, Albert

    2017-03-01

    Assessment of drug concentrations is indicated to guide dosing of a selected number of drugs used in psychiatry. Conventionally this is done by vena puncture. Novel sampling strategies such as dried blood spot (DBS) sampling have been developed for various drugs, including antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood-stabilizers. DBS sampling is typically performed by means of a finger prick. This method allows for remote sampling, which means that patients are not required to travel to a health care facility. The number of DBS assays for drugs used in psychiatry has increased over the last decade and includes antidepressants (tricyclic and serotonin and/or norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), mood stabilizers and first- and second-generation antipsychotics. Available assays often comply with analytical validation criteria but are seldom used in routine clinical care. Little attention has been paid to the clinical validation and implementation processes of home sampling. Ideally, not only medicines but also clinical chemistry parameters should be measured within the same sample. This article reflects on the position of DBS remote sampling in psychiatry and provides insight in the requisites of making such a sampling tool successful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. Fresh and citrated whole-blood specimens can produce different thromboelastography results in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Elizabeth A; Koch, Christopher D; Santrach, Paula J; Schears, Gregory J; Karon, Brad S

    2013-08-01

    To compare thromboelastography (TEG) tracings obtained from fresh and citrated whole-blood samples in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) or after cardiopulmonary bypass and in healthy volunteers. Samples of fresh and citrated whole blood were analyzed for 25 patients and 4 healthy volunteers. Thromboelastography analysis was performed in both plain and heparinase cups. In 5 of 6 patients on ECMO, use of citrated samples resulted in apparent partial or complete heparin reversal. In TEG tracings from patients following cardiopulmonary bypass, there was a slight hypercoagulable appearance in the citrated sample. No differences were noted between fresh and citrated samples from healthy volunteers whose blood was spiked with heparin. In some patients on ECMO, use of samples collected in sodium citrate tubes for TEG analysis results in significant artifacts, which could lead to heparin overdosing in these patients.

  11. Development and Validation of a GC-MS Method for the Detection and Quantification of Clotiapine in Blood and Urine Specimens and Application to a Postmortem Case

    PubMed Central

    Mannocchi, Giulio; Pantano, Flaminia; Tittarelli, Roberta; Catanese, Miriam; Umani Ronchi, Federica; Busardò, Francesco Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Clotiapine is an atypical antipsychotic of the dibenzothiazepine class introduced in a few European countries since 1970, efficient in treatment-resistant schizophrenic patients. There is little published data on the therapeutic and toxic concentrations of this drug. Aims. The aim of the present study is the development and validation of a method that allows the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine specimens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods. Validation was performed working on spiked postmortem blood and urine samples. Samples were extracted with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) technique at pH 8.5 with n-hexane/dichloromethane (85/15 v/v) and analysis was followed by GC-MS. Methadone-d9 was used as internal standard. Results. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.2 and 1.3 ng/mL for urine and blood, respectively, while the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 3.9 and 4.3 ng/mL, respectively. Linearity, precision, selectivity, accuracy, and recovery were also determined. The method was applied to a postmortem case. The blood and urine clotiapine concentrations were 1.32 and 0.49 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusions. A reliable GC-MS method for the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine samples has been developed and fully validated and then applied to a postmortem case. PMID:26236337

  12. Why dried blood spots are an ideal tool for CYP1A2 phenotyping.

    PubMed

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling has gained wide interest in bioanalysis during the last decade and has already been successfully applied in pharmacokinetic and phenotyping studies. However, all of the available phenotyping studies used small datasets and did not include a systematic evaluation of DBS-specific parameters. The latter is important since several of these factors still challenge the breakthrough of DBS in routine practice. In this study, caffeine and paraxanthine are determined in capillary DBS, venous DBS, whole blood and plasma for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 phenotyping. The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of DBS as a tool for CYP1A2 phenotyping. A CYP1A2 phenotyping study was conducted in 73 healthy volunteers who received a 150 mg oral dose of caffeine. Six hours post-administration, caffeine and paraxanthine concentrations and paraxanthine:caffeine molar concentration ratios, i.e., the actual CYP1A2 phenotyping indices, were determined in capillary DBS (obtained by non-volumetric application, direct from the fingertip), venous DBS, whole blood, and plasma. Furthermore, the impact of DBS-specific parameters, including hematocrit, volume spotted, and punch location, was evaluated. Concentrations of caffeine and paraxanthine in capillary DBS were, respectively, on average 12.7 and 13.8% lower than those in venous DBS and 31.5 and 33.1% lower than those in plasma. While these differences were statistically significant (p < 0.001), no significant difference was observed between the paraxanthine:caffeine molar ratios in the distinct evaluated matrices (p ≥ 0.053). This ratio also alleviated the impact of hematocrit and volume spotted. Using the largest DBS-based phenotyping study to date, we have demonstrated that CYP1A2 phenotyping in capillary DBS is a valid and convenient alternative for the classical plasma-based approach. Additionally, we have provided an objective basis as to why DBS are an ideal tool for CYP1A2 phenotyping.

  13. Newborn Thyroid Screening: Influence of Pre-Analytic Variables on Dried Blood Spot Thyrotropin Measurement.

    PubMed

    Butler, Allison M; Charoensiriwatana, Wiyada; Krasao, Piamnukul; Pankanjanato, Rotjanapan; Thong-Ngao, Penpan; Polson, Randall C; Snow, Gregory; Ehrenkranz, Joel

    2017-09-01

    Measuring thyrotropin (TSH) eluted from a dried blood spot (DBS) is used to screen an estimated 30 million newborns annually for congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Newborn thyroid screening has eliminated cretinism from the industrialized world and decreased the adverse effects of unrecognized CH on neurocognitive development. Hematocrit, a pre-analytic variable that affects the measurement of TSH from a DBS, contributes to the imprecision of DBS TSH measurement and could account for false-negative and false-positive DBS newborn screening test results. To assess whether variations in hematocrit found in newborns have a clinical effect in DBS-based newborn thyroid screening, the effects of hematocrit variability on the measurement of DBS TSH were studied. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention procedures for manufacturing DBS performance testing standards were used to generate DBSs from blood samples, with hematocrits of 35%, 40%, 45%, 50%, 55%, 60%, and 65% and serum TSH concentrations of 6.3 ± 0.4 and 26.6 ± 8.0 mIU/L. TSH was measured in the eluates of four replicate DBS 3 mm punches at each hematocrit using the Thailand Ministry of Public Health Newborn Screening Operation Center enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed-effects model. Based on the mixed-effects model, hematocrit significantly affected DBS TSH measurement (p < 0.001). A 1% increase in hematocrit resulted in a 0.06 mIU/L decrease in eluate TSH when TSH was 6.3 + 0.4 mIU/L, and a 0.21 mIU/L decrease in eluate TSH when TSH was 26.6 + 8.0 mIU/L. DBS TSH is significantly affected by the blood sample hematocrit. The pre-analytic variability due to hematocrit is independent of TSH assay sensitivity, specificity, precision, repeatability, and reference intervals. The effect of hematocrit on DBS TSH measurement is clinically relevant, could account for geographic and ethnic variation in the incidence of CH, and may result in both false

  14. High-Quality Exome Sequencing of Whole-Genome Amplified Neonatal Dried Blood Spot DNA

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Jakob; Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Christiansen, Michael; Hagen, Christian Munch; Maller, Julian; Stevens, Christine; Li, Shenting; Li, Qibin; Sun, Jihua; Wang, Jun; Nordentoft, Merete; Werge, Thomas Mears; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Daly, Mark; Hougaard, David Michael

    2016-01-01

    Stored neonatal dried blood spot (DBS) samples from neonatal screening programmes are a valuable diagnostic and research resource. Combined with information from national health registries they can be used in population-based studies of genetic diseases. DNA extracted from neonatal DBSs can be amplified to obtain micrograms of an otherwise limited resource, referred to as whole-genome amplified DNA (wgaDNA). Here we investigate the robustness of exome sequencing of wgaDNA of neonatal DBS samples. We conducted three pilot studies of seven, eight and seven subjects, respectively. For each subject we analysed a neonatal DBS sample and corresponding adult whole-blood (WB) reference sample. Different DNA sample types were prepared for each of the subjects. Pilot 1: wgaDNA of 2x3.2mm neonatal DBSs (DBS_2x3.2) and raw DNA extract of the WB reference sample (WB_ref). Pilot 2: DBS_2x3.2, WB_ref and a WB_ref replica sharing DNA extract with the WB_ref sample. Pilot 3: DBS_2x3.2, WB_ref, wgaDNA of 2x1.6 mm neonatal DBSs and wgaDNA of the WB reference sample. Following sequencing and data analysis, we compared pairwise variant calls to obtain a measure of similarity—the concordance rate. Concordance rates were slightly lower when comparing DBS vs WB sample types than for any two WB sample types of the same subject before filtering of the variant calls. The overall concordance rates were dependent on the variant type, with SNPs performing best. Post-filtering, the comparisons of DBS vs WB and WB vs WB sample types yielded similar concordance rates, with values close to 100%. WgaDNA of neonatal DBS samples performs with great accuracy and efficiency in exome sequencing. The wgaDNA performed similarly to matched high-quality reference—whole-blood DNA—based on concordance rates calculated from variant calls. No differences were observed substituting 2x3.2 with 2x1.6 mm discs, allowing for additional reduction of sample material in future projects. PMID:27089011

  15. Supplementation of Dried Mealworm (Tenebrio molitor larva) on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility and Blood Profiles in Weaning Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jin, X. H.; Heo, P. S.; Hong, J. S.; Kim, N. J.; Kim, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dried mealworm (Tenebrio molitor larva) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and blood profiles in weaning pigs. A total of 120 weaning pigs (28±3 days and 8.04±0.08 kg of body weight) were allotted to one of five treatments, based on sex and body weight, in 6 replicates with 4 pigs per pen by a randomized complete block design. Supplementation level of dried mealworm was 0%, 1.5%, 3.0%, 4.5%, or 6.0% in experimental diet as treatment. Two phase feeding programs (phase I from 0 day to 14 day, phase II from 14 day to 35 day) were used in this experiment. All animals were allowed to access diet and water ad libitum. During phase I, increasing level of dried mealworm in diet linearly improved the body weight (p<0.01), average daily gain (ADG) (p<0.01) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) (p<0.01). During phase II, ADG also tended to increase linearly when pigs were fed higher level of dried mealworm (p = 0.08). In addition, increasing level of dried mealworm improved the ADG (p<0.01), ADFI (p<0.05) and tended to increase gain to feed ratio (p = 0.07) during the whole experimental period. As dried mealworm level was increased, nitrogen retention and digestibility of dry matter as well as crude protein were linearly increased (p = 0.05). In the results of blood profiles, decrease of blood urea nitrogen (linear, p = 0.05) and increase of insulin-like growth factor (linear, p = 0.03) were observed as dried mealworm was increased in diet during phase II. However, there were no significant differences in immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG concentration by addition of dried mealworm in the growth trial. Consequently, supplementation of dried mealworm up to 6% in weaning pigs’ diet improves growth performance and nutrient digestibility without any detrimental effect on immune responses. PMID:27282974

  16. Blood Culture Collection through Peripheral Intravenous Catheters Increases the Risk of Specimen Contamination among Adult Emergency Department Patients

    PubMed Central

    Self, Wesley H.; Speroff, Theodore; McNaughton, Candace D.; Wright, Patty W.; Miller, Geraldine; Johnson, James G.; Daniels, Titus L.; Talbot, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    Five hundred five blood cultures collected through a peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) in an emergency department were matched to cultures obtained by dedicated venipuncture from the same patient within 10 minutes. The relative risk of contamination for cultures collected through PIVs compared with dedicated venipuncture was 1.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.08–3.11). PMID:22476282

  17. Blood culture collection through peripheral intravenous catheters increases the risk of specimen contamination among adult emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Self, Wesley H; Speroff, Theodore; McNaughton, Candace D; Wright, Patty W; Miller, Geraldine; Johnson, James G; Daniels, Titus L; Talbot, Thomas R

    2012-05-01

    Five hundred five blood cultures collected through a peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) in an emergency department were matched to cultures obtained by dedicated venipuncture from the same patient within 10 minutes. The relative risk of contamination for cultures collected through PIVs compared with dedicated venipuncture was 1.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-3.11).

  18. PCR-Based Assay Using Occult Blood Detection Cards for Detection of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in Specimens from U.S. Travelers to Mexico with Acute Diarrhea▿

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Kevin A.; Mohamed, Jamal A.; DuPont, Herbert L.; Padda, Ranjit S.; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Flores, Jose; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Martinez-Sandoval, Francisco G.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.

    2008-01-01

    Large field studies of travelers' diarrhea for multiple destinations are limited by the need to perform stool cultures on site in a timely manner. A method for the collection, transport, and storage of fecal specimens that does not require immediate processing and refrigeration and that is stable for months would be advantageous. This study was designed to determine if enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) DNA could be identified from cards that were processed for the evaluation of fecal occult blood. U.S. students traveling to Mexico during 2005 to 2007 were monitored for the occurrence of diarrheal illness. When ill, students provided a stool specimen for culture and occult blood by the standard methods. Cards then were stored at room temperature prior to DNA extraction. Fecal PCR was performed to identify ETEC and EAEC in DNA extracted from stools and from occult blood cards. Significantly more EAEC cases were identified by PCR that was performed on DNA that was extracted from cards (49%) or from frozen feces (40%) than from culture methods that used HEp-2 adherence assays (13%) (P < 0.001). Similarly, more ETEC cases were detected from card DNA (38%) than from fecal DNA (30%) or by culture that was followed by hybridization (10%) (P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the card test were 75 and 62%, respectively, compared to those for EAEC by culture and were 50 and 63%, respectively, compared to those for ETEC. DNA extracted from fecal cards that was used for the detection of occult blood is of use in identifying diarrheagenic E. coli. PMID:18480224

  19. A rapid liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-based method for measuring propranolol on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Malvagia, Sabrina; Villanelli, Fabio; Giocaliere, Elisa; Ombrone, Daniela; Funghini, Silvia; Filippi, Luca; Cavallaro, Giacomo; Bagnoli, Paola; Guerrini, Renzo; la Marca, Giancarlo

    2013-05-05

    Propranolol, a non-selective beta blocker drug, is used in young infants and newborns for treating several heart diseases; its pharmacokinetics has been extensively evaluated in adult patients using extrapolation to treat pediatric population. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate a method to measure propranolol levels in dried blood spots. The analysis was performed by using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The calibration curve in matrix was linear in the concentration range of 2.5-200 μg/L with correlation coefficient r=0.9996. Intra-day and inter-day precisions and biases were less than 8.0% (n=10) and 11.5% (n=10) respectively. The recoveries ranged from 94 to 100% and the matrix effect did not result in a severe signal suppression. Propranolol on dried blood spot showed a good stability at three different temperatures for one month. This paper describes a micromethod for measuring propranolol levels on dried blood spot, which determines a great advantage in neonates or young infants during pharmacokinetic studies because of less invasive sampling and small blood volume required.

  20. Determination of salmeterol in dried blood spot using an ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with HPLC.

    PubMed

    Hatami, Mehdi; Karimnia, Elham; Farhadi, Khalil

    2013-11-01

    A novel analytical method based on the use of a modified dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique by ionic liquids has been developed for the first time. This method was applied for the determination of salmeterol in dried blood spot samples from asthmatic patients followed by HPLC system equipped with fluorescence detector. The main novelty of the present work deals with the analysis of salmeterol in dried blood spot with significant advantages with regard to invasive sampling, volume of blood used (<20 μL), storage and transport of biological materials and requirements for special biohazard arrangements. The effects of significant factors in microextraction procedure including extracting and disperser solvents volume, sample pH and salt contents were investigated. Under optimized conditions, the mean recoveries were higher than 90.0% with linear responses about 1.00-500 ng mL(-1) concentration range. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.30 ng mL(-1) in S/N of 3. Intra-day (n=6) and inter-day (n=3) assay precision showed relative standard deviation lower than 6.0 and 8.5% for studied drug, respectively. The developed microextraction procedure was simpler and faster than conventional extraction techniques and was omitted hazard organic solvents. Finally, the proposed method is suitable for the analysis of salmeterol in dried blood spots from asthmatic patients for therapeutic drug monitoring purpose.

  1. Limited utility of dried-blood- and plasma spot-based screening for antiretroviral treatment failure with Cobas Ampliprep/TaqMan HIV-1 version 2.0.

    PubMed

    Sawadogo, Souleymane; Shiningavamwe, Andreas; Chang, Joy; Maher, Andrew D; Zhang, Guoqing; Yang, Chunfu; Gaeb, Esegiel; Kaura, Harold; Ellenberger, Dennis; Lowrance, David W

    2014-11-01

    The 2013 WHO antiretroviral therapy (ART) guidelines recommend dried blood spots (DBS) as an alternative specimen type for viral load (VL) monitoring. We assessed the programmatic utility of screening for antiretroviral (ARV) treatment failure (TF) at 5,000 and 1,000 copies/ml using DBS and dried plasma spots (DPS) with a commonly used VL assay, the Roche Cobas Ampliprep/Cobas TaqMan V.2.0 (CAP/CTM). Plasma, DBS, and DPS were prepared from 839 whole-blood specimens collected from patients on ART for ≥ 6 months at three public facilities in Namibia. Using the CAP/CTM test, VL were measured in plasma, DBS, and DPS, and the results were compared using the plasma VL as the reference standard. The clinical sensitivities, specificities, and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of DBS at ARV TF diagnostic thresholds of 5,000 copies/ml and 1,000 copies/ml were 0.99, 0.55, 0.33, and 0.99 and 0.99, 0.26, 0.29, and 0.99, respectively, and for DPS at TF diagnostic thresholds of 5,000 copies/ml and 1,000 copies/ml, they were 0.88, 0.98, 0.92, and 0.97 and 0.91, 0.96, 0.89, and 0.97, respectively. The prevalences of TF were overestimated in DBS by 33% and 57% at these two thresholds, respectively. A high rate of false-positive results would occur if the CAP/CTM with DBS were to be used to screen for ARV TF. WHO recommendations for DBS-based VL monitoring should be specific to the VL assay version and type. Despite the better performance of DPS, the programmatic utility for TF screening may be limited by requirements for processing the whole blood at the collection site. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Quantification of rifapentine, a potent antituberculosis drug, from dried blood spot samples using liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Teresa L; Marzinke, Mark A; Hoang, Thuy; Bliven-Sizemore, Erin; Weiner, Marc; Mac Kenzie, William R; Dorman, Susan E; Dooley, Kelly E

    2014-11-01

    The quantification of antituberculosis drug concentrations in multinational trials currently requires the collection of modest blood volumes, centrifugation, aliquoting of plasma, freezing, and keeping samples frozen during shipping. We prospectively enrolled healthy individuals into the Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 29B, a phase I dose escalation study of rifapentine, a rifamycin under evaluation in tuberculosis treatment trials. We developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for quantifying rifapentine in whole blood on dried blood spots (DBS) to facilitate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses in clinical trials. Paired plasma and whole-blood samples were collected by venipuncture, and whole blood was spotted on Whatman protein saver 903 cards. The methods were optimized for plasma and then validated for DBS. The analytical measuring range for quantification of rifapentine and its metabolite was 50 to 80,000 ng/ml in whole-blood DBS. The analyte was stable on the cards for 11 weeks with a desiccant at room temperature and protected from light. The method concordance for paired plasma and whole-blood DBS samples was determined after correcting for participant hematocrit or population-based estimates of bias from Bland-Altman plots. The application of either correction factor resulted in acceptable correlation between plasma and whole-blood DBS (Passing-Bablok regression corrected for hematocrit; y = 0.98x + 356). Concentrations of rifapentine may be determined from whole-blood DBS collected via venipuncture after normalization in order to account for the dilutional effects of red blood cells. Additional studies are focused on the application of this methodology to capillary blood collected by finger stick. The simplicity of processing, storage, shipping, and low blood volume makes whole-blood DBS attractive for rifapentine pharmacokinetic evaluations, especially in international and pediatric trials.

  3. Quantification of Rifapentine, a Potent Antituberculosis Drug, from Dried Blood Spot Samples Using Liquid Chromatographic-Tandem Mass Spectrometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Teresa L.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Hoang, Thuy; Bliven-Sizemore, Erin; Weiner, Marc; Mac Kenzie, William R.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of antituberculosis drug concentrations in multinational trials currently requires the collection of modest blood volumes, centrifugation, aliquoting of plasma, freezing, and keeping samples frozen during shipping. We prospectively enrolled healthy individuals into the Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 29B, a phase I dose escalation study of rifapentine, a rifamycin under evaluation in tuberculosis treatment trials. We developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for quantifying rifapentine in whole blood on dried blood spots (DBS) to facilitate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses in clinical trials. Paired plasma and whole-blood samples were collected by venipuncture, and whole blood was spotted on Whatman protein saver 903 cards. The methods were optimized for plasma and then validated for DBS. The analytical measuring range for quantification of rifapentine and its metabolite was 50 to 80,000 ng/ml in whole-blood DBS. The analyte was stable on the cards for 11 weeks with a desiccant at room temperature and protected from light. The method concordance for paired plasma and whole-blood DBS samples was determined after correcting for participant hematocrit or population-based estimates of bias from Bland-Altman plots. The application of either correction factor resulted in acceptable correlation between plasma and whole-blood DBS (Passing-Bablok regression corrected for hematocrit; y = 0.98x + 356). Concentrations of rifapentine may be determined from whole-blood DBS collected via venipuncture after normalization in order to account for the dilutional effects of red blood cells. Additional studies are focused on the application of this methodology to capillary blood collected by finger stick. The simplicity of processing, storage, shipping, and low blood volume makes whole-blood DBS attractive for rifapentine pharmacokinetic evaluations, especially in international and pediatric trials. PMID:25182637

  4. Detection of IL28B SNP DNA from Buccal Epithelial Cells, Small Amounts of Serum, and Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Halfon, Philippe; Ouzan, Denis; Khiri, Hacène; Pénaranda, Guillaume; Castellani, Paul; Oulès, Valerie; Kahloun, Asma; Amrani, Nolwenn; Fanteria, Lise; Martineau, Agnès; Naldi, Lou; Bourlière, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Point mutations in the coding region of the interleukin 28 gene (rs12979860) have recently been identified for predicting the outcome of treatment of hepatitis C virus infection. This polymorphism detection was based on whole blood DNA extraction. Alternatively, DNA for genetic diagnosis has been derived from buccal epithelial cells (BEC), dried blood spots (DBS), and genomic DNA from serum. The aim of the study was to investigate the reliability and accuracy of alternative routes of testing for single nucleotide polymorphism allele rs12979860CC. Methods Blood, plasma, and sera samples from 200 patients were extracted (400 µL). Buccal smears were tested using an FTA card. To simulate postal delay, we tested the influence of storage at ambient temperature on the different sources of DNA at five time points (baseline, 48 h, 6 days, 9 days, and 12 days) Results There was 100% concordance between blood, plasma, sera, and BEC, validating the use of DNA extracted from BEC collected on cytology brushes for genetic testing. Genetic variations in HPTR1 gene were detected using smear technique in blood smear (3620 copies) as well as in buccal smears (5870 copies). These results are similar to those for whole blood diluted at 1/10. A minimum of 0.04 µL, 4 µL, and 40 µL was necessary to obtain exploitable results respectively for whole blood, sera, and plasma. No significant variation between each time point was observed for the different sources of DNA. IL28B SNPs analysis at these different time points showed the same results using the four sources of DNA. Conclusion We demonstrated that genomic DNA extraction from buccal cells, small amounts of serum, and dried blood spots is an alternative to DNA extracted from peripheral blood cells and is helpful in retrospective and prospective studies for multiple genetic markers, specifically in hard-to-reach individuals. PMID:22412970

  5. Hepatitis B viral load in dried blood spots: a validation study in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Vinikoor, Michael J.; Zürcher, Samuel; Musukuma, Kalo; Kachuwaire, Obert; Rauch, Andri; Chi, Benjamin H.; Gorgievski, Meri; Zwahlen, Marcel; Wandeler, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to hepatitis B viral load (VL) testing is poor in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) due to economic and logistical reasons. Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of testing dried blood spots (DBS) for hepatitis B virus (HBV) VL in a laboratory in Lusaka, Zambia, and to compare HBV VLs between DBS and plasma samples. Study design Paired plasma and DBS samples from HIV-HBV co-infected Zambian adults were analyzed for HBV VL using the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HBV test (Version 2.0) and for genotype by direct sequencing. We used Bland-Altman analysis to compare VLs between sample types and by HBV genotype. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the probability of an undetectable DBS result by plasma VL. Results Among 68 participants, median age was 34 years, 61.8% were men, and median plasma HBV VL was 3.98 log IU/ml (interquartile range, 2.04–5.95). Among sequenced viruses, 28 were genotype A1 and 27 were genotype E. Bland-Altman plots suggested strong agreement between DBS and plasma VLs. DBS VLs were on average 1.59 log IU/ml lower compared to plasma with 95% limits of agreement of −2.40 to −0.83 log IU/ml. At a plasma VL ≥2,000 IU/ml, the probability of an undetectable DBS result was 1.8% (95% CI: 0.5–6.6). At plasma VL ≥20,000 IU/ml this probability reduced to 0.2% (95% CI: 0.03–1.7). Conclusions In a Zambian laboratory, we observed strong agreement between DBS and plasma VLs and high sensitivity in DBS at plasma VL ≥2,000 IU/ml. As HBV treatment expands, DBS could increase access to HBV VL testing in SSA settings. PMID:26356987

  6. A microsphere-based assay for mutation analysis of the biotinidase gene using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Janik, David K; Pass, Kenneth A

    2012-09-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive syndrome caused by defects in the biotinidase gene, the product of which affects biotin metabolism. Newborn screening (NBS) for biotinidase deficiency can identify affected infants prior to onset of symptoms; biotin supplementation can resolve or prevent the clinical features. In NBS, dry blood spots (DBS) are usually tested for biotinidase enzyme activity by colorimetric analysis. By taking advantage of the multiplexing capabilities of the Luminex platform, we have developed a microsphere-based array genotyping method for the simultaneous detection of six disease causing mutations in the biotinidase gene, thereby permitting a second tier of molecular analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3.2 mm DBS. Biotinidase gene sequences, containing the mutations of interest, were amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, followed by multiplexed allele-specific primer extension using universally tagged genotyping primers. The products were then hybridized to anti-tag carrying xTAG microspheres and detected on the Luminex platform. Genotypes were verified by sequencing. Genotyping results of 22 known biotinidase deficient samples by our xTAG biotinidase assay was in concordance with the results obtained from DNA sequencing, for all 6 mutations used in our panel. These results indicate that genotyping by an xTAG microsphere-based array is accurate, flexible, and can be adapted for high-throughput. Since NBS for biotinidase deficiency is by enzymatic assay, less than optimal quality of the DBS itself can compromise enzyme activity, while the DNA from these samples mostly remains unaffected. This assay warrants evaluation as a viable complement to the biotinidase semi-quantitative colorimetric assay.

  7. A microsphere-based assay for mutation analysis of the biotinidase gene using dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Janik, David K.; Pass, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive syndrome caused by defects in the biotinidase gene, the product of which affects biotin metabolism. Newborn screening (NBS) for biotinidase deficiency can identify affected infants prior to onset of symptoms; biotin supplementation can resolve or prevent the clinical features. In NBS, dry blood spots (DBS) are usually tested for biotinidase enzyme activity by colorimetric analysis. By taking advantage of the multiplexing capabilities of the Luminex platform, we have developed a microsphere-based array genotyping method for the simultaneous detection of six disease causing mutations in the biotinidase gene, thereby permitting a second tier of molecular analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3.2 mm DBS. Biotinidase gene sequences, containing the mutations of interest, were amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, followed by multiplexed allele-specific primer extension using universally tagged genotyping primers. The products were then hybridized to anti-tag carrying xTAG microspheres and detected on the Luminex platform. Genotypes were verified by sequencing. Genotyping results of 22 known biotinidase deficient samples by our xTAG biotinidase assay was in concordance with the results obtained from DNA sequencing, for all 6 mutations used in our panel. These results indicate that genotyping by an xTAG microsphere-based array is accurate, flexible, and can be adapted for high-throughput. Since NBS for biotinidase deficiency is by enzymatic assay, less than optimal quality of the DBS itself can compromise enzyme activity, while the DNA from these samples mostly remains unaffected. This assay warrants evaluation as a viable complement to the biotinidase semi-quantitative colorimetric assay. PMID:27625817

  8. Galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase dried blood spot quality control materials for newborn screening tests.

    PubMed

    Adam, Barbara W; Flores, Sharon R; Hou, Yu; Allen, Todd W; De Jesus, Victor R

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to prepare dried-blood-spot (DBS) quality control (QC) materials for galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), to evaluate their stability during storage and use, and to evaluate their performance in five DBS GALT test methods. We prepared and characterized GALT-normal and GALT-deficient DBS materials and compared GALT activities in DBSs after predetermined storage intervals at controlled temperatures and humidities. External evaluators documented the suitability of the DBS QC materials for use in five GALT test methods. GALT activity losses from DBSs stored in low (<30%) humidity for 14 days at 45°C, 35 days at 37°C, 91 days at room temperature, 182 days at 4°C, and 367 days at -20°C were 54%, 53%, 52% 23%, and 7% respectively. In paired DBSs stored in high humidity (>50%) for identical intervals, losses were: 45°C-68%; 37°C-79%; room temperature-72%, and 4°C-63%. GALT activities in DBSs stored at 4°C were stable throughout 19 excursions to room temperature. Twenty-five of 26 external evaluators, using five different GALT test methods, classified the GALT-deficient DBSs as "outside normal limits". All evaluators classified the GALT-normal DBSs as "within normal limits". Most of the GALT activity loss from DBSs stored at elevated or room temperature was attributable to the effects of storage temperature. Most of the loss from DBSs stored at 4°C was attributable to the effects of elevated humidity. Loss from DBSs stored at -20°C was insignificant. The DBS materials were suitable for monitoring performance of all five GALT test methods. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. All rights reserved.

  9. Galactose-1-phosphate Uridyltransferase Dried Blood Spot Quality Control Materials for Newborn Screening Tests

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Barbara W.; Flores, Sharon R.; Hou, Yu; Allen, Todd W.; De Jesus, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to prepare dried-blood-spot (DBS) quality control (QC) materials for galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), to evaluate their stability during storage and use, and to evaluate their performance in five DBS GALT test methods. Design and Methods We prepared and characterized GALT-normal and GALT-deficient DBS materials and compared GALT activities in DBSs after predetermined storage intervals at controlled temperatures and humidities. External evaluators documented the suitability of the DBS QC materials for use in five GALT test methods. Results GALT activity losses from DBSs stored in low (<30%) humidity for 14 days at 45°C, 35 days at 37°C, 91 days at room temperature, 182 days at 4°C, and 367 days at −20°C were 54%, 53%, 52% 23%, and 7% respectively. In paired DBSs stored in high humidity (>50%) for identical intervals, losses were: 45°C—68%; 37°C—79%; room temperature—72%, and 4°C—63%. GALT activities in DBSs stored at 4°C were stable throughout 19 excursions to room temperature. Twenty-five of 26 external evaluators, using five different GALT test methods, classified the GALT-deficient DBSs as “outside normal limits”. All evaluators classified the GALT-normal DBSs as “within normal limits”. Conclusions Most of the GALT activity loss from DBSs stored at elevated or room temperature was attributable to the effects of storage temperature. Most of the loss from DBSs stored at 4°C was attributable to the effects of elevated humidity. Loss from DBSs stored at −20°C was insignificant. The DBS materials were suitable for monitoring performance of all five GALT test methods. PMID:25528144

  10. Stability of dried blood spots for HIV-1 drug resistance analysis.

    PubMed

    Hearps, Anna C; Ryan, Claire E; Morris, Lisa M; Plate, Megan M; Greengrass, Vicki; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2010-03-01

    The wide scale application of dried blood spots (DBS) as a collection tool for low-cost HIV drug resistance testing requires a greater understanding of the accuracy of DBS for genotype analysis and the stability of DBS under various environmental conditions. Analysis of a 50microl DBS via a single amplicon, nested PCR-based in-house assay (the Burnet genotyping assay) showed an average nucleotide concordance of 98.9% with plasma samples, although only 65% of nucleotide mixtures detected in plasma were also detected within DBS. The analysis of three DBS resulted in the detection of a greater number of nucleotide mixtures (72 and 109 mixtures detected within one and three DBS, respectively, n=10). Two DBS extraction protocols (silica particle; NucliSENS, bioMerieux and spin column extraction; High Pure, Roche) were assessed and found to be equivalent (79% and 84% recovery success respectively, n=19). FTA Elute paper (Whatman) was an inferior DBS collection medium compared to Whatman 903 paper. DBS appeared relatively tolerant to multiple freeze/thaw cycles, with 79% of DBS subjected to ten freeze/thaw cycles successfully amplified compared to 93% of DBS defrosted once (n=14). High temperature (37 degrees C) and high humidity (>90%) substantially impaired DBS recovery within two weeks of storage (38%, n=8), whilst storage at -20 degrees C or 4 degrees C adequately preserved DBS for this period (100% recovery, n=8). Therefore, whilst DBS are suitable for HIV drug resistance surveillance, the use of multiple DBS may be required to ensure accurate detection of minor HIV quasispecies and short-term storage of samples at either 4 degrees C or -20 degrees C is recommended.

