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Sample records for dried blood specimens

  1. Field study of dried blood spot specimens for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping.

    PubMed

    Parry, C M; Parkin, N; Diallo, K; Mwebaza, S; Batamwita, R; DeVos, J; Bbosa, N; Lyagoba, F; Magambo, B; Jordan, M R; Downing, R; Zhang, G; Kaleebu, P; Yang, C; Bertagnolio, S

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are an alternative specimen type for HIV drug resistance genotyping in resource-limited settings. Data relating to the impact of DBS storage and shipment conditions on genotyping efficiency under field conditions are limited. We compared the genotyping efficiencies and resistance profiles of DBS stored and shipped at different temperatures to those of plasma specimens collected in parallel from patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. Plasma and four DBS cards from anti-coagulated venous blood and a fifth card from finger-prick blood were prepared from 103 HIV patients with a median viral load (VL) of 57,062 copies/ml (range, 1,081 to 2,964,191). DBS were stored at ambient temperature for 2 or 4 weeks or frozen at -80 °C and shipped from Uganda to the United States at ambient temperature or frozen on dry ice for genotyping using a broadly sensitive in-house method. Plasma (97.1%) and DBS (98.1%) stored and shipped frozen had similar genotyping efficiencies. DBS stored frozen (97.1%) or at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (93.2%) and shipped at ambient temperature also had similar genotyping efficiencies. Genotyping efficiency was reduced for DBS stored at ambient temperature for 4 weeks (89.3%, P = 0.03) or prepared from finger-prick blood and stored at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (77.7%, P < 0.001) compared to DBS prepared from venous blood and handled similarly. Resistance profiles were similar between plasma and DBS specimens. This report delineates the optimal DBS collection, storage, and shipping conditions and opens a new avenue for cost-saving ambient-temperature DBS specimen shipments for HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) surveillances in resource-limited settings. PMID:24871219

  2. Field Study of Dried Blood Spot Specimens for HIV-1 Drug Resistance Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Parry, C. M.; Diallo, K.; Mwebaza, S.; Batamwita, R.; DeVos, J.; Bbosa, N.; Lyagoba, F.; Magambo, B.; Jordan, M. R.; Downing, R.; Zhang, G.; Kaleebu, P.; Bertagnolio, S.

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are an alternative specimen type for HIV drug resistance genotyping in resource-limited settings. Data relating to the impact of DBS storage and shipment conditions on genotyping efficiency under field conditions are limited. We compared the genotyping efficiencies and resistance profiles of DBS stored and shipped at different temperatures to those of plasma specimens collected in parallel from patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. Plasma and four DBS cards from anti-coagulated venous blood and a fifth card from finger-prick blood were prepared from 103 HIV patients with a median viral load (VL) of 57,062 copies/ml (range, 1,081 to 2,964,191). DBS were stored at ambient temperature for 2 or 4 weeks or frozen at −80°C and shipped from Uganda to the United States at ambient temperature or frozen on dry ice for genotyping using a broadly sensitive in-house method. Plasma (97.1%) and DBS (98.1%) stored and shipped frozen had similar genotyping efficiencies. DBS stored frozen (97.1%) or at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (93.2%) and shipped at ambient temperature also had similar genotyping efficiencies. Genotyping efficiency was reduced for DBS stored at ambient temperature for 4 weeks (89.3%, P = 0.03) or prepared from finger-prick blood and stored at ambient temperature for 2 weeks (77.7%, P < 0.001) compared to DBS prepared from venous blood and handled similarly. Resistance profiles were similar between plasma and DBS specimens. This report delineates the optimal DBS collection, storage, and shipping conditions and opens a new avenue for cost-saving ambient-temperature DBS specimen shipments for HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) surveillances in resource-limited settings. PMID:24871219

  3. The use of dried blood spot specimens for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping in young children initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Salimo, Anna T.; Ledwaba, Johanna; Coovadia, Ashraf; Abrams, Elaine J.; Technau, Karl-Günter; Kuhn, Louise; Morris, Lynn; Hunt, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    Paired plasma and dried blood spots (DBS) from 232 South African HIV-infected children initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) were genotyped for drug resistance mutations, most of who had prior exposure to ART for prevention-of-mother-to-child-transmission. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations were most commonly detected in both specimen types, particularly Y181C/I and K103N/S. Resistance interpretation concordance was achieved in 97% of pairs with 7 children having mutations detected in DBS only. These results validate the preferential use of DBS specimens for HIVDR genotyping in this patient group. PMID:26192603

  4. Use of dried blood spot specimens in the detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Cassol, S; Salas, T; Arella, M; Neumann, P; Schechter, M T; O'Shaughnessy, M

    1991-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBSs) constitute a potentially valuable source of material for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serologic and molecular testing. To facilitate molecular testing, we have adapted the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to the detection of HIV proviral DNA in DBS samples. The method is highly reproducible, with 75 microliters of whole dried blood providing sufficient DNA for duplicate testing with three primer sets. By using DBS PCR, 66 of 69 (95.6%) seropositive at-risk individuals tested positive by at least two primer sets and 85 of 85 (100%) low-risk seronegative blood donors tested negative by all three sets of primers. The frequency of HIV DNA detection in seronegative at-risk individuals was low, with only 1 of 58 (1.7%) individuals testing positive. These results show that in a clinical environment, HIV PCR analysis of DBS specimens is specific and sensitive. The method is cost effective and presents a useful alternative to the isolation of HIV from seropositive babies with an undefined infection status. Images PMID:1890166

  5. Committee report: Considerations and recommendations for national guidance regarding the retention and use of residual dried blood spot specimens after newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Therrell, Bradford L; Hannon, W Harry; Bailey, Donald B; Goldman, Edward B; Monaco, Jana; Norgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Terry, Sharon F; Johnson, Alissa; Howell, R Rodney

    2011-07-01

    Newborn screening programs are state based with variable policies. Guidance regarding the retention, storage, and use of portions of newborn screening dried blood spots that remain after screening (residual specimens) was first published in 1996. Since then, newborn screening programs have paid increased attention to specimen storage and usage issues. Standard residual specimen uses include quality assurance and program evaluation, treatment efficacy, test refinement, and result verification. In all cases, privacy and security are primary concerns. In general, two distinct state practices regarding the storage and use of residual newborn screening specimens exist: (1) short-term storage (<3 years), primarily for standard program uses and (2) long-term storage (>18 years), for standard program uses and possible important public health research uses. Recently, there have been concerns in some consumer communities regarding both the potential uses of residual specimens and patient (newborn and family) privacy. To assist in policy improvements that can protect the individual's privacy and allow for important public health uses of residual newborn screening specimens, the Secretary of Health and Human Services' Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children has developed recommendations (with requested action by the Secretary where applicable). This report presents the Committee's recommendations and reviews the pertinent associated issues.

  6. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M Bradford

    2014-07-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5' and 3' region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5' and 3' proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes.

  7. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M Bradford

    2014-07-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5' and 3' region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5' and 3' proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes. PMID:24667303

  8. Single genome amplification of proviral HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spot specimens collected during early infant screening programs in Lusaka, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Seu, Lillian; Mwape, Innocent; Guffey, M. Bradford

    2014-01-01

    The ability to evaluate individual HIV-1 virions from the quasispecies of vertically infected infants was evaluated in a field setting at the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia. Infant heel-prick blood specimens were spotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) filter paper cards at government health clinics. Nucleic acid was extracted and used as a template for HIV-1 proviral DNA detection by a commercial Amplicor HIV-1 PCR test (Roche, version 1.5). On samples that tested positive by commercial diagnostic assay, amplification of DNA was performed using an in-house assay of the 5′ and 3′ region of the HIV-1 genome. Additionally, fragments covering 1200 nucleotides within pol (full length protease and partial reverse transcriptase) and 1400 nucleotides within env (variable 1-variable 5 region) were further analyzed by single genome amplification (SGA). In summary, we have demonstrated an in-house assay for amplifying the 5′ and 3′ proviral HIV-1 DNA as well as pol and env proviral DNA fragments from DBS cards collected and analyzed entirely in Zambia. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of utilizing DBS cards to amplify the whole proviral HIV-1 genome as well as perform SGA on key HIV-1 genes. PMID:24667303

  9. Comparison of Ahlstrom grade 226, Munktell TFN, and Whatman 903 filter papers for dried blood spot specimen collection and subsequent HIV-1 load and drug resistance genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Rottinghaus, Erin; Bile, Ebi; Modukanele, Mosetsanagape; Maruping, Maruping; Mine, Madisa; Nkengasong, John; Yang, Chunfu

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) collected onto filter paper have eased the difficulty of blood collection in resource-limited settings. Currently, Whatman 903 (W-903) filter paper is the only filter paper that has been used for HIV load and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing. We therefore evaluated two additional commercially available filter papers, Ahlstrom grade 226 (A-226) and Munktell TFN (M-TFN), for viral load (VL) testing and HIVDR genotyping using W-903 filter paper as a comparison group. DBS specimens were generated from 344 adult patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Botswana. The VL was measured with NucliSENS EasyQ HIV-1 v2.0, and genotyping was performed for those specimens with a detectable VL (≥ 2.90 log(10) copies/ml) using an in-house method. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a strong concordance in quantitative VL analysis between W-903 and A-226 (bias = -0.034 ± 0.246 log(10) copies/ml [mean difference ± standard deviation]) and W-903 and M-TFN (bias = -0.028 ± 0.186 log(10) copies/ml) filter papers, while qualitative VL analysis for virological failure determination, defined as a VL of ≥ 3.00 log(10) copies/ml, showed low sensitivities for A-266 (71.54%) and M-TFN (65.71%) filter papers compared to W-903 filter paper. DBS collected on M-TFN filter paper had the highest genotyping efficiency (100%) compared to W-903 and A-226 filter papers (91.7%) and appeared more sensitive in detecting major HIVDR mutations. DBS collected on A-226 and M-TFN filter papers performed similarly to DBS collected on W-903 filter paper for quantitative VL analysis and HIVDR detection. Together, the encouraging genotyping results and the variability observed in determining virological failure from this small pilot study warrant further investigation of A-226 and M-TFN filter papers as specimen collection devices for HIVDR monitoring surveys.

  10. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  11. Simultaneous Detection of Major Drug Resistance Mutations of HIV-1 Subtype B Viruses from Dried Blood Spot Specimens by Multiplex Allele-Specific Assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Zhou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jing; Nkengasong, John; Gao, Feng; Yang, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    A multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay has been developed for the detection of HIV-1 subtype C drug resistance mutations (DRMs). We have optimized the MAS assay to determine subtype B DRMs in dried blood spots (DBS) collected from patients on antiretroviral therapy. The new assay accurately detected DRMs, including low-abundance mutations that were often missed by Sanger sequencing. PMID:26560533

  12. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1675 - Blood specimen collection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood specimen collection device. 862.1675 Section... Systems § 862.1675 Blood specimen collection device. (a) Identification. A blood specimen collection device is a device intended for medical purposes to collect and to handle blood specimens and to...

  17. Microwave applications to rock specimen drying in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jihwan; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Microwave heating is the process in which electromagnetic wave with 300 MHz - 300 GHz heats dielectric material. Although in the beginning microwave was mainly used in food industry to cook or heat the food, it soon became clear that microwave had a large potential for other applications. It was thus introduced in geological fields of investigation like mineral processing, oil sand and oil shale extraction, soil remediation, waste treatment. However, the drying techniques using microwave was rarely treated in geology field. According to the ISRM suggested methods, experimental rock specimens in laboratory test were dried in 105°C oven for a period of at least 24 hours. In this method, hot air transmits heats to material by means of thermal conduction, and the heat was transferred from the surface to the inside of the rock specimens. The thermal gradient and moisture gradient can deteriorate the specimens, and energy can be wasted in bulk heating the specimens. The aim of our study was to compare physical property, microstructural property, and energy efficiency between microwave drying method and conventional oven drying method, and to suggest new method for rock drying. Granite, basalt, and sandstone were selected as specimens and were made in cylinder shape with 54 mm diameter. To compare two different methods, one set of saturated specimens were dried in 105°C conventional oven and the other set of saturated specimens were dried in microwave oven. After dried, the specimens were cooled and saturated in 20°C water 48 hours. The saturation-drying were repeated 50 cycles, and the physical property and microstructural property were measured every 10 cycles. Absorption and elastic wave velocity were measured to investigate the change of physical property, and microscope image and X-ray computed tomography image were obtained to investigate the change of microstructural property of rock specimens. The electricity consumption of conventional oven and microwave oven

  18. Stabilized dried blood spot collection.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Darren; Chung, Dwayne Chung Kim; Toth, Monika; Liew, Oi Wah; Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2016-08-01

    During the collection phase of the dried blood spot method, practitioners need to ensure that there is no smearing of the blood sample on the filter paper or else readings from it will be invalid. This can be difficult to accomplish in the field if there is relative motion between the site of blood discharge on the finger and the filter paper. In this article, a gyroscope stabilization method is introduced and demonstrated to provide consistent and improved dried blood spot collection within a circular guide region notwithstanding the presence of rocking. PMID:27156813

  19. Drone Transport of Microbes in Blood and Sputum Laboratory Specimens.

    PubMed

    Amukele, Timothy K; Street, Jeff; Carroll, Karen; Miller, Heather; Zhang, Sean X

    2016-10-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) could potentially be used to transport microbiological specimens. To examine the impact of UAVs on microbiological specimens, blood and sputum culture specimens were seeded with usual pathogens and flown in a UAV for 30 ± 2 min. Times to recovery, colony counts, morphologies, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identifications of the flown and stationary specimens were similar for all microbes studied.

  20. Innovation for reducing blood culture contamination: initial specimen diversion technique.

    PubMed

    Patton, Richard G; Schmitt, Timothy

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesized that diversion of the first milliliter of venipuncture blood-the initial specimen diversion technique (ISDT)-would eliminate incompletely sterilized fragments of skin from the culture specimen and significantly reduce our blood culture contamination rate (R). We studied our hypothesis prospectively beginning with our control culture (C) definition: one venipuncture with two sequentially obtained specimens, 10 ml each, the first specimen (M1) for aerobic and the second (M2) for anaerobic media. The test ISDT culture (D) was identical, with the exception that each was preceded by diverting a 1-ml sample (DS) from the same venipuncture. During the first of two sequential 9-month periods, we captured D versus C data (n=3,733), where DMXR and CMXR are R for D and C specimens. Our hypothesis predicted DS would divert soiled skin fragments from DM1, and therefore, CM1R would be significantly greater than DM1R. This was confirmed by CM1R (30/1,061 [2.8%]) less DM1R (37/2,672 [1.4%]; P=0.005), which equals 1.4%. For the second 9-month follow-up period, data were compiled for all cultures (n=4,143), where ADMXR is R for all (A) diversion specimens, enabling comparison to test ISDT. Our hypothesis predicted no significant differences for test ISDT versus all ISDT. This was confirmed by DM1R (37/2,672 [1.4%]) versus ADM1R (42/4,143 [1.0%]; P=0.17) and DM2R (21/2,672 [0.80%]) versus ADM2R (39/4,143 [0.94%]; P=0.50). We conclude that our hypothesis is valid: venipuncture needles soil blood culture specimens with unsterilized skin fragments and increase R, and ISDT significantly reduces R from venipuncture-obtained blood culture specimens.

  1. Molecular sex identification of dry human teeth specimens from Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Zagga, AD; Ahmed, H. OON; Ismail, SM; Tadros, AA

    2014-01-01

    Background: The advent of molecular techniques has revolutionized the ability of scientists to estimate the sex of individuals. Forensic odontology plays an important role in establishing the sex of victims with bodies mutilated beyond recognition due to major disaster. The genetic difference between males and females is defined by the presence or absence of the Y-chromosome. The use of alphoid-repeat primers in sex estimation was first applied on dried blood. Generally, the X, Y alphoid repeats blind test attest to the accuracy of genetic testing, and also point the potential for occasional error in morphometric sexing. Aim: To estimate genetic sex of dry human teeth specimens from Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A single-blind study of DNA analysis for sex estimation of nine dry human teeth specimens from Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria, through PCR, using alphoid repeats primers, was undertaken. Results: The genetic sex of each group of the teeth samples were accurately (100%) identified. For each group of teeth, PCR Sensitivity = 100%, Specificity = 0%, Predictive value of positive test = 100%, Predictive value of negative test = 0%, False positive rate = 0%, False negative rate = 0%, Efficiency of test = 100%. Fisher's exact probability test P = 1. Z-test: z- and P values were invalid. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated the successful use of alphoid-repeat primers in genetic sex identification of human dry teeth samples from Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria. This is the first known study estimating the sex of human dry teeth specimens by means of PCR in Nigeria. There is need for further studies in Nigeria to complement the findings of this study. PMID:25125922

  2. Pattern formation in drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, D.; Sobac, B.; Loquet, B.; Sampol, J.

    2011-01-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood exhibits coupled physical mechanisms, such as Marangoni flow, evaporation and wettability. The final stage of a whole blood drop evaporation reveals regular patterns with a good reproducibility for a healthy person. Other experiments on anaemic and hyperlipidemic people were performed, and different patterns were revealed. The flow motion inside the blood drop is observed and analyzed with the use of a digital camera: the influence of the red blood cells (RBCs) motion is revealed at the drop periphery as well as its consequences on the final stage of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of the dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of haematology. The blood drop evaporation process is evidenced to be driven only by Marangoni flow. The same axisymetric pattern formation is observed, and can be forecast for different blood drop diameters. The evaporation mass flux can be predicted with a good agreement, assuming only the knowledge of the colloids mass concentration.

  3. Effects of drying conditions, admixtures and specimen size on shrinkage strains

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saleh, Saleh A. . E-mail: alsaleh@dr.com; Al-Zaid, Rajeh Z.

    2006-10-15

    The paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the effects of drying conditions, specimen size and presence of plasticizing admixture on the development of shrinkage strains. The measurements are taken in a harsh (50 deg. C and 5% R.H.) and a moderate environment (28 deg. C and 50% R.H.). The results include strain development at various levels of cross sections of concrete prisms. The drying conditions are found to be the dominant parameter affecting the shrinkage strain development particularly in specimens of smaller sizes. The effect of plasticizing admixture on shrinkage strains is negligible.

  4. Improved surveillance of Japanese encephalitis by detection of virus-specific IgM in desiccated blood specimens*

    PubMed Central

    Burke, D. S.; Chatiyanonda, K.; Anandrik, S.; Nakornsri, S.; Nisalak, A.; Hoke, C. H.

    1985-01-01

    An IgM antibody-capture type enzyme-linked immunoassay (MAC ELISA) was compared with the haemagglutination inhibition method (HI) for establishing a laboratory diagnosis of acute Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus infection using specimens of dried blood eluted from filter paper strips. Paired samples from 243 encephalitis patients, which had been obtained by mail through a national surveillance programme in Thailand, were tested. During the peak of the 1983 encephalitis epidemic, 72% of cases were diagnosed as Japanese encephalitis by MAC ELISA, compared with only 38% by HI. During non-epidemic periods, the proportions diagnosed as Japanese encephalitis by MAC ELISA or HI were 26% and 33%, respectively. Detection of IgM anti-JE activity by the antibody-capture immunoassay is superior to the HI method for establishing a diagnosis of acute Japanese encephalitis using dried blood specimens. PMID:3011302

  5. Diagnosis of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome from stored filter paper blood specimens

    PubMed Central

    Starck, L; Lovgren, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Smith-Lemli-Opitz (SLO) syndrome is a recessively inheritable metabolic disease with deficiency of cholesterol and accumulation of dehydrocholesterols, caused by a defect in the last step of cholesterol biosynthesis. Biochemical methods for identification of affected individuals, even prenatally, have been developed. Reliable genetic counselling is now possible.
AIM—To find a method of proving or disproving whether a child in whom SLO syndrome had been suspected but not confirmed during lifetime had in fact died of the SLO syndrome.
METHODS—Lipid extracts of stored filter paper blood specimens collected at the national neonatal metabolic screening were used. The ratio of dehydrocholesterols to cholesterol was measured by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.
RESULTS—The ratio of 8-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol in stored filter paper specimens clearly distinguished affected infants from normal infants. SLO syndrome was thus proven in two children who had died more than seven years earlier.
CONCLUSION—It is possible to diagnose SLO syndrome from dried paper specimens, even when the samples were collected more than a decade ago. Genetic counselling is available for families of affected children who died before the discovery of the defect in cholesterol synthesis.

 PMID:10833186

  6. Design and Implementation of an External Quality Assessment Program for HIV Viral Load Measurements Using Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Prach, Lisa M.; Puren, Adrian; Lippman, Sheri A.; Carmona, Sergio; Stephenson, Sophie; Cutler, Ewalde; Barnhart, Scott

    2014-01-01

    An external quality assurance program was developed for HIV-1 RNA viral load measurements taken from dried blood spots using a reference panel and field-collected specimens. The program demonstrated that accurate and reproducible quantitation can be obtained from field-collected specimens. Residual proviral DNA may confound interpretation in virologically suppressed subjects. PMID:25520449

  7. Binding of the blood group-reactive lectins to human adult kidney specimens.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, L; Juusela, H; Virtanen, I

    1990-01-01

    The binding of a panel of blood group-reactive lectins to frozen sections of human kidney was studied with a special emphasis on reactivity with endothelia and basement membranes. The blood group A-reactive lectins, all specific for alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), Helix aspersa (HAA), Helix pomatia (HPA), and Griffonia simplicifolia I-A4 (GSA-I-A4) agglutinins bound to the endothelium in specimens with blood groups A and AB. In other samples, these lectins reacted predominantly with tubular basement membranes, as well as with certain tubules. Both Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Vicia villosa agglutinins (VVA), reported to react with blood group A1 substance, failed to reveal endothelia in most specimens, but bound differently to tubules in all blood groups. The blood group B-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-D-galactose (alpha-Gal) or GalNAc, respectively, GSA-I-B4 and Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), bound to the endothelia in specimens from blood group B or AB and in other specimens bound only to certain tubules. Among the blood group O-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-L-fucose (Fuc), Ulex europaeus I agglutinin (UEA-I) conjugates, but not other lectins with a similar nominal specificity, bound strongly to endothelia in specimens with blood group O. The UEA-I conjugates bound distinctly more faintly to endothelia in specimens of other blood groups. The present results indicate that lectins, binding to defined blood group determinants, react with endothelia in specimens of the respective blood group status. Furthermore, they suggest that basement membranes and some tubules in the human kidney show a distinct heterogeneity in their expression of saccharide residues, related to their blood group status.

  8. Effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in forensic drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    In forensic drug testing, it is important to immediately take biological specimens from suspects and victims to prove their drug intake. We evaluated the effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in terms of ease of sampling, drug detection sensitivity, and drug detection periods for each specimen type. After four commercially available pharmaceutical products were administered to healthy subjects, each in a single dose, their urine, blood, saliva, and fingerprints were taken at predetermined sampling times over approximately four weeks. Fourteen analytes (the administered drugs and their main metabolites) were extracted from each specimen using simple pretreatments, such as dilution and deproteinization, and were analyzed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Most of the analytes were detected in saliva and fingerprints, as well as in urine and blood. The time-courses of drug concentrations were similar between urine and fingerprints, and between blood and saliva. Compared to the other compounds, the acidic compounds, for example ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid, were more difficult to detect in all specimens. Acetaminophen, dihydrocodeine, and methylephedrine were detected in fingerprints at later sampling times than in urine. However, a relationship between the drug structures and their detection periods in each specimen was not found. Saliva and fingerprints could be easily sampled on site without using special techniques or facilities. In addition, fingerprints could be immediately analyzed after simple and rapid treatment. In cases where it would be difficult to immediately obtain urine and blood, saliva and fingerprints could be effective alternative specimens for drug testing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Ancient pathogens in museal dry bone specimens: analysis of paleocytology and aDNA.

    PubMed

    Gaul, Johanna Sophia; Winter, Eduard; Grossschmidt, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Bone samples investigated in this study derive from the pathologic-anatomical collection of the Natural History Museum of Vienna. In order to explore the survival of treponemes and treponemal ancient DNA in museal dry bone specimens, we analyzed three individuals known to have been infected with Treponema pallidum pallidum. No reproducible evidence of surviving pathogen's ancient DNA (aDNA) was obtained, despite the highly sensitive extraction and amplification techniques (TPP15 and arp). Additionally, decalcification fluid of bone sections was smear stained with May-Gruenwald-Giemsa. The slides were examined using direct light microscope and dark field illumination. Remnants of spirochetal structures were detectable in every smear. Our results demonstrate that aDNA is unlikely to survive, but spirochetal remains are stainable and thus detectable. PMID:25994097

  10. Process for measuring low cadmium levels in blood and other biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, David P.; Huff, Edmund A.; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H.

    1994-01-01

    A process for measuring low levels of cadmium in blood and other biological specimens is provided without interference from high levels of alkali metal contaminants by forming an aqueous solution and without contamination by environmental cadmium absent the proteins from the specimen, selectively removing cadmium from the aqueous solution on an anion exchange resin, thereby removing the alkali metal contaminants, resolubilizing cadmium from the resin to form a second solution and analyzing the second solution for cadmium, the process being carried out in a cadmium-free environment.

  11. Process for measuring low cadmium levels in blood and other biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, David P.; Huff, Edmund A.; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H.

    1994-05-03

    A process for measuring low levels of cadmium in blood and other biological specimens is provided without interference from high levels of alkali metal contaminants by forming an aqueous solution and without contamination by environmental cadmium absent the proteins from the specimen, selectively removing cadmium from the aqueous solution on an anion exchange resin, thereby removing the alkali metal contaminants, resolubilizing cadmium from the resin to form a second solution and analyzing the second solution for cadmium, the process being carried out in a cadmium-free environment.

  12. Evaluation of PNA FISH® Yeast Traffic Light in identification of Candida species from blood and non-blood culture specimens.

    PubMed

    Radic, Marina; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Tonkic, Marija

    2016-08-01

    PNA FISH(®) (peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization) Yeast Traffic Light (PNA FISH(®) YTL) assay is a commercially avaliable method for rapid identification of Candida spp. directly from positive blood cultures. This report provides a one-year experience in identification of yeasts from 25 specimens (15 positive blood cultures and 10 other clinically significant specimens) using PNA FISH(®) YTL and comparing it to VITEK 2 System. Overall, assay identification compatibility with VITEK 2 System was found among 21/25 (84%) isolates tested. Only 3/25 (12%) of the isolates were not identified, and one isolate was misidentified by the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay. Our results show that the assay is a reliable method in identification of Candida spp. not only from blood cultures, but even from other clinically significant specimens (urine cultures, catheter tip cultures, peritoneal fluid cultures) when compared to automated method like VITEK 2 System. This novel application of the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay could therefore contribute to cost savings and significant benefit to patients, as rapid information about isolated yeast species is provided. PMID:27067303

  13. Evaluation of PNA FISH® Yeast Traffic Light in identification of Candida species from blood and non-blood culture specimens.

    PubMed

    Radic, Marina; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Tonkic, Marija

    2016-08-01

    PNA FISH(®) (peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization) Yeast Traffic Light (PNA FISH(®) YTL) assay is a commercially avaliable method for rapid identification of Candida spp. directly from positive blood cultures. This report provides a one-year experience in identification of yeasts from 25 specimens (15 positive blood cultures and 10 other clinically significant specimens) using PNA FISH(®) YTL and comparing it to VITEK 2 System. Overall, assay identification compatibility with VITEK 2 System was found among 21/25 (84%) isolates tested. Only 3/25 (12%) of the isolates were not identified, and one isolate was misidentified by the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay. Our results show that the assay is a reliable method in identification of Candida spp. not only from blood cultures, but even from other clinically significant specimens (urine cultures, catheter tip cultures, peritoneal fluid cultures) when compared to automated method like VITEK 2 System. This novel application of the PNA FISH(®) YTL assay could therefore contribute to cost savings and significant benefit to patients, as rapid information about isolated yeast species is provided.

  14. Hi-Plex targeted sequencing is effective using DNA derived from archival dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dumont, T; Mahmoodi, M; Hammet, F; Tran, T; Tsimiklis, H; Giles, G G; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C; Park, D J

    2015-02-01

    Many genetic epidemiology resources have collected dried blood spots (predominantly as Guthrie Cards) as an economical and efficient means of archiving sources of DNA, conferring great value to genetic screening methods that are compatible with this medium. We applied Hi-Plex to screen the breast cancer predisposition gene PALB2 in 93 Guthrie Card-derived DNA specimens previously characterized for PALB2 genetic variants via DNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines, whole blood, and buffy coat. Of the 93 archival Guthrie Card-derived DNAs, 92 (99%) were processed successfully and sequenced using approximately half of a MiSeq run. From these 92 DNAs, all 59 known variants were detected and no false-positive variant calls were yielded. Fully 98.13% of amplicons (5417/5520) were represented within 15-fold of the median coverage (2786 reads), and 99.98% of amplicons (5519/5520) were represented at a depth of 10 read-pairs or greater. With Hi-Plex, we show for the first time that a High-Plex amplicon-based massively parallel sequencing (MPS) system can be applied effectively to DNA prepared from dried blood spot archival specimens and, as such, can dramatically increase the scopes of both method and resource.

  15. [Diagnosis of congenital cytomegalovirus infection in newborn dried blood spots on Guthrie cards. A promissory technique].

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Angélica L; González, Cecilia A; Pardón, Fabián; Sarubi, María A; Canero Velazco, Cristina

    2008-04-01

    Laboratories play a crucial role in the diagnosis of congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus infection, considering that other viral infections in newborn infants have similar clinical characteristics. The objectives of this work are to compare the results of the polymerase reaction in blood spots and urine as well as point out the relevance of the result in the Guthrie cards to differentiate congenital from perinatal infection. A total of 148 patients suspicious of CMVH infections were studied in the Congenital Perinatal Infections and Sexual Transmission Laboratory, at the National Institute "Carlos G. Malbrán". The dry blood samples (Guthrie cards) and urine of all patients were studied through the polymerase chain reaction. From the 148 patients, 3 presented other infections, 95 tested negative and 50 positive for cytomegalovirus: 35 had congenital infection and 15 perinatal. In the congenital cases, the polymerase reaction in dry blood was positive (sensitivity 100%, specificity 98.9%, VPP 98% and VPN 100%). Four of them with tardive symptoms were studied retrospectively. The urine specimens from the remaining 15 patients that were taken 15 days after birth were analyzed through the same methods, showing a sensitivity of 100%, the retrospective analysis of this dry blood group yielded negative results, so the infection was considered perinatal. Thus, the dry blood polymerase reaction of the newborn infants makes it a reliable assay for diagnosing congenital cytomegalovirus infection and could be used as an alternative method to urine polymerase reaction. In addition, this test is able to reveal whether the infection is congenital or perinatal in those cases of late symptom or other cases of controversial origin.

  16. Molecular Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae on Dried Blood Spots from Febrile Nigerian Children Compared to Culture

    PubMed Central

    Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Schleiss, Mark R.; Hassan-Hanga, Fatimah; Onuchukwu, Chuma; Umoru, Dominic; Obaro, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nigeria has one of the highest burdens of pneumococcal disease in the world, but accurate surveillance is lacking. Molecular detection of infectious pathogens in dried blood spots (DBS) is an ideal method for surveillance of infections in resource-limited settings because of its low cost, minimal blood volumes involved, and ease of storage at ambient temperature. Our study aim was to evaluate a Streptococcus pneumoniae real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR) assay on DBS from febrile Nigerian children on Whatman 903 and FTA filter papers, compared to the gold standard of culture. Methods Between September 2011 to May 2015, blood was collected from children 5 years of age or under who presented to six hospital study sites throughout northern and central Nigeria with febrile illness, and inoculated into blood culture bottles or spotted onto Whatman 903 or FTA filter paper. Culture and rt-PCR were performed on all samples. Results A total of 537 DBS specimens from 535 children were included in the study, of which 15 were culture-positive for S. pneumoniae. The rt-PCR assay detected S. pneumoniae in 12 DBS specimens (2.2%). One positive rt-PCR result was identified in a culture-negative specimen from a high-risk subject, and two positive rt-PCR results were negative on repeat testing. Six culture-confirmed cases of S. pneumoniae bacteremia were missed. Compared to culture, the overall sensitivities of Whatman 903 and FTA DBS for detection of S. pneumoniae were 57.1% (95% CI 18.4–90.1%) and 62.5% (95% CI 24.5–91.5%), respectively. Nonspecific amplification was noted in an additional 22 DBS (4.1%). Among these, six were positive for a non-S. pneumoniae pathogen on culture. Conclusions Rt-PCR was able to detect S. pneumoniae from clinical DBS specimens, including from a culture-negative specimen. Our findings show promise of this approach as a surveillance diagnostic, but also raise important cautionary questions. Several DBS specimens were detected as

  17. Evaluation and comparison of postmortem hydrocodone concentrations in peripheral blood, central blood and liver specimens: a minimal potential for redistribution.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Fitzgerald, Robert L; McIntyre, Iain M

    2015-02-01

    Postmortem changes can alter the concentration of drugs in the vascular compartment as compared with concentrations originally present at the time of death. Numerous drugs have been reported to increase due to postmortem redistribution (PMR). The potential for PMR of hydrocodone, a therapeutic opioid analgesic used to manage pain, is of particular interest due to its wide use. Hydrocodone concentrations in 39 peripheral blood, central blood, and liver specimens were compared. Dihydrocodeine (DHC), a commonly encountered hydrocodone metabolite, was present in 61% of the cases with an average concentration that was 29% of the hydrocodone value. Central blood to peripheral blood hydrocodone ratios were well correlated (R(2)=0.965) with an average (±S.D.) of 1.3 (±0.35) and a median of 1.2. The liver to peripheral blood (L/P) hydrocodone ratio was also well correlated (R(2)=0.915) with an average (±S.D.) of 3.4 (±1.7) L/kg and a median of 3.0 L/kg. This low L/P ratio suggests that hydrocodone is unlikely to undergo substantial PMR changes. PMID:25541075

  18. Quality impact on diagnostic blood specimen collection using a new device to relieve venipuncture pain.

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2013-07-01

    A new device called Buzzy(®) has been recently presented that combines a cooling ice pack and a vibrating motor in order to relieve the venipuncture pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Buzzy(®) use during diagnostic blood specimen collection by venipuncture for routine immunochemistry tests. Blood was collected from 100 volunteers by a single, expert phlebotomist. A vein was located on the left forearm without applying tourniquet, in order to prevent any interference from venous stasis, and blood samples were collected using a 20-G straight needle directly into 5 mL vacuum tubes with clot activator and gel separator. In sequence, external cold and vibration by Buzzy(®) was applied on the right forearm-5 cm above the chosen puncture site-for 1 min before venipuncture and continued until the end of the same procedure already done in the left forearm. The panel of tests included the following: glucose, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, albumin, c-reactive protein, urea, creatinine, uric acid, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, AST, ALT, g-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, total bilirubin, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, chloride, lipase, cortisol, insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine, free triiodothyronine, total thyroxine, free thyroxine and haemolysis index. Clinically significant differences between samples were found only for: total protein, albumin and transferrin. The Buzzy(®) can be used during diagnostic blood specimens collection by venipuncture for the majority of the routine immunochemistry tests. We only suggest avoiding this device during blood collection when protein, albumin and transferrin determinations should be performed. PMID:24426217

  19. Comparison of Proteins in Whole Blood and Dried Blood Spot Samples by LC/MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Andrew G.; Percy, Andrew J.; Hardie, Darryl B.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2013-09-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling methods are desirable for population-wide biomarker screening programs because of their ease of collection, transportation, and storage. Immunoassays are traditionally used to quantify endogenous proteins in these samples but require a separate assay for each protein. Recently, targeted mass spectrometry (MS) has been proposed for generating highly-multiplexed assays for biomarker proteins in DBS samples. In this work, we report the first comparison of proteins in whole blood and DBS samples using an untargeted MS approach. The average number of proteins identified in undepleted whole blood and DBS samples by liquid chromatography (LC)/MS/MS was 223 and 253, respectively. Protein identification repeatability was between 77 %-92 % within replicates and the majority of these repeated proteins (70 %) were observed in both sample formats. Proteins exclusively identified in the liquid or dried fluid spot format were unbiased based on their molecular weight, isoelectric point, aliphatic index, and grand average hydrophobicity. In addition, we extended this comparison to include proteins in matching plasma and serum samples with their dried fluid spot equivalents, dried plasma spot (DPS), and dried serum spot (DSS). This work begins to define the accessibility of endogenous proteins in dried fluid spot samples for analysis by MS and is useful in evaluating the scope of this new approach.

  20. Experimental basis of standardized specimen collection: effect of posture on blood picture.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, E A; Gräsbeck, R

    1988-03-01

    22 subjectively healthy females were supine, sat in an armchair and stood while specimens of peripheral venous blood were collected after at least 15 min in each position without using a tourniquet. The albumin, haemoglobin, erythrocyte concentration and the haematocrit increased significantly when the subjects assumed a more erect position, probably as a result of increased hydrostatic pressure. The leucocyte count did not rise, and there was a statistically significant drop in the lymphocyte concentration when changing from supine to sitting. However, the leucocyte concentration rose significantly from supine to sitting or standing. When interpreting laboratory data, the difference in the behaviour of different cell species should be kept in mind. However, on the whole this study supports the stipulation contained in international recommendations that the posture of the subject should be standardized before collection of peripheral blood for haematological tests. PMID:3356238

  1. Comparison of HIV antibody detection by conventional method and dried tube specimen: stability and validation study for HIV serology.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Shashi; Arora, Usha

    2011-06-01

    This study was carried out to compare HIV antibody detection by conventional method and serum dried in test tube and to check the stability of dried tube specimen (DTS) at ambient temperature. A total of 50 serum samples were tested for HIV antibodies, which were sent for testing in the state reference laboratory, by conventional method according to NACO guidelines. The same serum samples were dried in test tubes and then after elution with PBS again tested for HIV antibodies by same method and kits at 0 day and after 30 days. DTS eluted by PBS showed linear correlation to the serum samples. The antibodies in DTS were found to be stable at 37 degrees c up to 30 days. This method is simple, sensitive and specific and can be used in resource limited settings embarking on scaling up of HIV testing.

  2. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  3. Detection of Immunoglobulin Isotypes from Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nancy J; Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Preissler, Mark T.; Freed, Brian M.; Stockinger, Sabine; Bell, Erin; Druschel, Charlotte; Buck Louis, Germaine M.; Lawrence, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility of recovering immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes (IgG subclasses, IgA, IgE and IgM classes) from dried blood spots (DBS), a methodologic subcomponent of the Upstate KIDS Study. A multiplexed Luminex assay was used for IgG1/2/3/4, IgA and IgM analysis; an ELISA was used for IgE. Plasma samples from de-identified patients were used to compare the Luminex assay with nephelometry, which is routinely used to quantify IgA, IgG and IgM in clinical samples. The IgE ELISA was compared to an immunofluorescence assay. Prior to evaluation of punches from newborn dried blood spots (NDBSs), recoveries of Ig from punches of cord blood DBSs (CBDBSs) vs. plasma from the same cord bloods were compared. Although the recoveries of Ig from plasma and DBSs were not comparable, which could be due to cell lysates in the DBS samples, the analyses were reproducible. Additionally, the levels of IgA, IgG2, IgG4, and IgM recovered from CBDBSs positively correlated with those in plasma. The DBS data is a relative value since it is not equivalent to the plasma concentration. The majority of Ig concentrations recovered from 108 newborns of the Upstate KIDs Study were within the range of newborn plasma Ig levels with the exception of IgG3. The IgG4 values displayed the greatest variance with a wide range (0.01–319 mg/dl), whereas, IgG1 values had the narrowest range (85.2–960.4 mg/dl). PMID:24333851

  4. Storage and use of residual dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Webster, Dianne

    2003-01-01

    Newborn screening policy for Australia and New Zealand is developed by a committee of the Human Genetics Society of Australasia and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians Division of Pediatrics. Each program policy varies according to the local laws and customs. The residual dried blood spot policy recommends that each screening program develop its own policy taking into account the ownership of the material and the time of retention. Cards and associated records should be stored securely with regard to privacy issues. All uses of residual materials and access to stored material should be documented. Programs should state what permission and documentation is required for the use of samples in 1) investigation of cases missed by the screening program, 2) screening program development, method development and establishing normal ranges for new and existing tests, 3) requests from families for the return of samples, 4) requests from health professionals to use residual material for other health-related purposes, 5) research studies, and 6) coronial and forensic purposes. Storage of the samples must be appropriate to intended future uses and appropriate quality assurance material stored with the samples. Relevant privacy, legal and ethical issues should be considered when formulating storage and use policies. Use of dried blood spot samples for purposes other than newborn screening should also be covered.

  5. The use of mass spectrometry to analyze dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michel; Tonoli, David; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) typically consist in the deposition of small volumes of capillary blood onto dedicated paper cards. Comparatively to whole blood or plasma samples, their benefits rely in the fact that sample collection is easier and that logistic aspects related to sample storage and shipment can be relatively limited, respectively, without the need of a refrigerator or dry ice. Originally, this approach has been developed in the sixties to support the analysis of phenylalanine for the detection of phenylketonuria in newborns using bacterial inhibition test. In the nineties tandem mass spectrometry was established as the detection technique for phenylalanine and tyrosine. DBS became rapidly recognized for their clinical value: they were widely implemented in pediatric settings with mass spectrometric detection, and were closely associated to the debut of newborn screening (NBS) programs, as a part of public health policies. Since then, sample collection on paper cards has been explored with various analytical techniques in other areas more or less successfully regarding large-scale applications. Moreover, in the last 5 years a regain of interest for DBS was observed and originated from the bioanalytical community to support drug development (e.g., PK studies) or therapeutic drug monitoring mainly. Those recent applications were essentially driven by improved sensitivity of triple quadrupole mass spectrometers. This review presents an overall view of all instrumental and methodological developments for DBS analysis with mass spectrometric detection, with and without separation techniques. A general introduction to DBS will describe their advantages and historical aspects of their emergence. A second section will focus on blood collection, with a strong emphasis on specific parameters that can impact quantitative analysis, including chromatographic effects, hematocrit effects, blood effects, and analyte stability. A third part of the review is dedicated to

  6. Application of dried blood spot cards to determine olive oil phenols (hydroxytyrosol metabolites) in human blood.

    PubMed

    de Las Hazas, María Carmen López; Motilva, Maria José; Piñol, Carme; Macià, Alba

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a fast and simple blood sampling and sample pre-treatment method based on the use of the dried blood spot (DBS) cards and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the quantification of olive oil phenolic metabolites in human blood was developed and validated. After validation, the method was applied to determine hydroxytyrosol metabolites in human blood samples after the acute intake of an olive oil phenolic extract. Using the FTA DMPK-A DBS card under optimum conditions, with 20µL as the blood solution volume, 100µL of methanol/Milli-Q water (50/50, v/v) as the extraction solvent and 7 disks punched out from the card, the main hydroxytyrosol metabolites (hydroxytyrosol-3-O-sulphate and hydroxytyrosol acetate sulphate) were identified and quantified. The developed methodology allowed detecting and quantifying the generated metabolites at low μM levels. The proposed method is a significant improvement over existing methods to determine phenolic metabolites circulating in blood and plasma samples, thus making blood sampling possible with the volunteer pricking their own finger, and the subsequent storage of the blood in the DBS cards prior to chromatographic analysis. PMID:27474297

  7. X-ray fluorescence analysis of Mexican varieties of dried chili peppers II: Commercial and home-grown specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Dávila, E.; Miranda, J.; Pineda, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    Elemental analyses of samples of Mexican varieties of dried chili peppers were carried out using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Several specimens of Capsicum annuum L., Capsicum chinense, and Capsicum pubescens were analyzed and the results compared to previous studies of elemental contents in other varieties of Capsicum annuum (ancho, morita, chilpotle, guajillo, pasilla, and árbol). The first set of samples was bought packaged in markets. In the present work, the study focuses on home-grown samples of the árbol and chilpotle varieties, commercial habanero (Capsicum chinense), as well as commercial and home-grown specimens of manzano (Capsicum pubescencs). Samples were freeze dried and pelletized. XRF analyses were carried out using a spectrometer based on an Rh X-ray tube, using a Si-PIN detector. The system detection calibration was performed through the analysis of the NIST certified reference materials 1547 (peach leaves) and 1574 (tomato leaves), while accuracy was checked with the reference material 1571 (orchard leaves). Elemental contents of all elements in the new set of samples were similar to those of the first group. Nevertheless, it was found that commercial samples contain high amounts of Br, while home-grown varieties do not.

  8. Improved screening test for abnormal hemoglobins from dried blood samples.

    PubMed

    Altland, K; Kaempfer, M; Granda, H

    1979-01-01

    A method is described wherein blood samples taken from adults or newborns and dried on filter paper can be used for hemoglobin analysis within 2 years after sampling. The samples are eluted in 8 M urea in the presence of 5% 2-mercaptoethanol and 2% of the neutral detergent Nonidet P-40. Then the individual alpha, beta, gamma, and epsilon chains are separated by means of electrofocusing in 8 M urea-PAA gels. Up to 96 samples can be applied to a gel using multiple syringes. Several hundred samples can be analyzed daily by one person. This method may be especially useful for preventive programs against sickle cell anemia as well as for human mutation monitoring systems.

  9. Measurement and Comparison of Organic Compound Concentrations in Plasma, Whole Blood, and Dried Blood Spot Samples

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart A.; Chernyak, Sergey; Su, Feng-Chiao

    2016-01-01

    The preferred sampling medium for measuring human exposures of persistent organic compounds (POPs) is blood, and relevant sample types include whole blood, plasma, and dried blood spots (DBS). Because information regarding the performance and comparability of measurements across these sample types is limited, it is difficult to compare across studies. This study evaluates the performance of POP measurements in plasma, whole blood and DBS, and presents the distribution coefficients needed to convert concentrations among the three sample types. Blood samples were collected from adult volunteers, along with demographic and smoking information, and analyzed by GC/MS for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Regression models were used to evaluate the relationships between the sample types and possible effects of personal covariates. Distribution coefficients also were calculated using physically-based models. Across all compounds, concentrations in plasma were consistently the highest; concentrations in whole blood and DBS samples were comparable. Distribution coefficients for plasma to whole blood concentrations ranged from 1.74 to 2.26 for pesticides/CHCs, averaged 1.69 ± 0.06 for the PCBs, and averaged 1.65 ± 0.03 for the PBDEs. Regression models closely fit most chemicals (R2 > 0.80), and whole blood and DBS samples generally showed very good agreement. Distribution coefficients estimated using biologically-based models were near one and did not explain the observed distribution. Among the study population, median concentrations of several pesticides/CHCs and PBDEs exceeded levels reported in the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, while levels of other OCPs and PBDEs were comparable or lower. Race and smoking status appeared to slightly affect plasma/blood concentration ratios for several POPs. The experimentally

  10. Improved method to determine succinylacetone in dried blood spots for diagnosis of tyrosinemia type 1 using UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y; Rashed, Mohamed S; Jacob, Minnie; Al-Ahaideb, Lujane Y; Al-Amoudi, Mohamed; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Al-Sayed, Moeen M; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair; Al-Owain, Mohamed; Al-Zeidan, Hamad

    2008-11-01

    We describe an improved diagnostic method for tyrosinemia type 1 based on quantifying succinylacetone in dried blood spots by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Succinylacetone extracted from a single 3/16 inch disk of specimen collection paper containing a dried blood spot was derivatized with dansylhydrazine, separated on an Acquity UPLC BEH C(18) column (2.1 x 50 mm, 1.7 microm) and detected by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Succinylacetone derivative eluted at 0.6 min with a complete run time of 1 min. Using a 13C4 labeled succinylacetone as an internal standard, the calibration plot was linear up to 100 micromol/L with a detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.2 micromol/L. Intra-day (n = 13) and inter-day (n = 10) variations were better than 10%. The cutoff level of succinylacetone in dried blood spots from healthy infants obtained by the current method was 0.63 micromol/L (n = 151). In dried blood spots from patients with established tyrosinemia type 1 (n = 11), concentration of succinylacetone was 6.4-30.8 micromol/L.

  11. Validation and Application of a Dried Blood Spot Ceftriaxone Assay

    PubMed Central

    Page-Sharp, Madhu; Nunn, Troy; Salman, Sam; Moore, Brioni R.; Batty, Kevin T.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) antibiotic assays can facilitate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies in situations where venous blood sampling is logistically and/or ethically problematic. In this study, we aimed to develop, validate, and apply a DBS ceftriaxone assay. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) DBS ceftriaxone assay was assessed for matrix effects, process efficiency, recovery, variability, and limits of quantification (LOQ) and detection (LOD). The effects of hematocrit, protein binding, red cell partitioning, and chad positioning were evaluated, and thermal stability was assessed. Plasma, DBS, and cell pellet ceftriaxone concentrations in 10 healthy adults were compared, and plasma concentration-time profiles of DBS and plasma ceftriaxone were incorporated into population PK models. The LOQ and LOD for ceftriaxone in DBS were 0.14 mg/liter and 0.05 mg/liter, respectively. Adjusting for hematocrit, red cell partitioning, and relative recovery, DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable to measured plasma concentrations (r > 0.95, P < 0.0001), and Bland-Altman plots showed no significant bias. The final population PK estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and time above threshold MICs for measured and DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were similar. At 35°C, 21°C, 4°C, −20°C, and −80°C, ceftriaxone retained >95% initial concentrations in DBS for 14 h, 35 h, 30 days, 21 weeks, and >11 months, respectively. The present DBS ceftriaxone assay is robust and can be used as a surrogate for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK and PK/PD data in a variety of clinical situations, including in studies of young children and of those in remote or resource-poor settings. PMID:26438505

  12. Strict adherence to a blood bank specimen labeling policy by all clinical laboratories significantly reduces the incidence of "wrong blood in tube".

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Edward; Richardson-Weber, Leslie; McCormack, Gina; Uhl, Lynne; Haspel, Richard L

    2009-08-01

    Phlebotomy errors leading to incompatible transfusions are a leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Our institution's specimen-labeling policy requires the collection date, 2 unique patient identifiers, and the ability to identify the phlebotomist. This policy, however, was initially strictly enforced only by the blood bank. In fiscal year 2005, following an educational campaign on proper specimen labeling, all clinical laboratories began strictly adhering to the specimen-labeling policy. Compared with the preceding 4 years, in the 3 years following policy implementation, the incidence of wrong blood in tube (WBIT) and mislabeled specimens detected by the blood bank decreased by 73.5% (0.034% to 0.009%; P < or = .0001) and by 84.6% (0.026% to 0.004%; P < or = .0001), respectively. During a short period, a simple, low-cost educational initiative and policy change can lead to statistically significant decreases in WBIT and mislabeled specimens received by the blood bank. PMID:19605809

  13. Storage and use of Newborn Screening Blood Specimens for Research: Assessing Public Opinion in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Hart, Alexa; Petros, Michael; Charrow, Joel; Nash, Claudia; Wicklund, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Storage and use of residual dried blood spots (DBS) from newborn screening (NBS) for research purposes has been a topic of elevated interest following high profile disputes between genetic privacy advocacy groups and state NBS programs. Our objective was to assess public opinion in Illinois regarding storage and use of residual DBS for research. Five hundred twenty-six Illinois residents completed a survey assessing attitudes about research uses for DBS, storage length, and consent issues. Over 80 % of respondents expressed agreement with questions regarding research uses of DBS. Eighty-three percent of respondents were in favor of storage for at least one year with 44 % favoring indefinite storage. Respondents with higher educational attainment were more likely to support research use of DBS and less likely to desire contact for each future study (P < 0.05). Black respondents were less likely than white respondents to express agreement for the use of DBS for research or to favor long-term storage (P < 0.05). Support was high for storage and use of DBS in our sample. Consent was important and respondents wanted choices about participation. Forty-two percent of respondents were not aware of NBS prior to this survey, highlighting a need for greater education about this public health program. Trust in the public health service of NBS must be protected through transparency in the policy process.

  14. Mass spectrometry in cancer biomarker research: a case for immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins from clinical tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, DaRue A; Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C; Nissley, Dwight V; Simpson, R Mark; Citrin, Deborah E; Mackall, Crystal L; Linehan, W Marston; Blonder, Josip

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of clinically relevant cancer biomarkers using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven difficult, primarily because of the enormous dynamic range of blood-derived protein concentrations and the fact that the 22 most abundant blood-derived proteins constitute approximately 99% of the total plasma protein mass. Immunodepletion of clinical body fluid specimens (e.g., serum/plasma) for the removal of highly abundant proteins is a reasonable and reproducible solution. Often overlooked, clinical tissue specimens also contain a formidable amount of highly abundant blood-derived proteins present in tissue-embedded networks of blood/lymph capillaries and interstitial fluid. Hence, the dynamic range impediment to biomarker discovery remains a formidable obstacle, regardless of clinical sample type (solid tissue and/or body fluid). Thus, we optimized and applied simultaneous immunodepletion of blood-derived proteins from solid tissue and peripheral blood, using clear cell renal cell carcinoma as a model disease. Integrative analysis of data from this approach and genomic data obtained from the same type of tumor revealed concordant key pathways and protein targets germane to clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This includes the activation of the lipogenic pathway characterized by increased expression of adipophilin (PLIN2) along with 'cadherin switching', a phenomenon indicative of transcriptional reprogramming linked to renal epithelial dedifferentiation. We also applied immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins to various tissue types (e.g., adipose tissue and breast tissue) showing unambiguously that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins represents a powerful tool for the reproducible profiling of tissue proteomes. Herein, we show that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins from solid tissue specimens is of equal importance to depletion of body fluids and recommend its routine use in the context of biological discovery and

  15. Impact of a large-scale educational intervention program on venous blood specimen collection practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phlebotomy performed with poor adherence to venous blood specimen collection (VBSC) guidelines jeopardizes patient safety and may lead to patient suffering and adverse events. A first questionnaire study demonstrated low compliance to VBSC guidelines, motivating an educational intervention of all phlebotomists within a county council. The aim was to evaluate the impact of a large-scale educational intervention program (EIP) on primary health care phlebotomists’ adherence to VBSC guidelines. We hypothesised that the EIP would improve phlebotomists’ VBSC practical performance. Methods The present study comprise primary health care centres (n = 61) from two county councils in northern Sweden. The final selected study group consisted of phlebotomists divided into an intervention group (n = 84) and a corresponding control group (n = 79). Both groups responded to a validated self-reported VBSC questionnaire twice. The EIP included three parts: guideline studies, an oral presentation, and an examination. Non-parametric statistics were used for comparison within and between the groups. Results Evaluating the EIP, we found significant improvements in the intervention group compared to the control group on self-reported questionnaire responses regarding information search (ES = 0.23-0.33, p < 0.001-0.003), and patient rest prior to phlebotomy (ES = 0.27, p = 0.004). Test request management, patient identity control, release of venous stasis, and test tube labelling had significantly improved in the intervention group but did not significantly differ from the control group (ES = 0.22- 0.49, p = < 0.001- 0.006). The control group showed no significant improvements at all (ES = 0–0.39, p = 0.016-0.961). Conclusions The present study demonstrated several significant improvements on phlebotomists’ adherence to VBSC practices. Still, guideline adherence improvement to several crucial phlebotomy practices is needed. We

  16. Preliminary investigation of the use of dried-blood spots for the assessment of in utero exposure to environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Burse, V W; DeGuzman, M R; Korver, M P; Najam, A R; Williams, C C; Hannon, W H; Therrell, B L

    1997-08-01

    We determined the concentration of dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) in dried-blood spot specimens from 2-day-old infants from rural Texas who had never been breast fed. Anonymous, residual whole blood spots on filter paper, previously used for routine newborn screening procedures, were soaked in a phosphate buffer, extracted with an organic solvent, and eluted through silica gel. The concentrated eluates were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection (ECD). The blood collected from 10 newborns was analyzed and found to contain DDE concentrations ranging from 0.13 to 1.87 pg/microliter with a mean of 0.72 pg/microliter. One of the 10 newborns had a whole blood DDE concentration of 1.87 pg/microliter, which was greater than the concentration of 1.34 pg/microliter in a freshly drawn sample from an adult donor whose blood serum was shown to contain DDE. With improvement in detection limits, this approach has the potential to displace the analyses of mothers' blood (as a surrogate indicator of infants' exposures) and cord blood as standard procedures for determining the newborns' body burden of environmental pollutants.

  17. A simple 'paper smear' method for dry collection, transport and storage of cervical cytological specimens for rapid screening of HPV infection by PCR.

    PubMed

    Kailash, U; Hedau, S; Gopalkrishna, V; Katiyar, S; Das, B C

    2002-07-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are major pathogens associated with the development of cancer of the uterine cervix, the most common malignant tumour of women worldwide. Reliable diagnosis of HPV infection, particularly the 'high-risk' types (16/18), may facilitate early identification of 'high-risk' populations for developing cervical cancer and may augment the sensitivity and specificity of primary cervical cancer screening programmes by complementing the conventional Pap test. A simple paper smear method has been developed for dry collection, transport and storage of cervical smears/scrapes at room temperature for subsequent detection of HPV DNA by PCR assay. Imprint biopsies, blood and fine-needle aspirates were also collected by this method. The cervical scrapes or other body fluids were smeared (within 0.5-1 cm diameter) and dried on to sterile small slides made of Whatman 3MM filter paper, and stored individually at room temperature or at 4 degrees C. A small piece (2-3 mm) of the paper smear was punched or cut out with a sterile surgical blade, boiled in an eppendorf tube containing 50 microl of distilled water for 5 min and used directly for PCR amplification. The quality and quantity of DNA derived from paper smears and the results of PCR amplifications for HPV type 16, BRCA1 and p53 genes were identical to those obtained from the same samples following collection in PBS, storage (-70 degrees C) and phenol-chloroform-based DNA extraction. DNA was stable in the paper smears for up to a year, whether stored at room temperature or at 4 degrees C. This method is simple, rapid and cost-effective, and can be effectively employed for large-scale population screening, especially for regions where the specimens are to be transported from distant places to the laboratory.

  18. Enhanced Stability of Blood Matrices Using a Dried Sample Spot Assay to Measure Human Butyrylcholinesterase Activity and Nerve Agent Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jonas W.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Watson, Caroline M.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    Dried matrix spots are safer to handle and easier to store than wet blood products, but factors such as intra-spot variability and unknown sample volumes have limited their appeal as a sampling format for quantitative analyses. In this work, we introduce a dried spot activity assay for quantifying butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) specific activity which is BChE activity normalized to the total protein content in a sample spot. The method was demonstrated with blood, serum, and plasma spotted on specimen collection devices (cards) which were extracted to measure total protein and BChE activity using a modified Ellman assay. Activity recovered from dried spots was ∼80% of the initial spotted activity for blood and >90% for plasma and serum. Measuring total protein in the sample and calculating specific activity substantially improved quantification and reduced intra-spot variability. Analyte stability of nerve agent adducts was also evaluated, and the results obtained via BChE-specific activity measurements were confirmed by quantification of BChE adducts using a previously established LC-MS/MS method. The spotted samples were up to 10-times more resistant to degradation compared to unspotted control samples when measuring BChE inhibition by the nerve agents sarin and VX. Using this method, both BChE activity and adducts can be accurately measured from a dried sample spot. This use of a dried sample spot with normalization to total protein is robust, demonstrates decreased intra-spot variability without the need to control for initial sample volume, and enhances analyte stability. PMID:25955132

  19. Evaluation of Amount of Blood in Dry Blood Spots: Ring-Disk Electrode Conductometry.

    PubMed

    Kadjo, Akinde F; Stamos, Brian N; Shelor, C Phillip; Berg, Jordan M; Blount, Benjamin C; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2016-06-21

    A fixed area punch in dried blood spot (DBS) analysis is assumed to contain a fixed amount of blood, but the amount actually depends on a number of factors. The presently preferred approach is to normalize the measurement with respect to the sodium level, measured by atomic spectrometry. Instead of sodium levels, we propose electrical conductivity of the extract as an equivalent nondestructive measure. A dip-type small diameter ring-disk electrode (RDE) is ideal for very small volumes. However, the conductance (G) measured by an RDE depends on the depth (D) of the liquid below the probe. There is no established way of computing the specific conductance (σ) of the solution from G. Using a COMSOL Multiphysics model, we were able to obtain excellent agreement between the measured and the model predicted conductance as a function of D. Using simulations over a large range of dimensions, we provide a spreadsheet-based calculator where the RDE dimensions are the input parameters and the procedure determines the 99% of the infinite depth conductance (G99) and the depth D99 at which this is reached. For typical small diameter probes (outer electrode diameter ∼ <2 mm), D99 is small enough for dip-type measurements in extract volumes of ∼100 μL. We demonstrate the use of such probes with DBS extracts. In a small group of 12 volunteers (age 20-66), the specific conductance of 100 μL aqueous extracts of 2 μL of spotted blood showed a variance of 17.9%. For a given subject, methanol extracts of DBS spots nominally containing 8 and 4 μL of blood differed by a factor of 1.8-1.9 in the chromatographically determined values of sulfate and chloride (a minor and major constituent, respectively). The values normalized with respect to the conductance of the extracts differed by ∼1%. For serum associated analytes, normalization of the analyte value by the extract conductance can thus greatly reduce errors from variations in the spotted blood volume/unit area. PMID:27226021

  20. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status. PMID:26605791

  1. Diagnosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection in Infants by Use of Dried Blood Spots and an Ultrasensitive p24 Antigen Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Cachafeiro, Ada; Sherman, Gayle G.; Sohn, Annette H.; Beck-Sague, Consuelo; Fiscus, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    We tested 617 dried blood spots (DBS) from human immunodeficiency virus-exposed infants from five countries using an ultrasensitive p24 antigen assay (Up24). The sensitivity was 94.4% (67/71) and the specificity was 100% (431/431) for infants with DBS specimens ≤20 months old; DBS older than 30 months demonstrated only 72.2% sensitivity (39/54) (P < 0.001) but displayed 100% specificity (61/61). PMID:19073872

  2. Automatic disease screening method using image processing for dried blood microfluidic drop stain pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Sikarwar, Basant S; Roy, Mukesh; Ranjan, Priya; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines programmed automatic recognition of infection from samples of dried stains of micro-scale drops of patient blood. This technique has the upside of being low-cost and less-intrusive and not requiring puncturing the patient with a needle for drawing blood, which is especially critical for infants and the matured. It also does not require expensive pathological blood test laboratory equipment. The method is shown in this work to be successful for ailment identification in patients suffering from tuberculosis and anaemia. Illness affects the physical properties of blood, which thus influence the samples of dried micro-scale blood drop stains. For instance, if a patient has a severe drop in platelet count, which is often the case of dengue or malaria patients, the blood's physical property of viscosity drops substantially, i.e. the blood is thinner. Thus, the blood micro-scale drop stain samples can be utilised for diagnosing maladies. This paper presents programmed automatic examination of the dried micro-scale drop blood stain designs utilising an algorithm based on pattern recognition. The samples of micro-scale blood drop stains of ordinary non-infected people are clearly recognisable as well as the samples of micro-scale blood drop stains of sick people, due to key distinguishing features. As a contextual analysis, the micro-scale blood drop stains of patients infected with tuberculosis have been contrasted with the micro-scale blood drop stains of typical normal healthy people. The paper dives into the fundamental flow mechanics behind how the samples of the dried micro-scale blood drop stain is shaped. What has been found is a thick ring like feature in the dried micro-scale blood drop stains of non-ailing people and thin shape like lines in the dried micro-scale blood drop stains of patients with anaemia or tuberculosis disease. The ring like feature at the periphery is caused by an outward stream conveying suspended particles to the edge

  3. Evaluation of the Xpert™ MRSA/SA Blood Culture assay for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus including strains with reduced vancomycin susceptibility from blood culture specimens.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Peter G; Grabsch, Elizabeth A; Farrell, Jenny; Xie, Shirley; Montgomery, Janet; Mayall, Barrie; Howden, Benjamin P

    2011-07-01

    The Xpert MRSA/SA Blood Culture (BC) assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) was prospectively compared to culture and found to have excellent specificity for both Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in BC specimens with a sensitivity of 75% (3/4) and 100% (17/17), respectively. Among 28 heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA)/VISA spiked BCs, the assay correctly identified 84.6% VISA and 80% hVISA isolates as MRSA.

