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Sample records for drinking water disinfected

  1. Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    How to boil and disinfect water to kill most disease-causing microorganisms during emergency situations where regular water service has been interrupted and local authorities recommend using only bottled water, boiled water, or disinfected water.

  2. [Drinking water decontamination with isolative sorbent disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, M S

    2004-01-01

    Drinking water can be decontaminated with the use of isolative sorbent disinfectants. Consideration of the effectiveness of water disinfectants and the sorptive power of porous materials against bacteria and viruses attested to the favour of iodine and silver-containing disinfectants and their compositions on porous aggressive carriers to be employed in extreme conditions such as on board crewed space vehicles.

  3. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a one-year study at Jefferson Parish, Louisiana the chemical, microbiological, and mutagenic effects of using the major drinking water disinfectants (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, ozone) were evaluated. ests were performed on samples collected from various treatm...

  4. MUTAGENICITY OF DRINKING WATER FOLLOWING DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water utilities in the USA are considering alternatives to chlorine for disinfection in order to comply with federal regulations regarding disinfection by-products. An evaluation is thus needed of the potential risks associated with the use of alternative disinfecta...

  5. Basic Information about Chloramines and Drinking Water Disinfection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chloramines are disinfectants used to treat drinking water. Chloramines are most commonly formed when ammonia is added to chlorine to treat drinking water. Chloramines provide longer-lasting disinfection as the water moves through pipes to consumers.

  6. DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: WHAT IS KNOWN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently the major disinfectants being used to disinfect drinking water. Although the alternative disinfectants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine) are increasing in popularity in the United States, chlorine is still us...

  7. DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: WHAT IS KNOWN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently the major disinfectants being used to disinfect drinking water. Although the alternative disinfectants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine) are increasing in popularity in the United States, chlorine is still us...

  8. Studies on Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, Colleen E.

    2007-01-01

    Drinking water is disinfected with chemicals to remove pathogens, such as Giardia and Cryptosproridium, and prevent waterborne diseases such as cholera and typhoid. During disinfection, by-products are formed at trace concentrations. Because some of these by-products are suspected carcinogens, drinking water utilities must maintain the effectiveness of the disinfection process while minimizing the formation of by-products.

  9. Disinfection By-Products: Formation and Occurrence in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the twentieth century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended he...

  10. The Next Generation of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended healt...

  11. Disinfection By-Products: Formation and Occurrence in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the twentieth century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended he...

  12. The Next Generation of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended healt...

  13. Health effects of drinking water disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Condie, L.W.; Bercz, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes toxicological studies conducted with drinking water disinfectants. Toxicological effects, which are associated with the disinfectants themselves as well as with the by-products formed when disinfectants react with organic material present in water, are considered. The health impact of chemical reactions occurring between residual disinfectants and nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract is also discussed. 40 references, 5 tables.

  14. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. Equations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reation rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. An analytical solution for ...

  15. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. Equations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reation rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. An analytical solution for ...

  16. Environmental health perspectives. Volume 46. Drinking water disinfectants - December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lucier, G.W.; Hook, G.E.R.

    1982-01-01

    Among subjects considered are chlorine dioxide, N-chloramines, mutagenic activity by disinfectant reaction products, trihalomethane and behavioral toxicity, and carcinogenic risk estimation. There are 27 papers on these and related topics. The volume stems from a symposium on drinking water disinfectants and disinfectant by-products.

  17. Impact of disinfection on drinking water biofilm bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Mi, Zilong; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2015-11-01

    Disinfectants are commonly applied to control the growth of microorganisms in drinking water distribution systems. However, the effect of disinfection on drinking water microbial community remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the impacts of different disinfectants (chlorine and chloramine) and dosages on biofilm bacterial community in bench-scale pipe section reactors. Illumina MiSeq sequencing illustrated that disinfection strategy could affect both bacterial diversity and community structure of drinking water biofilm. Proteobacteria tended to predominate in chloraminated drinking water biofilms, while Firmicutes in chlorinated and unchlorinated biofilms. The major proteobacterial groups were influenced by both disinfectant type and dosage. In addition, chloramination had a more profound impact on bacterial community than chlorination. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection for Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens in water with potential to serve as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. USEPA provided guidance on the validation of UV reactors nearly a decade ago. Since then, lesson...

  19. Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection for Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens in water with potential to serve as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. USEPA provided guidance on the validation of UV reactors nearly a decade ago. Since then, lesson...

  20. [Research development on disinfection technology for viruses in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Yan; Dai, Ruihua; Liu, Xiang

    2010-09-01

    With the deterioration of water source pollution, the quality requirements for drinking water of countries will become stricter and stricter, and the microbe index has been one of the important aspects. The introduction of the virus index and the development of disinfection technology focusing on virus have significant importance for the improvement of the drinking water standards and for the protection of people health in every country. To be familiar with the domestic and abroad research development of the disinfection control technology focusing on virus provides certain theory guidance and technological support for continuously improving drinking water standard in our country and for establishing safer drinking water processing technologies. So, this article will comprehensively describes 4 aspects: resistance comparison of virus over every disinfection technology, influential factors of disinfection, research development of new technology, and the mechanisms.

  1. ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTION FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a one-yr study at Jefferson Parish, La., the chemical, microbiological, and mutagenic effects os using the major drinkgin water disinfectants (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, chloramine, ozone) were evaluated. Tests were performed on samples collected from various treatment s...

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF TI02/UV DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the presence of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated byproducts in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. One of the alternative treatment methods currently being evaluated for potential use with small systems ...

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfectants are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are popular alternatives, as they produce low...

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfectants are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are popular alternatives, as they produce low...

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF TI02/UV DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the presence of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated byproducts in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. One of the alternative treatment methods currently being evaluated for potential use with small systems ...

  6. Recent advances in drinking water disinfection: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Nonhlanhla; Ncube, Esper J; Parsons, James

    2013-01-01

    Drinking water is the most important single source of human exposure to gastroenteric diseases, mainly as a result of the ingestion of microbial contaminated water. Waterborne microbial agents that pose a health risk to humans include enteropathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. Therefore, properly assessing whether these hazardous agents enter drinking water supplies, and if they do, whether they are disinfected adequately, are undoubtedly aspects critical to protecting public health. As new pathogens emerge, monitoring for relevant indicator microorganisms (e.g., process microbial indicators, fecal indicators, and index and model organisms) is crucial to ensuring drinking water safety. Another crucially important step to maintaining public health is implementing Water Safety Plans (WSPs), as is recommended by the current WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality. Good WSPs include creating health-based targets that aim to reduce microbial risks and adverse health effects to which a population is exposed through drinking water. The use of disinfectants to inactivate microbial pathogens in drinking water has played a central role in reducing the incidence of waterborne diseases and is considered to be among the most successful interventions for preserving and promoting public health. Chlorine-based disinfectants are the most commonly used disinfectants and are cheap and easy to use. Free chlorine is an effective disinfectant for bacteria and viruses; however, it is not always effective against C. parvum and G. lamblia. Another limitation of using chlorination is that it produces disinfection by-products (DBPs), which pose potential health risks of their own. Currently, most drinking water regulations aggressively address DBP problems in public water distribution systems. The DBPs of most concern include the trihalomethanes (THMs), the haloacetic acids (HAAs), bromate, and chlorite. However, in the latest edition of the WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

  7. Guidelines for ultraviolet disinfection of drinking water: considerations for Ontario.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Ron; Andrews, Bob; Lachmaniuk, Pat

    The Ontario Ministry of the Environment is actively investigating protocols for approving the installation of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection systems for drinking water disinfection. This paper discusses issues that may be considered for selecting the appropriate UV dose, validating UV reactor performance, and monitoring the performance of the reactor once installed.

  8. Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Before its widespread use, millions of people died from waterborne diseases. Now, people in developed nations receive quality drinking water every day from their public wa...

  9. Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Before its widespread use, millions of people died from waterborne diseases. Now, people in developed nations receive quality drinking water every day from their public wa...

  10. An evaluation of drinking water samples treated with alternative disinfectants

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, K.S.; Lykins, B.W. Jr.; Garner, L.M.

    1995-10-01

    Due to concern over potential human health risks associated with the use of chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) for disinfection of drinking water, many utilities are considering alternative disinfectants. An evaluation is thus needed of the potential risks associated with the use of alternative disinfectants relative to those posed by Cl{sub 2}. At a pilot-scale drinking water plant in Jefferson Parish, LA., two studies were conducted in which clarified and sand filtered Mississippi River water was treated with either ozone (O{sub 3}), monochloramine (NH{sub 2}Cl), Cl{sub 2} or was not disinfected. Ozonated water was also post-disinfected with either NH{sub 2}Cl or Cl{sub 2}, to provide a disinfectant residual. For each treatment stream total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halide (TOX) and microbiological contaminants were determined. XAD resin concentrates were also prepared for mutagenicity testing in the Ames Salmonella assay. Water samples disinfected with O{sub 3} alone had low levels of mutagenic activity, the same as the non-disinfected water. The level of mutagenicity observed following chlorination was approximately twice that observed following treatment with NH{sub 2}Cl. Disinfection with O{sub 3} prior to treatment with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl resulted in a significantly lower level of mutagenicity than when either disinfectant was used alone. The concentrations of TOX present in the water samples showed a pattern similar to that of the mutagenicity data. The levels of TOC, by contrast, were similar for all the treatment streams. No significant baterial contamination was observed in water samples treated with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl alone or in combination with O{sub 3}, as determined by heterotrophic plate counts. However, O{sub 3} alone did not insure an acceptable level of disinfection at the end of the treatment stream.

  11. The Occurrence and Comparative Toxicity of Haloacetaldehyde Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The introduction of drinking water disinfection greatly reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases. However, the reaction between disinfectants and natural organic matter in the source water can lead to an unintended consequence, which is the formation of drinking water disinfe...

  12. The Occurrence and Comparative Toxicity of Haloacetaldehyde Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The introduction of drinking water disinfection greatly reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases. However, the reaction between disinfectants and natural organic matter in the source water can lead to an unintended consequence, which is the formation of drinking water disinfe...

  13. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NEWLY DISCOVERED IODOACID DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodoacid drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) were recently uncovered in drinking water samples from source water with a high bromide/iodide concentration that was disinfected with chloramines. The purpose of this paper is to report the analytical chemical identification...

  14. COMPARATIVE RISK DILEMNAS IN DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION [EDITORIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of drinking water supplies has been one of the most succesful public health interventions of the twentieth century. It has virtually eliminated outbreaks of serious waterborne infectious diseases, such as cholera and typhoid. there are still, however, an average of...

  15. DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS AND DURATION OF GESTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) suggest high exposure decreases risk of preterm birth. We examined this association with total trihalomethane (TTHM) and five haloacetic acids (HAA5) among 2,041 women in a prospective pregnancy study conducted from...

  16. DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS AND DURATION OF GESTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) suggest high exposure decreases risk of preterm birth. We examined this association with total trihalomethane (TTHM) and five haloacetic acids (HAA5) among 2,041 women in a prospective pregnancy study conducted from...