  11. Dried Blood Spot Sampling for Tacrolimus and Mycophenolic Acid in Children: Analytical and Clinical Validation.

    PubMed

    Martial, Lisa C; Hoogtanders, Karin E J; Schreuder, Michiel F; Cornelissen, Elisabeth A; van der Heijden, Jac; Joore, Manuela A; Van Maarseveen, Erik M; Burger, David M; Croes, Sander; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Aarnoutse, Rob E

    2017-08-01

    Tacrolimus and mycophenolic acid (MPA) are the backbone of immunosuppressive therapy after pediatric kidney transplantation. Dosing of these drugs is individualized by therapeutic drug monitoring. Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling may prove beneficial over conventional venous sampling. We aimed to develop and clinically validate a DBS method for tacrolimus and MPA in children. A joint DBS liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assay for tacrolimus and MPA was developed. DBS-specific items included the hematocrit effect and influence of spot volume. Subsequently, a clinical validation study among children aged 2-18 years was performed to assess the agreement between observed and DBS-predicted venous concentrations. Agreement of the methods was assessed with Passing-Bablok regression, Bland-Altman plots, and quantification of the DBS predictive performance in terms of bias (median percentage prediction error) and precision (median absolute percentage prediction error), both should be <15%. A total of 40 tacrolimus and 32 MPA samples were available from 28 children. Conversion factors were used to predict venous concentrations from DBS. For tacrolimus, 95% of the individual ratios of predicted and observed concentrations were within a range of 0.74-1.28, with 85% of these ratios between 0.80 and 1.20 (Bland-Altman plots). For MPA, the 95% limits of agreement represented a broader range of 0.49-1.49%, and 72% of individual ratios were between the 0.80 and 1.20 limits. Median percentage prediction error and median absolute percentage prediction error were less than 15% for both drugs. A DBS assay was developed for tacrolimus and MPA. Tacrolimus venous concentrations could be adequately predicted from DBS. DBS analysis of MPA seemed to be a semiquantitative measurement at the most when compared with conventional plasma analysis, considering the high variability between observed and predicted concentrations. Next, home-based DBS sampling of tacrolimus for the purpose of

  12. A Rapid Screening Test on Dried Blood for the Neonatal Diagnosis of Tyrosinemia Type I

    PubMed Central

    Bodaghkhan, Farahnaz; Geramizadeh, Bita; Rajeh, Abbas Abdollah; Haghighat, Mahmoud; Dehghani, Mohsen; Honar, Naser; Zahmatkeshan, Mojgan; Imanieh, Mohammad-Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tyrosinemia is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by elevated levels of tyrosine and its metabolites in plasma. Without treatment, the disease will progress to hepatic and renal failure, so that without liver transplantation will cause death in less than 10 years of age. So, early diagnosis and treatment can be life saving and crucial. It means that with early treatment starting in the neonatal period, the patient can have normal life with very few restrictions in diets containing tyrosine and phenylalanine. Objectives: In this study we wanted to evaluate an easy to perform, rapid and sensitive qualitative test with low cost, as a part of neonatal screening tests to help early diagnosis and treatment of hereditary tyrosinemia. Patients and Methods: In this cross sectional study, during the study period (2013 - 2014), 100 patients were selected. Fifty three (53) of these patients had proven tyrosinemia and the other 47 cases biliary atresia, paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts, cytomegalovirus (CMV) hepatitis, galactosemia and storage diseases. Results: There were 2 false negative and 14 false positive cases of hereditary tyrosinemia (HT-1) in the test. Six cases of biliary atresia, 7 cases of paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts and one patient with cytomegalovirus (CMV) hepatitis were falsely positive with the test. Sensitivity of the test was 96.23%, specificity 71.43%, positive predictive value (PPV) 78.46%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 94.59%. Conclusions: This rapid qualitative test on dried blood sample is an easy, cheap, and feasible method for the screening of hereditary tyrosinemia in neonatal period. PMID:28203327

  13. Evaluation of the Broad-Range PCR/ESI-MS Technology in Blood Specimens for the Molecular Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Giménez, Montserrat; Quesada, Mª Dolores; Rivaya, Belén; Marcó, Clara; Domínguez, Mª Jesús; Arméstar, Fernando; Martró, Elisa; Ausina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Background Rapid identification of the etiological agent in bloodstream infections is of vital importance for the early administration of the most appropriate antibiotic therapy. Molecular methods may offer an advantage to current culture-based microbiological diagnosis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of IRIDICA, a platform based on universal genetic amplification followed by mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) for the molecular diagnosis of sepsis-related pathogens directly from the patient’s blood. Methods A total of 410 whole blood specimens from patients admitted to Emergency Room (ER) and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with clinical suspicion of sepsis were tested with the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay (broad identification of bacteria and Candida spp.). Microorganisms grown in culture and detected by IRIDICA were compared considering blood culture as gold standard. When discrepancies were found, clinical records and results from other cultures were taken into consideration (clinical infection criterion). Results The overall positive and negative agreement of IRIDICA with blood culture in the analysis by specimen was 74.8% and 78.6%, respectively, rising to 76.9% and 87.2% respectively, when compared with the clinical infection criterion. Interestingly, IRIDICA detected 41 clinically significant microorganisms missed by culture, most of them from patients under antimicrobial treatment. Of special interest were the detections of one Mycoplasma hominis and two Mycobacterium simiae in immunocompromised patients. When ICU patients were analyzed separately, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values compared with blood culture were 83.3%, 78.6%, 33.9% and 97.3% respectively, and 90.5%, 87.2%, 64.4% and 97.3% respectively, in comparison with the clinical infection criterion. Conclusions IRIDICA is a promising technology that offers an early and reliable identification of a wide variety of pathogens directly from the patient’s blood

  14. Virtual Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual Field Trips have been around almost as long as the Worldwide Web itself yet virtual explorers do not generally return to their desktops with folders full of virtual hand specimens. Collection of real specimens on fields trips for later analysis in the lab (or at least in the pub) has been an important part of classical field geoscience education and research for generations but concern for the landscape and for preservation of key outcrops from wanton destruction has lead to many restrictions. One of the author’s favorite outcrops was recently vandalized presumably by a geologist who felt the need to bash some of the world’s most spectacular buckle folds with a rock sledge. It is not surprising, therefore, that geologists sometimes leave fragile localities out of field trip itineraries. Once analyzed, most specimens repose in drawers or bins, never to be seen again. Some end up in teaching collections but recent pedagogical research shows that undergraduate students have difficulty relating specimens both to their collection location and ultimate provenance in the lithosphere. Virtual specimens can be created using 3D modeling software and imported into virtual globes such as Google Earth (GE) where, they may be linked to virtual field trip stops or restored to their source localities on the paleo-globe. Sensitive localities may be protected by placemark approximation. The GE application program interface (API) has a distinct advantage over the stand-alone GE application when it comes to viewing and manipulating virtual specimens. When instances of the virtual globe are embedded in web pages using the GE plug-in, Collada models of specimens can be manipulated with javascript controls residing in the enclosing HTML, permitting specimens to be magnified, rotated in 3D, and sliced. Associated analytical data may be linked into javascript and localities for comparison at various points on the globe referenced by ‘fetching’ KML. Virtual specimens open up

  15. The Relevance of a Novel Quantitative Assay to Detect up to 40 Major Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Directly in Clinical Nasopharyngeal and Blood Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, Werner C.; van der Linden, Mark P. G.; Bénet, Thomas; Chou, Monidarin; Sylla, Mariam; Barreto Costa, Patricia; Richard, Nathalie; Klugman, Keith P.; Endtz, Hubert P.; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Telles, Jean-Noël

    2016-01-01

    For epidemiological and surveillance purposes, it is relevant to monitor the distribution and dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. Conventional serotyping methods do not provide rapid or quantitative information on serotype loads. Quantitative serotyping may enable prediction of the invasiveness of a specific serotype compared to other serotypes carried. Here, we describe a novel, rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the 40 most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes and the assay impacts in pneumonia specimens from emerging and developing countries. Eleven multiplex PCR to detect 40 serotypes or serogroups were optimized. Quantification was enabled by reference to standard dilutions of known bacterial load. Performance of the assay was evaluated to specifically type and quantify S. pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal and blood samples from adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with pneumonia (n = 664) from five different countries. Serogroup 6 was widely represented in nasopharyngeal specimens from all five cohorts. The most frequent serotypes in the French, South African, and Brazilian cohorts were 1 and 7A/F, 3 and 19F, and 14, respectively. When both samples were available, the serotype in blood was always present as carriage with other serotypes in the nasopharynx. Moreover, the ability of a serotype to invade the bloodstream may be linked to its nasopharyngeal load. The mean nasopharyngeal concentration of the serotypes that moved to the blood was 3 log-fold higher than the ones only found in the nasopharynx. This novel, rapid, quantitative assay may potentially predict some of the S. pneumoniae serotypes invasiveness and assessment of pneumococcal serotype distribution. PMID:26986831

  16. African Swine Fever Diagnosis Adapted to Tropical Conditions by the Use of Dried-blood Filter Papers.

    PubMed

    Randriamparany, T; Kouakou, K V; Michaud, V; Fernández-Pinero, J; Gallardo, C; Le Potier, M-F; Rabenarivahiny, R; Couacy-Hymann, E; Raherimandimby, M; Albina, E

    2016-08-01

    The performance of Whatman 3-MM filter papers for the collection, drying, shipment and long-term storage of blood at ambient temperature, and for the detection of African swine fever virus and antibodies was assessed. Conventional and real-time PCR, viral isolation and antibody detection by ELISA were performed on paired samples (blood/tissue versus dried-blood 3-MM filter papers) collected from experimentally infected pigs and from farm pigs in Madagascar and Côte d'Ivoire. 3-MM filter papers were used directly in the conventional and real-time PCR without previous extraction of nucleic acids. Tests that performed better with 3-MM filter papers were in descending order: virus isolation, real-time UPL PCR and conventional PCR. The analytical sensitivity of real-time UPL PCR on filter papers was similar to conventional testing (virus isolation or conventional PCR) on organs or blood. In addition, blood-dried filter papers were tested in ELISA for antibody detection and the observed sensitivity was very close to conventional detection on serum samples and gave comparable results. Filter papers were stored up to 9 months at 20-25°C and for 2 months at 37°C without significant loss of sensitivity for virus genome detection. All tests on 3-MM filter papers had 100% specificity compared to the gold standards. Whatman 3-MM filter papers have the advantage of being cheap and of preserving virus viability for future virus isolation and characterization. In this study, Whatman 3-MM filter papers proved to be a suitable support for the collection, storage and use of blood in remote areas of tropical countries without the need for a cold chain and thus provide new possibilities for antibody testing and virus isolation.

  17. Hemoglobin Variant Analysis via Direct Surface Sampling of Dried Blood Spots Coupled with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are the most common inherited disorders. Newborn blood screening for clinically significant hemoglobin variants, including sickle (HbS), HbC, and HbD, has been adopted in many countries as it is widely acknowledged that early detection improves the outcome. We present a method for determination of Hb variants by direct surface sampling of dried blood spots by use of an Advion Triversa Nanomate automated electrospray system coupled to a high-resolution mass spectrometer. The method involves no sample preparation. It is possible to unambiguously identify homozygous and heterozygous HbS, HbC, and HbD variants in <10 min without the need for additional confirmation. The method allows for repeated analysis of a single blood spot over a prolonged time period and is tolerant of blood spot storage conditions. PMID:21341716

  18. Development of a fluorometric microtiter plate based enzyme assay for MPS IVA (Morquio type A) using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Millington, David S; Bali, Deeksha S

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA or Morquio type-A disease is a hereditary lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). The disease is caused by lysosomal accumulation of unprocessed glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) that manifests with severe to mild skeletal and cardiopulmonary abnormalities. We have developed a modified microtiter plate-based enzyme activity assay using dried blood spots and a fluorescent substrate for measuring specific GALNS activity to identify patients with MPS IVA.

  19. Comparison between dried blood spot and plasma sampling for therapeutic drug monitoring of antiepileptic drugs in children with epilepsy: A step towards home sampling.

    PubMed

    Linder, Camilla; Wide, Katarina; Walander, Malin; Beck, Olof; Gustafsson, Lars L; Pohanka, Anton

    2017-05-01

    To investigate if dried blood spots could be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of the antiepileptic drugs, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproic acid in children with epilepsy. Fingerprick blood samples from 46 children at a neuropediatric outpatient clinic was collected on filterpaper at the same time as capillary plasma sampling. A validated dried blood spot liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproic acid was compared with the routine plasma laboratory methods. Method agreement was evaluated and plasma concentrations were estimated by different conversion approaches. Strong correlation was shown between dried blood spot and plasma concentrations for all three drugs, with R2 values>0.89. Regression analysis showed a proportional bias with 35% lower dried blood spot concentrations for valproic acid (n=33) and concentrations were 18% higher for carbamazepine (n=17). A ratio approach was used to make a conversion from dried blood spots to estimated plasma for these two drugs. Dried blood spot concentrations were directly comparable with plasma for lamotrigine (n=20). This study supports that dried blood spot concentrations can be used as an alternative to plasma in a children population for three commonly used antiepileptic drugs with the possibility to expand by adding other antiepileptic drugs. Clinical decisions can be made based on converted (carbamazepine, valproic acid) or unconverted (lamotrigine) dried blood spot concentrations. Dried blood spot sampling, in the future taken at home, will simplify an effective therapeutic drug monitoring for this group of patients who often have concomitant disorders and also reduce costs for society. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dry period cooling ameliorates physiological variables and blood acid base balance, improving milk production in murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Aarif, Ovais; Aggarwal, Anjali

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of evaporative cooling during late gestation on physiological responses, blood gas and acid base balance and subsequent milk production of Murrah buffaloes. To investigate this study sixteen healthy pregnant dry Murrah buffaloes (second to fourth parity) at sixty days prepartum were selected in the months of May to June and divided into two groups of eight animals each. One group of buffaloes (Cooled/CL) was managed under fan and mist cooling system during dry period. Group second buffaloes (Noncooled/NCL) remained as control without provision of cooling during dry period. The physiological responses viz. Rectal temperature (RT), Respiratory rate (RR) and Pulse rate were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in group 2, with the provision of cooling. Skin surface temperature at thorax was significantly lower in cooled group relative to noncooled group. Blood pH and pO2 were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in heat stressed group as compared to the cooled group. pCO2, TCO2, HCO3, SBC, base excess in extracellular fluid (BEecf), base excess in blood (BEb), PCV and Hb were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled group as compared to noncooled group. DMI was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cooled relative to noncooled animals. Milk yield, FCM, fat yield, lactose yield and total solid yield was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in cooled group of Murrah buffaloes.

  1. Dry period cooling ameliorates physiological variables and blood acid base balance, improving milk production in murrah buffaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarif, Ovais; Aggarwal, Anjali

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of evaporative cooling during late gestation on physiological responses, blood gas and acid base balance and subsequent milk production of Murrah buffaloes. To investigate this study sixteen healthy pregnant dry Murrah buffaloes (second to fourth parity) at sixty days prepartum were selected in the months of May to June and divided into two groups of eight animals each. One group of buffaloes (Cooled/CL) was managed under fan and mist cooling system during dry period. Group second buffaloes (Noncooled/NCL) remained as control without provision of cooling during dry period. The physiological responses viz. Rectal temperature (RT), Respiratory rate (RR) and Pulse rate were significantly ( P < 0.05) lower in group 2, with the provision of cooling. Skin surface temperature at thorax was significantly lower in cooled group relative to noncooled group. Blood pH and pO2 were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in heat stressed group as compared to the cooled group. pCO2, TCO2, HCO3, SBC, base excess in extracellular fluid (BEecf), base excess in blood (BEb), PCV and Hb were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in cooled group as compared to noncooled group. DMI was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in cooled relative to noncooled animals. Milk yield, FCM, fat yield, lactose yield and total solid yield was significantly higher ( P < 0.05) in cooled group of Murrah buffaloes.

  2. Determining population and developmental pharmacokinetics of metronidazole using plasma and dried blood spot samples from premature infants.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Sampson, Mario; Bloom, Barry T; Arrieta, Antonio; Wynn, James L; Martz, Karen; Harper, Barrie; Kearns, Gregory L; Capparelli, Edmund V; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K; Smith, P Brian

    2013-09-01

    Limited pharmacokinetic (PK) data of metronidazole in premature infants have led to various dosing recommendations. Surrogate efficacy targets for metronidazole are ill-defined and therefore aimed to exceed minimum inhibitory concentration of organisms responsible for intra-abdominal infections. We evaluated the PK of metronidazole using plasma and dried blood spot samples from infants ≤32 weeks gestational age in an open-label, PK, multicenter (N = 3) study using population PK modeling (NONMEM). Monte Carlo simulations (N = 1000 virtual subjects) were used to evaluate the surrogate efficacy target. Metabolic ratios of parent and metabolite were calculated. Twenty-four premature infants (111 plasma and 51 dried blood spot samples) were enrolled: median (range) gestational age at birth 25 (23-31) weeks, postnatal age 27 (1-82) days, postmenstrual age 31 (24-39) weeks and weight 740 (431-1466) g. Population clearance (L/h/kg) was 0.038 × (postmenstrual age/30) and volume of distribution (L/kg) of 0.93. PK parameter estimates and precision were similar between plasma and dried blood spot samples. Metabolic ratios correlated with clearance. Simulations suggested the majority of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (>80%) would meet the surrogate efficacy target using postmenstrual age-based dosing.

  3. Validation and development of an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin levels in dried blood spots from patients with COPD*

    PubMed Central

    Zillmer, Laura Russo; Russo, Rodrigo; Manzano, Beatriz Martins; Ivanaga, Ivan; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; de Souza, Altay Alves Lino; Santos, Gildo; Rodriguez, Francisco; Miravitlles, Marc; Jardim, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate and develop an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) levels in dried blood spots from COPD patients in Brazil. METHODS: We determined AAT levels in serum samples and dried blood spots from 192 COPD patients. For the preparation of dried blood spots, a disk (diameter, 6 mm) was placed into a tube, eluted with 200 µL of PBS, and stored overnight at 4ºC. All of the samples were analyzed by immunonephelometry in duplicate. We used the bootstrap resampling method in order to determine a cut-off point for AAT levels in dried blood spots. RESULTS: The correlation coefficient between the AAT levels in serum samples and those in dried blood spots was r = 0.45. For dried blood spots, the cut-off value was 2.02 mg/dL (97% CI: 1.45-2.64 mg/dL), with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 100%, 95.7%, 27.2%, and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This method for the determination of AAT levels in dried blood spots appears to be a reliable screening tool for patients with AAT deficiency. PMID:24310627

  4. Detection of newly produced T and B lymphocytes by digital PCR in blood stored dry on nylon flocked swabs.

    PubMed

    Tessitore, Marion Vaglio; Sottini, Alessandra; Roccaro, Aldo M; Ghidini, Claudia; Bernardi, Simona; Martellosio, Giovanni; Serana, Federico; Imberti, Luisa

    2017-04-05

    A normal number of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and K-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs) is considered a biomarker for adequate new T- and B-cell production. In newborns, detection of TRECs and KRECs by real time PCR from dried blood spotted on filter paper is used for the screening of severe immunodeficiency. In adults, elderly and during diseases, where the number of TRECs is lower than in newborns and children, a large amount of DNA and a sensitive method of amplification are necessary to identify newly produced lymphocytes. DNA was prepared from blood of 203 healthy adults (range: 18-91 years old) absorbed for 10 s on flocked swabs and let to dry, or from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. DNA was subjected to digital PCR and to well established conventional real time PCR-based method using TREC- and KREC-specific primers and probes. The number of TRECs and KRECs was expressed per mL of blood. Statistical analysis was performed by nested ANOVA, Pearson coefficient of determination, and by linear regression tests. The novel method for the storage of dried blood on nylon flocked swabs and the use of digital PCR allow quantification of TRECs and KRECs with high degree of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and precision. TRECs and KRECs were amplified by digital PCR in all tested blood samples, including those obtained from elderly individuals (>70 years old) and that were negative by real time PCR. Furthermore, values of TRECs and KRECs obtained by digital PCR were in the range of those acquired by real time PCR. Our findings demonstrate that DNA isolation from dried blood on flocked swabs followed by digital PCR-based analysis represents a useful tool for studying new lymphocyte production in adults and elderly individuals. This suggests the potential use of the methodology when monitoring of clinical variables is limited by the number of molecules that can be amplified and detected, such as in patients with immunodeficiency or under

  5. Effect of collection, transport, processing and storage of blood specimens on the activity of lysosomal enzymes in plasma and leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Burin, M; Dutra-Filho, C; Brum, J; Mauricio, T; Amorim, M; Giugliani, R

    2000-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of different conditions of collection, transport and storage on the quality of blood samples from normal individuals in terms of the activity of the enzymes ss-glucuronidase, total hexosaminidase, hexosaminidase A, arylsulfatase A and ss-galactosidase. The enzyme activities were not affected by the different materials used for collection (plastic syringes or vacuum glass tubes). In the evaluation of different heparin concentrations (10% heparin, 5% heparin, and heparinized syringe) in the syringes, it was observed that higher doses resulted in an increase of at least 1-fold in the activities of ss-galactosidase, total hexosaminidase and hexosaminidase A in leukocytes, and ss-glucuronidase in plasma. When the effects of time and means of transportation were studied, samples that had been kept at room temperature showed higher deterioration with time (72 and 96 h) before processing, and in this case it was impossible to isolate leukocytes from most samples. Comparison of heparin and acid citrate-dextrose (ACD) as anticoagulants revealed that ss-glucuronidase and hexosaminidase activities in plasma reached levels near the lower normal limits when ACD was used. In conclusion, we observed that heparin should be used as the preferable anticoagulant when measuring these lysosomal enzyme activities, and we recommend that, when transport time is more than 24 h, samples should be shipped by air in a styrofoam box containing wet ice.

  6. Streamlined determination of lysophosphatidylcholines in dried blood spots for newborn screening of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Coleman T; Moser, Ann B; Mørkrid, Lars; Magera, Mark J; Gavrilov, Dimitar K; Oglesbee, Devin; Raymond, Kimiyo; Rinaldo, Piero; Matern, Dietrich; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Pre-symptomatic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is essential to achieve best possible outcomes for patients with the childhood cerebral form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). We describe a high-throughput method for measurement of C20-C26 lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) and biochemical diagnosis of X-ALD using the same dried blood spots (DBS) routinely used for newborn screening. LPCs are extracted from 3-mm DBS punch with methanol containing an isotopically labeled LPC as internal standard. This extract is transferred to a 96-well plate, evaporated and then reconstituted in mobile phase for flow injection analysis tandem mass spectrometry (FIA-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring mode for measurement of four different LPCs (C20, C22, C24, C26) and the internal standard (d4-C26-LPC). Analysis time is 1.5min per sample. The mean CVs from the intra- and inter-assay experiments for LPCs were 6.3-15.1% for C20-LPC, 4.4-18.6% for C22-LPC and 4.5-14.3% for C24-LPC. Limits of detection were determined for C20-LPC (LOD=0.03μg/mL), C22-LPC (0.03μg/mL), C24-LPC (0.03μg/mL) and C26-LPC (0.01μg/mL). Reference ranges were established from DBS of 130 newborns and 20 adults. Samples of patients with X-ALD (n=16), peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (n=8), and X-ALD carriers (n=12) were analyzed blindly and all were correctly identified. Analysis of LPC species by FIA-MS/MS is a fast, simple and reliable method to screen for X-ALD and other peroxisomal disorders in DBS. To maximize specificity, abnormal results can be verified by a 2nd tier assay using LC-MS/MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Enzymatic diagnosis of Fabry disease using a fluorometric assay on dried blood spots: An alternative methodology.

    PubMed

    Caudron, Eric; Prognon, Patrice; Germain, Dominique P

    2015-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD, OMIM#301500) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the functional deficiency of α-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme. A method to screen for FD in large populations has been developed using a fluorometric assay of α-galactosidase A activity in dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. However, results can be influenced by quenching of fluorescence by haemoglobin which, together with small sample size, may result in a low light emission signal. An alternative, simple and sensitive fluorometric assay was developed for the determination of α-galactosidase A activity in DBS. The assay uses 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-d-galactose as an artificial substrate. To minimize the risk of false-positives, zinc sulfate was used for protein precipitation to stop the enzymatic reaction and eliminate interfering species (hemoglobin). Samples from 209 individuals (60 hemizygotes, 68 heterozygotes, and 81 controls) were tested to establish reference values for the assay. The mean α-galactosidase A activity of the 81 controls was 9.1 ± 3.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (mean ± SD). All 60 hemizygotes affected with FD had AGAL activities below 1.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (0.2 ± 0.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). For the 68 heterozygous females, AGAL activity ranged from 0 to 12.6 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (3.5 ± 2.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Two-thirds of the female patients could be identified using the enzymatic assay and a cut-off level of 40% of the median control value (<3.4 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Our fluorometric assay using zinc sulfate protein precipitation was shown to have similar sensitivity and robustness while reducing the risk of false positive results due to quenching of 4-MU fluorescence by haemoglobin. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Emtricitabine-Triphosphate in Dried Blood Spots as a Marker of Recent Dosing.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose; Seifert, Sharon; Campbell, Kayla; Coleman, Stacey; McAllister, Kevin; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Gardner, Edward M; Liu, Albert; Glidden, David V; Grant, Robert; Hosek, Sybil; Wilson, Craig M; Bushman, Lane R; MaWhinney, Samantha; Anderson, Peter L

    2016-11-01

    New objective measures of antiretroviral adherence are needed. We determined if emtricitabine triphosphate (FTC-TP) in dried blood spots (DBS) can be used as a marker of recent dosing with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-emtricitabine (TDF-FTC). The half-life of FTC-TP was estimated in DBS samples obtained from an intensive pharmacokinetic (PK) study of coformulated TDF-FTC in HIV-negative and HIV-infected participants. The concordance of quantifiable FTC-TP in DBS with tenofovir (TFV)/FTC in plasma was evaluated by utilizing paired plasma-DBS samples from participants enrolled in 2 large preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) open-label trials. The time to FTC-TP nondetectability after TDF-FTC dosing was evaluated utilizing DBS from HIV-negative participants enrolled in a directly observed therapy study of variable adherence to TDF-FTC. The mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) terminal half-life of FTC-TP in the PK study was 35 (23 to 47) h. A total of 143/163 (88%) samples obtained 0 to 48 h post-TDF-FTC dose had quantifiable FTC-TP in DBS, compared with 2/93 (2%) and 0/87 (0%) obtained >48 and >96 h postdose. In 746 paired plasma-DBS samples from 445 participants enrolled in PrEP trials, when both TFV/FTC in plasma were below the limit of quantification, FTC-TP was as well in 98.9% of the samples, and when either TFV or FTC in plasma was quantifiable, FTC-TP was as well in 90.5% of the samples. The half-life of FTC-TP in DBS is short relative to that of TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP), making it a surrogate for TFV-FTC detection in plasma. FTC-TP can be quantified in DBS simultaneously with TFV-DP, which quantifies cumulative adherence to TDF-FTC. (The clinical trials discussed in this article have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifiers NCT01040091, NCT02022657, NCT00458393, NCT01772823, and NCT02012621.).

  9. Evaluation of a novel dried blood spot collection device (HemaSpot™) to test blood samples collected from dogs for antibodies to Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Pick, Leanne D; Hernandez, Jaime O Esquivel; Lindsay, David S

    2014-09-15

    Collection of blood samples from veterinary and wildlife patients is often challenging because the samples have to be collected on farm or in the wild under various environmental conditions. This poses many technical problems associated with venipuncture materials, their safe use and disposal, transportation and processing of collected samples. Dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection techniques offer a simple and practical alternative to traditional blood collection methods to obtain blood samples from animals for parasite antibody evaluation. The DBS collection devices are compact, simple to use, and are particularly useful for large number of samples. Additionally, DBS samples take up less space and they are easier to transport than traditional venipuncture-collected blood samples. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a potentially fatal parasitic disease of dogs and humans and it is frequently diagnosed by antibody tests. Immunochromatographic tests (ICT) for antibodies to Leishmania infantum are commercially available for dogs and they produce qualitative results in minutes. Measurement of canine antibodies to L. infantum with the ICT using traditional venipuncture has been validated previously, but the use of DBS samples has not been evaluated using this method. The purpose of the present study was to determine the ability of DBS samples to detect antibodies to L. infantum in dogs using a commercial ICT assay. One hundred plasma samples from dogs experimentally infected with the LIVT-1 strain of L. infantum were collected by venipuncture and frozen. Individual samples were thawed, and then 80 μl plasma (2 drops) was aliquotted onto the 8-spoked disk pad on individual DBS sample collection devices (HemaSpot™, Spot-On Sciences, Austin, TX), dried, and stored in the dark at room temperature. After one month and six months, respectively, 2 spokes of the 8 spokes of the disk pad of each DBS sample were removed and eluted in 200 μl PBS. The eluate was used to test

  10. A dried blood spots technique based LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of posaconazole in human whole blood samples.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Todime M; Tama, Cristina I; Hayes, Roger N

    2011-11-15

    A rugged and robust liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method utilizing dried blood spots (DBS) was developed and validated for the analysis of posaconazole in human whole blood. Posaconazole fortified blood samples were spotted (15 μL) onto Ahlstrom Alh-226 DBS cards and dried for at least 2h. Punched spots were then extracted by using a mixture of acetonitrile and water containing stable labeled internal standard (IS). Posaconazole and its IS were separated from endogenous matrix components on a Kinetex™ C18 column under gradient conditions with a mobile phase A consisting of 0.1% formic acid and a mobile phase B consisting of 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile/methanol (70/30, v/v). The analyte and IS were detected using a Sciex API 4000 triple quadrupole LC-MS/MS system equipped with a TurboIonSpray™ source operated in the positive ion mode. The assay was linear over the concentration range of 5-5000 ng/mL. The inter-run accuracy and precision of the assay were -1.8% to 0.8% and 4.0% to 10.4%, respectively. Additional assessments unique to DBS were investigated including sample spot homogeneity, spot volume, and hematocrit. Blood spot homogeneity was maintained and accurate and precise quantitation results were obtained when using a blood spot volume of between 15 and 35 μL. Human blood samples with hematocrit values ranging between 25% and 41% gave acceptable quantitation results. The validation results indicate that the method is accurate, precise, sensitive, selective and reproducible.