  4. Active tracking of rejected dried blood samples in a large program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Inalegwu, Auchi; Phillips, Sunny; Datir, Rawlings; Chime, Christopher; Ozumba, Petronilla; Peters, Samuel; Ogbanufe, Obinna; Mensah, Charles; Abimiku, Alash’Le; Dakum, Patrick; Ndembi, Nicaise

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the impact of rejection at different levels of health care by retrospectively reviewing records of dried blood spot samples received at the molecular laboratory for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) early infant diagnosis (EID) between January 2008 and December 2012. METHODS: The specimen rejection rate, reasons for rejection and the impact of rejection at different levels of health care was examined. The extracted data were cleaned and checked for consistency and then de-duplicated using the unique patient and clinic identifiers. The cleaned data were ciphered and exported to SPSS version 19 (SPSS 2010 IBM Corp, New York, United States) for statistical analyses. RESULTS: Sample rejection rate of 2.4% (n = 786/32552) and repeat rate of 8.8% (n = 69/786) were established. The mean age of infants presenting for first HIV molecular test among accepted valid samples was 17.83 wk (95%CI: 17.65-18.01) vs 20.30 wk (95%CI: 16.53-24.06) for repeated samples. HIV infection rate was 9.8% vs 15.9% for accepted and repeated samples. Compared to tertiary healthcare clinics, secondary and primary clinics had two-fold and three-fold higher likelihood of sample rejection, respectively (P < 0.05). We observed a significant increase in sample rejection rate with increasing number of EID clinics (r = 0.893, P = 0.041). The major reasons for rejection were improper sample collection (26.3%), improper labeling (16.4%) and insufficient blood (14.8%). CONCLUSION: Programs should monitor pre-analytical variables and incorporate continuous quality improvement interventions to reduce errors associated with sample rejection and improve patient retention. PMID:27175352

  5. Buprenorphine and major metabolites in blood specimens collected for drug analysis in law enforcement purposes.

    PubMed

    Oechsler, Stephanie; Skopp, Gisela

    2010-02-25

    A liquid chromatographic/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric method for the quantification of buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), buprenorphine-3-beta-D-glucuronide (BUPG) and norbuprenorphine-3-beta-D-glucuronide (NBUPG) in serum samples was developed and validated. Pre-treatment of BUP and NBUP was by liquid-liquid extraction, while glucuronides were favourably isolated by solid phase extraction. Separation in 2 separate runs (2 x 5 min) was achieved using isocratic elution. The method was applied to 20 authentic serum specimens collected for law enforcement purposes where BUP intake had been indicated. The parent drug was not detectable in half of the specimens at a lower limit of detection of 0.2 ng/mL, whereas NBUP could be determined from any sample but one. NBUPG is the major metabolite present, which could be identified along with BUPG in all samples under investigation. In authentic specimens it could be advisable to monitor BUP metabolites along with the parent drug. PMID:20006453

  6. δ18O values of Sus scrofa blood water and bone phosphate; a marked discrepancy between domestic and wild specimens.

    PubMed

    Longinelli, Antonio; Selmo, Enrico

    2011-12-30

    δ¹⁸O analyses of water in the blood of domestic and wild pigs indicated that large isotopic differences exist between domestic and wild specimens of the same species (Sus scrofa) living in the same area. Similar isotopic differences are found between the δ¹⁸O(PO₄³⁻) values of bones from the two groups of animals. When δ¹⁸O values obtained from recent wild boar bones are introduced in the equation of the isotopic scale determined for domestic pigs, totally unreliable δ¹⁸O values of local meteoric water are obtained. The δ¹⁸O(PO₄³⁻) values measured in three groups of modern wild boar specimens allow the calculation of a first approximate equation which is quite different from that of domestic pigs. This isotopic scale should be accurately re-calibrated for wild animals.

  7. RESIDUES AND METABOLITES OF SELECTED PERSISTENT HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS IN BLOOD SPECIMENS FROM A GENERAL POPULATION SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Health Statistics collaborated with the National Human Monitoring Program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in a four-year study to assess the exposure of the general population to selected pesticides through analysis of blood serum and uri...

  8. Collecting in collections: a PCR strategy and primer set for DNA barcoding of decades-old dried museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Natural history museums are vastly underutilized as a source of material for DNA analysis because of perceptions about the limitations of DNA degradation in older specimens. Despite very few exceptions, most DNA barcoding projects, which aim to obtain sequence data from all species, generally use specimens collected specifically for that purpose, instead of the wealth of identified material in museums, constrained by the lack of suitable PCR methods. Any techniques that extend the utility of museum specimens for DNA analysis therefore are highly valuable. This study first tested the effects of specimen age and PCR amplicon size on PCR success rates in pinned insect specimens, then developed a PCR primer set and amplification strategy allowing greatly increased utilization of older museum specimens for DNA barcoding. PCR success rates compare favourably with the few published studies utilizing similar aged specimens, and this new strategy has the advantage of being easily automated for high-throughput laboratory workflows. The strategy uses hemi-nested, degenerate, M13-tailed PCR primers to amplify two overlapping amplicons, using two PCRs per amplicon (i.e. four PCRs per DNA sample). Initial PCR products are reamplified using an internal primer and a M13 primer. Together the two PCR amplicons yield 559 bp of the COI gene from Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Odonata and presumably also other insects. BARCODE standard-compliant data were recovered from 67% (56 of 84) of specimens up to 25 years old, and 51% (102 of 197) of specimens up to 55 years old. Given the time, cost and specialist expertise required for fieldwork and identification, 'collecting in collections' is a viable alternative allowing researchers to capitalize on the knowledge captured by curation work in decades past.

  9. What is the right blood hematocrit preparation procedure for standards and quality control samples for dried blood spot analysis?

    PubMed

    Koster, Remco A; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C; Botma, Rixt; Greijdanus, Ben; Touw, Daan J; Uges, Donald R A; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2015-01-01

    Remco Koster is a research analyst and PhD candidate at the University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen. He has been working in the field of bioanalysis for over 13 years, where he has developed numerous analytical methods using LC-MS/MS. His main research focus is the influence of various matrices on the development and performance of analytical methods using LC-MS/MS. The development of high-speed extraction and analysis methods for drugs and drugs of abuse in human matrices like blood, plasma, hair, saliva and dried blood spots often leads to improved procedures for preparation of standards and quality control samples, sample handling and validation. Two hematocrit preparation procedures for standards and quality control samples were evaluated in order to improve the quality of procedures for dried blood spot validation and analysis.

  10. Dried Blood Spots for Viral Load Monitoring in Malawi: Feasible and Effective

    PubMed Central

    Rutstein, Sarah E.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kamwendo, Deborah; Soko, Alice; Mkandawire, Memory; Biddle, Andrea K.; Miller, William C.; Weinberger, Morris; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Gupta, Sundeep; Chimbwandira, Frank; Mwenda, Reuben; Kamiza, Steve; Hoffman, Irving; Mataya, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of dried blood spots (DBS) use for viral load (VL) monitoring, describing patient outcomes and programmatic challenges that are relevant for DBS implementation in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We recruited adult antiretroviral therapy (ART) patients from five district hospitals in Malawi. Eligibility reflected anticipated Ministry of Health VL monitoring criteria. Testing was conducted at a central laboratory. Virological failure was defined as >5000 copies/ml. Primary outcomes were program feasibility (timely result availability and patient receipt) and effectiveness (second-line therapy initiation). Results We enrolled 1,498 participants; 5.9% were failing at baseline. Median time from enrollment to receipt of results was 42 days; 79.6% of participants received results within 3 months. Among participants with confirmed elevated VL, 92.6% initiated second-line therapy; 90.7% were switched within 365 days of VL testing. Nearly one-third (30.8%) of participants with elevated baseline VL had suppressed (<5,000 copies/ml) on confirmatory testing. Median period between enrollment and specimen testing was 23 days. Adjusting for relevant covariates, participants on ART >4 years were more likely to be failing than participants on therapy 1–4 years (RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.8); older participants were less likely to be failing (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.98). There was no difference in likelihood of failure based on clinical symptoms (RR 1.17, 95% CI 0.65-2.11). Conclusions DBS for VL monitoring is feasible and effective in real-world clinical settings. Centralized DBS testing may increase access to VL monitoring in remote settings. Programmatic outcomes are encouraging, especially proportion of eligible participants switched to second-line therapy. PMID:25898365

  11. Evaluation of the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx Assay Using Plasma and Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Malaya K; Varghese, Vici; White, Elizabeth; Winslow, Meg; Katzenstein, David A; Shafer, Robert W; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2016-10-01

    HIV-1 RNA quantitation in plasma, or virus load testing, is the primary method by which the response to antiretroviral therapy is monitored. Here we describe evaluation of the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx assay (Aptima) performed on the automated Panther system. The clinical performance of Aptima was compared to that of the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 Test v2.0 (CAP/CTM) using 162 EDTA plasma samples collected from patients undergoing HIV-1 monitoring. Overall agreement was 84.0% (136/162), with a kappa statistic of 0.723 (standard error, 0.047; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.630 to 0.815), indicating substantial agreement. Using the 86 clinical samples quantifiable by both methods, Passing-Bablok regression revealed a regression line of Y = (1.069 × X) - 0.346 (95% CI of the slope [1.003 to 1.139] and intercept [-0.666 to -0.074]), and Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a mean difference (Aptima-CAP/CTM) of -0.075 log10 copies/ml (95% limits of agreement of -0.624 to 0.475), consistent with negative bias. Comparison of Aptima results for paired dried blood spot (DBS) and plasma specimens archived from participants in the Peninsula AIDS Research Cohort Study (PARC) demonstrated an overall agreement of 94.7% (90/95) when 1,000 copies/ml was used as the threshold. In conclusion, the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx assay provides a suitable alternative for HIV-1 monitoring in plasma and DBS. PMID:27535684

  12. Differential fluorescent staining method for detection of bacteria in blood cultures, cerebrospinal fluid and other clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Fazii, P; Ciancaglini, E; Riario Sforza, G

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a differential staining method to distinguish gram-positive from gram-negative bacteria in fluorescence. The method is based on two fluorochromes, one acting in the wavelength of red, i.e. the acridine orange, and another acting in the wavelength of green, i.e. the fluorescein. With this method, gram-positive bacteria appear yellow and gram-negative bacteria appear green. In view of the importance of a rapid aetiological diagnosis in cases of septicaemia, the differential staining method in fluorescence was compared with Gram stain for the detection of bacteria in blood. Of 5,820 blood cultures entered into the study and identified by the Bactec 9120 fluorescent series instrument (Becton Dickinson Europe, France), 774 were positive. Of the 774 positive cultures, 689 yielded only a single organism. The differential staining method in fluorescence detected 626 of the 689 cultures, while Gram stain detected 468. On the basis of these results, the sensitivity of the differential staining method in fluorescence was 90.9%, while that of Gram stain was 67.9%. The difference between the two methods was statistically significant ( P<0.001). The differential fluorescent staining method was more sensitive than Gram stain in the detection of bacteria in blood cultures during the incubation period. This technique provides a rapid, simple and highly sensitive staining method that can be used in conjunction with subculture methods. Whereas subculture requires an incubation period of 18-24 h, the fluorescent staining technique can detect bacteria on the same day that smears are prepared and examined. The differential fluorescent staining method was also evaluated for its ability to detect microorganisms in cerebrospinal fluid and other clinical specimens. The microorganisms were easily detected, even when bacterial counts in the specimens were low.

  13. Dried tube specimens: a simple and cost-effective method for preparation of HIV proficiency testing panels and quality control materials for use in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Bharat S; Anyanwu, Juliana; Patel, Hetal; Downer, Marie; Kalou, Mireille; Gichimu, Catherine; Keipkerich, Bera Steven; Clement, Nelly; Omondi, Michael; Mayer, Oren; Ou, Chin-Yih; Nkengasong, John N

    2010-02-01

    HIV testing has rapidly expanded worldwide, but proficiency testing (PT) programs to monitor and improve the quality of testing are often lacking in resource-limited settings (RLS). Traditional PT programs and quality control reagents use serum or plasma specimens requiring stringent conditions for storage and transportation. A novel, simple and easy to use approach, based on dried tube specimens (DTS), was developed that can help monitor the quality of HIV antibody testing in RLS. DTS were prepared by drying 20 microl of specimen overnight at room temperature. The addition of a green dye (0.1%) made the DTS pellets visible without affecting the test results. Before testing, the DTS were rehydrated with 200 microl of PBS-Tween buffer. A panel of 303 DTS samples (135 HIV positive and 168 HIV negative) was evaluated with two rapid tests. Sensitivity and specificity with the Determine HIV-1/2 test were 99.3% and 99.4%, respectively, and with OraQuick were 98.5% and 100%, respectively. Stability studies showed that HIV-specific antibodies in the DTS specimens were stable at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C for 4 weeks, with only marginal decline at 37 degrees C and 45 degrees C over 4 weeks. The DTS-based PT program was piloted successfully in 24 testing sites in Kenya. Results demonstrate that the DTS is a simple to use, practical method to prepare and distribute PT panels and quality control specimens to monitor HIV testing practices in RLS. PMID:19878697

  14. Fast quantification of ethanol in whole blood specimens by the enzymatic alcohol dehydrogenase method. Optimization by experimental design.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Lena; Skuterud, Bjørn; Larssen, Bente R; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Smith-Kielland, Anne

    2005-01-01

    A sensitive, fast, simple, and high-throughput enzymatic method for the quantification of ethanol in whole blood (blood) on Hitachi 917 is presented. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) oxidizes ethanol to acetaldehyde using the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), which is concurrently reduced to form NADH. Method development was performed with the aid of factorial design, varying pH, and concentrations of NAD+ and ADH. The linear range increased and reaction end point decreased with increasing NAD+ concentration and pH. The method was linear in the concentration range 0.0024-0.4220 g/dL. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.0007 g/dL and 0.0024 g/dL, respectively. Relative standard deviations for the repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility were in the ranges 0.7-5.7% and 1.6-8.9%, respectively. The correlation coefficient when compared with headspace gas chromatography-flame ionization detection methods was 0.9903. Analysis of authentic positive blood specimens gave results that were slightly lower than those of the reference method.

  15. A rapid, reliable, and inexpensive method for detection of di- and trinucleotide repeat markers and disease loci from dried blood spots

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.A. |; Chalifoux, M.; Wing, M.

    1996-08-09

    We used a rapid and inexpensive method for studying the FMR1 CGG-repeat from dried blood spots, prepared from heel pricks, finger pricks, or an aliquot of blood from a venipuncture. The procedure includes a single tube for preparation of template DNA for PCR and minimal handling, avoiding opportunities for mislabelling specimens and loss of template. We extended the protocol to numerous di- and trinucleotide repeat markers and disease loci, including FRAXE, FRAXF, DXS548, DRPLA, and ZFY. The use of a highly reliable and very inexpensive method which employs blood spots as a source for target DNA means that newborn Guthrie cards can be used to establish allele frequencies for linkage disequilibrium studies, that large populations can be screened for genetic disorders, and that mapping studies can proceed rapidly even when only small amounts of blood are available from key family members. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Analysis of the Stability of Urea in Dried Blood Spots Collected and Stored on Filter Paper

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Mukhopadhyay, Ashok Kumar; Jailkhani, Bansi Lal

    2013-01-01

    The ability to use dry blood spots (DBSs) on filter paper for the analysis of urea levels could be an important diagnostic tool for areas that have limited access to laboratory facilities. We developed a method for the extraction and quantification of urea from DBSs that were stored on 3M Whatman filter paper and investigated the effect of long-term storage on the level of urea in DBSs. DBSs of 4.5 mm in diameter were used for our assay, and we determined the urea levels in blood using a commercially available enzymatic kit (UV GLDH-method; Randox laboratories Ltd., UK). The DBSs on filter discs were stored at 4℃ or at 37℃ for 120 days. The mean intra- and inter-assay coefficient of variance for our method of urea extraction from dried blood was 4.2% and 6.3%, respectively. We collected 75 fresh blood samples and compared the urea content of each fresh sample with the urea content of DBSs taken from corresponding fresh blood samples. Regression analysis reported a regression coefficient (r) value of 0.97 and a recovery of urea from dried spots was 102.2%. Urea concentrations in DBSs were stable for up to 120 and 90 days when stored at 4℃ and 37℃, respectively. Our results show that urea can be stored and quantitatively recovered from small volumes of blood that was collected on filter paper. PMID:23667845

  17. Laser cutting eliminates nucleic acid cross-contamination in dried-blood-spot processing.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Daza, Glenda; Chang, Ming; Coombs, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are useful for molecular assays but are prone to false positives from cross-contamination. In our malaria DBS assay, cross-contamination was encountered despite cleaning techniques suitable for HIV-1. We therefore developed a contact-free laser cutting system that effectively eliminated cross-contamination during DBS processing.

  18. Development of an assay to simultaneously measure orotic acid, amino acids, and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Held, Patrice K.; Haynes, Christopher A.; De Jesús, Víctor R.; Baker, Mei W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Orotic aciduria in the presence of hyperammonemia is a key indicator for a defect in the urea cycle, specifically ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency. Current newborn screening (NBS) protocols can detect several defects of the urea cycle, but screening for OTC deficiency remains a challenge due to the lack of a suitable assay. The purpose of this study was to develop a high-throughput assay to measure orotic acid in dried blood spot (DBS) specimens as an indicator for urea cycle dysfunction, which can be readily incorporated into routine NBS. Methods Orotic acid was extracted from DBS punches and analyzed using flow-injection analysis tandem mass spectrometry (FIA–MS/MS) with negative-mode ionization, requiring <2 min/sample run time. This method was then multiplexed into a conventional newborn screening assay for analysis of amino acids, acylcarnitines, and orotic acid. Results We describe 2 assays which can quantify orotic acid in DBS: a stand-alone method and a combined method for analysis of orotic acid, amino acids, and acylcarnitines. Both methods demonstrated orotic acid recovery of 75–85% at multiple levels of enrichment. Precision was also comparable to traditional FIA–MS/MS methods. Analysis of residual presumptively normal NBS specimens demonstrated a 5:1 signal to noise ratio and the average concentration of orotic acid was approximately 1.2 μmol/l. The concentration of amino acids and acylcarnitines as measured by the combined method showed no significant differences when compared to the conventional newborn screening assay. In addition, retrospective analysis of confirmed patients and presumptively normal newborn screening specimens suggests potential for the methods to identify patients with OTC deficiency, as well as other urea cycle defects. Conclusion The assays described here quantify orotic acid in DBS using a simple extraction and FIA–MS/MS analysis procedures that can be implemented into current NBS protocols. PMID

  19. Pilot study for utilization of dried blood spots for screening of lead, mercury and cadmium in newborns.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sanwat N; Butala, Steven J M; Ball, R Wayne; Braniff, Christopher T

    2009-03-01

    different states across the Rocky Mountain region. Internal blank punches adjacent to the blood spot and actual dried spot punches from the same card were analyzed simultaneously. The blank punch indicated the amount of contamination present in the blood spot sample. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using MANOVA followed by calculations for each metal separately. This method was found to be suitable for assessing maternal exposure to lead and mercury using residual newborn screening specimens. Additional research into the applicability for cadmium is needed. Because of the intrinsic problem of contamination from the skin surface of capillary blood samples or other internal or extraneous sources, automatic re-analysis of elevated results assures minimal false positives are reported.

  20. Development of an UPLC-MS/MS method for the determination of antibiotic ertapenem on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Giocaliere, Elisa; Villanelli, Fabio; Malvagia, Sabrina; Funghini, Silvia; Ombrone, Daniela; Filippi, Luca; De Gaudio, Marina; De Martino, Maurizio; Galli, Luisa

    2012-03-01

    Ertapenem (Invanz) is a newly developed carbapenem β-lactam antimicrobial agent. The drug usage in pediatric age needs an accurate drug monitoring for effective patient management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of dried blood spot (DBS) specimens to measure ertapenem concentration during treatment. The analysis was performed by UPLC-MS/MS operating in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve in matrix was linear in the concentration range of 0.5-100 mg/L with correlation coefficient value higher than 0.997. Performance parameters of this method like lower limit of detection (LLOD, 0.2 mg/L), lower limit of quantification (LLOQ, 0.5 mg/L), matrix effect (20%), intra- and inter-day imprecision (CV within than 15%) and accuracy (between 94 and 155%) of drug concentrations have been evaluated. The drug stability at different temperatures was tested for one month, to evaluate the risks of sample delivery at different climatic conditions. The reported method allows now ertapenem analysis and offers many advantages for patients including the possibility of collecting samples at home. This new assay is both precise and accurate and is especially suitable for therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies in neonates in whom obtaining larger blood samples is not convenient or possible.

  1. Emerging liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technologies improving dried blood spot analysis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ramisetti Nageswara

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS), a micro blood sampling technique, has recently gained interest in drug discovery and development due to its inherent advantages over the conventional whole blood, plasma or serum sample collection. Since the regulatory authorities have agreed to the use of blood as an acceptable biological matrix for drug exposure measurements, its applications have been extended not only to therapeutic drug monitoring but also to toxicokinetic and pharmacokinetic studies. The pharmaceutical industry is keen to promote DBS as a prominent tool in bioanalytical applications due to the financial, ethical and organizational issues involved in clinical trials. This could be accomplished due to the latest advances in modern analytical technology, particularly liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The present review discusses some of the emerging liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technologies in improving DBS analysis for its innovative applications in the development of new drugs.

  2. Rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of antibiotic linezolid on dried blood spot.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Villanelli, Fabio; Malvagia, Sabrina; Ombrone, Daniela; Funghini, Silvia; De Gaudio, Marina; Fallani, Stefania; Cassetta, Maria Iris; Novelli, Andrea; Chiappini, Elena; de Martino, Maurizio; Galli, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Linezolid is a new drug from the oxazolidinone class of antibiotics used against mycobacteria and multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-positive bacterial infections, which may are also glycopeptide-resistant. The drug usage in pediatric age needs an accurate drug monitoring for effective patient management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of dried blood spot (DBS) specimens to determinate linezolid levels during treatment. Advantages of DBS include short collection time, low invasiveness, ease and low cost of sample collection, transport and storage. The analysis was performed in LC-MS/MS operating in positive ion mode and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve in matrix was linear in the concentration range of 1-100 mg/L with correlation coefficient value of 0.9987. Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were within 3.6% and 13.0%, respectively. We also tested the thermal and temporal drug stability in dried blood spots at four different temperatures to evaluate the risks of sample delivery in different conditions. The short term stability studies showed that linezolid concentration remained stable for at least one month under all the conditions tested. This new assay has favorable characteristics being highly precise and accurate and allows a fast linezolid analysis with a total run time 22 min long, in gradient analysis. Concentration data for plasma and DBS samples from patients after treatment were compared showing a good correlation. Correlation between DBS data and serum samples measured by HPLC-UV was satisfactory. The benefit for patients is the ability to monitor the treatment with a simple and convenient sample collection at home.

  3. Dried Blood Spots - Preparing and Processing for Use in Immunoassays and in Molecular Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Grüner, Nico; Stambouli, Oumaima; Ross, R. Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The idea of collecting blood on a paper card and subsequently using the dried blood spots (DBS) for diagnostic purposes originated a century ago. Since then, DBS testing for decades has remained predominantly focused on the diagnosis of infectious diseases especially in resource-limited settings or the systematic screening of newborns for inherited metabolic disorders and only recently have a variety of new and innovative DBS applications begun to emerge. For many years, pre-analytical variables were only inappropriately considered in the field of DBS testing and even today, with the exception of newborn screening, the entire pre-analytical phase, which comprises the preparation and processing of DBS for their final analysis has not been standardized. Given this background, a comprehensive step-by-step protocol, which covers al the essential phases, is proposed, i.e., collection of blood; preparation of blood spots; drying of blood spots; storage and transportation of DBS; elution of DBS, and finally analyses of DBS eluates. The effectiveness of this protocol was first evaluated with 1,762 coupled serum/DBS pairs for detecting markers of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus infections on an automated analytical platform. In a second step, the protocol was utilized during a pilot study, which was conducted on active drug users in the German cities of Berlin and Essen. PMID:25867233

  4. Human neuro-specimen banking 1961-1992. The National Neurological Research Specimen Bank (a donor program of pre- and post-mortem tissues and cerebrospinal fluid/blood; and a collection of cryopreserved human neurological specimens for neuroscientists).

    PubMed

    Tourtellotte, W W; Rosario, I P; Conrad, A; Syndulko, K

    1993-01-01

    The National Neurological Research Specimen Bank (The Bank) was established in 1961 to provide a vital service to neuroscientists. Our purpose is to support medical research which seeks the etiopathogenesis for devastating neurological disorders with no known cause, treatment or precise animal model. It serves as a bridge between the neurology clinician who diagnoses and cares for patients with incurable disease and the basic scientist who has need for specimens to find their etiopathogenesis. In the long run this service should advance neurologic diagnoses and serve as the basis for designing treatment. The Bank has grown to be the largest, most diverse neurological specimen bank of its kind in the world. It is a type of "tissue bank" where donor members "will" their central nervous system tissues to science. Then we collect, photograph, seal in air tight bags, quick freeze, cryogenically store and distribute on request the donated tissue to research scientists around the world. All tissue diagnoses are confirmed by clinical records and neuropathologic examination; further histology is conducted on request. In addition to brain and spinal cord tissues, the Bank has samples of other tissues. There are also samples of pre- and post-mortem CSF and sera from normal individuals and patients with various neurological disorders, especially serial specimens on multiple sclerosis patients and HIV-1 seropositive and at risk individuals. This paper outlines the global operations of our human brain bank, based on protocols developed and used by the authors. These operations include donor solicitation, tissue acquisition and documentation, tissue processing and storage, specimen dissemination to users, outcome assessment of banking, quality control, cost of our operation, table of organization and the future. PMID:8360665

  5. Guidelines for the qualitative detection of viral genomes in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Davide; De Crignis, Elisa; Re, Maria Carla

    2012-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBSs) are a useful alternative to blood sampling especially in children or for screening high-risk populations in developing countries. DBS blood collection can be employed in the diagnosis of viral infections by PCR or RT-PCR and also in viral genome sequencing. In addition, the advent of multiplex PCR approaches has led to further diagnostic and methodological improvements allowing simultaneous detection of two or more different viral genomes in the same sample and amplification reaction. This chapter describes general guidelines for the qualitative viral genome amplification and detection in DBS providing an example application of a qualitative real-time SYBR Green-based multiplex RT-PCR assay targeting two major viral pathogens, HIV-1 and HCV.

  6. Cryopreservation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity inside red blood cells: developing a specimen repository in support of development and evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzyme deficiency. It is characterized by abnormally low levels of G6PD activity. Individuals with G6PD deficiency are at risk of undergoing acute haemolysis when exposed to 8‒aminoquinoline-based drugs, such as primaquine. For this reason it is imperative to identify individuals with G6PD deficiency prior to administering these anti-malarial drugs. There is a need for the development and evaluation of point-of-care G6PD deficiency screening tests suitable for areas of the developing world where malarial treatments are frequently administered. The development and evaluation of new G6PD tests will be greatly assisted with the availability of specimen repositories. Methods Cryopreservation of erythrocytes was evaluated as a means to preserve G6PD activity. Blood specimens from 31 patients including ten specimens with normal G6PD activity, three with intermediate activity, and 18 with deficient activity were cryopreserved for up to six months. Results Good correlation in G6PD activity between fresh and cryopreserved specimens (R2 = 0.95). The cryopreserved specimens show an overall small drop in mean G6PD activity of 0.23 U/g Hb (P=0.23). Cytochemical staining showed that intracellular G6PD activity distribution within the red blood cell populations is preserved during cryopreservation. Furthermore, the mosaic composition of red blood cells in heterozygous women is also preserved for six months or more. The fluorescent spot and the BinaxNOW qualitative tests for G6PD deficiency also showed high concordance in G6PD status determination between cryopreserved specimens and fresh specimens. Conclusions A methodology for establishing a specimen panel for evaluation of G6PD tests is described. The approach is similar to that used in several malaria research facilities for the cryopreservation of parasites in clinical specimens and axenic cultures. Specimens stored in this manner will aid

  7. Dried blood spots, valid screening for viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus in real-life

    PubMed Central

    Mössner, Belinda K; Staugaard, Benjamin; Jensen, Janne; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Christensen, Peer B; Holm, Dorte Kinggaard

    2016-01-01

    AIM To detect chronic hepatitis B (CHB), chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in dried blood spot (DBS) and compare these samples to venous blood sampling in real-life. METHODS We included prospective patients with known viral infections from drug treatment centers, a prison and outpatient clinics and included blood donors as negative controls. Five drops of finger capillary blood were spotted on filter paper, and a venous blood sample was obtained. The samples were analyzed for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV levels as well as subjected to a combined nucleic acid test (NAT) for HBV DNA, HCV RNA and HIV RNA. RESULTS Samples from 404 subjects were screened (85 CHB, 116 CHC, 114 HIV and 99 blood donors). DBS had a sensitivity of > 96% and a specificity of > 98% for the detection of all three infections. NAT testing did not improve sensitivity, but correctly classified 95% of the anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic and past infections. Anti-HBc and anti-HBS showed low sensitivity in DBS (68% and 42%). CONCLUSION DBS sampling, combined with an automated analysis system, is a feasible screening method to diagnose chronic viral hepatitis and HIV infections outside of the health care system. PMID:27672281

  8. Japanese Reference Panel of Blood Specimens for Evaluation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA and Core Antigen Quantitative Assays

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Asako; Sugiyama, Nao; Watashi, Koichi; Masaki, Takahiro; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Aizaki, Hideki; Mizuochi, Toshiaki; Wakita, Takaji

    2012-01-01

    An accurate and reliable quantitative assay for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is essential for measuring viral propagation and the efficacy of antiviral therapy. There is a growing need for domestic reference panels for evaluation of clinical assay kits because the performance of these kits may vary with region-specific genotypes or polymorphisms. In this study, we established a reference panel by selecting 80 donated blood specimens in Japan that tested positive for HCV. Using this panel, we quantified HCV viral loads using two HCV RNA kits and five core antigen (Ag) kits currently available in Japan. The data from the two HCV RNA assay kits showed excellent correlation. All RNA titers were distributed evenly across a range from 3 to 7 log IU/ml. Although the data from the five core Ag kits also correlated with RNA titers, the sensitivities of individual kits were not sufficient to quantify viral load in all samples. As calculated by the correlation with RNA titers, the theoretical lower limits of detection by these core Ag assays were higher than those for the detection of RNA. Moreover, in several samples in our panel, core Ag levels were underestimated compared to RNA titers. Sequence analysis in the HCV core region suggested that polymorphisms at amino acids 47 to 49 of the core Ag were responsible for this underestimation. The panel established in this study will be useful for estimating the quality of currently available and upcoming HCV assay kits; such quality control is essential for clinical usage of these kits. PMID:22495557

  9. A novel RealTime HIV-1 Qualitative assay for the detection of HIV-1 nucleic acids in dried blood spots and plasma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shihai; Erickson, Brian; Mak, Wai Bing; Salituro, John; Abravaya, Klara

    2011-12-01

    Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Qualitative is an in vitro real-time PCR assay for detecting HIV-1 nucleic acids in human plasma and dried blood spots (DBS). The assay was designed to be used in diagnosis of HIV-1 infections in pediatric and adult patients, with an emphasis on the applicability in resource-limited settings. Use of DBS facilitates specimen collection from remote areas and transportation to testing laboratories. Small sample input requirement facilitates testing of specimens with limited collection volume. The Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Qualitative assay is capable of detecting HIV-1 group M subtypes A-H, group O and group N samples. HIV-1 virus concentrations detected with 95% probability were 80 copies/mL of plasma using the plasma protocol, and 2469 copies/mL of whole blood using the DBS protocol. The assay detected HIV-1 infection in 13 seroconversion panels an average 10.5 days earlier than an HIV-1 antibody test and 4.9 days earlier than a p24 antigen test. For specimens collected from 6 weeks to 18 months old infants born to HIV-1 positive mothers, assay results using both the DBS and plasma protocols agreed well with the Roche Amplicor HIV-1 DNA Test version 1.5 (95.5% agreement for DBS and 97.8% agreement for plasma).

  10. Comparative evaluation of the role of single and multiple blood specimens in the outcome of blood cultures using BacT/ALERT 3D (automated) blood culture system in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Elantamilan, D.; Lyngdoh, Valarie Wihiwot; Khyriem, Annie B.; Rajbongshi, Jyotismita; Bora, Ishani; Devi, Surbala Thingujam; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Barman, Himesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a leading cause of mortality in critically ill patients. The mortality directly attributable to BSI has been estimated to be around 16% and 40% in general hospital population and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) population, respectively. The detection rate of these infections increases with the number of blood samples obtained for culture. The newer continuous monitoring automated blood culture systems with enhanced culture media show increased yield and sensitivity. Hence, we aimed at studying the role of single and multiple blood specimens from different sites at the same time in the outcome of automated blood culture system. Materials and Methods and Results: A total of 1054 blood culture sets were analyzed over 1 year, the sensitivity of one, two, and three samples in a set was found to be 85.67%, 96.59%, and 100%, respectively, which showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.0001). Similar findings were seen in few more studies, however, among individual organisms in contrast to other studies, the isolation rates of Gram-positive bacteria were less than that of Gram-negative Bacilli with one (or first) sample in a blood culture set. In our study, despite using BacT/ALERT three-dimensional continuous culture monitoring system with FAN plus culture bottles, 15% of positive cultures would have been missed if only a single sample was collected in a blood culture set. Conclusion: The variables like the volume of blood and number of samples collected from different sites still play a major role in the outcome of these automated blood culture systems.

  11. Dried Blood Spot Analysis for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Linezolid in Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vu, D. H.; Bolhuis, M. S.; Koster, R. A.; Greijdanus, B.; de Lange, W. C. M.; van Altena, R.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.; Uges, D. R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Linezolid is a promising antimicrobial agent for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), but its use is limited by toxicity. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) may help to minimize toxicity while adequate drug exposure is maintained. Conventional plasma sampling and monitoring might be hindered in many parts of the world by logistical problems that may be solved by dried blood spot (DBS) sampling. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a novel method for TDM of linezolid in MDR-TB patients using DBS sampling. Plasma, venous DBS, and capillary DBS specimens were obtained simultaneously from eight patients receiving linezolid. A DBS sampling method was developed and clinically validated by comparing DBS with plasma results using Passing-Bablok regression and Bland-Altman analysis. This study showed that DBS analysis was reproducible and robust. Accuracy and between- and within-day precision values from three validations presented as bias and coefficient of variation (CV) were less than 17.2% for the lower limit of quantification and less than 7.8% for other levels. The method showed a high recovery of approximately 95% and a low matrix effect of less than 8.7%. DBS specimens were stable at 37°C for 2 months and at 50°C for 1 week. The ratio of the concentration of linezolid in DBS samples to that in plasma was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 1.27). Linezolid exposure calculated from concentrations DBS samples and plasma showed good agreement. In conclusion, DBS analysis of linezolid is a promising tool to optimize linezolid treatment in MDR-TB patients. An easy sampling procedure and high sample stability may facilitate TDM, even in underdeveloped countries with limited resources and where conventional plasma sampling is not feasible. PMID:22926568

  12. Pyrosequencing Dried Blood Spots Reveals Differences in HIV Drug Resistance between Treatment Naïve and Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hezhao; Li, Yang; Liang, Binhua; Pilon, Richard; MacPherson, Paul; Bergeron, Michèle; Kim, John; Graham, Morag; Van Domselaar, Gary; Sandstrom, Paul; Brooks, James

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) are an alternative specimen collection format for HIV-1 genotyping. DBS produce HIV genotyping results that are robust and equivalent to plasma when using conventional sequencing methods. However, using tagged, pooled pyrosequencing, we demonstrate that concordance between plasma and DBS is not absolute and varies according to viral load (VL), duration of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) status. The plasma/DBS concordance is the highest when VL is ≥5,000 copies/ml and/or the patient has no ART exposure and/or when the duration of HIV infection is ≤2 years. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that VL is most important independent predictor for concordance of DBS with plasma genotypes. This is the first study to use next generation sequencing to identify discordance between DBS and plasma genotypes. Consideration should be given to VL, duration of infection, and ART exposure when interpreting DBS genotypes produced using next generation sequencing. These findings are of particular significance when DBS are to be used for clinical monitoring purposes. PMID:23409150

  13. Dried blood spot proteomics: surface extraction of endogenous proteins coupled with automated sample preparation and mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicholas J; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spots offer many advantages as a sample format including ease and safety of transport and handling. To date, the majority of mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots have focused on small molecules or hemoglobin. However, dried blood spots are a potentially rich source of protein biomarkers, an area that has been overlooked. To address this issue, we have applied an untargeted bottom-up proteomics approach to the analysis of dried blood spots. We present an automated and integrated method for extraction of endogenous proteins from the surface of dried blood spots and sample preparation via trypsin digestion by use of the Advion Biosciences Triversa Nanomate robotic platform. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the resulting digests enabled identification of 120 proteins from a single dried blood spot. The proteins identified cross a concentration range of four orders of magnitude. The method is evaluated and the results discussed in terms of the proteins identified and their potential use as biomarkers in screening programs.

  14. Dried Blood Spot Proteomics: Surface Extraction of Endogenous Proteins Coupled with Automated Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spots offer many advantages as a sample format including ease and safety of transport and handling. To date, the majority of mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots have focused on small molecules or hemoglobin. However, dried blood spots are a potentially rich source of protein biomarkers, an area that has been overlooked. To address this issue, we have applied an untargeted bottom-up proteomics approach to the analysis of dried blood spots. We present an automated and integrated method for extraction of endogenous proteins from the surface of dried blood spots and sample preparation via trypsin digestion by use of the Advion Biosciences Triversa Nanomate robotic platform. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the resulting digests enabled identification of 120 proteins from a single dried blood spot. The proteins identified cross a concentration range of four orders of magnitude. The method is evaluated and the results discussed in terms of the proteins identified and their potential use as biomarkers in screening programs.

  15. Genome-Wide Profiling of RNA from Dried Blood Spots: Convergence with Bioinformatic Results Derived from Whole Venous Blood and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    McDade, Thomas W; M Ross, Kharah; L Fried, Ruby; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Miller, Gregory E; Cole, Steve W

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptional profiling has emerged as a powerful tool for analyzing biological mechanisms underlying social gradients in health, but utilization in population-based studies has been hampered by logistical constraints and costs associated with venipuncture blood sampling. Dried blood spots (DBS) provide a minimally invasive, low-cost alternative to venipuncture, and in this article we evaluate how closely the substantive results from DBS transcriptional profiling correspond to those derived from parallel analyses of gold-standard venous blood samples (PAXgene whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMC]). Analyses focused on differences in gene expression between African-Americans and Caucasians in a community sample of 82 healthy adults (age 18-70 years; mean 35). Across 19,679 named gene transcripts, DBS-derived values correlated r = .85 with both PAXgene and PBMC values. Results from bioinformatics analyses of gene expression derived from DBS samples were concordant with PAXgene and PBMC samples in identifying increased Type I interferon signaling and up-regulated activity of monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells in African-Americans compared to Caucasian participants. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of DBS in field-based studies of gene expression and encourage future studies of human transcriptome dynamics in larger, more representative samples than are possible with clinic- or lab-based research designs. PMID:27337553

  16. [Investigation into vegetative regulation of blood circulation during 7-day dry immersion].

    PubMed

    Eshmanova, A K; Luchinskaia, E S; Baevskiĭ, R M

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations into vegetative regulation of blood circulation and regulation modification by peroral amlodipine and myostimulation during 7-d dry immersion. It was shown that in immersion vegetative regulation readjusted towards predominance of the sympathetic mechanisms. Myostimulation and peroral amlodipine modified regulation substantially mobilizing high level suprasegmentary structures. It should be noted that amlodipine and myostimulation differ in mechanisms of their action on central regulation. Pharmaceutical intervention seems to have a more complex and varying effect on people including side-effects. Presumably, it was the cause of poor orthostatic tolerance of several test-subjects.

  17. Hemato-critical issues in quantitative analysis of dried blood spots: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    De Kesel, Pieter Mm; Sadones, Nele; Capiau, Sara; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling for quantitative determination of drugs in blood has entered the bioanalytical arena at a fast pace during the last decade, primarily owing to progress in analytical instrumentation. Despite the many advantages associated with this new sampling strategy, several issues remain, of which the hematocrit issue is undoubtedly the most widely discussed challenge, since strongly deviating hematocrit values may significantly impact DBS-based quantitation. In this review, an overview is given of the different aspects of the 'hematocrit problem' in quantitative DBS analysis. The different strategies that try to cope with this problem are discussed, along with their potential and limitations. Implementation of some of these strategies in practice may help to overcome this important hurdle in DBS assays, further allowing DBS to become an established part of routine quantitative bioanalysis.

  18. Dried blood spots for the enzymatic diagnosis of lysosomal storage diseases in dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Adrian C.; Haskins, Mark E.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Background In people lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) can be diagnosed by assaying enzyme activities in dried blood spots (DBS). Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using DBS samples from dogs and cats to measure lysosomal enzymatic activities and diagnose LSD. Methods Drops of fresh whole blood collected in EDTA from dogs and cats with known or suspected LSD and from clinically healthy dogs and cats were placed on neonatal screening cards, dried, and mailed to the Metabolic Laboratory, University Children’s Hospital, Frankfurt, Germany. Activities of selected lysosomal enzymes were measured using fluorescent substrates in a 2-mm diameter disk (~2.6 μL blood) punched from the DBS. Results were expressed as nmol substrate hydrolyzed per mL of blood per minute or hour. Results Reference values were established for several lysosomal enzyme activities in DBS from dogs and cats; for most enzymes, activities were higher than those published for human samples. Activities of β-glucuronidase, N-acetylglucosamine-4-sulfatase (arylsulfatase B), α-mannosidase, α-galactosidase, α-fucosidase, and hexosaminidase A were measureable in DBS from healthy cats and dogs; α-iduronidase activity was measureable only in cats. In samples from animals with LSD, markedly reduced activity of a specific enzyme was found. In contrast, in samples from cats affected with mucolipidosis II activities of lysosomal enzymes were markedly increased. Conclusions Measurement of lysosomal enzyme activities in DBS provides an inexpensive, simple, and convenient method to screen animals for suspected LSD and requires only a small sample volume. For diseases in which the relevant enzyme activity can be measured in DBS, a specific diagnosis can be made. PMID:23121383

  19. A dried blood spot mass spectrometry metabolomic approach for rapid breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingjun; Sun, Tao; Cao, Yunfeng; Gao, Peng; Dong, Jun; Fang, Yanhua; Fang, Zhongze; Sun, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Zhitu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer (BC) is still a lethal threat to women worldwide. An accurate screening and diagnosis strategy performed in an easy-to-operate manner is highly warranted in clinical perspective. Besides the routinely focused protein markers, blood is full of small molecular metabolites with diverse structures and properties. This study aimed to screen metabolite markers with BC diagnosis potentials. Methods A dried blood spot-based direct infusion mass spectrometry (MS) metabolomic analysis was conducted for BC and non-BC differentiation. The targeted analytes included 23 amino acids and 26 acylcarnitines. Results Multivariate analysis screened out 21 BC-related metabolites in the blood. Regression analysis generated a diagnosis model consisting of parameters Pip, Asn, Pro, C14:1/C16, Phe/Tyr, and Gly/Ala. Tested with another set of BC and non-BC samples, this model showed a sensitivity of 92.2% and a specificity of 84.4%. Compared to the routinely used protein markers, this model exhibited distinct advantage with its higher sensitivity. Conclusion Blood metabolites screening is a more plausible approach for BC detection. Furthermore, this direct MS analysis could be finished within few minutes, which means that its throughput is higher than the currently used imaging techniques. PMID:27042107

  20. Do capillary dried blood spot concentrations of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid mirror those in venous blood? A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sadones, Nele; Archer, John R H; Ingels, Ann-Sofie M E; Dargan, Paul I; Wood, David M; Wood, Michelle; Neels, Hugo; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2015-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a well-known illicit club and date-rape drug. Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling is a promising alternative for classical venous sampling in cases of (suspected) GHB intoxication since it allows rapid sampling, which is of interest for the extensively metabolized GHB. However, there is limited data if -and how- capillary DBS concentrations correlate with venous concentrations. We conducted a comparative study in 50 patients with suspected GHB intoxication, to determine and to correlate GHB concentrations in venous DBS (vDBS) and capillary DBS (cDBS). This is the first study that evaluates in a large cohort the correlation between capillary and venous concentrations of an illicit drug in real-life samples. Of the 50 paired samples, 7 were excluded: the vDBS concentration was below the LLOQ of 2 µg/mL in 3 cases and 4 samples were excluded after visual inspection of the DBS. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean % difference of -2.8% between cDBS and vDBS concentrations, with the zero value included in the 95% confidence interval of the mean difference in GHB concentration. A paired sample t-test confirmed this observation (p = 0.17). Also the requirement for incurred sample reproducibility was fulfilled: for more than two-thirds of the samples the concentrations obtained in cDBS and those in vDBS were within 20% of their mean. Since equivalent concentrations were observed in cDBS and vDBS, blood obtained by fingerprick can be considered a valid alternative for venous blood for GHB determination.

  1. Dried Blood Spot Collection of Health Biomarkers to Maximize Participation in Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ostler, Michael W.; Porter, James H.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers are directly-measured biological indicators of disease, health, exposures, or other biological information. In population and social sciences, biomarkers need to be easy to obtain, transport, and analyze. Dried Blood Spots meet this need, and can be collected in the field with high response rates. These elements are particularly important in longitudinal study designs including interventions where attrition is critical to avoid, and high response rates improve the interpretation of results. Dried Blood Spot sample collection is simple, quick, relatively painless, less invasive then venipuncture, and requires minimal field storage requirements (i.e. samples do not need to be immediately frozen and can be stored for a long period of time in a stable freezer environment before assay). The samples can be analyzed for a variety of different analytes, including cholesterol, C-reactive protein, glycosylated hemoglobin, numerous cytokines, and other analytes, as well as provide genetic material. DBS collection is depicted as employed in several recent studies. PMID:24513728

  2. Dried blood spot in the genotyping, quantification and storage of HCV RNA: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Greenman, Jamie; Roberts, Teri; Cohn, Jennifer; Messac, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The entry of new all-oral direct acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C provides an opportunity to scale up HCV care in low- and middle-income countries. In HIV, use of dried blood spots (DBS) has facilitated the diagnosis and management of HIV in resource-poor settings. DBS may be used in a similar way to facilitate diagnosis and management of HCV. Here, we present a systematic review of the literature of DBS for HCV RNA detection and genotyping. Using an a priori review protocol, three databases were searched for studies published up to August 2013 that reported the use of dried blood and serum spots in genotyping, detection and measurement of HCV RNA, as well as the rate of degradation of HCV RNA when stored in DBS at room temperature. Nine papers were eligible for inclusion; eight studied DBS and one dried serum. Two studies measured concordance between genotype and subtype determined by DBS and whole plasma and both found 100% concordance. Four studies measured endpoint detection limits of HCV RNA-positive samples by DBS and found positive predictive values of 100% down to 250, 334, 2500 and 24160 IU/mL. Two studies found deterioration of HCV RNA in DBS samples stored at room temperature, while two others failed to detect such deterioration. These results support the potential use of DBS for genotyping and HCV RNA detection. Studies of the use of DBS for HCV RNA viral load measurement and of the rate of degradation of HCV RNA when stored in DBS at ambient temperatures remain inconclusive. PMID:25367722

  3. Alginate and chitosan foam combined with electromembrane extraction for dried blood spot analysis.

    PubMed

    Eibak, Lars Erik Eng; Hegge, Anne Bee; Rasmussen, Knut Einar; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2012-10-16

    Samples of 10 μL of whole blood containing citalopram, loperamide, methadone, and sertraline as model substances were spotted on alginate and chitosan foams as sampling media. After drying and storage at room temperature, the punched out dried blood spot and the foam was dissolved in 300 μL of 1 mM HCl. With alginate foam as sampling medium, the analytes dissolved completely after 3 min. Enrichment and cleanup was performed with electromembrane extraction for 10 min. The analytes were collected in 21 μL of 10 mM formic acid as the acceptor phase, and the extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Sample preparation of blood spots on commercial cards was also performed (Whatman FTA DMPK and Agilent Bond Elut DMS) using elution procedures recommended by the manufacturers. The recoveries obtained with the commercial cards were lower for most of the model analytes compared to the recoveries obtained with alginate and chitosan foams as sampling media. The procedure used for Agilent Bond Elut DMS showed higher recoveries than the procedure used for Whatman FTA DMPK-A, but the time needed for sample preparation was significantly longer (nearly 2 h). The stability of the model substances on the alginate foam was acceptable within 50 days of storage. The limit of quantification (LOQ) defined as S/N = 10, was 1.2, 5.5, 2.0, and 5.3 ng/mL for citalopram, loperamide, methadone, and sertraline, respectively. Linear calibration graphs were obtained in the range 17.5-560 ng/mL with r(2) values 0.983-0.995, and the relative standard deviations were below 20%. PMID:22991973

  4. Oral flurbiprofen metabolic ratio assessment using a single-point dried blood spot.

    PubMed

    Daali, Y; Samer, C; Déglon, J; Thomas, A; Chabert, J; Rebsamen, M; Staub, C; Dayer, P; Desmeules, J

    2012-03-01

    We investigated whether a single blood measurement using the minimally invasive technique of a finger prick to draw a blood sample of 5 µl (to yield a dried blood spot (DBS)) is suitable for the assessment of flurbiprofen (FLB) metabolic ratio (MR). Ten healthy volunteers who had been genotyped for CYP2C9 were recruited as subjects. They received FLB alone in session 1 and FLB with fluconazole in session 2. In session 3, the subjects were pretreated for 4 days with rifampicin and received FLB with the last dose of rifampicin on day 5. Plasma and DBS samples were obtained between 0 and 8 h after FLB administration, and urine was collected during the 8 h after administration. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the drugs were comparable in DBS and plasma. FLB's apparent clearance values decreased by 35% in plasma and DBS during session 2 and increased by 75% in plasma and by 30% in DBS during session 3. Good correlations were observed between MRs calculated from urine, plasma, and DBS samples.

  5. Dried blood spot sampling for detection of monoclonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Petrara, Maria Raffaella; Elefanti, Lisa; Quaggio, Monica; Zanchetta, Marisa; Scaini, Maria Chiara; Masalu, Nestory; De Rossi, Anita; Menin, Chiara

    2013-10-01

    Molecular methods are important tools for diagnosis and monitoring of many lymphoproliferative disorders. The reliability of lymphoma diagnoses is strikingly different between developed and developing countries, partly due to lack of access to these advanced molecular analyses. To overcome these problems, we propose a new application of dried blood spots (DBS) for detecting clonal B-cell populations in peripheral blood (PB). We ensured that the DBS contained sufficient lymphocytes to perform a PCR-based clonality assay without producing false positives. Using the Namalwa B-cell line, we established that the assay is sensitive enough to detect 200 clonal cells in the analyzed sample. Very similar clonal results were obtained between DNA from DBS and fresh whole blood from patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. B-cell clonality can also be detected in DBS from African children with EBV-associated diseases. This is the first study demonstrating that clonality testing can be performed on DBS samples, thus improving the diagnostic and monitoring options for lymphoproliferative diseases in resource-limited settings. PMID:23965169

  6. Analysis of ochratoxin A in dried blood spots - Correlation between venous and finger-prick blood, the influence of hematocrit and spotted volume.

    PubMed

    Osteresch, Bernd; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    We report the improvement of a method for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) and its thermal degradation product 2'R-ochratoxin A in dried blood spots (DBS) by high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The DBS technique was advanced for the analysis of these two compounds in DBS with unknown amounts of blood as well as varying hematocrit values. Furthermore the comparability of venous vs. capillary blood was investigated. Human whole blood samples were spotted, dried, and extracted with a solvent consisting of acetone, acetonitrile and water for analysis by HPLC-MS/MS. Quantification was carried out by stable isotope labelled internal standards. Blood samples of volunteers (n=50) were used to further optimize and simplify the procedure. Ochratoxin A and 2'R-ochratoxin A concentrations found in the entire spots (approx. 100 μL blood) were compared with punched DBS discs of 8.8mm size containing approximately 20 μL blood. As a result the amounts of both toxins in a punched 8.8mm disc correlate well with the entire DBS. Also the use of capillary blood from finger-pricks versus venous blood was evaluated. The analyte levels correlate as well indicating that the less invasive finger-prick sampling gives also reliable results. The influence of hematocrit was investigated in a range of 25-55% according to the hematocrit in the used real blood samples (34-46% hematocrit). However no significant hematocrit effect was observed for the utilized real blood samples. Moreover different blood volumes were spotted and punched as a minimal spot size is usually recommended for accurate analysis. In this experiment finger-prick samples typically consist of about 90 μL blood. Therefore spots of 75, 100 and 125 μL blood were prepared and analyzed. Similar to the hematocrit effect, no considerable influence was observed. PMID:27046696

  7. Bridging the gap between sample collection and laboratory analysis: using dried blood spots to identify human exposure to chemical agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I.; Blake, Thomas A.; Perez, Jonas W.; Crow, Brian S.; Shaner, Rebecca L.; Coleman, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-05-01

    Public health response to large scale chemical emergencies presents logistical challenges for sample collection, transport, and analysis. Diagnostic methods used to identify and determine exposure to chemical warfare agents, toxins, and poisons traditionally involve blood collection by phlebotomists, cold transport of biomedical samples, and costly sample preparation techniques. Use of dried blood spots, which consist of dried blood on an FDA-approved substrate, can increase analyte stability, decrease infection hazard for those handling samples, greatly reduce the cost of shipping/storing samples by removing the need for refrigeration and cold chain transportation, and be self-prepared by potentially exposed individuals using a simple finger prick and blood spot compatible paper. Our laboratory has developed clinical assays to detect human exposures to nerve agents through the analysis of specific protein adducts and metabolites, for which a simple extraction from a dried blood spot is sufficient for removing matrix interferents and attaining sensitivities on par with traditional sampling methods. The use of dried blood spots can bridge the gap between the laboratory and the field allowing for large scale sample collection with minimal impact on hospital resources while maintaining sensitivity, specificity, traceability, and quality requirements for both clinical and forensic applications.

  8. Detection of hemagglutinins in dried saliva stains and their potential use in blood typing.

    PubMed

    Harrington, J J; Martin, R; Kobilinsky, L

    1988-05-01

    Since 1928, hemagglutinins have been known to exist in saliva; however, they have not been utilized as evidence in criminal investigations because in the past, techniques for measuring them have not been sufficiently sensitive. In this paper we describe improved techniques for detecting salivary hemagglutinins and report initial results obtained with these methods. The stability of salivary hemagglutinins at several different temperatures was examined in liquid samples and in dried stains on filter paper, cigarette butts, and envelope flaps. Our observations indicate that salivary hemagglutinins may be sufficiently stable, over periods of one to several days at ambient room temperatures, to be of value to forensic science investigators. The results of the hemagglutinin assay are not affected by the age or sex of the sample donor. Because salivary hemagglutinins can be used to determine ABO blood type, analyses of this kind can serve as an important confirmatory test which the forensic serologist can use in conjunction with salivary agglutinogen determinations. PMID:3385376

  9. Influence of erythrocyte iodothyronine-binding proteins on radioimmunoassay of thyroxin in dried blood spots

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, W.A.; Lynskey, C.P.

    1982-01-01

    Three erythrocyte proteins, one identified as hemoglobin, bind thyroid hormones. Using a dextran/charcoal radioimmunoassay for thyroxin in dried blood spots, we demonstrate that such binding differs with the buffer used. Barbital, phosphate, and borate buffers significantly enhance the binding more than glycine and tris(hydroxymethyl)methylamine buffers. Binding is not affected by agents commonly used to inhibit thyroxin binding to serum proteins. A highly significant nonlinear direct relationship between sample storage (temperature and duration) and increased thyroxin-erythrocyte binding is documented, together with an associated decrease in assayed concentrations of thyroxin. However, concomitant serial measurement of thyroxin with polyethylene glycol and combined double-antibody/polyethylene glycol radioimmunoassays produced no evidence of interference by erythrocyte proteins in the radioimmune reaction. We conclude that erythrocyte proteins act only as low-affinity secondary binders in radioimmunoassay for thyroxin.

  10. Spot them in the spot: analysis of abused substances using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Sadones, Nele; Capiau, Sara; De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and DBS analysis have increasingly received attention during recent years. Furthermore, a substantial number of DBS methods has recently become available in clinical, forensic and occupational toxicology. In this review, we provide an overview of the different DBS-based methods that have been developed for detecting (markers of) abused substances. These include both legal and illegal drugs belonging to different categories, including cannabinoids, cocaine and metabolites, opioids, benzodiazepines and Z-drugs, amphetamines and analogs, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, ketamine and novel psychoactive substances such as cathinones. Markers of ethanol consumption and tobacco use are also covered in this review. Since the majority of published methods has shown promising results overall, an interesting role for DBS analysis in diverse toxicological applications can be envisaged. For the distinct applications, we discuss the specific potential and benefits of DBS, the associated limitations and challenges, as well as recent developments and future perspectives.

  11. Dried blood spots PCR assays to screen congenital cytomegalovirus infection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Huiping; Qian, Jihong; Zhu, Jianxing

    2015-04-14

    The performance of dried blood spots (DBS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays in screening for congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection varies between different studies. To determine whether the DBS PCR assay has sufficient accuracy to be used as a screening test for cCMV infection, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 studies (n = 26007 neonates) that evaluated the performance of DBS PCR tests in screening for cCMV infection and that met our inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.844 (95% CI = 0.812-0.872) and 0.999 (95% CI = 0.998-0.999), respectively, and the diagnostic odds ratio was 1362.10 (95%CI = 566.91-3272.60). As sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust. In conclusion, the performance of DBS PCR assays for testing cCMV was more suitable for retrospective diagnosis than screening.

  12. The opisthonephric blood vascular system of the chicken embryo as studied by scanning electron microscopy of microvascular corrosion casts and critical point dried preparations.

    PubMed

    Ditrich, H; Splechtna, H

    1989-06-01

    Microvascular corrosion casts of chicken embryos between four and 19 days after fertilization have been prepared. The developing kidney was investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The injection technique and resin composition were modified in order to facilitate the complete replication of native blood vascular systems of specimens as small as 15 mm body length. The development of the opisthonephros was followed from near the beginning of its function until a vascular development comparable to the adult situation was reached. Critical point dried glomeruli show the differentiation of the glomerular visceral epithelium (podocytes) from initially epithelioid to highly branched forms. The embryonic kidney (cranial part of the opisthonephros-mesonephros) shows a construction-principle resembling amphibians that is entirely different from the definitive excretory organ (caudal part of the opisthonephros-metanephros). PMID:2814402

  13. Second-tier test for quantification of underivatized amino acids in dry blood spot for metabolic diseases in newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Zhu, Hongbin; Zhang, Wenyan; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2013-02-01

    The quantitative analysis of amino acids (AAs) in single dry blood spot (DBS) samples is an important issue for metabolic diseases as a second-tier test in newborn screening. An analytical method for quantifying underivatized AAs in DBS was developed by using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The sample preparation in this method is simple and ion-pairing agent is not used in the mobile phase that could avoid ion suppression, which happens in mass spectrometry and avoids damage to the column. Through chromatographic separation, some isomeric compounds could be identified and quantified, which cannot be solved through only appropriate multiple reactions monitoring transitions by MS/MS. The concentrations of the different AAs were determined using non-deuterated internal standard. All calibration curves showed excellent linearity within test ranges. For most of the amino acids the accuracy of extraction recovery was between 85.3 and 115 %, and the precision of relative standard deviation was <7.0 %. The 35 AAs could be identified in DBS specimens by the developed LC-MS/MS method in 17-19 min, and eventually 24 AAs in DBS were quantified. The results of the present study prove that this method as a second-tier test in newborn screening for metabolic diseases could be performed by the quantification of free AAs in DBS using the LC-MS/MS method. The assay has advantages of high sensitive, specific, and inexpensive merits because non-deuterated internal standard and acetic acid instead of ion-pairing agent in mobile phase are used in this protocol.

  14. Use of dried blood spots to define antibody response to the Strongyloides stercoralis recombinant antigen NIE.

    PubMed

    Mounsey, Kate; Kearns, Therese; Rampton, Melanie; Llewellyn, Stacey; King, Mallory; Holt, Deborah; Currie, Bart J; Andrews, Ross; Nutman, Thomas; McCarthy, James

    2014-10-01

    An approach to improve the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection is the use of serologic assays utilising the NIE antigen from S. stercoralis, with good diagnostic sensitivity and excellent specificity reported. Detection of antibody eluted from dried blood spots (DBS) has shown utility in large-scale seroepidemiological studies for a range of conditions and is appealing for use with children where sample collection is difficult. We adapted an existing NIE-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the testing of strongyloides antibody response on DBS, and evaluated it in a population screening and mass drug administration programme (MDA) for strongyloidiasis conducted in an Australian indigenous community. Study participants were treated with 200 μg/kg ivermectin (>15 kg) or 3× 400 mg albendazole (<15kg). The sensitivity of the NIE DBS-ELISA was determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis to be 85.7%. A total of 214 DBS were collected from 184 participants across two screening and MDA encounters. A total of 27 of 164 participants (16.5%) tested positive for S. stercoralis NIE-DBS prior to MDA treatment, and 6 of 50 participants (12.0%) tested positive after treatment. These prevalence values are similar to those documented by standard serology in the same community. For 30 participants where a DBS was collected at both MDA 1 and 2, a significant decline in ELISA values was evident post treatment (0.12-0.02, p=0.0012). These results are in agreement with previous studies documenting the high seroprevalence of S. stercoralis in remote Australian Indigenous communities, and suggest that collection of dried blood spots may be a useful approach for field diagnosis of S. stercoralis seroprevalence.