  17. COMPARATIVE RISK DILEMNAS IN DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION [EDITORIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of drinking water supplies has been one of the most succesful public health interventions of the twentieth century. It has virtually eliminated outbreaks of serious waterborne infectious diseases, such as cholera and typhoid. there are still, however, an average of...

  18. Drinking water and biofilm disinfection by Fenton-like reaction.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, F; Madeira, L M; Juhna, T; Block, J C

    2013-10-01

    A Fenton-like disinfection process was conducted with Fenton's reagent (H2O2) at pH 3 or 5 on autochthonous drinking water biofilms grown on corroded or non-corroded pipe material. The biofilm disinfection by Fenton-like oxidation was limited by the low content of iron and copper in the biomass grown on non-corroded plumbing. It was slightly improved by spiking the distribution system with some additional iron source (soluble iron II or ferrihydrite particles appeared as interesting candidates). However successful in situ disinfection of biofilms was only achieved in fully corroded cast iron pipes using H2O2 and adjusting the pH to 5. These new results provide additional support for the use of Fenton's processes for cleaning drinking water distribution systems contaminated with biological agents or organics.

  19. [Application of solar disinfection to drinking water in tropical regions].

    PubMed

    De Lorenzi, G; Volta, C; Monjour, L

    1989-01-01

    Since unsafe water elicits a broad spectrum of bacteriological, parasitological and virological diseases, purification of polluted drinking water has to be developed in tropical rural regions. Around 70% of rural wells and 7% of bore-holes contain water unsafe for human consumption. Water is also contaminated during transport and storage. Several techniques of purification have been recommended to protect drinking water. Recently, sterilisation in the U. V. or simply in the sun rays has been systematically tested. In tropical rural areas, solar disinfection has given questionable results. It affords no guarantee for the health of the consumer in contrast with other techniques as chlorination.

  20. Formation of disinfection byproducts in typical Chinese drinking water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbo; Zhao, Yanmei; Chow, Christopher W K; Wang, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Eight typical drinking water supplies in China were selected in this study. Both source and tap water were used to investigate the occurrence of chlorinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs), and seasonal variation in the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) of seven water sources was compared. The results showed that the pollution level for source water in China, as shown by DBP formation potential, was low. The most encountered DBPs were chloroform, dichloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and chlorodibromoacetic acid. The concentration of every THMs and haloacetic acid (HAA) compound was under the limit of standards for drinking water quality. The highest total THMs concentrations were detected in spring.

  1. MUTAGENICITY AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SURFACE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTED WITH PERACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to ...

  2. MUTAGENICITY AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SURFACE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTED WITH PERACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to ...

  3. Drinking water disinfection byproducts: review and approach to toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boorman, G A

    1999-02-01

    There is widespread potential for human exposure to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water because everyone drinks, bathes, cooks, and cleans with water. The need for clean and safe water led the U.S. Congress to pass the Safe Drinking Water Act more than 20 years ago in 1974. In 1976, chloroform, a trihalomethane (THM) and a principal DBP, was shown to be carcinogenic in rodents. This prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in 1979 to develop a drinking water rule that would provide guidance on the levels of THMs allowed in drinking water. Further concern was raised by epidemiology studies suggesting a weak association between the consumption of chlorinated drinking water and the occurrence of bladder, colon, and rectal cancer. In 1992 the U.S. EPA initiated a negotiated rulemaking to evaluate the need for additional controls for microbial pathogens and DBPs. The goal was to develop an approach that would reduce the level of exposure from disinfectants and DBPs without undermining the control of microbial pathogens. The product of these deliberations was a proposed stage 1 DBP rule. It was agreed that additional information was necessary on how to optimize the use of disinfectants while maintaining control of pathogens before further controls to reduce exposure beyond stage 1 were warranted. In response to this need, the U.S. EPA developed a 5-year research plan to support the development of the longer term rules to control microbial pathogens and DBPs. A considerable body of toxicologic data has been developed on DBPs that occur in the drinking water, but the main emphasis has been on THMs. Given the complexity of the problem and the need for additional data to support the drinking water DBP rules, the U.S. EPA, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the U.S. Army are working together to develop a comprehensive biologic and mechanistic DBP database. Selected DBPs will be tested using 2-year toxicity and

  4. Mutagenicity and disinfection by-products in surface drinking water disinfected with peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Monarca, Silvano; Richardson, Susan D; Feretti, Donatella; Grottolo, Mario; Thruston, Alfred D; Zani, Claudia; Navazio, Giancarlo; Ragazzo, Patrizia; Zerbini, Ilaria; Alberti, Adriana

    2002-02-01

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to those found with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2). The Ames test, root anaphase aberration assay, and root/micronuclei assay in Allium cepa and Tradescantia/micronuclei test were used to evaluate the mutagenicity of disinfected samples. Microbiological tests were also performed, and disinfection by-products (DBPs) were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A slight bacterial mutagenicity was found in raw lake and river water, and similar activity was detected in disinfected samples. A plant test revealed genotoxicity in raw river water, and microbiological analysis showed that PAA has bactericidal activity but lower than that of the other disinfectants. The DBPs produced by PAA were mainly carboxylic acids, which are not recognized as mutagenic, whereas the waters treated with the other disinfectants showed the presence of mutagenic/carcinogenic halogenated DBPs. However, additional experiments should be performed with higher concentrations of PAA and using water with higher organic carbon content to better evaluate this disinfectant.

  5. MAMMALIAN CELL CYTOTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water continues to protect the public health against acute disease. Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of a disinfectant with naturally occurring organic matter. Many DBPs are genotoxic and are implicated as huma...

  6. MAMMALIAN CELL CYTOTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water continues to protect the public health against acute disease. Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of a disinfectant with naturally occurring organic matter. Many DBPs are genotoxic and are implicated as huma...

  7. Drinking water and health: Disinfectants and disinfectant by-products. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Studies of the toxicity of the by-products of disinfectants have focused on the trihalomethanes (THMs), which are formed during chlorination and for which considerable data on carcinogenicity have been developed. The level of total THMs in finished drinking water, currently regulated at 100 micrograms/L, should be reduced. Noting that chloroform is the principal THM produced by chlorination, the subcommittee found this level to be unsupportable on the basis of the risk values for chloroform developed in this review. Other, non-volatile by-products of chlorination may be important in contributing mutagenic properties to drinking water, especially when the natural water being treated contains high levels of organic matter. Short-term animal skin tests, although not conclusive, provide indications that organic concentrates from chlorinated water are tumorigenic under some experimental conditions. Unfortunately, many by-products of chlorination and other disinfection practices have not been identified. Consequently, the risks of ingesting cannot be quantified at present, but are potentially high enough to warrant continued efforts to analyze them. The use of alternative methods of drinking water disinfection is increasing, largely due to health and regulatory concerns about trihalomethanes. Thus, the nature and toxicity of the by-products of some other widely used water treatments (chloramination, ozonation, and chlorine dioxide) are also evaluated in the report to the extent allowed by available data. The subcommittee calculated quantitative risk assessment for disinfectants or their by-products when there was sufficient data.

  8. Neural tube defects and drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Klotz, J B; Pyrch, L A

    1999-07-01

    We conducted a population-based case control study of neural tube defects and drinking water contaminants, specifically, disinfection by-products. We used public monitoring records concurrent with the first month of gestation to assess exposure. The prevalence odds ratios (PORs) for the highest tertile of total trihalomethanes compared with the lowest was 1.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.9-2.70). Surface water source was also associated with neural tube defects (POR = 1.5; 95% CI = 0.9-2.5). Sensitivity analyses restricted to isolated neural tube defect cases and mothers with known residence at conception yielded stronger associations [total trihalomethanes, POR = 2.1 (95% CI = 1.1-4.0); surface water, POR = 1.7 (95% CI = 0.9-3.2)]. Other major groups of disinfection by-products (haloacetic acids and haloacetonitriles) showed little relation to these defects.

  9. RESEARCH PLAN FOR MICROBIAL PATHOGENS AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research plan was developed to describe research needed to support EPA's development of drinking water regulations concerning disinfectants, disinfection by-products (DBPs) and microbial pathogens, focusing on key scientific and technical information needed. The research pl...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORAMINE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide and chloramine are two popular alternative disinfectants, with...

  11. RESEARCH PLAN FOR MICROBIAL PATHOGENS AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research plan was developed to describe research needed to support EPA's development of drinking water regulations concerning disinfectants, disinfection by-products (DBPs) and microbial pathogens, focusing on key scientific and technical information needed. The research pl...

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORAMINE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide and chloramine are two popular alternative disinfectants, with...

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  15. Genotoxicity of drinking water disinfectants in plant bioassays.

    PubMed

    Monarca, Silvano; Feretti, Donatella; Zani, Claudia; Rizzoni, Marco; Casarella, Silvia; Gustavino, Bianca

    2005-08-01

    The genotoxicity of two widely used drinking water disinfectants, sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)), and a new disinfectant, peracetic acid (PAA, CH(3)-CO-COOH), was evaluated in three short-term plant tests: (1) induction of anaphase chromosome aberrations in the root cells of Allium cepa, (2) micronucleus induction in the root cells of Vicia faba, and (3) micronucleus induction in Tradescantia pollen cells. The study was carried out in the laboratory by directly exposing the plants to several concentrations of the disinfectants in redistilled water at unadjusted (acid) and adjusted (neutral) pHs. Both 0.1 and 0.2 mg/l NaClO induced chromosome aberrations in the Allium cepa test at acid pH, but concentrations up to 0.5 mg/l of all the disinfectants were negative at neutral pH. Concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 mg/l NaClO, ClO(2,) and PAA induced micronuclei in Vicia faba at acid pH, while 1-2 mg/l NaClO and ClO(2) and 0.5-2 mg/l PAA gave positive responses at neutral pH. Most of concentrations of ClO(2) produced positive responses in the Tradescantia micronucleus test. In general, the highest levels of genotoxicity were observed under acid conditions; at acid pH, significant effects were induced by low concentrations of ClO(2) and PAA. Since the test concentrations of disinfectants are typical of those encountered in the biocidal treatment of tap water and similar concentrations are consumed daily by a large number of people, the genotoxicity of these compounds may constitute a significant public health concern.

  16. Differential resistance of drinking water bacterial populations to monochloramine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Tzu-Hsin; Clancy, Tara M; Pinto, Ameet; Xi, Chuanwu; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2014-04-01

    The impact of monochloramine disinfection on the complex bacterial community structure in drinking water systems was investigated using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Changes in viable bacterial diversity were monitored using culture-independent methods that distinguish between live and dead cells based on membrane integrity, providing a highly conservative measure of viability. Samples were collected from lab-scale and full-scale drinking water filters exposed to monochloramine for a range of contact times. Culture-independent detection of live cells was based on propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment to selectively remove DNA from membrane-compromised cells. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to quantify the DNA of live bacteria and characterize the bacterial communities, respectively. The inactivation rate determined by the culture-independent PMA-qPCR method (1.5-log removal at 664 mg·min/L) was lower than the inactivation rate measured by the culture-based methods (4-log removal at 66 mg·min/L). Moreover, drastic changes in the live bacterial community structure were detected during monochloramine disinfection using PMA-pyrosequencing, while the community structure appeared to remain stable when pyrosequencing was performed on samples that were not subject to PMA treatment. Genera that increased in relative abundance during monochloramine treatment include Legionella, Escherichia, and Geobacter in the lab-scale system and Mycobacterium, Sphingomonas, and Coxiella in the full-scale system. These results demonstrate that bacterial populations in drinking water exhibit differential resistance to monochloramine, and that the disinfection process selects for resistant bacterial populations.