  11. Evaluation of fibronectin 1 in one dried blood spot and in urine after rhGH treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferro, P; Ventura, R; Pérez-Mañá, C; Farré, M; Segura, J

    2016-10-07

    Since the appearance of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in the 1980s, its expansion and acquisition through the black market has increased, so the detection of its abuse continues to be a challenge. New biomarkers that are more reliable and sensitive, allowing a larger detection window, are still needed. In this line, Fibronectin 1 (FN1) has been proposed as a potential genetic and protein biomarker of rhGH abuse in peripheral blood lymphocytes, serum, and plasma. However, logistic problems associated with current blood collection in sports drug testing point towards potential new alternative matrices that could be good candidates to be evaluated. Results obtained in this study showed high ELISA FN1 levels in one dried blood spot and in urine samples in ten healthy male volunteers treated with rhGH. Results showed that especially dried blood spots appear as a potential good matrix to detect rhGH abuse by means of FN1 biomarker. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Development and implementation challenges of a quality assured HIV infant diagnosis program in Nigeria using dried blood spots and DNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Audu, Rosemary; Onwuamah, Chika; Salu, Olumuyiwa; Okwuraiwe, Azuka; Ou, Chin-Yih; Bolu, Omotayo; Bond, Kyle B; Diallo, Karidia; Lu, Lydia; Jelpe, Tapdiyel; Okoye, McPaul; Ngige, Evelyn; Vertefeuille, John

    2015-04-01

    Nigeria has one of the highest HIV burdens as well as mother-to-infant transmission rates in the world. A pilot program using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based testing of dried blood spot (DBS) specimens was implemented to enable early identification of HIV-infected infants and timely referral and linkage to care. From February 2007 to October 2008, whole blood was collected by finger prick to prepare DBS from infants <18 months presenting in six public mother-and-child health facilities in Lagos, Nigeria. The DBS were tested using the Roche Amplicor HIV-1 DNA Test, v1.5. To monitor laboratory testing quality, all of the PCR-positive and 10% of the PCR-negative DBS were retested by the same method at another reference laboratory. Three hundred and sixty-five randomly selected infants were screened using HIV rapid tests (RT) according to the national algorithm and RT-negative and PCR-positive specimens were also tested using Genscreen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) (Bio-Rad, France). The turnaround time (TAT) from sample collection, testing, and dispatching of results from each health facility was monitored. A total of 1,273 infants with a median age of 12.6 weeks (1 day to 71.6 weeks) participated in the program and 280 (22.0%) were PCR positive. HIV transmission levels varied greatly in the different health facilities ranging from 7.1% to 38.4%. Infants aged 48 to 72 weeks had the highest level of PCR positivity (41.1%). All PCR-positive specimens were confirmed by retesting. The mean turnaround time from DBS collection to returning of the laboratory result to the health facilities was 25 days. Three infants were found to be HIV antibody negative by rapid tests but were positive by both PCR and the fourth generation EIA. The DBS-based PCR program accurately identified all of the HIV-infected infants. However, many programmatic challenges related to the laboratory and TAT were identified.

  13. Development and Implementation Challenges of a Quality Assured HIV Infant Diagnosis Program in Nigeria Using Dried Blood Spots and DNA Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Audu, Rosemary; Onwuamah, Chika; Salu, Olumuyiwa; Okwuraiwe, Azuka; Ou, Chin-Yih; Bolu, Omotayo; Bond, Kyle B.; Diallo, Karidia; Lu, Lydia; Jelpe, Tapdiyel; Okoye, McPaul; Ngige, Evelyn; Vertefeuille, John

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria has one of the highest HIV burdens as well as mother-to-infant transmission rates in the world. A pilot program using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based testing of dried blood spot (DBS) specimens was implemented to enable early identification of HIV-infected infants and timely referral and linkage to care. From February 2007 to October 2008, whole blood was collected by finger prick to prepare DBS from infants < 18 months presenting in six public mother-and-child health facilities in Lagos, Nigeria. The DBS were tested using the Roche Amplicor HIV-1 DNA Test, v1.5. To monitor laboratory testing quality, all of the PCR-positive and 10% of the PCR-negative DBS were retested by the same method at another reference laboratory. Three hundred and sixty-five randomly selected infants were screened using HIV rapid tests (RT) according to the national algorithm and RT-negative and PCR-positive specimens were also tested using Genscreen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) (Bio-Rad, France). The turnaround time (TAT) from sample collection, testing, and dispatching of results from each health facility was monitored. A total of 1,273 infants with a median age of 12.6 weeks (1 day to 71.6 weeks) participated in the program and 280 (22.0%) were PCR positive. HIV transmission levels varied greatly in the different health facilities ranging from 7.1% to 38.4%. Infants aged 48 to 72 weeks had the highest level of PCR positivity (41.1%). All PCR-positive specimens were confirmed by retesting. The mean turnaround time from DBS collection to returning of the laboratory result to the health facilities was 25 days. Three infants were found to be HIV antibody negative by rapid tests but were positive by both PCR and the fourth generation EIA. The DBS-based PCR program accurately identified all of the HIV-infected infants. However, many programmatic challenges related to the laboratory and TAT were identified. PMID:25381805

  14. Blood cholesterol screening in several environments using a portable, dry-chemistry analyzer and fingerstick blood samples. Lipid Research Clinics Cholesterol Screening Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bradford, R H; Bachorik, P S; Roberts, K; Williams, O D; Gotto, A M

    1990-01-01

    A multicenter study of blood cholesterol screening was performed in several typical environments, such as community sites (shopping malls and a supermarket), health care sites, work sites, a blood bank and a school. Cholesterol was measured with a portable, dry-chemistry analyzer using capillary blood obtained by fingerstick. Data are reported from a total of 13,824 participants, spanning the entire age spectrum. Overall, 25% of screened subjects had blood cholesterol levels above the age-specific cutpoints used in the current study. Although in the aggregate this screening experience very closely approximates the expected level of referrals, the proportion of referred screened subjects differed significantly among the 5 types of screening environments and by gender. Follow-up telephone interviews indicated that 53% of referrals had initiated a physician contact. More than 75% of those who had seen a physician reported that the diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia had been confirmed, and almost 72% had been prescribed a diet. A large proportion of referred screened subjects reported having modified their diet, particularly when recommended to do so by a physician. This study has yielded encouraging evidence that physicians gave referred screened subjects appropriate initial advice for managing hypercholesterolemia. The new technology for blood cholesterol measurement evaluated in the current study has proven to be a feasible and reliable means for measuring blood cholesterol in typical screening settings.

  15. Improved MS/MS analysis of succinylacetone extracted from dried blood spots when combined with amino acids and acylcarnitine butyl esters.

    PubMed

    Chace, Donald H; Lim, Timothy; Hansen, Christina R; De Jesus, Victor R; Hannon, W Harry

    2009-09-01

    The utilization of succinylacetone (SUAC) as the primary metabolic marker for tyrosinemia Type I is now well known, thus new methods have been developed to analyze SUAC as a first tier test in newborn screening. One approach is to prepare a SUAC hydrazine derivative from the dried blood spots (DBS) previously utilized in the extraction of acylcarnitine (AC) and amino acids (AA). The final derivatized products of SUAC, AA and AC are combined in a single tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis. However, butyl esterification techniques may result in contamination of underivatized acylcarnitines by as much as 20%. We have developed a simple wash step to improve the combined analysis of SUAC, AA and AC in DBS by MS/MS. AA and AC were extracted with methanol containing labeled internal standard from 3.2mm punches taken from the DBS specimen. The previously extracted blood spot that remains after removal of the methanol extraction solvent was used in the preparation of SUAC with and without additional washing of the blood spot. The butyl ester eluates of AA and AC, and SUAC hydrazine derivatives were recombined and measured by MS/MS. Three additional methanol wash steps of the remaining DBS punches prior to SUAC derivatization reduced the presence of underivatized acylcarnitines, resulting in a 4-fold reduction of underivatized palmitoylcarnitine. Palmitoylcarnitine butyl ester is detected at m/z 456 while the underivatized species is detected at m/z 400, which is also the mass of dodecanoylcarnitine butyl ester. The linearity of the SUAC assay was unchanged by the additional wash steps. For butyl esterification methods, the preferred analytic procedure, the presence of AC can compromise the results of a newborn screen for the actual concentrations of acylcarnitines. It is essential to remove any underivatized acylcarnitines prior to SUAC analysis. The additional methanol wash steps did not alter SUAC assay results but did remove underivatized acylcarnitines which

  16. Cost Evaluation of Dried Blood Spot Home Sampling as Compared to Conventional Sampling for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Children.

    PubMed

    Martial, Lisa C; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Schreuder, Michiel F; Henriet, Stefanie S; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Joore, Manuela A

    2016-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling for the purpose of therapeutic drug monitoring can be an attractive alternative for conventional blood sampling, especially in children. This study aimed to compare all costs involved in conventional sampling versus DBS home sampling in two pediatric populations: renal transplant patients and hemato-oncology patients. Total costs were computed from a societal perspective by adding up healthcare cost, patient related costs and costs related to loss of productivity of the caregiver. Switching to DBS home sampling was associated with a cost reduction of 43% for hemato-oncology patients (€277 to €158) and 61% for nephrology patients (€259 to €102) from a societal perspective (total costs) per blood draw. From a healthcare perspective, costs reduced with 7% for hemato-oncology patients and with 21% for nephrology patients. Total savings depend on the number of hospital visits that can be avoided by using home sampling instead of conventional sampling.

  17. Cost Evaluation of Dried Blood Spot Home Sampling as Compared to Conventional Sampling for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Children

    PubMed Central

    Martial, Lisa C.; Aarnoutse, Rob E.; Schreuder, Michiel F.; Henriet, Stefanie S.; Brüggemann, Roger J. M.; Joore, Manuela A.

    2016-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling for the purpose of therapeutic drug monitoring can be an attractive alternative for conventional blood sampling, especially in children. This study aimed to compare all costs involved in conventional sampling versus DBS home sampling in two pediatric populations: renal transplant patients and hemato-oncology patients. Total costs were computed from a societal perspective by adding up healthcare cost, patient related costs and costs related to loss of productivity of the caregiver. Switching to DBS home sampling was associated with a cost reduction of 43% for hemato-oncology patients (€277 to €158) and 61% for nephrology patients (€259 to €102) from a societal perspective (total costs) per blood draw. From a healthcare perspective, costs reduced with 7% for hemato-oncology patients and with 21% for nephrology patients. Total savings depend on the number of hospital visits that can be avoided by using home sampling instead of conventional sampling. PMID:27941974

  18. Therapeutic drug monitoring of everolimus using the dried blood spot method in combination with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, J; de Beer, Y; Hoogtanders, K; Christiaans, M; de Jong, G J; Neef, C; Stolk, L

    2009-11-01

    An assay of everolimus based on finger prick sampling and consecutive application as a blood spot on sampling paper has been developed. We explored several methods [K. Hoogtanders, J. van der Heijden, M. Christiaans, P. Edelbroek, J. van Hooff, L. Stolk, J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 44 (2006) 658-664; A. Allanson, M. Cotton, J. Tettey, et al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 44 (2007) 963-969] and developed a new method, namely the impregnation of sampling paper with a solution of plasma-protein, formic acid and ammonium acetate, in combination with the extraction of the blood spot by filter filtration. This kind of sample preparation provides new possibilities for blood spot sampling especially if analytes are adsorbed to the paper. The dried blood spot was analysed using the HPLC-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry method, with 32-desmethoxyrapamycin as the internal standard. The working range of our study was 2-30 microg/l. Within this range, intra-and inter-assay variability for precision and accuracy was <15%. Everolimus blood spot samples proved stable for 3 days at 60 degrees C and for 32 days at 4 degrees C. Everolimus concentrations of one stable out-patient were compared after both blood spot sampling and conventional venous sampling on various occasions. Results indicate that this new method is promising for therapeutic drug monitoring in stable renal transplant patients.

  19. Evaluation of whole fresh blood and dried blood on filter paper discs in serological tests for Trypanosoma evansi in experimentally infected water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Holland, W G; Thanh, N G; My, L N; Magnus, E; Verloo, D; Büscher, P; Goddeeris, B; Vercruysse, J

    2002-02-01

    In this study we investigated if whole blood could substitute for serum in the direct card agglutination test (CATT/Trypansosoma evansi) and the indirect card agglutination test (LATEX/T. evansi) for the sero-diagnosis of T. evansi in buffaloes. Likewise blood spots on filter paper were compared with sera for use in the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay/T. evansi (ELISA) and immunotrypanolysis test (T.L./T. evansi). Samples were collected weekly from experimentally T. evansi infected- and non-infected water buffaloes. To estimate test agreement between serum and respectively whole fresh blood and dried blood spots on filterpaper of the tests, kappa values with 95% confidence intervals were calculated, 0.75+/-0.11 for the CATT/T. evansi; 0.80+/-0.11 for the ELISA/T. evansi; 0.84+/-0.11 for the LATEX/T. evansi and 0.93+/-0.11 for the T.L./T. evansi. In addition kappa values with 95% confidence intervals were computed to assess agreement between results obtained in the reference T.L./T. evansi test and those obtained in the other assays; 0.70+/-0.10 for the CATT-Serum; 0.75+/-0.11 for the LATEX-Blood; 0.77+/-0.11 for the LATEX-Serum; 0.81+/-0.10 for the CATT-Blood; 0.81+/-0.11 for the ELISA-Serum and 0.84+/-0.11 for the ELISA-Confetti. Based on the high kappa values as calculated, we conclude that serum can be replaced by fresh whole blood for the agglutination assays or blood on filter paper for the ELISA/T. evansi and T.L./T. evansi.

  20. Chemical composition and biological value of spray dried porcine blood by-products and bone protein hydrolysate for young chickens.

    PubMed

    Jamroz, D; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Orda, J; Skorupińska, J; Słupczyńska, M; Kuryszko, J

    2011-10-01

    The chemical composition of spray dried porcine blood by-products is characterised by wide variation in crude protein contents. In spray dried porcine blood plasma (SDBP) it varied between 670-780 g/kg, in spray dried blood cells (SDBC) between 830-930 g/kg, and in bone protein hydrolysate (BPH) in a range of 740-780 g/kg. Compared with fish meal, these feeds are poor in Met and Lys. Moreover, in BPH deep deficits of Met, Cys, Thr and other amino acids were found. The experiment comprised 7 dietary treatments: SDBP, SDBC, and BPH, each at an inclusion rate of 20 or 40 g/kg diet, plus a control. The addition of 20 or 40 g/kg of the analysed meals into feeds for very young chickens (1-28 d post hatch) significantly decreased the body weight (BW) of birds. Only the treatments with 40 g/kg of SDBP and SDBC showed no significant difference in BW as compared with the control. There were no significant differences between treatments and type of meal for feed intake, haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations in blood. Addition of bone protein and blood cell meals to feed decreased the IgG concentration in blood and caused shortening of the femur and tibia bones. However, changes in the mineral composition of bones were not significantly affected by the type of meal used. The blood by-products, which are rich in microelements, improved retention of Ca and Cu only. In comparison to control chickens, significantly better accretion of these minerals was found in treatments containing 20 g/kg of SDBP or 40 g/kg of SDBC. Great variability in apparent ileal amino acid digestibility in chickens was determined. In this respect, some significant differences related to the type of meal fed were confirmed for Asp, Pro, Val, Tyr and His. In general, the apparent ileal digestibility of amino acids was about 2-3 percentage units better in chickens fed on diets containing the animal by products than in control birds.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Four Real-Time PCR Methods for the Quantitative Detection of Epstein-Barr Virus from Whole Blood Specimens.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Daelynn; Sun, Yilun; Tang, Li; Gu, Zhengming; Pounds, Stanley; Hayden, Randall

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) load in immunocompromised patients has become integral to their care. An increasing number of reagents are available for quantitative detection of EBV; however, there are little published comparative data. Four real-time PCR systems (one using laboratory-developed reagents and three using analyte-specific reagents) were compared with one another for detection of EBV from whole blood. Whole blood specimens seeded with EBV were used to determine quantitative linearity, analytical measurement range, lower limit of detection, and CV for each assay. Retrospective testing of 198 clinical samples was performed in parallel with all methods; results were compared to determine relative quantitative and qualitative performance. All assays showed similar performance. No significant difference was found in limit of detection (3.12-3.49 log10 copies/mL; P = 0.37). A strong qualitative correlation was seen with all assays that used clinical samples (positive detection rates of 89.5%-95.8%). Quantitative correlation of clinical samples across assays was also seen in pairwise regression analysis, with R(2) ranging from 0.83 to 0.95. Normalizing clinical sample results to IU/mL did not alter the quantitative correlation between assays. Quantitative EBV detection by real-time PCR can be performed over a wide linear dynamic range, using three different commercially available reagents and laboratory-developed methods. EBV was detected with comparable sensitivity and quantitative correlation for all assays.

  2. Aquatic exercise is as effective as dry land training to blood pressure reduction in postmenopausal hypertensive women.

    PubMed

    Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Martinelli, Bruno; Martin, Luis Cuadrado; Waisberg, César Becalel; Franco, Roberto Jorge da Silva

    2014-06-01

    The evidence of the benefits from regular physical activity to hypertensives is based on dry land training studies. Therefore, the aim of this study is to compare the effect of aquatic exercise with dry land training on hypertensive women. This is a randomized controlled study with 52 post-menopausal hypertensive women. The patients were randomly allocated in three groups: water aerobic training group (n = 19), dry land aerobic training group (n = 19) and a non-intervention control group (n = 14). The training protocol was performed by 12 weeks. There were no differences among the three groups concerning basal blood pressure (BP) and biochemical variables. In water group, there was a statistically significant reduction of systolic BP from 136 ± 16 mm Hg at zero week to 124 ± 18 mm Hg at 11th week and 124 ± 15 mm Hg at 12th week. In dry land training group, there was a statistically significant reduction of systolic BP from 138 ± 15 mm Hg at zero week to 125 ± 10 mm Hg at 7th week, 127 ± 10 mm Hg at 10th week and 126 ± 9 mm Hg at 12th week. The control group presented no change in any of the assessed variables. No changes were carried out in any antihypertensive medications during study. This is a randomized controlled study that demonstrates the antihypertensive efficacy of aerobic aquatic exercise. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. DRIED BLOOD SPOT REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ASSAYS TO SCREEN NEWBORNS FOR CONGENITAL CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Boppana, Suresh B.; Ross, Shannon A.; Novak, Zdenek; Shimamura, Masako; Tolan, Robert W.; Palmer, April L.; Ahmed, Amina; Michaels, Marian G.; Sánchez, Pablo J.; Bernstein, David I.; Britt, William J.; Fowler, Karen B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Reliable methods to screen newborns for congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection are needed for identification of infants at increased risk for hearing loss. Since dried blood spots (DBS) are routinely collected for metabolic screening from all newborns in the United States, there has been interest in using DBS polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for newborn CMV screening. Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of DBS real-time PCR assays for newborn CMV screening Design, Setting, and Participants Between March 2007 and May 2008, infants born at seven medical centers in the U.S. were enrolled in the CMV and Hearing Multicenter Screening (CHIMES) study. Newborn saliva specimens were tested for the detection of early antigen fluorescent foci (DEAFF). Results of saliva DEAFF were compared with a single-primer (from 03/07 to 12/07) and a two-primer (from 01/08 to 05/08) DBS real-time PCR. Infants positive by screening DEAFF or PCR were enrolled in follow-up to confirm congenital infection by the reference standard method, DEAFF on saliva or urine. Main Outcome Measures Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LRs) of single-primer and two-primer DBS real-time PCR assays for identifying infants with confirmed congenital CMV infection. Results Congenital CMV infection was confirmed in 92 of 20,448 (0.45%; 95% CI, 0.36–0.55) infants. Ninety-one of 92 infants were saliva DEAFF positive on screening. Of the 11,422 infants screened using the single-primer DBS PCR, 17 of 60 (28%) infants were positive with this assay, whereas, among the 9,026 infants screened using the two-primer DBS PCR, 11 of 32 (34%) infants were positive. The single-primer DBS PCR identified congenital CMV infection with a sensitivity of 28.3% (95% CI, 17.4–41.4%), specificity, 99.9% (95% CI, 99.9–100%), positive LR, 803.7 (95% CI, 278.7–2317.9), and negative LR, 0.7 (95% CI, 0.6–0.8). The positive and negative predictive values of the

  4. The stability of amitriptyline N-oxide and clozapine N-oxide on treated and untreated dry blood spot cards.

    PubMed

    Temesi, David; Swales, John; Keene, Warren; Dick, Samuel

    2013-03-25

    Procedures for drug monitoring based on Dried Blood Spot (DBS) sampling are gaining acceptance for an increasing number of clinical and preclinical applications, where ease of use, small sample requirement, and improved sample stability have been shown to offer advantages over blood tube sampling. However, to-date, the vast majority of this work has described the analysis of well characterized drugs. Using amitriptyline, clozapine, and their potentially labile N-oxide metabolites as model compounds, we consider the merits of using DBS for discovery pharmacokinetic (PK) studies where the metabolic fate of test compounds are often unknown. Both N-oxide metabolites reverted to parent compound under standard drying (2hr) and extraction conditions. Card type significantly affected the outcome, with 14% and 22% degradation occurring for clozapine-N-oxide and amitriptyline-N-oxide on a brand of untreated DBS cards, compared to 59 and 88% on a brand of treated DBS cards. Enrichment of the parent compound ex vivo leads to overestimation of circulating blood concentration and inaccurate determination of the PK profile.

  5. Type 1 diabetes risk analysis on dried blood spot samples from population-based newborns: design and feasibility of an unselected case-control study.

    PubMed

    Eising, Stefanie; Svensson, Jannet; Skogstrand, Kristin; Nilsson, Anita; Lynch, Kristian; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Lernmark, Ake; Hougaard, David M; Pociot, Flemming; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Nerup, Jørn

    2007-11-01

    Development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) may be triggered pre- or perinatally by multiple factors. Identifying new predisposing T1D markers or combinations of markers in a large, well-characterised case-control collection may be important for future T1D prevention. The present work describes the design and feasibility of a large and unselected case-control study, which will define and evaluate prediction criteria for T1D at the time of birth. Danish registries (Biological Specimen Bank for Neonatal Screening, and the National Discharge Registry) made it possible to identify and collect dried blood spots (DBS) from newborns who later developed T1D (cases) born 1981-2002. DBS samples from 2086 cases and two matching control subjects per case were analysed for genetic and immune factors that are associated with T1D: (a) candidate genes (HLA, INS and CTLA4), (b) cytokines and inflammatory markers, (c) islet auto-antibodies (GAD65A, IA-2A). The objective of the study was to define reliable prediction tools for T1D using samples available at the time of birth. In a unique approach, the study linked a large unselected and population-based sample resource to well-ascertained clinical databases and advanced technology. It combined genetic, immunological and demographic data to develop prediction algorithms. It also provided a resource for future studies in which new genetic markers can be included as they are identified.

  6. Dried Blood Spot Methodology in Combination With Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry Facilitates the Monitoring of Teriflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Lunven, Catherine; Turpault, Sandrine; Beyer, Yann-Joel; O'Brien, Amy; Delfolie, Astrid; Boyanova, Neli; Sanderink, Ger-Jan; Baldinetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Background: Teriflunomide, a once-daily oral immunomodulator approved for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, is eliminated slowly from plasma. If necessary to rapidly lower plasma concentrations of teriflunomide, an accelerated elimination procedure using cholestyramine or activated charcoal may be used. The current bioanalytical assay for determination of plasma teriflunomide concentration requires laboratory facilities for blood centrifugation and plasma storage. An alternative method, with potential for greater convenience, is dried blood spot (DBS) methodology. Analytical and clinical validations are required to switch from plasma to DBS (finger-prick sampling) methodology. Methods: Using blood samples from healthy subjects, an LC-MS/MS assay method for quantification of teriflunomide in DBS over a range of 0.01–10 mcg/mL was developed and validated for specificity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, reproducibility, and stability. Results were compared with those from the current plasma assay for determination of plasma teriflunomide concentration. Results: Method was specific and selective relative to endogenous compounds, with process efficiency ∼88%, and no matrix effect. Inaccuracy and imprecision for intraday and interday analyses were <15% at all concentrations tested. Quantification of teriflunomide in DBS assay was not affected by blood deposit volume and punch position within spot, and hematocrit level had a limited but acceptable effect on measurement accuracy. Teriflunomide was stable for at least 4 months at room temperature, and for at least 24 hours at 37°C with and without 95% relative humidity, to cover sampling, drying, and shipment conditions in the field. The correlation between DBS and plasma concentrations (R2 = 0.97), with an average blood to plasma ratio of 0.59, was concentration independent and constant over time. Conclusions: DBS sampling is a simple and practical method for monitoring teriflunomide

  7. On-line liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry simultaneous determination of opiates, cocainics and amphetamines in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Saussereau, E; Lacroix, C; Gaulier, J M; Goulle, J P

    2012-02-15

    A novel approach has been developed for the illicit drugs quantitative determination using dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. The illicit drugs tested were opiates (morphine and its 3- and 6-glucuronide metabolites, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine), cocainics (ecgonine methylester, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, cocaethylene) and amphetamines (amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDA, MDMA, MDEA). The described method, requiring a small blood volume, is based on high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using on-line extraction. A Whatman card 903 was spotted with 30μL of whole blood and left overnight to dry at room temperature. A 3-mm diameter disk was removed using a manual punch, suspended in 150μL of water for 10min with ultrasonication, and then 100μL was injected in the on-line LC-MS/MS system. An Oasis HLB was used as an extraction column and a C18 Atlantis as an analytical column. The chromatographic cycle was performed with 20mM ammonium formate buffer (pH 2.8) (solvent A) and acetonitrile/solvent A (90:10, v/v) gradient in 16min. Detection was performed in positive electrospray ionization mode (ESI+) with a Quattro Micro (Waters). Recoveries of all analytes were up to 80%. DBS were stored in duplicate at 4°C and -20°C for up to 6 months. Illicit drugs seemed to be much more stabled at -20°C. Furthermore, it was tested whether analysis of DBS may be as reliable as that of whole blood investigating authentic samples; significant correlations were obtained. This DBS assay has potential as rapid, sensitive and inexpensive option for the illicit drugs determination in small blood volumes, which seems of great interest in suspected cases of driving under the influence of drugs.

  8. Evaluation of quantification of HIV-1 RNA viral load in plasma and dried blood spots by use of the semiautomated Cobas Amplicor assay and the fully automated Cobas Ampliprep/TaqMan assay, version 2.0, in Kisumu, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ouma, Kenneth N; Basavaraju, Sridhar V; Okonji, Jully A; Williamson, John; Thomas, Timothy K; Mills, Lisa A; Nkengasong, John N; Zeh, Clement

    2013-04-01

    In Kenya, HIV-1 viral load monitoring is commonly performed with the Cobas Amplicor using plasma specimens. Interest is growing in transitioning to real-time PCR (RT-PCR), such as the Cobas Ampliprep/Cobas TaqMan (CAP/CTM), using dried blood spots (DBS). Before implementation, direct evaluation of the two assays using DBS field specimens is required. This study compares the sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values (NPV and PPV, respectively), concordance, and agreement between HIV-1 viral load measurements using plasma and DBS specimens obtained from 512 HIV-1-infected pregnant females enrolled in the Kisumu Breastfeeding Study and tested with the Cobas Amplicor and CAP/CTM assays. The sensitivity and NPV of viral load detection in DBS specimens were higher with CAP/CTM (sensitivity, 100%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 99.1 to 100.0%; NPV, 100%; 95% CI, 59.0 to 100.0%) than the Cobas Amplicor (sensitivity, 96.6%; 95% CI, 94.3 to 98.1%; NPV, 58.8%; 95% CI, 40.7 to 75.4%). The PPVs were comparable between both assays when using DBS. The specificity of viral load detection in DBS specimens was lower with CAP/CTM (77.8%; 95% CI, 40.0 to 97.2%) than that of the Cobas Amplicor (95.2%; 95% CI, 76.2 to 99.9%). Good concordance and agreement were observed when paired plasma and DBS specimens were tested with both assays. Lower specificity with the CAP/CTM is likely due to proviral HIV-1 DNA amplification and lower detection limits with RT-PCR. However, the CAP/CTM has better sensitivity and higher throughput than the Cobas Amplicor. These findings suggest that DBS may be a suitable alternative to plasma when using RT-PCR, which could increase access to viral load monitoring in resource-limited settings.

  9. Evaluation of Quantification of HIV-1 RNA Viral Load in Plasma and Dried Blood Spots by Use of the Semiautomated Cobas Amplicor Assay and the Fully Automated Cobas Ampliprep/TaqMan Assay, Version 2.0, in Kisumu, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ouma, Kenneth N.; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.; Okonji, Jully A.; Williamson, John; Thomas, Timothy K.; Mills, Lisa A.; Nkengasong, John N.

    2013-01-01

    In Kenya, HIV-1 viral load monitoring is commonly performed with the Cobas Amplicor using plasma specimens. Interest is growing in transitioning to real-time PCR (RT-PCR), such as the Cobas Ampliprep/Cobas TaqMan (CAP/CTM), using dried blood spots (DBS). Before implementation, direct evaluation of the two assays using DBS field specimens is required. This study compares the sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values (NPV and PPV, respectively), concordance, and agreement between HIV-1 viral load measurements using plasma and DBS specimens obtained from 512 HIV-1-infected pregnant females enrolled in the Kisumu Breastfeeding Study and tested with the Cobas Amplicor and CAP/CTM assays. The sensitivity and NPV of viral load detection in DBS specimens were higher with CAP/CTM (sensitivity, 100%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 99.1 to 100.0%; NPV, 100%; 95% CI, 59.0 to 100.0%) than the Cobas Amplicor (sensitivity, 96.6%; 95% CI, 94.3 to 98.1%; NPV, 58.8%; 95% CI, 40.7 to 75.4%). The PPVs were comparable between both assays when using DBS. The specificity of viral load detection in DBS specimens was lower with CAP/CTM (77.8%; 95% CI, 40.0 to 97.2%) than that of the Cobas Amplicor (95.2%; 95% CI, 76.2 to 99.9%). Good concordance and agreement were observed when paired plasma and DBS specimens were tested with both assays. Lower specificity with the CAP/CTM is likely due to proviral HIV-1 DNA amplification and lower detection limits with RT-PCR. However, the CAP/CTM has better sensitivity and higher throughput than the Cobas Amplicor. These findings suggest that DBS may be a suitable alternative to plasma when using RT-PCR, which could increase access to viral load monitoring in resource-limited settings. PMID:23390278

  10. Isolation of human genomic DNA for genetic analysis from premature neonates: a comparison between newborn dried blood spots, whole blood and umbilical cord tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genotyping requires biological sample collection that must be reliable, convenient and acceptable for patients and clinicians. Finding the most optimal procedure of sample collection for premature neonates who have a very limited blood volume is a particular challenge. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the use of umbilical cord (UC) tissue and newborn dried blood spot (DBS)-extracted genomic DNA (gDNA) as an alternative to venous blood-derived gDNA from premature neonates for molecular genetic analysis. All samples were obtained from premature newborn infants between 24-32 weeks of gestation. Paired blood and UC samples were collected from 31 study participants. gDNA was extracted from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) anticoagulant-treated blood samples (~500 μl) and newborn DBSs (n = 723) using QIAamp DNA Micro kit (Qiagen Ltd., Crawley, UK); and from UC using Qiagen DNAeasy Blood and Tissue kit (Qiagen Ltd., Crawley, UK). gDNA was quantified and purity confirmed by measuring the A260:A280 ratio. PCR amplification and pyrosequencing was carried out to determine suitability of the gDNA for molecular genetic analysis. Minor allele frequency of two unrelated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was calculated using the entire cohort. Results Both whole blood samples and UC tissue provided good quality and yield of gDNA, which was considerably less from newborn DBS. The gDNA purity was also reduced after 3 years of storage of the newborn DBS. PCR amplification of three unrelated genes resulted in clear products in all whole blood and UC samples and 86%-100% of newborn DBS. Genotyping using pyrosequencing showed 100% concordance in the paired UC and whole blood samples. Minor allele frequencies of the two SNPs indicated that no maternal gDNA contamination occurred in the genotyping of the UC samples. Conclusions gDNAs from all three sources are suitable for standard PCR and pyrosequencing assays. Given that UC provide good quality

  11. Using Dried Blood Spot Sampling to Improve Data Quality and Reduce Animal Use in Mouse Pharmacokinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Perkins, Everett J

    2015-01-01

    Traditional pharmacokinetic analysis in nonclinical studies is based on the concentration of a test compound in plasma and requires approximately 100 to 200 µL blood collected per time point. However, the total blood volume of mice limits the number of samples that can be collected from an individual animal—often to a single collection per mouse—thus necessitating dosing multiple mice to generate a pharmacokinetic profile in a sparse-sampling design. Compared with traditional methods, dried blood spot (DBS) analysis requires smaller volumes of blood (15 to 20 µL), thus supporting serial blood sampling and the generation of a complete pharmacokinetic profile from a single mouse. Here we compare plasma-derived data with DBS-derived data, explain how to adopt DBS sampling to support discovery mouse studies, and describe how to generate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from a single mouse. Executing novel study designs that use DBS enhances the ability to identify and streamline better drug candidates during drug discovery. Implementing DBS sampling can reduce the number of mice needed in a drug discovery program. In addition, the simplicity of DBS sampling and the smaller numbers of mice needed translate to decreased study costs. Overall, DBS sampling is consistent with 3Rs principles by achieving reductions in the number of animals used, decreased restraint-associated stress, improved data quality, direct comparison of interanimal variability, and the generation of multiple endpoints from a single study. PMID:25836959

  12. Using dried blood spot sampling to improve data quality and reduce animal use in mouse pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Perkins, Everett J

    2015-03-01

    Traditional pharmacokinetic analysis in nonclinical studies is based on the concentration of a test compound in plasma and requires approximately 100 to 200 μL blood collected per time point. However, the total blood volume of mice limits the number of samples that can be collected from an individual animal-often to a single collection per mouse-thus necessitating dosing multiple mice to generate a pharmacokinetic profile in a sparse-sampling design. Compared with traditional methods, dried blood spot (DBS) analysis requires smaller volumes of blood (15 to 20 μL), thus supporting serial blood sampling and the generation of a complete pharmacokinetic profile from a single mouse. Here we compare plasma-derived data with DBS-derived data, explain how to adopt DBS sampling to support discovery mouse studies, and describe how to generate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from a single mouse. Executing novel study designs that use DBS enhances the ability to identify and streamline better drug candidates during drug discovery. Implementing DBS sampling can reduce the number of mice needed in a drug discovery program. In addition, the simplicity of DBS sampling and the smaller numbers of mice needed translate to decreased study costs. Overall, DBS sampling is consistent with 3Rs principles by achieving reductions in the number of animals used, decreased restraint-associated stress, improved data quality, direct comparison of interanimal variability, and the generation of multiple endpoints from a single study.