  15. Sulfatide Analysis by Mass Spectrometry for Screening of Metachromatic Leukodystrophy in Dried Blood and Urine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Spacil, Zdenek; Kumar, Arun Babu; Liao, Hsuan-Chieh; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Stark, Samantha; Suhr, Teryn R.; Scott, C. Ronald; Turecek, Frantisek; Gelb, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency in arylsulfatase A activity, leading to accumulation of sulfatide substrates. Diagnostic and monitoring procedures include demonstration of reduced arylsulfatase A activity in peripheral blood leukocytes or detection of sulfatides in urine. However, the development of a screening test is challenging because of instability of the enzyme in dried blood spots (DBS), the widespread occurrence of pseudodeficiency alleles, and the lack of available urine samples from newborn screening programs. METHODS We measured individual sulfatide profiles in DBS and dried urine spots (DUS) from MLD patients with LC-MS/MS to identify markers with the discriminatory power to differentiate affected individuals from controls. We also developed a method for converting all sulfatide molecular species into a single species, allowing quantification in positive-ion mode upon derivatization. RESULTS In DBS from MLD patients, we found up to 23.2-fold and 5.1-fold differences in total sulfatide concentrations for early- and late-onset MLD, respectively, compared with controls and pseudodeficiencies. Corresponding DUS revealed up to 164-fold and 78-fold differences for early- and late-onset MLD patient samples compared with controls. The use of sulfatides converted to a single species simplified the analysis and increased detection sensitivity in positive-ion mode, providing a second option for sulfatide analysis. CONCLUSIONS This study of sulfatides in DBS and DUS suggests the feasibility of the mass spectrometry method for newborn screening of MLD and sets the stage for a larger-scale newborn screening pilot study. PMID:26585924

  16. Role of therapeutic drug monitoring in pulmonary infections: use and potential for expanded use of dried blood spot samples.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Susan; Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Koster, Remco A; Akkerman, Onno W; van Assen, Sander; Stove, Christophe; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections are among the most common infections in men. We reviewed literature to document their pharmacological treatments, and the extent to which therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is needed during treatment. We subsequently examined potential use of dried blood spots as sample procedure for TDM. TDM was found to be an important component of clinical care for many (but not all) pulmonary infections. For gentamicin, linezolid, voriconazole and posaconazole dried blood spot methods and their use in TDM were already evident in literature. For glycopeptides, β-lactam antibiotics and fluoroquinolones it was determined that development of a dried blood spot (DBS) method could be useful. This review identifies specific antibiotics for which development of DBS methods could support the optimization of treatment of pulmonary infections.

  17. Dry reagent technology for rapid, convenient measurements of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Oberhardt, B J; Dermott, S C; Taylor, M; Alkadi, Z Y; Abruzzini, A F; Gresalfi, N J

    1991-04-01

    Rapid coagulation and fibrinolysis assays suitable for use with an imprecisely measured sample volume (either whole blood or plasma) have been developed, utilizing a technology based on paramagnetic iron oxide particles (PIOP) that move in response to an oscillating magnetic field. PIOP are combined with appropriate test reagents for clotting and thrombolysis assays and formulated as dry reagents within a capillary test chamber. The minima and maxima of the PIOP oscillations define a two-sided waveform that provides kinetic information on fibrin polymerization and lysis. Subject to the chemistry of the dry reagent formulation, the resulting waveform can be used to define clotting time, lysis onset time, or fibrinogen variables. Applications to one-stage prothrombin time and one-stage activated partial thromboplastin time tests have yielded assays with consistently good correlations with other test methods. Applications to fibrinolysis studies have yielded global assays of thrombolytic activity, in that the assay results reflect the interactions of multiple factors associated with the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy. Depending on the components utilized in a particular reagent formulation, one can derive information about the activity of such factors as fibrinogen, plasminogen, and related inhibitors, as well as the lytic agent being administered. Use of these assays in a clinical setting should provide a rapid, convenient alternative to conventional testing of coagulation variables and a reliable method for monitoring thrombolytic therapy. PMID:2015664

  18. Does volumetric absorptive microsampling eliminate the hematocrit bias for caffeine and paraxanthine in dried blood samples? A comparative study.

    PubMed

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2015-06-30

    Volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS) is a novel sampling technique that allows the straightforward collection of an accurate volume of blood (approximately 10μL) from a drop or pool of blood by dipping an absorbent polymeric tip into it. The resulting blood microsample is dried and analyzed as a whole. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of VAMS to overcome the hematocrit bias, an important issue in the analysis of dried blood microsamples. An LC-MS/MS method for analysis of the model compounds caffeine and paraxanthine in VAMS samples was fully validated and fulfilled all pre-established criteria. In conjunction with previously validated procedures for dried blood spots (DBS) and blood, this allowed us to set up a meticulous comparative study in which both compounds were determined in over 80 corresponding VAMS, DBS and liquid whole blood samples. These originated from authentic human patient samples, covering a wide hematocrit range (0.21-0.50). By calculating the differences with reference whole blood concentrations, we found that analyte concentrations in VAMS samples were not affected by a bias that changed over the evaluated hematocrit range, in contrast to DBS results. However, VAMS concentrations tend to overestimate whole blood concentrations, as a consistent positive bias was observed. A different behavior of VAMS samples prepared from incurred and spiked blood, combined with a somewhat reduced recovery of caffeine and paraxanthine from VAMS tips at high hematocrit values, an effect that was not observed for DBS using a very similar extraction procedure, was found to be at the basis of the observed VAMS-whole blood deviations. Based on this study, being the first in which the validity and robustness of VAMS is evaluated by analyzing incurred human samples, it can be concluded that VAMS effectively assists in eliminating the effect of hematocrit. PMID:26041521

  19. Does volumetric absorptive microsampling eliminate the hematocrit bias for caffeine and paraxanthine in dried blood samples? A comparative study.

    PubMed

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2015-06-30

    Volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS) is a novel sampling technique that allows the straightforward collection of an accurate volume of blood (approximately 10μL) from a drop or pool of blood by dipping an absorbent polymeric tip into it. The resulting blood microsample is dried and analyzed as a whole. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of VAMS to overcome the hematocrit bias, an important issue in the analysis of dried blood microsamples. An LC-MS/MS method for analysis of the model compounds caffeine and paraxanthine in VAMS samples was fully validated and fulfilled all pre-established criteria. In conjunction with previously validated procedures for dried blood spots (DBS) and blood, this allowed us to set up a meticulous comparative study in which both compounds were determined in over 80 corresponding VAMS, DBS and liquid whole blood samples. These originated from authentic human patient samples, covering a wide hematocrit range (0.21-0.50). By calculating the differences with reference whole blood concentrations, we found that analyte concentrations in VAMS samples were not affected by a bias that changed over the evaluated hematocrit range, in contrast to DBS results. However, VAMS concentrations tend to overestimate whole blood concentrations, as a consistent positive bias was observed. A different behavior of VAMS samples prepared from incurred and spiked blood, combined with a somewhat reduced recovery of caffeine and paraxanthine from VAMS tips at high hematocrit values, an effect that was not observed for DBS using a very similar extraction procedure, was found to be at the basis of the observed VAMS-whole blood deviations. Based on this study, being the first in which the validity and robustness of VAMS is evaluated by analyzing incurred human samples, it can be concluded that VAMS effectively assists in eliminating the effect of hematocrit.

  20. Sr/Ca proxy sea-surface temperature reconstructions from modern and holocene Montastraea faveolata specimens from the Dry Tortugas National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flannery, Jennifer A.; Poore, Richard Z.

    2013-01-01

    Sr/Ca ratios from skeletal samples from two Montastraea faveolata corals (one modern, one Holocene, ~6 Ka) from the Dry Tortugas National Park were measured as a proxy for sea-surface temperature (SST). We sampled coral specimens with a computer-driven triaxial micromilling machine, which yielded an average of 15 homogenous samples per annual growth increment. We regressed Sr/Ca values from resulting powdered samples against a local SST record to obtain a calibration equation of Sr/Ca = -0.0392 SST + 10.205, R = -0.97. The resulting calibration was used to generate a 47-year modern (1961-2008) and a 7-year Holocene (~6 Ka) Sr/Ca subannually resolved proxy record of SST. The modern M. faveolata yields well-defined annual Sr/Ca cycles ranging in amplitude from ~0.3 and 0.5 mmol/mol. The amplitude of ~0.3 to 0.5 mmol/mol equates to a 10-15°C seasonal SST amplitude, which is consistent with available local instrumental records. Summer maxima proxy SSTs calculated from the modern coral Sr/ Ca tend to be fairly stable: most SST maxima from 1961–2008 are 29°C ± 1°C. In contrast, winter minimum SST calculated in the 47-year modern time-series are highly variable, with a cool interval in the early to mid-1970s. The Holocene (~6 Ka) Montastraea faveolata coral also yields distinct annual Sr/Ca cycles with amplitudes ranging from ~0.3 to 0.6 mmol/mol. Absolute Sr/Ca values and thus resulting SST estimates over the ~7-year long record are similar to those from the modern coral. We conclude that Sr/Ca from Montastraea faveolata has high potential for developing subannually resolved Holocene SST records.

  1. Quantitation of brinzolamide in dried blood spots by a novel LC-QTOF-MS/MS method.

    PubMed

    Foivas, Anargyros; Malenović, Anđelija; Kostić, Nađa; Božić, Marija; Knežević, Miroslav; Loukas, Yannis L; Dotsikas, Yannis

    2016-02-01

    In the current study, a rapid and sensitive LC-QTOF-MS/MS method for the determination of brinzolamide in dried blood spots (DBS) was developed and validated. This novel sample collection, storage and transfer technique was suitable for analyzing a drug with high distribution into red blood cells and negligible plasma levels. The method included an isocratic mobile phase consisting of methanol and 10mM ammonium formate (90:10, v/v) and detection in positive electrospray mode (ESI+). The flow rate was adjusted to 0.350mL/min yielding retention times of 1.7min for both brinzolamide and internal standard (IS) rabeprazole on a Cyano analytical column, respectively. The validation of the proposed method over the concentration range 0.500-20.0μg/mL was performed in compliance with EMEA and FDA guidelines, assessing all major performance characteristics. Inter- and intra- assay precisions were less than 14%, while inter- and intra- assay accuracies varied from 92.2 to 111%. No matrix effect was observed and the mean brinzolamide extraction recovery was 93.5%. The method was successfully applied to real DBS samples from patients in steady state condition, receiving brinzolamide ophthalmic suspension 1% (w/v) for several months. Initial concentrations were corrected due to hematocrit effect, using image processing algorithm written in Matlab.

  2. Heart rate and blood pressure time courses during prolonged dry apnoea in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Perini, Renza; Tironi, Adelaide; Gheza, Alberto; Butti, Ferdinando; Moia, Christian; Ferretti, Guido

    2008-09-01

    To define the dynamics of cardiovascular adjustments to apnoea, beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) were recorded during prolonged breath-holding in air in 20 divers. Apnoea had a mean duration of 210 +/- 70 s. In all subjects, HR attained a value 14 beats min(-1) lower than control within the initial 30 s (phase I). HR did not change for the following 2-2.5 min (phase II). Then, nine subjects interrupted the apnoea (group A), whereas 11 subjects (group B) could prolong the breath-holding for about 100 s, during which HR continuously decreased (phase III). In both groups, mean blood pressure was 8 mmHg above control at the end of phase I; it then further increased by additional 12 mmHg at the end of the apnoea. In both groups, SaO(2) did not change in the initial 100-140 s of apnoea; then, it decreased to 95% at the end of phase II. In group B, SaO(2) further diminished to 84% at the end of phase III. A typical pattern of cardiovascular readjustments was identified during dry apnoea. This pattern was not compatible with a role for baroreflexes in phase I and phase II. Further readjustment in group B may imply a role for both baroreflexes and chemoreflexes. Hypothesis has been made that the end of phase II corresponds to physiological breakpoint.

  3. Robust measurement of vitamin A status in plasma and blood dried on paper.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yichao; Clements, Peter Roy; Gibson, Robert Alan

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in children and increases the risk of disease and death from severe infections. In addition, fat soluble vitamin A and associated retinoids directly regulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Conventional methods for measuring vitamin A involve venipuncture, centrifugation and refrigeration all of which make measuring vitamin A in nutritional surveys expensive. We aimed to develop a simple and robust system for measurement of retinol (biomarker for vitamin A) using dried blood spot (DBS) samples. Low recoveries and inconsistent results reported by others were found to be due to poor extraction efficiency rather than retinol instability. Maintaining acid conditions during extraction resulted in recoveries >95% with <6.5% of coefficient of variation. Using isocratic high performance liquid chromatography, separation was achieved in <3.5 min. Detector response was linear (R(2)=0.9939) within a range of 0.05-2 μg/mL, with a limit of quantification of 0.05 μg/mL. Retinol in DBS was shown to be stable (>95%) at room temperature for up to 10 weeks. DBS values for retinol were highly correlated with venous blood samples from 24 healthy subjects (r=0.9724) and were consistent with results from a commercial laboratory. This simple and reliable method for the determination of vitamin A status should prove particularly valuable for population studies and large clinical trials. PMID:26489594

  4. Dried blood spots in toxicology: from the cradle to the grave?

    PubMed

    Stove, Christophe P; Ingels, Ann-Sofie M E; De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E

    2012-03-01

    About a century after its first described application by Ivar Bang, the potential of sampling via dried blood spots (DBS) as an alternative for classical venous blood sampling is increasingly recognized. Perhaps best known is the use of DBS in newborn screening programs, ignited by the hallmark paper by Guthrie and Susi half a century ago. However, it is only recently that both academia and industry have recognized the many advantages that DBS sampling may offer for bioanalytical purposes, as reflected by the strong increase in published reports during the last few years. Currently, major DBS applications include newborn screening for metabolic disorders, epidemiological surveys (e.g. HIV monitoring), therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), as well as toxicology. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the distinct subdisciplines of toxicology for which DBS sampling has been applied. DBS sampling for toxicological evaluation has been performed from birth until autopsy, aiming at the assessment of therapeutic drugs, drugs of abuse, environmental contaminants, toxins, as well as (trace) elements, with applications situated in fields as toxicokinetics, epidemiology and environmental and forensic toxicology. We discuss the strengths and limitations of DBS in the different subdisciplines and provide future prospects for the use of this promising sampling technique in toxicology.

  5. Use of blood collected onto and dried on filter paper for diagnosing pregnancy in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong; Cho, Yong-Il; Comyn, Patrick; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-11-01

    The measurement of serum or plasma pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs) is increasingly used to diagnose pregnancy in cattle. This study evaluated whether a dried blood spot (DBS) collected on filter paper could be used as an alternative to serum or plasma for such tests. A total of 37 serum, 68 plasma and 68 DBS samples were collected from cows of known pregnancy status and tested using a commercial ELISA. None of the plasma or serum samples resulted in false positives or false negatives. No false positives (sample-negative (S-N) values >0.3 in non-pregnant cows) were observed with DBS samples, but false negatives were observed (S-N values <0.3 in pregnant cattle). The data suggested that PAGs in DBS samples were diluted during processing as samples from pregnant cattle had lower S-N values (0.111-0.494) than the corresponding serum (1.123-2.665) and/or plasma (0.764-2.042) samples. ROC analysis showed that lowering the cut-off S-N value from 0.3 to 0.1 for DBS samples prevented false negatives without increasing false positives. Modifications to the test protocol significantly increased mean S-N values of DBS samples from pregnant cows while those from non-pregnant cows were not affected. In conclusion, lowering the cut-off and modifying the protocol allowed DBS samples to be used for blood-based pregnancy testing. PMID:24269104

  6. Dried blood spot assay for the quantification of phenytoin using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Villanelli, Fabio; Giocaliere, Elisa; Malvagia, Sabrina; Rosati, Anna; Forni, Giulia; Funghini, Silvia; Shokry, Engy; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Guerrini, Renzo; la Marca, Giancarlo

    2015-02-01

    Phenytoin (PHT) is one of the most commonly used anticonvulsant drugs for the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorders. The large amount of plasma required by conventional methods for drug quantification makes mass spectrometry combined with dried blood spot (DBS) sampling crucial for pediatric patients where therapeutic drug monitoring or pharmacokinetic studies may be difficult to realize. DBS represents a new convenient sampling support requiring minimally invasive blood drawing and providing long-term stability of samples and less expensive shipment and storage. The aim of this study was to develop a LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of PHT on DBS. This analytical method was validated and gave good linearity (r(2)=0.999) in the range of 0-100mg/l. LOQ and LOD were 1.0mg/l and 0.3mg/l, respectively. The drug extraction from paper was performed in a few minutes using a mixture composed of organic solvent for 80%. The recovery ranged from 85 to 90%; PHT in DBS showed to be stable at different storage temperatures for one month. A good correlation was also obtained between PHT plasma and DBS concentrations. This method is both precise and accurate and appears to be particularly suitable to monitor treatment with a simple and convenient sample collection procedure.

  7. Use of blood collected onto and dried on filter paper for diagnosing pregnancy in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong; Cho, Yong-Il; Comyn, Patrick; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-11-01

    The measurement of serum or plasma pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs) is increasingly used to diagnose pregnancy in cattle. This study evaluated whether a dried blood spot (DBS) collected on filter paper could be used as an alternative to serum or plasma for such tests. A total of 37 serum, 68 plasma and 68 DBS samples were collected from cows of known pregnancy status and tested using a commercial ELISA. None of the plasma or serum samples resulted in false positives or false negatives. No false positives (sample-negative (S-N) values >0.3 in non-pregnant cows) were observed with DBS samples, but false negatives were observed (S-N values <0.3 in pregnant cattle). The data suggested that PAGs in DBS samples were diluted during processing as samples from pregnant cattle had lower S-N values (0.111-0.494) than the corresponding serum (1.123-2.665) and/or plasma (0.764-2.042) samples. ROC analysis showed that lowering the cut-off S-N value from 0.3 to 0.1 for DBS samples prevented false negatives without increasing false positives. Modifications to the test protocol significantly increased mean S-N values of DBS samples from pregnant cows while those from non-pregnant cows were not affected. In conclusion, lowering the cut-off and modifying the protocol allowed DBS samples to be used for blood-based pregnancy testing.

  8. Screening for late neonatal vitamin K deficiency by acarboxyprothrombin in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Motohara, K; Endo, F; Matsuda, I

    1987-04-01

    Acarboxyprothrombin (protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II] concentrations in dried blood spots were determined in 19,029 infants at about 1 month of age as an indicator of vitamin K deficiency. We observed 51 cases with raised blood concentrations of PIVKA-II (greater than 4 AU/ml), nine of whom showed very high concentrations (greater than 20 AU/ml). For infants who did not receive vitamin K prophylaxis at birth, the incidence of the PIVKA-II test yielding positive results was significantly higher in those solely breast fed (0.51%) compared with those fed formula milk (0.18%). Among solely breast fed infants, the incidence of a very high result of the PIVKA-II test was 0.14% in those who had not received vitamin K prophylaxis at birth, 0.04% in those who received 2 mg orally, and 0.03% in those who received 2 mg orally plus a further dose of 2-4 mg orally at 7 days. Thus vitamin K prophylaxis at birth did not completely prevent vitamin K deficiency at 1 month. We administered vitamin K therapeutically to all infants whose PIVKA-II test yielded a positive result at 1 month. Only one infant with a positive result developed late neonatal intracranial haemorrhage.

  9. Impact of the phlebotomy training based on CLSI/NCCLS H03-A6 - procedures for the collection of diagnostic blood specimens by venipuncture.

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The activities involving phlebotomy, a critical task for obtaining diagnostic blood samples, are poorly studied as regards the major sources of errors and the procedures related to laboratory quality control. The aim of this study was to verify the compliance with CLSI documents of clinical laboratories from South America and to assess whether teaching phlebotomists to follow the exact procedure for blood collection by venipuncture from CLSI/NCCLS H03-A6 - Procedures for the Collection of Diagnostic Blood Specimens by Venipuncture might improve the quality of the process. Materials and methods: A survey was sent by mail to 3674 laboratories from South America to verify the use of CLSI documents. Thirty skilled phlebotomists were trained with the CLSI H03-A6 document to perform venipuncture procedures for a period of 20 consecutive working days. The overall performances of the phlebotomists were further compared before and after the training program. Results: 2622 from 2781 laboratories that did answer our survey used CLSI documents to standardize their procedures and process. The phlebotomists’ training for 20 days before our evaluation completely eliminated non-conformity procedures for: i) incorrect friction of the forearm, during the cleaning of the venipuncture site to ease vein location; ii) incorrect sequence of vacuum tubes collection; and iii) inadequate mixing of the blood in primary vacuum tubes containing anticoagulants or clot activators. Unfortunately the CLSI H03-A6 document does not caution against both unsuitable tourniquet application time (i.e., for more than one minute) and inappropriate request to clench the fist repeatedly. These inadequate procedures were observed for all phlebotomists. Conclusion: We showed that strict observance of the CLSI H03-A6 document can remarkably improve quality, although the various steps for collecting diagnostic blood specimens are not a gold standard, since they may still permit errors. Tourniquet

  10. Field evaluation of the InBios Chagas detect plus rapid test in serum and whole-blood specimens in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vishal; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Gilman, Robert H; Ramirez, Margot; Saenza, Eliana; Malaga, Edith; Sanchez, Gerardo; Okamoto, Emi E; Sherbuck, Jacqueline E; Clark, Eva H; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Bozo, Ricardo; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Colanzi, Rony; Verastegui, Manuela; Bern, Caryn

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which affects an estimated 7 million to 8 million people. Chagas disease is endemic throughout Latin America, with the highest prevalence in Bolivia. Conventional diagnosis requires a well-equipped laboratory with experienced personnel. We evaluated the Chagas Detect Plus (CDP) (InBios, Seattle, WA), a rapid immunochromatographic assay for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi. CDP performance was compared to infection status based on results obtained by indirect hemagglutination assay, immunofluorescent-antibody test, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Confirmed infection required positive results by at least 2 conventional assays. We used specimens from adults of both sexes in a general hospital in the city of Santa Cruz and from pregnant women in a hospital and children in villages in the Bolivian Chaco, an area of hyperendemicity. CDP was performed in paired whole-blood and serum specimens from 385 individuals in the two hospital studies and in 200 serum specimens from the community study. CDP showed sensitivities/specificities of 96.2% (95% confidence interval, 92.7 to 98.4)/98.8% (95.9 to 99.9) in whole blood and 99.3% (97.5 to 99.9)/96.9% (94.2 to 98.6) in serum, with no differences by sex, age group, or study site. CDP showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in our study population, comparable to those of conventional serology. The test is reliable for field surveys, requires no laboratory equipment, and performed well in serum and whole blood. The CDP could also be used for accurate maternal screening to identify neonates at risk of congenital transmission. CDP performance data in diverse geographic areas are needed to strengthen the evidence base for its use.

  11. Improved identification of yeast species directly from positive blood culture media by combining Sepsityper specimen processing and Microflex analysis with the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization Biotyper system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yingjun; He, Ying; Maier, Thomas; Quinn, Criziel; Shi, Gongyi; Li, Haijing; Stratton, Charles W; Kostrzewa, Markus; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2011-07-01

    Current methods for identification of yeast from blood cultures may take several days after these microorganisms have been observed by Gram stain smears from positive blood cultures. We explored the use of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) Biotyper system in combination with Sepsityper specimen processing and Microflex analysis for improved detection and identification of yeast species directly from positive blood culture specimens demonstrating yeast-like organisms by Gram stain. The limit of detection of yeast species in blood culture medium was determined to be 5.9 × 10(5) CFU, with intra- and interstrain coefficients of variation of 1.8 to 3.6% and 2.9%, respectively. A total of 42 yeast-containing positive blood culture specimens were processed, and the identification results were compared to those obtained by routinely used phenotypic methods. Specimens with discrepant results between the Biotyper and phenotypic methods were identified on the basis of internal transcribed spacer region sequencing. The MALDI Biotyper system correctly identified the 42 specimens to species level, including 28 (66.7%) Candida albicans, 8 (19.0%) Candida parapsilosis, and 5 (11.9%) Candida tropicalis isolates and 1 (2.4%) Cryptococcus neoformans isolate. The entire procedure, from specimen extraction to final result reporting, can be completed within 1 h. Our data indicated that the Sepsityper specimen processing and Microflex analysis by the MALDI Biotyper system provide a rapid and reliable tool for yeast species identification directly from positive blood culture media.

  12. Development and Validation of a GC-MS Method for the Detection and Quantification of Clotiapine in Blood and Urine Specimens and Application to a Postmortem Case

    PubMed Central

    Mannocchi, Giulio; Pantano, Flaminia; Tittarelli, Roberta; Catanese, Miriam; Umani Ronchi, Federica; Busardò, Francesco Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Clotiapine is an atypical antipsychotic of the dibenzothiazepine class introduced in a few European countries since 1970, efficient in treatment-resistant schizophrenic patients. There is little published data on the therapeutic and toxic concentrations of this drug. Aims. The aim of the present study is the development and validation of a method that allows the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine specimens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods. Validation was performed working on spiked postmortem blood and urine samples. Samples were extracted with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) technique at pH 8.5 with n-hexane/dichloromethane (85/15 v/v) and analysis was followed by GC-MS. Methadone-d9 was used as internal standard. Results. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.2 and 1.3 ng/mL for urine and blood, respectively, while the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 3.9 and 4.3 ng/mL, respectively. Linearity, precision, selectivity, accuracy, and recovery were also determined. The method was applied to a postmortem case. The blood and urine clotiapine concentrations were 1.32 and 0.49 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusions. A reliable GC-MS method for the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine samples has been developed and fully validated and then applied to a postmortem case. PMID:26236337

  13. Development and Validation of a GC-MS Method for the Detection and Quantification of Clotiapine in Blood and Urine Specimens and Application to a Postmortem Case.

    PubMed

    Mannocchi, Giulio; Pantano, Flaminia; Tittarelli, Roberta; Catanese, Miriam; Umani Ronchi, Federica; Busardò, Francesco Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Clotiapine is an atypical antipsychotic of the dibenzothiazepine class introduced in a few European countries since 1970, efficient in treatment-resistant schizophrenic patients. There is little published data on the therapeutic and toxic concentrations of this drug. Aims. The aim of the present study is the development and validation of a method that allows the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine specimens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods. Validation was performed working on spiked postmortem blood and urine samples. Samples were extracted with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) technique at pH 8.5 with n-hexane/dichloromethane (85/15 v/v) and analysis was followed by GC-MS. Methadone-d9 was used as internal standard. Results. The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.2 and 1.3 ng/mL for urine and blood, respectively, while the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 3.9 and 4.3 ng/mL, respectively. Linearity, precision, selectivity, accuracy, and recovery were also determined. The method was applied to a postmortem case. The blood and urine clotiapine concentrations were 1.32 and 0.49 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusions. A reliable GC-MS method for the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine samples has been developed and fully validated and then applied to a postmortem case. PMID:26236337

  14. [Optimization of trehalose loading in red blood cells before freeze-drying].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Liu, Jing-Han; Ouyang, Xi-Lin; Chen, Lin-Feng; Che, Ji

    2007-04-01

    The key points for better protection of trehalose in freeze-drying red blood cells (RBCs) are to resolve non-osmosis of trehalose to red blood cells and to make cytoplasmic trehalose to reach effective concentration. This study was aimed to investigate the regularity of loading RBCs with trehalose, screen out optimal loading condition and evaluate the effect of trehalose on physico-chemical parameters of RBCs during the period of loading. The cytoplasmic trehalose concentration in red blood cells, free hemoglobin and ATP level were determined at different incubation temperatures (4, 22 and 37 degrees C), different trehaolse concentrations (0, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 mmol/L) and different incubation times (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours), the cytoplasmic trehalose, free hemoglobin (FHb), hemoglobin (Hb) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) in fresh RBCs and RBCs stored for 72 hours at 4 degrees C were compared, when loading condition was ensured. The results showed that with increase of incubation temperature, time and extracellular trehalose concentration, the loading of trehalose in RBCs also increased. Under the optimal loading condition, cytoplasmic trehalose concentration and free hemoglobin level of fresh RBCs and RBCs stored for 72 hours at 4 degrees C were 65.505 +/- 6.314 mmol/L, 66.2 +/- 5.002 mmol/L and 6.567 +/- 2.568 g/L, 16.168 +/- 3.922 g/L respectively. It is concluded that the most optimal condition of loading trehalose is that fresh RBCs incubate in 800 mmol/L trehalose solution for 8 hours at 37 degrees C. This condition can result in a efficient cytoplasmic trehalose concentration. The study provides an important basis for long-term preservation of RBCs. PMID:17493359

  15. Performance and Storage Integrity of Dried Blood Spots for PCB, BFR and Pesticide Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Chernyak, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) can provide accurate and valuable estimates of exposure to environmental toxicants, and the use of information derived from archived newborn DBS information has enormous potential to open up new research on the impacts of early chemical exposure on disease. Broad application of DBS for the purpose of quantitative exposure estimation requires robust and validated methods. This study investigates the suitability of DBS analyses for population studies of exposure to three chemical groups: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants (BFRs), and chlorinated pesticides. It examines background (matrix) contamination, recovery and extraction variability, sensitivity, and storage stability. DBS samples prepared using 50 μL of adult blood were analyzed by GC/MS, and method performance was confirmed by using certified materials and paired DBS-blood samples from six volunteers. Several of the target compounds and their degradation products have not been previously measured in DBS. All target compounds were detected in DBS samples collected from the volunteers. Sample DBS cards showed background contamination of several compounds. When stored at room temperature, target compounds, excluding PBDEs, were stable for up to one month. When refrigerated or frozen, stability was acceptable for all compounds up to one year, and multiyear storage appears acceptable at colder (e.g., −80 °C) temperatures. Multicompartment models may be used to estimate or correct for storage losses. Considering concentrations of contaminants for adults and children reported in the literature, and experimental values of detection limits and background contamination, DBS samples are suitable for quantifying exposures to many PCBs, BFRs and persistent pesticides. PMID:25058892

  16. Blood culture collection through peripheral intravenous catheters increases the risk of specimen contamination among adult emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Self, Wesley H; Speroff, Theodore; McNaughton, Candace D; Wright, Patty W; Miller, Geraldine; Johnson, James G; Daniels, Titus L; Talbot, Thomas R

    2012-05-01

    Five hundred five blood cultures collected through a peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) in an emergency department were matched to cultures obtained by dedicated venipuncture from the same patient within 10 minutes. The relative risk of contamination for cultures collected through PIVs compared with dedicated venipuncture was 1.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-3.11).

  17. Dried blood spots for monitoring and individualization of antiepileptic drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Milosheska, Daniela; Grabnar, Iztok; Vovk, Tomaž

    2015-07-30

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a multi-disciplinary clinical specialty used for optimization and individualization of drug therapy in the general and special populations. Since most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are characterized by pronounced intra- and inter-individual variability, it can be especially valuable as an aid for dosing adjustments in patients with epilepsy. Dried blood spots (DBS) sampling technique is recognized as a suitable alternative for conventional sampling methods as TDM interventions should be applied in the most cost-effective, rational and clinically useful manner. In the present review we summarize the latest trends and applications of DBS in TDM of epilepsy. Quantification of AEDs in DBS was employed in various clinical settings and has been already reported for phenobarbital, phenytoin, valproic acid, clonazepam, clobazam, carbamazepine, topiramate, rufinamide, lamotrigine, 10-hydroxycarbazepine and levetiracetam. The major limitation of the published studies are restricted evaluation of critical parameters such as the impact of spotted blood volume, spot homogeneity and haematocrit effect, limited clinical validation and non-established correlations between the DBS and plasma concentrations of AEDs. Standardization of critical technical aspects for appropriate sampling, sample preparation and validation of the analytical procedures for quantification of the drugs, as well as appropriate interpretation of the results are the fields which should get more attention in upcoming studies. Limited data on clinical validation and the fact that this technique has been used in practice only for a few AEDs makes the routine implementation of TDM of AEDs using DBS method a big challenge that should be faced by the pharmaceutical scientists in the future. PMID:25896371

  18. A Novel, Nondestructive, Dried Blood Spot-Based Hematocrit Prediction Method Using Noncontact Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Capiau, Sara; Wilk, Leah S; Aalders, Maurice C G; Stove, Christophe P

    2016-06-21

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling is recognized as a valuable alternative sampling strategy both in research and in clinical routine. Although many advantages are associated with DBS sampling, its more widespread use is hampered by several issues, of which the hematocrit effect on DBS-based quantitation remains undoubtedly the most widely discussed one. Previously, we developed a method to derive the approximate hematocrit from a nonvolumetrically applied DBS based on its potassium content. Although this method yielded good results and was straightforward to perform, it was also destructive and required sample preparation. Therefore, we now developed a nondestructive method which allows to predict the hematocrit of a DBS based on its hemoglobin content, measured via noncontact diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The developed method was thoroughly validated. A linear calibration curve was established after log/log transformation. The bias, intraday and interday imprecision of quality controls at three hematocrit levels and at the lower and upper limit of quantitation (0.20 and 0.67, respectively) were less than 11%. In addition, the influence of storage and the volume spotted was evaluated, as well as DBS homogeneity. Application of the method to venous DBSs prepared from whole blood patient samples (n = 233) revealed a good correlation between the actual and the predicted hematocrit. Limits of agreement obtained after Bland and Altman analysis were -0.076 and +0.018. Incurred sample reanalysis demonstrated good method reproducibility. In conclusion, mere scanning of a DBS suffices to derive its approximate hematocrit, one of the most important variables in DBS analysis.

  19. Current and future applications of dried blood spots in viral disease management.

    PubMed

    Snijdewind, Ingrid J M; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; Fraaij, Pieter L A; van der Ende, Marchina E; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Gruters, Rob A

    2012-03-01

    Almost five decades after their first application in diagnostics, dried blood spot (DBS) cards remain to be of key interest in many research areas and clinical applications. The advantages of sample stability during transport and storage, can now be combined with the high sensitivity of novel diagnostic techniques for the measurement and analysis of nucleic acids, proteins and small molecules which may overcome the limitations of the small samples sizes in DBS cards. Here we present a survey of the literature on the use of DBS cards for diagnosis, monitoring and epidemiological studies of virus infections other than HIV, including CMV, HBV, HCV, HAV, HEV, HTLV, EBV, HSV, measles-, rubella- and dengue-virus. The minimal invasiveness of sampling and the relative ease of handling and storing DBS cards is expected to offer additional opportunities to measure and analyze biomarkers of viral disease in resource poor settings or when limited amount of blood can be obtained. Large retrospective studies of virus infections in newborns using stored DBS cards have already been undertaken for screening of congenital infections. In addition, DBS cards have been used prospectively for prevalence studies, outbreak surveillance, mass screening for viral infections, follow-up of chronic infection and its treatment in resource-limited areas. We do not expect that current wet sampling techniques of plasma or serum will be replaced by DBS sampling but it allows extension of sampling in persons and settings that are currently difficult to access or that lack suitable storage facilities. In conclusion, DBS card sampling and storage will aid adequate outbreak management of existing and emerging viral diseases. PMID:22244848

  20. Use of Blood Smears and Dried Blood Spots for Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Infection and Plasmodium falciparum in Severely Ill Febrile African Children.

    PubMed

    Wihokhoen, Benchawan; Dondorp, Arjen M; Turner, Paul; Woodrow, Charles J; Imwong, Mallika

    2016-02-01

    Molecular approaches offer a means of testing archived samples stored as dried blood spots in settings where standard blood cultures are not possible. Peripheral blood films are one suggested source of material, although the sensitivity of this approach has not been well defined. Thin blood smears and dried blood spots from a severe pediatric malaria study were assessed using specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers to detect non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS; MisL gene), Streptococcus pneumoniae (lytA), and Plasmodium falciparum (18S rRNA). Of 16 cases of NTS and S. pneumoniae confirmed on blood culture, none were positive by PCR using DNA extracts from blood films or dried blood spots. In contrast, four of 36 dried blood spots and two of 178 plasma samples were PCR positive for S. pneumoniae, despite negative bacterial blood cultures, suggesting false positives. Quantitative assessment revealed that the effective concentration of P. falciparum DNA in blood films was three log orders of magnitude lower than for dried blood spots. The P. falciparum kelch13 gene could not be amplified from blood films. These findings question the value of blood PCR-based approaches for detection of NTS and S. pneumoniae, and show that stored blood films are an inefficient method of studying P. falciparum.

  1. Evaluation of the Broad-Range PCR/ESI-MS Technology in Blood Specimens for the Molecular Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Giménez, Montserrat; Quesada, Mª Dolores; Rivaya, Belén; Marcó, Clara; Domínguez, Mª Jesús; Arméstar, Fernando; Martró, Elisa; Ausina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Background Rapid identification of the etiological agent in bloodstream infections is of vital importance for the early administration of the most appropriate antibiotic therapy. Molecular methods may offer an advantage to current culture-based microbiological diagnosis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of IRIDICA, a platform based on universal genetic amplification followed by mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) for the molecular diagnosis of sepsis-related pathogens directly from the patient’s blood. Methods A total of 410 whole blood specimens from patients admitted to Emergency Room (ER) and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with clinical suspicion of sepsis were tested with the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay (broad identification of bacteria and Candida spp.). Microorganisms grown in culture and detected by IRIDICA were compared considering blood culture as gold standard. When discrepancies were found, clinical records and results from other cultures were taken into consideration (clinical infection criterion). Results The overall positive and negative agreement of IRIDICA with blood culture in the analysis by specimen was 74.8% and 78.6%, respectively, rising to 76.9% and 87.2% respectively, when compared with the clinical infection criterion. Interestingly, IRIDICA detected 41 clinically significant microorganisms missed by culture, most of them from patients under antimicrobial treatment. Of special interest were the detections of one Mycoplasma hominis and two Mycobacterium simiae in immunocompromised patients. When ICU patients were analyzed separately, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values compared with blood culture were 83.3%, 78.6%, 33.9% and 97.3% respectively, and 90.5%, 87.2%, 64.4% and 97.3% respectively, in comparison with the clinical infection criterion. Conclusions IRIDICA is a promising technology that offers an early and reliable identification of a wide variety of pathogens directly from the patient’s blood

  2. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics of rat blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier transporters: comparison with a human specimen.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasuo; Zhang, Zhengyu; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine absolute protein expression levels of transporters in rat choroid plexus, that is, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and to compare them with the levels in the human choroid plexus. Plasma membrane fractions were prepared from pooled, freshly isolated choroid plexuses of 30 male Wistar rats and from frozen choroid plexus of one male human donor. Protein expression levels of 54 rat and 121 human molecules were measured, using a quantitative targeted absolute proteomics technique. In rat, oatp1a5 showed the most abundant protein expression (30.3 fmol/μg protein), and its expression level was 3.1-, 4.5-, 5.5-, 8.4-, 9.0-, 9.9-, 22-, 91-, and 95-fold greater than those of glut1, oatp1c1, mrp1, mct1, oat3, pept2, mrp4, bcrp, and mdr1a, respectively. OATP1A2 (a possible homolog of rat oatp1a5), OATP1C1 and PEPT2 were not detected in human choroid plexus. MRP1, OAT3, and MRP4 showed 4.0-, 1.8-, and 1.7-fold smaller expression levels in human than rat, respectively. MATE1 was detected in human, but not rat, and its expression level (8.61 fmol/μg protein) was the highest among the xenobiotic transporters examined in human choroid plexus. These findings should be useful for understanding rat blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function and its differences from that in human. This is the first study clarifying the absolute protein expression levels of many transporters in the plasma membrane fractions of rat and human choroid plexuses, that is, blood cerebrospinal fluid barrier, by means of quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP) technique. This study also identified the protein expressions of some transporters including MATE1 and ABCA8 in the choroid plexus for the first time.

  3. [Direct proteome profiling of human blood serum in the experiment with 5-day dry immersion].

    PubMed

    Pastushkova, L Kh; Pakharukova, N A; Trifonova, O P; Dobrokhotov, I V; Valeeva, O A; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the investigation was to determine changes in blood plasma proteome in healthy human subjects (n = 14, 19 to 26 y.o.) in an experiment with dry immersion (DI). Plasma samples were drawn 7 and 2 days before the exposure, on DI days 2, 3 and 5, and on days 1, 3, 7 and 15 after the experiment. Previous to direct MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometric profiling, serum samples were pre-fractionated and enriched with magnetic particles MB WCX (WCX--a weak cation exchanger) on ClinProt (Bruker Daltonics). In each spectrum, 175 MS-peaks were detected on average within the mass range from 1000 to 17,000 Da with the signal/noise ratio = 5. Student's criterion (p < 0.05) was used to define reliable differences between DI and baseline samples from 48 peaks (27.4 % of all the proteome profile peaks). On DI days 2 and 3, growth of peak areas was observed in fragments of complement system proteins C3 and C4, high-molecular kininogen and fibrinogen that can be attributed to organism adaptation to conditions of the experiment. Significant increases of the peak area of apolipoprotein CI (reduced form with segregated threonine and proline) and C4 enzymes of the complement system, and fibrinogen on the first day after the experiment can be related to changes in motor activities of the subjects.

  4. Direct blood dry LAMP: a rapid, stable, and easy diagnostic tool for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kyoko; Kajino, Kiichi; Hachaambwa, Lottie; Namangala, Boniface; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2015-03-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a rapid and sensitive tool used for the diagnosis of a variety of infectious diseases. One of the advantages of this method over the polymerase chain reaction is that DNA amplification occurs at a constant temperature, usually between 60-65°C; therefore, expensive devices are unnecessary for this step. However, LAMP still requires complicated sample preparation steps and a well-equipped laboratory to produce reliable and reproducible results, which limits its use in resource-poor laboratories in most developing countries. In this study, we made several substantial modifications to the technique to carry out on-site diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) in remote areas using LAMP. The first essential improvement was that LAMP reagents were dried and stabilized in a single tube by incorporating trehalose as a cryoprotectant to prolong shelf life at ambient temperature. The second technical improvement was achieved by simplifying the sample preparation step so that DNA or RNA could be amplified directly from detergent-lysed blood samples. With these modifications, diagnosis of HAT in local clinics or villages in endemic areas becomes a reality, which could greatly impact on the application of diagnosis not only for HAT but also for other tropical diseases.

  5. Geneva cocktail for cytochrome p450 and P-glycoprotein activity assessment using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Bosilkovska, M; Samer, C F; Déglon, J; Rebsamen, M; Staub, C; Dayer, P; Walder, B; Desmeules, J A; Daali, Y

    2014-09-01

    The suitability of the capillary dried blood spot (DBS) sampling method was assessed for simultaneous phenotyping of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) using a cocktail approach. Ten volunteers received an oral cocktail capsule containing low doses of the probes bupropion (CYP2B6), flurbiprofen (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19), dextromethorphan (CYP2D6), midazolam (CYP3A), and fexofenadine (P-gp) with coffee/Coke (CYP1A2) on four occasions. They received the cocktail alone (session 1), and with the CYP inhibitors fluvoxamine and voriconazole (session 2) and quinidine (session 3). In session 4, subjects received the cocktail after a 7-day pretreatment with the inducer rifampicin. The concentrations of probes/metabolites were determined in DBS and plasma using a single liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the drugs were comparable in DBS and plasma. Important modulation of CYP and P-gp activities was observed in the presence of inhibitors and the inducer. Minimally invasive one- and three-point (at 2, 3, and 6 h) DBS-sampling methods were found to reliably reflect CYP and P-gp activities at each session.

  6. Geneva Cocktail for Cytochrome P450 and P-Glycoprotein Activity Assessment Using Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Bosilkovska, M; Samer, C F; Déglon, J; Rebsamen, M; Staub, C; Dayer, P; Walder, B; Desmeules, J A; Daali, Y

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of the capillary dried blood spot (DBS) sampling method was assessed for simultaneous phenotyping of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) using a cocktail approach. Ten volunteers received an oral cocktail capsule containing low doses of the probes bupropion (CYP2B6), flurbiprofen (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19), dextromethorphan (CYP2D6), midazolam (CYP3A), and fexofenadine (P-gp) with coffee/Coke (CYP1A2) on four occasions. They received the cocktail alone (session 1), and with the CYP inhibitors fluvoxamine and voriconazole (session 2) and quinidine (session 3). In session 4, subjects received the cocktail after a 7-day pretreatment with the inducer rifampicin. The concentrations of probes/metabolites were determined in DBS and plasma using a single liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the drugs were comparable in DBS and plasma. Important modulation of CYP and P-gp activities was observed in the presence of inhibitors and the inducer. Minimally invasive one- and three-point (at 2, 3, and 6 h) DBS-sampling methods were found to reliably reflect CYP and P-gp activities at each session. PMID:24722393

  7. The Relevance of a Novel Quantitative Assay to Detect up to 40 Major Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Directly in Clinical Nasopharyngeal and Blood Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, Werner C.; van der Linden, Mark P. G.; Bénet, Thomas; Chou, Monidarin; Sylla, Mariam; Barreto Costa, Patricia; Richard, Nathalie; Klugman, Keith P.; Endtz, Hubert P.; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Telles, Jean-Noël

    2016-01-01

    For epidemiological and surveillance purposes, it is relevant to monitor the distribution and dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. Conventional serotyping methods do not provide rapid or quantitative information on serotype loads. Quantitative serotyping may enable prediction of the invasiveness of a specific serotype compared to other serotypes carried. Here, we describe a novel, rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the 40 most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes and the assay impacts in pneumonia specimens from emerging and developing countries. Eleven multiplex PCR to detect 40 serotypes or serogroups were optimized. Quantification was enabled by reference to standard dilutions of known bacterial load. Performance of the assay was evaluated to specifically type and quantify S. pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal and blood samples from adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with pneumonia (n = 664) from five different countries. Serogroup 6 was widely represented in nasopharyngeal specimens from all five cohorts. The most frequent serotypes in the French, South African, and Brazilian cohorts were 1 and 7A/F, 3 and 19F, and 14, respectively. When both samples were available, the serotype in blood was always present as carriage with other serotypes in the nasopharynx. Moreover, the ability of a serotype to invade the bloodstream may be linked to its nasopharyngeal load. The mean nasopharyngeal concentration of the serotypes that moved to the blood was 3 log-fold higher than the ones only found in the nasopharynx. This novel, rapid, quantitative assay may potentially predict some of the S. pneumoniae serotypes invasiveness and assessment of pneumococcal serotype distribution. PMID:26986831

  8. The Relevance of a Novel Quantitative Assay to Detect up to 40 Major Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Directly in Clinical Nasopharyngeal and Blood Specimens.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Melina; Milenkov, Milen; Albrich, Werner C; van der Linden, Mark P G; Bénet, Thomas; Chou, Monidarin; Sylla, Mariam; Barreto Costa, Patricia; Richard, Nathalie; Klugman, Keith P; Endtz, Hubert P; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Telles, Jean-Noël

    2016-01-01

    For epidemiological and surveillance purposes, it is relevant to monitor the distribution and dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. Conventional serotyping methods do not provide rapid or quantitative information on serotype loads. Quantitative serotyping may enable prediction of the invasiveness of a specific serotype compared to other serotypes carried. Here, we describe a novel, rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the 40 most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes and the assay impacts in pneumonia specimens from emerging and developing countries. Eleven multiplex PCR to detect 40 serotypes or serogroups were optimized. Quantification was enabled by reference to standard dilutions of known bacterial load. Performance of the assay was evaluated to specifically type and quantify S. pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal and blood samples from adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with pneumonia (n = 664) from five different countries. Serogroup 6 was widely represented in nasopharyngeal specimens from all five cohorts. The most frequent serotypes in the French, South African, and Brazilian cohorts were 1 and 7A/F, 3 and 19F, and 14, respectively. When both samples were available, the serotype in blood was always present as carriage with other serotypes in the nasopharynx. Moreover, the ability of a serotype to invade the bloodstream may be linked to its nasopharyngeal load. The mean nasopharyngeal concentration of the serotypes that moved to the blood was 3 log-fold higher than the ones only found in the nasopharynx. This novel, rapid, quantitative assay may potentially predict some of the S. pneumoniae serotypes invasiveness and assessment of pneumococcal serotype distribution. PMID:26986831

  9. High-Quality Exome Sequencing of Whole-Genome Amplified Neonatal Dried Blood Spot DNA.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Lescai, Francesco; Grove, Jakob; Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Christiansen, Michael; Hagen, Christian Munch; Maller, Julian; Stevens, Christine; Li, Shenting; Li, Qibin; Sun, Jihua; Wang, Jun; Nordentoft, Merete; Werge, Thomas Mears; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Daly, Mark; Hougaard, David Michael; Bybjerg-Grauholm, Jonas; Hollegaard, Mads Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Stored neonatal dried blood spot (DBS) samples from neonatal screening programmes are a valuable diagnostic and research resource. Combined with information from national health registries they can be used in population-based studies of genetic diseases. DNA extracted from neonatal DBSs can be amplified to obtain micrograms of an otherwise limited resource, referred to as whole-genome amplified DNA (wgaDNA). Here we investigate the robustness of exome sequencing of wgaDNA of neonatal DBS samples. We conducted three pilot studies of seven, eight and seven subjects, respectively. For each subject we analysed a neonatal DBS sample and corresponding adult whole-blood (WB) reference sample. Different DNA sample types were prepared for each of the subjects. Pilot 1: wgaDNA of 2x3.2mm neonatal DBSs (DBS_2x3.2) and raw DNA extract of the WB reference sample (WB_ref). Pilot 2: DBS_2x3.2, WB_ref and a WB_ref replica sharing DNA extract with the WB_ref sample. Pilot 3: DBS_2x3.2, WB_ref, wgaDNA of 2x1.6 mm neonatal DBSs and wgaDNA of the WB reference sample. Following sequencing and data analysis, we compared pairwise variant calls to obtain a measure of similarity--the concordance rate. Concordance rates were slightly lower when comparing DBS vs WB sample types than for any two WB sample types of the same subject before filtering of the variant calls. The overall concordance rates were dependent on the variant type, with SNPs performing best. Post-filtering, the comparisons of DBS vs WB and WB vs WB sample types yielded similar concordance rates, with values close to 100%. WgaDNA of neonatal DBS samples performs with great accuracy and efficiency in exome sequencing. The wgaDNA performed similarly to matched high-quality reference--whole-blood DNA--based on concordance rates calculated from variant calls. No differences were observed substituting 2x3.2 with 2x1.6 mm discs, allowing for additional reduction of sample material in future projects.

  10. High-Quality Exome Sequencing of Whole-Genome Amplified Neonatal Dried Blood Spot DNA

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Jakob; Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Christiansen, Michael; Hagen, Christian Munch; Maller, Julian; Stevens, Christine; Li, Shenting; Li, Qibin; Sun, Jihua; Wang, Jun; Nordentoft, Merete; Werge, Thomas Mears; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Daly, Mark; Hougaard, David Michael

    2016-01-01

    Stored neonatal dried blood spot (DBS) samples from neonatal screening programmes are a valuable diagnostic and research resource. Combined with information from national health registries they can be used in population-based studies of genetic diseases. DNA extracted from neonatal DBSs can be amplified to obtain micrograms of an otherwise limited resource, referred to as whole-genome amplified DNA (wgaDNA). Here we investigate the robustness of exome sequencing of wgaDNA of neonatal DBS samples. We conducted three pilot studies of seven, eight and seven subjects, respectively. For each subject we analysed a neonatal DBS sample and corresponding adult whole-blood (WB) reference sample. Different DNA sample types were prepared for each of the subjects. Pilot 1: wgaDNA of 2x3.2mm neonatal DBSs (DBS_2x3.2) and raw DNA extract of the WB reference sample (WB_ref). Pilot 2: DBS_2x3.2, WB_ref and a WB_ref replica sharing DNA extract with the WB_ref sample. Pilot 3: DBS_2x3.2, WB_ref, wgaDNA of 2x1.6 mm neonatal DBSs and wgaDNA of the WB reference sample. Following sequencing and data analysis, we compared pairwise variant calls to obtain a measure of similarity—the concordance rate. Concordance rates were slightly lower when comparing DBS vs WB sample types than for any two WB sample types of the same subject before filtering of the variant calls. The overall concordance rates were dependent on the variant type, with SNPs performing best. Post-filtering, the comparisons of DBS vs WB and WB vs WB sample types yielded similar concordance rates, with values close to 100%. WgaDNA of neonatal DBS samples performs with great accuracy and efficiency in exome sequencing. The wgaDNA performed similarly to matched high-quality reference—whole-blood DNA—based on concordance rates calculated from variant calls. No differences were observed substituting 2x3.2 with 2x1.6 mm discs, allowing for additional reduction of sample material in future projects. PMID:27089011

  11. Supplementation of Dried Mealworm (Tenebrio molitor larva) on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility and Blood Profiles in Weaning Pigs.

    PubMed

    Jin, X H; Heo, P S; Hong, J S; Kim, N J; Kim, Y Y

    2016-07-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dried mealworm (Tenebrio molitor larva) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and blood profiles in weaning pigs. A total of 120 weaning pigs (28±3 days and 8.04±0.08 kg of body weight) were allotted to one of five treatments, based on sex and body weight, in 6 replicates with 4 pigs per pen by a randomized complete block design. Supplementation level of dried mealworm was 0%, 1.5%, 3.0%, 4.5%, or 6.0% in experimental diet as treatment. Two phase feeding programs (phase I from 0 day to 14 day, phase II from 14 day to 35 day) were used in this experiment. All animals were allowed to access diet and water ad libitum. During phase I, increasing level of dried mealworm in diet linearly improved the body weight (p<0.01), average daily gain (ADG) (p<0.01) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) (p<0.01). During phase II, ADG also tended to increase linearly when pigs were fed higher level of dried mealworm (p = 0.08). In addition, increasing level of dried mealworm improved the ADG (p<0.01), ADFI (p<0.05) and tended to increase gain to feed ratio (p = 0.07) during the whole experimental period. As dried mealworm level was increased, nitrogen retention and digestibility of dry matter as well as crude protein were linearly increased (p = 0.05). In the results of blood profiles, decrease of blood urea nitrogen (linear, p = 0.05) and increase of insulin-like growth factor (linear, p = 0.03) were observed as dried mealworm was increased in diet during phase II. However, there were no significant differences in immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG concentration by addition of dried mealworm in the growth trial. Consequently, supplementation of dried mealworm up to 6% in weaning pigs' diet improves growth performance and nutrient digestibility without any detrimental effect on immune responses.

  12. Supplementation of Dried Mealworm (Tenebrio molitor larva) on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility and Blood Profiles in Weaning Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jin, X. H.; Heo, P. S.; Hong, J. S.; Kim, N. J.; Kim, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dried mealworm (Tenebrio molitor larva) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and blood profiles in weaning pigs. A total of 120 weaning pigs (28±3 days and 8.04±0.08 kg of body weight) were allotted to one of five treatments, based on sex and body weight, in 6 replicates with 4 pigs per pen by a randomized complete block design. Supplementation level of dried mealworm was 0%, 1.5%, 3.0%, 4.5%, or 6.0% in experimental diet as treatment. Two phase feeding programs (phase I from 0 day to 14 day, phase II from 14 day to 35 day) were used in this experiment. All animals were allowed to access diet and water ad libitum. During phase I, increasing level of dried mealworm in diet linearly improved the body weight (p<0.01), average daily gain (ADG) (p<0.01) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) (p<0.01). During phase II, ADG also tended to increase linearly when pigs were fed higher level of dried mealworm (p = 0.08). In addition, increasing level of dried mealworm improved the ADG (p<0.01), ADFI (p<0.05) and tended to increase gain to feed ratio (p = 0.07) during the whole experimental period. As dried mealworm level was increased, nitrogen retention and digestibility of dry matter as well as crude protein were linearly increased (p = 0.05). In the results of blood profiles, decrease of blood urea nitrogen (linear, p = 0.05) and increase of insulin-like growth factor (linear, p = 0.03) were observed as dried mealworm was increased in diet during phase II. However, there were no significant differences in immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG concentration by addition of dried mealworm in the growth trial. Consequently, supplementation of dried mealworm up to 6% in weaning pigs’ diet improves growth performance and nutrient digestibility without any detrimental effect on immune responses. PMID:27282974

  13. Supplementation of Dried Mealworm (Tenebrio molitor larva) on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility and Blood Profiles in Weaning Pigs.

    PubMed

    Jin, X H; Heo, P S; Hong, J S; Kim, N J; Kim, Y Y

    2016-07-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dried mealworm (Tenebrio molitor larva) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and blood profiles in weaning pigs. A total of 120 weaning pigs (28±3 days and 8.04±0.08 kg of body weight) were allotted to one of five treatments, based on sex and body weight, in 6 replicates with 4 pigs per pen by a randomized complete block design. Supplementation level of dried mealworm was 0%, 1.5%, 3.0%, 4.5%, or 6.0% in experimental diet as treatment. Two phase feeding programs (phase I from 0 day to 14 day, phase II from 14 day to 35 day) were used in this experiment. All animals were allowed to access diet and water ad libitum. During phase I, increasing level of dried mealworm in diet linearly improved the body weight (p<0.01), average daily gain (ADG) (p<0.01) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) (p<0.01). During phase II, ADG also tended to increase linearly when pigs were fed higher level of dried mealworm (p = 0.08). In addition, increasing level of dried mealworm improved the ADG (p<0.01), ADFI (p<0.05) and tended to increase gain to feed ratio (p = 0.07) during the whole experimental period. As dried mealworm level was increased, nitrogen retention and digestibility of dry matter as well as crude protein were linearly increased (p = 0.05). In the results of blood profiles, decrease of blood urea nitrogen (linear, p = 0.05) and increase of insulin-like growth factor (linear, p = 0.03) were observed as dried mealworm was increased in diet during phase II. However, there were no significant differences in immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG concentration by addition of dried mealworm in the growth trial. Consequently, supplementation of dried mealworm up to 6% in weaning pigs' diet improves growth performance and nutrient digestibility without any detrimental effect on immune responses. PMID:27282974

  14. Quantification of Rifapentine, a Potent Antituberculosis Drug, from Dried Blood Spot Samples Using Liquid Chromatographic-Tandem Mass Spectrometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Teresa L.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Hoang, Thuy; Bliven-Sizemore, Erin; Weiner, Marc; Mac Kenzie, William R.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of antituberculosis drug concentrations in multinational trials currently requires the collection of modest blood volumes, centrifugation, aliquoting of plasma, freezing, and keeping samples frozen during shipping. We prospectively enrolled healthy individuals into the Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 29B, a phase I dose escalation study of rifapentine, a rifamycin under evaluation in tuberculosis treatment trials. We developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for quantifying rifapentine in whole blood on dried blood spots (DBS) to facilitate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses in clinical trials. Paired plasma and whole-blood samples were collected by venipuncture, and whole blood was spotted on Whatman protein saver 903 cards. The methods were optimized for plasma and then validated for DBS. The analytical measuring range for quantification of rifapentine and its metabolite was 50 to 80,000 ng/ml in whole-blood DBS. The analyte was stable on the cards for 11 weeks with a desiccant at room temperature and protected from light. The method concordance for paired plasma and whole-blood DBS samples was determined after correcting for participant hematocrit or population-based estimates of bias from Bland-Altman plots. The application of either correction factor resulted in acceptable correlation between plasma and whole-blood DBS (Passing-Bablok regression corrected for hematocrit; y = 0.98x + 356). Concentrations of rifapentine may be determined from whole-blood DBS collected via venipuncture after normalization in order to account for the dilutional effects of red blood cells. Additional studies are focused on the application of this methodology to capillary blood collected by finger stick. The simplicity of processing, storage, shipping, and low blood volume makes whole-blood DBS attractive for rifapentine pharmacokinetic evaluations, especially in international and pediatric trials. PMID:25182637

  15. Application to cows and horses of Spotchem, a dry-chemistry blood analyzer for use in veterinary clinics.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, F; Satho, M; Koyama, S; Nakadaka, K; Chiba, M; Ikeda, N; Hakamada, R; Higuchi, S; Kawamura, S

    1994-02-01

    The usefulness of a dry-chemistry blood analyzer, Spotchem SP-4410 (SP-4410) in a veterinary clinic for analysis of bovine and equine blood chemistry was studied. We quantitated total protein (TP), albumin (Alb), total bilirubin (T-Bil), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total cholesterol (T-Cho), glucose (Glu), calcium (Ca), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in bovine sera. Each sample was assayed with both the SP-4410 and an automated blood analyzer which served as a wet-chemistry reference system, and the data were analyzed with regression analysis. The correlation coefficient for AST was 0.997 being the highest for all the parameters, and all the correlation coefficients were 0.93 or higher. The coefficients of variation were lower than 5.0 except in the case of bovine T-Bil where it was 5,756. The ranges of normal reference values measured by SP-4410 were the same as those reported by other investigators in most cases, but those for GGT and CPK were slightly higher. The strongest interference was observed with hemoglobin. It seems that dry-chemical-analysis of blood serum using the SP-4410 is useful for analysis of bovine and equine blood. PMID:8085395

  16. A Pilot Study Using Residual Newborn Dried Blood Spots to Assess the Potential Role of Cytomegalovirus and Toxoplasma gondii in the Etiology of Congenital Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, Regina M.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Mei, Joanne V.; Dollard, Sheila C.; Frias, Jaime L.; Shaw, Gary M.; Canfield, Mark A.; Meyer, Robert E.; Jones, Jeffrey L.; Lorey, Fred; Honein, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital hydrocephalus is a condition characterized by accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles of the brain. Prenatal infections are risk factors for some birth defects. This pilot study investigated whether residual dried blood spots (DBS) could be used to assess infections as risk factors for birth defects by examining the associations between prenatal infection with Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) or cytomegalovirus (CMV) with congenital hydrocephalus. METHODS Case-infants with hydrocephalus (N = 410) were identified among live-born infants using birth defects surveillance systems in California, North Carolina, and Texas. Control-infants without birth defects were randomly selected from the same geographic areas and time periods as case-infants (N = 448). We tested residual DBS from case- and control-infants for T. gondii immunoglobulin M and CMV DNA. When possible, we calculated crude odds ratios (cORs) and confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS Evidence for prenatal T. gondii infection was more common among case-infants (1.2%) than control-infants (0%; p = 0.11), and evidence for prenatal CMV infection was higher among case-infants (1.5%) than control-infants (0.7%; cOR: 2.3; 95% CI: 0.48, 13.99). CONCLUSIONS Prenatal infections with T. gondii and CMV occurred more often among infants with congenital hydrocephalus than control-infants, although differences were not statistically significant. This pilot study highlighted some challenges in using DBS to examine associations between certain infections and birth defects, particularly related to reduced sensitivity and specimen storage conditions. Further study with increased numbers of specimens and higher quality specimens should be considered to understand better the contribution of these infections to the occurrence of congenital hydrocephalus. PMID:23716471

  17. A rapid liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-based method for measuring propranolol on dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Malvagia, Sabrina; Villanelli, Fabio; Giocaliere, Elisa; Ombrone, Daniela; Funghini, Silvia; Filippi, Luca; Cavallaro, Giacomo; Bagnoli, Paola; Guerrini, Renzo; la Marca, Giancarlo

    2013-05-01

    Propranolol, a non-selective beta blocker drug, is used in young infants and newborns for treating several heart diseases; its pharmacokinetics has been extensively evaluated in adult patients using extrapolation to treat pediatric population. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate a method to measure propranolol levels in dried blood spots. The analysis was performed by using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The calibration curve in matrix was linear in the concentration range of 2.5-200 μg/L with correlation coefficient r=0.9996. Intra-day and inter-day precisions and biases were less than 8.0% (n=10) and 11.5% (n=10) respectively. The recoveries ranged from 94 to 100% and the matrix effect did not result in a severe signal suppression. Propranolol on dried blood spot showed a good stability at three different temperatures for one month. This paper describes a micromethod for measuring propranolol levels on dried blood spot, which determines a great advantage in neonates or young infants during pharmacokinetic studies because of less invasive sampling and small blood volume required.