  17. ANALYZING DRINKING WATER FOR DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the mid 19th Century, Chinese workers on the North American transcontinental railroad suffered less illness than other groups. While generally mysterious at the time, today the reason is obvious. The Chinese preference for tea required heating the water, thus killing many path...

  18. ANALYZING DRINKING WATER FOR DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the mid 19th Century, Chinese workers on the North American transcontinental railroad suffered less illness than other groups. While generally mysterious at the time, today the reason is obvious. The Chinese preference for tea required heating the water, thus killing many path...

  19. Energy-efficient drinking water disinfection for greenhouse gas mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.J.; Greene, D.M.; Rosenfeld, A.

    1998-07-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that approximately one billion people worldwide use cookstoves to boil their drinking water. About half of this population is in China. Some populations (e.g. Jakarta) spend 1% of their GDP on boiling drinking water. Impoverished and/or ignorant populations not yet boiling their drinking water will do so when they can both afford it and understand the risks of unsafe drinking water. A recently developed water disinfection technology (UV Waterworks) can produce safe drinking water while earning tradable carbon credits (or credit as a clean development mechanism) when implemented as part of national energy, health, and carbon emissions trading policy, UV Waterworks uses approximately 6,000 times less energy than boiling over a biomass cookstove. Each unit that replaces boiling may save up to 175 or 300 tons/year of carbon-equivalent GHG emissions, depending on if it replaces sustainably harvested biomass (SHB) or non-SHB. For the approximately 500M Chinese boiling their drinking water over biomass (assumed SHB), this suggests a technical potential (that is, potential under the limiting case of 100% market adoption) of saving 87M tons/year of carbon-equivalent non-CO{sub 2} GHG emissions. The energy savings and corresponding emissions reductions will vary with cookstove fuels and stove efficiency: non-SHB and kerosene represent the most and least GHG-producing cookstove fuels, respectively, among those readily available to the populations of interest. The authors bracket the global technical potential for carbon emission reductions resulting from implementation of UV Waterworks, and estimate the value of tradable carbon credits earned from these reductions.

  20. Lemon juice as a natural biocide for disinfecting drinking water.

    PubMed

    D'Aquino, M; Teves, S A

    1994-12-01

    The natural biocidal activity of lemon juice was studied in order to explore its possible use as a disinfectant and inhibitor of Vibrio cholerae in drinking water for areas lacking water treatment plants. From January through July 1993, water samples of varying alkalinity and hardness were prepared artificially, and underground and surface water samples were obtained from a number of different rural and urban areas in Argentina's Buenos Aires Province. After measuring the latter samples' hardness and alkalinity, a range of concentrations of lemon juice and other acidifiers were added to each sample, and the resulting pH as well as the samples' ability to destroy V. cholerae were determined. The results show that lemon juice can actively prevent survival of V. cholerae but that such activity is reduced in markedly alkaline water. For example, treatment of underground drinking water, which is characterized as having the greatest degree of alkalinity in our area, will typically destroy V. cholerae if the alkalinity of the water is the equivalent of that produced by 200 mg CaCO3 per liter, if enough lemon juice is added to bring the lemon juice concentration to 2%, and if the lemon juice is allowed to act for 30 minutes. All this points up the need to determine the alkalinity of water from any local source to be treated in the process of assessing the minimum concentration of lemon juice required.

  1. Controlling Legionella in hospital drinking water: an evidence-based review of disinfection methods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yusen E; Stout, Janet E; Yu, Victor L

    2011-02-01

    Hospital-acquired Legionnaires' disease is directly linked to the presence of Legionella in hospital drinking water. Disinfecting the drinking water system is an effective preventive measure. The efficacy of any disinfection measures should be validated in a stepwise fashion from laboratory assessment to a controlled multiple-hospital evaluation over a prolonged period of time. In this review, we evaluate systemic disinfection methods (copper-silver ionization, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, ultraviolet light, and hyperchlorination), a focal disinfection method (point-of-use filtration), and short-term disinfection methods in outbreak situations (superheat-and-flush with or without hyperchlorination). The infection control practitioner should take the lead in selection of the disinfection system and the vendor. Formal appraisals by other hospitals with experience of the system under consideration is indicated. Routine performance of surveillance cultures of drinking water to detect Legionella and monitoring of disinfectant concentrations are necessary to ensure long-term efficacy.

  2. GC/MS IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM MILWAUKEE'S NEW OZONATION PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Milwaukee Water Works recently added ozonation disinfection facilities to their municipal drinking water treatment. Coupling ozone treatment with biologically active filtration (BAF) was seen as a logical step to enhance multiple water quality objectives (an effective barrier...

  3. GC/MS IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM MILWAUKEE'S NEW OZONATION PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Milwaukee Water Works recently added ozonation disinfection facilities to their municipal drinking water treatment. Coupling ozone treatment with biologically active filtration (BAF) was seen as a logical step to enhance multiple water quality objectives (an effective barrier...

  4. Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D.; Miller, P.; Motau, C.; Stevens, F.

    1997-09-01

    A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

  5. [First results on the use of chloramines to reduce disinfection byproducts in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Azara, Antonio; Muresu, Elena; Dettori, Marco; Ciappeddu, Pierluigi; Deidda, Antonio; Maida, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    The presence of disinfection byproducts (DBP) in drinking water raises concerns about the safety of chlorination and is one of the problems inherent the use of surface water as a source of drinking water. In order to reduce the presence of DBP (in particular of chlorites), we evaluated the combined use of chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection and monochloramine for residual disinfection in a water purification plant and distribution system in Sardinia (Italy). The results are very encouraging. Disinfection byproducts were reduced and other parameters were found to be within the recommended standards, indicating further improvements of the purification process.

  6. [Kinetics of monochloramine decay in disinfection of drinking water].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Gang; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Han, Chang; Qiu, Yan-Ling; Zhao, Jian-Fu

    2009-09-15

    The model of second-order reaction kinetics has been used to fit the monochloramine decay in water samples by nonlinear imitation. Several factors were investigated, including pH, temperature, carbonate, bromide, iodide concentrations and natural organic matters in this system. The results showed that pH value was an important factor on the monochloramine decay rate, especially when pH was below 7.0. Temperature and carbonate levels also had obvious effect on the monochloramine decay. Co-existence of bromide anions had different impact under different pH values. At pH 6.60, monochloramine decay rate tended to decrease dramatically with the increment of bromide levels. However, when pH was above 7.60, 0.1 mg/L of bromide hardly affected the decay rate of mononchloramine. Co-existence of iodide showed stronger effect on the decline rate of monochloramine than that of bromide. It was demonstrated that the second-order kinetic model could fit well the experimental results of monochloramine decay reaction under the conditions of bromide or iodide co-existence. The results of this study will be of benefit to the theory and technology of drinking water disinfection, especially for the reduction of DBPs and the control of disinfectant dosages in the area of coastland and estuary.

  7. MODELING CHLORINE DECAY AND THE FORMATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBPS) IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major objective of drinking water treatment is to provide microbiologically safe drinking water. The combination of conventional drinking water treatment and disinfection has proved to be one of the major public health advances in modern times. In the US, chlorine is most often...

  8. Drinking water disinfection by-products and time to pregnancy.

    PubMed

    MacLehose, Richard F; Savitz, David A; Herring, Amy H; Hartmann, Katherine E; Singer, Philip C; Weinberg, Howard S

    2008-05-01

    Laboratory evidence suggests tap water disinfection by-products (DBPs) could have an effect very early in pregnancy, typically before clinical detectability. Undetected early losses would be expected to increase the reported number of cycles to clinical pregnancy. We investigated the association between specific DBPs (trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, brominated-trihalomethanes, brominated-haloacetic acids, total organic halides, and bromodichloromethane) and time to pregnancy among women who enrolled in a study of drinking water and reproductive outcomes. We quantified exposure to DBPs through concentrations in tap water, quantity ingested through drinking, quantity inhaled or absorbed while showering or bathing, and total integrated exposure. The effect of DBPs on time to pregnancy was estimated using a discrete time hazard model. Overall, we found no evidence of an increased time to pregnancy among women who were exposed to higher levels of DBPs. A modestly decreased time to pregnancy (ie, increased fecundability) was seen among those exposed to the highest level of ingested DBPs, but not for tap water concentration, the amount absorbed while showering or bathing, or the integrated exposure. Our findings extend those of a recently published study suggesting a lack of association between DBPs and pregnancy loss.

  9. Metagenomic Analyses of Drinking Water Receiving Different Disinfection Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Revetta, Randy P.

    2012-01-01

    A metagenome-based approach was used to assess the taxonomic affiliation and function potential of microbial populations in free-chlorine-treated (CHL) and monochloramine-treated (CHM) drinking water (DW). In all, 362,640 (averaging 544 bp) and 155,593 (averaging 554 bp) pyrosequencing reads were analyzed for the CHL and CHM samples, respectively. Most annotated proteins were found to be of bacterial origin, although eukaryotic, archaeal, and viral proteins were also identified. Differences in community structure and function were noted. Most notably, Legionella-like genes were more abundant in the CHL samples while mycobacterial genes were more abundant in CHM samples. Genes associated with multiple disinfectant mechanisms were identified in both communities. Moreover, sequences linked to virulence factors, such as antibiotic resistance mechanisms, were observed in both microbial communities. This study provides new insights into the genetic network and potential biological processes associated with the molecular microbial ecology of DW microbial communities. PMID:22729545

  10. Metagenomic analyses of drinking water receiving different disinfection treatments.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Revetta, Randy P; Santo Domingo, Jorge W

    2012-09-01

    A metagenome-based approach was used to assess the taxonomic affiliation and function potential of microbial populations in free-chlorine-treated (CHL) and monochloramine-treated (CHM) drinking water (DW). In all, 362,640 (averaging 544 bp) and 155,593 (averaging 554 bp) pyrosequencing reads were analyzed for the CHL and CHM samples, respectively. Most annotated proteins were found to be of bacterial origin, although eukaryotic, archaeal, and viral proteins were also identified. Differences in community structure and function were noted. Most notably, Legionella-like genes were more abundant in the CHL samples while mycobacterial genes were more abundant in CHM samples. Genes associated with multiple disinfectant mechanisms were identified in both communities. Moreover, sequences linked to virulence factors, such as antibiotic resistance mechanisms, were observed in both microbial communities. This study provides new insights into the genetic network and potential biological processes associated with the molecular microbial ecology of DW microbial communities.

  11. DETERMINATION OF NEWLY IDENTIFIED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWDSC) is investigating the occurrence of 39 newly identified disinfection by-products (DBPs)-which were not included in the Information Collection Rule (ICR)-in drinking waters. Halomethanes (HMs), haloacetonitriles (HANs),...