  13. Determination of gemifloxacin on dried blood spots by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector: application to pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Nageswara Rao, R; Naidu, Ch Gangu; Guru Prasad, K; Padiya, Raju; Agwane, Sachin B

    2012-12-01

    A highly selective, sensitive and rapid hydrophilic liquid interaction chromatographic method was developed and validated for determination of gemifloxacin on dried blood spots. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed-phase zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic ZIC®HILIC-C₁₈ (4.6 × 100 mm; 5 µm) column using acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium acetate (pH 3.5; 80:20, v/v) as a mobile phase in an isocratic elution mode at a flow rate 0.6 mL/min at 27 °C. An on-line fluorescence detector set at excitation and emission wavelengths of 269 and 393 nm, respectively was used for monitoring column eluents. Ciprofloxacin was used as an internal standard. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, linearity and selectivity by design of experiments following ICH guidelines. The assay exhibited a linear range of 25-5000 ng/mL for gemifloxacin on dried blood spots. The lower limit of detection was found to be 10 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation did not exceed 7.4% deviation of the nominal concentration. The recovery of GFX from dried blood spots was >95.0% and its stability was excellent with no evidence of degradation during sample processing for at least 3 months storage in a freezer at -20 °C. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Improved detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei from non-blood clinical specimens using enrichment culture and PCR: narrowing diagnostic gap in resource-constrained settings.

    PubMed

    Tellapragada, Chaitanya; Shaw, Tushar; D'Souza, Annet; Eshwara, Vandana Kalwaje; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic utility of enrichment culture and PCR for improved case detection rates of non-bacteraemic form of melioidosis in limited resource settings. Clinical specimens (n = 525) obtained from patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital of South India with clinical symptoms suggestive of community-acquired pneumonia, lower respiratory tract infections, superficial or internal abscesses, chronic skin ulcers and bone or joint infections were tested for the presence of Burkholderia pseudomallei using conventional culture (CC), enrichment culture (EC) and PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CC and PCR were initially deduced using EC as the gold standard method. Further, diagnostic accuracies of all the three methods were analysed using Bayesian latent class modelling (BLCM). Detection rates of B. pseudomallei using CC, EC and PCR were 3.8%, 5.3% and 6%, respectively. Diagnostic sensitivities and specificities of CC and PCR were 71.4, 98.4% and 100 and 99.4%, respectively in comparison with EC as the gold standard test. With Bayesian latent class modelling, EC and PCR demonstrated sensitivities of 98.7 and 99.3%, respectively, while CC showed a sensitivity of 70.3% for detection of B. pseudomallei. An increase of 1.6% (95% CI: 1.08-4.32%) in the case detection rate of melioidosis was observed in the study population when EC and/or PCR were used in adjunct to the conventional culture technique. Our study findings underscore the diagnostic superiority of enrichment culture and/or PCR over conventional microbiological culture for improved case detection of melioidosis from non-blood clinical specimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Development of a fluorometric microtiter plate-based enzyme assay for arylsulfatase B (MPS VI) using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Millington, David S; Bali, Deeksha S

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARS-B) enzyme activity. It results in mild to severe multi-organ system failure from accumulation of undigested glycosaminoglycans (GAGs); dermatan sulfate and chondroitin-4-sulfate. We have developed a single-step enzyme assay using a fluorescent substrate and dried blood spots to measure ARS-B activity to identify disease patients. This assay is robust, reproducible, specific and convenient to perform.

  16. Shipping blood to a central laboratory in multicenter clinical trials: effect of ambient temperature on specimen temperature, and effects of temperature on mononuclear cell yield, viability and immunologic function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of immunologic therapies provide opportunities to study the cellular and molecular effects of those therapies and may permit identification of biomarkers of response. When the trials are performed at multiple centers, transport and storage of clinical specimens become important variables that may affect lymphocyte viability and function in blood and tissue specimens. The effect of temperature during storage and shipment of peripheral blood on subsequent processing, recovery, and function of lymphocytes is understudied and represents the focus of this study. Methods Peripheral blood samples (n = 285) from patients enrolled in 2 clinical trials of a melanoma vaccine were shipped from clinical centers 250 or 1100 miles to a central laboratory at the sponsoring institution. The yield of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) collected before and after cryostorage was correlated with temperatures encountered during shipment. Also, to simulate shipping of whole blood, heparinized blood from healthy donors was collected and stored at 15°C, 22°C, 30°C, or 40°C, for varied intervals before isolation of PBMC. Specimen integrity was assessed by measures of yield, recovery, viability, and function of isolated lymphocytes. Several packaging systems were also evaluated during simulated shipping for the ability to maintain the internal temperature in adverse temperatures over time. Results Blood specimen containers experienced temperatures during shipment ranging from -1 to 35°C. Exposure to temperatures above room temperature (22°C) resulted in greater yields of PBMC. Reduced cell recovery following cryo-preservation as well as decreased viability and immune function were observed in specimens exposed to 15°C or 40°C for greater than 8 hours when compared to storage at 22°C. There was a trend toward improved preservation of blood specimen integrity stored at 30°C prior to processing for all time points tested. Internal temperatures of

  17. Bosentan Pharmacokinetics in Pediatric Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Comparison of Dried Blood Spot and Plasma Analysis.

    PubMed

    Géhin, Martine; Sidharta, Patricia N; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    FUTURE-3, a phase III pediatric pharmacokinetic (PK) trial conducted to compare 2 bosentan dosing regimens in 64 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, offered the opportunity to compare dried blood spot (DBS)-derived data to plasma data. Bosentan PK parameters obtained with both methods were compared by the geometric mean ratio (GMR; DBS/plasma) and its 90% CI after correction for the blood-to-plasma partition ratio (0.6). Bosentan GMRs were 1.10 (1.03, 1.16) and 1.12 (1.04, 1.20) for AUCτ and Cmax, respectively. Bosentan concentrations measured by DBS were therefore good estimations of bosentan plasma concentrations. DBS can be considered a valid alternative to bosentan assessed in plasma. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Examination of Eurasian griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus fulvus) in Israel for exposure to environmental toxicants using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Shlosberg, Alan; Wu, Qian; Rumbeiha, Wilson K; Lehner, Andreas; Cuneah, Olga; King, Roni; Hatzofe, Ohad; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Johnson, Margaret

    2012-04-01

    The griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) is one of seven species of Old World Gyps vultures found over a wide range from the Iberian peninsula in the west through the Balkans, Turkey, and the Middle East to India in the east. The population of the griffon vultures in Israel has suffered a dramatic decrease, and in recent years productivity has been severely reduced. In this study, whole-blood samples taken from 25 apparently healthy griffon vultures at various stages of maturity were examined to investigate whether the vultures are being excessively exposed to environmental contaminants that might deleteriously affect their reproduction. Five groups of environmental contaminants, comprising toxic elements, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and perfluorinated compounds, were monitored in dried blood spots. Results of the analyses showed low levels of exposure of griffon vultures to environmental contaminants compared with the sparse data available on griffon vultures and other diurnal raptors in other countries.

  19. Evaluation of Two Techniques for Viral Load Monitoring Using Dried Blood Spot in Routine Practice in Vietnam (French National Agency for AIDS and Hepatitis Research 12338)

    PubMed Central

    Taieb, Fabien; Tram, Tran Hong; Ho, Hien Thi; Pham, Van Anh; Nguyen, Lan; Pham, Ban Hien; Tong, Linh An; Tuaillon, Edouard; Delaporte, Eric; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Bui, Duc Duong; Do, NhanThi; Madec, Yoann

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although it is the best method to detect early therapeutic failure, viral load (VL) monitoring is still not widely available in many resource-limited settings because of difficulties in specimen transfer, personnel shortage, and insufficient laboratory infrastructures. Dried blood spot (DBS) use, which was introduced in the latest World Health Organization recommendations, can overcome these difficulties. This evaluation aimed at validating VL measurement in DBS, in a laboratory without previous DBS experience and in routine testing conditions. Methods. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults were observed in a HIV care site in Hanoi, and each patient provided 2 DBS cards with whole blood spots and 2 plasma samples. Viral load was measured in DBS and in plasma using the COBAS Ampliprep/TaqMan and the Abbott RealTime assays. To correctly identify those with VL ≥ 1000 copies/mL, sensitivity and specificity were estimated. Results. A total of 198 patients were enrolled. With the Roche technique, 51 plasma VL were ≥1000 copies/mL; among these, 28 presented a VL in DBS that was also ≥1000 copies/mL (sensitivity, 54.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 40.3–68.9). On the other hand, all plasma VL < 1000 copies/mL were also <1000 copies/mL in DBS (specificity, 100; 95% CI, 97.5–100). With the Abbott technique, 45 plasma VL were ≥1000 copies/mL; among these, 42 VL in DBS were also ≥1000 copies/mL (sensitivity, 93.3%; 95% CI, 81.7–98.6); specificity was 94.8 (95% CI, 90.0–97.7). Conclusions. The Abbott RealTime polymerase chain reaction assay provided adequate VL results in DBS, thus allowing DBS use for VL monitoring. PMID:27704001

  20. Comparison of urine analysis and dried blood spot analysis for the detection of ephedrine and methylephedrine in doping control.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Asami; Nishitani, Yasunori; Sato, Mitsuhiko; Kageyama, Shinji; Dohi, Michiko; Okano, Masato

    2016-02-01

    When the misuse of stimulants is determined in doping control tests conducted during the in-competition period, athletes are asked to account for the violation of the rules. This study was designed to evaluate whether the urinary threshold values (10 µg/mL) for ephedrine and methylephedrine set by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) can be exceeded after the oral administration of each substance (25 mg). In addition, the study describes the validity of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method using dried blood spot testing to detect ephedrine and methylephedrine by comparing it to a quantitative laboratory urine assay. After administration of ephedrine, the urinary concentration of ephedrine did not exceed the threshold at 4-10 h in two subjects, whereas the threshold was exceeded in both the subjects at 12 h after administration. For methylephedrine, the urinary concentrations of all the subjects failed to reach the threshold for up to 10 h after administration. The concentrations reached the threshold at 12-24 h after administration in some volunteers. In contrast, the blood concentrations of ephedrine and methylephedrine reached their maximum levels at 2-8 h after administration. The blood concentrations showed a low inter-individual variability, and the results suggested that the urinary excretion of ephedrine and methylephedrine can be strongly affected by urine pH and/or urine volume. These facts suggest that urinary concentrations cannot reflect the psychoactive level of ephedrines in circulation. Thus, dried blood analysis might be suitable for the adequate detection of stimulants during in-competition testing.

  1. Determination of lead in blood by laser ablation ICP-TOF-MS analysis of blood spotted and dried on filter paper: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Cizdziel, James V

    2007-06-01

    Screening programs for pediatric lead (Pb) poisoning routinely collect blood by finger stick onto specially designed filter paper (FP) for subsequent laboratory testing. Here, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma time-of-flight mass spectrometry is evaluated as a novel method for the determination of Pb in blood spotted onto FP cards. The method requires no sample pretreatment and may be particularly suitable for rapidly screening a large number of samples. Signal intensity from the ICP-MS strongly correlated (r (2) = 0.996) with Pb target values for five blood cards from a laboratory proficiency testing program. Better precision was obtained by replicate ablation line scans (<15% rsd) compared to a grid of 25 individual ablation spots (>30% rsd). Because <2% of the sample is consumed in the laser ablation analysis, selected samples can also be analyzed by traditional techniques or archived. Lead isotope ratios determined during the same total-Pb analysis appear to be effective for discerning contamination extraneous to the blood sample. Determining that an elevated result was due to contamination may negate the need for retesting with invasive pediatric venipuncture. Some elements monitored along with Pb exhibited signal profiles conducive to potential quantitation (Ca, V, Fe, Cu Zn), whereas others did not (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cd, Hg, Tl, U). Copper, Ca, and V were inversely correlated with Pb (r = -0.89, -0.90, and -0.92, respectively). Scanning electron microscope images revealed surface modality differences between FP spotted with fresh whole blood and reconstituted freeze-dried blood reference material.

  2. Quantitative determination of opioids in whole blood using fully automated dried blood spot desorption coupled to on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Verplaetse, Ruth; Henion, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are well known, widely used painkillers. Increased stability of opioids in the dried blood spot (DBS) matrix compared to blood/plasma has been described. Other benefits provided by DBS techniques include point-of-care collection, less invasive micro sampling, more economical shipment, and convenient storage. Current methodology for analysis of micro whole blood samples for opioids is limited to the classical DBS workflow, including tedious manual punching of the DBS cards followed by extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalysis. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a fully automated on-line sample preparation procedure for the analysis of DBS micro samples relevant to the detection of opioids in finger prick blood. To this end, automated flow-through elution of DBS cards was followed by on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by LC-MS/MS. Selective, sensitive, accurate, and reproducible quantitation of five representative opioids in human blood at sub-therapeutic, therapeutic, and toxic levels was achieved. The range of reliable response (R(2)  ≥0.997) was 1 to 500 ng/mL whole blood for morphine, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone; and 0.1 to 50 ng/mL for fentanyl. Inter-day, intra-day, and matrix inter-lot accuracy and precision was less than 15% (even at lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) level). The method was successfully used to measure hydrocodone and its major metabolite norhydrocodone in incurred human samples. Our data support the enormous potential of DBS sampling and automated analysis for monitoring opioids as well as other pharmaceuticals in both anti-doping and pain management regimens.

  3. Detection of HIV type 1 env subtypes A, B, C, and E in Asia using dried blood spots: a new surveillance tool for molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cassol, S; Weniger, B G; Babu, P G; Salminen, M O; Zheng, X; Htoon, M T; Delaney, A; O'Shaughnessy, M; Ou, C Y

    1996-10-10

    Global surveillance of HIV-1 subtypes for genetic characterization is hampered by the biohazard of processing and the difficulties of shipping whole blood or cells from many developing country regions. We developed a technique for the direct automated sequencing of viral DNA from dried blood spot (DBS) specimens collected on absorbent paper, which can be mailed unrefrigerated in sturdy paper envelopes with low biohazard risk. DBS were collected nonrandomly from HIV-1-infected, mostly asymptomatic, patients in five Asian countries in 1991, and shipped via airmail or hand carried without refrigeration to Bangkok, and then transshipped to North America for processing. After more than 2 years of storage, including 6 months at ambient temperatures, proviral DNA in the DBS was amplified by nested PCR, and a 389-nucleotide segment of the C2-V3 env gene region was sequenced, from which 287 base pairs were aligned and subtyped by phylogenetic analysis with neighbor-joining and other methods. From southern India, there were 25 infections with subtype C and 2 with subtype A. From Myanmar (Burma), we identified the first subtype E infection, as well as six subtype BB, a distinct cluster within subtype B that was first discovered in Thailand and that has now appeared in China, Malaysia, and Japan. From southwest China, one BB was identified, while a "classical" B typical of North American and European strains was found in Indonesia. From Thailand, five DBS of ambiguous serotype were identified as three B, one BB, and one E. A blinded control serotype E specimen was correctly identified, but a serotype BB control was not tested. Most HIV-1 in southern India appears to be env subtype C, with rare A, as others have reported in western and northern India. The subtypes BB and E in Myanmar, and the BB in China, suggest epidemiological linkage with these subtypes in neighboring Thailand. DBS are a practical, economical technique for conducting large-scale molecular epidemiological

  4. Effect of sample collection on alpha-galactosidase A enzyme activity measurements in dried blood spots on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Olivova, Petra; van der Veen, Kristen; Cullen, Emmaline; Rose, Michael; Zhang, X Kate; Sims, Katherine B; Keutzer, Joan; Browning, Marsha F

    2009-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of alpha galactosidase A (AGAL, EC 3.2.1.22). Despite increasing utilization of dried blood spot (DBS) as samples for AGAL enzyme assays, the effects of blood sample collection techniques on enzyme activity have not been studied. DBS samples were prepared by spotting blood collected into an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) tube and by direct application of blood from a finger prick or a venipuncture syringe. AGAL activity was measured quantitatively by detecting the fluorescence of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) generated using the substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (4-MUGal) in an acidic pH for 20 h. N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) was used to inhibit alpha-galactosidase B (EC 3.2.1.49). We studied 88 previously diagnosed Fabry disease patients and 690 healthy controls. Average AGAL activity in DBS samples prepared using EDTA tubes was higher compared to those spotted directly irrespective of disease status. The study confirms the need for collection method-specific reference ranges using DBS samples.

  5. Top-Down Proteomics and Direct Surface Sampling of Neonatal Dried Blood Spots: Diagnosis of Unknown Hemoglobin Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Rebecca L.; Griffiths, Paul; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2012-11-01

    We have previously shown that liquid microjunction surface sampling of dried blood spots coupled with high resolution top-down mass spectrometry may be used for screening of common hemoglobin variants HbS, HbC, and HbD. In order to test the robustness of the approach, we have applied the approach to unknown hemoglobin variants. Six neonatal dried blood spot samples that had been identified as variants, but which could not be diagnosed by current screening methods, were analyzed by direct surface sampling top-down mass spectrometry. Both collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry were employed. Four of the samples were identified as β-chain variants: two were heterozygous Hb D-Iran, one was heterozygous Hb Headington, and one was heterozygous Hb J-Baltimore. The fifth sample was identified as the α-chain variant heterozygous Hb Phnom Penh. Analysis of the sixth sample suggested that it did not in fact contain a variant. Adoption of the approach in the clinic would require speed in both data collection and interpretation. To address that issue, we have compared manual data analysis with freely available data analysis software (ProsightPTM). The results demonstrate the power of top-down proteomics for hemoglobin variant analysis in newborn samples.

  6. Multicenter Comparison of ESP Culture System II with BACTEC 460TB and with Lowenstein-Jensen Medium for Recovery of Mycobacteria from Different Clinical Specimens, Including Blood

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, Enrico; Cichero, Paola; Chirillo, M. Gabriella; Gismondo, M. Rita; Bono, Letizia; Gesu, Giampietro; Simonetti, M. Tullia; Volpe, Gisella; Nardi, Giampietro; Marone, Piero

    1998-01-01

    The recently developed ESP Culture System II (AccuMed, Chicago, Ill.) was compared with radiometric BACTEC 460TB (Becton Dickinson, Towson, Md.) and with Lowenstein-Jensen medium for recovery of mycobacteria from over 2,500 clinical specimens both of respiratory and nonrespiratory origin, including blood. The majority of the 219 mycobacterial isolates (129) belonged to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, followed by 37 isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and 53 isolates of eight other mycobacterial species. Rates of recovery obtained with BACTEC, ESP, and Lowenstein-Jensen medium were 89, 79, and 64%, respectively, with such differences being statistically significant. Different media and systems appeared to behave differently when the more frequently detected organisms were considered: M. tuberculosis complex isolates grew better with BACTEC, and MAC isolates grew better with ESP. An analysis of the combinations of Lowenstein-Jensen medium with BACTEC and with ESP did not reveal significant differences in recovery rates. With regard to the times needed for the detection of positive cultures, they were significantly longer on Lowenstein-Jensen medium (average, 28 days) than with the remaining two systems, between which there was no difference (average, 18 days). We conclude, therefore, that the ESP system, when used in combination with a solid medium, performs as well as the thoroughly validated radiometric BACTEC system and offers the advantages of full automation and absence of radioisotopes. PMID:9574709

  7. Multicenter comparison of ESP Culture System II with BACTEC 460TB and with Lowenstein-Jensen medium for recovery of mycobacteria from different clinical specimens, including blood.

    PubMed

    Tortoli, E; Cichero, P; Chirillo, M G; Gismondo, M R; Bono, L; Gesu, G; Simonetti, M T; Volpe, G; Nardi, G; Marone, P

    1998-05-01

    The recently developed ESP Culture System II (AccuMed, Chicago, Ill.) was compared with radiometric BACTEC 460TB (Becton Dickinson, Towson, Md.) and with Lowenstein-Jensen medium for recovery of mycobacteria from over 2,500 clinical specimens both of respiratory and nonrespiratory origin, including blood. The majority of the 219 mycobacterial isolates (129) belonged to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, followed by 37 isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and 53 isolates of eight other mycobacterial species. Rates of recovery obtained with BACTEC, ESP, and Lowenstein-Jensen medium were 89, 79, and 64%, respectively, with such differences being statistically significant. Different media and systems appeared to behave differently when the more frequently detected organisms were considered: M. tuberculosis complex isolates grew better with BACTEC, and MAC isolates grew better with ESP. An analysis of the combinations of Lowenstein-Jensen medium with BACTEC and with ESP did not reveal significant differences in recovery rates. With regard to the times needed for the detection of positive cultures, they were significantly longer on Lowenstein-Jensen medium (average, 28 days) than with the remaining two systems, between which there was no difference (average, 18 days). We conclude, therefore, that the ESP system, when used in combination with a solid medium, performs as well as the thoroughly validated radiometric BACTEC system and offers the advantages of full automation and absence of radioisotopes.

  8. Effect of dried rumen digesta pellet levels on feed use, rumen ecology, and blood metabolite in swamp buffalo.

    PubMed

    Seankamsorn, Anuthida; Cherdthong, Anusorn; Wanapat, Metha; Supapong, Chanadol; Khonkhaeng, Benjamad; Uriyapongson, Sutipong; Gunun, Nirawan; Gunun, Pongsatron; Chanjula, Pin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to determine the effect of dried rumen digesta pellet levels on feed intake, digestibility, rumen ecology, and blood metabolites in swamp buffalo. Four 2-year-old male swamp buffalo with an initial body weight (BW) of 150 ± 10.0 kg were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design to receive four levels of dried rumen digesta pellets (DRDPs). The dietary treatments were supplementation of DRDP at 0, 50, 100, and 150 g dry matter/day, respectively. Total feed intake was significantly different among treatments (p < 0.05) and was highest in the 150 g/day DRDP supplement (2.68 kg/day). Intakes of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber did not affect DRDP levels, while intakes of organic matter and crude protein (CP) were altered significantly when 150 g of DRDP was used (p < 0.05). Buffalo fed with DRDP at 150 g/day had the highest CP and NDF digestibility (p < 0.05). DRDP supplementation did not affect rumen pH, and temperature and the concentration of ruminal ammonia-nitrogen and blood urea nitrogen were not altered among the treatments. The mean value of fungal zoospores in the buffalo was significantly different among treatments and was highest in supplementation with DRDP at 150 g. The mean value of propionic acid was significantly different at various levels of DRDP; it was highest in the group fed with 150 g DRDP (p < 0.05). Thus, supplementation of DRDP at 150 g improved feed use and increased fungal zoospore population. In addition, DRDP feeding is recommended, since it has positive economic impacts and helps control environmental pollution.

  9. Dried plasma/blood spots for monitoring antiretroviral treatment efficacy and pharmacokinetics: a cross-sectional study in rural Burundi

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Andrea; Motta, Ilaria; Milia, Maria Grazia; Rostagno, Roberto; Simiele, Marco; Libanore, Valentina; Fontana, Silvia; D'Avolio, Antonio; Ghisetti, Valeria; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Aims In limited resource settings monitoring antiretroviral (ARV) treatment efficacy is restrained by the lack of access to technological equipment. The aim of the study was to assess the use of dried plasma (DPS) and blood spots (DBS) to facilitate ARV monitoring in remote settings where clinical monitoring is the primary strategy. Methods A cross-sectional study in HIV-positive ARV-treated patients in Kiremba, Burundi was performed. DBS were used for HIV-1 viral load (limit of the assay 250 copies ml−1) and genotypic drug resistance tests and dried plasma spots were used for concentration measurements. Results Three hundred and seven patients [201 female (88.6%), 14 children (4.5%)] were enrolled. HIV-1 viral load was <250, 250–1000 and >1000 copies ml−1 in 250 (81.7%), 33 (10.8%) and 23 patients (7.5%). Eleven samples out of 23 were successfully amplified revealing nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistance associated mutations [in seven (58.3%) and six patients (50%)]. Nevirapine trough concentrations were <3000 ng ml−1 in 28/189 patients (14.8%) and efavirenz 12 h concentrations were <1000 ng ml−1 in 2/16 patients (12.5%). Children and patients with nevirapine exposure <3000 ng ml−1 presented a higher risk of viral replication. Conclusions Viral loads <250 copies ml−1 were observed in 81.7% of patients (83.6% adults and 42.9% children). Children and patients with low nevirapine concentrations had higher risk of viral replication. Dried blood and plasma spots may be useful for monitoring HIV-positive patients including viral load and drug level measurement as part of treatment management in remote areas. PMID:25377591

  10. Low risk of contamination with automated and manual excision of dried blood spots for HIV DNA PCR testing in the routine laboratory.

    PubMed

    Driver, Glenn A; Patton, Janet C; Moloi, Jackie; Stevens, Wendy S; Sherman, Gayle G

    2007-12-01

    In low resource settings the inability to diagnose HIV in infants early presents a major obstacle to providing care for HIV-infected children. Dried blood spot samples offer a solution to the scarcity of skills available for venesecting young infants but pose challenges to laboratories because their processing requirements are distinct from that of the liquid blood samples widely used for viral detection assays. Different methods of excising 287 paired HIV-positive and HIV-negative dried blood spot samples (n=574) for testing by the Roche Amplicor HIV-1 DNA assay version 1.5 were assessed. A manual punch in conjunction with three different cleaning protocols (n=372) and an automated punch (BSD 1000 GenePunch) using a single cleaning protocol (n=202) was assessed for the risk of cross contamination between samples. A single false positive result obtained using the automated punch may have been attributable to contamination during the excision step of the assay. Excision of dried blood spot samples is associated with a very low risk of cross contamination regardless of the instrument or cleaning intervention used. The process of excising dried blood spot samples should not compromise the results of HIV viral detection assays performed on dried blood spots in routine laboratories which is encouraging for increasing access to an accurate diagnosis of HIV in infants.

  11. Biomonitoring using dried blood spots: Detection of ochratoxin A and its degradation product 2’R‐ochratoxin A in blood from coffee drinkers*

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Benedikt; Osteresch, Bernd; Muñoz, Katherine A.; Hillmann, Hartmut; Sibrowski, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Scope In this study, human exposure to the mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) and its thermal degradation product 2’R‐ochratoxin A (2’R‐OTA, previously named as 14R‐Ochratoxin A [22]) through coffee consumption was assessed. LC‐MS/MS and the dried blood spot (DBS) technique were used for the analysis of blood samples from coffee and noncoffee drinkers (n = 50), and food frequency questionnaires were used to document coffee consumption. Methods and results For the detection of OTA and 2’R‐OTA in blood, a new sensitive and efficient sample preparation method based on DBS was established and validated. Using this technique 2’R‐OTA was for the first time detected in biological samples. Comparison between coffee drinkers and noncoffee drinkers showed for the first time that 2’R‐OTA was only present in blood from the first group while OTA could be found in both groups in a mean concentration of 0.21 μg/L. 2’R‐OTA mean concentration was 0.11 μg/L with a maximum concentration of 0.414 μg/L. Thus, in average 2’R‐OTA was approx. half the concentration of OTA but in some cases even exceeded OTA levels. No correlation between the amounts of coffee consumption and OTA or 2’R‐OTA levels was observed. Conclusion The results of this study revealed for the first time a high exposure of coffee consumers to 2’R‐OTA, a compound formed from OTA during coffee roasting. Since little information is available regarding toxicity and possible carcinogenicity of this compound, further OTA monitoring in blood including 2’R‐OTA is advisable. PMID:26012425

  12. A New Method to Quantify Ifosfamide Blood Levels Using Dried Blood Spots and UPLC-MS/MS in Paediatric Patients with Embryonic Solid Tumours.

    PubMed

    Torres, Luz-María; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Chávez-Pacheco, Juan L; Navas, Carlos F; Demetrio, Joel A; Alemón-Medina, Radamés; Trujillo, Francisca; Pérez, Martín; Zapata, Martha M; Cárdenas, Rocío; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Aquino, Arnoldo; Velázquez-Cruz, Rafael; Castillejos, Manuel-de-Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Ifosfamide blood concentrations are necessary to monitor its therapeutic response, avoiding any adverse effect. We developed and validated an analytical method by UPLC-MS/MS to quantify ifosfamide in dried blood spots (DBS). Blood samples were collected on Whatman 903® filter paper cards. Five 3 mm disks were punched out from each dried blood spot. Acetonitrile and ethyl acetate were used for drug extraction. Chromatographic separation was carried out in an Acquity UPLC equipment with a BEH-C18 column, 2.1 x 100 mm, 1.7 μm (Waters®). The mobile phase consisted in 5 mM ammonium formate and methanol:acetonitrile (40:48:12 v/v/v) at 0.2 mL/min. LC-MS/MS detection was done by ESI+ and multiple reaction mode monitoring, ionic transitions were m/z1+ 260.99 > 91.63 for ifosfamide and 261.00 > 139.90 for cyclophosphamide (internal standard). This method was linear within a 100-10000 ng/mL range and it was accurate, precise and selective. Ifosfamide samples in DBS were stable for up to 52 days at -80°C. The procedure was tested in 14 patients, ages 1 month to 17 years (9 males and 5 females), with embryonic tumours treated with ifosfamide, alone or combined, at a public tertiary referral hospital. Ifosfamide blood levels ranged from 11.1 to 39.7 μmol/L at 12 hours after the last infusion, while 24-hour levels ranged from 0.7-19.7 μmol/L. The median at 12 hours was 19.5 μmol/L (Q25 14.4-Q75 29.0) and 3.8 μmol/L (Q25 1.5-Q75 9.9) at 24 hours, p<0.001. This method is feasible to determine ifosfamide plasma levels in paediatric patients.