  18. A microsphere-based assay for mutation analysis of the biotinidase gene using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Janik, David K; Pass, Kenneth A

    2012-09-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive syndrome caused by defects in the biotinidase gene, the product of which affects biotin metabolism. Newborn screening (NBS) for biotinidase deficiency can identify affected infants prior to onset of symptoms; biotin supplementation can resolve or prevent the clinical features. In NBS, dry blood spots (DBS) are usually tested for biotinidase enzyme activity by colorimetric analysis. By taking advantage of the multiplexing capabilities of the Luminex platform, we have developed a microsphere-based array genotyping method for the simultaneous detection of six disease causing mutations in the biotinidase gene, thereby permitting a second tier of molecular analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3.2 mm DBS. Biotinidase gene sequences, containing the mutations of interest, were amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, followed by multiplexed allele-specific primer extension using universally tagged genotyping primers. The products were then hybridized to anti-tag carrying xTAG microspheres and detected on the Luminex platform. Genotypes were verified by sequencing. Genotyping results of 22 known biotinidase deficient samples by our xTAG biotinidase assay was in concordance with the results obtained from DNA sequencing, for all 6 mutations used in our panel. These results indicate that genotyping by an xTAG microsphere-based array is accurate, flexible, and can be adapted for high-throughput. Since NBS for biotinidase deficiency is by enzymatic assay, less than optimal quality of the DBS itself can compromise enzyme activity, while the DNA from these samples mostly remains unaffected. This assay warrants evaluation as a viable complement to the biotinidase semi-quantitative colorimetric assay. PMID:27625817

  19. A microsphere-based assay for mutation analysis of the biotinidase gene using dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Janik, David K.; Pass, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive syndrome caused by defects in the biotinidase gene, the product of which affects biotin metabolism. Newborn screening (NBS) for biotinidase deficiency can identify affected infants prior to onset of symptoms; biotin supplementation can resolve or prevent the clinical features. In NBS, dry blood spots (DBS) are usually tested for biotinidase enzyme activity by colorimetric analysis. By taking advantage of the multiplexing capabilities of the Luminex platform, we have developed a microsphere-based array genotyping method for the simultaneous detection of six disease causing mutations in the biotinidase gene, thereby permitting a second tier of molecular analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3.2 mm DBS. Biotinidase gene sequences, containing the mutations of interest, were amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction, followed by multiplexed allele-specific primer extension using universally tagged genotyping primers. The products were then hybridized to anti-tag carrying xTAG microspheres and detected on the Luminex platform. Genotypes were verified by sequencing. Genotyping results of 22 known biotinidase deficient samples by our xTAG biotinidase assay was in concordance with the results obtained from DNA sequencing, for all 6 mutations used in our panel. These results indicate that genotyping by an xTAG microsphere-based array is accurate, flexible, and can be adapted for high-throughput. Since NBS for biotinidase deficiency is by enzymatic assay, less than optimal quality of the DBS itself can compromise enzyme activity, while the DNA from these samples mostly remains unaffected. This assay warrants evaluation as a viable complement to the biotinidase semi-quantitative colorimetric assay.

  20. Dried blood spot analysis of creatinine with LC-MS/MS in addition to immunosuppressants analysis.

    PubMed

    Koster, Remco A; Greijdanus, Ben; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C; Touw, Daan J

    2015-02-01

    In order to monitor creatinine levels or to adjust the dosage of renally excreted or nephrotoxic drugs, the analysis of creatinine in dried blood spots (DBS) could be a useful addition to DBS analysis. We developed a LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of creatinine in the same DBS extract that was used for the analysis of tacrolimus, sirolimus, everolimus, and cyclosporine A in transplant patients with the use of Whatman FTA DMPK-C cards. The method was validated using three different strategies: a seven-point calibration curve using the intercept of the calibration to correct for the natural presence of creatinine in reference samples, a one-point calibration curve at an extremely high concentration in order to diminish the contribution of the natural presence of creatinine, and the use of creatinine-[(2)H3] with an eight-point calibration curve. The validated range for creatinine was 120 to 480 μmol/L (seven-point calibration curve), 116 to 7000 μmol/L (1-point calibration curve), and 1.00 to 400.0 μmol/L for creatinine-[(2)H3] (eight-point calibration curve). The precision and accuracy results for all three validations showed a maximum CV of 14.0% and a maximum bias of -5.9%. Creatinine in DBS was found stable at ambient temperature and 32 °C for 1 week and at -20 °C for 29 weeks. Good correlations were observed between patient DBS samples and routine enzymatic plasma analysis and showed the capability of the DBS method to be used as an alternative for creatinine plasma measurement.

  1. African Swine Fever Diagnosis Adapted to Tropical Conditions by the Use of Dried-blood Filter Papers.

    PubMed

    Randriamparany, T; Kouakou, K V; Michaud, V; Fernández-Pinero, J; Gallardo, C; Le Potier, M-F; Rabenarivahiny, R; Couacy-Hymann, E; Raherimandimby, M; Albina, E

    2016-08-01

    The performance of Whatman 3-MM filter papers for the collection, drying, shipment and long-term storage of blood at ambient temperature, and for the detection of African swine fever virus and antibodies was assessed. Conventional and real-time PCR, viral isolation and antibody detection by ELISA were performed on paired samples (blood/tissue versus dried-blood 3-MM filter papers) collected from experimentally infected pigs and from farm pigs in Madagascar and Côte d'Ivoire. 3-MM filter papers were used directly in the conventional and real-time PCR without previous extraction of nucleic acids. Tests that performed better with 3-MM filter papers were in descending order: virus isolation, real-time UPL PCR and conventional PCR. The analytical sensitivity of real-time UPL PCR on filter papers was similar to conventional testing (virus isolation or conventional PCR) on organs or blood. In addition, blood-dried filter papers were tested in ELISA for antibody detection and the observed sensitivity was very close to conventional detection on serum samples and gave comparable results. Filter papers were stored up to 9 months at 20-25°C and for 2 months at 37°C without significant loss of sensitivity for virus genome detection. All tests on 3-MM filter papers had 100% specificity compared to the gold standards. Whatman 3-MM filter papers have the advantage of being cheap and of preserving virus viability for future virus isolation and characterization. In this study, Whatman 3-MM filter papers proved to be a suitable support for the collection, storage and use of blood in remote areas of tropical countries without the need for a cold chain and thus provide new possibilities for antibody testing and virus isolation.

  2. Virtual Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual Field Trips have been around almost as long as the Worldwide Web itself yet virtual explorers do not generally return to their desktops with folders full of virtual hand specimens. Collection of real specimens on fields trips for later analysis in the lab (or at least in the pub) has been an important part of classical field geoscience education and research for generations but concern for the landscape and for preservation of key outcrops from wanton destruction has lead to many restrictions. One of the author’s favorite outcrops was recently vandalized presumably by a geologist who felt the need to bash some of the world’s most spectacular buckle folds with a rock sledge. It is not surprising, therefore, that geologists sometimes leave fragile localities out of field trip itineraries. Once analyzed, most specimens repose in drawers or bins, never to be seen again. Some end up in teaching collections but recent pedagogical research shows that undergraduate students have difficulty relating specimens both to their collection location and ultimate provenance in the lithosphere. Virtual specimens can be created using 3D modeling software and imported into virtual globes such as Google Earth (GE) where, they may be linked to virtual field trip stops or restored to their source localities on the paleo-globe. Sensitive localities may be protected by placemark approximation. The GE application program interface (API) has a distinct advantage over the stand-alone GE application when it comes to viewing and manipulating virtual specimens. When instances of the virtual globe are embedded in web pages using the GE plug-in, Collada models of specimens can be manipulated with javascript controls residing in the enclosing HTML, permitting specimens to be magnified, rotated in 3D, and sliced. Associated analytical data may be linked into javascript and localities for comparison at various points on the globe referenced by ‘fetching’ KML. Virtual specimens open up

  3. Further studies on the effects of diets containing dried coffee pulp: growth performance, blood and carcass characteristics of pigs.

    PubMed

    Okai, D B; Dabo, P

    1991-01-01

    4 groups of 5 pigs each were fed rations containing 0, 10, 20, or 30% of dried coffee pulp over a period of 10 weeks. The inclusion of these rations had no significant influence on the feed intake, growth rate and feed conversion efficiency. There were no significant differences in the blood parameters either (glucose, protein, P, Ca, cholesterol) or in the slaughter weight. Pigs fed the coffee pulp had less backfat and higher liver weights.

  4. Blood cholesterol screening in several environments using a portable, dry-chemistry analyzer and fingerstick blood samples. Lipid Research Clinics Cholesterol Screening Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bradford, R H; Bachorik, P S; Roberts, K; Williams, O D; Gotto, A M

    1990-01-01

    A multicenter study of blood cholesterol screening was performed in several typical environments, such as community sites (shopping malls and a supermarket), health care sites, work sites, a blood bank and a school. Cholesterol was measured with a portable, dry-chemistry analyzer using capillary blood obtained by fingerstick. Data are reported from a total of 13,824 participants, spanning the entire age spectrum. Overall, 25% of screened subjects had blood cholesterol levels above the age-specific cutpoints used in the current study. Although in the aggregate this screening experience very closely approximates the expected level of referrals, the proportion of referred screened subjects differed significantly among the 5 types of screening environments and by gender. Follow-up telephone interviews indicated that 53% of referrals had initiated a physician contact. More than 75% of those who had seen a physician reported that the diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia had been confirmed, and almost 72% had been prescribed a diet. A large proportion of referred screened subjects reported having modified their diet, particularly when recommended to do so by a physician. This study has yielded encouraging evidence that physicians gave referred screened subjects appropriate initial advice for managing hypercholesterolemia. The new technology for blood cholesterol measurement evaluated in the current study has proven to be a feasible and reliable means for measuring blood cholesterol in typical screening settings.

  5. Dry period cooling ameliorates physiological variables and blood acid base balance, improving milk production in murrah buffaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarif, Ovais; Aggarwal, Anjali

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of evaporative cooling during late gestation on physiological responses, blood gas and acid base balance and subsequent milk production of Murrah buffaloes. To investigate this study sixteen healthy pregnant dry Murrah buffaloes (second to fourth parity) at sixty days prepartum were selected in the months of May to June and divided into two groups of eight animals each. One group of buffaloes (Cooled/CL) was managed under fan and mist cooling system during dry period. Group second buffaloes (Noncooled/NCL) remained as control without provision of cooling during dry period. The physiological responses viz. Rectal temperature (RT), Respiratory rate (RR) and Pulse rate were significantly ( P < 0.05) lower in group 2, with the provision of cooling. Skin surface temperature at thorax was significantly lower in cooled group relative to noncooled group. Blood pH and pO2 were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in heat stressed group as compared to the cooled group. pCO2, TCO2, HCO3, SBC, base excess in extracellular fluid (BEecf), base excess in blood (BEb), PCV and Hb were significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in cooled group as compared to noncooled group. DMI was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in cooled relative to noncooled animals. Milk yield, FCM, fat yield, lactose yield and total solid yield was significantly higher ( P < 0.05) in cooled group of Murrah buffaloes.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Four Real-Time PCR Methods for the Quantitative Detection of Epstein-Barr Virus from Whole Blood Specimens.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Daelynn; Sun, Yilun; Tang, Li; Gu, Zhengming; Pounds, Stanley; Hayden, Randall

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) load in immunocompromised patients has become integral to their care. An increasing number of reagents are available for quantitative detection of EBV; however, there are little published comparative data. Four real-time PCR systems (one using laboratory-developed reagents and three using analyte-specific reagents) were compared with one another for detection of EBV from whole blood. Whole blood specimens seeded with EBV were used to determine quantitative linearity, analytical measurement range, lower limit of detection, and CV for each assay. Retrospective testing of 198 clinical samples was performed in parallel with all methods; results were compared to determine relative quantitative and qualitative performance. All assays showed similar performance. No significant difference was found in limit of detection (3.12-3.49 log10 copies/mL; P = 0.37). A strong qualitative correlation was seen with all assays that used clinical samples (positive detection rates of 89.5%-95.8%). Quantitative correlation of clinical samples across assays was also seen in pairwise regression analysis, with R(2) ranging from 0.83 to 0.95. Normalizing clinical sample results to IU/mL did not alter the quantitative correlation between assays. Quantitative EBV detection by real-time PCR can be performed over a wide linear dynamic range, using three different commercially available reagents and laboratory-developed methods. EBV was detected with comparable sensitivity and quantitative correlation for all assays.

  7. Validation and development of an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin levels in dried blood spots from patients with COPD*

    PubMed Central

    Zillmer, Laura Russo; Russo, Rodrigo; Manzano, Beatriz Martins; Ivanaga, Ivan; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; de Souza, Altay Alves Lino; Santos, Gildo; Rodriguez, Francisco; Miravitlles, Marc; Jardim, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate and develop an immunonephelometric assay for the determination of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) levels in dried blood spots from COPD patients in Brazil. METHODS: We determined AAT levels in serum samples and dried blood spots from 192 COPD patients. For the preparation of dried blood spots, a disk (diameter, 6 mm) was placed into a tube, eluted with 200 µL of PBS, and stored overnight at 4ºC. All of the samples were analyzed by immunonephelometry in duplicate. We used the bootstrap resampling method in order to determine a cut-off point for AAT levels in dried blood spots. RESULTS: The correlation coefficient between the AAT levels in serum samples and those in dried blood spots was r = 0.45. For dried blood spots, the cut-off value was 2.02 mg/dL (97% CI: 1.45-2.64 mg/dL), with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 100%, 95.7%, 27.2%, and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This method for the determination of AAT levels in dried blood spots appears to be a reliable screening tool for patients with AAT deficiency. PMID:24310627

  8. Evaluation of whole fresh blood and dried blood on filter paper discs in serological tests for Trypanosoma evansi in experimentally infected water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Holland, W G; Thanh, N G; My, L N; Magnus, E; Verloo, D; Büscher, P; Goddeeris, B; Vercruysse, J

    2002-02-01

    In this study we investigated if whole blood could substitute for serum in the direct card agglutination test (CATT/Trypansosoma evansi) and the indirect card agglutination test (LATEX/T. evansi) for the sero-diagnosis of T. evansi in buffaloes. Likewise blood spots on filter paper were compared with sera for use in the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay/T. evansi (ELISA) and immunotrypanolysis test (T.L./T. evansi). Samples were collected weekly from experimentally T. evansi infected- and non-infected water buffaloes. To estimate test agreement between serum and respectively whole fresh blood and dried blood spots on filterpaper of the tests, kappa values with 95% confidence intervals were calculated, 0.75+/-0.11 for the CATT/T. evansi; 0.80+/-0.11 for the ELISA/T. evansi; 0.84+/-0.11 for the LATEX/T. evansi and 0.93+/-0.11 for the T.L./T. evansi. In addition kappa values with 95% confidence intervals were computed to assess agreement between results obtained in the reference T.L./T. evansi test and those obtained in the other assays; 0.70+/-0.10 for the CATT-Serum; 0.75+/-0.11 for the LATEX-Blood; 0.77+/-0.11 for the LATEX-Serum; 0.81+/-0.10 for the CATT-Blood; 0.81+/-0.11 for the ELISA-Serum and 0.84+/-0.11 for the ELISA-Confetti. Based on the high kappa values as calculated, we conclude that serum can be replaced by fresh whole blood for the agglutination assays or blood on filter paper for the ELISA/T. evansi and T.L./T. evansi.

  9. Enzymatic diagnosis of Fabry disease using a fluorometric assay on dried blood spots: An alternative methodology.

    PubMed

    Caudron, Eric; Prognon, Patrice; Germain, Dominique P

    2015-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD, OMIM#301500) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the functional deficiency of α-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme. A method to screen for FD in large populations has been developed using a fluorometric assay of α-galactosidase A activity in dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. However, results can be influenced by quenching of fluorescence by haemoglobin which, together with small sample size, may result in a low light emission signal. An alternative, simple and sensitive fluorometric assay was developed for the determination of α-galactosidase A activity in DBS. The assay uses 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-d-galactose as an artificial substrate. To minimize the risk of false-positives, zinc sulfate was used for protein precipitation to stop the enzymatic reaction and eliminate interfering species (hemoglobin). Samples from 209 individuals (60 hemizygotes, 68 heterozygotes, and 81 controls) were tested to establish reference values for the assay. The mean α-galactosidase A activity of the 81 controls was 9.1 ± 3.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (mean ± SD). All 60 hemizygotes affected with FD had AGAL activities below 1.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (0.2 ± 0.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). For the 68 heterozygous females, AGAL activity ranged from 0 to 12.6 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (3.5 ± 2.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Two-thirds of the female patients could be identified using the enzymatic assay and a cut-off level of 40% of the median control value (<3.4 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Our fluorometric assay using zinc sulfate protein precipitation was shown to have similar sensitivity and robustness while reducing the risk of false positive results due to quenching of 4-MU fluorescence by haemoglobin. PMID:26520229

  10. Evaluation of dried blood spots collected on filter paper for serodiagnosis of human hydatidosis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naveen; Sehgal, Rakesh; Goyal, Kapil; Tripathi, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Serological diagnosis of hydatidosis is usually performed by detecting the circulating antibodies in serum by ELISA. The present study was carried out to standardize and evaluate procedure of the ELISA using elute from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper and blood stored at different temperatures and at different durations for its further application under field conditions. Materials and Methods: Dried blood spots were collected from fifty study subjects and fifty control subjects and evaluated for the detection of IgG antibodies against hydatid. Samples were stored at room temperature and 4°C and tested by ELISA at 0, 15 and 30 days. Results: The present study shows that elute of DBS on filter paper can be stored at room temperature for a maximum of 30 days without a decrease in antibody titer as compared to serum samples tested by ELISA. Conclusions: The collection of blood sample on filter paper may serve useful purpose in resource limited countries for carrying out sero-epidemiological surveys at a cost effective level. PMID:23767019

  11. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts thereof... international mail system. Provided, that this exception will not apply to any specimens or parts thereof...

  12. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts thereof... international mail system. Provided, that this exception will not apply to any specimens or parts thereof...

  13. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts thereof... international mail system. Provided, that this exception will not apply to any specimens or parts thereof...

  14. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or 23 of this subchapter, dead, preserved, dried, or embedded scientific specimens or parts thereof... international mail system. Provided, that this exception will not apply to any specimens or parts thereof...

  15. On-line liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry simultaneous determination of opiates, cocainics and amphetamines in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Saussereau, E; Lacroix, C; Gaulier, J M; Goulle, J P

    2012-02-15

    A novel approach has been developed for the illicit drugs quantitative determination using dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. The illicit drugs tested were opiates (morphine and its 3- and 6-glucuronide metabolites, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine), cocainics (ecgonine methylester, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, cocaethylene) and amphetamines (amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDA, MDMA, MDEA). The described method, requiring a small blood volume, is based on high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using on-line extraction. A Whatman card 903 was spotted with 30μL of whole blood and left overnight to dry at room temperature. A 3-mm diameter disk was removed using a manual punch, suspended in 150μL of water for 10min with ultrasonication, and then 100μL was injected in the on-line LC-MS/MS system. An Oasis HLB was used as an extraction column and a C18 Atlantis as an analytical column. The chromatographic cycle was performed with 20mM ammonium formate buffer (pH 2.8) (solvent A) and acetonitrile/solvent A (90:10, v/v) gradient in 16min. Detection was performed in positive electrospray ionization mode (ESI+) with a Quattro Micro (Waters). Recoveries of all analytes were up to 80%. DBS were stored in duplicate at 4°C and -20°C for up to 6 months. Illicit drugs seemed to be much more stabled at -20°C. Furthermore, it was tested whether analysis of DBS may be as reliable as that of whole blood investigating authentic samples; significant correlations were obtained. This DBS assay has potential as rapid, sensitive and inexpensive option for the illicit drugs determination in small blood volumes, which seems of great interest in suspected cases of driving under the influence of drugs. PMID:22281234

  16. Dried Blood Spot Methodology in Combination With Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry Facilitates the Monitoring of Teriflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Lunven, Catherine; Turpault, Sandrine; Beyer, Yann-Joel; O'Brien, Amy; Delfolie, Astrid; Boyanova, Neli; Sanderink, Ger-Jan; Baldinetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Background: Teriflunomide, a once-daily oral immunomodulator approved for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, is eliminated slowly from plasma. If necessary to rapidly lower plasma concentrations of teriflunomide, an accelerated elimination procedure using cholestyramine or activated charcoal may be used. The current bioanalytical assay for determination of plasma teriflunomide concentration requires laboratory facilities for blood centrifugation and plasma storage. An alternative method, with potential for greater convenience, is dried blood spot (DBS) methodology. Analytical and clinical validations are required to switch from plasma to DBS (finger-prick sampling) methodology. Methods: Using blood samples from healthy subjects, an LC-MS/MS assay method for quantification of teriflunomide in DBS over a range of 0.01–10 mcg/mL was developed and validated for specificity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, reproducibility, and stability. Results were compared with those from the current plasma assay for determination of plasma teriflunomide concentration. Results: Method was specific and selective relative to endogenous compounds, with process efficiency ∼88%, and no matrix effect. Inaccuracy and imprecision for intraday and interday analyses were <15% at all concentrations tested. Quantification of teriflunomide in DBS assay was not affected by blood deposit volume and punch position within spot, and hematocrit level had a limited but acceptable effect on measurement accuracy. Teriflunomide was stable for at least 4 months at room temperature, and for at least 24 hours at 37°C with and without 95% relative humidity, to cover sampling, drying, and shipment conditions in the field. The correlation between DBS and plasma concentrations (R2 = 0.97), with an average blood to plasma ratio of 0.59, was concentration independent and constant over time. Conclusions: DBS sampling is a simple and practical method for monitoring teriflunomide

  17. Evaluation of dried blood spots as sample matrix for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry based metabolomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sing Teang; Lin, Hai-Shu; Ching, Jianhong; Ho, Paul C

    2011-06-01

    We propose using dried blood spots (DBS) as sample matrix for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) based metabolomic profiling for the benefits of higher sample stability, more convenient sample acquisition with DBS, higher analyte separation power, and more readily biomarker identification with GC/MS. To establish this proposition, the metabolomic profiles generated from DBS were compared with that obtained from the conventional whole blood and plasma matrixes and also with dried plasma spots (DPS) as another covariate control. Our findings indicated that whole blood produced the most number of detectable markers (866), whereas DPS yielded the least number (614). DBS and plasma matrix, on the other hand, produced the most similar numbers of detectable (695 vs 749) and identifiable markers (137 vs 147, matching with Fiehn library). From the analysis of the DBS and plasma metabolomic profiles, it was concluded that when l-lysine 2, iminodiacetic acid 2, dl-threo-beta-hydroxyaspartic acid, citric acid, or adenosine-5-monophosphate 2 are not involved as markers, DBS could be a suitable substitute for plasma for metabolomic profiling.

  18. Using dried blood spot sampling to improve data quality and reduce animal use in mouse pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Perkins, Everett J

    2015-03-01

    Traditional pharmacokinetic analysis in nonclinical studies is based on the concentration of a test compound in plasma and requires approximately 100 to 200 μL blood collected per time point. However, the total blood volume of mice limits the number of samples that can be collected from an individual animal-often to a single collection per mouse-thus necessitating dosing multiple mice to generate a pharmacokinetic profile in a sparse-sampling design. Compared with traditional methods, dried blood spot (DBS) analysis requires smaller volumes of blood (15 to 20 μL), thus supporting serial blood sampling and the generation of a complete pharmacokinetic profile from a single mouse. Here we compare plasma-derived data with DBS-derived data, explain how to adopt DBS sampling to support discovery mouse studies, and describe how to generate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from a single mouse. Executing novel study designs that use DBS enhances the ability to identify and streamline better drug candidates during drug discovery. Implementing DBS sampling can reduce the number of mice needed in a drug discovery program. In addition, the simplicity of DBS sampling and the smaller numbers of mice needed translate to decreased study costs. Overall, DBS sampling is consistent with 3Rs principles by achieving reductions in the number of animals used, decreased restraint-associated stress, improved data quality, direct comparison of interanimal variability, and the generation of multiple endpoints from a single study.

  19. Using dried blood spot sampling to improve data quality and reduce animal use in mouse pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Perkins, Everett J

    2015-03-01

    Traditional pharmacokinetic analysis in nonclinical studies is based on the concentration of a test compound in plasma and requires approximately 100 to 200 μL blood collected per time point. However, the total blood volume of mice limits the number of samples that can be collected from an individual animal-often to a single collection per mouse-thus necessitating dosing multiple mice to generate a pharmacokinetic profile in a sparse-sampling design. Compared with traditional methods, dried blood spot (DBS) analysis requires smaller volumes of blood (15 to 20 μL), thus supporting serial blood sampling and the generation of a complete pharmacokinetic profile from a single mouse. Here we compare plasma-derived data with DBS-derived data, explain how to adopt DBS sampling to support discovery mouse studies, and describe how to generate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from a single mouse. Executing novel study designs that use DBS enhances the ability to identify and streamline better drug candidates during drug discovery. Implementing DBS sampling can reduce the number of mice needed in a drug discovery program. In addition, the simplicity of DBS sampling and the smaller numbers of mice needed translate to decreased study costs. Overall, DBS sampling is consistent with 3Rs principles by achieving reductions in the number of animals used, decreased restraint-associated stress, improved data quality, direct comparison of interanimal variability, and the generation of multiple endpoints from a single study. PMID:25836959

  20. Using Dried Blood Spot Sampling to Improve Data Quality and Reduce Animal Use in Mouse Pharmacokinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Perkins, Everett J

    2015-01-01

    Traditional pharmacokinetic analysis in nonclinical studies is based on the concentration of a test compound in plasma and requires approximately 100 to 200 µL blood collected per time point. However, the total blood volume of mice limits the number of samples that can be collected from an individual animal—often to a single collection per mouse—thus necessitating dosing multiple mice to generate a pharmacokinetic profile in a sparse-sampling design. Compared with traditional methods, dried blood spot (DBS) analysis requires smaller volumes of blood (15 to 20 µL), thus supporting serial blood sampling and the generation of a complete pharmacokinetic profile from a single mouse. Here we compare plasma-derived data with DBS-derived data, explain how to adopt DBS sampling to support discovery mouse studies, and describe how to generate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from a single mouse. Executing novel study designs that use DBS enhances the ability to identify and streamline better drug candidates during drug discovery. Implementing DBS sampling can reduce the number of mice needed in a drug discovery program. In addition, the simplicity of DBS sampling and the smaller numbers of mice needed translate to decreased study costs. Overall, DBS sampling is consistent with 3Rs principles by achieving reductions in the number of animals used, decreased restraint-associated stress, improved data quality, direct comparison of interanimal variability, and the generation of multiple endpoints from a single study. PMID:25836959

  1. Findings of graft biopsy specimens within 90 days after ABO blood group incompatible living donor kidney transplantation compared with ABO-identical and non-identical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ushigome, Hidetaka; Okamoto, Masahiko; Koshino, Katsuhiro; Nobori, Syuji; Okajima, Hideaki; Masuzawa, Naoko; Urasaki, Koji; Yoshimura, Norio

    2010-07-01

    As immunosuppressive therapy has advanced, we have markedly improved the outcome of ABO blood group incompatible living donor kidney transplantation. Consequently, graft survival at early phase after ABO-incompatible transplantation has been favorable than ABO-compatible transplantation in Japan. But in these days, it has been assumed that transplant glomerulopathy within one yr after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation might be significantly precipitated. That may be because of chronic, active antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). We performed kidney graft biopsies at the early phase within 90 d after living donor kidney transplantation that involved the episode and protocol biopsies and studied findings of graft biopsy specimens when compared with ABO incompatible and compatible involving non-identical and identical transplantations. In ABO-incompatible transplant cases, the ratio occurring glomerulitis, especially severe injury of g 2-3, was significantly higher than that of identical and non-identical transplant cases (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference in t score, i score, ptc score and v score between three transplant groups. The cases occurring AMR were concordant with the cases recognized with severe glomerulitis. AMR was difficult to be diagnosed by C4d analysis in ABO-incompatible transplant cases. Glomerular injury score, g score, may be considered as more significant and the injury should be cured thoroughly.

  2. Quantitative determination of opioids in whole blood using fully automated dried blood spot desorption coupled to on-line SPE-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Verplaetse, Ruth; Henion, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are well known, widely used painkillers. Increased stability of opioids in the dried blood spot (DBS) matrix compared to blood/plasma has been described. Other benefits provided by DBS techniques include point-of-care collection, less invasive micro sampling, more economical shipment, and convenient storage. Current methodology for analysis of micro whole blood samples for opioids is limited to the classical DBS workflow, including tedious manual punching of the DBS cards followed by extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalysis. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a fully automated on-line sample preparation procedure for the analysis of DBS micro samples relevant to the detection of opioids in finger prick blood. To this end, automated flow-through elution of DBS cards was followed by on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by LC-MS/MS. Selective, sensitive, accurate, and reproducible quantitation of five representative opioids in human blood at sub-therapeutic, therapeutic, and toxic levels was achieved. The range of reliable response (R(2)  ≥0.997) was 1 to 500 ng/mL whole blood for morphine, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone; and 0.1 to 50 ng/mL for fentanyl. Inter-day, intra-day, and matrix inter-lot accuracy and precision was less than 15% (even at lower limits of quantitation (LLOQ) level). The method was successfully used to measure hydrocodone and its major metabolite norhydrocodone in incurred human samples. Our data support the enormous potential of DBS sampling and automated analysis for monitoring opioids as well as other pharmaceuticals in both anti-doping and pain management regimens. PMID:26607771

  3. Evaluation of Two Techniques for Viral Load Monitoring Using Dried Blood Spot in Routine Practice in Vietnam (French National Agency for AIDS and Hepatitis Research 12338)

    PubMed Central

    Taieb, Fabien; Tram, Tran Hong; Ho, Hien Thi; Pham, Van Anh; Nguyen, Lan; Pham, Ban Hien; Tong, Linh An; Tuaillon, Edouard; Delaporte, Eric; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Bui, Duc Duong; Do, NhanThi; Madec, Yoann

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although it is the best method to detect early therapeutic failure, viral load (VL) monitoring is still not widely available in many resource-limited settings because of difficulties in specimen transfer, personnel shortage, and insufficient laboratory infrastructures. Dried blood spot (DBS) use, which was introduced in the latest World Health Organization recommendations, can overcome these difficulties. This evaluation aimed at validating VL measurement in DBS, in a laboratory without previous DBS experience and in routine testing conditions. Methods. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults were observed in a HIV care site in Hanoi, and each patient provided 2 DBS cards with whole blood spots and 2 plasma samples. Viral load was measured in DBS and in plasma using the COBAS Ampliprep/TaqMan and the Abbott RealTime assays. To correctly identify those with VL ≥ 1000 copies/mL, sensitivity and specificity were estimated. Results. A total of 198 patients were enrolled. With the Roche technique, 51 plasma VL were ≥1000 copies/mL; among these, 28 presented a VL in DBS that was also ≥1000 copies/mL (sensitivity, 54.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 40.3–68.9). On the other hand, all plasma VL < 1000 copies/mL were also <1000 copies/mL in DBS (specificity, 100; 95% CI, 97.5–100). With the Abbott technique, 45 plasma VL were ≥1000 copies/mL; among these, 42 VL in DBS were also ≥1000 copies/mL (sensitivity, 93.3%; 95% CI, 81.7–98.6); specificity was 94.8 (95% CI, 90.0–97.7). Conclusions. The Abbott RealTime polymerase chain reaction assay provided adequate VL results in DBS, thus allowing DBS use for VL monitoring. PMID:27704001

  4. Examination of Eurasian griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus fulvus) in Israel for exposure to environmental toxicants using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Shlosberg, Alan; Wu, Qian; Rumbeiha, Wilson K; Lehner, Andreas; Cuneah, Olga; King, Roni; Hatzofe, Ohad; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Johnson, Margaret

    2012-04-01

    The griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) is one of seven species of Old World Gyps vultures found over a wide range from the Iberian peninsula in the west through the Balkans, Turkey, and the Middle East to India in the east. The population of the griffon vultures in Israel has suffered a dramatic decrease, and in recent years productivity has been severely reduced. In this study, whole-blood samples taken from 25 apparently healthy griffon vultures at various stages of maturity were examined to investigate whether the vultures are being excessively exposed to environmental contaminants that might deleteriously affect their reproduction. Five groups of environmental contaminants, comprising toxic elements, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and perfluorinated compounds, were monitored in dried blood spots. Results of the analyses showed low levels of exposure of griffon vultures to environmental contaminants compared with the sparse data available on griffon vultures and other diurnal raptors in other countries.

  5. Biomonitoring using dried blood spots: Detection of ochratoxin A and its degradation product 2’R‐ochratoxin A in blood from coffee drinkers*

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Benedikt; Osteresch, Bernd; Muñoz, Katherine A.; Hillmann, Hartmut; Sibrowski, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Scope In this study, human exposure to the mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) and its thermal degradation product 2’R‐ochratoxin A (2’R‐OTA, previously named as 14R‐Ochratoxin A [22]) through coffee consumption was assessed. LC‐MS/MS and the dried blood spot (DBS) technique were used for the analysis of blood samples from coffee and noncoffee drinkers (n = 50), and food frequency questionnaires were used to document coffee consumption. Methods and results For the detection of OTA and 2’R‐OTA in blood, a new sensitive and efficient sample preparation method based on DBS was established and validated. Using this technique 2’R‐OTA was for the first time detected in biological samples. Comparison between coffee drinkers and noncoffee drinkers showed for the first time that 2’R‐OTA was only present in blood from the first group while OTA could be found in both groups in a mean concentration of 0.21 μg/L. 2’R‐OTA mean concentration was 0.11 μg/L with a maximum concentration of 0.414 μg/L. Thus, in average 2’R‐OTA was approx. half the concentration of OTA but in some cases even exceeded OTA levels. No correlation between the amounts of coffee consumption and OTA or 2’R‐OTA levels was observed. Conclusion The results of this study revealed for the first time a high exposure of coffee consumers to 2’R‐OTA, a compound formed from OTA during coffee roasting. Since little information is available regarding toxicity and possible carcinogenicity of this compound, further OTA monitoring in blood including 2’R‐OTA is advisable. PMID:26012425

  6. Detection of HIV type 1 env subtypes A, B, C, and E in Asia using dried blood spots: a new surveillance tool for molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Cassol, S; Weniger, B G; Babu, P G; Salminen, M O; Zheng, X; Htoon, M T; Delaney, A; O'Shaughnessy, M; Ou, C Y

    1996-10-10

    Global surveillance of HIV-1 subtypes for genetic characterization is hampered by the biohazard of processing and the difficulties of shipping whole blood or cells from many developing country regions. We developed a technique for the direct automated sequencing of viral DNA from dried blood spot (DBS) specimens collected on absorbent paper, which can be mailed unrefrigerated in sturdy paper envelopes with low biohazard risk. DBS were collected nonrandomly from HIV-1-infected, mostly asymptomatic, patients in five Asian countries in 1991, and shipped via airmail or hand carried without refrigeration to Bangkok, and then transshipped to North America for processing. After more than 2 years of storage, including 6 months at ambient temperatures, proviral DNA in the DBS was amplified by nested PCR, and a 389-nucleotide segment of the C2-V3 env gene region was sequenced, from which 287 base pairs were aligned and subtyped by phylogenetic analysis with neighbor-joining and other methods. From southern India, there were 25 infections with subtype C and 2 with subtype A. From Myanmar (Burma), we identified the first subtype E infection, as well as six subtype BB, a distinct cluster within subtype B that was first discovered in Thailand and that has now appeared in China, Malaysia, and Japan. From southwest China, one BB was identified, while a "classical" B typical of North American and European strains was found in Indonesia. From Thailand, five DBS of ambiguous serotype were identified as three B, one BB, and one E. A blinded control serotype E specimen was correctly identified, but a serotype BB control was not tested. Most HIV-1 in southern India appears to be env subtype C, with rare A, as others have reported in western and northern India. The subtypes BB and E in Myanmar, and the BB in China, suggest epidemiological linkage with these subtypes in neighboring Thailand. DBS are a practical, economical technique for conducting large-scale molecular epidemiological

  7. [Investigations on the usefulness of the dry chemistry blood anaylsis system SPOTCHEM SP-4410in laboratory diagnosis of cattle].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, I; Aigner, M; Klee, W

    2001-01-01

    The usefulness of the dry-chemistry blood analyzer, SPOTCHEM SP-4410, for analysis of bovine blood chemistry was studied in a veterinary clinic. The control serum Precipath-U, Boehringer-Mannheim, was used to measure precision within each run and between days. The coefficients of variation (CV) ranged between 1.54% and 4.86%, with the exception of albumin and creatine phosphokinase showing a CV of 6.3% and 10.03% for between-day precision. For methodological comparison bovine serum samples were assayed with both the SPOTCHEM SP-4410 and the automated blood analyzer HITACHI 705, which served as a wet-chemistry reference system. The following analytes were measured: glucose, urea, creatinine, total protein, albumin, total bilirubin and the enzymes AST, CPK and gamma-GT. For hemoglobin, which was measured in heparinized whole blood, the CO oximeter 855, CIBA-CORNING, was used as a reference system. The comparative analysis showed very good correlation in eight of ten parameters and their correlation coefficients (r) ranged between 0.962 and 0.998. Only the correlation coefficients of the analysis of total bilirubin (r = 0.903) and albumin (r = 0.771) were less satisfactory. The recovery test was carried out with the two parameters glucose and blood urea. The recovery of glucose was 93.7% and of urea 98.8%. The SPOTCHEM SP-4410 is easy to use and proved to be reliable and accurate, and therefore it seems to be useful for analysis of bovine blood samples. PMID:11225499

  8. A New Method to Quantify Ifosfamide Blood Levels Using Dried Blood Spots and UPLC-MS/MS in Paediatric Patients with Embryonic Solid Tumours.

    PubMed

    Torres, Luz-María; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Chávez-Pacheco, Juan L; Navas, Carlos F; Demetrio, Joel A; Alemón-Medina, Radamés; Trujillo, Francisca; Pérez, Martín; Zapata, Martha M; Cárdenas, Rocío; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Aquino, Arnoldo; Velázquez-Cruz, Rafael; Castillejos, Manuel-de-Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Ifosfamide blood concentrations are necessary to monitor its therapeutic response, avoiding any adverse effect. We developed and validated an analytical method by UPLC-MS/MS to quantify ifosfamide in dried blood spots (DBS). Blood samples were collected on Whatman 903® filter paper cards. Five 3 mm disks were punched out from each dried blood spot. Acetonitrile and ethyl acetate were used for drug extraction. Chromatographic separation was carried out in an Acquity UPLC equipment with a BEH-C18 column, 2.1 x 100 mm, 1.7 μm (Waters®). The mobile phase consisted in 5 mM ammonium formate and methanol:acetonitrile (40:48:12 v/v/v) at 0.2 mL/min. LC-MS/MS detection was done by ESI+ and multiple reaction mode monitoring, ionic transitions were m/z1+ 260.99 > 91.63 for ifosfamide and 261.00 > 139.90 for cyclophosphamide (internal standard). This method was linear within a 100-10000 ng/mL range and it was accurate, precise and selective. Ifosfamide samples in DBS were stable for up to 52 days at -80°C. The procedure was tested in 14 patients, ages 1 month to 17 years (9 males and 5 females), with embryonic tumours treated with ifosfamide, alone or combined, at a public tertiary referral hospital. Ifosfamide blood levels ranged from 11.1 to 39.7 μmol/L at 12 hours after the last infusion, while 24-hour levels ranged from 0.7-19.7 μmol/L. The median at 12 hours was 19.5 μmol/L (Q25 14.4-Q75 29.0) and 3.8 μmol/L (Q25 1.5-Q75 9.9) at 24 hours, p<0.001. This method is feasible to determine ifosfamide plasma levels in paediatric patients.

  9. A New Method to Quantify Ifosfamide Blood Levels Using Dried Blood Spots and UPLC-MS/MS in Paediatric Patients with Embryonic Solid Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Pacheco, Juan L.; Navas, Carlos F.; Demetrio, Joel A.; Alemón-Medina, Radamés; Trujillo, Francisca; Pérez, Martín; Zapata, Martha M.; Cárdenas, Rocío; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Aquino, Arnoldo; Velázquez-Cruz, Rafael; Castillejos, Manuel-de-Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Ifosfamide blood concentrations are necessary to monitor its therapeutic response, avoiding any adverse effect. We developed and validated an analytical method by UPLC-MS/MS to quantify ifosfamide in dried blood spots (DBS). Blood samples were collected on Whatman 903® filter paper cards. Five 3 mm disks were punched out from each dried blood spot. Acetonitrile and ethyl acetate were used for drug extraction. Chromatographic separation was carried out in an Acquity UPLC equipment with a BEH-C18 column, 2.1 x 100 mm, 1.7 μm (Waters®). The mobile phase consisted in 5 mM ammonium formate and methanol:acetonitrile (40:48:12 v/v/v) at 0.2 mL/min. LC-MS/MS detection was done by ESI+ and multiple reaction mode monitoring, ionic transitions were m/z1+ 260.99 > 91.63 for ifosfamide and 261.00 > 139.90 for cyclophosphamide (internal standard). This method was linear within a 100–10000 ng/mL range and it was accurate, precise and selective. Ifosfamide samples in DBS were stable for up to 52 days at -80°C. The procedure was tested in 14 patients, ages 1 month to 17 years (9 males and 5 females), with embryonic tumours treated with ifosfamide, alone or combined, at a public tertiary referral hospital. Ifosfamide blood levels ranged from 11.1 to 39.7 μmol/L at 12 hours after the last infusion, while 24-hour levels ranged from 0.7–19.7 μmol/L. The median at 12 hours was 19.5 μmol/L (Q25 14.4–Q75 29.0) and 3.8 μmol/L (Q25 1.5–Q75 9.9) at 24 hours, p<0.001. This method is feasible to determine ifosfamide plasma levels in paediatric patients. PMID:26600181

  10. Top-Down Proteomics and Direct Surface Sampling of Neonatal Dried Blood Spots: Diagnosis of Unknown Hemoglobin Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Rebecca L.; Griffiths, Paul; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2012-11-01

    We have previously shown that liquid microjunction surface sampling of dried blood spots coupled with high resolution top-down mass spectrometry may be used for screening of common hemoglobin variants HbS, HbC, and HbD. In order to test the robustness of the approach, we have applied the approach to unknown hemoglobin variants. Six neonatal dried blood spot samples that had been identified as variants, but which could not be diagnosed by current screening methods, were analyzed by direct surface sampling top-down mass spectrometry. Both collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry were employed. Four of the samples were identified as β-chain variants: two were heterozygous Hb D-Iran, one was heterozygous Hb Headington, and one was heterozygous Hb J-Baltimore. The fifth sample was identified as the α-chain variant heterozygous Hb Phnom Penh. Analysis of the sixth sample suggested that it did not in fact contain a variant. Adoption of the approach in the clinic would require speed in both data collection and interpretation. To address that issue, we have compared manual data analysis with freely available data analysis software (ProsightPTM). The results demonstrate the power of top-down proteomics for hemoglobin variant analysis in newborn samples.

  11. Dry matter intake and blood parameters of nonlactating Holstein and Jersey cows in late gestation.

    PubMed

    French, P D

    2006-03-01

    An experiment was conducted using 14 multiparous Holstein and 14 multiparous Jersey cows to determine if dry matter intake (DMI), specifically the decline in prepartum DMI and plasma parameters differed between breeds. Cows were blocked by expected calving date and received a dry cow total mixed ration (15% crude protein and 39% neutral detergent fiber) beginning 30 d before expected calving date. At calving, cows were switched to a lactation total mixed ration (17% crude protein and 33% neutral detergent fiber). Data were collected from d 23 prepartum to d 1 postpartum. Body weight was greater for Holsteins compared with Jerseys, but body condition score did not differ between breeds. Dry matter intake decreased for both Holsteins and Jerseys as parturition approached. The interaction of breed x day prepartum was significant for DMI with the magnitude of depression being greater for Holsteins compared with Jerseys. Plasma glucose and beta-hydroxy-butyrate was similar between breeds. Plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) were similar for the two breeds up to d 5 prepartum, but greater for Holsteins compared with Jerseys thereafter. The decline in prepartum DMI was positively correlated to plasma NEFA for Holsteins, but not for Jerseys. These results indicate that breed differences exist for the decline in prepartum DMI and plasma NEFA. In addition, these data show an association between prepartum DMI depression and plasma NEFA but do not suggest a causal relationship.

  12. Dried plasma/blood spots for monitoring antiretroviral treatment efficacy and pharmacokinetics: a cross-sectional study in rural Burundi

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Andrea; Motta, Ilaria; Milia, Maria Grazia; Rostagno, Roberto; Simiele, Marco; Libanore, Valentina; Fontana, Silvia; D'Avolio, Antonio; Ghisetti, Valeria; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Aims In limited resource settings monitoring antiretroviral (ARV) treatment efficacy is restrained by the lack of access to technological equipment. The aim of the study was to assess the use of dried plasma (DPS) and blood spots (DBS) to facilitate ARV monitoring in remote settings where clinical monitoring is the primary strategy. Methods A cross-sectional study in HIV-positive ARV-treated patients in Kiremba, Burundi was performed. DBS were used for HIV-1 viral load (limit of the assay 250 copies ml−1) and genotypic drug resistance tests and dried plasma spots were used for concentration measurements. Results Three hundred and seven patients [201 female (88.6%), 14 children (4.5%)] were enrolled. HIV-1 viral load was <250, 250–1000 and >1000 copies ml−1 in 250 (81.7%), 33 (10.8%) and 23 patients (7.5%). Eleven samples out of 23 were successfully amplified revealing nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistance associated mutations [in seven (58.3%) and six patients (50%)]. Nevirapine trough concentrations were <3000 ng ml−1 in 28/189 patients (14.8%) and efavirenz 12 h concentrations were <1000 ng ml−1 in 2/16 patients (12.5%). Children and patients with nevirapine exposure <3000 ng ml−1 presented a higher risk of viral replication. Conclusions Viral loads <250 copies ml−1 were observed in 81.7% of patients (83.6% adults and 42.9% children). Children and patients with low nevirapine concentrations had higher risk of viral replication. Dried blood and plasma spots may be useful for monitoring HIV-positive patients including viral load and drug level measurement as part of treatment management in remote areas. PMID:25377591

  13. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  14. [Direct proteomic profiling of human urine and blood serum in an experiment with 5-day dry immersion].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Changes in proteome of urine and blood serum obtained from 14 healthy humans (age 21-29 yrs) medically certified for an experiment with dry immersion were analyzed. Urine and serum samples were pre-fractionated and enriched with magnetic particles MB-WCX and MB-HIC, respectively, on robot ClinProt (Bruker Daltonics) for direct mass-spectrometry profiling by MALDI-TOF. As a result, 143 protein peaks on the average were identified in urine samples. It was shown that a high variation coefficient in 23.7% of protein peaks, i.e. double technical, points to the most plastic fraction of the urine proteome. In blood serum, 175 peaks were identified in a sample on the average. Comparison of baseline and immersion mass-spectra of the blood proteome revealed significant differences. Increased peak areas of several protein fragments--C3 and C4 fragments of complement system, high-molecular kininogen and fibrinogen--can be ascribed to human body adaptation to the experimental conditions.

  15. Field Evaluation of Dried Blood Spots for Routine HIV-1 Viral Load and Drug Resistance Monitoring in Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Monleau, Marjorie; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Dagnra, Anoumou; Kania, Dramane; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Touré-Kane, Coumba; Truong, Lien X. T.; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Delaporte, Eric; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) can be used in developing countries to alleviate the logistic constraints of using blood plasma specimens for viral load (VL) and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing, but they should be assessed under field conditions. Between 2009 and 2011, we collected paired plasma-DBS samples from treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected adults in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Togo, Thailand, and Vietnam. The DBS were stored at an ambient temperature for 2 to 4 weeks and subsequently at −20°C before testing. VL testing was performed on the plasma samples and DBS using locally available methods: the Abbott m2000rt HIV-1 test, generic G2 real-time PCR, or the NucliSENS EasyQ version 1.2 test. In the case of virological failure (VF), i.e., a plasma VL of ≥1,000 copies/ml, HIVDR genotyping was performed on paired plasma-DBS samples. Overall, we compared 382 plasma-DBS sample pairs for DBS VL testing accuracy. The sensitivities of the different assays in different laboratories for detecting VF using DBS varied from 75% to 100% for the m2000rt test in labs B, C, and D, 91% to 93% for generic G2 real-time PCR in labs A and F, and 85% for the NucliSENS test in lab E. The specificities varied from 82% to 97% for the m2000rt and NucliSENS tests and reached only 60% for the generic G2 test. The NucliSENS test showed good agreement between plasma and DBS VL but underestimated the DBS VL. The lowest agreement was observed for the generic G2 test. Genotyping was successful for 96/124 (77%) DBS tested, and 75/96 (78%) plasma-DBS pairs had identical HIVDR mutations. Significant discrepancies in resistance interpretations were observed in 9 cases, 6 of which were from the same laboratory. DBS can be successfully used as an alternative to blood plasma samples for routine VL and HIVDR monitoring in African and Asian settings. However, the selection of an adequate VL measurement method and the definition of the VF threshold should be considered, and laboratory

  16. Field evaluation of dried blood spots for routine HIV-1 viral load and drug resistance monitoring in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Africa and Asia.

    PubMed

    Monleau, Marjorie; Aghokeng, Avelin F; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Dagnra, Anoumou; Kania, Dramane; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Touré-Kane, Coumba; Truong, Lien X T; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Delaporte, Eric; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine

    2014-02-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) can be used in developing countries to alleviate the logistic constraints of using blood plasma specimens for viral load (VL) and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing, but they should be assessed under field conditions. Between 2009 and 2011, we collected paired plasma-DBS samples from treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected adults in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Togo, Thailand, and Vietnam. The DBS were stored at an ambient temperature for 2 to 4 weeks and subsequently at -20°C before testing. VL testing was performed on the plasma samples and DBS using locally available methods: the Abbott m2000rt HIV-1 test, generic G2 real-time PCR, or the NucliSENS EasyQ version 1.2 test. In the case of virological failure (VF), i.e., a plasma VL of ≥1,000 copies/ml, HIVDR genotyping was performed on paired plasma-DBS samples. Overall, we compared 382 plasma-DBS sample pairs for DBS VL testing accuracy. The sensitivities of the different assays in different laboratories for detecting VF using DBS varied from 75% to 100% for the m2000rt test in labs B, C, and D, 91% to 93% for generic G2 real-time PCR in labs A and F, and 85% for the NucliSENS test in lab E. The specificities varied from 82% to 97% for the m2000rt and NucliSENS tests and reached only 60% for the generic G2 test. The NucliSENS test showed good agreement between plasma and DBS VL but underestimated the DBS VL. The lowest agreement was observed for the generic G2 test. Genotyping was successful for 96/124 (77%) DBS tested, and 75/96 (78%) plasma-DBS pairs had identical HIVDR mutations. Significant discrepancies in resistance interpretations were observed in 9 cases, 6 of which were from the same laboratory. DBS can be successfully used as an alternative to blood plasma samples for routine VL and HIVDR monitoring in African and Asian settings. However, the selection of an adequate VL measurement method and the definition of the VF threshold should be considered, and laboratory performance

  17. Identification and quantification of psychoactive drugs in whole blood using dried blood spot (DBS) by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kyriakou, Chrystalla; Marchei, Emilia; Scaravelli, Giulia; García-Algar, Oscar; Supervía, August; Graziano, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    A procedure based on ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been developed for the determination of twenty three psychoactive drugs and metabolites in whole blood using dried blood spot (DBS). Chromatographic separation was achieved at ambient temperature using a reverse-phase column and a linear gradient elution with two solvents: 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile and 5mM ammonium formate at pH 3. The mass spectrometer was operated in positive ion mode, using multiple reaction monitoring via positive electro-spray ionization. The method was linear from the limit of quantification (5ng/ml for all the analytes apart from 15ng/ml for Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and metabolites) to 500ng/ml, and showed good correlation coefficients (r(2)=0.990) for all substances. Analytical recovery of analytes under investigation was always higher than 75% and intra-assay and inter-assay precision and accuracy always better than 15%. Using the validated method, ten DBS samples, collected at the hospital emergency department in cases of acute drug intoxication, were found positive to one or more psychoactive drugs. Our data support the potential of DBS sampling for non invasive monitoring of exposure/intoxication to psychoactive drugs. PMID:27232151

  18. Quantitation of sulfur-containing amino acids, homocysteine, methionine and cysteine in dried blood spot from newborn baby by HPLC-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Wada, Mitsuhiro; Kuroki, Mana; Minami, Yuu; Ikeda, Rie; Sekitani, Yui; Takamura, Noboru; Kawakami, Shigeru; Kuroda, Naotaka; Nakashima, Kenichiro

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids (SAAs), homocysteine (Hcy), methionine (Met) and cysteine (Cys) in blood are related to homocystinuria, an inborn error of metabolism. In this study, an assay method with HPLC-fluorescence detection to quantify the SAAs in a dried blood spot was established and applied to samples from newborn babies (n=200). Sample pretreatment involving reduction, derivatization with 4-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-7-fluoro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole, and liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate gave the separation of the derivatives with retention times within 12 min. The method was enough sensitive to determine the SAAs in a dried blood spot with 0.04-0.14 µm as the limit of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. However, the absolute recoveries were very low (5.7% for Hcy, 4.6% for Cys) except for Met (105.4%) owing to inefficient recovery of Hcy and Cys from the blood matrix. Other validation parameters such as accuracy (93.5-106.2%) and intra- (≤ 9.0%) and inter-day precisions (≤ 8.7%) were acceptable. The reliability of a dried blood spot as an analytical sample was estimated. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied to dried blood spots prepared from newborn babies.

  19. Rapid and simple LC-MS/MS screening of 64 novel psychoactive substances using dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Ambach, Lars; Hernández Redondo, Ana; König, Stefan; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    The range of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) including phenethylamines, cathinones, piperazines, tryptamines, etc. is continuously growing. Therefore, fast and reliable screening methods for these compounds are essential and needed. The use of dried blood spots (DBS) for a fast straightforward approach helps to simplify and shorten sample preparation significantly. DBS were produced from 10 µl of whole blood and extracted offline with 500 µl methanol followed by evaporation and reconstitution in mobile phase. Reversed-phase chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric detection (RP-LC-MS/MS) was achieved within a run time of 10 min. The screening method was validated by evaluating the following parameters: limit of detection (LOD), matrix effect, selectivity and specificity, extraction efficiency, and short-term and long-term stability. Furthermore, the method was applied to authentic samples and results were compared with those obtained with a validated whole blood method used for routine analysis of NPS. LOD was between 1 and 10 ng/ml. No interference from matrix compounds was observed. The method was proven to be specific and selective for the analytes, although with limitations for 3-FMC/flephedrone and MDDMA/MDEA. Mean extraction efficiency was 84.6 %. All substances were stable in DBS for at least a week when cooled. Cooling was essential for the stability of cathinones. Prepared samples were stable for at least 3 days. Comparison to the validated whole blood method yielded similar results. DBS were shown to be useful in developing a rapid screening method for NPS with simplified sample preparation.

  20. Fast Transmethylation of Total Lipids in Dried Blood by Microwave Irradiation and its Application to a Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu Hong; Hanson, Jennifer A.; Strandjord, Sarah E.; Salem, Nicholas M.; Dretsch, Michael N.; Haub, Mark D.; Hibbeln, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    A methodology combining finger-pricked blood sampling, microwave accelerated fatty acid assay, fast gas chromatography data acquisition, and automated data processing was developed, evaluated and applied to a population study. Finger-pricked blood was collected on filter paper previously impregnated with 0.05 mg of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene and air-dried at room temperature. Transmethylation was accelerated by microwave irradiation in an explosion-proof multimode microwave reaction system. The chemical procedure was based on a one-step direct transmethylation procedure catalyzed by acetyl chloride. The short-term stability of PUFA in blood dried on filter paper and stored overnight at room temperature was examined using venous blood. The recoveries ranged from 97–101 % for the categorized fatty acids as well as the ratios of n-6 to n-3 PUFA and the n-3% highly unsaturated fatty acid. Specifically, recoveries were 99, 98, 97, and 97 % for linoleic acid (18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (ARA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), respectively. The mol% (mean ± SD, 95% confidence interval) of fatty acid composition in subjects from the population study was determined as 36.2±3.8 (35.8, 36.7), 23.2±3.0 (22.8, 23.5), 36.8±3.5 (36.4, 37.2) and 3.79±1.0 (3.68, 3.91) for the saturated, monounsaturated, n-6 and n-3 PUFA, respectively. Individually, the mean mol% (95% CI) was 22.6 (22.3, 22.9) for 18:2n-6, 9.5 (9.3, 9.7) for ARA, 0.51 (0.49, 0.53) for ALA, 0.42 (0.38, 0.47) for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and 1.67 (1.61, 1.73) for DHA. This methodology provides an accelerated yet high-efficiency, chemically safe, and temperature-controlled transmethylation, with diverse laboratory applications including population studies. PMID:24986160

  1. Influence of Relative Humidity on the Spreading Dynamics of a Drying Drop of Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou Zeid, Wassim; Brutin, David

    2013-11-01

    Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids start spreading after coming into contact with a solid substrate till the anchoring of the triple line. Our experimental work aims to study the effect of the relative humidity on the spreading dynamics of drops of whole blood. Drops of blood of same volume (+/-4.8%) are injected using a digital micropipette and gently deposited onto microscope ultraclean glass substrates. Experiments are conducted in a glove box at ambient temperature and a range of investigated relative humidities between 13.0% and 80.0%. The recorded images are post-processed using ImageJ in which the position of the contact line is measured every 20 ms. We show that the spreading dynamics is, in a first time, governed by relative humidity and later no more influence by relative humidity. Two spreading regimes are observed and analyzed compared to classical viscous drops. In previous work, we show that relative humidity influences the contact angle and the initial wetting radius. In the first regime, we find a spreading power law exponent that decreases for an increasing relative humidity. In the second regime, all the data collapse on each other and the evolution of the dimensionless radius no more depend on relative humidity.

  2. Mass spectrometric studies on the in vivo metabolism and excretion of SIRT1 activating drugs in rat urine, dried blood spots, and plasma samples for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Höppner, Sebastian; Delahaut, Philippe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The NAD(+) depending enzyme SIRT1 regulates the mitochondrial biogenesis, fat and glucose metabolism through catalyzing the deacetylation of several metabolism-related protein-substrates. Recently, synthetic activators of SIRT1 referred to as STACs (Sirtuin activating compounds, e.g. SRT2104) were identified and tested in clinical studies for the treatment of aging-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's and obesity. Although the mechanism of SIRT1 activation by small molecules has caused considerable controversy, STACs demonstrated a significant performance enhancement in mice experiments including an improvement of endurance, muscle strength, and locomotor behavior. Due to their potential to increase exercise tolerance in healthy individuals, SIRT1 activators are currently being monitored by anti-doping authorities. In the present study, the in vivo metabolic clearance of three SIRT1 activators was investigated in rats by the collection of urine, DBS (dried blood spots) and plasma samples following a single oral administration. The resulting metabolic products were studied by positive electrospray ionization - (tandem) mass spectrometry and confirmed by the comparison with in vitro generated metabolites using human and rat liver microsomal preparations. Subsequently, a screening procedure for five SIRT1 activators and the metabolite M1-SRT1720 in DBS specimens was developed. Liquid-liquid-extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was employed based on diagnostic ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode and two deuterated internal standards namely d8-SRT1720 and d8-M1-SRT1720 were utilized. The doping control assay was characterized with regard to specificity, limit of detection (10-50ng/ml), recovery (65-83%) and imprecision (7-20%) and ion suppression/enhancement effects (<10%), demonstrating its fitness-for-purpose for sports drug testing applications.

  3. Development and application of a broadly sensitive dried-blood-spot-based genotyping assay for global surveillance of HIV-1 drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfu; McNulty, Amanda; Diallo, Karidia; Zhang, Jing; Titanji, Boghuma; Kassim, Sidibe; Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Aberle-Grasse, John; Kibuka, Tabitha; Ndumbe, Peter M; Vedapuri, Shanmugam; Zhou, Zhiyong; Chilima, Benson; Nkengasong, John N

    2010-09-01

    As antiretroviral therapy (ART) is scaled up in resource-limited countries, surveillance for HIV drug resistance (DR) is vital to ensure sustained effectiveness of first-line ART. We have developed and applied a broadly sensitive dried-blood-spot (DBS)-based genotyping assay for surveillance of HIV-1 DR in international settings. In 2005 and 2006, 171 DBS samples were collected under field conditions from newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected individuals from Malawi (n = 58), Tanzania (n = 60), and China (n =53). In addition, 30 DBS and 40 plasma specimens collected from ART patients in China and Cameroon, respectively, were also tested. Of the 171 DBS analyzed at the protease and RT regions, 149 (87.1%) could be genotyped, including 49 (81.7%) from Tanzania, 47 (88.7%) from China, and 53 (91.4%) from Malawi. Among the 70 ART patient samples analyzed, 100% (30/30) of the Chinese DBS and 90% (36/40) of the Cameroonian plasma specimens were genotyped, including 8 samples with a viral load of <400 copies/ml. The results of phylogenetic analyses indicated that the subtype, circulating recombinant form (CRF), and unique recombinant form (URF) distribution was as follows: 73 strains were subtype C (34%), 37 were subtype B (17.2%), 24 each were CRF01_AE or CRF02_AG (11.2% each), 22 were subtype A1 (10.2%), and 9 were unclassifiable (UC) (4.2%). The remaining samples were minor strains comprised of 6 that were CRF07_BC (2.8%), 5 that were CRF10_CD (2.3%), 3 each that were URF_A1C and CRF08_BC (1.4%), 2 each that were G, URF_BC, and URF_D/UC (0.9%), and 1 each that were subtype F1, subtype F2, and URF_A1D (0.5%). Our results indicate that this broadly sensitive genotyping assay can be used to genotype DBS collected from areas with diverse HIV-1 group M subtypes and CRFs. Thus, the assay is likely to become a useful screening tool in the global resistance surveillance and monitoring of HIV-1 where multiple subtypes and CRFs are found.