  12. Disinfectant Penetration into Nitrifying Drinking Water Distribution System Biofilm Using Microelectrodes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrification within drinking water distribution systems reduces water quality, causes difficulties maintaining adequate disinfectant residual, and poses public health concerns including exposure to nitrite, nitrate, and opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms. Monochloramine is...

  13. Disinfectant Penetration into Nitrifying Drinking Water Distribution System Biofilm Using Microelectrodes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrification within drinking water distribution systems reduces water quality, causes difficulties maintaining adequate disinfectant residual, and poses public health concerns including exposure to nitrite, nitrate, and opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms. Monochloramine is...

  14. DETERMINATION OF NEWLY IDENTIFIED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWDSC) is investigating the occurrence of 39 newly identified disinfection by-products (DBPs)-which were not included in the Information Collection Rule (ICR)-in drinking waters. Halomethanes (HMs), haloacetonitriles (HANs),...

  15. Association between drinking water disinfection and somatic parameters at birth.

    PubMed Central

    Kanitz, S; Franco, Y; Patrone, V; Caltabellotta, M; Raffo, E; Riggi, C; Timitilli, D; Ravera, G

    1996-01-01

    We conducted an epidemiological study in Liguria, Italy, on the association between somatic parameters at birth and drinking water disinfection with chlorine dioxide and/or sodium hypochlorite. Over 2 years (1988-1989), 676 births at two public hospitals, one in Genoa (548 cases) and another in Chiavari (128 cases) were examined and data regarding both mother and child were obtained from hospital records. Results indicate a higher frequency of small body length (< or = 49.5 cm) and small cranial circumference (< or = 35 cm) in infants born to mothers who drank water treated with chlorine compounds. In particular, the statistical analysis (by simultaneous variance analysis and Scheffé test) indicated that there may be an association between infants with smaller body length and mothers who drank water treated with chlorine dioxide [adjusted odds radio (OR) = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.2-3.3] or sodium hypoclorite (adjusted OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3-4.2) and between infants with smaller cranial circumference and mothers who drank water treated with chlorine dioxide (adjusted OR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.4-3.9) or sodium hypochlorite (adjusted OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 2.1-8.5). The presence of neonatal jaundice is almost twice as likely (adjusted OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.1-3.1) in infants whose mothers drank water treated with chlorine dioxide. Images Figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 3. PMID:8743439

  16. Association between drinking water disinfection and somatic parameters at birth.

    PubMed

    Kanitz, S; Franco, Y; Patrone, V; Caltabellotta, M; Raffo, E; Riggi, C; Timitilli, D; Ravera, G

    1996-05-01

    We conducted an epidemiological study in Liguria, Italy, on the association between somatic parameters at birth and drinking water disinfection with chlorine dioxide and/or sodium hypochlorite. Over 2 years (1988-1989), 676 births at two public hospitals, one in Genoa (548 cases) and another in Chiavari (128 cases) were examined and data regarding both mother and child were obtained from hospital records. Results indicate a higher frequency of small body length (< or = 49.5 cm) and small cranial circumference (< or = 35 cm) in infants born to mothers who drank water treated with chlorine compounds. In particular, the statistical analysis (by simultaneous variance analysis and Scheffé test) indicated that there may be an association between infants with smaller body length and mothers who drank water treated with chlorine dioxide [adjusted odds radio (OR) = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.2-3.3] or sodium hypoclorite (adjusted OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3-4.2) and between infants with smaller cranial circumference and mothers who drank water treated with chlorine dioxide (adjusted OR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.4-3.9) or sodium hypochlorite (adjusted OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 2.1-8.5). The presence of neonatal jaundice is almost twice as likely (adjusted OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.1-3.1) in infants whose mothers drank water treated with chlorine dioxide.

  17. Role of disinfection in suppressing the spread of pathogens with drinking water: possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Schoenen, D

    2002-09-01

    Transmission of pathogens with drinking water is a widespread problem, which affects not only the countries with low hygienic standards but the industrialized countries as well. The pathogens are excreted by man or animals and are picked up orally. Chlorination of drinking water has been introduced to the water supply in the beginning of the 19th century in order to stop the spreading of pathogens especially typhoid fever by drinking water. Despite the worldwide use of chlorine for disinfection of drinking water, water-mediated disease outbreaks occur again and again. Disinfection of drinking water with chlorine has undoubtedly contributed to the reduction of typhoid fever mortality. However, it must be clear that other factors play an important role in the mortality drop. Filtration of water is a long-known and very effective process for eliminating pathogens from the drinking water. Pathogens in particles cannot be killed sufficiently by a chemical disinfectant. Even small fecal particles have to be eliminated reliably from the water by filtration. Disinfection of drinking water cannot replace filtration. The disinfection should be used to minimize the residual risk due to the presence of pathogens in the water but cannot be used for bringing fecally contaminated water into a hygienically sound condition.

  18. EVALUATION OF ON-SITE CHLORINE GENERATORS FOR THE DISINFECTION OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public Water Systems (PWSs) routinely use various forms of chlorine as the disinfectant of choice for the treatment of drinking water. Chlorine is a popular choice because it is a very effective disinfectant, it is inexpensive, and it is widely available in various forms to suit...

  19. Innovative Approach to Validation of Ultraviolet (UV) Reactors for Disinfection in Drinking Water Systems - presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens found in source waters with the potential as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. For surface and groundwater sourced drinking water applications, the U.S. Environmental...

  20. EVALUATION OF ON-SITE CHLORINE GENERATORS FOR THE DISINFECTION OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public Water Systems (PWSs) routinely use various forms of chlorine as the disinfectant of choice for the treatment of drinking water. Chlorine is a popular choice because it is a very effective disinfectant, it is inexpensive, and it is widely available in various forms to suit...

  1. Innovative Approach to Validation of Ultraviolet (UV) Reactors for Disinfection in Drinking Water Systems - presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens found in source waters with the potential as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. For surface and groundwater sourced drinking water applications, the U.S. Environmental...

  2. Why Do People Stop Treating Contaminated Drinking Water with Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS)?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamas, Andrea; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS) is a simple method designed to treat microbiologically contaminated drinking water at household level. This article characterizes relapse behavior in comparison with continued SODIS use after a 7-month nonpromotion period. In addition, different subtypes among relapsers and continuers were assumed to diverge mainly…

  3. Why Do People Stop Treating Contaminated Drinking Water with Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS)?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamas, Andrea; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS) is a simple method designed to treat microbiologically contaminated drinking water at household level. This article characterizes relapse behavior in comparison with continued SODIS use after a 7-month nonpromotion period. In addition, different subtypes among relapsers and continuers were assumed to diverge mainly…

  4. MUTAGENICITY IN SALMONELLA OF HALONITROMETHANES: A RECENTLY RECOGNIZED CLASS OF DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATERS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halonitromethanes(HNMs)are a recently identified class of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water.They include chloronitromethane (CHN), dichloronitromethane (DCNM), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), bromonitromethane (BNM), dibromonitromethane (DBNM), tribromonitromethane ...

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED AT HIGH BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids, and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide is a popular alternative, with over 500 dri...

  6. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS AND OTHER EMERGING CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been studied for the last 30 years, significant, new concerns have arisen. These concerns include adverse reproductive and developmental effects recently observed in human populations, concerns that the types of cancer...

  7. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS AND OTHER EMERGING CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been studied for the last 30 years, significant, new concerns have arisen. These concerns include adverse reproductive and developmental effects recently observed in human populations, concerns that the types of cancer...

  8. Risk of viral acute gastrointestinal illness from non-disinfected drinking water distribution systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) resulting from pathogens directly entering the piping of drinking water distribution systems is insufficiently understood. Here, we estimate AGI incidence attributable to virus intrusions into non-disinfecting municipal distribution systems. Viruses were enumerat...

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED AT HIGH BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids, and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide is a popular alternative, with over 500 dri...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  12. Mammalian Cell Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of the Haloacetic Acids, A Major Class of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water, wastewaters and recreational pool waters. Currently, five HAAs [bromoacetic acid (BAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), dichloroacetic ac...

  13. Mammalian Cell Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of the Haloacetic Acids, A Major Class of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water, wastewaters and recreational pool waters. Currently, five HAAs [bromoacetic acid (BAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), dichloroacetic ac...

  14. QSPR for predicting chloroform formation in drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Luilo, G B; Cabaniss, S E

    2011-01-01

    Chlorination is the most widely used technique for water disinfection, but may lead to the formation of chloroform (trichloromethane; TCM) and other by-products. This article reports the first quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) for predicting the formation of TCM in chlorinated drinking water. Model compounds (n = 117) drawn from 10 literature sources were divided into training data (n = 90, analysed by five-way leave-many-out internal cross-validation) and external validation data (n = 27). QSPR internal cross-validation had Q² = 0.94 and root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.09 moles TCM per mole compound, consistent with external validation Q2 of 0.94 and RMSE of 0.08 moles TCM per mole compound, and met criteria for high predictive power and robustness. In contrast, log TCM QSPR performed poorly and did not meet the criteria for predictive power. The QSPR predictions were consistent with experimental values for TCM formation from tannic acid and for model fulvic acid structures. The descriptors used are consistent with a relatively small number of important TCM precursor structures based upon 1,3-dicarbonyls or 1,3-diphenols.

  15. Occurrence assessment for disinfectants and disinfection by-products (phase 6A) in public drinking water. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-03

    The EPA Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water is developing national primary drinking water regulations for disinfectant and disinfection by-product contaminants. Thirteen contaminants are being considered to be regulated under Phase 6. These contaminants, referred to as Phase 6a, are the subject of the report. The information is important for setting the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal for a contaminant. The exposure information also is used to estimate the baseline health impact assessment of current levels and for evaluation of the health benefits of the regulatory alternatives.

  16. Solar disinfection of drinking water protects against cholera in children under 6 years of age.

    PubMed

    Conroy, R M; Meegan, M E; Joyce, T; McGuigan, K; Barnes, J

    2001-10-01

    We have previously reported a reduction in risk of diarrhoeal disease in children who used solar disinfected drinking water. A cholera epidemic, occurring in an area of Kenya in which a controlled trial of solar disinfection and diarrhoeal disease in children aged under 6 had recently finished, offered an opportunity to examine the protection offered by solar disinfection against cholera. In the original trial, all children aged under 6 in a Maasai community were randomised by household: in the solar disinfection arm, children drank water disinfected by leaving it on the roof in a clear plastic bottle, while controls drank water kept indoors. We revisited all households which had participated in the original trial. There were 131 households in the trial area, of which 67 had been randomised to solar disinfection (a further 19 households had migrated as a result of severe drought). There was no significant difference in the risk of cholera in adults or in older children in households randomised to solar disinfection; however, there were only three cases of cholera in the 155 children aged under 6 years drinking solar disinfected water compared with 20 of 144 controls. Results confirm the usefulness of solar disinfection in reducing risk of water borne disease in children. Point of consumption solar disinfection can be done with minimal resources, which are readily available, and may be an important first line response to cholera outbreaks. Its potential in chorine resistant cholera merits further investigation.

  17. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODINATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  18. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo- prope...

  19. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo...

  20. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODINATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  1. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo- prope...