  13. A New Method to Quantify Ifosfamide Blood Levels Using Dried Blood Spots and UPLC-MS/MS in Paediatric Patients with Embryonic Solid Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Pacheco, Juan L.; Navas, Carlos F.; Demetrio, Joel A.; Alemón-Medina, Radamés; Trujillo, Francisca; Pérez, Martín; Zapata, Martha M.; Cárdenas, Rocío; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Aquino, Arnoldo; Velázquez-Cruz, Rafael; Castillejos, Manuel-de-Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Ifosfamide blood concentrations are necessary to monitor its therapeutic response, avoiding any adverse effect. We developed and validated an analytical method by UPLC-MS/MS to quantify ifosfamide in dried blood spots (DBS). Blood samples were collected on Whatman 903® filter paper cards. Five 3 mm disks were punched out from each dried blood spot. Acetonitrile and ethyl acetate were used for drug extraction. Chromatographic separation was carried out in an Acquity UPLC equipment with a BEH-C18 column, 2.1 x 100 mm, 1.7 μm (Waters®). The mobile phase consisted in 5 mM ammonium formate and methanol:acetonitrile (40:48:12 v/v/v) at 0.2 mL/min. LC-MS/MS detection was done by ESI+ and multiple reaction mode monitoring, ionic transitions were m/z1+ 260.99 > 91.63 for ifosfamide and 261.00 > 139.90 for cyclophosphamide (internal standard). This method was linear within a 100–10000 ng/mL range and it was accurate, precise and selective. Ifosfamide samples in DBS were stable for up to 52 days at -80°C. The procedure was tested in 14 patients, ages 1 month to 17 years (9 males and 5 females), with embryonic tumours treated with ifosfamide, alone or combined, at a public tertiary referral hospital. Ifosfamide blood levels ranged from 11.1 to 39.7 μmol/L at 12 hours after the last infusion, while 24-hour levels ranged from 0.7–19.7 μmol/L. The median at 12 hours was 19.5 μmol/L (Q25 14.4–Q75 29.0) and 3.8 μmol/L (Q25 1.5–Q75 9.9) at 24 hours, p<0.001. This method is feasible to determine ifosfamide plasma levels in paediatric patients. PMID:26600181

  14. Use of dried blood on filter paper in the ELISA for Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    McLean, G; Hilbink, F

    1989-09-29

    An ELISA for Brucella abortus antibody detection using blood collected on filter paper is described. The method gave similar results to the complement fixation test. The signal-noise ratio was good. The system offers considerable advantages when transport of serum samples to the laboratory causes problems.

  15. Evaluation of the performance of Abbott m2000 and Roche COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS Taqman assays for HIV-1 viral load determination using dried blood spots and dried plasma spots in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ndiege, Kenneth; Inzaule, Seth; Achieng, Rebecca; Williamson, John; Chih-Wei Chang, Joy; Ellenberger, Dennis; Nkengasong, John

    2017-01-01

    Background Routine HIV viral load testing is not widely accessible in most resource-limited settings, including Kenya. To increase access to viral load testing, alternative sample types like dried blood spots (DBS), which overcome the logistic barriers associated with plasma separation and cold chain shipment need to be considered and evaluated. The current study evaluated matched dried blood spots (DBS) and dried plasma spots (DPS) against plasma using the Abbott M 2000 (Abbott) and Roche Cobas Ampliprep/Cobas TaqMan (CAP/CTM) quantitative viral load assays in western Kenya. Methods Matched plasma DBS and DPS were obtained from 200 HIV-1 infected antiretroviral treatment (ART)-experienced patients attending patient support centers in Western Kenya. Standard quantitative assay performance parameters with accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CI) were assessed at the assays lower detection limit (400cps/ml for CAP/CTM and 550cps/ml for Abbott) using SAS version 9.2. Receiver operating curves (ROC) were further used to assess viral-load thresholds with best assay performance (reference assay CAP/CTM plasma). Results Using the Abbott test, the sensitivity and specificity, respectively, for DPS were (97.3%, [95%CI: 93.2–99.2] and 98.1% [95%CI: 89.7–100]) and those for DBS (93.9% [95%CI: 88.8–97.2] and 88.0% [95%CI: 82.2–92.4]). The correlation and agreement using paired plasma and DPS/DBS were strong, with r2 = 90.5 and rc = 68.1. The Bland-Altman relative percent change was 95.3 for DPS, (95%CI: 90.4–97.7) and 73.6 (95%CI: 51.6–86.5) for DBS. Using the CAP/CTM assay, the sensitivity for DBS was significantly higher compared to DPS (100.0% [95% CI: 97.6–100.0] vs. 94.7% [95%CI: 89.8–97.7]), while the specificity for DBS was lower: 4%, [95% CI: 0.4–13.7] compared to DPS: 94.0%, [95% CI: 83.5–98.7]. When compared under different clinical relevant thresholds, the accuracy for the Abbott assay was 95% at the 1000cps/ml cut-off with a sensitivity and

  16. Practical and reliable enzyme test for the detection of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (Morquio Syndrome type A) in dried blood samples.

    PubMed

    Camelier, Marli V; Burin, Maira G; De Mari, Jurema; Vieira, Taiane A; Marasca, Giórgia; Giugliani, Roberto

    2011-09-18

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), or Morquio Syndrome type A, is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS), resulting in excessive lysosomal storage of keratan sulfate in many tissues and organs. This accumulation causes a severe skeletal dysplasia with short stature, and affects the eye, heart and other organs, with many signs and symptoms. Morquio A syndrome is estimated to occur in 1 in 200,000 to 300,000 live births. Clinical trials with enzyme replacement therapy for this disease are in progress, and it is probable that the treatment, when available, would be more effective if started early. We describe an innovative fluorometric method for the assay of GALNS in dried blood spots (DBS). We used dried blood spots (DBS) as the enzyme source and compared it with leukocytes samples, having studied 25 MPS IVA patients and 54 healthy controls. We optimized the assay conditions, including incubation time and stability of DBS samples. To eppendorf type tubes containing a 3-mm diameter blood spot we added elution liquid and substrate solution. After 2 different incubations at 37°C, the amount of hydrolyzed product was compared with a calibrator to allow the quantification of the enzyme activity. Results in DBS were compared to the ones obtained in leukocytes using the standard technique. The fluorescent methodology was validated in our laboratory and the assay was found sensitive and specific, allowing reliable detection of MPS IVA patients. The use of DBS simplifies the collection and transport steps, and is especially useful for testing patients from more remote areas of large countries, and when samples need to cross country borders. This assay could be easily incorporated into the protocol of reference laboratories and play a role in the screening for MPS IVA, contributing to earlier detection of affected patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. "Center punch" and "whole spot" bioanalysis of apixaban in human dried blood spot samples by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Naiyu; Yuan, Long; Ji, Qin C; Mangus, Heidi; Song, Yan; Frost, Charles; Zeng, Jianing; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Arnold, Mark E

    2015-04-15

    Apixaban (Eliquis™) was developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) and Pfizer to use as an antithrombotic/anticoagulant agent and has been recently approved for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. A clinical study of apixaban, sponsored by BMS and Pfizer, included a pilot exploratory portion to evaluate the potential for future drug concentration monitoring using dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection. For DBS sample collection, a fixed blood volume was dispensed onto a DBS card by either regular volumetric pipette (venous blood collection) or capillary dispenser (finger prick blood collection). A 96-well semi-automated liquid-liquid extraction sample preparation procedure was developed to provide clean extracts for UHPLC-MS/MS quantitation. Assays using both partial-spot center punch and whole spot punch were developed and validated. The linear dynamic ranges for all the analyses were from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL. The coefficient of determination (r(2)) values was >0.9944 for all the validation runs. For the center punch approach, the intra-assay precision (%CV) was within 4.4% and inter-assay precision was within 2.6%. The assay accuracy, expressed as %Dev., was within ± 5.4% of the nominal concentrations. One accuracy and precision run was performed using the whole spot approach, the intra-assay precision (%CV) was within 7.1% and the accuracy was within ± 8.0% of the nominal concentrations. In contrast to the center punch approach, the whole spot approach eliminated the effect of hematocrit and high lipids on the analysis of apixaban in human DBS when an accurate sample blood volume was collected on DBS cards. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation of Serum and Dried Blood Spot Results for Quantitation of Schistosoma Circulating Anodic Antigen: a Proof of Principle

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Jennifer A.; Corstjens, Paul L.A.M.; Mngara, Julius; Lutonja, Peter; Isingo, Raphael; Urassa, Mark; Kornelis, Dieuwke; van Dam, Govert J.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating Anodic Antigen (CAA) testing is a powerful, increasingly-used tool for diagnosis of active schistosome infection. We sought to determine the feasibility and reliability of measuring CAA in blood spots collected on Whatman 903 Protein Saver cards, which are the predominant filter papers used worldwide for dried blood spot (DBS) research and clinical care. CAA was eluted from blood spots collected from 19 individuals onto Whatman 903 cards in Mwanza, Tanzania, and the assay was optimized to achieve CAA ratios comparable to those obtained from the spots’ corresponding serum samples. The optimized assay was then used to determine the correlation of serum samples (n=16) with DBS from cards that had been stored for 8 years at ambient temperature.Using a DBS volume equivalent to approximately four times the quantity of serum, CAA testing in DBS had a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 79% compared to CAA testing in serum. CAA testing was reliable in samples eluted from Whatman 903 cards that had been stored for 8 years at ambient temperature. The overall kappa coefficient was 0.53 (standard error 0.17, p<0.001). We conclude that CAA can be reliably and accurately measured in DBS collected onto the filter paper that is most commonly used for clinical care and research, and that can be stored for prolonged periods of time. This finding opens new avenues for future work among more than 700 million individuals living in areas worldwide in which schistosomes are endemic. PMID:26149541

  19. [Direct proteomic profiling of human urine and blood serum in an experiment with 5-day dry immersion].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Changes in proteome of urine and blood serum obtained from 14 healthy humans (age 21-29 yrs) medically certified for an experiment with dry immersion were analyzed. Urine and serum samples were pre-fractionated and enriched with magnetic particles MB-WCX and MB-HIC, respectively, on robot ClinProt (Bruker Daltonics) for direct mass-spectrometry profiling by MALDI-TOF. As a result, 143 protein peaks on the average were identified in urine samples. It was shown that a high variation coefficient in 23.7% of protein peaks, i.e. double technical, points to the most plastic fraction of the urine proteome. In blood serum, 175 peaks were identified in a sample on the average. Comparison of baseline and immersion mass-spectra of the blood proteome revealed significant differences. Increased peak areas of several protein fragments--C3 and C4 fragments of complement system, high-molecular kininogen and fibrinogen--can be ascribed to human body adaptation to the experimental conditions.

  20. The basel cocktail for simultaneous phenotyping of human cytochrome P450 isoforms in plasma, saliva and dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Donzelli, Massimiliano; Derungs, Adrian; Serratore, Maria-Giovanna; Noppen, Christoph; Nezic, Lana; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Haschke, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Phenotyping cocktails use a combination of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-specific probe drugs to simultaneously assess the activity of different CYP isoforms. To improve the clinical applicability of CYP phenotyping, the main objectives of this study were to develop a new cocktail based on probe drugs that are widely used in clinical practice and to test whether alternative sampling methods such as collection of dried blood spots (DBS) or saliva could be used to simplify the sampling process. In a randomized crossover study, a new combination of commercially available probe drugs (the Basel cocktail) was tested for simultaneous phenotyping of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4. Sixteen subjects received low doses of caffeine, efavirenz, losartan, omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam in different combinations. All subjects were genotyped, and full pharmacokinetic profiles of the probe drugs and their main metabolites were determined in plasma, dried blood spots and saliva samples. The Basel cocktail was well tolerated, and bioequivalence tests showed no evidence of mutual interactions between the probe drugs. In plasma, single timepoint metabolic ratios at 2 h (for CYP2C19 and CYP3A4) or at 8 h (for the other isoforms) after dosing showed high correlations with corresponding area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) ratios (AUC0-24h parent/AUC0-24h metabolite) and are proposed as simple phenotyping metrics. Metabolic ratios in dried blood spots (for CYP1A2 and CYP2C19) or in saliva samples (for CYP1A2) were comparable to plasma ratios and offer the option of minimally invasive or non-invasive phenotyping of these isoforms. This new combination of phenotyping probe drugs can be used without mutual interactions. The proposed sampling timepoints have the potential to facilitate clinical application of phenotyping but require further validation in conditions of altered CYP activity. The use of DBS or saliva samples seems feasible for phenotyping of the

  1. External Quality Control for Dried Blood Spot Based C-reactive Protein Assay: Experience from the Indonesia Family Life Survey and the Longitudinal Aging Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peifeng; Herningtyas, Elizabeth H.; Kale, Varsha; Crimmins, Eileen M.; Risbud, Arun R.; McCreath, Heather; Lee, Jinkook; Strauss, John; O’Brien, Jennifer C.; Bloom, David E.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation, in dried blood spots has been increasingly incorporated in community-based social surveys internationally. Although the dried blood spot based CRP assay protocol has been validated in the United States, it remains unclear whether laboratories in other less developed countries can generate C-reactive protein results of similar quality. We therefore conducted external quality monitoring for dried blood spot based C-reactive protein measurement for the Indonesia Family Life Survey and the Longitudinal Aging Study in India. Our results show that dried blood spot based C-reactive protein results in these two countries have excellent and consistent correlations with serum-based values and dried blood spot based results from the reference laboratory in the United States. Even though the results from duplicate samples may have fluctuations in absolute values over time, the relative order of C-reactive protein levels remains similar and the estimates are reasonably precise for population-based studies that investigate the association between socioeconomic factors and health. PMID:25879265

  2. Simultaneous quantitation of metformin and sitagliptin from mouse and human dried blood spots using laser diode thermal desorption tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Gallagher, Richard T; Denn, Mark; Peter, Raimund M

    2011-06-01

    A simple, rapid and robust high-throughput assay for the simultaneous analysis of metformin and sitagliptin from mouse and human dried blood spot samples using laser diode thermal desorption interfaced with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS) was developed for use in a pharmaceutical discovery environment as an alternative to traditional plasma analysis. Analytes were extracted from dried blood spots using a simple punch disc and solvent extract procedure. Details of the method development and optimization of the instrumental parameters are presented. The method was successfully applied to spiked mouse and human dried blood spot samples. Analyte stability was determined in dried blood spots on FTA cards and as extracts of dried blood spots. The method was subsequently used to determine the oral pharmacokinetics of metformin and sitagliptin after dosing to male mice. Metformin and Sitagliptin results are compared to data generated by more traditional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. Intra-assay and inter-assay accuracy and precision across the analytes and species deviated by less than 30% at all calibration levels and less than 20% at all quality control levels.

  3. Direct multiplex assay of enzymes in dried blood spots by tandem mass spectrometry for the newborn screening of lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Turecek, Frantisek; Scott, C. Ron; Chamoles, Nestor A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Tandem mass spectrometry is currently used in newborn screening programmes to quantify the level of amino acids and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots for detection of metabolites associated with treatable diseases. We have developed assays for lysosomal enzymes in re-hydrated dried blood spots in which a set of substrates is added and the set of corresponding enzymatic products are quantified using tandem mass spectrometry with the aid of mass-differentiated internal standards. We have developed a multiplex assay of the set of enzymes that, when deficient, cause the lysosomal storage disorders Fabry, Gaucher, Hurler, Krabbe, Niemann–Pick A/B and Pompe diseases. These diseases were selected because treatments are now available or expected to emerge shortly. The discovery that acarbose is a selective inhibitor of maltase glucoamylase allows the Pompe disease enzyme, acid α-glucosidase, to be selectively assayed in white blood cells and dried blood spots. When tested with dried blood spots from 40 unaffected individuals and 10–12 individuals with the lysosomal storage disorder, the tandem mass spectrometry assay led to the correct identification of the affected individuals with 100% sensitivity. Many of the reagents needed for the new assays are commercially available, and those that are not are being prepared under Good Manufacturing Procedures for approval by the FDA. Our newborn screening assay for Krabbe disease is currently being put in place at the Wadsworth Center in New York State for the analysis of ~1000 dried blood spots per day. Summary We have developed tandem mass spectrometry for the direct assay of lysosomal enzymes in rehydrated dried blood spots that can be implemented for newborn screening of lysosomal storage disorders. Several enzymes can be analysed by a single method (multiplex analysis) and in a high-throughput manner appropriate for newborn screening laboratories. PMID:16763908

  4. Methylmalonic acid quantified in dried blood spots provides a precise, valid, and stable measure of functional vitamin B-12 status in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Schroder, Theresa H; Quay, Teo A W; Lamers, Yvonne

    2014-10-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is a sensitive and specific functional biomarker of vitamin B-12 status, commonly assessed in plasma or serum. Dried blood spots (DBSs) allow simpler and more cost-efficient blood sampling than plasma. To facilitate convenient testing for vitamin B-12 deficiency in large-scale surveys and in population groups from remote areas, we developed a method for MMA quantification in DBSs and tested its applicability as well as the long-term stability of MMA in DBSs at various temperatures. MMA was extracted from an 8-mm DBS punch with water:methanol (95:5, v:v) and methyl-d3-malonic acid as the internal standard. After sample cleanup by ultrafiltration and hexane extraction, MMA was quantified by using reversed-phase LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Extraction conditions were optimized to maximize the detection signal and achieve DBS extract concentrations above the lowest limit of quantification (signal-to-noise ratio ≥ 10) of 10 nmol/L. Recovery was between 93% and 96%. Intra- and interassay variation (CV%) for DBS MMA was 0.49% and 2.3%, respectively. Calibrators showed linearity (R(2) = 0.998) between 10 and 10,000 nmol/L. In 94 healthy women, MMA concentrations in DBS extract (min-max: 10.2-80.5 nmol/L) and plasma (min-max: 68-950 nmol/L) were correlated (ρ = 0.90) (P < 0.001). MMA concentrations in DBSs were stable at room temperature for 1 wk, in the refrigerator for 8 wk, and at -80°C for at least 1 y. This simple and robust method allows quantification of MMA in DBSs of healthy individuals. The linear relation between plasma and DBS MMA suggests that DBS MMA could predict plasma MMA, the current reference indicator for functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. With the advantages of minimally invasive specimen collection and no need for laborious blood processing steps, this method has the potential to be a reliable, convenient, and field-applicable alternative for assessment of vitamin B-12 status. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Field Evaluation of Dried Blood Spots for Routine HIV-1 Viral Load and Drug Resistance Monitoring in Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Monleau, Marjorie; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Dagnra, Anoumou; Kania, Dramane; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Touré-Kane, Coumba; Truong, Lien X. T.; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Delaporte, Eric; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) can be used in developing countries to alleviate the logistic constraints of using blood plasma specimens for viral load (VL) and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing, but they should be assessed under field conditions. Between 2009 and 2011, we collected paired plasma-DBS samples from treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected adults in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Togo, Thailand, and Vietnam. The DBS were stored at an ambient temperature for 2 to 4 weeks and subsequently at −20°C before testing. VL testing was performed on the plasma samples and DBS using locally available methods: the Abbott m2000rt HIV-1 test, generic G2 real-time PCR, or the NucliSENS EasyQ version 1.2 test. In the case of virological failure (VF), i.e., a plasma VL of ≥1,000 copies/ml, HIVDR genotyping was performed on paired plasma-DBS samples. Overall, we compared 382 plasma-DBS sample pairs for DBS VL testing accuracy. The sensitivities of the different assays in different laboratories for detecting VF using DBS varied from 75% to 100% for the m2000rt test in labs B, C, and D, 91% to 93% for generic G2 real-time PCR in labs A and F, and 85% for the NucliSENS test in lab E. The specificities varied from 82% to 97% for the m2000rt and NucliSENS tests and reached only 60% for the generic G2 test. The NucliSENS test showed good agreement between plasma and DBS VL but underestimated the DBS VL. The lowest agreement was observed for the generic G2 test. Genotyping was successful for 96/124 (77%) DBS tested, and 75/96 (78%) plasma-DBS pairs had identical HIVDR mutations. Significant discrepancies in resistance interpretations were observed in 9 cases, 6 of which were from the same laboratory. DBS can be successfully used as an alternative to blood plasma samples for routine VL and HIVDR monitoring in African and Asian settings. However, the selection of an adequate VL measurement method and the definition of the VF threshold should be considered, and laboratory

  6. A simple screening method for individuals at risk of developing type 1 diabetes: measurement of islet cell autoantibodies (GADA, IA-2A, and IAA) on dried capillary blood spots collected on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Siraj, E S; Rogers, D G; Gupta, M K; Reddy, S S K

    2012-10-01

    There is limited information regarding the use of dried capillary blood spots collected on a filter paper (FP) to test for islet cell antibodies. The aim of this study was to validate the use of dried capillary blood spots collected on a FP for the analysis of islet cell antibodies. FP eluates were tested using both single and combined assay for antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) and/or to the protein tyrosine phosphatase like IA-2 (IA-2A), and a single assay for antibodies to insulin (IAA). The results were compared with those of serum assays. Ninety-one subjects were studied. Forty had Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and 51 were first-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with T1DM. The GADA and IA-2A were measured by radio-binding assays, which utilize 35S-labeled GAD65 and IA-2. IAA was measured by a microtiter plate assay using 125I-labeled insulin. Twenty-six of those with T1DM (65%) and 5 of the FDRs (10%) had at least 1 positive test on the single serum assays. The FP combi-assay for GADA and IA-2A had 97.8% concordance rate when compared with serum single assays for GADA and IA-2A. The concordance rate for individual assays were 96.7% for GADA, and 100% for both IA-2A and IAA There was significant correlation of the antibody levels between FP and serum specimen for all 3 antibodies. We conclude that antibody screening performed using dried capillary blood spots collected on a FP correlates well with serum assays, and provides an easy alternative for population screening.

  7. Influence of Hematocrit and Total-Spot Volume on Performance Characteristics of Dried Blood Spots for Newborn Screening.

    PubMed

    Hall, Elizabeth M; Flores, Sharon R; De Jesús, Víctor R

    2015-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) have been used in newborn screening (NBS) tests for over 50 years. The Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program (NSQAP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted studies to assess the individual impacts of hematocrit and total-spot volume on characteristics of DBS samples. Per-punch serum volumes decreased 27%, RBC volumes more than doubled, absorption times increased over 300%, and spot diameters decreased marginally between the hematocrits of 40% to 65%. Per-punch serum and RBC volumes decreased logarithmically with lowering total-spot volumes. Patient hematocrit is an uncontrollable variable and inevitably affects the resulting punch from a DBS sample. It may be possible, though, to identify samples that fall outside of an acceptable range by noting certain physical characteristics of the DBS.

  8. Influence of Hematocrit and Total-Spot Volume on Performance Characteristics of Dried Blood Spots for Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Elizabeth M.; Flores, Sharon R.; De Jesús, Víctor R.

    2017-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) have been used in newborn screening (NBS) tests for over 50 years. The Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program (NSQAP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted studies to assess the individual impacts of hematocrit and total-spot volume on characteristics of DBS samples. Per-punch serum volumes decreased 27%, RBC volumes more than doubled, absorption times increased over 300%, and spot diameters decreased marginally between the hematocrits of 40% to 65%. Per-punch serum and RBC volumes decreased logarithmically with lowering total-spot volumes. Patient hematocrit is an uncontrollable variable and inevitably affects the resulting punch from a DBS sample. It may be possible, though, to identify samples that fall outside of an acceptable range by noting certain physical characteristics of the DBS. PMID:28868497

  9. Dried venous blood samples for the detection and quantification of measles IgG using a commercial enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Michaela A.; Byrnes, Graham B.; Leydon, Jennie A.; Kelly, Heath A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether samples of dried venous blood (DVB) were an acceptable alternative to serum for detecting measles-specific IgG in a commercial enzyme immunoassay. METHODS: Paired samples of serum and DVB were collected from 98 suspected cases of measles and 1153 schoolchildren in Victoria, Australia. All samples were tested using the Dade Behring Enzygnost Anti-Measles-Virus/IgG immunoassay. DVB samples were eluted using either the sample buffer provided with the kit or 5% dry milk powder in phosphate-buffered saline-Tween 20. FINDINGS: DVB samples eluted by sample buffer showed significantly better linear correlation to the serum samples than did DVB samples eluted in 5% dry milk in phosphate-buffered saline-Tween 20. To improve the comparability of serum and DVB samples an adjustment factor of 1.28 was applied to the optical density (OD) values of DVB. This adjustment also enabled quantification of the titre of measles IgG in mIU/ml directly from the OD value using the alpha calculation as specified by the kit protocol. For DVB samples stored for less than six months at 4 degrees C, the assay showed an overall sensitivity of 98.4% and a specificity of 97.2% compared with the results of serum testing. CONCLUSION: These results illustrate the potential for DVB samples to be widely used with the Dade Behring enzyme immunoassay system for determining the immunity of the individual and the population to the measles virus. PMID:14758429

  10. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis as a feasible method for detecting spinal muscular atrophy via dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Er, Tze-Kiong; Kan, Tzu-Min; Su, Yu-Fa; Liu, Ta-Chih; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Hung, Shih-Ya; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2012-11-12

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease with the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. More than 95% of patients with SMA have a homozygous disruption in the survival motor neuron1 (SMN1) gene, caused by mutation, deletion, or rearrangement. Recently, treatment in humans in the immediate postnatal period, prior to the development of weakness or very early in the course of the disease, may be effective. Therefore, our objective was to establish a feasible method for SMA screening. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is rapidly becoming the most important mutation-scanning methodology that allows mutation scanning and genotyping without the need for costly labeled oligonucleotides. In the current study, we aim to develop a method for identifying the substitution of single nucleotide in SMN1 exon 7 (c.840C>T) by HRM analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples and dried blood spots obtained from 30 patients with SMA and 30 normal individuals. All results were previously confirmed by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). In order to identify the substitution of single nucleotide in SMN1 exon 7 (c.840C>T) by HRM analysis, a primer set was used in HRM analysis. At first, we failed to identify the substitution of single nucleotide in SMN1 exon 7 (c.840C>T) by HRM analysis because the homozygous CC and homozygous TT cannot be distinguished by HRM analysis. Therefore, all samples were mixed with a known SMN1/SMN2 copy number (SMN1/SMN2=0:3), which we may call driver. This strategy is used to differentiate between homozygous CC and homozygous TT. After mixing with driver, the melting profile of homozygous CC becomes heteroduplex; however, the homozygous TT remains the same in the normalized and temperature-shifted difference plots. HRM analysis can be successfully applied to screen SMA via DNA obtained from whole blood and dried blood spots. We strongly believe that HRM analysis, a high-throughput method

  11. Fast transmethylation of total lipids in dried blood by microwave irradiation and its application to a population study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu Hong; Hanson, Jennifer A; Strandjord, Sarah E; Salem, Nicholas M; Dretsch, Michael N; Haub, Mark D; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2014-08-01

    A methodology combining finger-pricked blood sampling, microwave accelerated fatty acid assay, fast gas chromatography data acquisition, and automated data processing was developed, evaluated and applied to a population study. Finger-pricked blood was collected on filter paper previously impregnated with 0.05 mg of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene and air-dried at room temperature. Transmethylation was accelerated by microwave irradiation in an explosion-proof multimode microwave reaction system. The chemical procedure was based on a one-step direct transmethylation procedure catalyzed by acetyl chloride. The short-term stability of PUFA in blood dried on filter paper and storage at room temperature was examined using venous blood. The recoveries ranged from 97 to 101 % for the categorized fatty acids as well as the ratios of n-6 to n-3 PUFA and the n-3 % highly unsaturated fatty acid. Specifically, recoveries were 99, 98, 97, and 97 % for linoleic acid (18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (ARA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), respectively. The mol% (mean ± SD, 95 % confidence interval) of fatty acid composition in subjects from the population study was determined as 36.2 ± 3.8 (35.8, 36.7), 23.2 ± 3.0 (22.8, 23.5), 36.8 ± 3.5 (36.4, 37.2) and 3.79 ± 1.0 (3.68, 3.91) for the saturated, monounsaturated, n-6 and n-3 PUFA, respectively. Individually, the mean mol% (95 % CI) was 22.6 (22.3, 22.9) for 18:2n-6, 9.5 (9.3, 9.7) for ARA, 0.51 (0.49, 0.53) for ALA, 0.42 (0.38, 0.47) for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and 1.67 (1.61, 1.73) for DHA. This methodology provides an accelerated yet high-efficiency, chemically safe, and temperature-controlled transmethylation, with diverse laboratory applications including population studies.

  12. Red blood cell fatty acid analysis for determining compliance with omega3 supplements in dry eye disease trials.

    PubMed

    Gadaria-Rathod, Neha; Dentone, Peter G; Peskin, Ellen; Maguire, Maureen G; Moser, Ann; Asbell, Penny A

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate pill counts and red blood cell (RBC) membrane fatty acid profiles as measures of compliance with oral omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3 PUFAs) and to compare the two techniques. Sixteen dry eye disease subjects were given oral ω3 PUFA or placebo for 3 months. Compliance was measured by pill counts and blood tests at baseline and 3 months. The Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and rank-sum tests were used to compare changes from baseline and the difference between the two groups; Spearman correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationship of pill counts to changes in blood FAs. Pill counts for the ω3 (n=7) and placebo (n=9) groups showed a mean consumption of 4.39 and 4.76 pills per day, respectively. In the ω3 group, the median change from baseline was +1.46% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (P=0.03), +1.49% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (P=0.08), and -1.91% for arachidonic acids (AA) (P=0.02). In the placebo group, median changes in all measured FAs were small and not statistically significant. The difference in change in FA levels between the two groups was significantly greater for EPA (P=0.01) and AA (P=0.04). The correlations between pill counts and changes in EPA (r=0.36, P=0.43) and DHA (r=0.17, P=0.70) were not strong. RBC FA analysis can be used to measure compliance in the active group and also monitor the placebo group for nonstudy ω3 intake. Low correlation of pill counts with blood levels suggests that pill counts alone may be inaccurate and should be replaced or supplemented with objective measures.

  13. Technical Stability and Biological Variability in MicroRNAs from Dried Blood Spots: A Lung Cancer Therapy-Monitoring Showcase.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Mustafa; Laufer, Thomas; Backes, Christina; Schrörs, Hannah; Fehlmann, Tobias; Ludwig, Nicole; Kohlhaas, Jochen; Meese, Eckart; Wehler, Thomas; Bals, Robert; Keller, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Different work flows have been proposed to use miRNAs as blood-borne biomarkers. In particular, the method used for collecting blood from patients can considerably influence the diagnostic results. We explored whether dried blood spots (DBSs) facilitate stable miRNA measurements and compared its technical stability with biological variability. First, we tested the stability of DBS samples by generating from 1 person 18 whole-genome-wide miRNA profiles of DBS samples that were exposed to different temperature and humidity conditions. Second, we investigated technical reproducibility by performing 7 replicates of DBS again from 1 person. Third, we investigated DBS samples from 53 patients with lung cancer undergoing different therapies. Across these 3 stages, 108 genome-wide miRNA profiles from DBS were generated and evaluated biostatistically. In the stability analysis, we observed that temperature and humidity had an overall limited influence on the miRNomes (average correlation between the different conditions of 0.993). Usage of a silica gel slightly diminished DBS' technical reproducibility. The 7 technical replicates had an average correlation of 0.996. The correlation with whole-blood PAXGene miRNomes of the same individual was remarkable (correlation of 0.88). Finally, evaluation of the samples from the 53 patients with lung cancer exposed to different therapies showed that the biological variations exceeded the technical variability significantly (P < 0.0001), yielding 51 dysregulated miRNAs. We present a stable work flow for profiling of whole miRNomes on the basis of samples collected from DBS. Biological variations exceeded technical variations significantly. DBS-based miRNA profiles will potentially further the translational character of miRNA biomarker studies. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  14. Comparison of manual and automated DNA purification for measuring TREC in dried blood spot (DBS) samples with qPCR.