  4. Dry Electrodes for ECG and Pulse Transit Time for Blood Pressure: A Wearable Sensor and Smartphone Communication Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyamkumar, Prashanth

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) have been a major cause for deaths in both men and women in United States. Cerebrovascular Diseases like Strokes are known to have origins in CVDs as well. Moreover, nearly 18 Million Americans have a history of myocardial infarction and are currently undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. Consequently, CVDs are the highest costing disease groups and cost more than all types of cancer combined. However, significant cost reduction is possible through the effective use of the vast advances in embedded and pervasive electronic devices for healthcare. These devices can automate and move a significant portion of disease management to the patient's home through cyber connectivity, a concept known as point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and healthcare services. POC can minimize hospital visits and potentially avoid admission altogether with prognostic tools that give advanced notice of any abnormalities or chronic illnesses so that the treatment can be planned in advance. The POC concept requires continuous remote health monitoring. Therefore, the various sensors needed for comprehensive monitoring need to be worn daily and throughout the day. Moreover, true "roaming" capability is necessary so that it does not restrict the user's travel or his/her quotidian activities. Two biomedical signals namely, Electrocardiogram (ECG) and Blood Pressure are important diagnostic tests in assessing the cardiac health of a person. To that end, the research presented in this thesis: First , describes the development of a remote monitoring solution based on Bluetooth(TM), smartphones and cyber infrastructure for cardiac care called e-nanoflex. Second, Sensors for ECG that are compatible with everyday life style namely, (a) dry, gel-less vertically aligned gold nanowire electrodes, (b) dry textile-based conductive sensor electrodes to address the need for this technology to monitor cardiovascular diseases in women are tested with e-nanoflex and discussed. Third, non

  5. Clinical Evaluation of an Affordable Qualitative Viral Failure Assay for HIV Using Dried Blood Spots in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Balinda, Sheila N.; Ondoa, Pascale; Obuku, Ekwaro A.; Kliphuis, Aletta; Egau, Isaac; Bronze, Michelle; Kasambula, Lordwin; Schuurman, Rob; Spieker, Nicole; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Kityo, Cissy

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO recommends regular viral load (VL) monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for timely detection of virological failure, prevention of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and avoiding unnecessary switching to second-line ART. However, the cost and complexity of routine VL testing remains prohibitive in most resource limited settings (RLS). We evaluated a simple, low–cost, qualitative viral–failure assay (VFA) on dried blood spots (DBS) in three clinical settings in Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross–sectional diagnostic accuracy study in three HIV/AIDS treatment centres at the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda. The VFA employs semi-quantitative detection of HIV–1 RNA amplified from the LTR gene. We used paired dry blood spot (DBS) and plasma with the COBASAmpliPrep/COBASTaqMan, Roche version 2 (VLref) as the reference assay. We used the VFA at two thresholds of viral load, (>5,000 or >1,000 copies/ml). Results 496 paired VFA and VLref results were available for comparative analysis. Overall, VFA demonstrated 78.4% sensitivity, (95% CI: 69.7%–87.1%), 93% specificity (95% CI: 89.7%–96.4%), 89.3% accuracy (95% CI: 85%–92%) and an agreement kappa = 0.72 as compared to the VLref. The predictive values of positivity and negativity among patients on ART for >12 months were 72.7% and 99.3%, respectively. Conclusions VFA allowed 89% of correct classification of VF. Only 11% of the patients were misclassified with the potential of unnecessary or late switch to second–line ART. Our findings present an opportunity to roll out simple and affordable VL monitoring for HIV–1 treatment in RLS. PMID:26824465

  6. Dried venous blood samples for the detection and quantification of measles IgG using a commercial enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Michaela A.; Byrnes, Graham B.; Leydon, Jennie A.; Kelly, Heath A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether samples of dried venous blood (DVB) were an acceptable alternative to serum for detecting measles-specific IgG in a commercial enzyme immunoassay. METHODS: Paired samples of serum and DVB were collected from 98 suspected cases of measles and 1153 schoolchildren in Victoria, Australia. All samples were tested using the Dade Behring Enzygnost Anti-Measles-Virus/IgG immunoassay. DVB samples were eluted using either the sample buffer provided with the kit or 5% dry milk powder in phosphate-buffered saline-Tween 20. FINDINGS: DVB samples eluted by sample buffer showed significantly better linear correlation to the serum samples than did DVB samples eluted in 5% dry milk in phosphate-buffered saline-Tween 20. To improve the comparability of serum and DVB samples an adjustment factor of 1.28 was applied to the optical density (OD) values of DVB. This adjustment also enabled quantification of the titre of measles IgG in mIU/ml directly from the OD value using the alpha calculation as specified by the kit protocol. For DVB samples stored for less than six months at 4 degrees C, the assay showed an overall sensitivity of 98.4% and a specificity of 97.2% compared with the results of serum testing. CONCLUSION: These results illustrate the potential for DVB samples to be widely used with the Dade Behring enzyme immunoassay system for determining the immunity of the individual and the population to the measles virus. PMID:14758429

  7. Are higher blood mercury levels associated with dry eye symptoms in adult Koreans? A population-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, So-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate whether blood mercury concentrations associated with the presence of dry eye symptoms in a nationally representative Korean population. Methods Population-based prospective cross-sectional study using the heavy metal data set of the 2010–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). A total of 4761 adult Koreans were the eligible population in this study. Of the 7162 survey participants, 2401 were excluded because they were <19 years of age, there were missing data in the heavy metal data set, or they had diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, asthma, depression and/or under-the-eye surgery. Blood mercury levels were measured on the day the participants completed a questionnaire regarding the presence of dry eye symptoms (persistent dryness or eye irritation). The population was divided into low and high groups by median level (4.26 and 2.89 µg/L for males and females, respectively). Results Self-reported dry eye symptoms were present in 13.0% of the cohort. Participants with dry eye symptoms were significantly more likely to have blood mercury levels exceeding the median than those without dry eye symptoms (45.7% vs 51.7%, p=0.021). Logistic regression analysis showed that, after adjusting for age, gender, education, total household income, smoking status, heavy alcohol use, sleep time, perceived stress status, total cholesterol levels and atopy history, dry eye symptoms were significantly associated with blood mercury levels that exceeded the median (reference: lower mercury group; OR, 1.324; 95% CI 1.059 to 1.655; p<0.05). Conclusions High blood mercury levels were associated with dry eye symptoms in a nationally representative Korean population. PMID:27121705

  8. Enhanced Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Bacteremia Using Antigen- and Molecular-Based Tools on Blood Specimens in Mali and Thailand: A Prospective Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Moïsi, Jennifer C.; Moore, Matthew; da Gloria Carvalho, Maria; Sow, Samba O.; Siludjai, Duangkamon; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Tapia, Milagritos; Baggett, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    Prior antibiotic use, contamination, limited blood volume, and processing delays reduce yield of blood cultures for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We performed immunochromatographic testing (ICT) on broth from incubated blood culture bottles and real-time lytA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on broth and whole blood and compared findings to blood culture in patients with suspected bacteremia. We selected 383 patients in Mali and 586 patients in Thailand based on their blood culture results: 75 and 31 were positive for pneumococcus, 100 and 162 were positive for other pathogens, and 208 and 403 were blood culture negative, respectively. ICT and PCR of blood culture broth were at least 87% sensitive and 97% specific compared with blood culture; whole blood PCR was 75–88% sensitive and 96–100% specific. Pneumococcal yields in children < 5 years of age increased from 2.9% to 10.7% in Mali with > 99% of additional cases detected by whole blood PCR, and from 0.07% to 5.1% in Thailand with two-thirds of additional cases identified by ICT. Compared with blood culture, ICT and lytA PCR on cultured broth were highly sensitive and specific but their ability to improve pneumococcal identification varied by site. Further studies of these tools are needed before widespread implementation. PMID:26643535

  9. Enhanced Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Bacteremia Using Antigen- and Molecular-Based Tools on Blood Specimens in Mali and Thailand: A Prospective Surveillance Study.

    PubMed

    Moïsi, Jennifer C; Moore, Matthew; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria; Sow, Samba O; Siludjai, Duangkamon; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Tapia, Milagritos; Baggett, Henry C

    2016-02-01

    Prior antibiotic use, contamination, limited blood volume, and processing delays reduce yield of blood cultures for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We performed immunochromatographic testing (ICT) on broth from incubated blood culture bottles and real-time lytA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on broth and whole blood and compared findings to blood culture in patients with suspected bacteremia. We selected 383 patients in Mali and 586 patients in Thailand based on their blood culture results: 75 and 31 were positive for pneumococcus, 100 and 162 were positive for other pathogens, and 208 and 403 were blood culture negative, respectively. ICT and PCR of blood culture broth were at least 87% sensitive and 97% specific compared with blood culture; whole blood PCR was 75-88% sensitive and 96-100% specific. Pneumococcal yields in children < 5 years of age increased from 2.9% to 10.7% in Mali with > 99% of additional cases detected by whole blood PCR, and from 0.07% to 5.1% in Thailand with two-thirds of additional cases identified by ICT. Compared with blood culture, ICT and lytA PCR on cultured broth were highly sensitive and specific but their ability to improve pneumococcal identification varied by site. Further studies of these tools are needed before widespread implementation.

  10. Comparison of fresh, dried and stir-frying gingers in decoction with blood stasis syndrome in rats based on a GC-TOF/MS metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Han, YanQuan; Li, YuXin; Wang, YongZhong; Gao, JiaRong; Xia, LunZhu; Hong, Yan

    2016-09-10

    In China, ginger (Zingiberofficinale Rosc.) and its processed products, such as dried ginger and stir-frying ginger are commonly applied in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The paper presents the research on the effects of fresh ginger, dried ginger and stir-frying ginger extracts in blood stasis syndrome. First, a blood stasis syndrome rats model was established and then the hemorheological and blood coagulation activities were analyzed. Third, a sensitive, simple, and valid gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) method was established to compare the metabolic fingerprint coupled with multivariate analysis. The total 27 metabolites (16 in serum and 11 in urine) were identified and contributed to the blood stasis progress. These metabolites mainly involve six metabolism pathways in different impact-value. The altered efficacy index and metabolites can be regulated to normal levels by fresh ginger (FG), dried ginger (DG) and stir-frying ginger (SG). FG is the most effective as shown by the efficacy index, similarity analysis and peak intensity. The result presented here shows that metabolomics equipped with efficacy index makes it possible to study the blood stasis syndrome and to compare the effect and metabolites in fresh, dried and stir-frying gingers. The metabolomics approach can be recommended to study the pharmacological effect and mechanism of herbal drugs. PMID:27454085

  11. Dried Blood as an Alternative to Plasma or Serum for Trypanosoma cruzi IgG Detection in Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    Holguín, Africa; Norman, Francesca; Martín, Leticia; Mateos, María Luisa; Chacón, Jesús; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi serological screening is recommended for people potentially exposed to this parasite in countries where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic and those where it is not endemic. Blood samples on filter paper may be a practical alternative to plasma/serum for antibody detection. Using the Architect Chagas assay, we detected the presence of IgG against T. cruzi in matched serum and dried blood spots (DBS) collected from 147 patients residing in Madrid, Spain, who had potential previous exposure to T. cruzi. The κ statistic for the DBS/serum proportion of agreement for the detection of antibodies against T. cruzi was 0.803, considering an S/CO (assay result unit; chemiluminescent signal from the sample [S] divided by the mean chemiluminescent signal for the three calibrators used in the test [CO]) cutoff value of ≥1.00. The relative sensitivity of the Architect test using DBS increased from 95.2% to 98.8% when the cutoff was lowered from ≥1.00 to ≥0.88, while the relative specificity decreased from 84.1% to 71.6%. Overall, the median S/CO values for DBS were significantly lower than those for serum (2.6 versus 6.5; P < 0.001). Discrepancies that occurred with the use of DBS included 10 false positives (with low S/CO values in 9 cases [median, 2.13]) and 4 false negatives, with mean S/CO values of 0.905 (gray zone). Using DBS plus a highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) may be a simple and reliable method for detecting IgG against T. cruzi when blood sampling by venipuncture is not feasible. This method may also reduce the false-negative rates observed with some rapid diagnostic tests. The lower relative sensitivity compared to the reference method may be increased by lowering the optical density threshold. PMID:23740927

  12. Validation and Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Method To Measure Miltefosine in Leishmaniasis Patients Using Dried Blood Spot Sample Collection

    PubMed Central

    Rosing, H.; Hillebrand, M. J. X.; Blesson, S.; Mengesha, B.; Diro, E.; Hailu, A.; Schellens, J. H. M.; Beijnen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate future pharmacokinetic studies of combination treatments against leishmaniasis in remote regions in which the disease is endemic, a simple cheap sampling method is required for miltefosine quantification. The aims of this study were to validate a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify miltefosine in dried blood spot (DBS) samples and to validate its use with Ethiopian patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Since hematocrit (Ht) levels are typically severely decreased in VL patients, returning to normal during treatment, the method was evaluated over a range of clinically relevant Ht values. Miltefosine was extracted from DBS samples using a simple method of pretreatment with methanol, resulting in >97% recovery. The method was validated over a calibration range of 10 to 2,000 ng/ml, and accuracy and precision were within ±11.2% and ≤7.0% (≤19.1% at the lower limit of quantification), respectively. The method was accurate and precise for blood spot volumes between 10 and 30 μl and for Ht levels of 20 to 35%, although a linear effect of Ht levels on miltefosine quantification was observed in the bioanalytical validation. DBS samples were stable for at least 162 days at 37°C. Clinical validation of the method using paired DBS and plasma samples from 16 VL patients showed a median observed DBS/plasma miltefosine concentration ratio of 0.99, with good correlation (Pearson's r = 0.946). Correcting for patient-specific Ht levels did not further improve the concordance between the sampling methods. This successfully validated method to quantify miltefosine in DBS samples was demonstrated to be a valid and practical alternative to venous blood sampling that can be applied in future miltefosine pharmacokinetic studies with leishmaniasis patients, without Ht correction. PMID:26787691

  13. Dry-Weight: A Concept Revisited in an Effort to Avoid Medication-Directed Approaches for Blood Pressure Control in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Achieving and maintaining dry-weight appears to be an effective but forgotten strategy in controlling and maintaining normotension among hypertensive patients on hemodialysis. Methods: Qualitative review of literature to define dry-weight and its utility in achieving blood pressure control. Results: The concept of dry-weight has evolved over time and its definition has changed. One such definition defines dry-weight as the lowest tolerated postdialysis weight achieved via gradual change in postdialysis weight at which there are minimal signs or symptoms of hypovolemia or hypervolemia. Although clinical examination does not perform well in detecting latent increase in dry-weight, several technologies such as relative plasma volume monitoring and body impedance analysis are emerging that may help in assessing dry-weight in the future. Sodium restriction is a modifiable risk factor that can lead to better blood pressure (BP) control. However, dietary sodium restriction requires lifestyle modifications that are difficult to implement and even harder to sustain over the long term. Restricting dialysate sodium is a simpler but underexplored strategy that can reduce thirst, limit interdialytic weight gain, and assist the achievement of dry-weight. Achievement of dry-weight can improve interdialytic BP, reduce pulse pressure, and limit hospitalizations. Conclusions: Avoiding medication-directed control of BP may enhance the opportunity to probe dry-weight, facilitate removal of volume, and limit the risk for pressure-volume overload, which may be a significant concern leading to myocardial remodeling in the hemodialysis patient. Probing dry-weight among patients with ESRD has the potential to improve dismal cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:20507951

  14. Estimation of HIV-1 DNA Level Interfering with Reliability of HIV-1 RNA Quantification Performed on Dried Blood Spots Collected from Successfully Treated Patients.

    PubMed

    Zida, Sylvie; Tuaillon, Edouard; Barro, Makoura; Kwimatouo Lekpa Franchard, Arnaud; Kagoné, Thérèse; Nacro, Boubacar; Ouedraogo, Abdoul Salam; Bolloré, Karine; Sanosyan, Armen; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Meda, Nicolas; Sangaré, Lassana; Rouzioux, Christine; Rouet, François; Kania, Dramane

    2016-06-01

    The impact of HIV-1 DNA coamplification during HIV-1 RNA quantification on dried blood spots (DBS) was explored. False-positive HIV RNA detection (22/62, 35%) was associated with high HIV-1 DNA levels. Specificity of HIV-1 RNA assays on DBS should be evaluated following manufacturer protocols on samples with HIV-1 DNA levels of ≥1,000 copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:27008874

  15. Disparate detection outcomes for anti-HCV IgG and HCV RNA in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Strop, Alexandra; Drobeniuc, Jan; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Forbi, Joseph C; Le, Ngoc-Thao; Li, Lixia; Mei, Joanne; Terrault, Norah; Kamili, Saleem

    2015-02-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) expedite the collection, storage and shipping of blood samples, thereby facilitating large-scale serologic studies. We evaluated the sensitivity of anti-HCV IgG testing and HCV-RNA quantitation using freshly prepared and stored DBS derived from HCV-infected patients. Protocols for elution were optimized using DBS prepared from plasma of 52 HCV-infected persons and 51 uninfected persons (control DBS), then applied to DBS from 33 chronic hepatitis C patients that had been stored at -20°C for 5 years (stored DBS). Control and stored DBS, and their corresponding plasma, were processed for anti-HCV IgG testing using the VITROS chemiluminescence assay (CIA) and the HCV 3.0 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics), and for HCV RNA quantitation by quantitative (q) RT-PCR. HCV genotyping was conducted by nucleotide sequencing. The sensitivity of CIA and EIA in control DBS was 92% and 90%, respectively, compared to 100% and 97%, respectively, in stored DBS. The sensitivity of HCV RNA detection was 88% in control DBS, compared to 36% in stored DBS. Specificity was 100% for all the assays in both control and stored DBS. Genotypes 1, 2 and 3 were detected in 16 (62%), 6 (23.1%), and 4 (15.3%) samples, respectively. Sequences generated from DBS and their corresponding plasma samples were identical. Whereas the sensitivity of anti-HCV IgG detection in stored DBS was equivalent to that in recently prepared DBS, the sensitivity of HCV RNA detection was markedly lower in stored DBS compared to recently prepared DBS. Stored DBS may be reliably used for anti-HCV detection but for HCV-RNA-based testing freshly prepared DBS is preferable to stored DBS.

  16. Development and validation of a dried blood spot-LC-APCI-MS assay for estimation of canrenone in paediatric samples.

    PubMed

    Suyagh, Maysa Faisal; Kole, Prashant Laxman; Millership, Jeff; Collier, Paul; Halliday, Henry; McElnay, James C

    2010-03-15

    A selective and sensitive liquid chromatography (LC)-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI)-mass spectroscopic (MS) assay of canrenone has been developed and validated employing Dried Blood Spots (DBS) as the sample collection medium. DBS samples were prepared by applying 30 microl of spiked whole blood onto Guthrie cards. A 6mm disc was punched from the each DBS and extracted with 2 ml of methanolic solution of 17alpha-methyltestosterone (Internal Standard). The methanolic extract was evaporated to dryness and reconstituted in acetonitrile:water (1:9, v/v). The reconstituted solution was further subjected to solid phase extraction using HLB cartridges. Chromatographic separation was achieved using Waters Sunfire C18 reversed-phase column using isocratic elution, followed by a high organic wash to clear late eluting/highly retained components. The mobile phase consisted of methanol:water (60:40, v/v) pumped at a flow rate of 0.3 ml/min. LC-APCI-MS detection was performed in the selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode using target ions at m/z 341.1 and 303.3 for canrenone and internal standard respectively. The selectivity of the method was established by analysing DBS samples from 6 different sources (individuals). The calibration curve for canrenone was found to be linear over 25-1000 ng/ml (r>0.994). Accuracy (% RE) and precision (% CV) values for within and between day were <20% at the lower limit of quantification (LLQC) and <15% at all other concentrations tested. The LLOQ of the method was validated at 25 ng/ml. Clinical validation of the method was achieved by employing the validated method for analysis of 160 DBS samples from 37 neonatal and paediatric patients. PMID:20153705

  17. Prediction of the hematocrit of dried blood spots via potassium measurement on a routine clinical chemistry analyzer.

    PubMed

    Capiau, Sara; Stove, Veronique V; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2013-01-01

    The potential of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling as an alternative for classical venous sampling is increasingly recognized, with multiple applications in, e.g., therapeutic drug monitoring and toxicology. Although DBS sampling has many advantages, it is associated with several issues, the hematocrit (Hct) issue being the most widely discussed challenge, given its possible strong impact on DBS-based quantitation. Hitherto, no approaches allow Hct prediction from nonvolumetrically applied DBS. Following a simple and rapid extraction protocol, K(+) levels from 3 mm DBS punches were measured via indirect potentiometry, using the Roche Cobas 8000 routine chemistry analyzer. The extracts' K(+) concentrations were used to calculate the approximate Hct of the blood used to generate DBS. A linear calibration line was established, with a Hct range of 0.19 to 0.63 (lower limit of quantification, LLOQ, to upper limit of quantification, ULOQ). The procedure was fully validated; the bias and imprecision of quality controls (QCs) at three Hct levels and at the LLOQ and ULOQ was less than 5 and 12%, respectively. In addition, the influence of storage (pre- and postextraction), volume spotted, and punch homogeneity was evaluated. Application on DBS from patient samples (n = 111), followed by Bland and Altman, Passing and Bablok, and Deming regression analysis, demonstrated a good correlation between the "predicted Hct" and the "actual Hct". After correcting for the observed bias, limits of agreement of ±0.049 were established. Incurred sample reanalysis demonstrated assay reproducibility. In conclusion, potassium levels in extracts from 3 mm DBS punches can be used to get a good prediction of the Hct, one of the most important "unknowns" in DBS analysis.

  18. Quantification of insulin-like growth factor-1 in dried blood spots for detection of growth hormone abuse in sport.

    PubMed

    Cox, Holly D; Rampton, Jessica; Eichner, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    There is significant evidence that athletes are using recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to enhance performance, and its use is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and professional sports leagues. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is the primary mediator of growth hormone action and is used as a biomarker for the detection of rhGH abuse. The current biomarker-based method requires collection and expedited shipment of venous blood which is costly and may decrease the number of tests performed. Measurement of GH biomarkers in dried blood spots (DBS) would considerably simplify sample collection and shipping methods to allow testing of a greater number of samples regardless of location. A method was developed to quantify intact IGF-1 protein in DBS by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A step-wise acid-acetonitrile extraction was optimized to achieve a sensitive assay with a lower limit of quantification of 50 ng/mL. IGF-1 remained stable at room temperature for up to 8 days, which would allow shipment of DBS cards at ambient temperature. In a comparison between plasma concentrations of IGF-1 and concentrations measured from venous and finger prick DBS, there was good correlation and agreement, r(2) of 0.8551 and accuracy of 86-113 % for venous DBS and r(2) of 0.9586 and accuracy of 89-122 % for finger prick DBS. The method is intended for use as a rapid screening method for IGF-1 to be used in the biomarker method of rhGH abuse detection.

  19. Short communication: Tenofovir diphosphate in dried blood spots as an objective measure of adherence in HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Searls, Kristina; Caraway, Patricia; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Gardner, Edward M; Predhomme, Julie; Bushman, Lane R; Anderson, Peter L; Meditz, Amie L

    2015-04-01

    Simple and reproducible tools to assess antiretroviral adherence are needed. A level of tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) in dried blood spots (DBS) <1,250 fmol/punch is predicted to identify imperfect adherence. Herein we evaluated TFV-DP in DBS as a measure of adherence among HIV-infected women. DBS and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected twice (∼1 week apart) in 35 well-controlled HIV-infected women [median age 42 years, 14 African American/black (AA)] receiving daily coformulated tenofovir/emtricitabine and either atazanavir/ritonavir (n=20) or raltegravir (n=16). TFV-DP in DBS and PBMCs was quantified by LC-MS/MS. Six-month adherence was measured as average days between monthly pharmacy refills. Data were loge transformed for analysis and presented as median (range); the correlation between continuous variables was analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The average TFV-DP between the two visits (aTFV-DP) in DBS and PBMCs was 1,874 (706-3,776) fmol/punch and 125 (1-278) fmol/10(6) cells, respectively. AA women had lower levels of aTFV-DP in DBS compared to whites (1,660 vs. 1,970 fmol/punch; p=0.04), with a viremic patient having the lowest drug levels (706 fmol/punch). Days between pharmacy refills were 34 (30-54) vs. 30 (26-40) in women with TFV-DP in DBS <1,250 vs. ≥1,250 fmol/punch (p=0.006). TFV-DP in DBS was negatively correlated with an increasing number of days between refills (r=-0.56, p=0.002). TFV-DP DBS was a reliable and objective measure of adherence in HIV-infected women based on a strong inverse relationship with pharmacy refill adherence.

  20. Short communication: Tenofovir diphosphate in dried blood spots as an objective measure of adherence in HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Searls, Kristina; Caraway, Patricia; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Gardner, Edward M; Predhomme, Julie; Bushman, Lane R; Anderson, Peter L; Meditz, Amie L

    2015-04-01

    Simple and reproducible tools to assess antiretroviral adherence are needed. A level of tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) in dried blood spots (DBS) <1,250 fmol/punch is predicted to identify imperfect adherence. Herein we evaluated TFV-DP in DBS as a measure of adherence among HIV-infected women. DBS and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected twice (∼1 week apart) in 35 well-controlled HIV-infected women [median age 42 years, 14 African American/black (AA)] receiving daily coformulated tenofovir/emtricitabine and either atazanavir/ritonavir (n=20) or raltegravir (n=16). TFV-DP in DBS and PBMCs was quantified by LC-MS/MS. Six-month adherence was measured as average days between monthly pharmacy refills. Data were loge transformed for analysis and presented as median (range); the correlation between continuous variables was analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The average TFV-DP between the two visits (aTFV-DP) in DBS and PBMCs was 1,874 (706-3,776) fmol/punch and 125 (1-278) fmol/10(6) cells, respectively. AA women had lower levels of aTFV-DP in DBS compared to whites (1,660 vs. 1,970 fmol/punch; p=0.04), with a viremic patient having the lowest drug levels (706 fmol/punch). Days between pharmacy refills were 34 (30-54) vs. 30 (26-40) in women with TFV-DP in DBS <1,250 vs. ≥1,250 fmol/punch (p=0.006). TFV-DP in DBS was negatively correlated with an increasing number of days between refills (r=-0.56, p=0.002). TFV-DP DBS was a reliable and objective measure of adherence in HIV-infected women based on a strong inverse relationship with pharmacy refill adherence. PMID:25328112

  1. THE STABILITY OF MARKERS IN DRIED-BLOOD SPOTS FOR RECOMMENDED NEWBORN SCREENING DISORDERS IN THE UNITED STATES

    PubMed Central

    Adam, BW; Hall, EM; Sternberg, M; Lim, TH; Flores, SR; O’Brien, S; Simms, D; Li, LX; De Jesus, VR; Hannon, WH

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to measure separately the contributions of heat and humidity to changes in levels of 34 markers of inborn disorders in dried-blood-spot (DBS) samples. Design and Methods Paired sets of DBSs were stored at 37°C for predetermined intervals in low-humidity and high-humidity environments. Marker levels of all samples in each complete sample set were measured in a single analytic run. Results During the 30±5 day study, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase and biotinidase lost almost 65% of initial activities in low-humidity storage; most of the degradation in 27 other markers was attributable to adverse effects of high humidity storage; seven markers in DBSs stored at high humidity lost more than 90% of initial levels by the end of the study and four of the seven lost more than 50% of initial levels within the first week of storage. Conclusions Minimizing both humidity and temperature in the DBS transportation and storage environments is essential to maintaining sample integrity. PMID:21963384

  2. Development and Application of Zirconia Coated Paper Substrate for High Sensitivity Analysis of Therapeutic Drugs in Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yajun; Wang, Qian; Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Bai, Zongquan; Han, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zhiping

    2016-07-19

    Paper spray mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be promising for direct analysis of therapeutic drugs in dried blood spots (DBS); however, the strong hydrogen bond and van de Waals interactions between paper substrate and analytes containing polar functional groups (e.g., therapeutic drugs) affect greatly the elution behavior and analysis sensitivity of compounds of interest during paper spray. Herein, we developed a one-sided ZrO2 coated paper substrate through a facile vacuum filtration approach using commercial ZrO2 particles as coating material and soluble starch as adhesive agent. Owing to the unique surface properties, as-prepared ZrO2 paper substrate has been shown to have excellent performance for analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS during paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to original cellulose paper substrates, improvements of 43-189-fold in lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) were obtained for the tested drugs using ZrO2 coated paper for paper spray. In comparing with the previously reported grade SG81 paper and one-sided silica coated paper, the LLOQs of the tested drugs with as-prepared ZrO2 paper decreased 1.5-16.5-fold relative to those from the above two, revealing that ZrO2 coated paper is a good candidate for paper spray in high sensitivity analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS.

  3. Development and Application of Zirconia Coated Paper Substrate for High Sensitivity Analysis of Therapeutic Drugs in Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yajun; Wang, Qian; Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Bai, Zongquan; Han, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Zhiping

    2016-07-19

    Paper spray mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be promising for direct analysis of therapeutic drugs in dried blood spots (DBS); however, the strong hydrogen bond and van de Waals interactions between paper substrate and analytes containing polar functional groups (e.g., therapeutic drugs) affect greatly the elution behavior and analysis sensitivity of compounds of interest during paper spray. Herein, we developed a one-sided ZrO2 coated paper substrate through a facile vacuum filtration approach using commercial ZrO2 particles as coating material and soluble starch as adhesive agent. Owing to the unique surface properties, as-prepared ZrO2 paper substrate has been shown to have excellent performance for analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS during paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to original cellulose paper substrates, improvements of 43-189-fold in lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) were obtained for the tested drugs using ZrO2 coated paper for paper spray. In comparing with the previously reported grade SG81 paper and one-sided silica coated paper, the LLOQs of the tested drugs with as-prepared ZrO2 paper decreased 1.5-16.5-fold relative to those from the above two, revealing that ZrO2 coated paper is a good candidate for paper spray in high sensitivity analysis of therapeutic drugs in DBS. PMID:27314839

  4. The Effect of Storage and Extraction Methods on Amplification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA from Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Alanna; Baidjoe, Amrish; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Bousema, Teun; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2015-05-01

    Extraction and amplification of DNA from dried blood spots (DBS) collected in field studies is commonly used for detection of Plasmodium falciparum. However, there have been few systematic efforts to determine the effects of storage and extraction methods on the sensitivity of DNA amplification. We investigated the effects of storage conditions, length of storage, and DNA extraction methods on amplification via three PCR-based assays using field samples and laboratory controls. Samples stored as DBS for 2 or more years at ambient temperature showed a significant loss of sensitivity that increased with time; after 10 years only 10% samples with parasite densities > 1,000 parasites/μL were detectable by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Conversely, DBS and extracted DNA stored at -20°C showed no loss of sensitivity with time. Samples with low parasite densities amplified more successfully with saponin/Chelex compared with spin-column-based extraction, though the latter method performed better on samples with higher parasite densities stored for 2 years at ambient temperature. DNA extracted via both methods was stable after 20 freeze-thaw cycles. Our results suggest that DBS should be stored at -20°C or extracted immediately, especially if anticipating 2 or more years of storage.

  5. Orotic acid quantification in dried blood spots and biological fluids by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    D'Apolito, Oceania; Garofalo, Daniela; Paglia, Giuseppe; Zuppaldi, Alfredo; Corso, Gaetano

    2010-03-01

    Orotic acid (ORA) is an intermediate metabolite in the pathway of pyrimidine nucleotides; its urinary excretion is useful to diagnose the hereditary orotic aciduria and some hyperammonemic inherited defects of urea cycle enzymes and amino acid transporters. ORA analysis is based on stable isotope dilution by GC-MS or LC-MS/MS methods. We developed a fast assay that measures the ORA in dried blood spots (DBS), plasma and urine using hydrophilic interaction LC-MS/MS. Within- and between-day analytical imprecision (CV%) of three quality control levels, in plasma, DBS and urine, ranged from 0.8 to 14.1%, while the inaccuracy ranged from -13.5 to 9.4%. In healthy children (n=20), ORA concentrations were less than 0.69 microM in plasma, less than 0.82 microM in DBS and from 0.2 to 1.4 mmol/mol of creatinine in urine. A patient with citrullinemia showed ORA levels of 133 microM in plasma and 39 microM in DBS. A patient with hyperammonemia-hyperornithinemia-homocitrullinemia (HHH) syndrome presented a urinary ORA level of 9.1 mmol/mol of creatinine. The method is potentially able to discriminate affected patients from reference subjects; the clinical validation should be expanded on a higher number of patients. PMID:20209505

  6. Governing biological material at the intersection of care and research: the use of dried blood spots for biobanking.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Conor M W; van El, Carla G; Faulkner, Alex; Cornel, Martina C

    2012-08-01

    A series of governance issues currently surrounds the multiple uses and multiple users of dried blood spots (DBS) for research purposes. Internationally there is a discussion on storing DBS resulting from newborn screening for public health and using them as the basis for large biobank-like collections to facilitate biomedical research. If such a transformation were to be formalized, then DBS would sit at the intersection of care (ie, public health) and research, with the mechanisms through which such a collection could be managed not totally self-evident. What is more, a DBS collection raises questions about the fuzzy boundaries between privacy and anonymity; how to control or define quality control uses of DBS; medical vs nonmedical uses; as well as benefit sharing and stakeholder involvement. Our goal here is to explore some of the key questions relating to DBS governance by way of the bio-objects and bio-objectification concepts. By embracing - rather than resisting to - the blurring of boundaries and problems in categorization that have come to characterize bio-objects and bio-objectification processes recently described in this journal, we attempt to highlight some issues that might not be currently considered, and to point to some possible directions to go (or avoid). Building from our knowledge of the current DBS situation in the Netherlands, we outline questions concerning the uses, management, collection, and storage of DBS.

  7. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger.

  8. Measuring thyroxine and thyrotropin simultaneously in a dried blood sample on filter paper, to screen for neonatal hypothroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Nagataki, S.; Ishibashi, K.,; Ohsawa, R.

    1980-05-01

    A highly sensitive radioimmunoassay of thyroxine and thyrotropin for mass screening for neonatal hypothroidism was developed. This assay involves a single disc (3 mm diameter) of dried blood on filter paper. The minimum detectable concentrations are 15 pg/tube (10 )g/L) for thyroxine and 15 nano-int. units/tube (10 milli-int. units/L) for thyrotropin; intra- and interassay CV's are <15% in both assays. The high sensitivity of this method is due to use of labeled thyroxine with high specific activity (3 kCi/g) and of an anti-thyrotropin serum with high affinity (K/sub eq/ = 7.8 x 10 rr L/mol). With this method, 1137 newborns were screened; a follow-up study revealed that only newborns with both high thyrotropin and low thyroxine concentrations had permanent hypothyroidism. It is concluded that this method is sensitive, simple, and reliable and that the recall rate with this method is much lower than that of tests for measuring thyroxine or thyrotropin alone.

  9. Rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever through identification of Salmonella typhi within 18 hours of specimen acquisition by culture of the mononuclear cell-platelet fraction of blood.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, F A; McWhirter, P D; Burr, D; Punjabi, N H; Lane, E; Kumala, S; Sudarmono, P; Pulungsih, S P; Lesmana, M; Tjaniadi, P

    1990-01-01

    Detection of Salmonella typhi in blood by culture of the mononuclear cell-platelet layer was compared with other methods currently used for the diagnosis of typhoid fever. Colonies of S. typhi were present in all mononuclear cell-platelet layer-positive cultures within 18 h of plating and were identified within an additional 10 min by a coagglutination technique. In contrast, identification of all positive cultures by conventional blood culture required 3 days. PMID:2332479

  10. Toward standardization of BK virus monitoring: evaluation of the BK virus R-gene kit for quantification of BK viral load in urine, whole-blood, and plasma specimens.

    PubMed

    Sueur, Charlotte; Solis, Morgane; Meddeb, Mariam; Soulier, Eric; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Lepiller, Quentin; Freitag, Rachel; Bahram, Seiamak; Caillard, Sophie; Barth, Heidi; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Fafi-Kremer, Samira

    2014-12-01

    Screening of BK virus (BKV) replication is recommended to identify patients at increased risk of BKV-associated diseases. However, the heterogeneity of molecular techniques hinders the establishment of universal guidelines for BKV monitoring. Here we aimed to compare the performance of the CE-marked BK virus R-gene kit (R-gene) to the performance of our in-house assay for quantification of BKV DNA loads (BKVL). A 12-specimen panel from the Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) organization, 163 urine samples, and 88 paired specimens of plasma and whole blood (WB) from transplant recipients were tested. Both the R-gene and in-house assays showed a good correlation within the QCMD panel (r = 0.995 and r = 0.989, respectively). BKVL were highly correlated between assays, although positive biases were observed with the in-house assay in analysis of urine (0.72 ± 0.83 log10 copies/ml), plasma (1.17 ± 0.63 log10 copies/ml), and WB (1.28 ± 0.37 log10 copies/ml). Recalibration with a common calibrator significantly reduced the bias in comparisons between assays. In contrast, BKVL was underestimated with the in-house PCR in eight samples containing BKV genotype II, presenting point mutations at primer-annealing sites. Using the R-gene assay, plasma and WB specimens were found to be equally suitable for quantification of BKVL, as indicated by the high correlation coefficient (r = 0.965, P < 0.0001). In conclusion, the R-gene assay demonstrated reliable performance and higher accuracy than the in-house assay for quantification of BKVL in urine and blood specimens. Screening of BKV replication by a well-validated commercial kit may enable clinical laboratories to assess viral loads with greater reproducibility and precision.

  11. Comparison of zopiclone concentrations in oral fluid sampled with Intercept(®) oral specimen collection device and Statsure Saliva Sampler™ and concentrations in blood.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Hallvard; Øiestad, Elisabeth L; Øiestad, Åse Marit L; Langødegård, Marit; Gustavsen, Ingebjørg; Hjelmeland, Knut; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2010-11-01

    A clinical study of zopiclone was performed using doses of 5 and 10 mg. Samples of oral fluid were collected using the Statsure and Intercept devices, and blood samples were collected simultaneously. Concentrations of zopiclone in samples of oral fluid and blood were determined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and concentrations in undiluted oral fluid were calculated. The concentrations of zopiclone in oral fluid were generally higher when using the Intercept compared to the Statsure device; the median oral fluid/whole blood concentration ratios were 3.8 (range 1.5-15.9) and 1.9 (range 1.2-4.6), respectively (n = 21). The correlation between zopiclone concentrations in oral fluid collected with the two devices was fairly poor, r(2) = 0.35. The results indicate that the type of sampling device may significantly affect the analytical result for zopiclone in sampled oral fluid.

  12. Perfluoroalkyl substances in the blood of wild rats and mice from 47 prefectures in Japan: use of samples from nationwide specimen bank.

    PubMed

    Taniyasu, Sachi; Senthilkumar, Kurunthachalam; Yamazaki, Eriko; Yeung, Leo W Y; Guruge, Keerthi S; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Numerous studies have reported on the global distribution, persistence, fate, and toxicity of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). However, studies on PFASs in terrestrial mammals are scarce. Rats can be good sentinels of human exposure to toxicants because of their habitat, which is in close proximity to humans. Furthermore, exposure data measured for rats can be directly applied for risk assessment because many toxicological studies use rodent models. In this study, a nationwide survey of PFASs in the blood of wild rats as well as surface water samples collected from rats' habitats from 47 prefectures in Japan was conducted. In addition to known PFASs, combustion ion chromatography technique was used for analysis of total fluorine concentrations in the blood of rats. In total, 216 blood samples representing three species of wild rats (house rat, Norway rats, and field mice) were analyzed for 23 PFASs. Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS; concentration range <0.05-148 ng/mL), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA; <0.1-157), perfluorododecanoate (<0.05-5.8), perfluoroundecanoate (PFUnDA; <0.05-51), perfluorodecanoate (PFDA; <0.05-9.7), perfluorononanoate (PFNA; <0.05-249), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) (<0.05-60) were detected >80 % of the blood samples. Concentrations of several PFASs in rat blood were similar to those reported for humans. PFSAs (mainly PFOS) accounted for 45 % of total PFASs, whereas perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs), especially PFUnDA and PFNA, accounted for 20 and 10 % of total PFASs, respectively. In water samples, PFCAs were the predominant compounds with PFOA and PFNA found in >90 % of the samples. There were strong correlations (p < 0.001 to p < 0.05) between human population density and levels of PFOS, PFNA, PFOA, and PFOSA in wild rat blood. PMID:23494483

  13. Simple, Sensitive, and Specific Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype B DNA in Dried Blood Samples for Diagnosis in Infants in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Ingrid A.; Drennan, Kathryn D.; Melvin, Ann J.; Mohan, Kathey M.; Herz, Arnd M.; Alarcón, Jorge; Piscoya, Julia; Velázquez, Carlos; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of virus is used to diagnose human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in infants due to the persistence of maternal antibodies for a year or more. An HIV-1 DNA PCR assay with simple specimen collection and processing was developed and evaluated. Whole blood was collected on filter paper that lysed cells and bound the DNA, eliminating specimen centrifugation and extraction procedures. The DNA remained bound to the filter paper during PCR amplification. Assays of copy number standards showed reproducible detection of 5 to 10 copies of HIV-1 in 5 μl of whole blood. The sensitivity of the assay did not decrease after storage of the standards on filter paper for 3 months at room temperature or after incubation at 37 or 45°C for 20 h. The primers used for nested PCR of the HIV-1 pol gene amplified templates from a reference panel of multiple HIV-1 subtypes but did not amplify a subtype A or a subtype C virus from children living in Seattle. The assay had a sensitivity of 98.4% and a specificity of 98.3% for testing of 122 specimens from 35 HIV-1-infected and 16 uninfected children and 43 seronegative adults living in Washington. The assay had a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 100% for testing of 102 HIV-1-positive (as determined by enzyme immunoassay) Peruvian women and 6 seropositive and 34 seronegative infants. This assay, with adsorption of whole blood to filter paper and no specimen processing, provides a practical, economical, sensitive, and specific method for the diagnosis of HIV-1 subtype B infection in infants. PMID:11136743

  14. Cinemicrographic specimen housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Housing used to observe gravitation effects on specimens embedded in support media, such as agar, supports microbial specimens vertically for time-lapsed cinemicrographic studies. Procedure cannot be performed with conventional microscopes which see specimens in horizontal plane only.

  15. Chemical composition of solar dried blood and the ruminal content and its effect on performance of Japanese quails

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Jyotiprabha; Abraham, Robinson J. J; Rao, V. Appa; Rajini, R. Asha; Mishra, B. P.; Sarangi, N. R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the chemical composition of solar dried blood and rumen content (DBRC) and further ascertain the concentration at which DBRC could be included in Japanese quail diets without any adverse effect on its performance. Materials and Methods: Feeding trial on the effect of DBRC on performance of Japanese quails was studied up to 5 weeks. 252 numbers of day old (Nandanam Type III breed) Japanese quails were purchased from Poultry Research Station, Madhavaram and divided into 7 batches (control+ six treatments) each consisting of 36 birds. The DBRC was included at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30% in diets as control, treatment-1 (T1), treatment-2 (T2), treatment-3 (T3), treatment-4 (T4), treatment-5 (T5) and treatment-6 (T6) respectively in a completely randomized design to replace soybean meal in Japanese quail feed. The birds were provided with ad-labidum feed and drinking water ad-libitum during the entire experimental period. Results: The crude protein (CP), crude fiber (CF), ether extract (EE) and ash contents of DBRC were 35.87%, 17.40%, 3.6% and 12.6%, respectively. The amount of essential amino acids and non-essential amino acid content were found to be 12.98 and 4.87 (g/100 g of feed) respectively in DBRC feed. Result showed that all birds fed DBRC diets performed better than the control group. Mortality was unaffected by dietary treatments. There was a significant difference (p<0.01) observed in weight gain in treatment groups compared to the control. Conclusion: Up to 30% DBRC could be incorporated in the diets of Japanese quails without any adverse effects on its performance. PMID:27047002

  16. DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Drábková, Lenka Záveská

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of molecular techniques, the historical collections have become widely used. Studying plant DNA using modern molecular techniques such as DNA sequencing plays an important role in understanding evolutionary relationships, identification through DNA barcoding, conservation status, and many other aspects of plant biology. Enormous herbarium collections are an important source of material especially for specimens from areas difficult to access or from taxa that are now extinct. The ability to utilize these specimens greatly enhances the research. However, the process of extracting DNA from herbarium specimens is often fraught with difficulty related to such variables as plant chemistry, drying method of the specimen, and chemical treatment of the specimen. Although many methods have been developed for extraction of DNA from herbarium specimens, the most frequently used are modified CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit protocols. Nine selected protocols in this chapter have been successfully used for high-quality DNA extraction from different kinds of plant herbarium tissues. These methods differ primarily with respect to their requirements for input material (from algae to vascular plants), type of the plant tissue (leaves with incrustations, sclerenchyma strands, mucilaginous tissues, needles, seeds), and further possible applications (PCR-based methods or microsatellites, AFLP). PMID:24415470

  17. Biological specimen banks in neonatal screening.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Simonsen, H

    1999-12-01

    The Danish neonatal screening program analyses dried blood spot samples (DBSS) from close to 70,000 newborns annually from Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. Since 1982, all DBSS have been stored in a biological specimen bank at -20 degrees C as a routine procedure after analysis. Before sampling, parents are given written information about the screening tests, the biobank and its use, and can choose to opt out. Since 1993 the biobank has been regulated by specific legislation, and thus assumes a unique position among biological specimen banks. Its purposes are: (i) diagnosis and treatment of diseases screened for, including repeat testing, quality assurance and group statistics; (ii) other diagnostic uses during infancy; and (iii) research projects. The stored samples have been used successfully to diagnose a range of genetic diseases using biochemical and molecular genetic assays, and to diagnose congenital CMV and toxoplasmosis infections using assays for specific IgM antibodies and pathogen nucleic acids. The unbiased nature and comprehensive coverage of the samples in the biobank make them attractive for research purposes. Our studies have focused on the epidemiology of genetic disease alleles and other molecular disease markers and on retrospective screening projects, which have allowed rapid appraisal of the performance of novel screening modalities, saving years of prospective screening trials. Storage of neonatal screening samples is thus beneficial not only to the individual testees, but also to future generations of newborns.

  18. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  19. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  20. Targeted screening for the detection of Pompe disease in patients with unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy or asymptomatic hyperCKemia using dried blood: A Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rivas, E; Bautista, J; Vílchez, J J; Muelas, N; Díaz-Manera, J; Illa, I; Martínez-Arroyo, A; Olivé, M; Sanz, I; Arpa, J; Fernández-Torrón, R; López de Munáin, A; Jiménez, L; Solera, J; Lukacs, Z

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to screen for Pompe disease in patients with unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) or asymptomatic hyperCKemia using dried blood spot (DBS) assays. Subsequently, we aimed to calculate the diagnostic delay between initial symptom presentation and the diagnosis. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted in 348 patients: 146 with unclassified LGMD and 202 with asymptomatic or paucisymptomatic hyperCKemia. We quantified levels of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) from dried blood spots analyzed fluorometrically. The test was positive in 20 patients, and Pompe disease was confirmed by genetic testing in 16. Undiagnosed Pompe disease was detected in 7.5% of patients with LGMD and in 2.5% of patients with persistent, idiopathic elevation of serum creatine kinase. The c.-32-13 T > G mutation was found most commonly. The diagnostic delay was 15 years on average. In conclusion, DBS tests are useful and reliable screening tools for Pompe disease. We recommend the dried blood spot test to be included in the diagnostic work-up of patients with unclassified myopathies with proximal weakness and/or hyperCKemia of unknown cause and, when positive, to define the diagnosis, it will have to be confirmed by biochemical and/or molecular genetic analysis. PMID:25998610

  1. Simultaneous quantitation of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine, amino acids, acylcarnitines, and succinylacetone during FIA–ESI–MS/MS analysis of dried blood spot extracts for newborn screening

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Christopher A.; De Jesús, Víctor R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to include the quantitation of hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine, a biomarker for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and other peroxisomal disorders, in the routine extraction and analysis procedure used to quantitate amino acids, acylcarnitines, and succinylacetone during newborn screening. Criteria for the method included use of a single punch from a dried blood spot, one simple extraction of the punch, no high-performance liquid chromatography, and utilizing tandem mass spectrometry to quantitate the analytes. Design and methods Dried blood spot punches were extracted with a methanolic solution of stable-isotope labeled internal standards, formic acid, and hydrazine, followed by flow injection analysis–electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry. Results Quantitation of amino acids, acylcarnitines, and hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine using this combined method was similar to results obtained using two separate methods. Conclusions A single dried blood spot punch extracted by a rapid (45 min), simple procedure can be analyzed with high throughput (2 min per sample) to quantitate amino acids, acylcarnitines, succinylacetone, and hexacosanoyl lysophosphatidylcholine. PMID:26432925

  2. The Validity of Phosphatidylethanol in Dried Blood Spots of Newborns for the Identification of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bakhireva, Ludmila N.; Leeman, Lawrence; Savich, Renate D.; Cano, Sandra; Gutierrez, Hilda; Savage, Daniel D.; Rayburn, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate identification of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) in the newborn period offers an opportunity for early identification of children at risk for future neurocognitive problems and the implementation of interventional approaches earlier in life. PAE newborn screening by measuring phosphatidylethanol in dried blood spot (PEth-DBS) cards is feasible, logistically easier, and more cost-efficient compared to other biomarkers. However, the sensitivity and specificity of this method have yet to be established. Methods This prospective cohort study examined validity of PEth-DBS among 28 infants with PAE and 32 controls relative to maternal self-report and other biomarkers. Pregnant women were recruited from a University of New Mexico clinic and followed to early postpartum period. The composite index, which was based on self-reported measures of alcohol use and allowed to classify subjects into PAE and control groups, was the criterion measure used to estimate sensitivity and specificity of PEth-DBS. Results The study included large proportions of patients representing ethnic minorities (7.4% American Indian, 81.7% Hispanic/Latina), low education (54.2%

  3. Determining prevalence of bluetongue and epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in mule deer in Arizona (USA) using whole blood dried on paper strips compared to serum analyses.

    PubMed

    Dubay, Shelli A; Rosenstock, Steven S; Stallknecht, David E; deVos, James C

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using whole blood dried on paper strips as a means to collect antibody prevalence data for the epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses (EHDV) and bluetongue viruses (BTV) from hunter-harvested male mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in October 2002 from Arizona, USA. We compared antibody prevalence estimates in mule deer from paired paper strip and serum samples. Prevalence data obtained from elution of dried blood on paper strips proved to be consistent with results from serum in 94% of the samples tested. The paper strip method allows easy collection of blood from dead animals, with a smaller amount of blood being needed for analyses. Also, samples do not need to be refrigerated before analyses. We also used serum samples to determine hemorrhagic disease (HD) serotype exposure status of mule deer harvested from 4 distinct areas in Arizona. Antibodies to BTV and EHDV were identified in 3 of the 4 areas, with positive results to EHDV-1, EHDV-2, BTV-10, and BTV-11 being most common. Many animals did not have antibodies against the BTV serotypes. Exposure varied geographically and potentially with elevation. Hemorrhagic disease viruses commonly infect Arizona mule deer, except on the Kaibab Plateau in northern Arizona.

  4. Combining rapid diagnostic tests and dried blood spot assays for point-of-care testing of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections in Burkina Faso, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Kania, D; Bekalé, A M; Nagot, N; Mondain, A-M; Ottomani, L; Meda, N; Traoré, M; Ouédraogo, J B; Ducos, J; Van de Perre, P; Tuaillon, E

    2013-12-01

    People screened for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in Africa remain generally unaware of their status for hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) infections. We evaluated a two-step screening strategy in Burkina Faso, using both HIV RDTs and Dried Blood Spot (DBS) assays to confirm an HIV-positive test, and to test for HBV and HCV infections. HIV counselling and point-of-care testing were performed at a voluntary counselling and testing centre with HBV, HCV status and HIV confirmation using DBS specimens, being assessed at a central laboratory. Serological testing on plasma was used as the reference standard assay to control for the performance of DBS assays. Nineteen out of 218 participants included in the study were positive for HIV using RDTs. A fourth-generation HIV ELISA and immunoblot assays on DBS confirmed HIV status. Twenty-four out of 25 participants infected with HBV were found positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using DBS. One sample with a low HBsAg concentration on plasma was not detected on DBS. Five participants tested positive for HCV antibodies were confirmed positive with an immunoblot assay using DBS specimens. Laboratory results were communicated within 7 days to participants with no loss to follow up of participants between the first and second post-test counselling sessions. In conclusion, DBS collection during HIV point-of-care testing enables screening and confirmation of HBV, HCV and HIV infections. Diagnosis using DBS may assist with implementation of national programmes for HBV, HCV and HIV screening and clinical care in middle- to low-income countries. PMID:23902574

  5. Drugs and driving: a retrospective study of the analyses of blood and urine specimens submitted to the Lothian and Borders Police Forensic Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ledingham, D

    1999-09-01

    A comprehensive review of 75 samples of both blood and urine from 72 different drivers suspected of being impaired by drugs in the Lothian and Borders Police Force, Scotland area of jurisdiction, between 1st January 1995 and 2nd May 1997, was undertaken. The police reports, analytical results and criminal conviction records relating to each of the drivers were examined. This provided useful information concerning differences in laboratory procedures and produced a profile of the average drugged driver. The average age of the drivers was 23 years. Only two females were within the sample. Drugs were found in 65 cases (86.7%). Polydrug use was found in seven cases (9.3%). The drugs found, in order of frequency, were benzodiazepines (40%), cannabinoids (24%), alcohol (16%), methadone (12%), dihydrocodeine (9.3%), ecstacy (5.3%), amphetamine (2.7%), volatiles (1.3%) and morphine (1.3%). 90.3% of the drivers had previous convictions for criminal offences and 47.2% had convictions for drugs-related offences. Recommendations concerning police and medical training are discussed with particular reference to the Drug Recognition Expert program. PMID:15335481

  6. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, Robert; McMonigal, K. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) has been established to collect, process, annotate, store, and distribute specimens under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The NBSR is a secure controlled storage facility that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time, under well-controlled conditions, for future use in approved human spaceflight-related research protocols. The repository supports the Human Research Program, which is charged with identifying and investigating physiological changes that occur during human spaceflight, and developing and implementing effective countermeasures when necessary. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can validate clinical hypotheses, study space-flight related changes, and investigate physiological markers All samples collected require written informed consent from each long duration crewmember. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating long duration ISS crewmembers. These biological samples are collected pre-flight at approximately 45 days prior to launch, during flight on flight days 15, 30, 60 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days following landing. The number of inflight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Operations began in 2007 and as of October 2009, 23 USOS crewmembers have completed or agreed to participate in this project. As currently planned, these human biological samples will be collected from crewmembers covering multiple ISS missions until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS or 2017. The NBSR will establish guidelines for sample distribution that are consistent with ethical principles

  7. [Bacteriological control of blood preservation, production of infusion solutions and dry human plasma under conditions of aseptic work and possible sources of their contamination].

    PubMed

    Bosković, S; Lucić, N; Aganović, N; Grbić, E

    1975-01-01

    In premises for blood conservation, production of dry human plasma and infusion solutions "notwithstanding the permanent measures for desinfection, new bacterial contamination occurs from time to time and whose source are the casings and material originating from non-sterile environment. Bacteriological control, which has primarily a preventive character, enables a due forecast for measures to be undertaken by the appropriate desinfection of the working surfaces and air, satisfactory conditions of aseptic work can be maintained. General hygiene should be paid attention to as well as mechanical cleansing of premises, avoidance of groups for lunch-time etc., since the treatment by desinfectors would not be sufficient for maintenance of aseptic working conditions. In order to prevent the transmission of bacterial contamination, premises for blood conservation should be strictly separated from other operations and also prevent the unnecessary movements of personnel through corridors. The results of the bacteriological control of the personnel show that greater attention should be paid to their health care since the workers there work in closed aseptic systems and thus avoid them as a bacteria transmittors in respect to danger of blood and dry human plasma contamination. It is also necessary to efficiently educate the personnel for work in aseptic conditions and also increase their elementary knowledge from bacteriology and hygiene. The bacterial skin-flora on the spot of donor's venepuncture also presents a certain danger for blood contamination. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the most optimal manner of skin desinfecate together with the most appropriate means having a fast bactericidal and fungicidal action. It would also be useful, on the basis of further test, to suggest certain standard for an allowed number of conditionally pathogenic and saprophytic microorganisms which would be used by the instutions performing the blood transfusion and production of

  8. Rapid Method for Screening Dried Blood Samples on Filter Paper for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Panteleeff, Dana DeVange; John, Grace; Nduati, Ruth; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Richardson, Barbra; Kreiss, Joan; Overbaugh, Julie

    1999-01-01

    PCR is a highly sensitive method for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleic acids in blood mononuclear cells and plasma. However, blood separation techniques require extensive laboratory support systems and are difficult when a limited volume of blood is available, which is often the case for infants. The use of blood samples stored on filter paper has many advantages for the detection of perinatal HIV-1 infection, but current methods require extraction and purification of target DNA prior to PCR amplification. We report a highly sensitive and rapid method for the extraction and detection of HIV-1 DNA in infant blood samples stored on filter papers. Because this rapid protocol does not involve steps for the removal of potential inhibitors of the PCR, the highest sensitivity is achieved by testing the filter paper lysate in quadruplicate. Assays for HIV-1 DNA were done by using nested PCR techniques that amplify HIV-1 gag DNA from blood spot samples on filter paper and from corresponding viably frozen mononuclear cells separated from venous blood samples obtained from 111 infants born to HIV-1-seropositive mothers. PCR results with blood from filter papers showed 100% specificity (95% confidence internal [CI] 93.1 to 100%) and 96% (95% CI, 88.65 to 98.9%) and 88% (95% CI, 79.2 to 94.5%) sensitivity (for quadruplicate and duplicate tests, respectively) compared to PCR results with blood mononuclear cells. Moreover, this method could detect HIV-1 sequences of multiple subtypes. PMID:9889216

  9. Hemolyzed, lyophilized bovine blood for quality control of lead determination of human whole blood

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.S.; Meranger, J.C.; Connor, J.

    1985-09-01

    The determination of Pb in human whole blood is perhaps the most common application of biological monitoring in occupational and environmental health. However, the lack of an adequate reference material has prevented a thorough evaluation of current analytical methods for Pb in blood and hence the evaluation of data generated by using such methods. As a result the concentration of Pb in human whole blood is not accurately known. In this paper the authors report the preparation and analysis of two freeze-dried bovine whole blood reference specimens containing two different levels of Pb.

  10. A Novel Dried Blood Spot-LCMS Method for the Quantification of Methotrexate Polyglutamates as a Potential Marker for Methotrexate Use in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hawwa, Ahmed F.; AlBawab, AbdelQader; Rooney, Madeleine; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Beresford, Michael W.; McElnay, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Development and validation of a selective and sensitive LCMS method for the determination of methotrexate polyglutamates in dried blood spots (DBS). Methods DBS samples [spiked or patient samples] were prepared by applying blood to Guthrie cards which was then dried at room temperature. The method utilised 6-mm disks punched from the DBS samples (equivalent to approximately 12 µl of whole blood). The simple treatment procedure was based on protein precipitation using perchloric acid followed by solid phase extraction using MAX cartridges. The extracted sample was chromatographed using a reversed phase system involving an Atlantis T3-C18 column (3 µm, 2.1×150 mm) preceded by Atlantis guard column of matching chemistry. Analytes were subjected to LCMS analysis using positive electrospray ionization. Key Results The method was linear over the range 5–400 nmol/L. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.6 and 5 nmol/L for individual polyglutamates and 1.5 and 4.5 nmol/L for total polyglutamates, respectively. The method has been applied successfully to the determination of DBS finger-prick samples from 47 paediatric patients and results confirmed with concentrations measured in matched RBC samples using conventional HPLC-UV technique. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance The methodology has a potential for application in a range of clinical studies (e.g. pharmacokinetic evaluations or medication adherence assessment) since it is minimally invasive and easy to perform, potentially allowing parents to take blood samples at home. The feasibility of using DBS sampling can be of major value for future clinical trials or clinical care in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24587116

  11. Ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assay for therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in pediatric HIV-1 infection applying dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; Reedijk, Mariska L.; Scheuer, Rachel D.; Dekker, Lennard J. M.; Burger, David M.; Hartwig, Nico G.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Luider, Theo M.; Gruters, Rob A.

    2010-01-01

    Kaletra® (Abott Laboratories) is a co-formulated medication used in the treatment of HIV-1-infected children, and it contains the two antiretroviral protease inhibitor drugs lopinavir and ritonavir. We validated two new ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assays to be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of lopinavir and ritonavir concentrations in whole blood and in plasma from HIV-1-infected children. Whole blood was blotted onto dried blood spot (DBS) collecting cards, and plasma was collected simultaneously. DBS collecting cards were extracted by an acetonitrile/water mixture while plasma samples were deproteinized with acetone. Drug concentrations were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-QqQ-MS/MS). The application of DBS made it possible to measure lopinavir and ritonavir in whole blood in therapeutically relevant concentrations. The MALDI-QqQ-MS/MS plasma assay was successfully cross-validated with a commonly used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)–ultraviolet (UV) assay for the therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of HIV-1-infected patients, and it showed comparable performance characteristics. Observed DBS concentrations showed as well, a good correlation between plasma concentrations obtained by MALDI-QqQ-MS/MS and those obtained by the HPLC-UV assay. Application of DBS for TDM proved to be a good alternative to the normally used plasma screening. Moreover, collection of DBS requires small amounts of whole blood which can be easily performed especially in (very) young children where collection of large whole blood amounts is often not possible. DBS is perfectly suited for TDM of HIV-1-infected children; but nevertheless, DBS can also easily be applied for TDM of patients in areas with limited or no laboratory facilities. PMID:20632164

  12. Determination of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in dried blood spots using a simple GC-MS method with direct "on spot" derivatization.