  2. Bench-Scale Evaluation of Peracetic Acid and Twin Oxide ™ as Disinfectants in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine is widely used as an inexpensive and potent disinfectant in the United States for drinking water. However, chlorine has the potential for forming carcinogenic and mutagenic disinfection by-products (DBPs). In this study, bench scale experiments were conducted at the U.S...

  3. Bench-Scale Evaluation of Peracetic Acid and Twin Oxide ™ as Disinfectants in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine is widely used as an inexpensive and potent disinfectant in the United States for drinking water. However, chlorine has the potential for forming carcinogenic and mutagenic disinfection by-products (DBPs). In this study, bench scale experiments were conducted at the U.S...

  4. CONTROL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: COST AND PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is in the process of developing a sophisticated regulatory strategy in an attempt to balance the risks associated with disinfectants and disinfection by-products (D/DBP) in drinking water. A major aspect of this strategy is the...

  5. Continuous-flow solar UVB disinfection reactor for drinking water.

    PubMed

    Mbonimpa, Eric Gentil; Vadheim, Bryan; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2012-05-01

    Access to safe, reliable sources of drinking water is a long-standing problem among people in developing countries. Sustainable solutions to these problems often involve point-of-use or community-scale water treatment systems that rely on locally-available resources and expertise. This philosophy was used in the development of a continuous-flow, solar UVB disinfection system. Numerical modeling of solar UVB spectral irradiance was used to define temporal variations in spectral irradiance at several geographically-distinct locations. The results of these simulations indicated that a solar UVB system would benefit from incorporation of a device to amplify ambient UVB fluence rate. A compound parabolic collector (CPC) was selected for this purpose. Design of the CPC was based on numerical simulations that accounted for the shape of the collector and reflectance. Based on these simulations, a prototype CPC was constructed using materials that would be available and inexpensive in many developing countries. A UVB-transparent pipe was positioned in the focal area of the CPC; water was pumped through the pipe to allow exposure of waterborne microbes to germicidal solar UVB radiation. The system was demonstrated to be effective for inactivation of Escherichia coli, and DNA-weighted UV dose was shown to govern reactor performance. The design of the reactor is expected to scale linearly, and improvements in process performance (relative to results from the prototype) can be expected by use of larger CPC geometry, inclusion of better reflective materials, and application in areas with greater ambient solar UV spectral irradiance than the location of the prototype tests. The system is expected to have application for water treatment among communities in (developing) countries in near-equatorial and tropical locations. It may also have application for disaster relief or military field operations, as well as in water treatment in areas of developed countries that receive

  6. Mass Spectrometry Identification of Toxicologically Important Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Before its widespread use, millions of people died from waterborne diseases. Now, people in developed nations receive quality drinking water every day from their public wate...

  7. Evaluation of Disinfection Byproducts formed from the Chlorination of Lyophilized and Reconstituted NOM Concentrate from a Drinking Water Source

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by difficulties in shipping large water quantities and NOM geographical and temporal variability. Access to a drinking water representative, shelf-stable, concentrated NOM source would solve th...

  8. Evaluation of Disinfection Byproducts Formed from the Chlorination of Lyophilized and Reconstituted NOM Concentrate from a Drinking Water Source - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by difficulties in shipping large water quantities and NOM geographical and temporal variability. Access to a drinking water representative, shelf-stable, concentrated NOM source would solve th...

  9. Evaluation of Disinfection Byproducts Formed from the Chlorination of Lyophilized and Reconstituted NOM Concentrate from a Drinking Water Source - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by difficulties in shipping large water quantities and NOM geographical and temporal variability. Access to a drinking water representative, shelf-stable, concentrated NOM source would solve th...

  10. Evaluation of Disinfection Byproducts formed from the Chlorination of Lyophilized and Reconstituted NOM Concentrate from a Drinking Water Source

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by difficulties in shipping large water quantities and NOM geographical and temporal variability. Access to a drinking water representative, shelf-stable, concentrated NOM source would solve th...

  11. Risk assessment on disinfection by-products of drinking water of different water sources and disinfection processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyi; Ye, Bixiong; Yang, Linsheng; Li, Yonghua; Wang, Yonghua

    2007-02-01

    The occurrences of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetics (HAAs) in the water supply in Beijing and Canada were investigated. The concentrations of THMs and HAAs in Beijing and Canada were below the maximum contaminant levels specified by the USEPA and WHO standards. The multi-pathway risk assessment (assessed through oral ingestion, dermal absorption and inhalation exposure to drinking water) was used to assess the cancer risk and the hazard index of THMs and HAAs from fifteen waterworks in Beijing, China and three treatment plants using different disinfection processes in Canada. Residents in Beijing and residents who were served by three treatment plants using different disinfection processes in Canada had a higher risk of cancer through oral ingestion than through the other two pathways. The cancer risk resulted from disinfection by-products (DBPs) was 8.50E-05(for males), 9.25E-05(for females) in Beijing, China, while it was 1.18E-04, 1.44E-04 in Canada. The risk was higher when water treatment plants used surface water source than when they used ground water source and mixture water source in Beijing. The risk showed different changes in three treatment plants using different disinfection processes in Canada. The lifetime cancer risk for THMs followed the order: Plant 2>Plant 1>Plant 3. And, the lifetime cancer risk for HAAs was: Plant 1>Plant 2>Plant 3.

  12. OCCURRENCE, GENOTOXICITY, AND CARCINOGENICITY OF EMERGING DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: A REVIEW AND ROADMAP FOR RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants (chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramines) react with naturally occurring organic matter, anthropogenic contaminants, bromide, and iodide during the production of drinking water. Here we review 30 years of re...

  13. OCCURRENCE, GENOTOXICITY, AND CARCINOGENICITY OF EMERGING DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: A REVIEW AND ROADMAP FOR RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants (chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramines) react with naturally occurring organic matter, anthropogenic contaminants, bromide, and iodide during the production of drinking water. Here we review 30 years of re...

  14. Toxic impact of bromide and iodide on drinking water disinfected with chlorine or chloramines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Komaki, Yukako; Kimura, Susana Y; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-21

    Disinfectants inactivate pathogens in source water; however, they also react with organic matter and bromide/iodide to form disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although only a few DBP classes have been systematically analyzed for toxicity, iodinated and brominated DBPs tend to be the most toxic. The objectives of this research were (1) to determine if monochloramine (NH2Cl) disinfection generated drinking water with less toxicity than water disinfected with free chlorine (HOCl) and (2) to determine the impact of added bromide and iodide in conjunction with HOCl or NH2Cl disinfection on mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genomic DNA damage induction. Water disinfected with chlorine was less cytotoxic but more genotoxic than water disinfected with chloramine. For both disinfectants, the addition of Br(-) and I(-) increased cytotoxicity and genotoxicity with a greater response observed with NH2Cl disinfection. Both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were highly correlated with TOBr and TOI. However, toxicity was weakly and inversely correlated with TOCl. Thus, the forcing agents for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were the generation of brominated and iodinated DBPs rather than the formation of chlorinated DBPs. Disinfection practices need careful consideration especially when using source waters containing elevated bromide and iodide.

  15. Effects of phosphorus on biofilm disinfections in model drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Hu, Jiangyong; Ong, Say Leong

    2010-09-01

    Drinking water biofilm development is affected by the available nutrient levels and the presence of disinfectants. Phosphorus is recognized as another important limiting nutrient besides organic carbon. In this study, drinking water biofilms were developed in annular reactors to examine the effects of phosphorus on the biofilm disinfections with free chlorine and monochloramine. Phosphorus addition was found to increase the biofilm cell number but decrease the exopolysaccharides (EPS) production. The disinfection efficacies of both free chlorine and monochloramine were increased when phosphorus was added into the reactor systems. At the same disinfection dosages, monochloramine showed greater biofilm removal efficiency than free chlorine. Monochloramine could be a better choice than free chlorine in biofilm disinfection when phosphate-based corrosion inhibitors are applied.

  16. DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER [LETTER TO THE EDITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comment on Professor Howard Weinberg's report on the analysis of potable water for disinfection byproducts.

    "I am unconvinced that it is necessary to identify and quantify each individual compound. Suppose we identify 1000 or 10,000 individual compounds, can we afford t...

  17. DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER [LETTER TO THE EDITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comment on Professor Howard Weinberg's report on the analysis of potable water for disinfection byproducts.

    "I am unconvinced that it is necessary to identify and quantify each individual compound. Suppose we identify 1000 or 10,000 individual compounds, can we afford t...

  18. Nano-silver in drinking water and drinking water sources: stability and influences on disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Tugulea, A-M; Bérubé, D; Giddings, M; Lemieux, F; Hnatiw, J; Priem, J; Avramescu, M-L

    2014-10-01

    Nano-silver is increasingly used in consumer products from washing machines and refrigerators to devices marketed for the disinfection of drinking water or recreational water. The nano-silver in these products may be released, ending up in surface water bodies which may be used as drinking water sources. Little information is available about the stability of the nano-silver in sources of drinking water, its fate during drinking water disinfection processes, and its interaction with disinfection agents and disinfection by-products (DBPs). This study aims to investigate the stability of nano-silver in drinking water sources and in the finished drinking water when chlorine and chloramines are used for disinfection and to observe changes in the composition of DBPs formed when nano-silver is present in the source water. A dispersion of nano-silver particles (10 nm; PVP-coated) was used to spike untreated Ottawa River water, treated Ottawa River water, organic-free water, and a groundwater at concentrations of 5 mg/L. The diluted dispersions were kept under stirred and non-stirred conditions for up to 9 months and analyzed weekly using UV absorption to assess the stability of the nano-silver particles. In a separate experiment, Ottawa River water containing nano-silver particles (at 0.1 and 1 mg/L concentration, respectively) was disinfected by adding sodium hypochlorite (a chlorinating agent) in sufficient amounts to maintain a free chlorine residual of approximately 0.4 mg/L after 24 h. The disinfected drinking water was then quenched with ascorbic acid and analyzed for 34 neutral DBPs (trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles, haloacetaldehydes, 1,1 dichloro-2-propanone, 1,1,1 trichloro-2-propanone, chloropicrin, and cyanogen chloride). The results were compared to the profile of DBPs obtained under the same conditions in the absence of nano-silver and in the presence of an equivalent concentration of Ag(+) ions (as AgNO3). The stability of the nano-silver dispersions in

  19. [Genotoxicity of drinking water during chlorine and chloramine disinfection and the influence of disinfection conditions using the umu-test].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhang, Li-Ping; Liu, Wen-Jun; Nie, Xue-Biao; Zhang, Su-Xia; Zhang, Shun

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of disinfectant dosage, reaction time and the ratio of Cl2 to N of disinfectant on genotoxicity of effluent of ozone-biological activated carbon (O3-BAC) during chlorine or chloramine disinfection were investigated using umu-test. It was found that, the genotoxicity of effluent of O3-BAC before disinfection ranged from 20-70 ng/L, and it increased after disinfection by chlorine or chloramines. With the same reaction time(24 h), genotoxicity after chlorination (40-95 ng/L) was higher than that after chloramination (20-40 ng/L) under same initial dosage. For chlorination, with initial dosage increasing from 0 mg/L to 10 mg/L, genotoxicity increased firstly, and got the maximum value at about 0.5-1 mg/L dosage, then decreased and got the minimum value at about 3-5 mg/L dosage, and finally increased again. For chloramination, genotoxicity didn't change that much. With the dosage of 3 mg/L and reaction time increasing from 0 h to 72 h, no matter for chlorine or chloramines disinfection, genotoxicity of effluent of O3-BAC both increased firstly, and got the maximum value at about 2 h, then decreased and got the minimum value at about 18 h, and finally increased again, and genotoxicity after chlorine disinfection (83-120 ng/L) was higher than that after chloramines disinfection (20-62 ng/L) under same reaction time. Further more, effects of the different ratios of Cl2 to N of disinfectant on genotoxicity of effluent of O3-BAC were also studied. Results of this study demonstrate that under test conditions, chloramine disinfection is safer than chlorine disinfection in the aspect of genotoxicity for drinking water, and the changes of genotoxicity are different from those of total HAAs.