    PubMed

    Lang, Pierre-Olivier; Govind, Sheila; Dramé, Moustapha; Aspinall, Richard

    2012-10-31

    Automated nucleic acid extractions from dried blood spot (DBS) samples promises standardized sample treatment, low error rates, avoidance of contamination and requirement of less hands-on time. In the present study, non-automated and automated column based extraction processes using the QIAamp Investigator procedure were compared for the extraction of DNA from DBS samples. The concentration and the purity of DNA generated were determined by optical density readings. Furthermore qPCR downstream applications using the nucleic acids extracted with the two processes and albumin and T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) copy numbers were measured and compared. The influence of the time of storage was also investigated by analyzing samples freshly dried and stored up to 11weeks at -20°C from the same individual. Finally, we provide arguments of preferentially choosing the automated procedure for extracting DNAs from DBS samples when downstream qPCR applications are required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dry Electrodes for ECG and Pulse Transit Time for Blood Pressure: A Wearable Sensor and Smartphone Communication Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyamkumar, Prashanth

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) have been a major cause for deaths in both men and women in United States. Cerebrovascular Diseases like Strokes are known to have origins in CVDs as well. Moreover, nearly 18 Million Americans have a history of myocardial infarction and are currently undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. Consequently, CVDs are the highest costing disease groups and cost more than all types of cancer combined. However, significant cost reduction is possible through the effective use of the vast advances in embedded and pervasive electronic devices for healthcare. These devices can automate and move a significant portion of disease management to the patient's home through cyber connectivity, a concept known as point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and healthcare services. POC can minimize hospital visits and potentially avoid admission altogether with prognostic tools that give advanced notice of any abnormalities or chronic illnesses so that the treatment can be planned in advance. The POC concept requires continuous remote health monitoring. Therefore, the various sensors needed for comprehensive monitoring need to be worn daily and throughout the day. Moreover, true "roaming" capability is necessary so that it does not restrict the user's travel or his/her quotidian activities. Two biomedical signals namely, Electrocardiogram (ECG) and Blood Pressure are important diagnostic tests in assessing the cardiac health of a person. To that end, the research presented in this thesis: First , describes the development of a remote monitoring solution based on Bluetooth(TM), smartphones and cyber infrastructure for cardiac care called e-nanoflex. Second, Sensors for ECG that are compatible with everyday life style namely, (a) dry, gel-less vertically aligned gold nanowire electrodes, (b) dry textile-based conductive sensor electrodes to address the need for this technology to monitor cardiovascular diseases in women are tested with e-nanoflex and discussed. Third, non

  16. Clinical Evaluation of an Affordable Qualitative Viral Failure Assay for HIV Using Dried Blood Spots in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Balinda, Sheila N.; Ondoa, Pascale; Obuku, Ekwaro A.; Kliphuis, Aletta; Egau, Isaac; Bronze, Michelle; Kasambula, Lordwin; Schuurman, Rob; Spieker, Nicole; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Kityo, Cissy

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO recommends regular viral load (VL) monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for timely detection of virological failure, prevention of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and avoiding unnecessary switching to second-line ART. However, the cost and complexity of routine VL testing remains prohibitive in most resource limited settings (RLS). We evaluated a simple, low–cost, qualitative viral–failure assay (VFA) on dried blood spots (DBS) in three clinical settings in Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross–sectional diagnostic accuracy study in three HIV/AIDS treatment centres at the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda. The VFA employs semi-quantitative detection of HIV–1 RNA amplified from the LTR gene. We used paired dry blood spot (DBS) and plasma with the COBASAmpliPrep/COBASTaqMan, Roche version 2 (VLref) as the reference assay. We used the VFA at two thresholds of viral load, (>5,000 or >1,000 copies/ml). Results 496 paired VFA and VLref results were available for comparative analysis. Overall, VFA demonstrated 78.4% sensitivity, (95% CI: 69.7%–87.1%), 93% specificity (95% CI: 89.7%–96.4%), 89.3% accuracy (95% CI: 85%–92%) and an agreement kappa = 0.72 as compared to the VLref. The predictive values of positivity and negativity among patients on ART for >12 months were 72.7% and 99.3%, respectively. Conclusions VFA allowed 89% of correct classification of VF. Only 11% of the patients were misclassified with the potential of unnecessary or late switch to second–line ART. Our findings present an opportunity to roll out simple and affordable VL monitoring for HIV–1 treatment in RLS. PMID:26824465

  17. A technique for ultrasound-guided blood sampling from a dry and gel-free puncture area.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Sofie; Gopalasingam, Nigopan; Bendtsen, Thomas Fichtner; Knudsen, Lars; Sloth, Erik

    2016-05-07

    Vein punctures are performed daily to sample blood. Ultrasound (US) offers an alternative to the blind landmark technique for difficult vascular access. A challenge for this procedure is the presence of US gel in the puncture area. We present a technique for US-guided puncture from extremity veins not palpable or visible to the human eye, while keeping the puncture area dry and gel-free. Ten healthy volunteers underwent two US-guided vein punctures from veins that were neither palpable nor visible. One was drawn from an antebrachial vein and another from a brachial vein. A sterile barrier drape was made from a commercially available dressing and a piece of transparent sterile plastic. The barrier drape consists of an adhesive part placed on the skin designed for sonography and a free transparent flap constituting the barrier between the unsterile sonographic site and the sterile gel-free puncture site. The success rate for vein puncture was 100% in both locations. A total of 22 skin punctures were performed (11 antebrachial and 11 brachial). Gain output was increased 7% (4-12%), and 8% (4-15%), respectively, to compensate for attenuation of the US signal due to the drape. Alignment of the centre of the transducer with the long-axis of the target vein during the procedure was reported as a challenge. US-guided blood sampling from a brachial and antebrachial vein was possible with a 100% success rate, while ensuring a dry and gel-free venipuncture area on one side and the transducer on the other side of a sterile barrier.

  18. Mass spectrometric studies on the in vivo metabolism and excretion of SIRT1 activating drugs in rat urine, dried blood spots, and plasma samples for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Höppner, Sebastian; Delahaut, Philippe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The NAD(+) depending enzyme SIRT1 regulates the mitochondrial biogenesis, fat and glucose metabolism through catalyzing the deacetylation of several metabolism-related protein-substrates. Recently, synthetic activators of SIRT1 referred to as STACs (Sirtuin activating compounds, e.g. SRT2104) were identified and tested in clinical studies for the treatment of aging-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's and obesity. Although the mechanism of SIRT1 activation by small molecules has caused considerable controversy, STACs demonstrated a significant performance enhancement in mice experiments including an improvement of endurance, muscle strength, and locomotor behavior. Due to their potential to increase exercise tolerance in healthy individuals, SIRT1 activators are currently being monitored by anti-doping authorities. In the present study, the in vivo metabolic clearance of three SIRT1 activators was investigated in rats by the collection of urine, DBS (dried blood spots) and plasma samples following a single oral administration. The resulting metabolic products were studied by positive electrospray ionization - (tandem) mass spectrometry and confirmed by the comparison with in vitro generated metabolites using human and rat liver microsomal preparations. Subsequently, a screening procedure for five SIRT1 activators and the metabolite M1-SRT1720 in DBS specimens was developed. Liquid-liquid-extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was employed based on diagnostic ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode and two deuterated internal standards namely d8-SRT1720 and d8-M1-SRT1720 were utilized. The doping control assay was characterized with regard to specificity, limit of detection (10-50ng/ml), recovery (65-83%) and imprecision (7-20%) and ion suppression/enhancement effects (<10%), demonstrating its fitness-for-purpose for sports drug testing applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of the usage of dried brewing yeast in the diets on the performance, egg traits and blood parameters in quails.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, S; Erol, H; Ozsoy, B; Onbaşılar, I; Yalçın, S

    2008-12-01

    This experiment was carried out to determine the effects of the usage of dried brewing yeast in quail diets on laying performance, egg traits and blood parameters. A total of 240 Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) aged 10 weeks were randomly allocated into one control group and three treatment groups. Each group was divided into five replicates as subgroups, comprising 12 quails each. Dried brewing yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was used at the levels of 1.5%, 3.0% and 4.5% in the diets of the first, second and third treatment groups, respectively. Soyabean meal was replaced with dried brewing yeast. The diets were formulated to be isocaloric and isonitrogenous. The experimental period lasted 18 weeks. Dietary treatments did not significantly affect body weight, daily feed intake, daily protein intake, egg production, egg weight, feed efficiency, mortality, egg shell thickness, egg albumen index, egg yolk index, egg Haugh unit, the percentages of egg shell, albumen and yolk, excreta moisture and small intestinal pH. Inclusion of 3% and 4.5% dried brewing yeast in diets reduced egg yolk cholesterol concentration as mg per yolk and mg per g yolk (P < 0.01). Blood serum cholesterol of groups fed diets with dried brewing yeast was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the control group. Feeding diets containing 3.0% and 4.5% dried brewing yeast resulted in significant increases (P < 0.01) in blood serum levels of total protein, alanine aminotransferase at the end of the experiment. Blood serum levels of uric acid, triglyceride, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were not affected by dietary dried brewing yeast. It is concluded that dried brewing yeast can be used up to 4.5% in the diets of laying quails without adverse effects on the measured parameters.

  20. Development and Application of a Broadly Sensitive Dried-Blood-Spot-Based Genotyping Assay for Global Surveillance of HIV-1 Drug Resistance ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunfu; McNulty, Amanda; Diallo, Karidia; Zhang, Jing; Titanji, Boghuma; Kassim, Sidibe; Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Aberle-Grasse, John; Kibuka, Tabitha; Ndumbe, Peter M.; Vedapuri, Shanmugam; Zhou, Zhiyong; Chilima, Benson; Nkengasong, John N.

    2010-01-01

    As antiretroviral therapy (ART) is scaled up in resource-limited countries, surveillance for HIV drug resistance (DR) is vital to ensure sustained effectiveness of first-line ART. We have developed and applied a broadly sensitive dried-blood-spot (DBS)-based genotyping assay for surveillance of HIV-1 DR in international settings. In 2005 and 2006, 171 DBS samples were collected under field conditions from newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected individuals from Malawi (n = 58), Tanzania (n = 60), and China (n =53). In addition, 30 DBS and 40 plasma specimens collected from ART patients in China and Cameroon, respectively, were also tested. Of the 171 DBS analyzed at the protease and RT regions, 149 (87.1%) could be genotyped, including 49 (81.7%) from Tanzania, 47 (88.7%) from China, and 53 (91.4%) from Malawi. Among the 70 ART patient samples analyzed, 100% (30/30) of the Chinese DBS and 90% (36/40) of the Cameroonian plasma specimens were genotyped, including 8 samples with a viral load of <400 copies/ml. The results of phylogenetic analyses indicated that the subtype, circulating recombinant form (CRF), and unique recombinant form (URF) distribution was as follows: 73 strains were subtype C (34%), 37 were subtype B (17.2%), 24 each were CRF01_AE or CRF02_AG (11.2% each), 22 were subtype A1 (10.2%), and 9 were unclassifiable (UC) (4.2%). The remaining samples were minor strains comprised of 6 that were CRF07_BC (2.8%), 5 that were CRF10_CD (2.3%), 3 each that were URF_A1C and CRF08_BC (1.4%), 2 each that were G, URF_BC, and URF_D/UC (0.9%), and 1 each that were subtype F1, subtype F2, and URF_A1D (0.5%). Our results indicate that this broadly sensitive genotyping assay can be used to genotype DBS collected from areas with diverse HIV-1 group M subtypes and CRFs. Thus, the assay is likely to become a useful screening tool in the global resistance surveillance and monitoring of HIV-1 where multiple subtypes and CRFs are found. PMID:20660209

  1. Development and application of a broadly sensitive dried-blood-spot-based genotyping assay for global surveillance of HIV-1 drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfu; McNulty, Amanda; Diallo, Karidia; Zhang, Jing; Titanji, Boghuma; Kassim, Sidibe; Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Aberle-Grasse, John; Kibuka, Tabitha; Ndumbe, Peter M; Vedapuri, Shanmugam; Zhou, Zhiyong; Chilima, Benson; Nkengasong, John N

    2010-09-01

    As antiretroviral therapy (ART) is scaled up in resource-limited countries, surveillance for HIV drug resistance (DR) is vital to ensure sustained effectiveness of first-line ART. We have developed and applied a broadly sensitive dried-blood-spot (DBS)-based genotyping assay for surveillance of HIV-1 DR in international settings. In 2005 and 2006, 171 DBS samples were collected under field conditions from newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected individuals from Malawi (n = 58), Tanzania (n = 60), and China (n =53). In addition, 30 DBS and 40 plasma specimens collected from ART patients in China and Cameroon, respectively, were also tested. Of the 171 DBS analyzed at the protease and RT regions, 149 (87.1%) could be genotyped, including 49 (81.7%) from Tanzania, 47 (88.7%) from China, and 53 (91.4%) from Malawi. Among the 70 ART patient samples analyzed, 100% (30/30) of the Chinese DBS and 90% (36/40) of the Cameroonian plasma specimens were genotyped, including 8 samples with a viral load of <400 copies/ml. The results of phylogenetic analyses indicated that the subtype, circulating recombinant form (CRF), and unique recombinant form (URF) distribution was as follows: 73 strains were subtype C (34%), 37 were subtype B (17.2%), 24 each were CRF01_AE or CRF02_AG (11.2% each), 22 were subtype A1 (10.2%), and 9 were unclassifiable (UC) (4.2%). The remaining samples were minor strains comprised of 6 that were CRF07_BC (2.8%), 5 that were CRF10_CD (2.3%), 3 each that were URF_A1C and CRF08_BC (1.4%), 2 each that were G, URF_BC, and URF_D/UC (0.9%), and 1 each that were subtype F1, subtype F2, and URF_A1D (0.5%). Our results indicate that this broadly sensitive genotyping assay can be used to genotype DBS collected from areas with diverse HIV-1 group M subtypes and CRFs. Thus, the assay is likely to become a useful screening tool in the global resistance surveillance and monitoring of HIV-1 where multiple subtypes and CRFs are found.

  2. Are higher blood mercury levels associated with dry eye symptoms in adult Koreans? A population-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, So-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate whether blood mercury concentrations associated with the presence of dry eye symptoms in a nationally representative Korean population. Methods Population-based prospective cross-sectional study using the heavy metal data set of the 2010–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). A total of 4761 adult Koreans were the eligible population in this study. Of the 7162 survey participants, 2401 were excluded because they were <19 years of age, there were missing data in the heavy metal data set, or they had diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, asthma, depression and/or under-the-eye surgery. Blood mercury levels were measured on the day the participants completed a questionnaire regarding the presence of dry eye symptoms (persistent dryness or eye irritation). The population was divided into low and high groups by median level (4.26 and 2.89 µg/L for males and females, respectively). Results Self-reported dry eye symptoms were present in 13.0% of the cohort. Participants with dry eye symptoms were significantly more likely to have blood mercury levels exceeding the median than those without dry eye symptoms (45.7% vs 51.7%, p=0.021). Logistic regression analysis showed that, after adjusting for age, gender, education, total household income, smoking status, heavy alcohol use, sleep time, perceived stress status, total cholesterol levels and atopy history, dry eye symptoms were significantly associated with blood mercury levels that exceeded the median (reference: lower mercury group; OR, 1.324; 95% CI 1.059 to 1.655; p<0.05). Conclusions High blood mercury levels were associated with dry eye symptoms in a nationally representative Korean population. PMID:27121705

  3. Are higher blood mercury levels associated with dry eye symptoms in adult Koreans? A population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Chung, So-Hyang; Myong, Jun-Pyo

    2016-04-27

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether blood mercury concentrations associated with the presence of dry eye symptoms in a nationally representative Korean population. Population-based prospective cross-sectional study using the heavy metal data set of the 2010-2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). A total of 4761 adult Koreans were the eligible population in this study. Of the 7162 survey participants, 2401 were excluded because they were <19 years of age, there were missing data in the heavy metal data set, or they had diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, asthma, depression and/or under-the-eye surgery. Blood mercury levels were measured on the day the participants completed a questionnaire regarding the presence of dry eye symptoms (persistent dryness or eye irritation). The population was divided into low and high groups by median level (4.26 and 2.89 µg/L for males and females, respectively). Self-reported dry eye symptoms were present in 13.0% of the cohort. Participants with dry eye symptoms were significantly more likely to have blood mercury levels exceeding the median than those without dry eye symptoms (45.7% vs 51.7%, p=0.021). Logistic regression analysis showed that, after adjusting for age, gender, education, total household income, smoking status, heavy alcohol use, sleep time, perceived stress status, total cholesterol levels and atopy history, dry eye symptoms were significantly associated with blood mercury levels that exceeded the median (reference: lower mercury group; OR, 1.324; 95% CI 1.059 to 1.655; p<0.05). High blood mercury levels were associated with dry eye symptoms in a nationally representative Korean population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Development and validation of a dried blood spot-HPLC assay for the determination of metronidazole in neonatal whole blood samples.

    PubMed

    Suyagh, Maysa Faisal; Iheagwaram, Godwill; Kole, Prashant Laxman; Millership, Jeff; Collier, Paul; Halliday, Henry; McElnay, James C

    2010-05-01

    A selective and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method with UV detection for the determination of metronidazole in dried blood spots (DBS) has been developed and validated. DBS samples [spiked or patient samples] were prepared by applying blood (30 microL) to Guthrie cards. Discs (6 mm diameter) were punched from the cards and extracted using water containing the internal standard, tinidazole. The extracted sample was chromatographed without further treatment using a reversed phase system involving a Symmetry(R) C18 (5 microm, 3.9 x 150 mm) preceded by a Symmetry(R) guard column of matching chemistry and a detection wavelength of 317 nm. The mobile phase comprised acetonitrile/0.01 M phosphate solution (KH(2)PO(4)), pH 4.7, 15:85, v/v, with a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The calibration was linear over the range 2.5-50 mg/mL. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.6 and 1.8 microg/mL, respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of 203 DBS samples from neonatal patients for a phamacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study.

  5. Structure build-up and evolution in the drying of sessile blood droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craster, Richard; Uppal, Aran; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    Experimental observations have recorded blood undergoing a sol-gel transition during the evaporation process. Consequently, the rheology becomes non-uniform throughout the droplet and exhibits transitional complex phenomena that we must capture if we wish to accurately model the evaporative/cracking process. We propose a model where thixotropy is introduced to capture the evolving rheology as evaporation occurs. Thixotropy is often used to describe fluids which exhibit a decrease in viscosity due to flow and subsequent slow recovery of viscosity after the cessation of the flow. We introduce an additional parameter to describe the internal structure of the fluid at each point and consider a droplet in the limit of the lubrication approximation. We present a discussion of our results that demonstrates the dependence of structure build-up, which accompanies the spatio-temporal evolution of the drop, on system parameters. EPSRC UK Centre for Doctoral Training.

  6. Comparison of Multiple Steroid Concentrations in Serum and Dried Blood Spots throughout the Day of Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sarafoglou, Kyriakie; Himes, John H.; Lacey, Jean M.; Netzel, Brian C.; Singh, Ravinder J.; Matern, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim Periodic measurement of plasma concentrations of cortisol precursors on a clinic visit may be of limited value in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia because it does not reflect a patient's circadian patterns of adrenal steroid secretion. Steroid profiling in dried blood spots (DBS) may allow for more frequent and sensitive monitoring. Methods We compared the agreement between 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) and androstenedione (D4A) levels determined from DBS samples and concurrently collected serum samples. Blood was drawn from 9 congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients every 4 h over a 24-hour period. Serum and DBS steroid levels were measured by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results DBS determinations of 17-OHP overestimated corresponding serum levels (mean difference 1.67 ng/ml), and underestimated D4A serum levels (mean difference 0.84 ng/ml). However, the DBS assay yielded excellent agreement (97%) with serum 17-OHP, but did considerably poorer for D4A (31%). Conclusions Our results indicate an excellent agreement between DBS and serum 17-OHP measurements to identify the peaks and troughs associated with an individual's circadian pattern. Larger-scale studies are required to evaluate the utility of DBS for home monitoring and to determine if more frequent monitoring leads to improved clinical outcomes. PMID:20798478

  7. Validation of an optimized ELISA for quantitative assessment of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies from dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Eick, Geeta; Urlacher, Samuel S.; McDade, Thomas W.; Kowal, Paul; Snodgrass, J Josh

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to validate a commercially-available ELISA to measure antibody titers against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in dried blood spots (DBS) to replace a previously validated assay for DBS that is no longer available. We evaluated the precision, reliability, and stability of the assay for the measurement of EBV antibodies in matched plasma, fingerprick DBS, and venous blood DBS samples from 208 individuals. Effects of hematocrit and DBS sample matrix on EBV antibody determination were also investigated, and the cut-off for seropositivity in DBS was determined. A conversion equation was derived to enable comparison of results generated using this method with the former DBS method. There was a high correlation between plasma and DBS EBV antibody titers (R2 = 0.93) with very little bias (−0.07 based on Bland-Altman analysis). The assay showed good linearity, did not appear to be affected by the DBS matrix, and physiological hematocrit levels had no effect on assay performance. There was reasonable agreement between DBS EBV titer estimates obtained using this assay and the previously-validated assay (R2 = 0.72). The commercially-available ELISA assay for EBV antibody titers that we validated for use with DBS will facilitate continued investigation of EBV antibody titers in DBS. PMID:27337556

  8. Determination of venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine in dried blood spots for TDM purposes, using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Berm, E J J; Brummel-Mulder, E; Paardekooper, J; Hak, E; Wilffert, B; Maring, J G

    2014-04-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and quantitative analyses of many current therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM)-guided drugs are advantageous because of the minimal invasive sampling strategy. Here, a fast and robust LC-MS/MS method was developed and analytically validated for simultaneous determination of venlafaxine (VEN) and O-desmethylvenlafaxine (ODV) in DBS. Six-millimeter circles were punched out from DBS collected on Whatman DMPK-C paper, and the DBS was extracted with acetonitrile/methanol at 1:3. The total run time was 4.8 min. The assay was linear in the range of 20-1,000 μg/L for both VEN and ODV. Assay accuracy and precision was well within limits of acceptance (LLOQ = 20 μg/L). Normal hematocrit concentrations (0.30-0.50) did not influence the results neither did a normal spot volume (40-80 μL). Punch position at the perimeter instead of the center of the blood spot gave a bias ranging from 2.4 to 10.4%. Correlation between plasma and spiked DBS samples was high. The concentrations found in spiked DBS samples were higher than those in plasma, indicating that a conversion factor for translation of DBS to plasma values is needed. This analytically validated method is suitable for determination of VEN and ODV in DBS and applicable for TDM. The method will be used for TDM of VEN in the Dutch CYSCE multicenter trial (NCT01778907).

  9. Development and validation of a dried blood spot LC-MS/MS assay to quantify ranitidine in paediatric samples.

    PubMed

    Yakkundi, Shirish; Millership, Jeff; Collier, Paul; Shields, Michael D; McElnay, James

    2011-12-15

    A novel approach has been developed to determine ranitidine in paediatric samples using dried blood spots (DBS) on Guthrie cards (Whatman 903). A selective and sensitive HPLC-MS/MS assay has been developed and validated using small volumes of blood (30 μl). A 6 mm disc was punched from each DBS and extracted with methanolic solution of the internal standard (IS) nizatidine. This was further subjected to solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by reversed phase HPLC separation, using a XBridge™ C18 column and mobile phase 10 mM ammonium acetate/methanol (98:2 v/v) with a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. This was combined with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass detection using electrospray ionisation (ESI). The calibration curve for ranitidine was found linear over the range 10-500 ng/mL (r=0.996). The limit of quantification (LOQ) of the method was validated at 10 ng/mL. Accuracy and precision values for within and between days were <20% at the LOQ and <15% at all other concentrations. The validated DBS method was successfully applied to a clinical study employing 81 samples from 36 paediatric patients.

  10. Dried blood spots: liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its main metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mercolini, Laura; Mandrioli, Roberto; Sorella, Vittorio; Somaini, Lorenzo; Giocondi, Daniele; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2013-01-04

    A sensitive and selective HPLC-MS/MS method has been developed for the first time for the analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (the most important active cannabinoid) and its hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites in human Dried Blood Spots (DBSs). The simultaneous determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and its two main metabolites allows assessing the time elapsed after the drug intake and distinguishing between acute or former consumption. This is an important information in specific contexts such as "on street" controls by police forces. DBSs have been chosen as the optimal biological matrix for this kind of testing, since they provide information on the actual state of intoxication, without storage and transportation problems usually associated with classical blood testing. The analysis is carried out on a C8 reversed phase column with a mobile phase composed of 0.1% formic acid in a water/methanol mixture and an electrospray ionisation (ESI) source, coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated according to international guidelines, with satisfactory results in terms of extraction yields, precision, stability and accuracy. Application to real DBS samples from Cannabis abusers gave reliable results, thus confirming the methodology suitability for roadside testing.

  11. Development of a novel single tube nested PCR for enhanced detection of cytomegalovirus DNA from dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, C; Emery, V C; Griffiths, P D

    2014-02-01

    Newborn screening for congenital cytomegalovirus (CCMV) using dried blood spots (DBS) has been proposed because many developed countries have DBS screening programmes in place for other diseases. The aim of this study was to develop a rapid, single tube nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for enhanced detection of CMV from DBS compared to existing (single target) real time PCRs. The new method was compared with existing real time PCRs for sensitivity and specificity. Overall sensitivity of the single target PCR assays in both asymptomatic and symptomatic infants with laboratory confirmed congenital CMV was 69% (CMV PCR or culture positive before day 21 of life). In contrast, the single tube nested assay had an increased sensitivity of 81% with100% specificity. Overall the assay detected CMV from a DBS equivalent to an original blood sample which contained 500IU/ml. In conclusion this single tube nested methodology allows simultaneous amplification and detection of CMV DNA in 1.5h removing the associated contamination risk of a two step nested PCR. Owing to its increased sensitivity, it has the potential to be used as a screening assay and ultimately allow early identification and intervention for children with congenital CMV.

  12. Simultaneous determination of 3-hydroxypropionic acid, methylmalonic acid and methylcitric acid in dried blood spots: Second-tier LC-MS/MS assay for newborn screening of propionic acidemia, methylmalonic acidemias and combined remethylation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Sylvia; Baráth, Ákos; Fingerhut, Ralph; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Kölker, Stefan; Hoffmann, Georg F.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Increased propionylcarnitine levels in newborn screening are indicative for a group of potentially severe disorders including propionic acidemia (PA), methylmalonic acidemias and combined remethylation disorders (MMACBL). This alteration is relatively non-specific, resulting in the necessity of confirmation and differential diagnosis in subsequent tests. Thus, we aimed to develop a multiplex approach for concurrent determination of 3-hydroxypropionic acid, methylmalonic acid and methylcitric acid from the same dried blood spot (DBS) as in primary screening (second-tier test). We also set out to validate the method using newborn and follow-up samples of patients with confirmed PA or MMACBL. Methods The assay was developed using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry and clinically validated with retrospective analysis of DBS samples from PA or MMACBL patients. Results Reliable determination of all three analytes in DBSs was achieved following simple and fast (<20 min) sample preparation without laborious derivatization or any additional pipetting steps. The method clearly distinguished the pathological and normal samples and differentiated between PA and MMACBL in all stored newborn specimens. Methylcitric acid was elevated in all PA samples; 3-hydroxypropionic acid was also high in most cases. Methylmalonic acid was increased in all MMACBL specimens; mostly together with methylcitric acid. Conclusions A liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry assay allowing simultaneous determination of the biomarkers 3-hydroxypropionic acid, methylmalonic acid and methylcitric acid in DBSs has been developed. The assay can use the same specimen as in primary screening (second-tier test) which may reduce the need for repeated blood sampling. The presented preliminary findings suggest that this method can reliably differentiate patients with PA and MMACBL in newborn screening. The validated assay is being evaluated prospectively in a pilot

  13. Validation and Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Method To Measure Miltefosine in Leishmaniasis Patients Using Dried Blood Spot Sample Collection

    PubMed Central

    Rosing, H.; Hillebrand, M. J. X.; Blesson, S.; Mengesha, B.; Diro, E.; Hailu, A.; Schellens, J. H. M.; Beijnen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate future pharmacokinetic studies of combination treatments against leishmaniasis in remote regions in which the disease is endemic, a simple cheap sampling method is required for miltefosine quantification. The aims of this study were to validate a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify miltefosine in dried blood spot (DBS) samples and to validate its use with Ethiopian patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Since hematocrit (Ht) levels are typically severely decreased in VL patients, returning to normal during treatment, the method was evaluated over a range of clinically relevant Ht values. Miltefosine was extracted from DBS samples using a simple method of pretreatment with methanol, resulting in >97% recovery. The method was validated over a calibration range of 10 to 2,000 ng/ml, and accuracy and precision were within ±11.2% and ≤7.0% (≤19.1% at the lower limit of quantification), respectively. The method was accurate and precise for blood spot volumes between 10 and 30 μl and for Ht levels of 20 to 35%, although a linear effect of Ht levels on miltefosine quantification was observed in the bioanalytical validation. DBS samples were stable for at least 162 days at 37°C. Clinical validation of the method using paired DBS and plasma samples from 16 VL patients showed a median observed DBS/plasma miltefosine concentration ratio of 0.99, with good correlation (Pearson's r = 0.946). Correcting for patient-specific Ht levels did not further improve the concordance between the sampling methods. This successfully validated method to quantify miltefosine in DBS samples was demonstrated to be a valid and practical alternative to venous blood sampling that can be applied in future miltefosine pharmacokinetic studies with leishmaniasis patients, without Ht correction. PMID:26787691

  14. Validation and Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Method To Measure Miltefosine in Leishmaniasis Patients Using Dried Blood Spot Sample Collection.

    PubMed

    Kip, A E; Rosing, H; Hillebrand, M J X; Blesson, S; Mengesha, B; Diro, E; Hailu, A; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H; Dorlo, T P C

    2016-04-01

    To facilitate future pharmacokinetic studies of combination treatments against leishmaniasis in remote regions in which the disease is endemic, a simple cheap sampling method is required for miltefosine quantification. The aims of this study were to validate a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify miltefosine in dried blood spot (DBS) samples and to validate its use with Ethiopian patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Since hematocrit (Ht) levels are typically severely decreased in VL patients, returning to normal during treatment, the method was evaluated over a range of clinically relevant Ht values. Miltefosine was extracted from DBS samples using a simple method of pretreatment with methanol, resulting in >97% recovery. The method was validated over a calibration range of 10 to 2,000 ng/ml, and accuracy and precision were within ±11.2% and ≤7.0% (≤19.1% at the lower limit of quantification), respectively. The method was accurate and precise for blood spot volumes between 10 and 30 μl and for Ht levels of 20 to 35%, although a linear effect of Ht levels on miltefosine quantification was observed in the bioanalytical validation. DBS samples were stable for at least 162 days at 37°C. Clinical validation of the method using paired DBS and plasma samples from 16 VL patients showed a median observed DBS/plasma miltefosine concentration ratio of 0.99, with good correlation (Pearson'sr= 0.946). Correcting for patient-specific Ht levels did not further improve the concordance between the sampling methods. This successfully validated method to quantify miltefosine in DBS samples was demonstrated to be a valid and practical alternative to venous blood sampling that can be applied in future miltefosine pharmacokinetic studies with leishmaniasis patients, without Ht correction.