    PubMed

    Ingels, Ann-Sofie M E; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was the development of an accurate and sensitive method for the determination of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in dried whole blood samples using a GC-MS method. The complete procedure was optimized, with special attention on the sample pretreatment, and validated. Therefore, dried blood spots of only 50 μl were prepared and, after the addition of internal standard GHB-d6, directly derivatized using 100 μl of a freshly prepared mixture of trifluoroacetic acid anhydride and heptafluorobutanol (2:1). The derivatized extract was injected into a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS), operating in the electron impact mode, with a total run time of 12.3 min. Method validation included the evaluation of linearity, precision, accuracy, sensitivity, selectivity, and stability. A weighting factor of 1/x(2) was chosen and acceptable intra-batch precision, inter-batch precision, and accuracy were seen. The linear calibration curve ranged from 2 to 100 μg/ml, with a limit of detection of 1 μg/ml. Our procedure, utilizing the novel approach of direct "on spot" derivatization followed by analysis with GC-MS, proved to be reliable, fast, and applicable in routine toxicology.

  13. Dietary supplementation with dried chicory root triggers changes in the blood serum proteins engaged in the clotting process and the innate immune response in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Lepczynski, A; Herosimczyk, A; Ozgo, M; Skomial, J; Taciak, M; Barszcz, M; Berezecka, N

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the systemic immune and metabolic alterations in the blood serum of growing pigs in response to a dietary supplementation with 4% of dried chicory roots. This was achieved by examining the influence of the experimental diet on serum protein changes especially these related with immunology and lipid metabolism. Serum proteins with the isoelectric point ranging from pH 3.0 to 10.0 were separated using high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis. As a result, we found that experimental diet triggered significant changes in 37 protein spots. Of these, 14 were up-regulated, whereas 23 showed down-regulation. Of 37 significantly altered protein spots, 24 were successfully identified, representing 14 distinct gene products. Implementation of the dried chicory roots into the diet of growing pigs caused a significant down-regulation of apolipoprotein C-II complement component C6, C-reactive protein, CD14 antigen, C4b binding protein α and β chains, and fibrinogen. Piglets fed experimental diet had similar IgA, IgG and IgM concentrations, although the level of IgM tended to be lower compared to the control group. It is concluded that diet supplemented with 4% of dried chicory root may exert anti-inflammatory properties and affect lipid metabolism in growing pigs. PMID:25716964

  14. Short communication: Reference limits for blood analytes in Holstein late-pregnant heifers and dry cows: Effects of parity, days relative to calving, and season.

    PubMed

    Brscic, M; Cozzi, G; Lora, I; Stefani, A L; Contiero, B; Ravarotto, L; Gottardo, F

    2015-11-01

    Reference limits for metabolic profiles in Holstein late-pregnant heifers and dry cows were determined considering the effects of parity, days relative to calving, and season. Blood samples were collected from 104 pregnant heifers and 186 dry cows (68 primiparous and 118 pluriparous) from 60 to 10 d before the expected calving date in 31 dairy farms in northeastern Italy. Sampling was performed during summer (182 samples) and the following winter (108 samples). All the animals were judged as clinically healthy at a veterinary visit before sampling. Outliers were removed from data of each blood analyte, and variables that were not normally distributed were log transformed. A mixed model was used to test the fixed effects of parity (late-pregnant heifers, primiparous or pluriparous dry cows), class of days relative to calving (60-41 d, 40-21 d, 20-10 d), season (summer or winter), and the interactions between parity and class of days relative to calving and between parity and season, with farm as random effect. Single general reference limits and 95% confidence intervals were generated for analytes that did not vary according to fixed effects. Whenever a fixed effect included in the model significantly affected a given analyte, specific reference limits and 95% confidence intervals were generated for each of its levels. Albumin, urea, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine kinase, conjugated bilirubin, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, chloride, zinc, copper, and iron concentrations were not influenced by any of the fixed effects. Total protein, globulins, creatinine, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and sodium plasma concentrations were affected by parity. The class of days relative to calving had a significant effect on the concentrations of total protein, globulins, fatty acids, cholesterol, total bilirubin, and sodium. Season affected plasma concentrations of

  15. Short communication: Reference limits for blood analytes in Holstein late-pregnant heifers and dry cows: Effects of parity, days relative to calving, and season.

    PubMed

    Brscic, M; Cozzi, G; Lora, I; Stefani, A L; Contiero, B; Ravarotto, L; Gottardo, F

    2015-11-01

    Reference limits for metabolic profiles in Holstein late-pregnant heifers and dry cows were determined considering the effects of parity, days relative to calving, and season. Blood samples were collected from 104 pregnant heifers and 186 dry cows (68 primiparous and 118 pluriparous) from 60 to 10 d before the expected calving date in 31 dairy farms in northeastern Italy. Sampling was performed during summer (182 samples) and the following winter (108 samples). All the animals were judged as clinically healthy at a veterinary visit before sampling. Outliers were removed from data of each blood analyte, and variables that were not normally distributed were log transformed. A mixed model was used to test the fixed effects of parity (late-pregnant heifers, primiparous or pluriparous dry cows), class of days relative to calving (60-41 d, 40-21 d, 20-10 d), season (summer or winter), and the interactions between parity and class of days relative to calving and between parity and season, with farm as random effect. Single general reference limits and 95% confidence intervals were generated for analytes that did not vary according to fixed effects. Whenever a fixed effect included in the model significantly affected a given analyte, specific reference limits and 95% confidence intervals were generated for each of its levels. Albumin, urea, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine kinase, conjugated bilirubin, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, chloride, zinc, copper, and iron concentrations were not influenced by any of the fixed effects. Total protein, globulins, creatinine, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and sodium plasma concentrations were affected by parity. The class of days relative to calving had a significant effect on the concentrations of total protein, globulins, fatty acids, cholesterol, total bilirubin, and sodium. Season affected plasma concentrations of

  16. Use of Dried Blood Spots for Estimating Children?s Exposures to Heavy Metals in Epidemiological Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Children’s exposures to arsenic (As), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and cadmium (Cd) are of particular concern in early-life. Exposures to heavy metals are traditionally measured in whole venous blood, which is costly and invasive. As an alternative we describe a met...

  17. Analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in archived dried blood spots and its application to track temporal trends of environmental chemicals in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wan-Li; Gao, Chongjing; Bell, Erin M.; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Caggana, Michele; Aldous, Kenneth M.; Buck Louis, Germaine M.; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) collected from infants shortly after birth for the newborn screening program (NSP) in the United States are valuable resources for the assessment of exposure to environmental chemicals in newborns. The NSP was debuted as a public health program in the United States in the 1960s; and the DBS samples collected over a period of time can be used in tracking temporal trends in exposure to environmental chemicals by newborns. In this study, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were measured in DBS samples collected from newborns in Upstate New York from 1997 to 2011 by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Twelve PCBs and two OCPs were found in DBS samples at a detection rate above 50% (n = 51). The mean whole blood concentration of ΣPCBs (sum of 12 congeners) over the 15-year period was 1.06 ng/mL, followed by p,p′-DDE (0.421 ng/mL) and HCB (0.065 ng/mL). The measured concentrations of PCBs and p,p′-DDE in infants’ blood were comparable to those reported in cord blood, suggesting maternal/trans-placental transfer of these compounds from mothers to fetuses. The concentrations of ΣPCBs and p,p′-DDE in blood samples of infants decreased significantly between 1997 and 2001, and no significant reduction was found thereafter. This observation is consistent with the trends reported for these chemicals in other human tissues in the United States. PMID:24968082

  18. Analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in archived dried blood spots and its application to track temporal trends of environmental chemicals in newborns.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wan-Li; Gao, Chongjing; Bell, Erin M; Druschel, Charlotte M; Caggana, Michele; Aldous, Kenneth M; Louis, Germaine M Buck; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) collected from infants shortly after birth for the newborn screening program (NSP) in the United States are valuable resources for the assessment of exposure to environmental chemicals in newborns. The NSP was debuted as a public health program in the United States in the 1960s; and the DBS samples collected over a period of time can be used in tracking temporal trends in exposure to environmental chemicals by newborns. In this study, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were measured in DBS samples collected from newborns in Upstate New York from 1997 to 2011 by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Twelve PCBs and two OCPs were found in DBS samples at a detection rate above 50% (n=51). The mean whole blood concentration of ΣPCBs (sum of 12 congeners) over the 15-year period was 1.06 ng/mL, followed by p,p'-DDE (0.421 ng/mL) and HCB (0.065 ng/mL). The measured concentrations of PCBs and p,p'-DDE in infants'blood were comparable to those reported in cord blood, suggesting maternal/trans-placental transfer of these compounds from mothers to fetuses. The concentrations of ΣPCBs and p,p'-DDE in blood samples of infants decreased significantly between 1997 and 2001, and no significant reduction was found thereafter. This observation is consistent with the trends reported for these chemicals in other human tissues in the United States. PMID:24968082

  19. Potassium-based algorithm allows correction for the hematocrit bias in quantitative analysis of caffeine and its major metabolite in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Capiau, Sara; Stove, Veronique V; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2014-10-01

    Although dried blood spot (DBS) sampling is increasingly receiving interest as a potential alternative to traditional blood sampling, the impact of hematocrit (Hct) on DBS results is limiting its final breakthrough in routine bioanalysis. To predict the Hct of a given DBS, potassium (K(+)) proved to be a reliable marker. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether application of an algorithm, based upon predicted Hct or K(+) concentrations as such, allowed correction for the Hct bias. Using validated LC-MS/MS methods, caffeine, chosen as a model compound, was determined in whole blood and corresponding DBS samples with a broad Hct range (0.18-0.47). A reference subset (n = 50) was used to generate an algorithm based on K(+) concentrations in DBS. Application of the developed algorithm on an independent test set (n = 50) alleviated the assay bias, especially at lower Hct values. Before correction, differences between DBS and whole blood concentrations ranged from -29.1 to 21.1%. The mean difference, as obtained by Bland-Altman comparison, was -6.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), -9.7 to -3.4%). After application of the algorithm, differences between corrected and whole blood concentrations lay between -19.9 and 13.9% with a mean difference of -2.1% (95% CI, -4.5 to 0.3%). The same algorithm was applied to a separate compound, paraxanthine, which was determined in 103 samples (Hct range, 0.17-0.47), yielding similar results. In conclusion, a K(+)-based algorithm allows correction for the Hct bias in the quantitative analysis of caffeine and its metabolite paraxanthine.

  20. Analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in archived dried blood spots and its application to track temporal trends of environmental chemicals in newborns.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wan-Li; Gao, Chongjing; Bell, Erin M; Druschel, Charlotte M; Caggana, Michele; Aldous, Kenneth M; Louis, Germaine M Buck; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) collected from infants shortly after birth for the newborn screening program (NSP) in the United States are valuable resources for the assessment of exposure to environmental chemicals in newborns. The NSP was debuted as a public health program in the United States in the 1960s; and the DBS samples collected over a period of time can be used in tracking temporal trends in exposure to environmental chemicals by newborns. In this study, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were measured in DBS samples collected from newborns in Upstate New York from 1997 to 2011 by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Twelve PCBs and two OCPs were found in DBS samples at a detection rate above 50% (n=51). The mean whole blood concentration of ΣPCBs (sum of 12 congeners) over the 15-year period was 1.06 ng/mL, followed by p,p'-DDE (0.421 ng/mL) and HCB (0.065 ng/mL). The measured concentrations of PCBs and p,p'-DDE in infants'blood were comparable to those reported in cord blood, suggesting maternal/trans-placental transfer of these compounds from mothers to fetuses. The concentrations of ΣPCBs and p,p'-DDE in blood samples of infants decreased significantly between 1997 and 2001, and no significant reduction was found thereafter. This observation is consistent with the trends reported for these chemicals in other human tissues in the United States.

  1. LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination on a dried blood spot of multiple analytes relevant for treatment monitoring in patients with tyrosinemia type I.

    PubMed

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Malvagia, Sabrina; Materazzi, Serena; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Boenzi, Sara; Martinelli, Diego; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2012-01-17

    Tyrosinemia type 1 is caused by deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase. The enzymatic defect impairs the conversion of fumarylacetoacetate to fumarate, causing accumulation of succinylacetone which induces severe liver and kidney dysfunction along with mutagenic changes and hepatocellular carcinoma. Treatment is based on nitisinone (NTBC), an enzymatic inhibitor which suppresses succinylacetone production. NTBC, which has dramatically changed the disease course improving liver and kidney functions and reducing risk of liver cancer, causes a side effect of the increase of tyrosine levels. Treatment is therefore based on the combination of NTBC with a protein-restricted diet to prevent the potential toxicity of excessive tyrosine accumulation. Long-term therapy requires a careful monitoring in blood of NTBC levels along with other disease biomarkers, which include succinylacetone, and a selected panel of circulating aminoacids. We have developed a straightforward and fast MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of NTBC, succinylacetone, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and methionine on a dried blood spot requiring a 2 min run. A single assay suitable for quantitative evaluation of all biochemical markers is of great advance over conventional methods, especially in pediatric patients, since it reduces laboratory costs and blood sampling, is less invasive and particularly suitable for pediatric patients, and allows easier storage and shipping.

  2. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  3. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  4. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  5. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  6. 46 CFR 4.06-20 - Specimen collection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provide a specimen of their urine according to 46 CFR part 16 and 49 CFR part 40. (2) Specimen collection and shipping kits used to conduct drug testing must be used according to 49 CFR part 40. ... involved in the SMI must provide a specimen of their breath, blood, or saliva to the marine employer...

  7. 37 CFR 2.59 - Filing substitute specimen(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filing substitute specimen(s..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Drawing § 2.59 Filing substitute specimen(s). (a... specimen(s), the applicant must: (1) For an amendment to allege use under § 2.76, verify by affidavit...

  8. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  9. Quantification of phosphatidylethanol 16:0/18:1, 18:1/18:1, and 16:0/16:0 in venous blood and venous and capillary dried blood spots from patients in alcohol withdrawal and control volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Natalie; Ingels, Ann-Sofie; Wille, Sarah M R; Hanak, Catherine; Verbanck, Paul; Lambert, Willy E E; Samyn, Nele; Stove, Christophe P

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanol species (PEths) are promising biomarkers of alcohol consumption. Here, we report on the set-up, validation, and application of a novel UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for the quantification of PEth 16:0/18:1, PEth 18:1/18:1, and PEth 16:0/16:0 in whole blood (30 μL) and in venous (V, 30 μL) or capillary (C, 3 punches (3 mm)) dried blood spots (DBS). The methods were linear from 10 (LLOQ) to 2000 ng/mL for PEth 16:0/18:1, from 10 (LLOQ) to 1940 ng/mL for PEth 18:1/18:1, and from 19 (LLOQ) to 3872 ng/mL for PEth 16:0/16:0. Extraction efficiencies were higher than 55% (RSD < 18%) and matrix effects compensated for by IS were between 77 and 125% (RSD < 10%). Accuracy, repeatability, and intermediate precision fulfilled acceptance criteria (bias and RSD below 13%). Validity of the procedure for determination of PEth 16:0/18:1 in blood was demonstrated by the successful participation in a proficiency test. The quantification of PEths in C-DBS was not significantly influenced by the hematocrit, punch localization, or spot volume. The stability of PEths in V-DBS stored at room temperature was demonstrated up to 6 months. The method was applied to authentic samples (whole blood, V-DBS, and C-DBS) from 50 inpatients in alcohol withdrawal and 50 control volunteers. Applying a cut-off value to detect inpatients at 221 ng/mL for PEth 16:0/18:1 provided no false positive results and a good sensitivity (86%). Comparison of quantitative results (Bland-Altman plot, Passing-Bablok regression, and Wilcoxon signed rank test) revealed that V-DBS and C-DBS were valid alternatives to venous blood for the detection of alcohol consumption. PMID:26597914

  10. Quantification of phosphatidylethanol 16:0/18:1, 18:1/18:1, and 16:0/16:0 in venous blood and venous and capillary dried blood spots from patients in alcohol withdrawal and control volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Natalie; Ingels, Ann-Sofie; Wille, Sarah M R; Hanak, Catherine; Verbanck, Paul; Lambert, Willy E E; Samyn, Nele; Stove, Christophe P

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanol species (PEths) are promising biomarkers of alcohol consumption. Here, we report on the set-up, validation, and application of a novel UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for the quantification of PEth 16:0/18:1, PEth 18:1/18:1, and PEth 16:0/16:0 in whole blood (30 μL) and in venous (V, 30 μL) or capillary (C, 3 punches (3 mm)) dried blood spots (DBS). The methods were linear from 10 (LLOQ) to 2000 ng/mL for PEth 16:0/18:1, from 10 (LLOQ) to 1940 ng/mL for PEth 18:1/18:1, and from 19 (LLOQ) to 3872 ng/mL for PEth 16:0/16:0. Extraction efficiencies were higher than 55% (RSD < 18%) and matrix effects compensated for by IS were between 77 and 125% (RSD < 10%). Accuracy, repeatability, and intermediate precision fulfilled acceptance criteria (bias and RSD below 13%). Validity of the procedure for determination of PEth 16:0/18:1 in blood was demonstrated by the successful participation in a proficiency test. The quantification of PEths in C-DBS was not significantly influenced by the hematocrit, punch localization, or spot volume. The stability of PEths in V-DBS stored at room temperature was demonstrated up to 6 months. The method was applied to authentic samples (whole blood, V-DBS, and C-DBS) from 50 inpatients in alcohol withdrawal and 50 control volunteers. Applying a cut-off value to detect inpatients at 221 ng/mL for PEth 16:0/18:1 provided no false positive results and a good sensitivity (86%). Comparison of quantitative results (Bland-Altman plot, Passing-Bablok regression, and Wilcoxon signed rank test) revealed that V-DBS and C-DBS were valid alternatives to venous blood for the detection of alcohol consumption.

  11. Effect of Ensiled Mulberry Leaves and Sun-Dried Mulberry Fruit Pomace on Finishing Steer Growth Performance, Blood Biochemical Parameters, and Carcass Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenming; Zhou, Bo; Ren, Liping; Meng, Qingxiang

    2014-01-01

    Fifty-one Simmental crossbred steers (357.0±16.5 kg) were used to compare a standard total mix ration (TMR) with variants on animal performance, ruminal fermentation, blood biochemical parameters, and carcass characteristics. Corn grain and cotton seed meal were partially replaced by ensiled mulberry leaves (EML) or sun-dried mulberry fruit pomace (SMFP). Experimental diets had similar amounts of crude protein (CP), acid detergent fiber (ADF), and metabolizable energy (ME). Animals were divided into three groups: control group (CONT), 8% EML group, and 6.3% SMFP group. Performance, including average daily weight gain (ADG), and dry matter intake (DMI), was measured. Blood and rumen samples were collected at the end of the experiment (16 weeks). There were no differences in final body weight (P = 0.743), ADG (P = 0.425), DMI (P = 0.642), or ADG/DMI (P = 0.236) between the groups. There were no differences (P = 0.2024) in rumen pH values; ammonia N was lower (P = 0.0076) in SMFP than in the EML and CONT groups. There were differences in the concentrations of total and individual volatile fatty acids, while no differences were determined in blood biochemical parameters (i.e., plasma glucose, urea concentrations, triglycerides, total protein, insulin, IgG, alanine transaminase, and aspartate aminotransferase, P ≥ 0.098). No differences were observed in carcass characteristics (P ≥ 0.513), tenderness (P = 0.844), adipose and lean color values (P ≥ 0.149), and chemical composition (P ≥ 0.400); however, intramuscular fat was lower in the EML and SMFP groups compared to the CONT animals (P = 0.034). In conclusion, diets supplemented with these two mulberry products in an isocaloric and isonitrogenous manner have similar effects to corn grain and cotton seed meals on steer performance, blood biochemical parameters and carcass characteristics, with the exception of ruminal VFA concentrations and lower intramuscular fat content. PMID

  12. Effect of ensiled mulberry leaves and sun-dried mulberry fruit pomace on finishing steer growth performance, blood biochemical parameters, and carcass characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenming; Zhou, Bo; Ren, Liping; Meng, Qingxiang

    2014-01-01

    Fifty-one Simmental crossbred steers (357.0 ± 16.5 kg) were used to compare a standard total mix ration (TMR) with variants on animal performance, ruminal fermentation, blood biochemical parameters, and carcass characteristics. Corn grain and cotton seed meal were partially replaced by ensiled mulberry leaves (EML) or sun-dried mulberry fruit pomace (SMFP). Experimental diets had similar amounts of crude protein (CP), acid detergent fiber (ADF), and metabolizable energy (ME). Animals were divided into three groups: control group (CONT), 8% EML group, and 6.3% SMFP group. Performance, including average daily weight gain (ADG), and dry matter intake (DMI), was measured. Blood and rumen samples were collected at the end of the experiment (16 weeks). There were no differences in final body weight (P = 0.743), ADG (P = 0.425), DMI (P = 0.642), or ADG/DMI (P = 0.236) between the groups. There were no differences (P = 0.2024) in rumen pH values; ammonia N was lower (P = 0.0076) in SMFP than in the EML and CONT groups. There were differences in the concentrations of total and individual volatile fatty acids, while no differences were determined in blood biochemical parameters (i.e., plasma glucose, urea concentrations, triglycerides, total protein, insulin, IgG, alanine transaminase, and aspartate aminotransferase, P ≥ 0.098). No differences were observed in carcass characteristics (P ≥ 0.513), tenderness (P = 0.844), adipose and lean color values (P ≥ 0.149), and chemical composition (P ≥ 0.400); however, intramuscular fat was lower in the EML and SMFP groups compared to the CONT animals (P = 0.034). In conclusion, diets supplemented with these two mulberry products in an isocaloric and isonitrogenous manner have similar effects to corn grain and cotton seed meals on steer performance, blood biochemical parameters and carcass characteristics, with the exception of ruminal VFA concentrations and lower intramuscular fat content. PMID:24427304

  13. A simple method for the analysis by MS/MS of underivatized amino acids on dry blood spots from newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Wenyan; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2012-05-01

    The analysis by electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry of amino acids with butyl esterification and isotopically labeled internal standard is routine in newborn screening laboratories worldwide. In the present study, we established a direct analysis method of higher accuracy that uses a non-deuterated internal standard. The automatic sampler and the pump of an LC apparatus were used to inject sample and mobile phase to MS, but no LC column was needed. The dry blood spot (DBS) material was prepared at levels of low, medium and high concentration; the running time was 1 min. In parallel to the new procedure, we applied the established method to analyze nine amino acids on DBS of healthy newborns and phenylketonuria newborns. The newly proposed method of product ion confirmation scan along with multiple reaction monitoring resulted in a very accurate identification of each amino acid. Our innovative protocol had high sensitivity and specificity in the analysis of cases of suspected metabolic diseases.

  14. Early life lead exposure causes gender-specific changes in the DNA methylation profile of DNA extracted from dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arko; Heredia, Nicole; Senut, Marie-Claude; Hess, Matthew; Land, Susan; Qu, Wen; Hollacher, Kurt; Dereski, Mary O; Ruden, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    Aims In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that early life lead (Pb) exposure associated DNA methylation (5mC) changes are dependent on the sex of the child and can serve as biomarkers for Pb exposure. Methods In this pilot study, we measured the 5mC profiles of DNA extracted from dried blood spots (DBS) in a cohort of 43 children (25 males and 18 females; ages from 3 months to 5 years) from Detroit. Result & Discussion We found that the effect of Pb-exposure on the 5-mC profiles can be separated into three subtypes: affected methylation loci which are conserved irrespective of the sex of the child (conserved); affected methylation loci unique to males (male-specific); and affected methylation loci unique to females (female-specific). PMID:26077427

  15. Free thyroxine values in dried blood spots on filter paper in newborns are related to both gestational age and birth body weight.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarotti, A; Bartalena, L; Chiovato, L; Falcone, M; Buratti, L; Ciampi, M; Giusti, L F; Grasso, L; Fenzi, G F; Martino, E

    1988-01-01

    The results of free thyroxine (FT4) measurements in dried blood spots on filter paper in 744 euthyroid newborns (616 at term, 128 preterm), 10 newborns with congenital hypothyroidism and 4 euthyroid newborns with congenital TBG deficiency are reported. FT4 was measured by column adsorption chromatography of free hormone followed by radioimmunoassay in the eluate. FT4 values averaged 24 +/- 0.2 pmol/L (mean +/- SE) in euthyroid newborns, 23.0 +/- 0.9 pmol/L in euthyroid newborns with TBG deficiency (p = NS), and 5.7 +/- 0.4 pmol/L in hypothyroid newborns (p less than 0.001 vs both groups). Total T4 (TT4) values in newborns with TBG deficiency were not different from those in hypothyroid newborns, but were significantly lower than those in euthyroid newborns without TBG abnormalities. FT4 values were higher in full-term newborns than in preterm newborns (25.2 +/- 0.3 vs 21.2 +/- 0.5 pmol/L, p less than 0.001). In both full-term and preterm newborns FT4 values in dried blood spots increased with birth body weight (bbw), virtually plateauing when bbw was greater than 2,500 g. The cut-off values established on the basis of the bbw (8.0 and 13.1 pmol/L for a bbw of less than or equal to 2,500 g and greater than 2,500 g, respectively) showed higher specificity and predictive value of positive results than the cut-off values based on the gestational age. In any case, the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of FT4 determinations proved to be higher than those of TT4 and TSH measurements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3139742

  16. Free thyroxine values in dried blood spots on filter paper in newborns are related to both gestational age and birth body weight.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarotti, A; Bartalena, L; Chiovato, L; Falcone, M; Buratti, L; Ciampi, M; Giusti, L F; Grasso, L; Fenzi, G F; Martino, E

    1988-01-01

    The results of free thyroxine (FT4) measurements in dried blood spots on filter paper in 744 euthyroid newborns (616 at term, 128 preterm), 10 newborns with congenital hypothyroidism and 4 euthyroid newborns with congenital TBG deficiency are reported. FT4 was measured by column adsorption chromatography of free hormone followed by radioimmunoassay in the eluate. FT4 values averaged 24 +/- 0.2 pmol/L (mean +/- SE) in euthyroid newborns, 23.0 +/- 0.9 pmol/L in euthyroid newborns with TBG deficiency (p = NS), and 5.7 +/- 0.4 pmol/L in hypothyroid newborns (p less than 0.001 vs both groups). Total T4 (TT4) values in newborns with TBG deficiency were not different from those in hypothyroid newborns, but were significantly lower than those in euthyroid newborns without TBG abnormalities. FT4 values were higher in full-term newborns than in preterm newborns (25.2 +/- 0.3 vs 21.2 +/- 0.5 pmol/L, p less than 0.001). In both full-term and preterm newborns FT4 values in dried blood spots increased with birth body weight (bbw), virtually plateauing when bbw was greater than 2,500 g. The cut-off values established on the basis of the bbw (8.0 and 13.1 pmol/L for a bbw of less than or equal to 2,500 g and greater than 2,500 g, respectively) showed higher specificity and predictive value of positive results than the cut-off values based on the gestational age. In any case, the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of FT4 determinations proved to be higher than those of TT4 and TSH measurements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Development and validation of an enantioselective LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of the anthelmintic drug praziquantel and its main metabolite in human plasma, blood and dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Meister, Isabel; Leonidova, Anna; Kovač, Jana; Duthaler, Urs; Keiser, Jennifer; Huwyler, Jörg

    2016-01-25

    Praziquantel (PZQ) is the treatment of choice against various trematode and cestode infections. To study the pharmacokinetics of PZQ in patients infected with the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, we developed and validated an enantioselective liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry method for the analysis of R - and S -PZQ and its R -trans-4-OH-PZQ metabolite in human plasma, blood and dried blood spots (DBS). The analytes were detected in the positive mode using selected reaction monitoring (R- and S-PZQ: m/z 312.2 → 202.2; R-trans -4-OH-PZQ: m/z 328.0 → 202.0). Prior to the chiral separation with a cellulose tris(3-chloro-4-methylphenylcarbamate) column, the analytes were purified from matrix contaminants and concentrated on a C-18 trapping column. The analytical range for each PZQ enantiomer was 0.01-2.5 μg/mL, and 0.1-25 μg/mL for the metabolite. The method met the requirements regarding precision (± 15%, ± 20% at the lower limit of quantification-LLOQ), intra- and inter-assay accuracy (85-115%, 80-120% at LLOQ), and linearity (R(2) ≥ 0.998). The analytes were stable in stock solutions as well as in plasma, blood and DBS. For DBS, the influences of hematocrit and blood spot size were considered as minor. Our validation results show that the method presented here is precise, accurate and selective, and can be used for pharmacokinetic studies. Moreover, the enantioselective separation was achieved with a run time of 11.5 min and a simple sample processing method.

  18. Performance of Roche CAP/CTM HIV-1 qualitative test version 2.0 using dried blood spots for early infant diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gueye, Sokhna Bousso; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Diallo, Mamadou Malick; Ly, Omar; Sow-Ndoye, Aissatou; Diagne-Gueye, Ndèye Diabou; Kébé-Fall, Khady; Diop, Fatou; Gaye-Diallo, Aïssatou; Belec, Laurent; Mboup, Souleymane; Touré-Kane, Coumba

    2016-03-01

    In the context of early infant diagnosis (EID) decentralization in sub-Saharan Africa, dried blood spot (DBS) is now widely used for HIV proviral DNA detection in resource-limited settings. A new version of CAP/CTM (version 2) has been introduced, recently by Roche Diagnosis as a new real-time PCR assay to replace previous technologies on qualitative detection of HIV-1 DNA using whole blood and DBS samples. The objective of this study was to evaluate CAP/CTM version 2 compared to CAP/CTM version 1 and Amplicor on DBS. A total of 261 DBS were collected from children aged 4 weeks to 17 months born from HIV-seropositive mothers and tested by the three techniques. CAP/CTM version 2 showed 100% of agreement with Amplicor including 74 positive results and 187 negative results. CAP/CTM version 2 versus CAP/CTM version 1 as well as CAP/CTM version 1 versus Amplicor showed two discordant results giving a sensitivity of 98.6%, specificity of 99.5%, positive predictive value of 98.6% and negative predictive value of 99.5%. The concordance was 99.12% (95% of confidence interval) giving a Kappa coefficient of 0.97 (p<0.001). These findings confirmed the expected good performance of CAP/CTM version 2 for HIV-1 EID.

  19. Reliability of DNA methylation measures from dried blood spots and mononuclear cells using the HumanMethylation450k BeadArray

    PubMed Central

    Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; English, Dallas R.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Jung, Chol-Hee; Bassett, Julie K.; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Wong, Ee Ming; Joo, Jihoon E.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.

    2016-01-01

    The reliability of methylation measures from the widely used HumanMethylation450 (HM450K) microarray has not been assessed for DNA from dried blood spots (DBS) or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), nor for combined data from different studies. Repeated HM450K methylation measures in DNA from DBS and PBMC samples were available from participants in six case-control studies nested within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. Reliability was assessed for individual CpGs by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) based on technical replicates (samples repeated in a single study; 126 PBMC, 136 DBS) and study duplicates (samples repeated across studies; 280 PBMC, 769 DBS) using mixed-effects models. Reliability based on technical replicates was moderate for PBMC (median ICC = 0.42), but lower for DBS (median ICC = 0.20). Study duplicates gave lower ICCs than technical replicates. CpGs that were either highly methylated or unmethylated generally had lower ICCs, which appeared to be mostly related to their lower variability. The ICCs for global methylation measures were high, typically greater than 0.70. The reliability of methylation measures determined by the HM450K microarray is wide-ranging and depends primarily on the variability in methylation at individual CpG sites. The power of association studies is low for a substantial proportion of CpGs in the HM450K assay. PMID:27457678

  20. Metabonomics of newborn screening dried blood spot samples: a novel approach in the screening and diagnostics of inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dénes, Júlia; Szabó, Eszter; Robinette, Steven L; Szatmári, Ildikó; Szőnyi, László; Kreuder, Joachim G; Rauterberg, Ernst W; Takáts, Zoltán

    2012-11-20

    A novel, single stage high resolution mass spectrometry-based method is presented for the population level screening of inborn errors of metabolism. The approach proposed here extends traditional electrospray tandem mass spectrometry screening by introducing nanospray ionization and high resolution mass spectrometry, allowing the selective detection of more than 400 individual metabolic constituents of blood including acylcarnitines, amino acids, organic acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, bile acids, and complex lipids. Dried blood spots were extracted using a methanolic solution of isotope labeled internal standards, and filtered extracts were electrosprayed using a fully automated chip-based nanospray ion source in both positive and negative ion mode. Ions were analyzed using an Orbitrap Fourier transformation mass spectrometer at nominal mass resolution of 100,000. Individual metabolic constituents were quantified using standard isotope dilution methods. Concentration threshold (cutoff) level-based analysis allows the identification of newborns with metabolic diseases, similarly to the traditional electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) method; however, the detection of additional known biomarkers (e.g., organic acids) results in improved sensitivity and selectivity. The broad range of detected analytes allowed the untargeted multivariate statistical analysis of spectra and identification of additional diseased states, therapeutic artifacts, and damaged samples, besides the metabolic disease panel.

  1. Comparison of active dry yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and yeast culture for growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality and blood indexes in finishing bulls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chun-Yin; Ren, Li-Ping; Zhou, Zhen-Ming; Chang, Ying; Meng, Qing-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effect of active dry yeasts (ADY) and yeast cultures (YC), two typical products of yeast preparations, on growth performance, carcass characteristics, meat quality and blood indexes in finishing bulls fed a high-concentrate diet. Forty-five finishing bulls (mean body weight (BW) ± standard deviation: 505 ± 29 kg BW) were allocated to three groups of 15 bulls and assigned randomly to one of three diets which were CON diet (basal diet), ADY diet (basal diet + Levucell SC) and YC diet (basal diet + Diamond V XP), respectively. After 98 days of trial, all bulls were slaughtered. The result showed that ADY rather than YC improved growth performance and carcass traits of bulls compared to CON. Moreover, both ADY and YC improved beef tenderness and changed blood indexes related to fat metabolism. In conclusion, ADY had more pronounced effect on growth performance of bulls fed high-concentrate diet, and both ADY and YC improved the beef quality by intensive fat metabolism. PMID:26472702

  2. Automated system for on-line desorption of dried blood spots applied to LC/MS/MS pharmacokinetic study of flurbiprofen and its metabolite.

    PubMed

    Déglon, Julien; Thomas, Aurélien; Daali, Youssef; Lauer, Estelle; Samer, Caroline; Desmeules, Jules; Dayer, Pierre; Mangin, Patrice; Staub, Christian

    2011-01-25

    This paper illustrates the development of an automated system for the on-line bioanalysis of dried blood spots (on-line DBS). In this way, a prototype was designed for integration into a conventional LC/MS/MS, allowing the successive extraction of 30 DBS toward the analytical system without any sample pretreatment. The developed method was assessed for the DBS analysis of flurbiprofen (FLB) and its metabolite 4-hydroxyflurbiprofen (OH-FLB) in human whole blood (i.e. 5 μL). The automated procedure was fully validated based on international criteria and showed good precision, trueness, and linearity over the expected concentration range (from 10 to 1000 ng/mL and 100 to 10,000 ng/mL for OH-FLB and FLB respectively). Furthermore, the prototype showed good results in terms of recovery and carry-over. Stability of both analytes on filter paper was also investigated and the results suggested that DBS could be stored at ambient temperature for over 1 month. The on-line DBS automated system was then successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study performed on healthy male volunteers after oral administration of a single 50-mg dose of FLB. Additionally, a comparison between finger capillary DBS and classic venous plasma concentrations was investigated. A good correlation was observed, demonstrating the complementarity of both sampling forms. The automated system described in this article represents an efficient tool for the LC/MS/MS analysis of DBS samples in many bioanalytical applications.

  3. Fast LC-MS/MS analysis of tacrolimus, sirolimus, everolimus and cyclosporin A in dried blood spots and the influence of the hematocrit and immunosuppressant concentration on recovery.

    PubMed

    Koster, Remco A; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C; Greijdanus, Ben; Uges, Donald R A

    2013-10-15

    We developed a method for the analysis of four immunosuppressants in dried blood spot (DBS) samples to facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring for transplant patients outside the hospital. An 8mm disc from the central part of the DBS was punched, extracted and followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The method was validated with ranges from 1.00-50.0 µg/L for tacrolimus, sirolimus and everolimus, and from 20.0-2000 µg/L for cyclosporin A. The validation showed a maximum overall bias of 13.0% for the sirolimus LLOQ, while the maximum overall CV was 15.7% for the everolimus LLOQ. All four immunosuppressants showed to be stable in DBS for at least 7 days at 22°C. The volume of the blood spot showed to have minor effect on measured concentrations. A cross-validation test between the 31 ET CHR paper and the Whatman FTA DMPK-C cards showed no significant difference between the two types of paper. During validation the hematocrit (HT) showed to have significant influence on the analytical results. When the measured concentrations were corrected for the effect of the HT, biases improved significantly. Additional recovery tests proved that the combination of especially low HT and high concentration does not only affect the spot size but can also affect the extraction recoveries of sirolimus and especially everolimus. Although the tested parameters like HT and concentrations are extreme and unlikely for routine analysis of outpatients, the fundamental effect of the combination of these parameters on extraction recoveries are proven with this research. The protein binding in the blood and hydrogen binding to the cellulose of the paper is suggested to influence extractions and gives new insights in the extraction methodology of DBS samples. The observed HT effect during the validation appeared to be negligible during the correlation study as no concentration corrections for the HT values were needed. Nevertheless, results from DBS samples with extremely high concentrations combined

  4. Comparison of the quantification of acetaminophen in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and dried blood spots using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rachel R.; Hoffman, Keith L.; Schniedewind, Björn; Clavijo, Claudia; Galinkin, Jeffrey L.; Christians, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) acetamide) is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for the management of pain in children. Quantification of acetaminophen in pre-term and term neonates and small children requires the availability of highly sensitive assays in small volume blood samples. We developed and validated an LC-MS/MS assay for the quantification of acetaminophen in human plasma, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) and dried blood spots (DBS). Reconstitution in water (DBS only) and addition of a protein precipitation solution containing the deuterated internal standard were the only manual steps. Extracted samples were analyzed on a Kinetex 2.6 μm PFP column using an acetonitrile/formic acid gradient. The analytes were detected in the positive multiple reaction mode. Alternatively, DBS were automatically processed using direct desorption in a sample card and preparation (SCAP) robotic autosampler in combination with online extraction. The range of reliable response in plasma and CSF was 3.05-20,000 ng/ml (r2 > 0.99) and 27.4-20,000 ng/ml (r2 > 0.99) for DBS (manual extraction and automated direct desorption). Inter-day accuracy was always within 85-115% and inter-day precision for plasma, CSF and manually extracted DBS were less than 15%. Deming regression analysis comparing 167 matching pairs of plasma and DBS samples showed a correlation coefficient of 0.98. Bland Altman analysis indicated a 26.6% positive bias in DBS, most likely reflecting the blood: plasma distribution ratio of acetaminophen. DBS are a valid matrix for acetaminophen pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:23670126

  5. The use of dried blood spots for quantification of 15 antipsychotics and 7 metabolites with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Patteet, Lisbeth; Maudens, Kristof E; Stove, Christophe P; Lambert, Willy E; Morrens, Manuel; Sabbe, Bernard; Neels, Hugo

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring of antipsychotics is important in optimizing individual therapy. In psychiatric populations, classical venous blood sampling is experienced as frightening. Interest in alternative techniques, like dried blood spots (DBS), has consequently increased. A fast and easy to perform DBS method for quantification of 16 antipsychotics (amisulpride, aripiprazole, asenapine, bromperidol, clozapine, haloperidol, iloperidone, levosulpiride, lurasidone, olanzapine, paliperidone, pipamperone, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole and zuclopenthixol) and 8 metabolites was developed. DBS were prepared using 25 μL of whole blood and extraction of complete spots was performed using methanol: methyl-t-butyl-ether (4:1). After evaporation, the extract was reconstituted in the mobile phase and 10 μL were injected on an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Separation using a C18 column and gradient elution with a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min resulted in a 6-min run-time. Ionization was performed in positive mode and a dynamic MRM method was applied. Median recovery was 66.4 % (range 28.7-84.5%). Accuracy was within the acceptance criteria, except for pipamperone (LLOQ and low concentration) and lurasidone (low concentration). Imprecision was only aberrant for lurasidone at low and medium concentration. All compounds were stable during 1 month at room temperature, 4 °C and -18 °C. Lurasidone was unstable when the extract was stored for 12 h on the autosampler. Absolute matrix effects (ME) (median 66.1%) were compensated by the use of deuterated IS (median 98.8%). The DBS method was successfully applied on 25-μL capillary DBS from patients and proved to be a reliable alternative for quantification of all antipsychotics except for olanzapine and N-desmethylolanzapine.

  6. Personalized monitoring of therapeutic salicylic acid in dried blood spots using a three-layer setup and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Siebenhaar, Markus; Küllmer, Kai; Fernandes, Nuno Miguel de Barros; Hüllen, Volker; Hopf, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry is an emerging technology for direct therapeutic drug monitoring in dried blood spots (DBS). Current DBS methods require manual application of small molecules as internal standards for absolute drug quantification. With industrial standardization in mind, we superseded the manual addition of standard and built a three-layer setup for robust quantification of salicylic acid directly from DBS. We combined a dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate weave facilitating sample spreading with a cellulose layer for addition of isotope-labeled salicylic acid as internal standard and a filter paper for analysis of the standard-containing sample by DESI-MS. Using this setup, we developed a quantification method for salicylic acid from whole blood with a validated linear curve range from 10 to 2000 mg/L, a relative standard deviation (RSD%) ≤14%, and determination coefficients of 0.997. The limit of detection (LOD) was 8 mg/L and the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 10 mg/L. Recovery rates in method verification by LC-MS/MS were 97 to 101% for blinded samples. Most importantly, a study in healthy volunteers after administration of a single dose of Aspirin provides evidence to suggest that the three-layer setup may enable individual pharmacokinetic and endpoint testing following blood collection by finger pricking by patients at home. Taken together, our data suggests that DBS-based quantification of drugs by DESI-MS on pre-manufactured three-layer cartridges may be a promising approach for future near-patient therapeutic drug monitoring.

  7. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies. PMID:27591865

  8. Butylated hydroxytoluene can protect polyunsaturated fatty acids in dried blood spots from degradation for up to 8 weeks at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dried blood spots (DBS) from fingertip prick blood can enable high throughput fatty acid profiling but may be prone to lipid peroxidation during storage. The use of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) on chromatography paper can prevent polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) loss but examinations on the length of storage times possible are not comprehensive. Method In the first study, venous whole blood was saturated on paper strips pre-soaked with 0, 2.5 or 5.0 mg/mL BHT and exposed to air for up to 28 days. In a second study, the effect of sealing DBS on 5.0 mg/mL BHT-soaked chromatography strips in capped test tubes or vacuum sealed polypropylene bags with and without nitrogen purging was examined over eight weeks. The fatty acid composition of the DBS were determined by gas chromatography and the effect of sample storage on omega-3 biomarkers were examined. Results PUFA and omega-3 biomarkers in DBS stored without BHT were dramatically reduced by day 3. In general, BHT delayed decreases in eicosapentaenoic + docosahexaenoic acid from baseline (3.2 ± 0.2 wt%) to 28 days (2.6 ± 0.03 wt%) of storage. In the % n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) in total HUFA biomarker, BHT was more effective at preventing changes, particularly with 5.0 mg/mL BHT where no differences were detected up to 28 days. Sealed storage with BHT tended to increase the stability of the PUFA in DBS and nitrogen purging did not appear to provide additional benefits. The % n-3 HUFA in total HUFA biomarker also appeared to be more stable in the sealed storage study. Conclusions The storage of DBS in sealed containers with BHT may prevent PUFA degradation for up to 8 weeks. The % n-3 HUFA in total HUFA biomarker appears to provide a more consistent assessment of omega-3 status throughout storage as compared with other omega-3 blood biomarkers. PMID:23425563

  9. Application of dried blood spots to determine vitamin D status in a large nutritional study with unsupervised sampling: the Food4Me project.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Ulrich; Baur, Manuela; Roos, Franz F; Brennan, Lorraine; Daniel, Hannelore; Fallaize, Rosalind; Forster, Hannah; Gibney, Eileen R; Gibney, Mike; Godlewska, Magdalena; Hartwig, Kai; Kolossa, Silvia; Lambrinou, Christina P; Livingstone, Katherine M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Macready, Anna L; Manios, Yannis; Marsaux, Cyril F M; Martinez, J Alfredo; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Moschonis, George; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; O'Donovan, Clare B; San-Cristobal, Rodrigo; Saris, Wim H M; Surwiłło, Agnieszka; Traczyk, Iwona; Tsirigoti, Lydia; Walsh, Marianne C; Woolhead, Clara; Mathers, John C; Weber, Peter

    2016-01-28

    An efficient and robust method to measure vitamin D (25-hydroxy vitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) and 25-hydroxy vitamin D2 in dried blood spots (DBS) has been developed and applied in the pan-European multi-centre, internet-based, personalised nutrition intervention study Food4Me. The method includes calibration with blood containing endogenous 25(OH)D3, spotted as DBS and corrected for haematocrit content. The methodology was validated following international standards. The performance characteristics did not reach those of the current gold standard liquid chromatography-MS/MS in plasma for all parameters, but were found to be very suitable for status-level determination under field conditions. DBS sample quality was very high, and 3778 measurements of 25(OH)D3 were obtained from 1465 participants. The study centre and the season within the study centre were very good predictors of 25(OH)D3 levels (P<0·001 for each case). Seasonal effects were modelled by fitting a sine function with a minimum 25(OH)D3 level on 20 January and a maximum on 21 July. The seasonal amplitude varied from centre to centre. The largest difference between winter and summer levels was found in Germany and the smallest in Poland. The model was cross-validated to determine the consistency of the predictions and the performance of the DBS method. The Pearson's correlation between the measured values and the predicted values was r 0·65, and the sd of their differences was 21·2 nmol/l. This includes the analytical variation and the biological variation within subjects. Overall, DBS obtained by unsupervised sampling of the participants at home was a viable methodology for obtaining vitamin D status information in a large nutritional study.

  10. Multiplex Assay of Second-Line Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs in Dried Blood Spots Using Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Jun, Sun-Hee; Han, Minje; Song, Sang Hoon; Park, Jong Sun; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Kyoung Un

    2016-01-01

    As dried blood spots (DBSs) have various advantages over conventional venous blood sampling, some assays for detection of one or two anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs in DBSs have been developed. However, there are no assays currently available for the simultaneous measurement of three or more anti-TB drugs in DBSs. In this study, we developed and evaluated a multiplex method for detecting nine anti-TB drugs including streptomycin, kanamycin, clarithromycin, cycloserine, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, para-aminosalicylic acid, prothionamide, and linezolid in DBSs by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Seventy-nine patient samples of DBS were analyzed on the UPLC-MS/MS system. All drug concentrations were determined within 4 min, and assay performance was evaluated. All drugs were clearly separated without ion suppression. Within-run and between-run precisions were 1.7-13.0% and 5.7-17.0%, respectively, at concentrations representing low and high levels for the nine drugs. Lower limits of detection and quantification were 0.06-0.6 and 0.5-5.0 µg/mL, respectively. Linearity was acceptable at five level concentrations for each drug. Correlations between drug concentrations in plasma and DBSs by using Passing-Bablock regression and Pearson's rho (ρ, 0.798-0.989) were acceptable. In conclusion, we developed a multiplex assay to measure nine second-line anti-TB drugs in DBSs successfully. This assay provided convenient and rapid drug quantification and could have applications in drug monitoring during treatment. PMID:27374716

  11. Validation and Application of a Dried Blood Spot Assay for Biofilm-Active Antibiotics Commonly Used for Treatment of Prosthetic Implant Infections.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Ben; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Salman, Sam; Clark, Ben; Dyer, John; Batty, Kevin T; Davis, Timothy M E; Manning, Laurens

    2016-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) antibiotic assays can facilitate pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) studies in situations where venous blood sampling is logistically difficult. We sought to develop, validate, and apply a DBS assay for rifampin (RIF), fusidic acid (FUS), and ciprofloxacin (CIP). These antibiotics are considered active against organisms in biofilms and are therefore commonly used for the treatment of infections associated with prosthetic implants. A liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy DBS assay was developed and validated, including red cell partitioning and thermal stability for each drug and the rifampin metabolite desacetyl rifampin (Des-RIF). Plasma and DBS concentrations in 10 healthy adults were compared, and the concentration-time profiles were incorporated into population PK models. The limits of quantification for RIF, Des-RIF, CIP, and FUS in DBS were 15 μg/liter, 14 μg/liter, 25 μg/liter, and 153 μg/liter, respectively. Adjusting for hematocrit, red cell partitioning, and relative recovery, DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable to measured plasma concentrations for each antibiotic (r > 0.95; P < 0.0001), and Bland-Altman plots showed no significant bias. The final population PK estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and time above threshold MICs for measured and DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable. These drugs were stable in DBSs for at least 10 days at room temperature and 1 month at 4°C. The present DBS antibiotic assays are robust and can be used as surrogates for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK and PK/PD data in a variety of clinical situations, including therapeutic drug monitoring or studies of implant infections.

  12. Genomics and museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Michael W

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, Allan Wilson and colleagues isolated DNA sequences from museum specimens of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys panamintinus) and compared these sequences with those from freshly collected animals (Thomas et al. 1990). The museum specimens had been collected up to 78 years earlier, so the two samples provided a direct temporal comparison of patterns of genetic variation. This was not the first time DNA sequences had been isolated from preserved material, but it was the first time it had been carried out with a population sample. Population geneticists often try to make inferences about the influence of historical processes such as selection, drift, mutation and migration on patterns of genetic variation in the present. The work of Wilson and colleagues was important in part because it suggested a way in which population geneticists could actually study genetic change in natural populations through time, much the same way that experimentalists can do with artificial populations in the laboratory. Indeed, the work of Thomas et al. (1990) spawned dozens of studies in which museum specimens were used to compare historical and present-day genetic diversity (reviewed in Wandeler et al. 2007). All of these studies, however, were limited by the same fundamental problem: old DNA is degraded into short fragments. As a consequence, these studies mostly involved PCR amplification of short templates, usually short stretches of mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites. In this issue, Bi et al. (2013) report a breakthrough that should open the door to studies of genomic variation in museum specimens. They used target enrichment (exon capture) and next-generation (Illumina) sequencing to compare patterns of genetic variation in historic and present-day population samples of alpine chipmunks (Tamias alpinus) (Fig. 1). The historic samples came from specimens collected in 1915, so the temporal span of this comparison is nearly 100 years.

  13. Pharmacokinetic Study of Praziquantel Enantiomers and Its Main Metabolite R-trans-4-OH-PZQ in Plasma, Blood and Dried Blood Spots in Opisthorchis viverrini-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Isabel; Kovac, Jana; Duthaler, Urs; Odermatt, Peter; Huwyler, Jörg; Vanobberghen, Fiona; Sayasone, Somphou; Keiser, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Praziquantel (PZQ) is the treatment of choice for infections with the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, a major health problem in Southeast Asia. However, pharmacokinetic (PK) studies investigating the disposition of PZQ enantiomers (R- and S-PZQ) and its main metabolite, R-trans-4-OH-PZQ, in diseased patients are lacking. The implementation of a dried blood spot (DBS) sampling technique would ease the performance of PK studies in remote areas without clinical facilities. The aim of the present study is to provide data on the disposition of PZQ enantiomers and R-trans-4-OH-PZQ in opisthorchiasis patients and to validate the use of DBS compared to plasma and blood sampling. Methodology/Principal Findings PZQ was administered to nine O. viverrini-infected patients at 3 oral doses of 25 mg/kg in 4 h intervals. Plasma, blood and DBS were simultaneously collected at selected time points from 0 to 24 h post-treatment. PK parameters were determined using non-compartmental analysis. Drug concentrations and areas under the curve (AUC0–24h) measured in the 3 matrices were compared using Bland-Altman analysis. We observed plasma AUC0–24hs of 1.1, 9.0 and 188.7 μg/ml*h and half-lives of 1.1, 3.3 and 6.4 h for R-PZQ, S-PZQ and R-trans-4-OH, respectively. Maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax) of 0.2, 0.9 and 13.9 μg/ml for R-PZQ, S-PQZ and R-trans-4-OH peaked at 7 h for PZQ enantiomers and at 8.7 h for the metabolite. Individual drug concentration measurements and patient AUC0–24hs displayed ratios of blood or DBS versus plasma between 79–94% for R- and S-PZQ, and between 108–122% for R-trans-4-OH. Conclusions/Significance Pharmacodynamic (PD) in vitro studies on PZQ enantiomers and R-trans-4-OH-PZQ are necessary to be able to correlate PK parameters with efficacy. DBS appears to be a valid alternative to conventional venous sampling for PK studies in PZQ-treated patients. PMID:27152952

  14. Analysis of cocaine and two metabolites in dried blood spots by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection: a novel test for cocaine and alcohol intake.

    PubMed

    Mercolini, Laura; Mandrioli, Roberto; Gerra, Gilberto; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2010-11-12

    An original HPLC method coupled to spectrofluorimetric detection is presented for the simultaneous analysis in dried blood spots (DBS) of cocaine and two important metabolites, namely benzoylecgonine (its main metabolite) and cocaethylene (the active metabolite formed in the presence of ethanol). The chromatographic analysis was carried out on a C8 column, using a mobile phase containing phosphate buffer (pH 3.0)-acetonitrile (85:15, v/v). Native analyte fluorescence was monitored at 315 nm while exciting at 230 nm. A fast and feasible sample pre-treatment was implemented by solvent extraction, obtaining good extraction yields (>91%) and satisfactory precision values (RSD<4.8%). The method was successfully applied to DBS samples collected from some cocaine users, both with and without concomitant ethanol intake. The results were in good agreement with those obtained from plasma samples subjected to an original solid-phase extraction procedure on C8 cartridges. The method has demonstrated to be suitable for the monitoring of cocaine/ethanol use by means of DBS or plasma testing. Assays are in progress to apply this method on the street, for the control of subjects suspected of driving under the influence of psychotropic substances. PMID:20934184

  15. Effect of different levels of dried citrus pulp on performance, egg quality, and blood parameters of laying hens in early phase of production.

    PubMed

    Nazok, Ahmad; Rezaei, Mansour; Sayyahzadeh, Hadi

    2010-04-01

    Utilization of agricultural wastes in animal nutrition is a matter of great concern. Dried citrus pulp (DCP) is a potential source of some valuable nutrients for animal and poultry. In an experiment with completely randomized design, the effect of different levels (0%, 4%, 8%, 12%, and 16%) of DCP was evaluated on performance, egg quality, and blood parameters of laying hens from 25 to 37 weeks of age. The birds were randomly allocated to five groups with six replicates and three birds in each replicate. The results showed that with increasing the level of DCP up to 12%, there were no significant differences among treatments for feed intake, egg production, egg mass, feed conversion ratio, final body weight, yolk index, and yolk color. There were no significant differences between treatments in shell thickness, eggshell index, egg score, and Haugh unit. Utilization of DCP up to 16% significantly increased serum glucose and high-density lipoprotein and reduced cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides (P < 0.05). Results of the present study indicated that use of 12% DCP in laying hen diets had no adverse effect on performance and egg quality of laying hens in early phase of production. PMID:19882229

  16. Validation of biomarkers of CVD risk from dried blood spots in community-based research: Methodologies and study-specific serum equivalencies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Laura B.; Hall, Martica H.; McLean, Shakir; Porter, James H.; Berkman, Lisa; Marino, Miguel; Sembajwe, Grace; McDade, Thomas W.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dried blood spot (DBS) methodology offers significant advantages over venipuncture in vulnerable populations or large-scale studies, including reduced participant burden and higher response rates. Uncertainty about validity of cardiovascular risk biomarkers remains a barrier to wide-scale use. We determined the validity of DBS-derived biomarkers of CVD risk versus gold-standard assessments, and study-specific, serum-equivalency values for clinical relevance of DBS-derived values. Methods Concurrent venipuncture serum and DBS samples (n=150 adults) were assayed in CLIA-certified and DBS laboratories, respectively. Time controls of DBS standard samples were assayed single-blind along with test samples. Linear regression analyses evaluated DBS-to-serum equivalency values; agreement and bias were assessed via Bland-Altman plots. Results Linear regressions of venipuncture values on DBS-to-serum equivalencies provided R2 values for TC, HDL-C, CRP of 0.484, 0.118, 0.666, respectively. Bland-Altman plots revealed minimal systematic bias between DBS-to-serum and venipuncture values; precision worsened at higher mean values of CRP. Time controls reveal little degradation or change in analyte values for HDL-C and CRP over 30 weeks. Conclusions DBS-assessed biomarkers represent a valid alternative to venipuncture assessments. Large studies using DBS should include study-specific serum-equivalency determinations to optimize individual-level sensitivity, viability of detecting intervention effects, and generalizability in community-level, primary prevention interventions. PMID:26652683

  17. Development of a validated LC-MS/MS method for determination of doxofylline on rat dried blood spots and urine: application to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Prasad, K Guru; Naidu, Ch Gangu; Saida, Shaik; Agwane, Sachin B

    2013-05-01

    A rapid and highly sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for determination of doxofylline on rat dried blood spots and urine was developed and validated. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a reverse phase C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm), using 20 mM ammonium acetate (pH adjusted to 3.5 with trifluoroacetic acid) and acetonitrile (75:25 v/v) as a mobile phase at 25 °C. LC-MS detection was performed with selective ion monitoring using target ions at m/z 267 and m/z 195 for doxofylline and caffeine used as internal standard respectively. The calibration curve showed a good linearity in the concentration range of 1-5000 ng/mL. The effect of hematocrit on extraction of doxofylline from DBS was evaluated. The mean recoveries of doxofylline from DBS and urine were 93.46 and 89.86% respectively. The intra and inter-day precisions were less than 4.28% in DBS as well as urine. The limit of detection and quantification were 0.24 and 0.84 ng/mL in DBS and 0.28 and 1.00 ng/mL in urine samples respectively. The method was validated as per ICH guidelines and successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of doxofylline in rats.

  18. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  19. Multiaxial graphite test specimen

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    A multiaxial test program is to be conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on the core component graphite. The objectives of the tests are to obtain failure data under uniaxial and biaxial states of stress in order to construct a failure surface in a two-dimensional stress space. These data will be used in verifying the accuracy of the maximum stress failure theory being proposed for use in designing the core graphite components. Tubular specimens are proposed to be used and are either loaded axially and/or subjected to internal pressure. This report includes a study on three specimen configurations. The conclusions of that study indicate that an elliptical transition geometry procedures the smallest discontinuity effects. Several loading combustions were studied using the elliptical transition specimen. The primary purpose is to establish the location of the highest stress state and its relation to the gage section for all of the loading conditions. The tension/internal pres sure loading condition (1:1) indicated that the high stress area is just outside the gage section but still should be acceptable. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  20. Specimen Holder For Flammability Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    1992-01-01

    Fixture holds sheet specimens for flammability tests. Frame and clamps designed to minimize local overstress on specimen. Heat capacity of fixture low, interfering less with interpretation of results of test by drawing less heat away from specimen. Accepts films, fabrics, foams, and other sheets, rigid or flexible. Specimens thin or thick, or of variable thickness. Bent to accommodate curved rigid specimens. Also used for such other tests as particle-impact tests.

  1. Maternal Screening for Hypothyroidism and Thyroiditis Using Filter Paper Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Foley, T.P.; Henry, J.J.; Hofman, L.F.; Sanfilippo, J.S.; Naylor, E.W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objective Hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis are more prevalent than previously considered in women during pregnancy and the postpartum, and are associated with adverse effects on the mother and her fetus. We determined the efficacy and accuracy of screening women for primary hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis by testing TSH and two thyroid antibodies (TAb): thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb) and thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb), in eluates of filter paper specimens collected during early pregnancy and the postpartum. Methods We enrolled 494 first-trimester pregnant women with no exclusion criteria into a prospective study to detect primary hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis. Finger stick blood was applied to filter paper, dried in room air, eluted, and promptly tested for TSH and TAb. A total of 178 of the pregnant women (36%) were tested in the early postpartum. Women with abnormal results had confirmatory serum tests. Results It was found that 91 pregnant women (18.4%) and 43 postpartum women (24.2%) had abnormal TSH values (>4.0 mU/L) and/or positive TAb; 140 pregnant women (28.3%) had TSH values >2.5 mU/L. All subjects with TSH values >4.0 mU/L tested positive for TAb. Eighteen women (3.6%) who tested normal during pregnancy tested abnormal in the postpartum. Conclusions This study confirms that TSH and TPOAb measured in eluates of blood-spotted filter paper specimens are excellent screening tests to detect primary hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis in pregnant and postpartum women. Results are very comparable to serum data in this population published in the literature. PMID:24025107

  2. Method for thinning specimen

    DOEpatents

    Follstaedt, David M.; Moran, Michael P.

    2005-03-15

    A method for thinning (such as in grinding and polishing) a material surface using an instrument means for moving an article with a discontinuous surface with an abrasive material dispersed between the material surface and the discontinuous surface where the discontinuous surface of the moving article provides an efficient means for maintaining contact of the abrasive with the material surface. When used to dimple specimens for microscopy analysis, a wheel with a surface that has been modified to produce a uniform or random discontinuous surface significantly improves the speed of the dimpling process without loss of quality of finish.

  3. Application of a Liquid Extraction Based Sealing Surface Sampling Probe for Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Dried Blood Spots and Mouse Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2009-01-01

    The utility of a liquid extraction based sealing surface sampling probe (SSSP) for the direct mass spectrometric analysis of targeted drugs and metabolites in dried blood spots (DBSs) and whole mouse thin tissue sections was demonstrated. The accuracy and precision for the quantitative analysis of a minimum of 50 ng/mL sitamaquine or acetaminophen in DBSs on paper were well within the required 15% dictated by internationally recognized acceptance criteria for assay validations. Analysis of whole-body mouse thin tissue sections from animals dosed with propranolol, adhered to an adhesive tape substrate, provided semi-quantitative information for propranolol and its hydroxyproranolol glucuronide metabolite within specific organs of the tissue. The relative abundances recorded for the two compounds in the brain, lung, kidney and liver were in nominal agreement with previously reported amounts based on analysis using a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP), and whole-body autoradiography (WBA) and HPLC-MS analysis. The ability to sample and analyze from tape-adhered tissue samples, which are generally employed in WBA analysis, presents the possibility of consecutive WBA and SSSP-MS analysis of the same tissue section. This would facilitate assignment, and possibly quantitation, of the different molecular forms of total drug related material detected in the WBA analysis. The flexibility to sample larger or smaller spot sizes, alternative probe sealing mechanisms, and a reduction in internal volumes and associated sample carryover issues will be among the first simple improvements necessary to make the SSSP-MS method a practical DBS and/or thin tissue section analysis tool or to expand its use to other surface sampling applications.