  20. A NATIONWIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT OCCURRENCE STUDY - IDENTIFICATION OF NEW AND TOXICOLOGICALLY SIGNIFICANT COMPOUNDS WITH MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants, such as chlorine, react with natural organic matter and bromide present in the water. Chloroform was the first DBP identified in drinking water (in 1974), and was subsequently shown (along with other t...

  1. Impact of UV disinfection on microbially available phosphorus, organic carbon, and microbial growth in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Lehtola, Markku J; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Vartiainen, Terttu; Rantakokko, Panu; Hirvonen, Arja; Martikainen, Pertti J

    2003-03-01

    UV irradiation at a wavelength of 253.7 nm (UV(254)) is commonly used for drinking water disinfection. UV radiation is known to convert organically combined phosphorus to orthophosphate and to degrade natural organic matter. We studied if UV disinfection increases the amount of microbially available forms of organic carbon and phosphorus in drinking waters with different characteristics, and if these changes in water chemical quality could enhance the microbial growth in drinking water. The UV(254) dose (15-50 mWs/cm(2)) used in waterworks reduced the concentration of assimilable organic carbon and the sum of the molecular size fractions. The release of microbially available phosphorus needed higher doses (204 mWs/cm(2)) of UV(254) radiation. Of bacteria in drinking water, 90% were inactivated with UV(254)-irradiation doses below 50 mWs/cm(2). A high dose (501 mWs/cm(2)) of UV(254) radiation inhibited the microbial growth in water.

  2. Reduced Efficiency of Chlorine Disinfection of Naegleria fowleri in a Drinking Water Distribution Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Miller, Haylea C; Wylie, Jason; Dejean, Guillaume; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sutton, David; Braun, Kalan; Puzon, Geoffrey J

    2015-09-15

    Naegleria fowleri associated with biofilm and biological demand water (organic matter suspended in water that consumes disinfectants) sourced from operational drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) had significantly increased resistance to chlorine disinfection. N. fowleri survived intermittent chlorine dosing of 0.6 mg/L for 7 days in a mixed biofilm from field and laboratory-cultured Escherichia coli strains. However, N. fowleri associated with an attached drinking water distribution biofilm survived more than 30 times (20 mg/L for 3 h) the recommended concentration of chlorine for drinking water. N. fowleri showed considerably more resistance to chlorine when associated with a real field biofilm compared to the mixed laboratory biofilm. This increased resistance is likely due to not only the consumption of disinfectants by the biofilm and the reduced disinfectant penetration into the biofilm but also the composition and microbial community of the biofilm itself. The increased diversity of the field biofilm community likely increased N. fowleri's resistance to chlorine disinfection compared to that of the laboratory-cultured biofilm. Previous research has been conducted in only laboratory scale models of DWDSs and laboratory-cultured biofilms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating how N. fowleri can persist in a field drinking water distribution biofilm despite chlorination.

  3. INTEGRATED DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS MIXTURES RESEARCH: COMPREHENSIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF WATER CONCENTRATES PREPARED FROM CHLORINATED AND OZONATED/POSTCHLORINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes the disinfection byproduct (DBP) characterization portion of a series of experiments designed for comprehensive chemical and toxicological evaluation of two drinking water concentrates containing highly complex mixtures of DBP. This project, called the Four...

  4. Disinfection Byproduct Formation in Reverse-Osmosis Concentrated and Lyophilized Natural Organic Matter from a Drinking Water Source

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by natural organic matter (NOM) temporal variability. NOM preservation by lyophilization (freeze-drying) has been long practiced to address this issue; however, its applicability for drinking wa...

  5. Disinfection Byproduct Formation in Reverse-Osmosis Concentrated and Lyophilized Natural Organic Matter from a Drinking Water Source

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by natural organic matter (NOM) temporal variability. NOM preservation by lyophilization (freeze-drying) has been long practiced to address this issue; however, its applicability for drinking wa...

  6. Solar disinfection of drinking water protects against cholera in children under 6 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, R; Meegan, M; Joyce, T; McGuigan, K; Barnes, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—We have previously reported a reduction in risk of diarrhoeal disease in children who used solar disinfected drinking water. A cholera epidemic, occurring in an area of Kenya in which a controlled trial of solar disinfection and diarrhoeal disease in children aged under 6 had recently finished, offered an opportunity to examine the protection offered by solar disinfection against cholera.
METHODS—In the original trial, all children aged under 6 in a Maasai community were randomised by household: in the solar disinfection arm, children drank water disinfected by leaving it on the roof in a clear plastic bottle, while controls drank water kept indoors. We revisited all households which had participated in the original trial.
RESULTS—There were 131 households in the trial area, of which 67 had been randomised to solar disinfection (a further 19 households had migrated as a result of severe drought). There was no significant difference in the risk of cholera in adults or in older children in households randomised to solar disinfection; however, there were only three cases of cholera in the 155 children aged under 6 years drinking solar disinfected water compared with 20 of 144controls.
CONCLUSIONS—Results confirm the usefulness of solar disinfection in reducing risk of water borne disease in children. Point of consumption solar disinfection can be done with minimal resources, which are readily available, and may be an important first line response to cholera outbreaks. Its potential in chorine resistant cholera merits further investigation.

 PMID:11567937

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Alternative Disinfectants for Drinking Water and Wastewater Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) initiated a research program to evaluate the performance of various disinfectants that could potentially be used in drink...

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED IN THE PRESENCE OF BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using a combination of mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy, disinfection by-products (DBPs) were identified in ozonated drinking water containing elevated bromide levels, and in ozonated water treated with secondary chlorine or chloramine. Only one brominated by-product-d...

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED IN THE PRESENCE OF BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using a combination of mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy, disinfection by-products (DBPs) were identified in ozonated drinking water containing elevated bromide levels, and in ozonated water treated with secondary chlorine or chloramine. Only one brominated by-product-d...

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Alternative Disinfectants for Drinking Water and Wastewater Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) initiated a research program to evaluate the performance of various disinfectants that could potentially be used in drink...

  11. Spatial and temporal evaluations of disinfection by-products in drinking water distribution systems in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianrong; Ye, Bixiong; Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Linsheng; Tao, Jing; Hang, Zhiyu

    2010-09-15

    Disinfection by-products were determined in 15 water treatment plants in Beijing City. The effects of different water sources (surface water source, mixture water source and ground water source), seasonal variation and spatial variation were examined. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were the major disinfection by-products found in all treated water samples, which accounted for 42.6% and 38.1% of all disinfection by-products respectively. Other disinfection by-products including haloacetonitriles, chloral hydrate, haloketones and chloropicrin were usually detected in treated water samples but at lower concentrations. The levels of disinfection by-products in drinking water varied with different water sources and followed the order: surface water source > mixture water source > ground water source. High spatial and seasonal variation of disinfection by-products in the drinking water of Beijing was shown as a result.

  12. Differential toxicity of drinking water disinfected with combinations of ultraviolet radiation and chlorine.

    PubMed

    Plewa, Michael J; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Metz, Deborah H; Kashinkunti, Ramesh; Jamriska, Katherine J; Meyer, Maria

    2012-07-17

    Alternative technologies to disinfect drinking water such as ultraviolet (UV) disinfection are becoming more widespread. The benefits of UV disinfection include reduced risk of microbial pathogens such as Cryptosporidium and reduced production of regulated drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs). The objective of this research was to determine if mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity varied in response to different chlorination protocols with and without polychromatic medium pressure UV (MPUV) and monochromatic low pressure UV (LPUV) disinfection technologies. The specific aims were to analyze the mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of concentrated organic fractions from source water before and after chlorination and to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the concentrated organic fractions from water samples treated with UV alone or UV before or after chlorination. Exposure of granular activated carbon-filtered Ohio River water to UV alone resulted in the lowest levels of mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. With combinations of UV and chlorine, the lowest levels of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were observed with MPUV radiation. The best combined UV plus chlorine methodology that generated the lowest cytotoxicity and genotoxicity employed chlorination first followed by MPUV radiation. These data may prove important in the development of multibarrier methods of pathogen inactivation of drinking water, while limiting unintended toxic consequences.

  13. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies.

    PubMed Central

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Bull, R; Holdsworth, G

    1986-01-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increases in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. For example, after 3 months of exposure to deionized water or water containing 15 ppm monochloramine, plasma cholesterol was 1266 +/- 172 and 2049 +/- 212 mg/dl, respectively, a difference of 783 mg/dl. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. We suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3456597

  14. Sequential UV- and chlorine-based disinfection to mitigate Escherichia coli in drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Murphy, H M; Payne, S J; Gagnon, G A

    2008-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the potential downstream benefits of sequential disinfection to control the persistence of Escherichia coli under conditions relevant to drinking water distribution systems. Eight annular reactors (four polycarbonate and four cast iron) were setup in parallel to address various factors that could influence biofilm growth in distribution systems. Eight reactors were treated with chlorine, chlorine dioxide and monochloramine alone or in combination with UV to examine the effects on Escherichia coli growth and persistence in both the effluent and biofilm. In general, UV-treated systems in combination with chlorine or chlorine dioxide and monochloramine achieved greater log reductions in both effluent and biofilm than systems treated with chlorine-based disinfectants alone. However, during UV-low chlorine disinfection, E. coli was found to persist at low levels, suggesting that the UV treatment had instigated an adaptive mutation. During UV-chlorine-dioxide treatment, the E. coli that was initially below the detection limit reappeared during a low level of disinfection (0.2 mg/L) in the cast iron systems. Chloramine was shown to be effective in disinfecting suspended E. coli in the effluent but was unable to reduce biofilm counts to below the detection limit. Issues such as repair mechanism of E. coli and nitrification could help explain some of these aberrations. Improved understanding of the ability of chlorine-based disinfectant in combination with UV to provide sufficient disinfection will ultimately effect in improved management and safety of drinking water.

  15. Metagenomic Analyses of Drinking Water Receiving Different Disinfection Treatments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A metagenome-based approach was utilized for assessing the taxonomic affiliation and function potential of microbial populations in free chlorine (CHL) and monochloramine (CHM) treated drinking water (DW). A total of 1,024, 242 (averaging 544 bp) and 849, 349 (averaging 554 bp) ...