  15. Dried blood as an alternative to plasma or serum for Trypanosoma cruzi IgG detection in screening programs.

    PubMed

    Holguín, Africa; Norman, Francesca; Martín, Leticia; Mateos, María Luisa; Chacón, Jesús; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Pérez-Molina, José A

    2013-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi serological screening is recommended for people potentially exposed to this parasite in countries where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic and those where it is not endemic. Blood samples on filter paper may be a practical alternative to plasma/serum for antibody detection. Using the Architect Chagas assay, we detected the presence of IgG against T. cruzi in matched serum and dried blood spots (DBS) collected from 147 patients residing in Madrid, Spain, who had potential previous exposure to T. cruzi. The κ statistic for the DBS/serum proportion of agreement for the detection of antibodies against T. cruzi was 0.803, considering an S/CO (assay result unit; chemiluminescent signal from the sample [S] divided by the mean chemiluminescent signal for the three calibrators used in the test [CO]) cutoff value of ≥1.00. The relative sensitivity of the Architect test using DBS increased from 95.2% to 98.8% when the cutoff was lowered from ≥1.00 to ≥0.88, while the relative specificity decreased from 84.1% to 71.6%. Overall, the median S/CO values for DBS were significantly lower than those for serum (2.6 versus 6.5; P < 0.001). Discrepancies that occurred with the use of DBS included 10 false positives (with low S/CO values in 9 cases [median, 2.13]) and 4 false negatives, with mean S/CO values of 0.905 (gray zone). Using DBS plus a highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) may be a simple and reliable method for detecting IgG against T. cruzi when blood sampling by venipuncture is not feasible. This method may also reduce the false-negative rates observed with some rapid diagnostic tests. The lower relative sensitivity compared to the reference method may be increased by lowering the optical density threshold.

  16. Direct analysis of site-specific N-glycopeptides of serological proteins in dried blood spot samples.

    PubMed

    Choi, Na Young; Hwang, Heeyoun; Ji, Eun Sun; Park, Gun Wook; Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2017-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) samples have a number of advantages, especially with respect to ease of collection, transportation, and storage and to reduce biohazard risk. N-glycosylation is a major post-translational modification of proteins in human blood that is related to a variety of biological functions, including metastasis, cell-cell interactions, inflammation, and immunization. Here, we directly analyzed tryptic N-glycopeptides from glycoproteins in DBS samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) without centrifugation of blood samples, depletion of major proteins, desalting of tryptic peptides, and enrichment of N-glycopeptides. Using this simple method, we identified a total of 41 site-specific N-glycopeptides from 16 glycoproteins in the DBS samples, from immunoglobulin gamma 1 (IgG-1, 10 mg/mL) down to complement component C7 (50 μg/mL). Of these, 32 N-glycopeptides from 14 glycoproteins were consistently quantified over 180 days stored at room temperature. The major abundant glycoproteins in the DBS samples were IgG-1 and IgG-2, which contain nine asialo-fucosylated complex types of 16 different N-glycopeptide isoforms. Sialo-non-fucosylated complex types were primarily detected in the other glycoproteins such as alpha-1-acid glycoprotein 1, 2, alpha-1-antitypsin, alpha-2-macroglobulin, haptoglobin, hemopexin, Ig alpha 1, 2 chain C region, kininogen-1, prothrombin, and serotransferrin. We first report the characterization of site-specific N-glycoproteins in DBS samples by LC-MS/MS with minimal sample preparation.

  17. Carbohydrate supplements and their effects on pasture dry matter intake, feeding behavior, and blood factors associated with intake regulation.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, A J; Kay, J K; Roche, J R

    2013-01-01

    Supplementary feeds are offered to grazing dairy cows to increase dry matter (DM) and metabolizable energy (ME) intakes; however, offering feed supplements reduces pasture DM intake, a phenomenon known as substitution. The objective of the study was to investigate changes in blood factors associated with intake regulation in monogastric species in pasture-fed dairy cows supplemented with either a starch- or nonforage fiber-based concentrate. Fifteen multiparous Friesian × Jersey cross cows were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments at calving. Measurements were undertaken in wk 8 of lactation. Treatments were pasture only, pasture plus a starch-based concentrate (3.5 kg of DM/cow per day; STA), and pasture plus a nonforage fiber-based concentrate (4.4 kg of DM/cow per day). Pelleted concentrates were fed at an isoenergetic rate in 2 equal portions at a.m. and p.m. milkings. Measurements were undertaken to investigate differences in pasture DM intake, feeding behavior, and profiles of blood factors for 4h after a.m. and p.m. milkings, the periods of intensive feeding in grazing cows. Supplementing cows with STA concentrate reduced pasture DM intake to a greater extent than the fiber concentrate, although time spent eating did not differ between treatments. The blood factor response to feeding differed between the a.m. and p.m. feeding events. Blood factors associated with a preprandial or fasted state were elevated prefeeding in the a.m. and declined following feeding, whereas satiety factors increased. In comparison, the blood factor response to feeding in the p.m. differed, with responses to feeding delayed for most factors. Plasma ghrelin concentration increased during the p.m. feeding event, despite the consumption of feed and the positive energy state remaining from the previous a.m. feeding, indicating that environmental factors (e.g., sunset) supersede physiological cues in regulating feeding behavior. The greater reduction in pasture DM intake for the STA treatment

  18. Tandem mass spectrometric identification of dextrose markers in dried-blood spots from infants receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Chace, Donald H; De Jesús, Víctor R; Lim, Timothy H; Hannon, W Harry; Spitzer, Alan R

    2010-11-11

    The false positive rate for the newborn screening of disorders of amino acid metabolism for premature infants is higher than full term infants. This may be due to very low birth weight infants receiving high concentrations of amino acids from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) administration and/or immature metabolism. An investigation of the possible influence of TPN on screening of premature infants resulted in the detection of three unusual peaks in the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) acylcarnitine profile. These markers were closely correlated with the detection of very high multiple amino acid increases in the profiles of newborns administered with TPN and who were ultimately found to be normal and free of inherited metabolic disorders. TPN solutions contain a concentrated mixture of amino acids and dextrose and other nutrients in saline. Due to its high concentration and suggestion of a carbohydrate, it was hypothesized that dextrose (D-glucose) was the contaminant and source of the markers detected. Dextrose, stable isotope-labeled 13C6-dextrose and various TPN solutions were analyzed directly or after enrichment in whole blood by multiple MS/MS acquisition modes including MS-only, product and precursor ion and neutral loss scans. Analysis of dried-blood spots (DBS) prepared from whole blood spiked with TPN solutions containing 12.5% dextrose and amino acid formulations designed to deliver 2.5 gm/kg/day of an amino acid mixture had moderate increases of all 3 dextrose markers detected at m/z 325, 399 and 473 as compared to controls. MS-only scans, product and precursor ion scans of dextrose and 13C6-dextrose in positive ion mode confirmed that these 3 peaks are derived from dextrose. Mass spectral analysis of labeled and unlabeled dextrose suggested that these peaks were dimers derived from dextrose. The identification of dextrose markers in DBS indicates that high concentrations of dextrose were present in blood and the likely source was contamination by TPN

  19. Quantitative analysis of NIM811, a cyclophilin inhibitor, in human dried blood spots using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenkui; Williams, Shannon M; Smith, Harold T; Tse, Francis L S

    2011-08-15

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the quantitative analysis of NIM811, a cyclophilin inhibitor, in human dried blood spot (DBS) samples, which were produced by spotting 20 μl whole blood onto FTA cards. A 3mm disc was cut from the DBS samples and extracted using methanol, followed by liquid-liquid extraction with MTBE. The reconstituted extracts were chromatographed using a Halo C(18) column and gradient elution for MS/MS detection. The possible impact of hematocrit, blood sample volume and punching location on DBS sampling was investigated. The results showed that blood sample volume or punching location has no impact on assay performance, but the presence of a high hematocrit resulted in significantly increased analyte concentrations measured from the high QC samples. The current method was fully validated over the range of 10.0-5000 ng/ml with correlation coefficients (r(2)) for three validation batches equal to or better than 0.991. The accuracy and precision (CV) at the LLOQ were -0.7 to 6.0% bias of the nominal value (10.0 ng/ml) and 10.2-2.3%, respectively. For the balance of QC samples (20.0, 50.0, 750, 1500 and 3750 ng/ml), the precision (CV) ranged from 3.2 to 11.7% and from 5.6 to 10.2%, respectively, for the intra-day and inter-day evaluations. The accuracy ranged from -6.8 to 8.5% and -0.2% to 2.7% bias, respectively, for the intra-day and inter-day batches. NIM811 is stable in the DBS samples for at least 24h at room temperature and 4h at 60°C. Interestingly, the long term stability (LTS) assessment showed that the stability of the analyte is better when the DBS samples were stored at a lower storage temperature (e.g. ≤ -60°C) compared to storage at room temperature. This is probably due to the interaction of the additives and/or other materials (e.g. cellulose, etc) on the DBS card with NIM811, a cyclic peptide. The current methodology has been applied to

  20. Improved analysis of C26:0-lysophosphatidylcholine in dried-blood spots via negative ion mode HPLC-ESI-MS/MS for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Christopher A; De Jesús, Víctor R

    2012-08-16

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common human peroxisomal disorder, and is caused by mutations in the peroxisomal transmembrane ALD protein (ALDP, ABCD1). The biochemical defect associated with X-ALD is an accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA, e.g. C24:0 and C26:0), which has been shown to result in the accumulation of C26:0-lysophosphatidylcholine (C26:0-LPC). We describe the analysis of C26:0-LPC in dried-blood spots (DBS) using a rapid (30 min) and simple extraction procedure, isocratic HPLC resolution of LPC, and structure-specific analysis via negative ion mode tandem mass spectrometry. In putative normal DBS specimens from newborns (N=223) C26:0-LPC was 0.09±0.03 μmol/l whole blood, while in peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (including X-ALD) patients (N=28) C26:0-LPC was 1.13±0.67 μmol/l whole blood. Both multiple reaction monitoring and a neutral loss scan (225.1 Da) analysis of DBS were used to analyze LPC. Compared to a previous report of C26:0-LPC analysis in DBS, the method described here is simpler, faster, and more structure-specific for LPC with C26:0 acyl chains. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Enhanced Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Bacteremia Using Antigen- and Molecular-Based Tools on Blood Specimens in Mali and Thailand: A Prospective Surveillance Study.

    PubMed

    Moïsi, Jennifer C; Moore, Matthew; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria; Sow, Samba O; Siludjai, Duangkamon; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Tapia, Milagritos; Baggett, Henry C

    2016-02-01

    Prior antibiotic use, contamination, limited blood volume, and processing delays reduce yield of blood cultures for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We performed immunochromatographic testing (ICT) on broth from incubated blood culture bottles and real-time lytA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on broth and whole blood and compared findings to blood culture in patients with suspected bacteremia. We selected 383 patients in Mali and 586 patients in Thailand based on their blood culture results: 75 and 31 were positive for pneumococcus, 100 and 162 were positive for other pathogens, and 208 and 403 were blood culture negative, respectively. ICT and PCR of blood culture broth were at least 87% sensitive and 97% specific compared with blood culture; whole blood PCR was 75-88% sensitive and 96-100% specific. Pneumococcal yields in children < 5 years of age increased from 2.9% to 10.7% in Mali with > 99% of additional cases detected by whole blood PCR, and from 0.07% to 5.1% in Thailand with two-thirds of additional cases identified by ICT. Compared with blood culture, ICT and lytA PCR on cultured broth were highly sensitive and specific but their ability to improve pneumococcal identification varied by site. Further studies of these tools are needed before widespread implementation.

  2. Genotyping of celiac disease-related-risk haplotypes using a closed-tube polymerase chain reaction analysis of dried blood and saliva disk samples.

    PubMed

    Ollikka, Pia; Raussi, Hanna-Mari; Laitala, Ville; Jaakkola, Lassi; Hovinen, Jari; Hemmilä, Ilkka; Ylikoski, Alice

    2009-03-01

    Expansion of molecular diagnostics more widely into clinical routines requires simplified methods allowing automation. We developed a homogeneous, multilabel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method based on time-resolved fluorometry, and studied the use of dried disk samples in PCR. Celiac disease-related HLA-DQA1*05, HLA-DQB1*02, and HLA-DQB1*0302 genotyping was used to verify the method with blood and saliva samples dried on S&S 903 and IsoCode sample collection papers. Three sample preparation procedures, including manufacturer's manual elution, an automated elution, and direct use of disk samples, were compared using dried disk samples. The three procedures gave successful amplification and correct genotyping results. Owing to the simplicity of the direct use of disk samples in PCR, this method was chosen for the subsequent homogeneous analysis of blood (n=194) and saliva (n=30) disk samples on S&S 903 paper. The results revealed that, in addition to DNA samples (n=29), both blood and saliva disk samples were successfully amplified and genotyped using the homogeneous PCR assays for HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1. The homogeneous PCR assays developed provide a useful tool to genotype celiac disease-related HLA-DQA1*05, HLA-DQB1*02, and HLA-DQB1*0302 alleles. Furthermore, the method provides a direct way to perform a closed-tube PCR analysis of dried blood and saliva disk samples enabling simple automation.

  3. Outbreak of hepatitis E virus infection in Darfur, Sudan: effectiveness of real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis of dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Mérens, Audrey; Guérin, Philippe Jean; Guthmann, Jean-Paul; Nicand, Elisabeth

    2009-06-01

    Biological samples collected in refugee camps during an outbreak of hepatitis E were used to compare the accuracy of hepatitis E virus RNA amplification by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for sera and dried blood spots (concordance of 90.6%). Biological profiles (RT-PCR and serology) of asymptomatic individuals were also analyzed.

  4. Investigation of endogenous blood lipids components that contribute to matrix effects in dried blood spot samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ismaiel, Omnia A; Jenkins, Rand G; Karnes, H Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a rapidly developing approach in the field of biopharmaceutical analysis. DBS sampling enables analysis of small sample volumes with high sensitivity and selectivity while providing a convenient easy to store and ship format. Lipid components that may be extracted during biological sample processing may result in matrix ionization effects and can significantly affect the precision and accuracy of the results. Glycerophosphocholines (GPChos), cholesterols and triacylglycerols (TAG) are the main lipid components that contribute to matrix effects in LC-MS/MS. Various organic solvents such as methanol, acetonitrile, methyl tertiary butyl ether, ethyl ether, dichloromethane and n-hexane were investigated for elution of these lipid components from DBS samples. Methanol extracts demonstrated the highest levels of GPChos whereas ethyl ether and n-hexane extracts contained less than 1.0 % of the GPChos levels in the methanol extracts. Ethyl ether extracts contained the highest levels of cholesterols and TAG in comparison to other investigated organic solvents. Acetonitrile is recommended as an elution solvent due to low lipid recoveries. Matrix effects resulted from different extracted lipid components should be studied and assessed carefully in DBS samples. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Relocation of cryopreserved umbilical cord blood samples using a high-capacity dry shipper to a new laboratory: a cord blood banking experience.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajah, Kalaivani; Wong, Chee-Yin; Vijayan, Vickneswary Veera; Ooi, Ghee-Chien; Ng, Mei-Theng; Cheong, Soon-Keng; Then, Kong-Yong

    2015-05-01

    Processed umbilical cord blood (UCB) must be stored at cryogenic temperature at all times to maintain the quality and viability of the cells. However, a challenge is presented in the form of moving a large number of cryopreserved UCB samples to a new location. In this report, we share our experience on relocating more than 100,000 units of cryopreserved UCB samples stored in 12 liquid nitrogen freezers (LNFs) to our new laboratory. For quality control purposes, 2 weeks before relocation, donor UCB samples were processed, cryopreserved, and stored in each LNF. On relocation day, half of the samples were retrieved to determine total nucleated cell count, percentage of CD34+ cells, and cell viability as controls for later comparison. UCB samples were transferred into dry shippers before being relocated to the new laboratory. Upon arrival, LNFs were serviced before transferring UCB samples back into its original location within the LNF. The remaining donor UCB samples were retrieved and analyzed for the same tests mentioned. We found no significant differences in pre- and postrelocation values of the tests performed. All UCB samples were successfully relocated into the new laboratory without affecting the quality. © 2014 AABB.

  6. The design and evaluation of a shaped filter collection device to sample and store defined volume dried blood spots from finger pricks.

    PubMed

    Polley, Spencer D; Bell, David; Oliver, James; Tully, Frank; Perkins, Mark D; Chiodini, Peter L; González, Iveth J

    2015-02-05

    Dried blood spots are a common medium for collecting patient blood prior to testing for malaria by molecular methods. A new shaped filter device for the quick and simple collection of a designated volume of patient blood has been designed and tested against conventional blood spots for accuracy and precision. Shaped filter devices were laser cut from Whatman GB003 paper to absorb a 20 μl blood volume. These devices were used to sample Plasmodium falciparum infected blood and the volume absorbed was measured volumetrically. Conventional blood spots were made by pipetting 20 μl of the same blood onto Whatman 3MM paper. DNA was extracted from both types of dried blood spot using Qiagen DNA blood mini or Chelex extraction for real-time PCR analysis, and PURE extraction for malaria LAMP testing. The shaped filter devices collected a mean volume of 21.1 μl of blood, with a coefficient of variance of 8.1%. When used for DNA extraction by Chelex and Qiagen methodologies the mean number of international standard units of P. falciparum DNA recovered per μl of the eluate was 53.1 (95% CI: 49.4 to 56.7) and 32.7 (95% CI: 28.8 to 36.6), respectively for the shaped filter device, and 54.6 (95% CI: 52.1 to 57.1) and 12.0 (95% CI: 9.9 to 14.1), respectively for the 3MM blood spots. Qiagen extraction of 200 μl of whole infected blood yielded 853.6 international standard units of P. falciparum DNA per μl of eluate. A shaped filter device provides a simple way to quickly sample and store a defined volume of blood without the need for any additional measuring devices. Resultant dried blood spots may be employed for DNA extraction using a variety of technologies for nucleic acid amplification without the need for repeated cleaning of scissors or punches to prevent cross contamination of samples and results are comparable to traditional DBS.

  7. Disparate detection outcomes for anti-HCV IgG and HCV RNA in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Strop, Alexandra; Drobeniuc, Jan; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Forbi, Joseph C; Le, Ngoc-Thao; Li, Lixia; Mei, Joanne; Terrault, Norah; Kamili, Saleem

    2015-02-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) expedite the collection, storage and shipping of blood samples, thereby facilitating large-scale serologic studies. We evaluated the sensitivity of anti-HCV IgG testing and HCV-RNA quantitation using freshly prepared and stored DBS derived from HCV-infected patients. Protocols for elution were optimized using DBS prepared from plasma of 52 HCV-infected persons and 51 uninfected persons (control DBS), then applied to DBS from 33 chronic hepatitis C patients that had been stored at -20°C for 5 years (stored DBS). Control and stored DBS, and their corresponding plasma, were processed for anti-HCV IgG testing using the VITROS chemiluminescence assay (CIA) and the HCV 3.0 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics), and for HCV RNA quantitation by quantitative (q) RT-PCR. HCV genotyping was conducted by nucleotide sequencing. The sensitivity of CIA and EIA in control DBS was 92% and 90%, respectively, compared to 100% and 97%, respectively, in stored DBS. The sensitivity of HCV RNA detection was 88% in control DBS, compared to 36% in stored DBS. Specificity was 100% for all the assays in both control and stored DBS. Genotypes 1, 2 and 3 were detected in 16 (62%), 6 (23.1%), and 4 (15.3%) samples, respectively. Sequences generated from DBS and their corresponding plasma samples were identical. Whereas the sensitivity of anti-HCV IgG detection in stored DBS was equivalent to that in recently prepared DBS, the sensitivity of HCV RNA detection was markedly lower in stored DBS compared to recently prepared DBS. Stored DBS may be reliably used for anti-HCV detection but for HCV-RNA-based testing freshly prepared DBS is preferable to stored DBS.

  8. Limited sampling strategy for prolonged-release tacrolimus in renal transplant patients by use of the dried blood spot technique.

    PubMed

    van Boekel, G A J; Donders, A R T; Hoogtanders, K E J; Havenith, T R A; Hilbrands, L B; Aarnoutse, R E

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a clinically applicable limited sampling strategy for ambulatory Caucasian kidney transplant patients to estimate area under the curve in a 24-h period (AUC0-24) of prolonged-release tacrolimus. Twenty six kidney recipients, at least 6 months after transplantation, receiving prolonged-release tacrolimus, were enrolled. In each patient, seven blood samples were collected during a period of 24 h by use of the validated dried blood spot method. Best subset selection multiple linear regression was performed to derive limited sampling strategy (LSS). The equations were constrained to include a maximum of three samples collected within 4 h after the intake to maintain clinical applicability. To assess the predictive performance of LSS, residuals for each patient were calculated based on models fitted to a dataset where that patient was omitted. The prediction formula for the AUC(0-24) using the time points 0, 2, and 4 h after ingestion (C(0h)-C(2h)-C(4h)) provided the highest correlation with the AUC(0-24) (r(2) = 0.95): AUC0-24 = 44.9 + 8.9 × C(0h) + 2.1 × C(2h) + 7.6 × C(4h). Measures for bias and precision, i.e., median percentage prediction error (MPPE) and median absolute prediction error (MAPE), were 0.4 and 4.8%, respectively. For the same patients, the correlation between C(24h) and AUC0-24 was worse (r(2) = 0.77) while MPPE and MAPE were 6.2 and 7.2%, respectively. In the outpatient department, a LSS using C(0h)-C(2h)-C(4h) can be used for reliable estimation of the AUC(0-24) of prolonged-release tacrolimus.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of 25 inflammatory markers and neurotrophins in neonatal dried blood spots by immunoassay with xMAP technology.

    PubMed

    Skogstrand, Kristin; Thorsen, Poul; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Schendel, Diana E; Sørensen, Line C; Hougaard, David M

    2005-10-01

    Inflammatory reactions and other events in early life may be part of the etiology of late-onset diseases, including cerebral palsy, autism, and type 1 diabetes. Most neonatal screening programs for congenital disorders are based on analysis of dried blood spot samples (DBSS), and stored residual DBSS constitute a valuable resource for research into the etiology of these diseases. The small amount of blood available, however, limits the number of analytes that can be determined by traditional immunoassay methodologies. We used new multiplexed sandwich immunoassays based on flowmetric Luminex xMAP technology to measure inflammatory markers and neutrophins in DBSS. The high-capacity 25-plex multianalyte method measured 23 inflammatory and trophic cytokines, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1), and C-reactive protein in two 3.2-mm punches from DBSS. It also measured 26 cytokines and TREM-1 in serum. Standards Recovery in the 25-plex method were 90%-161% (mean, 105%). The low end of the working range for all 25 analytes covered concentrations found in DBSS from healthy newborns. Mean recovery of exogenous analytes added at physiologic concentrations in DBSS models was 174%, mean intra- and interassay CVs were 6.2% and 16%, respectively, and the mean correlation between added and measured analytes was r2 = 0.91. In DBSS routinely collected on days 5-7 from 8 newborns with documented inflammatory reactions at birth, the method detected significantly changed concentrations of inflammatory cytokines. Measurements on DBSS stored at -24 degrees C for >20 years showed that most cytokines are detectable in equal concentrations over time. The method can reliably measure 25 inflammatory markers and growth factors in DBSS. It has a large potential for high-capacity analysis of DBSS in epidemiologic case-control studies and, with further refinements, in neonatal screening.

  10. Prediction of the hematocrit of dried blood spots via potassium measurement on a routine clinical chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Capiau, Sara; Stove, Veronique V; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2013-01-02

    The potential of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling as an alternative for classical venous sampling is increasingly recognized, with multiple applications in, e.g., therapeutic drug monitoring and toxicology. Although DBS sampling has many advantages, it is associated with several issues, the hematocrit (Hct) issue being the most widely discussed challenge, given its possible strong impact on DBS-based quantitation. Hitherto, no approaches allow Hct prediction from nonvolumetrically applied DBS. Following a simple and rapid extraction protocol, K(+) levels from 3 mm DBS punches were measured via indirect potentiometry, using the Roche Cobas 8000 routine chemistry analyzer. The extracts' K(+) concentrations were used to calculate the approximate Hct of the blood used to generate DBS. A linear calibration line was established, with a Hct range of 0.19 to 0.63 (lower limit of quantification, LLOQ, to upper limit of quantification, ULOQ). The procedure was fully validated; the bias and imprecision of quality controls (QCs) at three Hct levels and at the LLOQ and ULOQ was less than 5 and 12%, respectively. In addition, the influence of storage (pre- and postextraction), volume spotted, and punch homogeneity was evaluated. Application on DBS from patient samples (n = 111), followed by Bland and Altman, Passing and Bablok, and Deming regression analysis, demonstrated a good correlation between the "predicted Hct" and the "actual Hct". After correcting for the observed bias, limits of agreement of ±0.049 were established. Incurred sample reanalysis demonstrated assay reproducibility. In conclusion, potassium levels in extracts from 3 mm DBS punches can be used to get a good prediction of the Hct, one of the most important "unknowns" in DBS analysis.

  11. Determining Population and Developmental Pharmacokinetics of Metronidazole Using Plasma and Dried Blood Spot Samples from Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Sampson, Mario; Bloom, Barry T.; Arrieta, Antonio; Wynn, James L.; Martz, Karen; Harper, Barrie; Kearns, Gregory L.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited pharmacokinetic (PK) data of metronidazole in premature infants has led to various dosing recommendations. Surrogate efficacy targets for metronidazole are ill-defined and therefore aimed to exceed minimum inhibitory concentration of organisms responsible for intra-abdominal infections. Methods We evaluated the PK of metronidazole using plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) samples from infants ≤32 weeks gestational age in an open-label, PK, multicenter (N=3) study using population PK modeling (NONMEM). Monte Carlo simulations (N=1000 virtual subjects) were used to evaluate the surrogate efficacy target. Metabolic ratios of parent and metabolite were calculated. Results Twenty-four premature infants (111 plasma and 51 DBS samples) were enrolled: median (range) gestational age at birth 25 (23–31) weeks, postnatal age 27 (1–82) days, postmenstrual age (PMA) 31 (24–39) weeks, and weight 740 (431–1466) g. Population clearance (CL, L/h/kg) was 0.038 × (PMA/30)2.45 and volume of distribution (L/kg) of 0.93. PK parameter estimates and precision were similar between plasma and DBS samples. Metabolic ratios correlated with CL. Conclusion Simulations suggested the majority of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (>80%) would meet the surrogate efficacy target using PMA-based dosing. PMID:23587979

  12. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger.

  13. Development and validation of a mass spectrometric detection method of peginesatide in dried blood spots for sports drug testing.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ines; Thomas, Andreas; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-07-01

    As recently reported, dried blood spot (DBS) analysis is an advantageous technique for doping control purposes due to the minimal invasive sample collection, the simple and economic manner, as well as the low susceptibility to manipulation. Its general applicability to the sports drug testing arena has been shown for analytes of various substance classes, all of which comprise exclusively low molecular mass compounds. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the technique of DBS analysis is applicable also to (pegylated) peptides with relevance for doping controls. As target analyte, peginesatide (Omontys, Hematide), a recently approved pegylated erythropoietin-mimetic peptide of approximately 45 kDa, tested for the treatment of anaemia in patients with renal failure, was chosen, which has been prohibited in elite sports due to its assumed endurance enhancing effects. Therefore, a detection method for peginesatide employing DBS was developed based on extraction, proteolytic digestion and cation-exchange purification followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Eventually, the assay was validated for qualitative purposes and proved to be specific, sensitive (limit of detection, 10 ng/mL) and precise (relative standard deviations below 18%), demonstrating the general suitability of DBS analysis in sports drug testing also for (pegylated) peptides.

  14. Governing biological material at the intersection of care and research: the use of dried blood spots for biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Conor M.W.; van El, Carla G.; Faulkner, Alex; Cornel, Martina C.

    2012-01-01

    A series of governance issues currently surrounds the multiple uses and multiple users of dried blood spots (DBS) for research purposes. Internationally there is a discussion on storing DBS resulting from newborn screening for public health and using them as the basis for large biobank-like collections to facilitate biomedical research. If such a transformation were to be formalized, then DBS would sit at the intersection of care (ie, public health) and research, with the mechanisms through which such a collection could be managed not totally self-evident. What is more, a DBS collection raises questions about the fuzzy boundaries between privacy and anonymity; how to control or define quality control uses of DBS; medical vs nonmedical uses; as well as benefit sharing and stakeholder involvement. Our goal here is to explore some of the key questions relating to DBS governance by way of the bio-objects and bio-objectification concepts. By embracing – rather than resisting to – the blurring of boundaries and problems in categorization that have come to characterize bio-objects and bio-objectification processes recently described in this journal, we attempt to highlight some issues that might not be currently considered, and to point to some possible directions to go (or avoid). Building from our knowledge of the current DBS situation in the Netherlands, we outline questions concerning the uses, management, collection, and storage of DBS. PMID:22911534

  15. The stability of markers in dried-blood spots for recommended newborn screening disorders in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adam, B W; Hall, E M; Sternberg, M; Lim, T H; Flores, S R; O'Brien, S; Simms, D; Li, L X; De Jesus, V R; Hannon, W H

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to measure separately the contributions of heat and humidity to changes in levels of 34 markers of inborn disorders in dried-blood-spot (DBS) samples. We stored paired sets of DBSs at 37°C for predetermined intervals in low-humidity and high-humidity environments. Marker levels of all samples in each complete sample set were measured in a single analytic run. During the 30 ± 5 day studies, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase and biotinidase lost almost 65% of initial activities in low-humidity storage; most of the degradation in 27 other markers was attributable to adverse effects of high-humidity storage; seven markers in DBSs stored at high humidity lost more than 90% of initial levels by the end of the study and 4 of the 7 lost more than 50% of initial levels within the first week of storage. Minimizing both humidity and temperature in DBS transportation and storage environments is essential to maintaining sample integrity. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. All rights reserved.

  16. THE STABILITY OF MARKERS IN DRIED-BLOOD SPOTS FOR RECOMMENDED NEWBORN SCREENING DISORDERS IN THE UNITED STATES

    PubMed Central

    Adam, BW; Hall, EM; Sternberg, M; Lim, TH; Flores, SR; O’Brien, S; Simms, D; Li, LX; De Jesus, VR; Hannon, WH

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to measure separately the contributions of heat and humidity to changes in levels of 34 markers of inborn disorders in dried-blood-spot (DBS) samples. Design and Methods Paired sets of DBSs were stored at 37°C for predetermined intervals in low-humidity and high-humidity environments. Marker levels of all samples in each complete sample set were measured in a single analytic run. Results During the 30±5 day study, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase and biotinidase lost almost 65% of initial activities in low-humidity storage; most of the degradation in 27 other markers was attributable to adverse effects of high humidity storage; seven markers in DBSs stored at high humidity lost more than 90% of initial levels by the end of the study and four of the seven lost more than 50% of initial levels within the first week of storage. Conclusions Minimizing both humidity and temperature in the DBS transportation and storage environments is essential to maintaining sample integrity. PMID:21963384

  17. Dry Olive Leaf Extract Counteracts L-Thyroxine-Induced Genotoxicity in Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Žukovec Topalović, Dijana; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger. PMID:25789081

  18. Measuring thyroxine and thyrotropin simultaneously in a dried blood sample on filter paper, to screen for neonatal hypothroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Nagataki, S.; Ishibashi, K.,; Ohsawa, R.

    1980-05-01

    A highly sensitive radioimmunoassay of thyroxine and thyrotropin for mass screening for neonatal hypothroidism was developed. This assay involves a single disc (3 mm diameter) of dried blood on filter paper. The minimum detectable concentrations are 15 pg/tube (10 )g/L) for thyroxine and 15 nano-int. units/tube (10 milli-int. units/L) for thyrotropin; intra- and interassay CV's are <15% in both assays. The high sensitivity of this method is due to use of labeled thyroxine with high specific activity (3 kCi/g) and of an anti-thyrotropin serum with high affinity (K/sub eq/ = 7.8 x 10 rr L/mol). With this method, 1137 newborns were screened; a follow-up study revealed that only newborns with both high thyrotropin and low thyroxine concentrations had permanent hypothyroidism. It is concluded that this method is sensitive, simple, and reliable and that the recall rate with this method is much lower than that of tests for measuring thyroxine or thyrotropin alone.