  4. Evaluation of Mutual Drug-Drug Interaction within Geneva Cocktail for Cytochrome P450 Phenotyping using Innovative Dried Blood Sampling Method.

    PubMed

    Bosilkovska, Marija; Samer, Caroline; Déglon, Julien; Thomas, Aurélien; Walder, Bernhard; Desmeules, Jules; Daali, Youssef

    2016-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity can be assessed using a 'cocktail' phenotyping approach. Recently, we have developed a cocktail (Geneva cocktail) which combines the use of low-dose probes with a low-invasiveness dried blood spots (DBS) sampling technique and a single analytical method for the phenotyping of six major CYP isoforms. We have previously demonstrated that modulation of CYP activity after pre-treatment with CYP inhibitors/inducer could be reliably predicted using Geneva cocktail. To further validate this cocktail, in this study, we have verified whether probe drugs contained in the latter cause mutual drug-drug interactions. In a randomized, four-way, Latin-square crossover study, 30 healthy volunteers received low-dose caffeine, flurbiprofen, omeprazole, dextromethorphan and midazolam (a previously validated combination with no mutual drug-drug interactions); fexofenadine alone; bupropion alone; or all seven drugs simultaneously (Geneva cocktail). Pharmacokinetic profiles of the probe drugs and their metabolites were determined in DBS samples using both conventional micropipette sampling and new microfluidic device allowing for self-sampling. The 90% confidence intervals for the geometric mean ratios of AUC metabolite/AUC probe for CYP probes administered alone or within Geneva cocktail fell within the 0.8-1.25 bioequivalence range indicating the absence of pharmacokinetic interaction. The same result was observed for the chosen phenotyping indices, that is metabolic ratios at 2 hr (CYP1A2, CYP3A) or 3 hr (CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6) post-cocktail administration. DBS sampling could successfully be performed using a new microfluidic device. In conclusion, Geneva cocktail combined with an innovative DBS sampling device can be used routinely as a test for simultaneous CYP phenotyping.

  5. Microwave-assisted on-spot derivatization for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based determination of polar low molecular weight compounds in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Sadones, Nele; Van Bever, Elien; Archer, John R H; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I; Van Bortel, Luc; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2016-09-23

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and analysis is increasingly being applied in bioanalysis. Although the use of DBS has many advantages, it is also associated with some challenges. E.g. given the limited amount of available material, highly sensitive detection techniques are often required to attain sufficient sensitivity. In gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), derivatization can be helpful to achieve adequate sensitivity. Because this additional sample preparation step is considered as time-consuming, we introduce a new derivatization procedure, i.e. "microwave-assisted on-spot derivatization", to minimize sample preparation of DBS. In this approach the derivatization reagents are directly applied onto the DBS and derivatization takes place in a microwave instead of via conventional heating. In this manuscript we evaluated the applicability of this new concept of derivatization for the determination of two polar low molecular weight molecules, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gabapentin, in DBS using a standard GC-MS configuration. The method was successfully validated for both compounds, with imprecision and bias values within acceptance criteria (<20% at LLOQ, <15% at 3 other QC levels). Calibration lines were linear over the 10-100μg/mL and 1-30μg/mL range for GHB and gabapentin, respectively. Stability studies revealed no significant decrease of gabapentin and GHB in DBS upon storage at room temperature for at least 84 days. Furthermore, DBS-specific parameters, including hematocrit and volume spotted, were evaluated. As demonstrated by the analysis of GHB and gabapentin positive samples, "microwave-assisted on-spot derivatization" proved to be reliable, fast and applicable in routine toxicology. Moreover, other polar low molecular weight compounds of interest in clinical and/or forensic toxicology, including vigabatrin, beta-hydroxybutyric acid, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol, 1,4-butanediol and 1,2-butanediol, can also be

  6. Microwave-assisted on-spot derivatization for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based determination of polar low molecular weight compounds in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Sadones, Nele; Van Bever, Elien; Archer, John R H; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I; Van Bortel, Luc; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2016-09-23

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling and analysis is increasingly being applied in bioanalysis. Although the use of DBS has many advantages, it is also associated with some challenges. E.g. given the limited amount of available material, highly sensitive detection techniques are often required to attain sufficient sensitivity. In gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), derivatization can be helpful to achieve adequate sensitivity. Because this additional sample preparation step is considered as time-consuming, we introduce a new derivatization procedure, i.e. "microwave-assisted on-spot derivatization", to minimize sample preparation of DBS. In this approach the derivatization reagents are directly applied onto the DBS and derivatization takes place in a microwave instead of via conventional heating. In this manuscript we evaluated the applicability of this new concept of derivatization for the determination of two polar low molecular weight molecules, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gabapentin, in DBS using a standard GC-MS configuration. The method was successfully validated for both compounds, with imprecision and bias values within acceptance criteria (<20% at LLOQ, <15% at 3 other QC levels). Calibration lines were linear over the 10-100μg/mL and 1-30μg/mL range for GHB and gabapentin, respectively. Stability studies revealed no significant decrease of gabapentin and GHB in DBS upon storage at room temperature for at least 84 days. Furthermore, DBS-specific parameters, including hematocrit and volume spotted, were evaluated. As demonstrated by the analysis of GHB and gabapentin positive samples, "microwave-assisted on-spot derivatization" proved to be reliable, fast and applicable in routine toxicology. Moreover, other polar low molecular weight compounds of interest in clinical and/or forensic toxicology, including vigabatrin, beta-hydroxybutyric acid, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol, 1,4-butanediol and 1,2-butanediol, can also be

  7. Therapeutic drug monitoring of carbamazepine and its metabolite in children from dried blood spots using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Engy; Villanelli, Fabio; Malvagia, Sabrina; Rosati, Anna; Forni, Giulia; Funghini, Silvia; Ombrone, Daniela; Della Bona, Maria; Guerrini, Renzo; la Marca, Giancarlo

    2015-05-10

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is a first-line drug for the treatment of different forms of epilepsy and the first choice drug for trigeminal neuralgia. CBZ is metabolized in the liver by oxidation into carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide (CBZE), its major metabolite which is equipotent and known to contribute to the pharmacological activity of CBZ. The aim of the present study was to develop and validate a reliable, selective and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of CBZ and its active metabolite in dried blood spots (DBS). The extraction process was carried out from DBS using methanol-water-formic acid (80:20:0.1, v/v/v). Chromatographic elution was achieved by using a linear gradient with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-water-0.1% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.50mL/min. The method was linear over the range 1-40mg/L and 0.25-20mg/L for CBZ and CBZE, respectively. The limit of quantification was 0.75mg/L and 0.25mg/L for CBZ and CBZE. Intra-day and inter-day assay precisions were found to be lower than 5.13%, 6.46% and 11.76%, 4.72% with mean percentage accuracies of 102.1%, 97.5% and 99.2%, 97.8% for CBZ and CBZE. We successfully applied the method for determining DBS finger-prick samples in paediatric patients and confirmed the results with concentrations measured in matched plasma samples. This novel approach allows quantification of CBZ and its metabolite from only one 3.2mm DBS disc by LC-MS/MS thus combining advantages of DBS technique and LC-MS/MS in clinical practice.

  8. Incident Infection and Resistance Mutation Analysis of Dried Blood Spots Collected in a Field Study of HIV Risk Groups, 2007-2010

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xierong; Smith, Amanda J.; Forrest, David W.; Cardenas, Gabriel A.; Beck, Dano W.; LaLota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa R.; Sionean, Catlainn; Owen, S. Michele; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the utility of cost-effective dried blood spot (DBS) field sampling for incidence and drug resistance surveillance of persons at high risk for HIV infection. Methods We evaluated DBS collected in 2007–2010 in non-clinical settings by finger-stick from HIV-positive heterosexuals at increased risk of HIV infection (n = 124), men who have sex with men (MSM, n = 110), and persons who inject drugs (PWID, n = 58). Relative proportions of recent-infection findings among risk groups were assessed at avidity index (AI) cutoffs of ≤25%, ≤30%, and ≤35%, corresponding to an infection mean duration of recency (MDR) of 220.6, 250.4, and 278.3 days, respectively. Drug resistance mutation prevalence was compared among the risk groups and avidity indices. Results HIV antibody avidity testing of all self-reported ARV-naïve persons (n = 186) resulted in 9.7%, 11.3% and 14.0% with findings within the 221, 250, and 278-day MDRs, respectively. The proportion of ARV-naïve MSM, heterosexuals, and PWID reporting only one risk category who had findings below the suggested 30% AI was 23.1%, 6.9% and 3.6% (p<0.001), respectively. MSM had the highest prevalence of drug resistance and the only cases of transmitted multi-class resistance. Among the ARV-experienced, MSM had disproportionately more recent-infection results than did heterosexuals and PWID. Conclusions The disproportionately higher recent-infection findings for MSM as compared to PWID and heterosexuals increased as the MDR window increased. Unreported ARV use might explain greater recent-infection findings and drug resistance in this MSM population. DBS demonstrated utility in expanded HIV testing; however, optimal field handling is key to accurate recent-infection estimates. PMID:27415433

  9. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  10. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  11. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  12. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  13. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Accident Testing Blood/Urine Custody and Control Form (49 CFR part 219) (Form FRA F 6180.74 (revised.... Collection of blood and urine specimens is required to be conducted at an independent medical facility... and transfer of blood and urine specimens for three surviving employees can be found in the FRA...

  14. Vise holds specimens for microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greule, W. N.

    1980-01-01

    Convenient, miniature, spring-loaded clamp holds specimens for scanning electron microscope. Clamp is made out of nesting sections of studded angle-aluminum. Specimens are easier to mount and dismount with vise than with conductive adhesive or paint.

  15. Radioimmunoassay of ''free thyroxin'' in dried blood spots on filter paper - preliminary observations on the effective differentiation of subjects with congenital hypothyroidism from those with subnormal thyroxin-binding globulin and normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, H.; Miyai, K.; Ichihara, K.; Amino, N.; Harada, T.; Nose, O.; Tanizawa, O.

    1982-03-01

    In this sensitive, simple method for measuring ''free thyroxin'' (FT/sub 4/) in eluates of dried blood spots on filter paper by use of a radioimmunoassay kit (Amerlex Free T/sub 4/ RIA), the measurable range of FT/sub 4/ is 1.8 to 57 ng/L (equivalent to the concentration in serum), or 7 to 237 fg/tube. The mean coefficients of variation for within assay-within spots, within assay-between spots, and between assays were 5.3%, 5.0%, and 6.2%, respectively. FT/sub 4/ in blood spotted on filter paper is stable for at least a month when dried and kept at either -20/sup 0/C, 4/sup 0/C, room temperature (about 25/sup 0/C), or 37/sup 0/C. The results for FT/sub 4/ in dried blood spots correlated closely with the free-T/sub 4/ concentration in serum (r = 0.99). The method can be used to differentiate cases of primary and secondary hypothyroidism from normal subjects and those with subnormal thyroxin-binding globulin. This method may be useful in screening for congenital hypothyroidism, because sample-retesting is not necessary.

  16. Dry hair

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of dry hair are: Anorexia nervosa Excessive hair washing, or using harsh soaps or alcohols Excessive blow-drying Dry air Menkes kinky hair syndrome Malnutrition Underactive parathyroid ( ...

  17. The effects of a 6-month resistance training and dried plum consumption intervention on strength, body composition, blood markers of bone turnover, and inflammation in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Simonavice, Emily; Liu, Pei-Yang; Ilich, Jasminka Z; Kim, Jeong-Su; Arjmandi, Bahram; Panton, Lynn B

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of resistance training (RT) and dried plum (DP) consumption on strength, body composition, blood markers of bone, and inflammation in breast cancer survivors (BCS). Twenty-three BCS (RT, n = 12; RT+DP, n = 11), aged 64 ± 7 years, were evaluated at baseline and after 6 months of intervention on the following: muscular strength (chest press and leg extension) via 1-repetition maximums (1RMs); body composition, specifically bone mineral density (BMD) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; biochemical markers of bone turnover (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-5b)); and inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP)). Target RT prescription was 2 days/week of 10 exercises, including 2 sets of 8-12 repetitions at ∼60%-80% of 1RM. RT+DP also consumed 90 g of DP daily. There were no baseline differences between groups or any group-by-time interactions for any of the variables. BCS increased upper (p < 0.05) (RT: 64 ± 14 to 80 ± 17 kg; RT+DP: 72 ± 23 to 91 ± 20 kg) and lower (p < 0.05) (RT: 69 ± 20 to 87 ± 28 kg; RT+DP: 78 ± 19 to 100 ± 21 kg) body strength. Body composition and BMD improvements were not observed. TRAP-5b decreased in the RT group (p < 0.05) (4.55 ± 1.57 to 4.04 ± 1.63 U/L) and the RT+DP group (p = 0.07) (5.10 ± 2.75 to 4.27 ± 2.03 U/L). Changes in BAP and CRP were not observed. RT was effective for improving biochemical markers of bone turnover and muscular strength in BCS. A longer and higher intensity intervention may be needed to reveal the true effects of RT and DP on body composition and biochemical markers of inflammation.

  18. Rat dried blood spot analysis of (R,S)-(-)- and (S,R)-(+)- enantiomers of emtricitabin on immobilized tris-(3,5-dimethylphenyl carbamate) amylose silica as a chiral stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ramisetti Nageswara; Santhakumar, Kondapalli; Naidu, Challa Gangu

    2015-10-01

    An enantioselective high performance liquid chromatography method has been developed and validated by evaluating the suitability of newly introduced immobilized polysaccharide chiral stationary phases, the effect of different organic modifiers and temperature including the entropy and enthalpy on resolution of the (R,S)-(-) & (S,R)-(+) emtricitabine enantiomers on rat dried blood spots. Both the enantiomers were extracted from dried blood spots using ethanol: methanol (80:20 v/v) mixture and separated on an immobilized amylose tris-(3,5-dimethyl phenyl carbamate) chiral stationary phase using n-hexane:ethanol (65:35 v/v) as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.8mL/min. The detection was carried out at 280nm using photo diode array detector connected to a polarimeter in series to determine their order of eluton. The method was validated with respect to limits of detection and quantification, linearity, accuracy and precision. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 0.5-500μg/mL for both enantiomers and the correlation coefficient (r(2)) was >0.998. The overall recovery of (R,S)- & (S,R)-enantiomers of emtricitabin from DBS were 90.4 and 90.6%, respectively. The limits of detection and quantification of enantiomers were 0.26, 0.30 and 0.85, 0.92μg/mL for (R,S)- and (S,R)-emtricitabin enantiomers, respectively. The assay was specific and precise (RSD <10%). The stability of emtricitabin was also performed and the results were found to be well within the limits. The effect of hematocrit on extraction of emtricitabin enantiomers from dried blood spots was evaluated and no interference from endogenous substances was observed.

  19. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  20. Hematocrit-Independent Quantitation of Stimulants in Dried Blood Spots: Pipet versus Microfluidic-Based Volumetric Sampling Coupled with Automated Flow-Through Desorption and Online Solid Phase Extraction-LC-MS/MS Bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Verplaetse, Ruth; Henion, Jack

    2016-07-01

    A workflow overcoming microsample collection issues and hematocrit (HCT)-related bias would facilitate more widespread use of dried blood spots (DBS). This report describes comparative results between the use of a pipet and a microfluidic-based sampling device for the creation of volumetric DBS. Both approaches were successfully coupled to HCT-independent, fully automated sample preparation and online liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis allowing detection of five stimulants in finger prick blood. Reproducible, selective, accurate, and precise responses meeting generally accepted regulated bioanalysis guidelines were observed over the range of 5-1000 ng/mL whole blood. The applied heated flow-through solvent desorption of the entire spot and online solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure were unaffected by the blood's HCT value within the tested range of 28.0-61.5% HCT. Enhanced stability for mephedrone on DBS compared to liquid whole blood was observed. Finger prick blood samples were collected using both volumetric sampling approaches over a time course of 25 h after intake of a single oral dose of phentermine. A pharmacokinetic curve for the incurred phentermine was successfully produced using the described validated method. These results suggest that either volumetric sample collection method may be amenable to field-use followed by fully automated, HCT-independent DBS-SPE-LC-MS/MS bioanalysis for the quantitation of these representative controlled substances. Analytical data from DBS prepared with a pipet and microfluidic-based sampling devices were comparable, but the latter is easier to operate, making this approach more suitable for sample collection by unskilled persons. PMID:27270226

  1. Estimation of perimortal percent carboxy-heme in nonstandard postmortem specimens using analysis of carbon monoxide by GC/MS and iron by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Middleberg, R A; Easterling, D E; Zelonis, S F; Rieders, F; Rieders, M F

    1993-01-01

    In decomposed, formalin-fixed, embalmed, exhumed, and some fire-dried cases in which normal blood is unavailable, the usual methods for determination of carboxyhemoglobin saturation frequently fail. To address these specimens, a method utilizing both gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) determination of carbon monoxide (CO) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) determination of iron (Fe), in the same specimen, was developed. The method is reported here, along with its application to seven pertinent forsensic death investigations. The CO analytical methodology involves acid liberation of the gas from the specimen aliquot in a headspace vial. After heating and equilibrating, a sample of the headspace vapor is injected into the GC/MS system with a gastight syringe. Quantitation is achieved by standard addition comparison utilizing the ideal gas law equation. Iron is quantified by FAAS analysis of the same aliquot used for the CO determination, following nitric acid digestion. The concentration is determined by comparison to a standard curve. A formula for determining the minimum percent carboxy-heme saturation was derived by using the ratio of the amount of CO to the amount of Fe in the aliquot analyzed. Tissue types analyzed include spleen, liver, muscle, dried blood, and unspecified decomposed tissue.

  2. Estimation of perimortal percent carboxy-heme in nonstandard postmortem specimens using analysis of carbon monoxide by GC/MS and iron by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Middleberg, R A; Easterling, D E; Zelonis, S F; Rieders, F; Rieders, M F

    1993-01-01

    In decomposed, formalin-fixed, embalmed, exhumed, and some fire-dried cases in which normal blood is unavailable, the usual methods for determination of carboxyhemoglobin saturation frequently fail. To address these specimens, a method utilizing both gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) determination of carbon monoxide (CO) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) determination of iron (Fe), in the same specimen, was developed. The method is reported here, along with its application to seven pertinent forsensic death investigations. The CO analytical methodology involves acid liberation of the gas from the specimen aliquot in a headspace vial. After heating and equilibrating, a sample of the headspace vapor is injected into the GC/MS system with a gastight syringe. Quantitation is achieved by standard addition comparison utilizing the ideal gas law equation. Iron is quantified by FAAS analysis of the same aliquot used for the CO determination, following nitric acid digestion. The concentration is determined by comparison to a standard curve. A formula for determining the minimum percent carboxy-heme saturation was derived by using the ratio of the amount of CO to the amount of Fe in the aliquot analyzed. Tissue types analyzed include spleen, liver, muscle, dried blood, and unspecified decomposed tissue. PMID:8429619

  3. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  4. Use of a commercial ELISA for the detection of measles-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in dried blood spots collected from children living in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Colson, K Ellicott; Potter, Alan; Conde-Glez, Carlos; Hernandez, Bernardo; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H

    2015-09-01

    Seroepidemiological monitoring of population immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases is critical to prevent future outbreaks. Dried blood spots (DBS), drops of capillary blood dried on filter paper, are an affordable, minimally invasive alternative to venipuncture for collecting blood in field settings. However, few proven methods exist to analyze DBS for the presence of protective antibodies. This study validates a novel technique for measuring measles-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in capillary DBS using a commercial ELISA. The predictive performance of a new method for analyzing DBS was tested by comparing matched serum and DBS samples from 50 children. The accuracy, precision, and reliability of the procedure were evaluated, and the optimal cut points to classify positive and negative samples were determined. The method was then applied to 1,588 DBS collected during a large survey of children in Mexico and Nicaragua. Measles-specific IgG in serum samples were 62% negative, 10% equivocal, and 28% positive. In comparisons with matched serum, DBS results were 100% sensitive and 96 · 8% specific, and agreed in 46 of 50 (92%) cases. The inter-assay and intra-assay coefficients of variation from kit-provided controls were greater than desired (24.8% and 8.4%, respectively). However, in predictive simulations the average misclassification was only 3.9%. Procedures were found to be acceptable to surveyors and participants. Analyzing DBS collected in low-resources settings is a feasible and accurate means of measuring population immunity to measles and should be used to generate objective measures of health status and health system performance. PMID:25988945

  5. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the effect of dried purple carrot on body mass, lipids, blood pressure, body composition, and inflammatory markers in overweight and obese adults: the QUENCH trial.

    PubMed

    Wright, Olivia R L; Netzel, Gabriele A; Sakzewski, Amy R

    2013-06-01

    Obesity is a significant health issue worldwide and is associated with chronic, low-grade inflammation predisposing the individual to cardiovascular disease and impaired blood glucose homeostasis. Anthocyanins and phenolic acids from purple carrots are effective at reversing inflammation and metabolic alterations in animal models, potentially through inhibition of inflammatory pathways. The effects of dried purple carrot on body mass, body composition, blood pressure, lipids, inflammatory markers, liver function tests, and appetite were investigated in 16 males (aged 53.1 ± 7.6 years and with a mean BMI of 32.8 ± 4.6 kg/m(2)) with normal lipid and inflammatory markers. There was no evidence that 118.5 mg/day of anthocyanins and 259.2 mg/day of phenolic acids for 4 weeks resulted in statistically significant changes in body mass, body composition, appetite, dietary intake, low density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, blood pressure, or C-reactive protein in these obese participants at the dose and length of intervention used in this trial. High density lipoprotein cholesterol was lower in the intervention group (p < 0.05). Aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase did not change, indicating that the intervention was safe. More studies are required to establish the bioavailability and pharmacokinetic effects of purple carrot anthocyanins and phenolic acids prior to further trials of efficacy with respect to treating inflammation and metabolic alterations.

  6. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature.

  7. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature. PMID:1962281

  8. Stability of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibodies in whole blood dried on filter paper and stored under various tropical conditions in Kinshasa, Zaire.

    PubMed

    Behets, F; Kashamuka, M; Pappaioanou, M; Green, T A; Ryder, R W; Batter, V; George, J R; Hannon, W H; Quinn, T C

    1992-05-01

    The use of whole-blood spots on filter paper for the detection of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was evaluated during a 20-week period under a variety of storage environments simulating the harsh tropical field conditions in Kinshasa, Zaire. During the first 6 weeks of storage, all replicates of high- and low-titer HIV-1-positive reference samples remained positive by enzyme immunoassay and Western blotting (immunoblotting), and all replicates of HIV-1-negative samples remained negative under all storage conditions. However, hot and humid storage conditions for up to 20 weeks caused a progressive decline in enzyme immunoassay optical density ratio values, which was particularly noticeable in samples with a low HIV-1 antibody titer. Harsh tropical operational conditions did not cause any repeatedly false-positive results during the 20-week storage period. The use of gas-impermeable bags with desiccant for the storage of blood spots on filter paper improved the stability of HIV-1 antibody detection over time and is recommended for the storage of whole-blood spots on filter paper in harsh tropical field settings.

  9. Collection & Processing of Vertebrate Specimens for Arbovirus Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudia, W. Daniel; And Others

    Described are techniques used by the National Communicable Disease Center in obtaining blood and tissues from man and other vertebrates for arbovirus isolation and antibody studies. Also included are techniques for capturing and handling vertebrates; banding and marking; restraining and bleeding; storing of specimens to preserve antibody and…

  10. Detecting Rickettsia parkeri infection from eschar swab specimens.

    PubMed

    Myers, Todd; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Dent, Mike; Jiang, Ju; Daly, Patrick L; Maguire, Jason D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-05-01

    The typical clinical presentation of several spotted fever group Rickettsia infections includes eschars. Clinical diagnosis of the condition is usually made by analysis of blood samples. We describe a more sensitive, noninvasive means of obtaining a sample for diagnosis by using an eschar swab specimen from patients infected with Rickettsia parkeri.

  11. Measurement of Single Cell Refractive Index, Dry Mass, Volume, and Density Using a Transillumination Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Jacques, Steven L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2012-09-01

    Phase contrast microscopy has become ubiquitous in the field of biology, particularly in qualitative investigations of cellular morphology. However, the use of quantitative phase retrieval methods and their connection to cellular refractive index and dry mass density remain under utilized. This is due in part to the restriction of phase and cellular mass determination to custom built instruments, involved mathematical analysis, and prohibitive sample perturbations. We introduce tomographic bright field imaging, an accessible optical imaging technique enabling the three dimensional measurement of cellular refractive index and dry mass density using a standard transillumination optical microscope. The validity of the technique is demonstrated on polystyrene spheres. The technique is then applied to the measurement of the refractive index, dry mass, volume, and density of red blood cells. This optical technique enables a simple and robust means to perform quantitative investigations of engineered and biological specimens in three dimensions using standard optical microscopes.

  12. The use of retained patient specimens for haematology quality control.

    PubMed

    Hackney, J R; Cembrowski, G S

    1990-01-01

    Patient blood specimens constitute ideal quality control material in many respects. Although stability is a problem, patient specimens are sufficiently stable to allow their use in the control of short-term systematic error. The principal challenges involve the design of a system which combines excellent performance characteristics (probability of error detection and probability of false rejection) with a minimum of extra work. In the past, guidelines have been presented for an optimized quality control program using retained patient specimens in haematology. These guidelines call for the use of three retained specimens initially analysed only once, with subsequent analyses judged 'out of control' if they deviate from the initial result by a prescribed multiple of the long-term standard deviation. In practice, this system may result in a relatively high probability of false rejection of data (Pfr) due to inadequately established control ranges. Also, the maintenance of three retained patient specimens may be an excessive burden on small laboratories. We present data on the optimization of a quality control program using one retained specimen that is appropriate for use by smaller laboratories. The control rules and the number of initial analyses are adjusted to yield the highest possible probability of error detection (Ped while maintaining a low Pfr and a low additional workload. In addition, we present data concerning the control of satellite instruments by sharing patient specimens between the satellite instrument and a 'reference' instrument.

  13. Detection of cytomegalovirus DNA on dried blood spots collected from infants infected with HIV: an in-house method adaptable in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Ngin, Sopeak; Guilleminot, Tiffany; Kfutwah, Anfumbom; Moussa, Sandrine; Tran, Ton; Nerrienet, Eric

    2013-11-01

    In countries with limited resources, infants infected with HIV are highly exposed to CMV co-infection which probably represents a major risk factor for disease progression in this population. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of a low cost CMV DNA extraction method from DBS and the feasibility of its implementation in laboratories of 4 countries with limited resources. DNA was extracted from DBS with a cationic resin (chelex 100) and amplified with an "in house" real time CMV PCR. Dilutions of a quantified whole blood sample were spotted on paper to evaluate the 95% detection limit. A DBS quality control panel was analyzed in all laboratories. CMV PCR was compared between DBS and liquid whole blood (gold standard) in 2 populations: 418 transplanted patients and 59 infants infected with HIV (median age of 2 months). The CMV PCR 95% detection limit in DBS was 3.87 log10 copies/mL. Its positive and negative predictive values for CMV diagnosis in infants infected with HIV were 100% and 87.5% respectively. Quality control panels gave consistent qualitative results in all laboratories. This assay had high predictive values for CMV diagnosis in infants infected with HIV and its implementation in resource-limited countries with limited resources is feasible. PMID:23891874

  14. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric method for the determination of tamoxifen, N-desmethyltamoxifen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen in dried blood spots--development, validation and clinical application during breast cancer adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Marina Venzon; Raymundo, Suziane; de Oliveira, Vanessa; Staudt, Dilana Elisabeth; Gössling, Gustavo; Peteffi, Giovana Piva; Biazús, Jorge Villanova; Cavalheiro, José Antônio; Tre-Hardy, Marie; Capron, Arnaud; Haufroid, Vincent; Wallemacq, Pierre; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Linden, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    A LC-MSMS method for the simultaneous determination of tamoxifen, N-desmethyltamoxifen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen in dried blood spots samples was developed and validated. The method employs an ultrasound-assisted liquid extraction and a reversed phase separation in an Acquity(®) C18 column (150×2.1 mm, 1.7 µm). Mobile phase was a mixture of formic acid 0.1% (v/v) pH 2.7 and acetonitrile (gradient from 60:40 to 50:50, v/v). Total analytical run time was 8 min. Precision assays showed CV % lower than 10.75% and accuracy in the range 94.5 to 110.3%. Mean analytes recoveries from DBS ranged from 40% to 92%. The method was successfully applied to 91 paired clinical DBS and plasma samples. Dried blood spots concentrations were highly correlated to plasma, with rs>0.83 (P<0.01). Median estimated plasma concentrations after hematocrit and partition factor adjustment were: TAM 123.3 ng mL(-1); NDT 267.9 ng mL(-1), EDF 10.0 ng mL(-1) and HTF 1.3 ng mL(-1,) representing in average 98 to 104% of the actually measured concentrations. The DBS method was able to identify 96% of patients with plasma EDF concentrations below the clinical threshold related to better prognosis (5.9 ng mL(-1)). The procedure has adequate analytical performance and can be an efficient tool to optimize adjuvant breast cancer treatment, especially in resource limited settings. PMID:25476377

  15. An interlaminar tension strength specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tension strength, sigma(sub 3c) of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 degrees, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism which was held by the grips of a tensile testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the loading arm length had no effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality. Width was found to affect the value of sigma(sub 3c) only slightly. The wider specimens generally had a slightly lower strength since more material was under high stress, and hence, had a larger probability of containing a significant flaw.

  16. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  17. Effects of feeding a spray-dried multivalent polyclonal antibody preparation on feedlot performance, feeding behavior, carcass characteristics, rumenitis, and blood gas profile of Brangus and Nellore yearling bulls.

    PubMed

    Millen, D D; Pacheco, R D L; DiLorenzo, N; Martins, C L; Marino, C T; Bastos, J P S T; Mariani, T M; Barducci, R S; Sarti, L M N; DiCostanzo, A; Rodrigues, P H M; Arrigoni, M D B

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of replacing monensin (MON) with a spray-dried multivalent polyclonal antibody preparation (PAP) against several ruminal microorganisms on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, feeding behavior, blood gas profile, and the rumenitis incidence of Brangus and Nellore yearling bulls. The study was designed as a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, replicated 6 times (4 bulls per pen and a total of 24 pens), in which bulls ( = 48) of each biotype were fed diets containing either MON fed at 300 mg/d or PAP fed at 3 g/d. No significant feed additive main effects were observed for ADG ( = 0.27), G:F ( = 0.28), HCW ( = 0.99), or dressing percentage ( = 0.80). However, bulls receiving PAP had greater DMI ( = 0.02) and larger ( = 0.02) final LM area as well as greater ( < 0.01) blood concentrations of bicarbonate and base excess in the extracellular fluid than bulls receiving MON. Brangus bulls had greater ( < 0.01) ADG and DMI expressed in kilograms, final BW, heavier HCW, and larger initial and final LM area than Nellore bulls. However, Nellore bulls had greater daily DMI fluctuation ( < 0.01), expressed as a percentage, and greater incidence of rumenitis ( = 0.05) than Brangus bulls. In addition, Brangus bulls had greater ( < 0.01) DMI per meal and also presented lower ( < 0.01) DM and NDF rumination rates when compared with Nellore bulls. Significant interactions ( < 0.05) between biotype and feed additive were observed for SFA, unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), MUFA, and PUFA concentrations in adipose tissues. When Nellore bulls were fed PAP, fat had greater ( < 0.05) SFA and PUFA contents but less ( < 0.01) UFA and MUFA than Nellore bulls receiving MON. For Brangus bulls, MON led to greater ( < 0.05) SFA and PUFA and less ( < 0.05) UFA and MUFA than Brangus bulls fed PAP. Feeding a spray-dried PAP led to similar feedlot performance compared with that when feeding MON. Spray-dried

  18. century drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  19. Feasibility of Using the Mosquito Blood Meal for Rapid and Efficient Human and Animal Virus Surveillance and Discovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Garver, Lindsey S; Bingham, Karen M; Hang, Jun; Jochim, Ryan C; Davidson, Silas A; Richardson, Jason H; Jarman, Richard G

    2015-12-01

    Mosquito blood meals taken from humans and animals potentially represent a useful source of blood for the detection of blood-borne pathogens. In this feasibility study, Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes were fed with blood meals spiked with dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) and harvested at serial time points. These mosquitoes are not competent vectors, and the virus is not expected to replicate. Ingested blood was spotted on Whatman FTA cards and stored at room temperature. Mosquito abdomens were removed and stored at -80°C. Control blood meal aliquots were stored in vials or applied onto FTA cards. After 4 weeks of storage, the samples were extracted using beadbeating and QIAamp Viral RNA kit (Qiagen Sciences, Germantown, MD). Recovered viral RNA was analyzed by DENV-2 TaqMan RT-PCR assay and next-generation sequencing (NGS). Overall viral RNA recovery efficiency was 15% from the directly applied dried blood spots and approximately 20% or higher for dried blood spots made by blotting mosquito midgut on FTA cards. Viral RNA in mosquito-ingested blood decreases over time, but remains detectable 24 hours after blood feeding. The viral sequences in FTA-stored specimens can be maintained at room temperature. The strategy has the potential utility in expedited zoonotic virus discovery and blood-borne pathogen surveillance. PMID:26416112

  20. Performance of an Early Infant Diagnostic Test, AmpliSens DNA-HIV-FRT, Using Dried Blood Spots Collected from Children Born to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Mothers in Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Vedapuri; Azarskova, Marianna; Nguyen, Shon; Hurlston, Mackenzie; Sabatier, Jennifer; Zhang, Guoqing; Osmanov, Saladin; Ellenberger, Dennis; Yang, Chunfu; Vitek, Charles; Liulchuk, Maria; Nizova, Natalya

    2015-01-01

    An accurate accessible test for early infant diagnosis (EID) is crucial for identifying HIV-infected infants and linking them to treatment. To improve EID services in Ukraine, dried blood spot (DBS) samples obtained from 237 HIV-exposed children (≤18 months of age) in six regions in Ukraine in 2012 to 2013 were tested with the AmpliSens DNA-HIV-FRT assay, the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan (CAP/CTM) HIV-1 Qual test, and the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Qualitative assay. In comparison with the paired whole-blood results generated from AmpliSens testing at the oblast HIV reference laboratories in Ukraine, the sensitivity was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.95 to 1.00) for the AmpliSens and Roche CAP/CTM Qual assays and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.90 to 0.98) for the Abbott Qualitative assay. The specificity was 1.00 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1.00) for the AmpliSens and Abbott Qualitative assays and 0.99 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.00) for the Roche CAP/CTM Qual assay. McNemar analysis indicated that the proportions of positive results for the tests were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Cohen's kappa (0.97 to 0.99) indicated almost perfect agreement among the three tests. These results indicated that the AmpliSens DBS and whole-blood tests performed equally well and were comparable to the two commercially available EID tests. More importantly, the performance characteristics of the AmpliSens DBS test meets the World Health Organization EID test requirements; implementing AmpliSens DBS testing might improve EID services in resource-limited settings. PMID:26447114

  1. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  2. Appendix A: Specimen 72275 documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1974-01-01

    The friability of the matrix of specimen 72275 caused numerous fragments and an abundance of fines to break away from the main mass during transport from the moon and handling in the lunar receiving laboratory. Samples 72275,1 to 72275,14 were labeled during PET examination. Samples 72275,1, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were placed in storage, and the remainder were distributed.

  3. Standard Specimen Reference Set: Breast — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The primary objective of this study is to assemble a well-characterized set of blood specimens to test biomarkers that, in conjunction with mammography, can detect and discriminate breast cancer. These samples will be divided to provide “sets” of specimens that can be tested in a number of different laboratories. Since tests will be performed on the same sets of samples, the data will be directly comparable and decisions regarding which biomarker or set of biomarkers have value in breast cancer detection can be made. These sets will reside at a National Cancer Institute facility at Frederick, MD.

  4. Eccentric loading of microtensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trapp, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic materials have a lower density than most metals and are capable of performing at extremely high temperatures. The utility of these materials is obvious; however, the fracture strength of brittle materials is not easily predicted and often varies greatly. Characteristically, brittle materials lack ductility and do not yield as other materials. Ceramics materials are naturally populated with microscopic cracks due to fabrication techniques. Upon application of a load, stress concentration occurs at the root of these cracks and fracture will eventually occur at some not easily predicted strength. In order to use ceramics in any application some design methodology must exist from which a component can be placed into service. This design methodology is CARES/LIFE (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) which has been developed and refined at NASA over the last several decades. The CARES/LIFE computer program predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component over its service life. CARES combines finite element results from a commercial FE (finite element) package such as ANSYS and experimental results to compute the abovementioned probability of failure. Over the course of several tests CARES has had great success in predicting the life of various ceramic components and has been used throughout industry. The latest challenge is to verify that CARES is valid for MEMS (Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems). To investigate a series of microtensile specimens were fractured in the laboratory. From this data, material parameters were determined and used to predict a distribution of strength for other specimens that exhibit a known stress concentration. If the prediction matches the experimental results then these parameters can be applied to a desired component outside of the laboratory. During testing nearly half of the tensile Specimens fractured at a location that was not expected and hence not captured in the FE model. It has been my duty

  5. In vitro fracture testing of submicron diameter collagen fibril specimens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Dodge, Mohammad Reza; Kahn, Harold; Ballarini, Roberto; Eppell, Steven J

    2010-09-22

    Mechanical testing of collagenous tissues at different length scales will provide improved understanding of the mechanical behavior of structures such as skin, tendon, and bone, and also guide the development of multiscale mechanical models. Using a microelectromechanical-systems (MEMS) platform, stress-strain response curves up to failure of type I collagen fibril specimens isolated from the dermis of sea cucumbers were obtained in vitro. A majority of the fibril specimens showed brittle fracture. Some displayed linear behavior up to failure, while others displayed some nonlinearity. The fibril specimens showed an elastic modulus of 470 ± 410 MPa, a fracture strength of 230 ± 160 MPa, and a fracture strain of 80% ± 44%. The fibril specimens displayed significantly lower elastic modulus in vitro than previously measured in air. Fracture strength/strain obtained in vitro and in air are both significantly larger than those obtained in vacuo, indicating that the difference arises from the lack of intrafibrillar water molecules produced by vacuum drying. Furthermore, fracture strength/strain of fibril specimens were different from those reported for collagenous tissues of higher hierarchical levels, indicating the importance of obtaining these properties at the fibrillar level for multiscale modeling.

  6. In Vitro Fracture Testing of Submicron Diameter Collagen Fibril Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Dodge, Mohammad Reza; Kahn, Harold; Ballarini, Roberto; Eppell, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical testing of collagenous tissues at different length scales will provide improved understanding of the mechanical behavior of structures such as skin, tendon, and bone, and also guide the development of multiscale mechanical models. Using a microelectromechanical-systems (MEMS) platform, stress-strain response curves up to failure of type I collagen fibril specimens isolated from the dermis of sea cucumbers were obtained in vitro. A majority of the fibril specimens showed brittle fracture. Some displayed linear behavior up to failure, while others displayed some nonlinearity. The fibril specimens showed an elastic modulus of 470 ± 410 MPa, a fracture strength of 230 ± 160 MPa, and a fracture strain of 80% ± 44%. The fibril specimens displayed significantly lower elastic modulus in vitro than previously measured in air. Fracture strength/strain obtained in vitro and in air are both significantly larger than those obtained in vacuo, indicating that the difference arises from the lack of intrafibrillar water molecules produced by vacuum drying. Furthermore, fracture strength/strain of fibril specimens were different from those reported for collagenous tissues of higher hierarchical levels, indicating the importance of obtaining these properties at the fibrillar level for multiscale modeling. PMID:20858445

  7. 46 CFR 4.06-30 - Specimen collection in incidents involving fatalities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... fatalities. (a) When an individual engaged or employed on board a vessel dies as a result of a serious marine incident, blood and urine specimens must be obtained from the remains of the individual for...

  8. 46 CFR 4.06-30 - Specimen collection in incidents involving fatalities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... fatalities. (a) When an individual engaged or employed on board a vessel dies as a result of a serious marine incident, blood and urine specimens must be obtained from the remains of the individual for...

  9. Estimation of the optimum ratio of standardized ileal digestible isoleucine to lysine for eight- to twenty-five-kilogram pigs in diets containing spray-dried blood cells or corn gluten feed as a protein source.

    PubMed

    Wiltafsky, M K; Bartelt, J; Relandeau, C; Roth, F X

    2009-08-01

    Two growth assays and 1 N balance trial were conducted to determine the standardized ileal digestible (SID) Ile:Lys ratio in 8- to 25-kg pigs using spray-dried blood cells or corn gluten feed as a protein source. In Exp. 1, 48 individually penned pigs (initial BW = 7.7 kg) were used in a 6-point SID Ile titration study (analyzed SID Ile of 0.36, 0.43, 0.50, 0.57, 0.64, and 0.72%) by addition of graded levels of L-Ile. The basal diet contained 1.00% SID Lys, 18.4% CP, and 13.6 MJ of ME/kg. Diets were based on wheat, barley, corn, and 7.5% spray-dried blood cells as a protein source. Dietary SID Leu and Val levels were 1.61 and 1.02%, respectively. For the 35-d period, ADG, ADFI, and G:F increased linearly (P < 0.01) and quadratically (P < 0.04) with increasing SID Ile:Lys. Estimates of optimal SID Ile:Lys ratios were 59% for ADG and ADFI. In Exp. 2, 24 N balances were conducted using the Exp. 1 diets (12 pigs; individually penned; average BW = 11.5 kg). Pigs were fed 3 times daily with an amount equal to 1.0 MJ of ME/kg of BW(0.75). Preparation and collection periods (7 d each) were repeated after rearranging the animals to treatments. Increasing the dietary SID Ile:Lys ratio increased N retention linearly (P < 0.01), and N utilization linearly (P < 0.01) and quadratically (P < 0.01). An optimal SID Ile:Lys ratio of 54% was estimated for N retention. In Exp. 3, 48 individually penned pigs (initial BW = 8.0 kg) were fed grain-based diets in a 6-point SID Ile titration (analyzed SID Ile of 0.35, 0.41, 0.49, 0.56, 0.62, and 0.69%). Dietary SID Ile was increased by graded addition of L-Ile. The basal diet contained 0.97% SID Lys, 16.8% CP, and 13.6 MJ of ME/kg. In contrast to Exp. 1 and 2, spray-dried blood cells were excluded and corn gluten feed was used as a protein source. Dietary SID Leu and Val were set to 1.05 and 0.66%. For the 42-d period, ADG, ADFI, and G:F increased linearly (P < 0.01) and quadratically (P < 0.01) with increasing SID Ile:Lys. Estimated

  10. Multiphoton microspectroscopy of biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bai-Ling; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Ping C.; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Chen, RangWu; Wang, YiMin; Chen, JianCheng; Wang, Yung-Shun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Huang, Mao-Kuo

    2000-07-01

    The non-linear nature of multi-photon fluorescence excitation restricts the fluorescing volume to the vicinity of the focal point. As a result, the technology has the capacity for micro- spectroscopy of biological specimen at high spatial resolution. Chloroplasts in mesophyll protoplast of Arabidopsis thaliana and maize stem sections were used to demonstrate the feasibility of multi-photon fluorescence micro-spectroscopy at subcellular compartments. Time-lapse spectral recording provides a means for studying the response of cell organelles to high intensity illumination.

  11. Hepatitis C virus genotype testing in paraffin wax embedded liver biopsies for specimen identification.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Y; Ohsawa, M; Hai, E; Jomura, H; Ueda, M

    2003-12-01

    Despite advances in medical technology, careful specimen identification is still a fundamental principle of laboratory testing. If pathological samples are mixed up, especially in the case of extremely small biopsy samples, large amounts of time and energy may be wasted in correctly identifying the specimens. Recently, two liver biopsy specimens were mixed up in this department, and a new pathological technology was used to resolve the issue. Liver biopsy was performed on two patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. During sample transfer or tissue processing, the biopsy specimens were mixed up. Because the ABO blood group of the two patients was identical (type AB), the specimens were subsequently identified by analysing the HCV genotypes. RNA extracted from the paraffin wax embedded liver specimens was examined by a polymerase chain reaction based HCV genotype assay. This enabled the correct identification of the specimens, and each patient received the appropriate treatment on the basis of the accurate diagnosis.

  12. Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens.

    PubMed

    Chao, Rubén; Macía-Vázquez, Germán; Zalama, Eduardo; Gómez-García-Bermejo, Jaime; Perán, José-Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster has become a model organism in the study of neurobiology and behavior patterns. The analysis of the way the fly moves and its behavior is of great scientific interest for research on aspects such as drug tolerance, aggression or ageing in humans. In this article, a procedure for detecting, identifying and tracking numerous specimens of Drosophila by means of computer vision-based sensing systems is presented. This procedure allows dynamic information about each specimen to be collected at each moment, and then for its behavior to be quantitatively characterized. The proposed algorithm operates in three main steps: a pre-processing step, a detection and segmentation step, and tracking shape. The pre-processing and segmentation steps allow some limits of the image acquisition system and some visual artifacts (such as shadows and reflections) to be dealt with. The improvements introduced in the tracking step allow the problems corresponding to identity loss and swaps, caused by the interaction between individual flies, to be solved efficiently. Thus, a robust method that compares favorably to other existing methods is obtained. PMID:26258779

  13. Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Rubén; Macía-Vázquez, Germán; Zalama, Eduardo; Gómez-García-Bermejo, Jaime; Perán, José-Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster has become a model organism in the study of neurobiology and behavior patterns. The analysis of the way the fly moves and its behavior is of great scientific interest for research on aspects such as drug tolerance, aggression or ageing in humans. In this article, a procedure for detecting, identifying and tracking numerous specimens of Drosophila by means of computer vision-based sensing systems is presented. This procedure allows dynamic information about each specimen to be collected at each moment, and then for its behavior to be quantitatively characterized. The proposed algorithm operates in three main steps: a pre-processing step, a detection and segmentation step, and tracking shape. The pre-processing and segmentation steps allow some limits of the image acquisition system and some visual artifacts (such as shadows and reflections) to be dealt with. The improvements introduced in the tracking step allow the problems corresponding to identity loss and swaps, caused by the interaction between individual flies, to be solved efficiently. Thus, a robust method that compares favorably to other existing methods is obtained. PMID:26258779

  14. Strong Correlation Between Concentrations of Tenofovir (TFV) Emtricitabine (FTC) in Hair and TFV Diphosphate and FTC Triphosphate in Dried Blood Spots in the iPrEx Open Label Extension: Implications for Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Adherence Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Monica; Glidden, David V.; Liu, Albert; Anderson, Peter L.; Horng, Howard; Defechereux, Patricia; Guanira, Juan V.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Grant, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Self-reported adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has limitations, raising interest in pharmacologic monitoring. Drug concentrations in hair and dried blood spots (DBS) are used to assess long-term-exposure; hair shipment/storage occurs at room temperature. The iPrEx Open Label Extension collected DBS routinely, with opt-in hair collection; concentrations were measured with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In 806 hair-DBS pairs, tenofovir (TFV) hair levels and TFV diphosphate (DP) in DBS were strongly correlated (Spearman coefficient r = 0.734; P < .001), as were hair TFV/DBS emtricitabine (FTC) triphosphate (TP) (r = 0.781; P < .001); hair FTC/DBS TFV-DP (r = 0.74; P < .001); hair FTC/DBS FTC-TP (r = 0.587; P < .001). Drug detectability was generally concordant by matrix. Hair TFV/FTC concentrations correlate strongly with DBS levels, which are predictive of PrEP outcomes. PMID:25895984

  15. Strong Correlation Between Concentrations of Tenofovir (TFV) Emtricitabine (FTC) in Hair and TFV Diphosphate and FTC Triphosphate in Dried Blood Spots in the iPrEx Open Label Extension: Implications for Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Adherence Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Monica; Glidden, David V; Liu, Albert; Anderson, Peter L; Horng, Howard; Defechereux, Patricia; Guanira, Juan V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Grant, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    Self-reported adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has limitations, raising interest in pharmacologic monitoring. Drug concentrations in hair and dried blood spots (DBS) are used to assess long-term-exposure; hair shipment/storage occurs at room temperature. The iPrEx Open Label Extension collected DBS routinely, with opt-in hair collection; concentrations were measured with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In 806 hair-DBS pairs, tenofovir (TFV) hair levels and TFV diphosphate (DP) in DBS were strongly correlated (Spearman coefficient r = 0.734; P < .001), as were hair TFV/DBS emtricitabine (FTC) triphosphate (TP) (r = 0.781; P < .001); hair FTC/DBS TFV-DP (r = 0.74; P < .001); hair FTC/DBS FTC-TP (r = 0.587; P < .001). Drug detectability was generally concordant by matrix. Hair TFV/FTC concentrations correlate strongly with DBS levels, which are predictive of PrEP outcomes.

  16. Field evaluation of Abbott Real Time HIV-1 Qualitative test for early infant diagnosis using dried blood spots samples in comparison to Roche COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Qual test in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joy; Omuomo, Kenneth; Anyango, Emily; Kingwara, Leonard; Basiye, Frank; Morwabe, Alex; Shanmugam, Vedapuri; Nguyen, Shon; Sabatier, Jennifer; Zeh, Clement; Ellenberger, Dennis

    2014-08-01

    Timely diagnosis and treatment of infants infected with HIV are critical for reducing infant mortality. High-throughput automated diagnostic tests like Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Qual Test (Roche CAPCTM Qual) and the Abbott Real Time HIV-1 Qualitative (Abbott Qualitative) can be used to rapidly expand early infant diagnosis testing services. In this study, the performance characteristics of the Abbott Qualitative were evaluated using two hundred dried blood spots (DBS) samples (100 HIV-1 positive and 100 HIV-1 negative) collected from infants attending the antenatal facilities in Kisumu, Kenya. The Abbott Qualitative results were compared to the diagnostic testing completed using the Roche CAPCTM Qual in Kenya. The sensitivity and specificity of the Abbott Qualitative were 99.0% (95% CI: 95.0-100.0) and 100.0% (95% CI: 96.0-100.0), respectively, and the overall reproducibility was 98.0% (95% CI: 86.0-100.0). The limits of detection for the Abbott Qualitative and Roche CAPCTM Qual were 56.5 and 6.9copies/mL at 95% CIs (p=0.005), respectively. The study findings demonstrate that the Abbott Qualitative test is a practical option for timely diagnosis of HIV in infants.

  17. Evaluation of the intercept oral specimen collection device with HIV assays versus paired serum/plasma specimens.

    PubMed

    Beelaert, G; Van Heddegem, L; Van Frankenhuijsen, M; Vandewalle, G; Compernolle, V; Florence, E; Fransen, K

    2016-08-01

    Oral fluid has many advantages over blood-based techniques: it is less invasive, eliminates the occupational risk associated with needle stick accidents and collection can be self-administrated. Each individual test is packaged with a corresponding collection device. This study tested the suitability of the Intercept Oral Specimen Collection Device for different HIV diagnostic tests: three different rapid HIV tests and two adapted ELISAs, which were evaluated and compared with a gold standard on blood. In addition a total IgG quantification was performed to demonstrate the quality of the specimen. HIV antibodies were detected with a sensitivity of 100%, 99.3%, 98.6%, 100% and 95.7% for, DPP, OraQuick, Aware, Genscreen and Vironostika respectively using the Intercept Collection Device. Respective specificities were 100%, 100%, 99.3%, 97.3% and 100%. PMID:27142112

  18. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Download Printable Version [ ... on the topics below to get started. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer How is cancer ...

  19. [Recovery of facultatives and anaerobes from frozen specimens with a polymicrobial nature].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Chizuko; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2003-01-01

    Microbiological examination of frozen specimens is sometimes carried out in clinical microbiology and the result is used as an aid of diagnosis and/or treatment of polymicrobial infections. The study was carried out to reevaluate the merit of freezing specimens in clinical microbiology. A total of 10 specimens with a polymicrobial nature were included in this study. Before and after freezing specimens, we isolated facultative and anaerobic bacteria using a set of primary isolation media, consisting of three aerobic agar plates (MacConkey agar, blood agar and chocolate agar) and four pre-reduced anaerobic agar plates (HK Blood agar, HK blood agar with paromomycin (PM) and vancomycin (VM), phenyl ethyl-alcohol (PEA) agar and Bacteroides bile esculin (BBE) agar). All the procedures were done in a properly controlled anaerobic chamber. The number of isolates before and after freezing was 79 and 70, respectively. Among the strains isolated before freezing, 33 strains were recovered on the same kin of media artery freezing, without a remarkable decrease in the quantity. But 26 strains were not recovered and 2 strains were recovered with a remarkable decrease. Among 26 strains, 15 strains could be successfully backed up on the different kind of media. In conclusion, an anaerobic technique with an anaerobic chamber and a set of isolatin plates including blood agar, chocolate agar, HK blood agar, PEA blood agar, HK blood agar with PM and VM enable us to estimate the bacteriology before freezing from frozen specimens.

  20. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Coal under Dry and Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yixin; Liu, Shimin; Jiang, Yaodong; Wang, Kai; Huang, Yaqiong

    2016-05-01

    The tensile failure characterization of dry and saturated coals under different impact loading conditions was experimentally investigated using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar. Indirect dynamic Brazilian disc tension tests for coals were carried out. The indirect tensile strengths for different bedding angles under different impact velocities, strain rates and loading rates are analyzed and discussed. A high-speed high-resolution digital camera was employed to capture and record the dynamic failure process of coal specimens. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the saturated specimens have stronger loading rate dependence than the dry specimens. The bedding angle has a smaller effect on the dynamic indirect tensile strength compared to the impact velocity. Both shear and tensile failures were observed in the tested coal specimens. Saturated coal specimens have higher indirect tensile strength than dry ones.

  1. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  2. Apparatus for automated testing of biological specimens

    DOEpatents

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for performing automated testing of infections biological specimens is disclosed. The apparatus comprise a process controller for translating user commands into test instrument suite commands, and a test instrument suite comprising a means to treat the specimen to manifest an observable result, and a detector for measuring the observable result to generate specimen test results.

  3. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  4. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  5. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Split specimens. 26.135 Section 26.135 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.135 Split specimens. (a) If the FFD program follows split-specimen procedures, as described in § 26.113, the licensee...

  6. Drying Thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    In searching for an improved method of removing water from polyester type resins without damaging the materials, Conair Inc. turned to the NASA Center at the University of Pittsburgh for assistance. Taking an organized, thorough look at existing technology before beginning research has helped many companies save significant time and money. They searched the NASA and other computerized files for microwave drying of thermoplastics. About 300 relevant citations were retrieved - eight of which were identified as directly applicable to the problem. Company estimates it saved a minimum of a full year in compiling research results assembled by the information center.

  7. Specimen preparation for NanoSIMS analysis of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grovenor, C. R. M.; Smart, K. E.; Kilburn, M. R.; Shore, B.; Dilworth, J. R.; Martin, B.; Hawes, C.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2006-07-01

    In order to achieve reliable and reproducible analysis of biological materials by SIMS, it is critical both that the chosen specimen preparation method does not modify substantially the in vivo chemistry that is the focus of the study and that any chemical information obtained can be calibrated accurately by selection of appropriate standards. In Oxford, we have been working with our new Cameca NanoSIMS50 on two very distinct classes of biological materials; the first where the sample preparation problems are relatively undemanding - human hair - but calibration for trace metal analysis is a critical issue and, the second, marine coccoliths and hyperaccumulator plants where reliable specimen preparation by rapid freezing and controlled drying to preserve the distribution of diffusible species is the first and most demanding requirement, but worthwhile experiments on tracking key elements can still be undertaken even when it is clear that some redistribution of the most diffusible ions has occurred.

  8. Implementation and Operational Research: Programmatic Feasibility of Dried Blood Spots for the Virological Follow-up of Patients on Antiretroviral Treatment in Nord Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Laetitia; Muwonga, Jeremie; Kabuayi, Jean Pierre; Kambale, Alain; Mutaka, Fidèle; Fujiwara, Paula I.; Decosas, Josef; Peeters, Martine; Delaporte, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: As part of its policy to shift monitoring of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to primary health care (PHC) workers, the Ministry of Health of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) tested the feasibility of using dried blood spots (DBS) for viral load (VL) quantification and genotypic drug resistance testing in off-site high-throughput laboratories. Methods: DBS samples from adults on ART were collected in 13 decentralized PHC facilities in the Nord-Kivu province and shipped during program quarterly supervision to a reference laboratory 2000 km away, where VL was quantified with a commercial assay (m2000rt, Abbott). A second DBS was sent to a World Health Organization (WHO)-accredited laboratory for repeat VL quantification on a subset of samples with a generic assay (Biocentric) and genotypic drug resistance testing when VL >1000 copies per milliliter. Findings: Constraints arose because of an interruption in national laboratory funding rather than to technical or logistic problems. All samples were assessed by both VL assays to allow ART adjustment. Median DBS turnaround time was 37 days (interquartile range: 9–59). Assays performed unequally with DBS, impacting clinical decisions, quality assurance, and overall cost-effectiveness. Based on m2000rt or generic assay, 31.3% of patients were on virological failure (VF) and 14.8% presented resistance mutations versus 50.3% and 15.4%, respectively. Conclusion: This study confirms that current technologies involving DBS make virological monitoring of ART possible at PHC level, including in challenging environments, provided organizational issues are addressed. Adequate core funding of HIV laboratories and adapted choice of VL assays require urgent attention to control resistance to ART as coverage expands. PMID:26413848

  9. Dry Mouth or Xerostomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Xerostomia Request Permissions Print to PDF Dry Mouth or Xerostomia Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... a dry mouth. Signs and symptoms of dry mouth The signs and symptoms of dry mouth include ...

  10. Alfredo Dugès' type specimens of amphibians and reptiles revisited.

    PubMed

    Flores-Villela, Oscar; Ríos-Muñoz, César A; Magaña-Cota, Gloria E; Quezadas-Tapia, Néstor L

    2016-03-14

    The type specimens of amphibians and reptiles of the Museo de Historia Natural Alfredo Dugès, at the University of Guanajuato (MADUG) were reviewed following Smith & Necker's (1943) summary. Owing to this collection's eventful history and its historical importance as the oldest herpetological collection in Mexico, a review of its conservation status was needed. After many years, the collection has received proper recognition at the University of Guanajuato with a portion of the herpetological types considered "Precious Assets" of the university. We found 34 type specimens pertaining to 18 taxa; six are additional specimens to those previously reported; six herpetological types are missing, including the body of the type of Adelophis copei. All specimens are in good to reasonable condition except for the type of Rhinocheilus antonii, which has dried out completely. All specimens are illustrated to show their condition.

  11. Alfredo Dugès' type specimens of amphibians and reptiles revisited.

    PubMed

    Flores-Villela, Oscar; Ríos-Muñoz, César A; Magaña-Cota, Gloria E; Quezadas-Tapia, Néstor L

    2016-01-01

    The type specimens of amphibians and reptiles of the Museo de Historia Natural Alfredo Dugès, at the University of Guanajuato (MADUG) were reviewed following Smith & Necker's (1943) summary. Owing to this collection's eventful history and its historical importance as the oldest herpetological collection in Mexico, a review of its conservation status was needed. After many years, the collection has received proper recognition at the University of Guanajuato with a portion of the herpetological types considered "Precious Assets" of the university. We found 34 type specimens pertaining to 18 taxa; six are additional specimens to those previously reported; six herpetological types are missing, including the body of the type of Adelophis copei. All specimens are in good to reasonable condition except for the type of Rhinocheilus antonii, which has dried out completely. All specimens are illustrated to show their condition. PMID:27394365

  12. A scanning electron microscopy specimen holder for viewing different angles of a single specimen.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Hans

    2010-12-01

    The specimen holder for scanning electron microscopy described herein allows a single specimen to be examined in any possible view and significantly improves object illumination. The specimen is glued to a fine pin and flexibly mounted on a double-sided adhesive conductive pad on a rotatable pivot. A milled pot placed beneath the specimen acts as an electron trap. This provides a homogeneous black image background by minimizing noisy signals from the specimen's surroundings. PMID:20196104

  13. Nondestructive DNA extraction from museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Hofreiter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Natural history museums around the world hold millions of animal and plant specimens that are potentially amenable to genetic analyses. With more and more populations and species becoming extinct, the importance of these specimens for phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses is rapidly increasing. However, as most DNA extraction methods damage the specimens, nondestructive extraction methods are useful to balance the demands of molecular biologists, morphologists, and museum curators. Here, I describe a method for nondestructive DNA extraction from bony specimens (i.e., bones and teeth). In this method, the specimens are soaked in extraction buffer, and DNA is then purified from the soaking solution using adsorption to silica. The method reliably yields mitochondrial and often also nuclear DNA. The method has been adapted to DNA extraction from other types of specimens such as arthropods.

  14. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  15. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  16. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be made... 43 CFR part 24. Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3....

  17. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be made... 43 CFR part 24. Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3....

  18. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in... of research, baseline inventories, monitoring, impact analysis, group study, or museum display...

  19. 37 CFR 1.93 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specimens. 1.93 Section 1.93 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE....93 Specimens. When the invention relates to a composition of matter, the applicant may be required...

  20. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  1. 10 CFR 26.135 - Split specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shall store Bottles A and B of the specimen in a secure manner until the facility has finished testing. If the initial validity and drug test results are negative and the specimen in Bottle A will not be forwarded to the HHS-certified laboratory, the licensee testing facility may discard both Bottle A...

  2. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of the member's services. (4) A collective membership mark specimen must show use by members to... cassette tape recording, CD-ROM, or other appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format....

  3. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the member's services. (4) A collective membership mark specimen must show use by members to... cassette tape recording, CD-ROM, or other appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format....

  4. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection....

  5. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection....

  6. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be made... 43 CFR part 24. Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3....

  7. 36 CFR 2.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... superintendent approves a written research proposal and determines that the collection will benefit science or... Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed specimens will be made... 43 CFR part 24. Regulations concerning archeological resources are found in 43 CFR part 3....

  8. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection....

  9. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... collections will bear official National Park Service museum labels and their catalog numbers will be registered in the National Park Service National Catalog. (2) Specimens and data derived from consumed... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Research specimens....

  10. 36 CFR 1002.5 - Research specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Research specimens. 1002.5... RECREATION § 1002.5 Research specimens. (a) Taking plants, fish, wildlife, rocks or minerals except in accordance with other regulations of this chapter or pursuant to the terms and conditions of a...

  11. 37 CFR 1.166 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Plant Patents § 1.166 Specimens. The applicant may be required to furnish specimens of the plant, or its flower or fruit, in a quantity and at a time in its stage of growth as may be designated, for study and inspection....

  12. Layered Plating Specimens For Mechanical Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Linda B.; Flowers, Cecil E.

    1991-01-01

    Layered specimens readily made in standard sizes for tensile and other tests of mechanical properties. Standard specimen of metal ordinarily difficult to plate to standard grip thickness or diameter made by augmentation with easier-to-plate material followed by machining to standard size and shape.