  16. Metagenomic Analyses of Drinking Water Receiving Different Disinfection Treatments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A metagenome-based approach was utilized for assessing the taxonomic affiliation and function potential of microbial populations in free chlorine (CHL) and monochloramine (CHM) treated drinking water (DW). A total of 1,024, 242 (averaging 544 bp) and 849, 349 (averaging 554 bp) ...

  17. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  18. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  19. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Bull, R.; Holdsworth, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increase in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. The authors suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  20. The effect of chlorine and combined chlorine/UV treatment on coliphages in drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zyara, Alyaa M; Torvinen, Eila; Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine disinfection is a globally used method to ensure the safety of drinking water. However, it has not always been successful against viruses and, therefore, it is important to find new methods to disinfect water. Seventeen different coliphages were isolated from the treated municipal wastewater. These coliphages and MS2 were treated with different dosages of chlorine in drinking water, and a combined chlorine/ultraviolet irradiation treatment for the chlorine-resistant coliphages. Chlorine disinfection with 0.3-0.5 mg/L total chlorine (free Cl-dosage 0.12-0.21 mg/L) for 10 min achieved 2.5-5.7 Log10-reductions for 11 sensitive coliphages. The six most resistant coliphages showed no reduction with these chlorine concentrations. MS2 was intermediate in chlorine resistance, and thus it is not a good indicator for viruses in chlorine disinfection. In the combined treatment total chlorine of 0.05-0.25 mg/L (free Cl-dosage 0.02-0.08 mg/L) and ultraviolet irradiation (14-22 mWs/cm(2)) were more effective than chlorine alone, and 3-5 Log10-reductions were achieved for the chlorine-resistant strains. The chlorination efficiency could be increased by higher dosages and longer contact times, but this could increase the formation of disinfection by-products. Therefore, the combination treatment is a recommended disinfection method.

  1. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF HEALTH CONCERN IN DRINKING WATER: RESULTS OF A NATIONWIDE OCCURRENCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  2. The present status of research on the disinfection of drinking water in the USSR

    PubMed Central

    Čerkinskij, S. N.; Trahtman, N.

    1972-01-01

    The article reviews recent research in the USSR aimed at evaluating methods of disinfecting drinking water and at elucidating the mechanisms involved. The use of chlorine, ozone, and gamma rays is discussed, as are their advantages and disadvantages and their effects on Enterobacteriaceae and on enteroviruses. PMID:4537489

  3. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF HEALTH CONCERN IN DRINKING WATER: RESULTS OF A NATIONWIDE OCCURRENCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  4. REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade many toxicologic studies have addressed the potential for disinfection byproducts of drinking water to elicit alterations on the reproductive system and fetal development.
    The types and designs of these studies vary considerably, but in general they can ...

  5. ANIMAL MODELS FOR STUDYING MISCARRIAGE: ILLUSTRATION WITH STUDY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal models for studying miscarriage: Illustration with study of drinking water disinfection by-products
    Authors & affiliations:
    Narotsky1, M.G. and S. Bielmeier Laffan2.
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Tri...

  6. HALONITROMETHANE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND MAMMALIAN CELL CYTOTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halonitromethanes are drinking water disinfection by-products that have recently received a high priority for health effects research from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Our purpose was to identify and synthesize where necessary the mixed halonitromethanes and to deter...

  7. THE NEXT GENERATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS AND HEALTH ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  8. Type of disinfectant in drinking water and patterns of mortality in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Zierler, S.; Danley, R.A.; Feingold, L.

    1986-11-01

    Chlorination has been the major strategy for disinfection of drinking water in the United States. Concern about the potential health effects of the reaction by-products of chlorine has prompted use of alternative strategies. One such method is chloramination, a treatment process that does not appear to have carcinogenic by-product, but may have less potent biocidal activity than chlorination. The authors examined the patterns of mortality of residents in Massachusetts who died between 1969 and 1983 and lived in communities using drinking water that was disinfected either by chlorine or chloramine. Comparison of type of disinfectant among 51,645 cases of deaths due to selected cancer sites and 214,998 controls who died from cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or pulmonary disease, or from lymphatic cancer showed small variation in the patterns of mortality. Bladder cancer was moderately associated with residence at death in a chlorinated community in a logistic regression analysis using controls who die from lymphatic cancer. A slight excess of deaths from pneumonia and influenza was observed in communities whose residents drink chloraminated water compared to residents from chlorinated communities, as well as to all Massachusetts residents. These results are intended to be preliminary and crude descriptions of the relationship under study. The serious potential for misclassification of exposure status and errors in death certificate classification of cause of death affect the interpretability of the overall evidence that patterns of mortality are similar according to disinfectant in drinking water.

  9. HALONITROMETHANE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND MAMMALIAN CELL CYTOTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halonitromethanes are drinking water disinfection by-products that have recently received a high priority for health effects research from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Our purpose was to identify and synthesize where necessary the mixed halonitromethanes and to deter...

  10. REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade many toxicologic studies have addressed the potential for disinfection byproducts of drinking water to elicit alterations on the reproductive system and fetal development.
    The types and designs of these studies vary considerably, but in general they can ...

  11. ANIMAL MODELS FOR STUDYING MISCARRIAGE: ILLUSTRATION WITH STUDY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal models for studying miscarriage: Illustration with study of drinking water disinfection by-products
    Authors & affiliations:
    Narotsky1, M.G. and S. Bielmeier Laffan2.
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Tri...

  12. SURVEY OF HALONITROMETHANES AND IODOMETHANES: DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project involves the study of two classes of chemicals, halonitromethanes and iodomethanes, which have been found to be drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Both have been predicted to have toxicity. In toxicity screening tests, bromonitromethanes have been shown ...

  13. TRIBROMOPYRROLE, BROMINATED ACIDS, AND OTHER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS PRODUCED BY DISINFECTION OF DRINKING WATER RICH IN BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), we investigated the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from high bromide waters (2 mg/L) treated with chlorine or chlorine dioxide used in combination with chlorine and chloramines. This study represents the first comp...

  14. TRIBROMOPYRROLE, BROMINATED ACIDS, AND OTHER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS PRODUCED BY DISINFECTION OF DRINKING WATER RICH IN BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), we investigated the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from high bromide waters (2 mg/L) treated with chlorine or chlorine dioxide used in combination with chlorine and chloramines. This study represents the first comp...

  15. Transformation of pharmaceuticals during oxidation/disinfection processes in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Postigo, Cristina; Richardson, Susan D

    2014-08-30

    Pharmaceuticals are emerging contaminants of concern and are widespread in the environment. While the levels of these substances in finished drinking waters are generally considered too low for human health concern, there are now concerns about their disinfection by-products (DBPs) that can form during drinking water treatment, which in some cases have been proven to be more toxic than the parent compounds. The present manuscript reviews the transformation products of pharmaceuticals generated in water during different disinfection processes, i.e. chlorination, ozonation, chloramination, chlorine dioxide, UV, and UV/hydrogen peroxide, and the main reaction pathways taking place. Most of the findings considered for this review come from controlled laboratory studies involving reactions of pharmaceuticals with these oxidants used in drinking water treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Elmaksoud, Sherif Abd; Patel, Nikita; Maxwell, Sherri L; Sifuentes, Laura Y; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-05-01

    Household bleach is typically used as a disinfectant for water in times of emergencies and by those engaging in recreational activities such as camping or rafting. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend a concentration of free chlorine of 1 mg/L for 30 minutes, or about 0.75 mL (1/8 teaspoon) of household bleach per gallon of water. The goal of the study described in this article was to assess two household bleach products to kill waterborne bacteria and viruses using the test procedures in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Guide Standard and Protocol for Testing Microbiological Purifiers. Bleach was found to meet these requirements in waters of low turbidity and organic matter. While the test bacterium was reduced by six logs in high turbid and organic-laden waters, the test viruses were reduced only by one-half to one log. In such waters greater chlorine doses or contact times are needed to achieve greater reduction of viruses.

  17. Metabolism and pharmacokinetics of alternate drinking water disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, M S; Couri, D; Bull, R J

    1982-12-01

    The chlorination of surface waters is known to elevate trihalomethanes; consequently, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is being considered as an alternative disinfectant. The primary products resulting from ClO2 disinfection of waters are chlorites (ClO2-) and chlorates (ClO3-). Studies in rats revealed that ClO2 is converted to chloride (Cl-), ClO2- and ClO3-. ClO2- and ClO3- are excreted as Cl-, ClO2- and Cl-, ClO2-, ClO3-, respectively. Radioactivity was rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract following the administration of 36ClO2 orally, and the half-life for the elimination of 36Cl from the rat was 44 hr, corresponding to a rate constant of 0.016/hr. After 72 hr, radioactivity was highest in plasma, followed by kidney, lung, and stomach. 36Cl in plasma reached a peak at 2 hr and 1 hr after oral administration of 36ClO2- and 36ClO3-, respectively. 36Cl excretion was greatest 24 hr after the administration of 36ClO3-, but in the case of 36ClO2-, the excretion probably represented saturation of the biotransformation and excretion pathway. A low activity in packed cells compared to plasma was detected in chlorate ingestion, rather than an even distribution in chlorite treatment. Chloroform determinations in rat blood after one year indicated that chloroform was significantly higher than control in the 100 and 1000 mg/l. ClO2 groups. However, no significant values were observed in the 1 or 10 mg/l. ClO2 and ClO2 metabolites groups. ClO2 and its metabolites are eliminated from the body more rapidly than chlorine, and they do not appear to increase trihalomethane concentrations at low dosages.

  18. Reducing diarrhoea in Guatemalan children: randomized controlled trial of flocculant-disinfectant for drinking-water.

    PubMed Central

    Chiller, Tom M.; Mendoza, Carlos E.; Lopez, M. Beatriz; Alvarez, Maricruz; Hoekstra, Robert M.; Keswick, Bruce H.; Luby, Stephen P.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of a new point-of-use treatment for drinking-water, a commercially developed flocculant-disinfectant, on the prevalence of diarrhoea in children. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial among 514 rural Guatemalan households, divided into 42 neighbourhood clusters, for 13 weeks, from 4 November 2002 through 31 January 2003. Clusters assigned to water treatment with the flocculant-disinfectant were compared with those using their usual water-handling practices. The longitudinal prevalence of diarrhoea was calculated as the proportion of total days with diarrhoea divided by the total number of days of observation. The prevalence of diarrhoea was compared using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. FINDINGS: The 1702 people in households receiving the disinfectant had a prevalence of diarrhoea that was 40% lower than that among the 1699 people using standard water-handling practices (0.9% versus 1.5%; P = 0.001). In households using the flocculant-disinfectant, children < 1 year of age had a 39% lower prevalence of diarrhoea than those in households using their standard practices (3.7% versus 6.0%; P = 0.005). CONCLUSION: In settings where families rarely treat drinking-water, we introduced a novel flocculant-disinfectant that reduced the longitudinal prevalence of diarrhoea, especially among children aged < 1 year, among whom diarrhoea has been strongly associated with mortality. Successful introduction and use of this product could contribute to preventing diarrhoeal disease globally. PMID:16501712

  19. Evidence that monochloramine disinfectant could lead to elevated Pb levels in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Jay A; Rajasekharan, Vishnu V; Boonsalee, Sansanee; Kulp, Elizabeth A; Bohannan, Eric W

    2006-05-15

    Many water districts have recently shifted from free chlorine (in the form of HOCl/OCl-) to monochloramine (NH2-Cl) as a disinfectant for drinking water to lower the concentration of chlorinated hydrocarbon byproducts in the water. There is concern that the use of NH2Cl disinfectant may lead to higher Pb levels in drinking water. In this study, the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance is used to compare the effects of these two disinfectants on the dissolution of Pb films. A 0.5 microm thick Pb film nearly completely dissolves in a NH2Cl solution, but it is passivated in a HOCl/OCl- solution. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the NH2Cl oxidizes Pb to Pb(II) species such as Pb3-(OH)2(CO3)2, whereas the stronger oxidant, HOCl/OCl-, oxidizes Pb to Pb(IV) as an insoluble PbO2 conversion coating. Although NH2Cl may produce less halogenated organic byproducts than HOCl/OCl- when used as a disinfectant, it may lead to increased Pb levels in drinking water.