  19. The Effect of Storage and Extraction Methods on Amplification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA from Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Alanna; Baidjoe, Amrish; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Bousema, Teun; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2015-05-01

    Extraction and amplification of DNA from dried blood spots (DBS) collected in field studies is commonly used for detection of Plasmodium falciparum. However, there have been few systematic efforts to determine the effects of storage and extraction methods on the sensitivity of DNA amplification. We investigated the effects of storage conditions, length of storage, and DNA extraction methods on amplification via three PCR-based assays using field samples and laboratory controls. Samples stored as DBS for 2 or more years at ambient temperature showed a significant loss of sensitivity that increased with time; after 10 years only 10% samples with parasite densities > 1,000 parasites/μL were detectable by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Conversely, DBS and extracted DNA stored at -20°C showed no loss of sensitivity with time. Samples with low parasite densities amplified more successfully with saponin/Chelex compared with spin-column-based extraction, though the latter method performed better on samples with higher parasite densities stored for 2 years at ambient temperature. DNA extracted via both methods was stable after 20 freeze-thaw cycles. Our results suggest that DBS should be stored at -20°C or extracted immediately, especially if anticipating 2 or more years of storage. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  20. The Effect of Storage and Extraction Methods on Amplification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA from Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Alanna; Baidjoe, Amrish; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Dorsey, Grant; Bousema, Teun; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Extraction and amplification of DNA from dried blood spots (DBS) collected in field studies is commonly used for detection of Plasmodium falciparum. However, there have been few systematic efforts to determine the effects of storage and extraction methods on the sensitivity of DNA amplification. We investigated the effects of storage conditions, length of storage, and DNA extraction methods on amplification via three PCR-based assays using field samples and laboratory controls. Samples stored as DBS for 2 or more years at ambient temperature showed a significant loss of sensitivity that increased with time; after 10 years only 10% samples with parasite densities > 1,000 parasites/μL were detectable by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Conversely, DBS and extracted DNA stored at −20°C showed no loss of sensitivity with time. Samples with low parasite densities amplified more successfully with saponin/Chelex compared with spin-column-based extraction, though the latter method performed better on samples with higher parasite densities stored for 2 years at ambient temperature. DNA extracted via both methods was stable after 20 freeze-thaw cycles. Our results suggest that DBS should be stored at −20°C or extracted immediately, especially if anticipating 2 or more years of storage. PMID:25758652

  1. Quantification of the HIV-integrase inhibitor raltegravir and detection of its main metabolite in human plasma, dried blood spots and peripheral blood mononuclear cell lysate by means of high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ter Heine, R; Hillebrand, M J X; Rosing, H; van Gorp, E C M; Mulder, J W; Beijnen, J H; Huitema, A D R

    2009-02-20

    For the quantification of the HIV-integrase inhibitor raltegravir in human plasma, dried blood spots and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) lysate, an assay was developed and validated, using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The assay also allowed detection, but no quantification due to absence of reference substance, of the main metabolite, raltegravir-glucuronide. Raltegravir was extracted from plasma by means of protein precipitation with a mixture of methanol and acetonitrile using only 50microL plasma. Extraction from dried blood spots was performed with a simple one-step extraction with a mixture of methanol, acetonitrile and 0.2M zincsulphate in water (1:1:2, v/v/v) and extraction from cell lysate was performed in 50% methanol in water. Chromatographic separation was performed on a reversed phase C18 column (150mmx2.0mm, particle size 5microm) with a quick stepwise gradient using an acetate buffer (pH 5) and methanol, at a flow rate of 0.25mL/min. The analytical run time was 10min. The triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was operated in the positive ion-mode and multiple reaction monitoring was used for drug quantification. The method was validated over a range of 50-10,000ng/mL in plasma and dried blood spots and a range of 1-500ng/mL in PBMC lysate. Dibenzepine was used as the internal standard. The method was proven to be specific, accurate, precise and robust. Accuracies ranged from 104% to 105% in plasma, from 93% to 105% in dried blood spots and from 82% to 113% in PBMC lysate. Precision over the complete concentration range was less than 6%, 11% and 13% in plasma, dried blood spots and PBMC lysate, respectively. The method is now applied for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacological research in HIV-infected patients treated with raltegravir.

  2. Evaluation of nucleic acid stabilization products for ambient temperature shipping and storage of viral RNA and antibody in a dried whole blood format.

    PubMed

    Dauner, Allison L; Gilliland, Theron C; Mitra, Indrani; Pal, Subhamoy; Morrison, Amy C; Hontz, Robert D; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L

    2015-07-01

    Loss of sample integrity during specimen transport can lead to false-negative diagnostic results. In an effort to improve upon the status quo, we used dengue as a model RNA virus to evaluate the stabilization of RNA and antibodies in three commercially available sample stabilization products: Whatman FTA Micro Cards (GE Healthcare Life Sciences, Pittsburgh, PA), DNAstāble Blood tubes (Biomātrica, San Diego, CA), and ViveST tubes (ViveBio, Alpharetta, GA). Both contrived and clinical dengue-positive specimens were stored on these products at ambient temperature or 37°C for up to 1 month. Antibody and viral RNA levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays, respectively, and compared with frozen unloaded controls. We observed reduced RNA and antibody levels between stabilized contrived samples and frozen controls at our earliest time point, and this was particularly pronounced for the FTA cards. However, despite some time and temperature dependent loss, a 94.6-97.3% agreement was observed between stabilized clinical specimens and their frozen controls for all products. Additional considerations such as cost, sample volume, matrix, and ease of use should inform any decision to incorporate sample stabilization products into a diagnostic testing workflow. We conclude that DNAstāble Blood and ViveST tubes are useful alternatives to traditional filter paper for ambient temperature shipment of clinical specimens for downstream molecular and serological testing.

  3. Socioeconomic disparities in indoor air, breath, and blood perchloroethylene level among adult and child residents of buildings with or without a dry cleaner.

    PubMed

    Storm, Jan E; Mazor, Kimberly A; Shost, Stephen J; Serle, Janet; Aldous, Kenneth M; Blount, Benjamin C

    2013-04-01

    In many cities, dry cleaners using perchloroethylene are frequently located in multifamily residential buildings and often cause elevated indoor air levels of perchloroethylene throughout the building. To assess individual perchloroethylene exposures associated with co-located dry cleaners, we measured perchloroethylene in residential indoor air, and in blood and breath of adults and children residing in buildings with a dry cleaner as part of the New York City (NYC) Perc Project. We also measured perchloroethylene in indoor air, and in blood and breath of residents of buildings without a dry cleaner for comparison. Here, we evaluate whether an environmental disparity in perchloroethylene exposures is present. Study participants are stratified by residential building type (dry cleaner or reference) and socioeconomic characteristics (race/ethnicity and income); measures of perchloroethylene exposure are examined; and, the influence of stratified variables and other factors on perchloroethylene exposure is assessed using multivariate regression. All measures of perchloroethylene exposure for residents of buildings with a dry cleaner indicated a socioeconomic disparity. Mean indoor air perchloroethylene levels were about five times higher in minority (82.5 ug/m(3)) than in non-minority (16.5 ug/m(3)) households, and about six times higher in low-income (105.5 ug/m(3)) than in high income (17.8 ug/m(3)) households. Mean blood perchloroethylene levels in minority children (0.27 ng/mL) and adults (0.46 ng/mL) were about two and three times higher than in non-minority children (0.12 ng/mL) and adults (0.15 ng/mL), respectively. Mean blood perchloroethylene levels in low income children (0.34 ng/mL) and adults (0.62 ng/mL) were about three and four times higher than in high income children (0.11 ng/mL) and adults (0.14 ng/mL), respectively. A less marked socioeconomic disparity was observed in perchloroethylene breath levels with minority and low income residents having

  4. Prediction of Vitamin A, Vitamin E, Selenium and Zinc Status of Periparturient Dairy Cows Using Blood Sampling During the Mid Dry Period

    PubMed Central

    Meglia, GE; Holtenius, K; Petersson, L; Öhagen, P; Waller, K Persson

    2004-01-01

    Vitamins A and E, and the trace elements selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) are essential for the health and performance of dairy cows. Their concentrations often decrease around calving and extra supplementation is sometimes recommended at that time. However, the need for this varies, for example depending on quantity and quality of feedstuffs in the diet. The aim of this study was to measure the concentrations of serum vitamin A (S-vit A) and vitamin E (S-vit E), plasma Se (P-Se) and serum Zn (S-Zn) in blood samples taken at several time points from one month before to one month after calving, and to evaluate if a blood sample taken during the mid dry period can accurately predict the blood concentration at calving and early lactation. Dairy cows on 3 different feeding regimens during the dry period were included in the study. A significant decrease in the concentrations of S-vit A and S-vit E, and S-Zn, was observed at calving, and P-Se was significantly lower during the dry period and at calving than in early lactation. The blood concentrations of S-vit E and P-Se in the mid dry period significantly predicted the occurrence of values considered marginal or deficient at the time of calving. The data indicate that a mid dry period concentration of ≥5.4 mg/l of S-vit E and ≥0.09 mg/l of P-Se will result in a 90% chance that the cow stays above marginal levels at calving given that a feed of the same quality is offered. PMID:15535092

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Therapeutic Drugs in Dried Blood Spot Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry: An Avenue to Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manicke, Nicholas Edward; Abu-Rabie, Paul; Spooner, Neil; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2011-09-01

    A method is presented for the direct quantitative analysis of therapeutic drugs from dried blood spot samples by mass spectrometry. The method, paper spray mass spectrometry, generates gas phase ions directly from the blood card paper used to store dried blood samples without the need for complex sample preparation and separation; the entire time for preparation and analysis of blood samples is around 30 s. Limits of detection were investigated for a chemically diverse set of some 15 therapeutic drugs; hydrophobic and weakly basic drugs, such as sunitinib, citalopram, and verapamil, were found to be routinely detectable at approximately 1 ng/mL. Samples were prepared by addition of the drug to whole blood. Drug concentrations were measured quantitatively over several orders of magnitude, with accuracies within 10% of the expected value and relative standard deviation (RSD) of around 10% by prespotting an internal standard solution onto the paper prior to application of the blood sample. We have demonstrated that paper spray mass spectrometry can be used to quantitatively measure drug concentrations over the entire therapeutic range for a wide variety of drugs. The high quality analytical data obtained indicate that the technique may be a viable option for therapeutic drug monitoring.

  6. Quantitation of Gamma-Hydroxybutyric Acid in Dried Blood Spots: Feasibility Assessment for Newborn Screening of Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (SSADH) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Forni, Sabrina; Pearl, Phillip L.; Gibson, K. Michael; Yu, Yuezhou; Sweetman, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Objective SSADH deficiency, the most prevalent autosomal recessive disorder of GABA degradation, is characterized by elevated gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). Neurological outcomes may be improved with early intervention and anticipatory guidance. Morbidity has been compounded by complications, e.g. hypotonia, in undiagnosed infants with otherwise routine childhood illnesses. We report pilot methodology on the feasibility of newborn screening for SSADH deficiency. Method Dried blood spot (DBS) cards from patients affected with SSADH deficiency were compared with 2831 archival DBS cards for gamma-hydroxybutyric acid content. Following extraction with methanol, GHB in DBS was separated and analyzed using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results Methodology was validated to meet satisfactory accuracy and reproducibility criteria, including intra-day and inter-day validation. Archival refrigerated dried blood spots samples of babies, infants and children (N=2831) were screened for GHB, yielding a mean +/- S.D. of 8 ± 5 nM (99.9 %-tile 63 nM) (Min 0.0 Max 78 nM). The measured mean and median concentrations in blood spots derived from seven SSADH deficient patients were 1182 nM and 699 nM respectively (Min 124, Max 4851nM). Conclusions GHB concentration in all 2831 dried blood spot cards was well below the lowest concentration of affected children. These data provide proof-of-principle for screening methodology to detect SSADH deficiency with applicability to newborn screening and earlier diagnosis. PMID:23742746

  7. DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Drábková, Lenka Záveská

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of molecular techniques, the historical collections have become widely used. Studying plant DNA using modern molecular techniques such as DNA sequencing plays an important role in understanding evolutionary relationships, identification through DNA barcoding, conservation status, and many other aspects of plant biology. Enormous herbarium collections are an important source of material especially for specimens from areas difficult to access or from taxa that are now extinct. The ability to utilize these specimens greatly enhances the research. However, the process of extracting DNA from herbarium specimens is often fraught with difficulty related to such variables as plant chemistry, drying method of the specimen, and chemical treatment of the specimen. Although many methods have been developed for extraction of DNA from herbarium specimens, the most frequently used are modified CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit protocols. Nine selected protocols in this chapter have been successfully used for high-quality DNA extraction from different kinds of plant herbarium tissues. These methods differ primarily with respect to their requirements for input material (from algae to vascular plants), type of the plant tissue (leaves with incrustations, sclerenchyma strands, mucilaginous tissues, needles, seeds), and further possible applications (PCR-based methods or microsatellites, AFLP).

  8. D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine chloromethyl ketone (PPACK): alternative anticoagulant to heparin salts for blood gas and electrolyte specimens.

    PubMed

    Lyon, M E; Fine, J S; Henderson, P J; Lyon, A W

    1995-07-01

    D-Phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine chloromethyl ketone (PPACK), a selective thrombin inhibitor, was evaluated as an alternative anticoagulant to lithium heparin (LiHep) for blood gas and whole-blood electrolyte analyses. Initial studies in serum revealed a negative proportional bias for ionized calcium (iCa) concentration measured in the range of increasing concentrations of LiHep (-0.02 mmol/L iCa per 33 kIU/L), whereas no bias in iCa concentration was detected with increasing concentrations of PPACK. No anticoagulant-dependent changes in serum sodium, potassium, chloride, glucose, lactate, ionized magnesium, or pH were detected with either PPACK or LiHep. Similarly, no bias was observed in the measurement of whole-blood PO2, PCO2, pH, or sodium or potassium concentrations with either anticoagulant. Whole blood anticoagulated with LiHep (33 kIU/L) demonstrated a consistent -0.06 +/- 0.01 mmol/L bias for iCa compared with a nonanticoagulated whole-blood control. In comparison, no iCa bias was observed with PPACK-anticoagulated whole blood. We conclude that PPACK has ideal bias-free properties as an anticoagulant in analyses for blood gases, electrolytes, and iCa.

  9. Cinemicrographic specimen housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Housing used to observe gravitation effects on specimens embedded in support media, such as agar, supports microbial specimens vertically for time-lapsed cinemicrographic studies. Procedure cannot be performed with conventional microscopes which see specimens in horizontal plane only.

  10. Cinemicrographic specimen housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Housing used to observe gravitation effects on specimens embedded in support media, such as agar, supports microbial specimens vertically for time-lapsed cinemicrographic studies. Procedure cannot be performed with conventional microscopes which see specimens in horizontal plane only.

  11. Measurement of succinyl-carnitine and methylmalonyl-carnitine on dried blood spot by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Cristiano; Boenzi, Sara; Inglese, Rita; la Marca, Giancarlo; Muraca, Maurizio; Martinez, Tegra Barreiro; Johnson, David W; Zelli, Eleonora; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2014-02-15

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is one of the most frequent organic acidurias, a class of diseases caused by enzymatic defects mainly involved in the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids. Recently, mild MMA and C4-dicarboxylyl-carnitine (C4DC-C) accumulation have been reported in patients carrying mutation in genes encoding the α-subunit (SUCLG1) and the β-subunit (SUCLA2) of the ADP-forming succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS). We developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantify in dried blood spot the two isobaric compounds of C4DC-C, succinyl-carnitine and methylmalonyl-carnitine, to allow the differential diagnosis between classical MMA and SCS-related defects. This method, with an easy liquid-phase extraction and derivatization procedure, has been validated to demonstrate the specificity, linearity, recovery, lowest limit of quantification (LLOQ), accuracy and precision for quantitative determination of blood succinyl-carnitine and methylmalonyl-carnitine. The assay was linear over a concentration range of 0.025-10 μmol/L and achieved the LLOQ of 0.025 μmol/L for both metabolites. The average slope, intercept, and coefficient of linear regression (r(2)) were respectively: 0.3389 (95% confidence interval 0.2888-0.3889), 0.0113 (95% confidence interval -0.0157 to 0.0384), 0.9995 (95% confidence interval 0.9990-1.0000) for succinyl-carnitine and 0.5699 (95% confidence interval 0.5263-0.6134), 0.0319 (95% confidence interval -0.0038 to 0.0677), 0.9997 (95% confidence interval 0.9995-1.0000) for methylmalonyl-carnitine. Within-day and between-day coefficients of variation (CV) were 1.94% and 3.19% for succinyl-carnitine and 3.21%, and 2.56 for methylmalonyl-carnitine. This method is accurate and provides a new tool to differentiate patients with classical methylmalonic acidemia from those with SCS-related defects.

  12. A cyclic-olefin-copolymer microfluidic immobilized-enzyme reactor for rapid digestion of proteins from dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Bert; Dapic, Irena; Valkenburg, Thalassa S E; Wouters, Sam; Niezen, Leon; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Corthals, Garry L; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2017-03-31

    A critical step in the bottom-up characterization of proteomes is the conversion of proteins to peptides, by means of endoprotease digestion. Nowadays this method typically uses overnight digestion and as such represents a considerable bottleneck for high-throughput analysis. This report describes protein digestion using an immobilized-enzyme reactor (IMER), which enables accelerated digestion times that are completed within seconds to minutes. For rapid digestion to occur, a cyclic-olefin-copolymer microfluidic reactor was constructed containing trypsin immobilized on a polymer monolithic material through a 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone linker. The IMER was applied for the rapid offline digestion of both singular protein standards and a complex protein mixture prior to liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. The effects of protein concentration and residence time in the IMER were assessed for protein standards of varying molecular weight between 11 and 240kDa. Compared to traditional in-solution digestion, IMER-facilitated protein digestion at room temperature for 5min yielded similar results in terms of sequence coverage and number of identified peptides. Good repeatability was demonstrated with a relative standard deviation of 6% for protein-sequence coverage. The potential of the IMER was also demonstrated for a complex protein mixture in the analysis of dried blood spots. Compared to a traditional workflow a similar number of proteins could be identified, while reducing the total analysis time from 22.5h to 4h and importantly omitting the sample-pre-treatment steps (denaturation, reduction, and alkylation). The identified proteins from two workflows showed similar distributions in terms of molecular weight and hydrophobic character. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Early infant diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in Luanda, Angola, using a new DNA PCR assay and dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Martin, Francisco; Palladino, Claudia; Mateus, Rita; Bolzan, Anna; Gomes, Perpétua; Brito, José; Carvalho, Ana Patrícia; Cardoso, Yolanda; Domingos, Cristovão; Lôa Clemente, Vanda Sofia; Taveira, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment reduces HIV-1-related mortality, morbidity and size of viral reservoirs in infants infected perinatally. Commercial molecular tests enable the early diagnosis of infection in infants but the high cost and low sensitivity with dried blood spots (DBS) limit their use in sub-Saharan Africa. To develop and validate a sensitive and cheap qualitative proviral DNA PCR-based assay for early infant diagnosis (EID) in HIV-1-exposed infants using DBS samples. Chelex-based method was used to extract DNA from DBS samples followed by a nested PCR assay using primers for the HIV-1 integrase gene. Limit of detection (LoD) was determined by Probit regression using limiting dilutions of newly produced recombinant plasmids with the integrase gene of all HIV-1 subtypes and ACH-2 cells. Clinical sensitivity and specificity were evaluated on 100 HIV-1 infected adults; 5 infected infants; 50 healthy volunteers; 139 HIV-1-exposed infants of the Angolan Pediatric HIV Cohort (APEHC) with serology at 18 months of life. All subtypes and CRF02_AG were amplified with a LoD of 14 copies. HIV-1 infection in infants was detected at month 1 of life. Sensitivity rate in adults varied with viral load, while diagnostic specificity was 100%. The percentage of HIV-1 MTCT cases between January 2012 and October 2014 was 2.2%. The cost per test was 8-10 USD which is 2- to 4-fold lower in comparison to commercial assays. The new PCR assay enables early and accurate EID. The simplicity and low-cost of the assay make it suitable for generalized implementation in Angola and other resource-constrained countries.

  14. Simultaneous Testing for 6 Lysosomal Storage Disorders and X-Adrenoleukodystrophy in Dried Blood Spots by Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tortorelli, Silvia; Turgeon, Coleman T; Gavrilov, Dimitar K; Oglesbee, Devin; Raymond, Kimiyo M; Rinaldo, Piero; Matern, Dietrich

    2016-09-01

    Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) has revealed that late-onset variants of these conditions are unexpectedly frequent and therefore may evade diagnosis. We developed an efficient and cost-effective multiplex assay to diagnose six LSDs and several peroxisomal disorders in patients presenting with diverse phenotypes at any age. Three 3-mm dried blood spot (DBS) punches were placed into individual microtiter plates. One disc was treated with a cocktail containing acid sphingomyelinase-specific substrate and internal standard (IS). To the second DBS we added a cocktail containing substrate and IS for β-glucosidase, acid α-glucosidase, α-galactosidase A, galactocerebrosidase, and α-L-iduronidase. The third DBS was extracted with methanol containing d4-C26 lysophosphatidylcholine as IS and stored until the enzyme plates were combined and purified by liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction. The extracts were evaporated, reconstituted with the extract from the lysophosphatidylcholine plate, and analyzed by flow injection tandem mass spectrometry. Reference intervals were determined by analysis of 550 samples from healthy controls. DBS from confirmed patients with 1 of the 6 LSDs (n = 33), X-adrenoleukodystrophy (n = 9), or a peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (n = 5), as well as carriers for Fabry disease (n = 17) and X-adrenoleukodystrophy (n = 5), were analyzed for assay validation. Prospective clinical testing of 578 samples revealed 25 patients affected with 1 of the detectable conditions. Our flow injection tandem mass spectrometry approach is amenable to high-throughput population screening for Hurler disease, Gaucher disease, Niemann-Pick A/B disease, Pompe disease, Krabbe disease, Fabry disease, X-adrenoleukodystrophy, and peroxisomal biogenesis disorder in DBS. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  15. Diagnosis of immunodeficiency caused by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase defect by using tandem mass spectrometry on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Canessa, Clementina; Giocaliere, Elisa; Romano, Francesca; Malvagia, Sabrina; Funghini, Silvia; Moriondo, Maria; Valleriani, Claudia; Lippi, Francesca; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Speckmann, Carsten; Borte, Stephan; Brodszki, Nicholas; Gennery, Andrew R; Weinacht, Katja; Celmeli, Fatih; Pagel, Julia; de Martino, Maurizio; Guerrini, Renzo; Wittkowski, Helmut; Santisteban, Ines; Bali, Pawan; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Hershfield, Michael; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency is a rare form of autosomal recessive combined primary immunodeficiency caused by a enzyme defect leading to the accumulation of inosine, 2'-deoxy-inosine (dIno), guanosine, and 2'-deoxy-guanosine (dGuo) in all cells, especially lymphocytes. Treatments are available and curative for PNP deficiency, but their efficacy depends on the early approach. PNP-combined immunodeficiency complies with the criteria for inclusion in a newborn screening program. This study evaluate whether mass spectrometry can identify metabolite abnormalities in dried blood spots (DBSs) from affected patients, with the final goal of individuating the disease at birth during routine newborn screening. DBS samples from 9 patients with genetically confirmed PNP-combined immunodeficiency, 10,000 DBS samples from healthy newborns, and 240 DBSs from healthy donors of different age ranges were examined. Inosine, dIno, guanosine, and dGuo were tested by using tandem mass spectrometry (TMS). T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC) levels were evaluated by using quantitative RT-PCR only for the 2 patients (patients 8 and 9) whose neonatal DBSs were available. Mean levels of guanosine, inosine, dGuo, and dIno were 4.4, 133.3, 3.6, and 3.8 μmol/L, respectively, in affected patients. No indeterminate or false-positive results were found. In patient 8 TREC levels were borderline and KREC levels were abnormal; in patient 9 TRECs were undetectable, whereas KREC levels were normal. TMS is a valid method for diagnosis of PNP deficiency on DBSs of affected patients at a negligible cost. TMS identifies newborns with PNP deficiency, whereas TREC or KREC measurement alone can fail. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dry Blood Spots a Reliable Method for Measurement of Hepatitis B Viral Load in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Stene-Johansen, Kathrine; Yaqoob, Nadeem; Overbo, Joakim; Aberra, Hanna; Desalegn, Hailemichael; Berhe, Nega; Johannessen, Asgeir

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatitis B virus (HBV) quantification is essential in the management of chronic hepatitis B, both to determine treatment eligibility and in the monitoring of treatment effect. This test, however, is rarely available in resource-limited settings due to high costs and stringent requirements for shipment and storage of plasma. Dried Blood Spots (DBS) can be a convenient alternative to plasma, but its use for HBV monitoring has not been investigated under real-life conditions in Africa. Methods The performance of DBS in HBV quantification was investigated using a modified commercial test (Abbott RealTime HBV assay). Paired DBS and plasma samples were collected from an HBV positive cohort in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. DBS were stored at ambient temperature for 4–39 days before shipment to the laboratory. Results Twenty-six paired samples were selected covering the total range of quantification, from 2.14 log IU/ml to >7 log IU/ml. HBV was detected in 21 of 21 (100%) DBS from patients with a corresponding plasma viral load above 2.70 log IU/ml. The mean difference between plasma and DBS was 0.59 log IU/ml, and the correlation was strong (R2 = 0.92). In stability studies there was no significant change in DBS viral load after storage at room temperature for up to 12 weeks. Conclusions This study suggests that DBS can be a feasible and reliable alternative to plasma for quantification of HBV in resource-limited settings. DBS can expand access to antiviral treatment for patients in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:27820845

  17. Rise in testing and diagnosis associated with Scotland's Action Plan on Hepatitis C and introduction of dried blood spot testing.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Allan; Weir, Amanda; Aitken, Celia; Gunson, Rory; Templeton, Kate; Molyneaux, Pamela; McIntyre, Paul; McDonald, Scott; Goldberg, David; Hutchinson, Sharon

    2014-12-01

    A key aim of the Hepatitis C Action Plan for Scotland was to reduce the undiagnosed population through awareness-raising activities, for general practitioners and those at risk, and the introduction of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling in community drug services to overcome barriers to testing. This study evaluates the impact of these activities on testing and diagnosis. Data on hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing undertaken between January 1999 and December 2011 in Scotland's four largest health boards were analysed. Segmented regression analysis was used to examine changes in testing following the (1) launch of the Action Plan and (2) introduction of DBS testing. Between the pre-Action Plan and Action Plan periods, increases were observed in the average number of HCV tests (19 058-29 045), positive tests (1993-2405) and new diagnoses (1221-1367). Since July 2009, 26% of new diagnoses were made in drug services. The trend in the number of positive tests was raised during the Action Plan, compared to pre-Action Plan, particularly in drug services (rate ratio (RR)=1.4, p<0.001) and prisons (RR=1.2, p<0.001); no change was observed in general practice. Following introduction of DBS testing, there was a 3-fold increase in testing (RR=3.5, p<0.001) and 12-fold increase in positives (RR=12.1, p<0.001) in drug services. The introduction of DBS sampling in community drug services has made an appreciable contribution to efforts to diagnose the HCV-infected population in Scotland. These findings are important to other countries, with injecting-related HCV epidemics, needing to scale-up testing/case-finding initiatives. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Newborn Dried Blood Spot Polymerase Chain Reaction to Identify Infants with Congenital Cytomegalovirus-Associated Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Ross, Shannon A; Ahmed, Amina; Palmer, April L; Michaels, Marian G; Sánchez, Pablo J; Stewart, Audra; Bernstein, David I; Feja, Kristina; Fowler, Karen B; Boppana, Suresh B

    2017-05-01

    To determine the utility of dried blood spot (DBS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in identifying infants with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection-associated sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Newborns at 7 US hospitals between March 2007 and March 2012 were screened for CMV by saliva rapid culture and/or PCR. Infected infants were monitored for SNHL during the first 4 years of life to determine sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of DBS PCR for identifying CMV-associated SNHL. DBS at birth was positive in 11 of 26 children (42%) with SNHL at age 4 years and in 72 of 270 children (27%) with normal hearing (P = .11). The sensitivity (42.3%; 95% CI, 23.4%-63.1%) and specificity (73.3%; 95% CI, 67.6%-78.5%) was low for DBS PCR in identifying children with SNHL at age 4 years. The positive and negative likelihood ratios of DBS PCR positivity to detect CMV-associated SNHL at age 4 years were 1.6 (95% CI, 0.97-2.6) and 0.8 (95% CI, 0.6-1.1), respectively. There was no difference in DBS viral loads between children with SNHL and those without SNHL. DBS PCR for CMV has low sensitivity and specificity for identifying infants with CMV-associated hearing loss. These findings, together with previous reports, demonstrate that DBS PCR does not identify either the majority of CMV-infected newborns or those with CMV-associated SNHL early in life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ethyl glucuronide in vitreous humor and blood postmortem specimens: analysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry and interpreting results of neo-formation of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Sara; Bernini, Marzia; De Ferrari, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The determination of ethyl glucuronide (EtG), a stable and sensitive marker that is specific to alcohol intake, finds many applications both in the forensic toxicology and clinical fields. The aim of the study is to examine the possibility of using a cadaveric biological matrix, vitreous humor (VH), to determine EtG as a marker of recent ethanol use. The blood, taken from the femoral vein, and the VH were obtained from 63 autopsy cases. Analysis of the EtG was performed using an LC/MS/MS system. Analyses of the ethanol and putrefaction biomarkers, such as acetaldehyde and n-propanol, were performed using the HS-GC/FID technique in both the matrices. In 17 cases, both ethanol and EtG were absent in both matrices.Nineteen cases presented ethanol in blood from 0.05 to 0.30 g/L, EtG-Blood concentration from 0.02 to 3.27 mg/L, and EtG-VH concentration from 0.01 mg/L to 2.88 mg/L. Thirteen cases presented ethanol in blood > 0.05 g/L but EtG concentration in blood and VH lower than 0.01 mg/L, are part of these 8 samples presented acetic aldehyde and n- propanol in blood or VH, means identification of putrefaction indicators. Fourteen cases presented ethanol in blood > 0.46 and EtG concentration in blood and VH higher than 0.01 mg/L. The determination of EtG in biological material is important in those cases where the intake of ethanol appears doubtful, as it allows us to exclude the possibility of any post-mortem formation of ethanol.

  20. Simple, Sensitive, and Specific Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype B DNA in Dried Blood Samples for Diagnosis in Infants in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Ingrid A.; Drennan, Kathryn D.; Melvin, Ann J.; Mohan, Kathey M.; Herz, Arnd M.; Alarcón, Jorge; Piscoya, Julia; Velázquez, Carlos; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of virus is used to diagnose human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants due to the persistence of maternal antibodies for a year or more. An HIV-1 DNA PCR assay with simple specimen collection and processing was developed and evaluated. Whole blood was collected on filter paper that lysed cells and bound the DNA, eliminating specimen centrifugation and extraction procedures. The DNA remained bound to the filter paper during PCR amplification. Assays of copy number standards showed reproducible detection of 5 to 10 copies of HIV-1 in 5 μl of whole blood. The sensitivity of the assay did not decrease after storage of the standards on filter paper for 3 months at room temperature or after incubation at 37 or 45°C for 20 h. The primers used for nested PCR of the HIV-1 pol gene amplified templates from a reference panel of multiple HIV-1 subtypes but did not amplify a subtype A or a subtype C virus from children living in Seattle. The assay had a sensitivity of 98.4% and a specificity of 98.3% for testing of 122 specimens from 35 HIV-1-infected and 16 uninfected children and 43 seronegative adults living in Washington. The assay had a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 100% for testing of 102 HIV-1-positive (as determined by enzyme immunoassay) Peruvian women and 6 seropositive and 34 seronegative infants. This assay, with adsorption of whole blood to filter paper and no specimen processing, provides a practical, economical, sensitive, and specific method for the diagnosis of HIV-1 subtype B infection in infants. PMID:11136743

  1. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biolog