  13. 37 CFR 1.93 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specimens. 1.93 Section 1.93 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE....93 Specimens. When the invention relates to a composition of matter, the applicant may be required...

  14. Detection of infections with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus by analyses of dried blood spots - performance characteristics of the ARCHITECT system and two commercial assays for nucleic acid amplification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays, dried blood spots (DBS) are primarily used to obtain diagnostic access to risk collectives such as intravenous drug users, who are prone to infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Before DBS analyses can be used in this diagnostic context, however, a comprehensive evaluation of its performance characteristics must be conducted. To the best of our knowledge, the current study presents for the first time such essential data for the Abbott ARCHITECT system, which is currently the worldwide leading platform in this field of infection diagnostics. Methods The investigation comprised 1,762 paired serum/DBS samples and a total of 3,524 determinations with the Abbott ARCHITECT HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV and HIV-1-p24-antigen/anti-HIV 1/2 assays as well as with the artus HBV LC PCR and VERSANT HCV RNA qualitative (TMA) tests. Results In the context of DBS testing, a specificity of 100% was recorded for the seven serological and molecular biological assays. The analytical sensitivity of HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV, HIV-1-p24-antigen/anti-HIV 1/2, HBV DNA, and HCV RNA detections in DBS eluates was 98.6%, 97.1%, 97.5%, 97.8%, 100%, 93%, and 100%, respectively. Discussion/conclusions The results obtained indicate that it is today possible to reliably detect HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-HCV and HIV-1-p24 antigen/anti-HIV 1/2 with state-of-the-art analytical systems such as the Abbott ARCHITECT in DBS eluates even when a comparatively high elution volume of 1,000 μl is used. They also provide evidence for the inherent analytical limits of DBS testing, which primarily concern the anti-HBc/anti-HBs system for individuals with HIV infections and nucleic acid tests with relatively low analytical sensitivity. PMID:23497102

  15. Spatial and temporal continuity of kangaroo rat populations shown by sequencing mitochondrial DNA from museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W K; Pääbo, S; Villablanca, F X; Wilson, A C

    1990-08-01

    The advent of direct sequencing via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has opened up the possibility of molecular studies on museum specimens. Here we analyze genetic variation in populations over time by applying PCR to DNA extracted from museum specimens sampled from populations of one species over the last 78 years. Included in this study were 43 museum specimens of the Panamint kangaroo rat Dipodomys panamintinus from localities representing each of three geographically distinct subspecies. These specimens were originally collected and prepared as dried skins in 1911, 1917, or 1937. For each specimen, a 225-bp segment of the mitochondrial genome was sequenced. These mitochondrial DNA sequences were compared to those of 63 specimens collected at the same localities in 1988. The three subspecies were nearly completely distinct. Only 2 of the 106 individuals shared mitochondrial types between subspecies. For all three localities, the diversity levels were maintained between the two temporal samples. The concordance observed between the two temporally separate phylogenies supports the use of museum specimens for phylogenetic inference. This study demonstrates the accuracy and routine nature of the use of museum specimens in the analysis of mitochondrial sequence variation in natural populations and, importantly, that a temporal aspect can now be added to such studies.

  16. Characterizing DNA preservation in degraded specimens of Amara alpina (Carabidae: Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Heintzman, Peter D; Elias, Scott A; Moore, Karen; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Barnes, Ian

    2014-05-01

    DNA preserved in degraded beetle (Coleoptera) specimens, including those derived from dry-stored museum and ancient permafrost-preserved environments, could provide a valuable resource for researchers interested in species and population histories over timescales from decades to millenia. However, the potential of these samples as genetic resources is currently unassessed. Here, using Sanger and Illumina shotgun sequence data, we explored DNA preservation in specimens of the ground beetle Amara alpina, from both museum and ancient environments. Nearly all museum specimens had amplifiable DNA, with the maximum amplifiable fragment length decreasing with age. Amplification of DNA was only possible in 45% of ancient specimens. Preserved mitochondrial DNA fragments were significantly longer than those of nuclear DNA in both museum and ancient specimens. Metagenomic characterization of extracted DNA demonstrated that parasite-derived sequences, including Wolbachia and Spiroplasma, are recoverable from museum beetle specimens. Ancient DNA extracts contained beetle DNA in amounts comparable to museum specimens. Overall, our data demonstrate that there is great potential for both museum and ancient specimens of beetles in future genetic studies, and we see no reason why this would not be the case for other orders of insect.

  17. Electron microprobe analysis program for biological specimens: BIOMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, B. F.

    1972-01-01

    BIOMAP is a Univac 1108 compatible program which facilitates the electron probe microanalysis of biological specimens. Input data are X-ray intensity data from biological samples, the X-ray intensity and composition data from a standard sample and the electron probe operating parameters. Outputs are estimates of the weight percentages of the analyzed elements, the distribution of these estimates for sets of red blood cells and the probabilities for correlation between elemental concentrations. An optional feature statistically estimates the X-ray intensity and residual background of a principal standard relative to a series of standards.

  18. Vomiting blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... first part of the small intestine, or esophagus Blood clotting disorders Defects in the blood vessels of the ... as a complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistries, blood clotting tests, and liver function tests Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (placing ...

  19. Blood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect ...

  20. 10 CFR 26.165 - Testing split specimens and retesting single specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Testing split specimens and retesting single specimens. 26.165 Section 26.165 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Laboratories Certified by the Department of Health and Human Services § 26.165 Testing split specimens and...

  1. Mode-II-Fracture Specimen And Holder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, Robert J.; Ghosn, Louis; Succop, George

    1991-01-01

    Test specimen and loading frame developed for fatigue and fracture testing of materials under mode-II (sliding-mode) loading. Assembly placed in compression-testing machine. Loads directed oppositely along centerline cause self-similar crack to propagate. Enables consistently accurate alignment of specimens before insertion of specimen/frame assemblies into compression-testing machine. Makes design attractive for testing in hostile environments in which access to machine or furnace limited. Additional feature, with little or no modification, placed horizontally into impact testing machine and subjected to loading at high speeds.

  2. Evaluation of Granada agar plate for detection of Streptococcus agalactiae in urine specimens from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Javier; Gómez-Garcés, José-Luis; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2004-08-01

    The Granada agar plate (GAP; Biomedics SL, Madrid, Spain) was evaluated for the detection of group B streptococci (GBS) in urine specimens from pregnant women submitted for testing for asymptomatic bacteriuria and was compared with blood agar (BA [Columbia agar with 5% sheep blood]; bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). The GAP detected 103 out of 105 GBS, whereas BA detected only 50. Use of the GAP could be a good method for the detection of GBS in urine specimens from pregnant women. PMID:15297542

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMonigal, Kathleen A.; Pietrzyk, Robert a.; Johnson, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository (Repository) is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. Samples from the International Space Station (ISS), including blood and urine, will be collected, processed and archived during the preflight, inflight and postflight phases of ISS missions. This investigation has been developed to archive biosamples for use as a resource for future space flight related research. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a platform to investigate the effects of microgravity on human physiology prior to lunar and exploration class missions. The storage of crewmember samples from many different ISS flights in a single repository will be a valuable resource with which researchers can study space flight related changes and investigate physiological markers. The development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Biological Specimen Repository will allow for the collection, processing, storage, maintenance, and ethical distribution of biosamples to meet goals of scientific and programmatic relevance to the space program. Archiving of the biosamples will provide future research opportunities including investigating patterns of physiological changes, analysis of components unknown at this time or analyses performed by new methodologies.

  4. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format. ... member uses the mark on the member's goods or in the sale or advertising of the member's services. (4)...

  5. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format. ... member uses the mark on the member's goods or in the sale or advertising of the member's services. (4)...

  6. 37 CFR 2.56 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... appropriate medium. (4) For a TEAS submission, the specimen must be a digitized image in .jpg or .pdf format. ... member uses the mark on the member's goods or in the sale or advertising of the member's services. (4)...

  7. A Live Specimen Cell for the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Provides background and instructions for the assembly of a microaquarium, or specimen cell, in which the dynamic world of living microorganisms can be viewed through a microscope overextended periods of time utilizing the simplest of materials in the process. (JJK)

  8. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  9. Impact of specimen adequacy on the assessment of renal allograft biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Cimen, S; Geldenhuys, L; Guler, S; Imamoglu, A; Molinari, M

    2016-01-01

    The Banff classification was introduced to achieve uniformity in the assessment of renal allograft biopsies. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of specimen adequacy on the Banff classification. All renal allograft biopsies obtained between July 2010 and June 2012 for suspicion of acute rejection were included. Pre-biopsy clinical data on suspected diagnosis and time from renal transplantation were provided to a nephropathologist who was blinded to the original pathological report. Second pathological readings were compared with the original to assess agreement stratified by specimen adequacy. Cohen's kappa test and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analyses. Forty-nine specimens were reviewed. Among these specimens, 81.6% were classified as adequate, 6.12% as minimal, and 12.24% as unsatisfactory. The agreement analysis among the first and second readings revealed a kappa value of 0.97. Full agreement between readings was found in 75% of the adequate specimens, 66.7 and 50% for minimal and unsatisfactory specimens, respectively. There was no agreement between readings in 5% of the adequate specimens and 16.7% of the unsatisfactory specimens. For the entire sample full agreement was found in 71.4%, partial agreement in 20.4% and no agreement in 8.2% of the specimens. Statistical analysis using Fisher's exact test yielded a P value above 0.25 showing that - probably due to small sample size - the results were not statistically significant. Specimen adequacy may be a determinant of a diagnostic agreement in renal allograft specimen assessment. While additional studies including larger case numbers are required to further delineate the impact of specimen adequacy on the reliability of histopathological assessments, specimen quality must be considered during clinical decision making while dealing with biopsy reports based on minimal or unsatisfactory specimens.

  10. Impact of specimen adequacy on the assessment of renal allograft biopsy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cimen, S.; Geldenhuys, L.; Guler, S.; Imamoglu, A.; Molinari, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Banff classification was introduced to achieve uniformity in the assessment of renal allograft biopsies. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of specimen adequacy on the Banff classification. All renal allograft biopsies obtained between July 2010 and June 2012 for suspicion of acute rejection were included. Pre-biopsy clinical data on suspected diagnosis and time from renal transplantation were provided to a nephropathologist who was blinded to the original pathological report. Second pathological readings were compared with the original to assess agreement stratified by specimen adequacy. Cohen's kappa test and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analyses. Forty-nine specimens were reviewed. Among these specimens, 81.6% were classified as adequate, 6.12% as minimal, and 12.24% as unsatisfactory. The agreement analysis among the first and second readings revealed a kappa value of 0.97. Full agreement between readings was found in 75% of the adequate specimens, 66.7 and 50% for minimal and unsatisfactory specimens, respectively. There was no agreement between readings in 5% of the adequate specimens and 16.7% of the unsatisfactory specimens. For the entire sample full agreement was found in 71.4%, partial agreement in 20.4% and no agreement in 8.2% of the specimens. Statistical analysis using Fisher's exact test yielded a P value above 0.25 showing that - probably due to small sample size - the results were not statistically significant. Specimen adequacy may be a determinant of a diagnostic agreement in renal allograft specimen assessment. While additional studies including larger case numbers are required to further delineate the impact of specimen adequacy on the reliability of histopathological assessments, specimen quality must be considered during clinical decision making while dealing with biopsy reports based on minimal or unsatisfactory specimens. PMID:27119314

  11. Mode 2 fatigue crack growth specimen development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Mode II test specimen was developed which has potential application in understanding phemonena associated with mixed mode fatigue failures in high performance aircraft engine bearing races. The attributes of the specimen are: it contains one single ended notch, which simplifiers data gathering and reduction; the fatigue crack grous in-line with the direction of load application; a single axis test machine is sufficient to perform testing; and the Mode I component is vanishingly small.

  12. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

  13. Correlation between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA measurements obtained with dried blood spots and those obtained with plasma by use of Nuclisens EasyQ HIV-1 and Abbott RealTime HIV load tests.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Carolina; Zahonero, Natalia; Corral, Angélica; Arredondo, Miguel; Soriano, Vincent; de Mendoza, Carmen

    2009-04-01

    The plasma human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA load is used in the clinical routine for the monitoring of HIV infection and the patient's response to antiretroviral therapy. Other body fluids or dried blood spots (DBS) can be used, however, to assess the level of viremia. The use of DBS may be especially helpful for the monitoring of HIV-infected patients in resource-poor settings, where access to adequate laboratory facilities is often difficult. However, the correlation between the HIV RNA levels in plasma and those in DBSs has not been well established. Paired plasma and DBS samples obtained from HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients were tested for HIV RNA copy numbers by using two different commercial assays, the Nuclisens EasyQ HIV-1 (version 1.1) test (the Nuclisens test; Biomerieux) and the m2000rt RealTime HIV test (the m2000rt test; Abbott). Nucleic acid extraction was performed manually by using either the Nuclisens isolation kit (which uses the Boom methodology) or the m2000rt sample preparation kit (an iron particle-based method). A total of 103 paired plasma and DBS samples were tested. Viral load results were obtained for 97 (94.2%) samples with the Nuclisens isolation kit and 81 (78.6%) samples with the m2000rt kit. The overall correlation between the RNA loads in plasma and DBS was good, although better results were obtained by the Nuclisens test (R(2) = 0.87, P < 0.001) than by the m2000rt test (R(2) = 0.70, P < 0.001). While the specificities were excellent and similar for both the Nuclisens and the m2000rt tests (97.1% and 100%, respectively), the sensitivity was greater by the Nuclisens test than by the m2000rt test (75.8% and 56.6%, respectively). Overall, the viral loads in DBS tended to be lower than those in plasma, with mean differences of 0.3 log unit (standard deviation, 0.5 log unit) and 0.76 log unit (standard deviation, 0.8 log unit) for the Nuclisens and the m2000rt tests, respectively. The levels of agreement between the

  14. Solution Preserves Nucleic Acids in Body-Fluid Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    A solution has been formulated to preserve deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in specimens of blood, saliva, and other bodily fluids. Specimens of this type are collected for diagnostic molecular pathology, which is becoming the method of choice for diagnosis of many diseases. The solution makes it possible to store such specimens at room temperature, without risk of decomposition, for subsequent analysis in a laboratory that could be remote from the sampling location. Thus, the solution could be a means to bring the benefits of diagnostic molecular pathology to geographic regions where refrigeration equipment and diagnostic laboratories are not available. The table lists the ingredients of the solution. The functions of the ingredients are the following: EDTA chelates divalent cations that are necessary cofactors for nuclease activity. In so doing, it functionally removes these cations and thereby retards the action of nucleases. EDTA also stabilizes the DNA helix. Tris serves as a buffering agent, which is needed because minor contaminants in an unbuffered solution can exert pronounced effects on pH and thereby cause spontaneous degradation of DNA. SDS is an ionic detergent that inhibits ribonuclease activity. SDS has been used in some lysis buffers and as a storage buffer for RNA after purification. The use of the solution is straightforward. For example, a sample of saliva is collected by placing a cotton roll around in the subject's mouth until it becomes saturated, then the cotton is placed in a collection tube. Next, 1.5 mL of the solution are injected directly into the cotton and the tube is capped for storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of the solution has been demonstrated in tests on specimens of saliva containing herpes simplex virus. In the tests, the viral DNA, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction, was detected even after storage for 120 days.

  15. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  16. Blood clotting

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the external bleeding stops. Clotting factors in the blood cause strands of blood-borne material, called fibrin, to stick together and ... the inside of the wound. Eventually, the cut blood vessel heals, and the blood clot dissolves after ...

  17. Closeout of JOYO-1 Specimen Fabrication Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    ME Petrichek; JL Bump; RF Luther

    2005-10-31

    Fabrication was well under way for the JOYO biaxial creep and tensile specimens when the NR Space program was canceled. Tubes of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 for biaxial creep specimens had been drawn at True Tube (Paso Robles, CA), while tubes of Mo-47.5 Re were being drawn at Rhenium Alloys (Cleveland, OH). The Mo-47.5 Re tubes are now approximately 95% complete. Their fabrication and the quantities produced will be documented at a later date. End cap material for FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had been swaged at Pittsburgh Materials Technology, Inc. (PMTI) (Large, PA) and machined at Vangura (Clairton, PA). Cutting of tubes, pickling, annealing, and laser engraving were in process at PMTI. Several biaxial creep specimen sets of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had already been sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for weld development. In addition, tensile specimens of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, and Mo-47.5 Re had been machined at Kin-Tech (North Huntington, PA). Actual machining of the other specimen types had not been initiated. Flowcharts 1-3 detail the major processing steps each piece of material has experienced. A more detailed description of processing will be provided in a separate document [B-MT(SRME)-51]. Table 1 lists the in-process materials and finished specimens. Also included are current metallurgical condition of these materials and specimens. The available chemical analyses for these alloys at various points in the process are provided in Table 2.

  18. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  19. Characterization of some biological specimens using TEM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Smith, Don W.

    2009-05-01

    The advent of novel techniques using the Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes improved observation on various biological specimens to characterize them. We studied some biological specimens using Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes. We followed negative staining technique with Phosphotungstic acid using bacterial culture of Bacillus subtilis. Negative staining is very convenient technique to view the structural morphology of different samples including bacteria, phage viruses and filaments in a cell. We could observe the bacterial cell wall and flagellum very well when trapped the negative stained biofilm from bacterial culture on a TEM grid. We cut ultra thin sections from the fixed root tips of Pisum sativum (Garden pea). Root tips were pre fixed with osmium tetroxide and post fixed with uranium acetate and placed in the BEEM capsule for block making. The ultrathin sections on the grid under TEM showed the granular chromatin in the nucleus. The protein bodies and large vacuoles with the storage materials were conspicuous. We followed fixation, critical point drying and sputter coating with gold to view the tissues with SEM after placing on stubs. SEM view of the leaf surface of a dangerous weed Tragia hispida showed the surface trichomes. These trichomes when break on touching releases poisonous content causing skin irritation. The cultured tissue from in vitro culture of Albizia lebbeck, a tree revealed the regenerative structures including leaf buds and stomata on the tissue surface. SEM and TEM allow investigating the minute details characteristic morphological features that can be used for classroom teaching.

  20. Unusual Histopathological Findings in Childhood Appendectomy Specimens.

    PubMed

    Buyukbese Sarsu, Sevgi; Ucak, Ramazan; Buyukbese, Mehmet Akif; Karakus, Suleyman Cuneyt; Deniz, Hale

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the unusual findings in the childhood appendectomy specimens and their incidence. The clinicopathological data of 1,306 patients whose ages ranged from 3 to 16 were retrospectively collected. Histopathological findings in appendectomy specimens taken from patients who had a prediagnosis of appendicitis were obtained. Incidental appendectomies were not included in the research. Unusual findings were reevaluated in the histopathological assessment of appendectomy specimens. The number of patients whose pathological findings are considered unusual is 25 (1.91 %). Nine of the patients were girls and 16 of them were boys. Their ages ranged from 6 to 15. Pathological results revealed that there were 16 (1.22 %) cases of parasitosis, 3 (0.23 %) cases of granulomatosis, 3 (0.23 %) cases of eosinophilic appendicitis, 2 (0.15 %) cases of carcinoid tumors, and 1 (0.08 %) case of appendiceal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. All patients underwent a standard appendectomy. Uncommon histopathological findings in childhood appendectomy specimens are more common than those in adulthood. This kind of certain unexpected lesions of the appendix may require advanced diagnostics, careful clinical care, follow-up for years, and a multidisciplinary approach. Therefore, histopathological examinations of appendectomy specimens must be performed routinely. PMID:26730070

  1. Investigations in space-related molecular biology. [cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.; Pritzker, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Improved instrumentation and preparation techniques for high resolution, high voltage cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens are reported. Computer correlated ultrastructural and biochemical work on hydrated and dried cell membranes and related biological systems provided information on membrane organization, ice crystal formation and ordered water, RNA virus linked to cancer, lunar rock samples, and organometallic superconducting compounds. Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 specimens were analyzed

  2. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy... Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use split-specimen methods of collection. (b) If the urine specimen is to be split into two specimen...

  3. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy... Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use split-specimen methods of collection. (b) If the urine specimen is to be split into two specimen...

  4. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Splitting the urine specimen. 26.113 Section 26.113 Energy... Splitting the urine specimen. (a) Licensees and other entities may, but are not required to, use split-specimen methods of collection. (b) If the urine specimen is to be split into two specimen...

  5. Genomic treasure troves: complete genome sequencing of herbarium and insect museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Staats, Martijn; Erkens, Roy H J; van de Vossenberg, Bart; Wieringa, Jan J; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Stielow, Benjamin; Geml, József; Richardson, James E; Bakker, Freek T

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS) world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22-82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus) were generated with 81.4-97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2-71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes), but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylo)genetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more horizontal

  6. 46 CFR 4.06-50 - Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... sent to the Medical Review Officer meeting the requirements of 49 CFR 40.121, as designated by the... required by 49 CFR part 40, subpart G, and submit his or her findings to the marine employer. Blood test... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures....

  7. 46 CFR 4.06-50 - Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... sent to the Medical Review Officer meeting the requirements of 49 CFR 40.121, as designated by the... required by 49 CFR part 40, subpart G, and submit his or her findings to the marine employer. Blood test... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specimen analysis and follow-up procedures....

  8. Correlation of surface topography of metal-shadowed specimens with their negatively stained reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Buhle, E L; Aebi, U; Smith, P R

    1985-01-01

    We present a comparison of surface reconstructions from three different freeze-dried and unidirectionally metal-shadowed specimens (i.e. bacteriophage T4 polyheads, crystalline actin sheets and nuclear pore complexes) with two- or three-dimensional reconstructions of the same specimens when prepared by negative staining. Based on these and many published results, the following conclusions have been reached: With a "cooperative" specimen (e.g. the polyheads), the surface reconstruction computed from a metal-shadowed replica compares favorably with two- or three-dimensional reconstructions obtained from the same specimen after negative staining at the 3-4 nm resolution level. This relatively "poor" level at which the surface topographies of the two preparations can be compared appears to be set by a "practical" resolution limit (i.e. of distinct and reproducible structural detail) of metal replicas of biological specimens, despite the appearance of weak higher-order diffraction spots (i.e. corresponding to 2-3 nm). While in some cases (e.g. the crystalline actin sheets) the surface reliefs of metal replicas may bear little resemblance to the actual structure under investigation, the replicas may still contain sufficient features to establish the polarity or handedness of the structure (i.e., the "top" and "bottom" surfaces of a crystalline sheet). Information from negatively stained specimens is usually complementary with information from freeze-dried and metal-shadowed specimens. However, there are artifacts in both techniques, and we present an example with the nuclear pore complex, where these techniques yield confusing results. PMID:2413606

  9. Surface analysis of space telescope material specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, A. T.; Daneshvar, K.

    1985-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative data on Space Telescope materials which were exposed to low Earth orbital atomic oxygen in a controlled experiment during the 41-G (STS-17) mission were obtained utilizing the experimental techniques of Rutherford backscattering (RBS), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), and ellipsometry (ELL). The techniques employed were chosen with a view towards appropriateness for the sample in question, after consultation with NASA scientific personnel who provided the material specimens. A group of eight samples and their controls selected by NASA scientists were measured before and after flight. Information reported herein include specimen surface characterization by ellipsometry techniques, a determination of the thickness of the evaporated metal specimens by RBS, and a determination of trace impurity species present on and within the surface by PIXE.

  10. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis. PMID:26988066

  11. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach. Part I: Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    In this article, part I of a series, the forensic methods used in "typing" human blood, which as physical evidence is often found in the dried state, are outlined. Background information about individualization, antibody typing, fresh blood, dried blood, and additional systems is provided. (CW)

  12. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  13. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  14. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  15. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  16. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  17. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  18. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart A of... - Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dummy Specimen in Specimen Holder 6 Figure 6 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt....

  19. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1610 - Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specimen Holder Supported in Specimen Rack 3 Figure 3 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part...

  2. Attitudes of pregnant women towards collection of biological specimens during pregnancy and at birth.

    PubMed

    Nechuta, Sarah; Mudd, Lanay M; Elliott, Michael R; Lepkowski, James M; Paneth, Nigel

    2012-05-01

    Epidemiological investigations of maternal and child health may involve the collection of biological specimens, including cord blood and the placenta; however, the attitudes of pregnant women towards participation in the collection of biological specimens have been studied rarely. We evaluated attitudes towards collection and storage of biological specimens, and determined whether attitudes differed by maternal characteristics, in a cross-sectional study of pregnant women residing in Kent County, Michigan. Women were interviewed at their first visit for prenatal care between April and October 2006 (n = 311). Willingness to participate was highest for maternal blood collection (72%), followed by storage of biological specimens (68%), placenta collection (64%), and cord blood collection (63%). About one-quarter of women (25-28% by procedure) would not participate even if compensated. Hispanic ethnicity was associated with unwillingness to participate in maternal blood collection (OR = 2.16 [95% CI 1.15, 4.04]). Primiparity was associated with unwillingness to participate in cord blood collection (OR = 1.72 [95% CI 1.23, 2.42]). Among women willing to participate, Hispanic women were less likely to require compensation; while higher educated, married and primiparous women were more likely to require compensation. In conclusion, while many pregnant women were willing to participate in biological specimen collection, some women were more resistant, in particular Hispanic and primiparous women. Targeting these groups of women for enhanced recruitment efforts may improve overall participation rates and the representativeness of participants in future studies of maternal and child health.

  3. The production of calibration specimens for impact testing of subsize Charpy specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Corwin, W.R.; Owings, T.D.

    1994-09-01

    Calibration specimens have been manufactured for checking the performance of a pendulum impact testing machine that has been configured for testing subsize specimens, both half-size (5.0 {times} 5.0 {times} 25.4 mm) and third-size (3.33 {times} 3.33 {times} 25.4 mm). Specimens were fabricated from quenched-and-tempered 4340 steel heat treated to produce different microstructures that would result in either high or low absorbed energy levels on testing. A large group of both half- and third-size specimens were tested at {minus}40{degrees}C. The results of the tests were analyzed for average value and standard deviation, and these values were used to establish calibration limits for the Charpy impact machine when testing subsize specimens. These average values plus or minus two standard deviations were set as the acceptable limits for the average of five tests for calibration of the impact testing machine.

  4. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... examiner. If the applicant requests the examiner to inspect plants in the field before a final decision...

  5. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... examiner. If the applicant requests the examiner to inspect plants in the field before a final decision...

  6. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... examiner. If the applicant requests the examiner to inspect plants in the field before a final decision...

  7. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... examiner. If the applicant requests the examiner to inspect plants in the field before a final decision...

  8. 50 CFR 14.24 - Scientific specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific specimens. 14.24 Section 14.24 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING... systematic research purposes may enter or exit through any U.S. Customs port, or may be shipped through...

  9. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.8 Specimen requirements. (a) The applicant may be..., in a quantity and at a specified stage of growth, as may be necessary to verify the statements in the... reimburse the Office for all costs, including travel, per diem or subsistence, and salary. (b)...

  10. Simultaneous specimen and stage cleaning device for analytical electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1996-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are provided for cleaning both a specimen stage, a specimen and an interior of an analytical electron microscope (AEM). The apparatus for cleaning a specimen stage and specimen comprising a plasma chamber for containing a gas plasma and an air lock coupled to the plasma chamber for permitting passage of the specimen stage and specimen into the plasma chamber and maintaining an airtight chamber. The specimen stage and specimen are subjected to a reactive plasma gas that is either DC or RF excited. The apparatus can be mounted on the analytical electron microscope (AEM) for cleaning the interior of the microscope.

  11. Rehydration of forensically important larval Diptera specimens.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Michelle R; Pechal, Jennifer L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2011-01-01

    Established procedures for collecting and preserving evidence are essential for all forensic disciplines to be accepted in court and by the forensic community at large. Entomological evidence, such as Diptera larvae, are primarily preserved in ethanol, which can evaporate over time, resulting in the dehydration of specimens. In this study, methods used for rehydrating specimens were compared. The changes in larval specimens with respect to larval length and weight for three forensically important blow fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) species in North America were quantified. Phormia regina (Meigen), Cochliomyia macellaria (F.), and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) third-instar larvae were collected from various decomposing animals and preserved with three preservation methods (80% ethanol, 70% isopropyl alcohol, and hot-water kill then 80% ethanol). Preservative solutions were allowed to evaporate. Rehydration was attempted with either of the following: 80% ethanol, commercial trisodium phosphate substitute solution, or 0.5% trisodium phosphate solution. All three methods partially restored weight and length of specimens recorded before preservation. Analysis of variance results indicated that effects of preservation, rehydration treatment, and collection animal were different in each species. The interaction between preservative method and rehydration treatment had a significant effect on both P. regina and C. macellaria larval length and weight. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of collection animal on larval C. macellaria measurements. No significant effect was observed in C. rufifacies larval length or weight among the preservatives or treatments. These methods could be used to establish a standard operating procedure for dealing with dehydrated larval specimens in forensic investigations.

  12. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic ... mouth trouble chewing, swallowing, tasting, or speaking a burning feeling in the mouth a dry feeling in the throat cracked lips ...

  13. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin, which may bleed if severe. Chapped or cracked lips. When dry skin cracks, germs can get ... cause the skin to become dry, raw, and cracked. Swimming : Some pools have high levels of chlorine, ...

  14. Isolation Frequency Characteristics of Candida Species from Clinical Specimens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Yeon; Jeon, Jae-Sik; Kim, Jae Kyung

    2016-06-01

    Candida spp. is an invasive infectious fungus, a major risk factor that can increase morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. In this study, 2,508 Candida spp. were isolated from various clinical specimens collected from university hospitals from July 2011 to October 2014. They were identified in order to determine isolation frequencies and characteristics by specimen, gender, age group, year, season, and month. The strain-specific isolation rate of Candida spp. is in the order of Candida albicans (1,218 strains, 48.56%), Candida glabrata (416 strains, 16.59%), Candida utilis (305 strains, 12.16%), Candida tropicalis (304 strains, 12.12%), and Candida parapsilosis (116 strains, 4.63%) and these five species accounted for more than 94% of the total strains. Of the specimens, Candida spp. were most frequently isolated from urine-catheter, followed by urine-voided, blood, sputum, other, open pus, vaginal discharge, Tip, ear discharge, bronchial aspiration and bile, in that order. Looking at the age distribution, the detection rate of patients in their 60s and older was significantly higher at 75.8% (1,900/2,508). The detection rate of patients in their 20s and younger was shown to be very low at 2.55% (64/2,508). By year, the detection rate of non-albicans Candida spp. showed a tendency to gradually increase each year compared with C. albicans. As isolation of Candida spp. from clinical samples at the specie level can vary depending on characteristics of the patient, sample, season, etc., continual studies are required.

  15. Salvia divinorum: toxicological aspects and analysis in human biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Margalho, Cláudia; Corte-Real, Francisco; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2016-07-01

    The identification and quantitation of the main psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum (salvinorin A) in biological specimens are crucial in forensic and clinical toxicology. Despite all the efforts made, its uncontrolled abuse has increased quickly, exposing its users' health to serious risks both in the short and long term. The use of alternative biological matrices in toxicological analyzes can be advantageous as complementary postmortem samples, or in situations when neither blood nor urine can be collected; they may be useful tools in those determinations, providing important information about prior exposure. The aim of this article is to present a brief summary of legal aspects of Salvia divinorum and salvinorin A, including the methods used for the determination of the latter in biological matrices. PMID:27277872

  16. The development and validation of micro-CT of large deep frozen specimens.

    PubMed

    Kampschulte, Marian; Erdmann, Georg; Sender, Jonas; Martels, Gunhild; Böcker, Wolfgang; ElKhassawna, Thaqif; Heiß, Christian; Langheinrich, Alexanders Claus; Roeb, Elke; Roderfeld, Martin; Krombach, Gabriele Anja

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive freeze/thaw cycles lead to a progressive loss of structural and molecular integrity in deep frozen specimens. The aim of this study was to evaluate a micro-CT stage, which maintains the cryoconservation of large specimens throughout micro-CT imaging. Deep frozen ovine vertebral segments (-20 °C) were fixed in a micro-CT stage made of expanded polystyrene and cooled with dry ice (0 g, 60 g and 120 g). The temperature inside the stage was measured half-hourly over a time span of three hours with subsequent measurement of surface temperature. The method was validated in a series of 30 deep frozen vertebral specimens and in liver tissue after repetitive micro-CT scanning. Isolation without cooling resulted in defrosting. Cooling with 60 g of dry ice led to a temperature rise inside the stage (max. 5.1 °C) and on the specimen surfaces (max. -3 °C). Cooling with 120 g of dry ice resulted in a significant (p < 0.001) and sufficient lowering of the temperature inside the stage (max. -14 °C) and on the surface of the specimens (max. -13.9 °C). The surface temperature during the subsequent micro-CT validation study did not exceed -16 °C (processing time 1 h 45 min). The resolution was 33 μm isotropic voxel side length, enabling a binarization of bone microstructures. Temperature can reliably be maintained below -10 °C during a micro-CT scan by applying the described technique. The resulting spatial resolution and image quality permits a binarization of bone microstructure. PMID:25639882

  17. The development and validation of micro-CT of large deep frozen specimens.

    PubMed

    Kampschulte, Marian; Erdmann, Georg; Sender, Jonas; Martels, Gunhild; Böcker, Wolfgang; ElKhassawna, Thaqif; Heiß, Christian; Langheinrich, Alexanders Claus; Roeb, Elke; Roderfeld, Martin; Krombach, Gabriele Anja

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive freeze/thaw cycles lead to a progressive loss of structural and molecular integrity in deep frozen specimens. The aim of this study was to evaluate a micro-CT stage, which maintains the cryoconservation of large specimens throughout micro-CT imaging. Deep frozen ovine vertebral segments (-20 °C) were fixed in a micro-CT stage made of expanded polystyrene and cooled with dry ice (0 g, 60 g and 120 g). The temperature inside the stage was measured half-hourly over a time span of three hours with subsequent measurement of surface temperature. The method was validated in a series of 30 deep frozen vertebral specimens and in liver tissue after repetitive micro-CT scanning. Isolation without cooling resulted in defrosting. Cooling with 60 g of dry ice led to a temperature rise inside the stage (max. 5.1 °C) and on the specimen surfaces (max. -3 °C). Cooling with 120 g of dry ice resulted in a significant (p < 0.001) and sufficient lowering of the temperature inside the stage (max. -14 °C) and on the surface of the specimens (max. -13.9 °C). The surface temperature during the subsequent micro-CT validation study did not exceed -16 °C (processing time 1 h 45 min). The resolution was 33 μm isotropic voxel side length, enabling a binarization of bone microstructures. Temperature can reliably be maintained below -10 °C during a micro-CT scan by applying the described technique. The resulting spatial resolution and image quality permits a binarization of bone microstructure.

  18. Ophthalmic use of blood-derived products.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Ryan B; Lee, Graham A

    2015-01-01

    There is a wide spectrum of blood-derived products that have been used in many different medical and surgical specialties with success. Blood-derived products for clinical use can be extracted from autologous or allogeneic specimens of blood, but recombinant products are also commonly used. A number of blood derivatives have been used for a wide range of ocular conditions, from the ocular surface to the retina. With stringent preparation guidelines, the potential risk of transmission of blood-borne diseases is minimized. We review blood-derived products and how they are improving the management of ocular disease.

  19. Museum genomics: low-cost and high-accuracy genetic data from historical specimens.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Kevin C; Singhal, Sonal; Macmanes, Matthew D; Ayroles, Julien F; Morelli, Toni Lyn; Rubidge, Emily M; Bi, Ke; Moritz, Craig C

    2011-11-01

    Natural history collections are unparalleled repositories of geographical and temporal variation in faunal conditions. Molecular studies offer an opportunity to uncover much of this variation; however, genetic studies of historical museum specimens typically rely on extracting highly degraded and chemically modified DNA samples from skins, skulls or other dried samples. Despite this limitation, obtaining short fragments of DNA sequences using traditional PCR amplification of DNA has been the primary method for genetic study of historical specimens. Few laboratories have succeeded in obtaining genome-scale sequences from historical specimens and then only with considerable effort and cost. Here, we describe a low-cost approach using high-throughput next-generation sequencing to obtain reliable genome-scale sequence data from a traditionally preserved mammal skin and skull using a simple extraction protocol. We show that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the genome sequences obtained independently from the skin and from the skull are highly repeatable compared to a reference genome.

  20. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of ... pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would be evaluated for having high blood pressure. If left ...

  1. Blood Sugar

    MedlinePlus

    Blood sugar, or glucose, is the main sugar found in your blood. It comes from the food you eat, and is your body's main source of energy. Your blood carries glucose to all of your body's cells to use ...

  2. Accelerated corrosion of steel in dry-cast reinforced concrete pipes after initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Brian William

    Instrumented dry-cast reinforced concrete pipe (DC-RCP) specimens in which corrosion of the reinforcing steel had initiated were selected to accelerate the corrosion. Type C and type F DC-RCP were used. An anodic current density of various magnitudes (0.5 muA/cm2, 1 muA/cm2 and 2.5 muA/cm2) was applied during the corrosion propagation stage. The specimens were placed in high humidity and selected specimens were later covered with wet sand. Selected specimens were terminated for visual examination and gravimetric analysis. Typically, the reinforcement potentials during the accelerated corrosion period were more negative for F specimens compared to C specimens. The C specimens experienced ~2x more corrosion than the F specimens. The accumulated corrosion products did not cause cracks. A method was developed that allows for modest corrosion acceleration during the corrosion propagation stage of DC-RCP.

  3. Development of headspace SPME method for analysis of volatile organic compounds present in human biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maiko; Mendez, Eladio; Furton, Kenneth G

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, interest has increased regarding the identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for metabolic profiling, human scent identification of the living and deceased, and diagnostic potentials for certain diseases that are known for its association with distinct odor. In this study, a method has been developed that is capable of sampling, identifying, and differentiating the VOCs present in various biological specimens of forensic importance (blood, breath, buccal cells, and urine) taken from the same individuals. The developed method requires a pretreatment step to remove targeted VOCs from the sampling apparatus prior to sampling of the individual specimens. The VOCs collected from the biological specimens were characterized by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with ratios of the most abundant and frequent VOCs compared using qualitative and semiquantitative methods. Blood, breath, and buccal cells required extraction procedures ranging from 18 to 21 h in order to optimize the limit of detection, which averaged 5-15 ng across these specimens. The optimal method for measuring urine VOCs was complete in less than an hour; however, the limit of detection was higher with a range of 10-40 ng quantifiable. The demonstrated sensitivity and reproducibility of the methods developed allow for population studies of human scent VOCs from various biological specimen collection kits used in the forensic and clinical fields.

  4. Comparative analysis of hospital and forensic laboratory ethanol concentrations: A 15 month investigation of antemortem specimens.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Estrada, Julio; Fitzgerald, Robert L; McIntyre, Iain M

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative serum alcohol concentrations from regional hospitals (from specimens collected at time of hospital admission) were compared to results from whole blood (from specimens collected at the time of hospital admission) concentrations measured at the San Diego County Medical Examiner's Office (SDCMEO). Over a 15 month period (January 2012 to March 2013), the postmortem forensic toxicology laboratory analyzed a total of 2,321 cases. Of these, 280 were hospital cases (antemortem) representing 12% of the overall Medical Examiner toxicology casework. 59 of the 280 hospital cases (or 21%) screened positive for alcohol (ethanol). 39 of these 59 cases were included in the study based on available specimens for quantitative analyses. This investigation indicated that serum hospital ethanol concentrations correlated well (R(2) = 0.942) with ethanol values determined at SDCMEO (generally measured in whole blood). There was an observed negative bias with an average of -14.1%. A paired t-test was applied to the data and it was shown that this observed bias is statistically significant. These differences in ethanol concentrations could result from differences in specimen, analytical techniques, and/or calibration. The potential for specimen contamination is also discussed.

  5. Immunoelectrophoresis - blood

    MedlinePlus

    IEP - serum; Immunoglobulin electrophoresis - blood; Gamma globulin electrophoresis; Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis ... A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture

  6. Genotyping of ABO blood group system by PCR and RFLP on mummies discovered at Taklamakan desert in 1912.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Kondo, T; Minamino, T; Sun, E; Liu, G; Ohshima, T

    1996-10-01

    ABO genotyping was carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method on the dried remains of nine human mummies which had been discovered at Taklamakan desert in 1912. In all the nine mummies, ABO genotype could be determined as BO type, and ABO phenotype of the eight mummies with hair specimen could be revealed as B type using absorption-elution method. These results mean that ABO phenotype estimated from its genotype by PCR-RFLP was consistent with that by absorption-elution method in all of the eight cases examined. And in the other one child mummy, ABO phenotype could not be examined because of no hair specimen. Although it is impossible to assess the allele frequency of ABO blood group system in the populations having lived in Gao Chang at that time, the present study shows a possibility of ABO genotyping from ancient human remains.

  7. Specimen Behavior in the Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, R M

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that cryo-EM specimens are severely damaged by a level of electron exposure that is much lower than what is needed to obtain high-resolution images from single macromolecules. Perhaps less well appreciated in the cryo-EM literature, the vitreous ice in which samples are suspended is equally sensitivity to radiation damage. This chapter provides a review of several fundamental topics such as inelastic scattering of electrons, radiation chemistry, and radiation biology, which-together-can help one to understand why radiation damage occurs so "easily." This chapter also addresses the issue of beam-induced motion that occurs at even lower levels of electron exposure. While specimen charging may be a contributor to this motion, it is argued that both radiation-induced relief of preexisting stress and damage-induced generation of additional stress may be the dominant causes of radiation-induced movement. PMID:27572722

  8. Modeling of marine corrosion of steel specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Melchers, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    Phenomenological modeling of the long term general corrosion of mild and low alloy steel specimens under marine conditions is considered, using weight loss as a function of time. A conceptual model for immersion corrosion, tidal corrosion and atmospheric corrosion under marine conditions is proposed. The model uses accepted theories for short term surface corrosion and employs modern understanding of the action of bacterial colonization of the surfaces of specimens, including the development of anaerobic conditions. Kinetic, diffusion, nutrient and anaerobic components of the model are identified and mathematical descriptions given. The model is compared to some data available in the literature. Some observations are made about data requirements for further development of models of the type proposed.

  9. Transection of Radioactive Seeds in Breast Specimens.

    PubMed

    Gilcrease, Michael Z; Dogan, Basak E; Black, Dalliah M; Contreras, Alejandro; Dryden, Mark J; Jimenez, Sandra M

    2016-10-01

    Radioactive seed localization is a new procedure for localizing breast lesions that has several advantages over the standard wire-localization procedure. It is reported to be safe for both patients and medical personnel. Although it is theoretically possible to transect the titanium-encapsulated seed while processing the breast specimen in the pathology laboratory, the likelihood of such an event is thought to be exceedingly low. In fact, there are no previous reports of such an event in the literature to date. We recently encountered 2 cases in which a radioactive seed was inadvertently transected while slicing a breast specimen at the grossing bench. In this report, we describe each case and offer recommendations for minimizing radioactive exposure to personnel and for preventing radioactive contamination of laboratory equipment. PMID:27627744

  10. Motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Andreas Karl; Andresen, Nord

    2010-12-14

    The invention relates to a motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen holder with sub-micron resolution parallel to a y-z plane and rotating the specimen holder in the y-z plane, the manipulator comprising a base (2), and attachment means (30) for attaching the specimen holder to the manipulator, characterized in that the manipulator further comprises at least three nano-actuators (3.sup.a, 3.sup.b, 3.sup.c) mounted on the base, each nano-actuator showing a tip (4.sup.a, 4.sup.b, 4.sup.c), the at least three tips defining the y-z plane, each tip capable of moving with respect to the base in the y-z plane; a platform (5) in contact with the tips of the nano-actuators; and clamping means (6) for pressing the platform against the tips of the nano-actuators; as a result of which the nano-actuators can rotate the platform with respect to the base in the y-z plane and translate the platform parallel to the y-z plane.

  11. 10 CFR 26.113 - Splitting the urine specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-specimen methods of collection. (b) If the urine specimen is to be split into two specimen bottles, hereinafter referred to as Bottle A and Bottle B, the collector shall take the following steps: (1) The... urine specimen. The collector shall pour 30 mL of urine into Bottle A and a minimum of 15 mL of...

  12. Specimen loading list for the varying temperature experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A.L.; Sitterson, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    The varying temperature experiment HFIR-RB-13J has been assembled and inserted in the reactor. Approximately 5300 specimens were cleaned, inspected, matched, and loaded into four specimen holders. A listing of each specimen loaded into the steady temperature holder, its position in the capsule, and the identification of the corresponding specimen loaded into the varying temperature holder is presented in this report.

  13. 42 CFR 493.1232 - Standard: Specimen identification and integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Specimen identification and integrity... Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1232 Standard: Specimen identification and integrity. The... optimum integrity of a patient's specimen from the time of collection or receipt of the specimen...

  14. Polyphenol- and fibre-rich dried fruits with green tea attenuate starch-derived postprandial blood glucose and insulin: a randomised, controlled, single-blind, cross-over intervention.

    PubMed

    Nyambe-Silavwe, H; Williamson, G

    2016-08-01

    Polyphenol- and fibre-rich foods (PFRF) have the potential to affect postprandial glycaemic responses by reducing glucose absorption, and thus decreasing the glycaemic response of foods when consumed together. A randomised, single-blind, cross-over study was conducted on sixteen healthy volunteers to test whether PFRF could attenuate postprandial blood glucose in healthy volunteers when added to a source of carbohydrate (starch in bread). This is the first study to examine the effects of a meal comprised of components to inhibit each stage of the biochemical pathway, leading up to the appearance of glucose in the blood. The volunteers were fasted and attended four visits: two control visits (bread, water, balancing sugars) and two test visits (single and double dose of PFRF) where they consumed bread, water and PFRF. Blood samples were collected at 0 (fasted), 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after consumption. The PFRF components were tested for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory potential in vitro. Plasma glucose was lower after consumption of both doses compared with controls: lower dose, change in mean incremental areas under the glucose curves (IAUC)=-27·4 (sd 7·5) %, P<0·001; higher dose, IAUC=-49·0 (sd 15·3) %, P<0·001; insulin IAUC was also attenuated by-46·9 (sd 13·4) %, P<0·01. Consistent with this, the polyphenol components of the PFRF inhibited α-amylase (green tea, strawberry, blackberry and blackcurrant) and α-glucosidase (green tea) activities in vitro. The PFRF have a pronounced and significant lowering effect on postprandial blood glucose and insulin response in humans, due in part to inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase, as well as glucose transport. PMID:27278405

  15. 10 CFR 26.165 - Testing split specimens and retesting single specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...” feature when there is no one in the MRO's office to answer the phone). The donor's request may be oral or... reconfirming the first laboratory's findings by conducting specimen validity tests. The second laboratory...

  16. Influence of Specimen Preparation and Specimen Size on Composite Transverse Tensile Strength and Scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; DeMarco, Kevin; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The influence of specimen polishing, configuration, and size on the transverse tension strength of two glass-epoxy materials, and one carbon-epoxy material, loaded in three and four point bending was evaluated. Polishing machined edges, arid/or tension side failure surfaces, was detrimental to specimen strength characterization instead of yielding a higher, more accurate, strength as a result of removing inherent manufacture and handling flaws. Transverse tension strength was typically lower for longer span lengths due to the classical weakest link effect. However, strength was less sensitive to volume changes achieved by increasing specimen width. The Weibull scaling law typically over-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in three point bend tests and under-predicted changes in transverse tension strengths in four point bend tests. Furthermore, the Weibull slope varied with specimen configuration, volume, and sample size. Hence, this scaling law was not adequate for predicting transverse tension strength of heterogeneous, fiber-reinforced, polymer matrix composites.

  17. A review of chevron-notched fracture specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The historical development of chevron notched fracture specimens is reviewed. Stress intensity factors and load line displacement solutions proposed for some of these specimens are compared. The original bend bar configurations up to the present day short rod and bar specimens are reviewed. The results of an analytical round robin that was conducted on chevron-notched specimens are presented. In the round robin, stress-intensity factors for either the chevron notched round rod or square bar specimens were calculated. The consensus stress intensity factor (compliance) solution for these specimens is assessed. The stress intensity factor solutions proposed for three and four point bend chevron notched specimens are reviewed.

  18. Obtaining parotid saliva specimens after major surgery.

    PubMed

    Good, Marion; Wotman, Stephen; Anderson, Gene Cranston; Ahn, Sukhee; Cong, Xiaomei

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a standard method of collecting saliva from postoperative patients. Saliva was collected from patients following major abdominal surgery from both parotid glands in intraoral cups and measured in milliliters. Trained research nurses stimulated saliva production with lemon juice and collected saliva at 4 time points on postoperative day 2. Collection time was measured with a stopwatch, and flow rate was calculated by dividing the amount in milliliters by collection time in minutes. Attrition was 9% due to ineligibility after enrollment and 1 withdrawal. In participating patients (n = 68), there were 272 tests planned and 28% were missing. The reasons were postoperative health problems, hospital discharge, and not wanting to be bothered. When saliva collection attempts were made, three-fourths were successful, but the remainder resulted in "dry mouth." Milliliters, minutes, and flow rate were calculated with and without those with dry mouth. Mean flow rates were 0.23 to 0.33 ml/min excluding those with dry mouth and 0.17 to 0.24 ml/min including those with dry mouth. Saliva variables were correlated with antihypertension medications, opioids, opioid side effects, and length of surgery, but statistically significant correlations were not found consistently at all 4 time points. The findings suggest that nurse-researchers studying biological markers can successfully collect saliva from postoperative patients if they recognize the difficulties and make efforts to minimize and control for them.

  19. Preparation of Regular Specimens for Atom Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kim; Wishard, James

    2003-01-01

    A method of preparation of specimens of non-electropolishable materials for analysis by atom probes is being developed as a superior alternative to a prior method. In comparison with the prior method, the present method involves less processing time. Also, whereas the prior method yields irregularly shaped and sized specimens, the present developmental method offers the potential to prepare specimens of regular shape and size. The prior method is called the method of sharp shards because it involves crushing the material of interest and selecting microscopic sharp shards of the material for use as specimens. Each selected shard is oriented with its sharp tip facing away from the tip of a stainless-steel pin and is glued to the tip of the pin by use of silver epoxy. Then the shard is milled by use of a focused ion beam (FIB) to make the shard very thin (relative to its length) and to make its tip sharp enough for atom-probe analysis. The method of sharp shards is extremely time-consuming because the selection of shards must be performed with the help of a microscope, the shards must be positioned on the pins by use of micromanipulators, and the irregularity of size and shape necessitates many hours of FIB milling to sharpen each shard. In the present method, a flat slab of the material of interest (e.g., a polished sample of rock or a coated semiconductor wafer) is mounted in the sample holder of a dicing saw of the type conventionally used to cut individual integrated circuits out of the wafers on which they are fabricated in batches. A saw blade appropriate to the material of interest is selected. The depth of cut and the distance between successive parallel cuts is made such that what is left after the cuts is a series of thin, parallel ridges on a solid base. Then the workpiece is rotated 90 and the pattern of cuts is repeated, leaving behind a square array of square posts on the solid base. The posts can be made regular, long, and thin, as required for samples

  20. How to use... blood cultures.

    PubMed

    De, Surjo Kiran; Shetty, Nandini; Kelsey, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Positive blood culture is the gold standard for diagnosing bacteraemia and fungaemia, yet there is significant variability in aspects of performing and interpreting the test in children and neonates. Processing a blood culture can take several days, and includes use of semi-automated incubation with growth detection and a broad range of laboratory techniques such as Gram staining, phenotypic or molecular identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on a cultured isolate. Sensitivity and specificity of a blood culture and time-to-positivity depend on a number of factors related to host/pathogen interaction, collection and transport of the specimen to the laboratory and methods employed to process the specimen. Interpretation of a positive result relies on correlation of the identity of the cultured microorganism with the clinical assessment of the child. PMID:24334340

  1. Detection of iso-α-acids to confirm beer consumption in postmortem specimens.

    PubMed

    Rodda, Luke N; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Drummer, Olaf H

    2015-01-01

    Iso-α-acids (IAAs) can be used as markers for the consumption of beer. Postmortem specimens from a range of coronial cases were analyzed for IAAs in order to determine the prevalence of beer consumption and any correlation to blood alcohol concentrations (BAC). A total of 130 cases were included in this study including those where beer was mentioned in the case circumstances, cases where beer was not mentioned specifically but alcohol was detected, and cases where neither beer was mentioned nor a positive BAC was present. Available blood, serum, vitreous humour and urine specimens were analyzed. Of the 50 cases where beer was mentioned, 86% had one or more IAAs detected. In cases that only had a positive BAC (n = 60), 57% of these cases also showed the presence of these beer markers. IAAs were detected in specimens obtained from traumatized, burnt, and decomposed cases with a mention of beer consumption or where BAC was positive in blood. No IAAs were detected in cases where BAC was negative. There was little or no correlation between blood IAA concentrations and BAC. This study demonstrates the possible detection of IAAs as a marker for beer consumption.

  2. Process and apparatus for analyzing specimens for the presence of microorganisms therein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Jr., Clifton (Inventor); Jones, Paul W. (Inventor); Gibson, Sandra F. (Inventor); Vannest, Richard D. (Inventor); Holen, James T. (Inventor); Keyser, George F. (Inventor); Meyer, Michael C. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Microorganisms in a specimen are detected, identified, and enumerated by introducing the specimen into a sampling cartridge and diluting the specimen with a known volume of water within the cartridge. The cartridge has a manifold and several cassettes attached to the manifold. Each cassette contains a serpentine flow channel having a series of filters therein and a detection cell located downstream from each filter. The flow channel in each cassette also contains a culture medium which is freeze dried and is highly selective in the sense that it promotes the growth of one type of microorganism, but not others. The mixture of the specimen and water flows from the manifold into the flow channel of each cassette where it rehydrates the culture medium therein and further flows through the filters. Each filter removes a known proportion of the microorganisms from the mixture of specimen, water and medium, thereby effecting a serial dilution. After the cassettes are heated to incubate the microoganisms, the detection cells are observed for growth of the microorganisms therein which is manifested in a change in the light transmitting characteristics of the mixtures within the cells.

  3. [Real-time PCR detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in clinical specimens].

    PubMed

    Vacková, Z; Lžičařová, D; Stock, N K; Kozáková, J

    2015-10-01

    The study aim was to implement a molecular real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay recommended by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) for the detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in clinical (culture negative) specimens from patients with suspected invasive bacterial disease. Clinical specimens are referred to the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for Meningococcal Infections, Unit for Airborne Bacterial Infections, Centre for Epidemiology and Microbiology, National Institute of Public Health from various regions of the Czech Republic. Clinical specimens are, in particular, cerebrospinal fluid, anti-coagulated blood or serum and, exceptionally, post-mortem specimens. The NRL has implemented molecular diagnosis of these bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis and sepsis from clinical specimens since 1999. The first diagnostic method was semi-nested PCR followed by electrophoretic analysis. In 2014, a molecular qualitative real-time PCR assay was implemented.

  4. Simulation of microcalcifications on specimen radiographs of breast biopsies by inks used in marking the surgical resection margins.

    PubMed

    Wong, John W; Bai, Hongwei; Abdul-Karim, Fadi W; MacLennan, Gregory T

    2004-01-01

    In routine practice, the evaluation of breast excisional biopsy specimens is assisted by the use of various tissue marking inks to delineate surgical margins and preserve tissue orientation. These inks may simulate microcalcifications in specimen and tissue block radiographs. The magnitude of this problem is studied by systematically identifying the factors leading to the creation of this artifact. Samples of fresh tissue from breast reduction mammaplasties were painted separately with fresh wet ink and ink mixed with dried powdery residue. Black India ink and commercial colored tissue inks (the Davidson Marking System) were tested. The painted tissues were radiographed before and after routine paraffin embedding. Routine histologic sections were obtained from each tissue block for microscopic examination. Compared with unmarked controls, samples inked with blue, green, and red inks containing powdery residues showed radiopaque artifacts on radiographs prior to tissue processing. Only the sample marked with red ink showed residual radiopaque artifacts after processing. Microscopically the dried red ink particles were readily distinguishable from microcalcifications on the tissue sections. On the tissue radiographs, the dried ink artifacts were indistinguishable from true microcalcifications. This study demonstrates that some tissue marking inks used in the pathology laboratory are radiopaque. Inks contaminated with particles of dried residue, often present on ink container lids, may appear as artifacts mimicking microcalcifications on specimen and tissue block radiographs, occasionally complicating the histologic localization of mammographically demonstrated microcalcifications. Tissue marking inks should be tested for radiopacity prior to use on breast biopsies. Ink containers should be checked frequently for buildup of dried residue.

  5. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  6. Dephosphorization when using DRI

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-21

    The increase in high quality steel production in electric arc furnaces (EAFs) requires the use of scrap substitute materials, such as Direct Reduced Iron (DRI) and Hot Briquetted Iron (HBI). Although DRI and HBI products have lower copper and nickel contents than most scrap materials, they can contain up to ten times more phosphorus. This project, led by Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for Iron and Steelmaking Research, improves the understanding of how phosphorus behaves when DRI and HBI melt.

  7. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  8. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 20 mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  9. The Dugdale model for compact specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Plastic zone size and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) equations were developed. Boundary collocation analyses were used to analyze the compact specimen subjected to various loading conditions (pin loads, concentrated forces, and uniform pressure acting on the crack surface). Stress intensity factor and crack surface displacement equations for some of these loadings were developed and used to obtain the Dugdale model. The results from the equations for plastic zone size and CTOD agreed well with numerical values calculated by Terada for crack length to width ratios greater than 0.4.

  10. The Dugdale model for the compact specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Plastic zone size and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) equations were developed. Boundary collocation analyses were used to analyze the compact specimen subjected to various loading conditions (pin loads, concentrated forces, and uniform pressure acting on the crack surface). Stress intensity factor and crack surface displacement equations for some of these loadings were developed and used to obtain the Dugdale model. The results from the equations for plastic zone size and CTOD agreed well with numerical values calculated by Terada for crack length to width ratios greater than 0.4.

  11. To Dry Or Not To Dry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaks, Audrey E.

    1977-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most frustrating problems which confront many teachers is lack of adequate drying space or facilities for prints, paintings and three-dimensional art activities. Suggests requirements necessary for an adequate storage unit and how to construct one. (Author/RK)

  12. Wildlife specimen collection, preservation, and shipment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, C. LeAnn; Dusek, Robert J.; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior to collecting samples, it is important to determine the capabilities and submission criteria of the laboratory receiving the samples. Some laboratories may specialize in a limited number of tests, be equipped to accept only certain types of tissues (instead of entire carcasses), or specialize in particular species or group of animals (e.g., reptiles, birds, mammals). Diagnostic laboratories have specific requirements regarding preparation, labeling, and shipping of samples. Adherence to these requirements helps ensure the usefulness of any submitted specimens. Although laboratories may vary in the cost and turnaround times for diagnostic tests, some laboratories may be able to prioritize samples and accommodate accelerated time frames if communicated at the time of submission. Keeping a prepacked kit with basic carcass-collection supplies, including a paper copy of the specimen history form (available for download from the Web sites of most diagnostic laboratories), in the office or vehicle will decrease the chances of forgetting an essential item and decrease response time for arriving at an event.

  13. Freeze-fracture of biological specimens prior to conductive staining.

    PubMed

    Iida, N

    1984-03-01

    Liver, kidney, spleen and other organs of the rat were fixed with glutaraldehyde, substituted with absolute ethanol or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), freeze-fractured in liquid nitrogen, stained by the rapid tannin-osmium thiocarbohydrazide-osmium (TaOTO) method (staining with each agent for 10 min), critical-point-dried with liquid carbon dioxide, and observed with the scanning electron microscope. The absolute ethanol or DMSO freeze-fracture method provided flat fracture surfaces (without regard to cell boundaries) of the samples and allowed a good visualization of their inner structures. The fracture surfaces were suitably stained by the rapid TaOTO method, and could be scanned with no charging. Neither maked damage nor undesired dislocation of tissue elements was noted on the freeze-fractured and TaOTO-stained surfaces. This procedure, freeze-fracture prior to conductive staining, has an advantage of eliminating the bulk charging effects that tend to occur in specimens fractured after staining. When substituted with 75% DMSO aqueous solution, the samples spontaneously fractured without any need for razor blades. Fracture planes in this spontaneous fracture sometimes ran along the cell boundaries and allowed a clear visualization in the SEM of the enfaced surfaces of closely associated cells such as hepatocytes. PMID:6204620

  14. Tray Drying of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afacan, Artin; Masliyah, Jacob

    1984-01-01

    Describes a drying experiment useful in presenting the concept of simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Background information, equipment requirements, experimental procedures, and results are provided. The reasonably good agreement in the calculated rate of drying and that observed experimentally makes students feel confident in applying…

  15. Blood Typing

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: Blood Group; Rh Factor Formal name: ABO Group and Rh Type Related ... mother's and baby's ABO blood groups, not the Rh factor. However, ABO grouping cannot be used to predict ...

  16. Blood smear

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral smear; Complete blood count - peripheral; CBC - peripheral ... Bain BJ. The peripheral blood smear. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 157. ...

  17. Blood Thinners

    MedlinePlus

    ... it takes to form a blood clot. Antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin, prevent blood cells called platelets ... that your healthcare provider knows all of the medicines and supplements you are using.

  18. What's Blood?

    MedlinePlus

    ... You know what blood is — it's that red stuff that oozes out if you get a paper ... ingredients. It makes them. Bone marrow — that goopy stuff inside your bones — makes the red blood cells, ...

  19. Blood transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... matches yours. You may have read about the danger of becoming infected with hepatitis, HIV, or other ... member or friend donating blood before a planned surgery. This blood is then set aside and held ...

  20. Influence of Water Content on Mechanical Properties of Rock in Both Saturation and Drying Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zilong; Cai, Xin; Cao, Wenzhuo; Li, Xibing; Xiong, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Water content has a pronounced influence on the properties of rock materials, which is responsible for many rock engineering hazards, such as landslides and karst collapse. Meanwhile, water injection is also used for the prevention of some engineering disasters like rock-bursts. To comprehensively investigate the effect of water content on mechanical properties of rocks, laboratory tests were carried out on sandstone specimens with different water contents in both saturation and drying processes. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance technique was applied to study the water distribution in specimens with variation of water contents. The servo-controlled rock mechanics testing machine and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique were used to conduct both compressive and tensile tests on sandstone specimens with different water contents. From the laboratory tests, reductions of the compressive and tensile strength of sandstone under static and dynamic states in different saturation processes were observed. In the drying process, all of the saturated specimens could basically regain their mechanical properties and recover its strength as in the dry state. However, for partially saturated specimens in the saturation and drying processes, the tensile strength of specimens with the same water content was different, which could be related to different water distributions in specimens.