  20. Formation and modeling of disinfection by-products in drinking water of six cities in China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bixiong; Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Linsheng; Wei, Jianrong; E, Xueli

    2011-05-01

    Water quality parameters including TOC, UV(254), pH, chlorine dosage, bromide concentration and disinfection by-products were measured in water samples from 41 water treatment plants of six selected cities in China. Chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid were the major disinfection by-products in the drinking water of China. Bromoform and dibromoacetic acid were also detected in many water samples. Higher concentrations of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were measured in summer compared to winter. The geographical variations in DBPs showed that TTHM levels were higher in Zhengzhou and Tianjin than other selected cities. And the HAA5 levels were highest in Changsha and Tianjin. The modeling procedure that predicts disinfection by-products formation was studied and developed using artificial neural networks. The performance of the artificial neural networks model was excellent (r > 0.84).

  1. Chloramines in Drinking Water

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chloramines are disinfectants used to treat drinking water. Chloramines are most commonly formed when ammonia is added to chlorine to treat drinking water. Chloramines provide longer-lasting disinfection as the water moves through pipes to consumers.

  2. Disinfection aboard cruise liners and naval units: formation of disinfection by-products using chlorine dioxide in different qualities of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ufermann, Petra; Petersen, Hauke; Exner, Martin

    2011-12-01

    The world-wide deployment of cruise liners and naval units has caused an increased need for the disinfection of drinking water. The main cause for this is the unknown quality of drinking water in foreign harbours--besides the formation of bio-films due to the climatically disadvantageous conditions in the operational area. Water conduits on board are currently disinfected with calcium hypochlorite in case of microbiological contamination. Chemical and physical analyses after disinfection with calcium hypochlorite have shown that organic by-products consisting of trihalomethanes develop in considerable amounts during disinfection. Furthermore, the method is susceptible to handling errors and thus often leads to insufficient disinfection results. Hitherto, the use of other disinfection methods allowed by government regulations, especially chlorine dioxide, is not widely spread. Unlike disinfection with calcium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide does not lead to the formation of trihalomethanes. Typical disinfection by-products (DBP) are the anions chlorite and chlorate, which are formed in oxidative processes. The formation conditions of these anions have not yet been elucidated. For this reason, the probability of the generation of inorganic by-products after disinfection with chlorine dioxide has been determined, and their occurrence in drinking water on board has been examined with respect to a possible correlation between water quality and the formation of chlorate and chlorite. Therefore, a chromatographic method was developed and validated in order to determine the periodical development of chlorate and chlorite from chorine dioxide in purified water at different pH-values as well as in actual drinking water samples from water conduits on board. The formation of the by-products chlorite and chlorate after disinfection with chlorine dioxide is influenced neither by pH-value nor by chemical properties of the disinfected water. Considering the examined conditions

  3. Genotoxicity of drinking water treated with different disinfectants and effects of disinfection conditions detected by umu-test.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xuebiao; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Qing

    2017-06-01

    The genotoxicity of drinking water treated with 6 disinfection methods and the effects of disinfection conditions were investigated using the umu-test. The pretreatment procedure of samples for the umu-test was optimized for drinking water analysis. The results of the umu-test were in good correlation with those of the Ames-test. The genotoxicity and production of haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the highest for chlorinated samples. UV+chloramination is the safest disinfection method from the aspects of genotoxicity, HAA production and inactivation effects. For chloramination, the effects of the mass ratio of Cl2 to N of chloramine on genotoxicity were also studied. The changes of genotoxicity were different from those of HAA production, which implied that HAA production cannot represent the genotoxic potential of water. The genotoxicity per chlorine decay of chlorination and chloramination had similar trends, indicating that the reaction of organic matters and chlorine made a great contribution to the genotoxicity. The results of this study are of engineering significance for optimizing the operation of waterworks. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Immunotoxicologic evaluation of chlorine-based drinking water disinfectants, sodium hypochlorite and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Exon, J H; Koller, L D; O'Reilly, C A; Bercz, J P

    1987-06-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to chlorine-based disinfectants in the drinking water from weaning to 12 weeks of age, at which time they were terminated and assessed for immune competence. Chlorine-based drinking water disinfectants used were sodium hypochlorite (5, 15 and 30 ppm) and monochloramine (9, 19 and 38 ppm). Parameters of immunity measured were spleen and thymus weights, antibody production, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions, natural killer cell (NKC) cytotoxicity, oxidative metabolism response (i.e chemiluminescence-CL) and phagocytosis by macrophages, and production of 2 immunoregulatory cytokines, interleukin 2 (IL2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) reductions of spleen weight, DTH reactions, and oxidative metabolism by macrophages were observed only in groups of rats exposed to high levels (30 ppm) of sodium hypochlorite, while PGE2 production was elevated. Rats exposed to the higher doses of monochloramine had reduced spleen weights (38 ppm), decreased antibody synthesis (9 and 19 ppm) and augmented PGE2 production (19 and 38 ppm). These results extend the earlier observations of others that macrophage function of laboratory rodents may be impaired by exposure to high concentrations of chlorinated drinking water. Furthermore, the function of other major populations of immunocytes and types of immune responses may also be altered following subchronic exposure to high concentrations of chlorinated drinking water. These types of effects on the immune system are a previously unrecognized potential side-effect of the ubiquitous practice of disinfection of water with chlorine compounds. Alteration of immune function of chlorine-based disinfectant-exposed rats in this study was only evident at relatively high doses, and only selected immune responses were altered. It appears, therefore, that these chlorine-based disinfectants are not particularly strong immunodepressants. However, further studies in

  5. Effect of solar disinfection on viability of intestinal protozoa in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Gaafar, Maha R

    2007-04-01

    The effect of solar disinfection on the viability of intestinal protozoa Giardia lamblia, Microsporidia sp., Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cyatenensis and Entamoeba histolytica in drinking water was studied as compared to chlorine disinfection. The protozoa were collected from stool samples, to infect to the distilled water. Chlorinated water samples were prepared at concentration of 4 ppm, and the parasites were incubated overnight at room temperature with the treated water. Sun treatment was applied for 2 exposures (6 & 24 hrs), in summer and winter. Sun treated water samples were put in tubes and exposed to sun. The 2 disinfection methods were tested in plastic and glass test tubes. Parasites viability was assessed by viability assay using trypan blue stain (0.4%), and bioassay infectivity tests in experimentally laboratory bred mice. Results proved that all parasites' viability was not affected by chlorine, following solar disinfection treatment, parasites became dark blue in colour and deformed by trypan blue stain. High parasites death was recorded for all parasites except Microsporidia sp. Bioassay infectivity test showed a statistically significant reduction in mean number of all parasites in intestinal sections compared to controls. The best results were tubes exposure to sun for 24 hrs in summer, where G. lamblia, C. parvum and C. cyatenensis were inactivated or absence in intestinal sections. No statistically significant difference was between the use of plastic and glass tubes, either in chlorine or sun treated parasites. So, solar disinfection proved a simple, cheap and effective means for improving water for human use, particularly in developing countries.

  6. ORD'S FOUR LAB STUDY: TOXICOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL EVALUATION OF COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfectants used in the production of drinking water react with naturally occurring organic and inorganic material in the source water to produce disinfection by-products (DBPs). Humans are exposed daily to a complex mixture of DBPs via oral, dermal, and inhalation routes. To ...

  7. ORD'S FOUR LAB STUDY: TOXICOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL EVALUATION OF COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfectants used in the production of drinking water react with naturally occurring organic and inorganic material in the source water to produce disinfection by-products (DBPs). Humans are exposed daily to a complex mixture of DBPs via oral, dermal, and inhalation routes. To ...

  8. Evaluation of an Innovative Approach to Validation of Ultraviolet (UV) Reactors for Disinfection in Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens found in source waters with the potential as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. For surface and groundwater sourced drinking water applications, the U.S. Environmental...

  9. Evaluation of an Innovative Approach to Validation of Ultraviolet (UV) Reactors for Disinfection in Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV disinfection is an effective process for inactivating many microbial pathogens found in source waters with the potential as stand-alone treatment or in combination with other disinfectants. For surface and groundwater sourced drinking water applications, the U.S. Environmental...

  10. Drinking Water Disinfection by In-line Electrolysis: Product and Inorganic By-Product Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, M. E. Henry

    This section covers peculiarities of so-called in-line electrolysis when drinking water is electrolysed to produce disinfection species killing microorganisms. Mainly mixed oxide electrodes (MIO) based on IrO2 and/or RuO2 coatings and boron-doped diamond electrodes were used in the studies. Artificial and real drinking water systems were electrolysed in continuous and discontinuous operating mode, varying water composition, current density and electrode materials. Results show, besides the ability of producing active chlorine, risks of inorganic disinfection by-products (DBPs) such as chlorate, perchlorate, nitrite, ammonium, chloramines, hydrogen peroxide and others. DBPs are responsible for analysis errors using DPD method for active chlorine measurements. Geometry may influence by-product yield. As a conclusion, the necessity of developing test routines for practical cell applications must be underlined.

  11. Response of Simulated Drinking Water Biofilm Mechanical and Structural Properties to Long-Term Disinfectant Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Huang, Conghui; Monroy, Guillermo L; Janjaroen, Dao; Derlon, Nicolas; Lin, Jie; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-02-16

    Mechanical and structural properties of biofilms influence the accumulation and release of pathogens in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS). Thus, understanding how long-term residual disinfectants exposure affects biofilm mechanical and structural properties is a necessary aspect for pathogen risk assessment and control. In this study, elastic modulus and structure of groundwater biofilms was monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) during three months of exposure to monochloramine or free chlorine. After the first month of disinfectant exposure, the mean stiffness of monochloramine- or free-chlorine-treated biofilms was 4 to 9 times higher than those before treatment. Meanwhile, the biofilm thickness decreased from 120 ± 8 μm to 93 ± 6-107 ± 11 μm. The increased surface stiffness and decreased biofilm thickness within the first month of disinfectant exposure was presumably due to the consumption of biomass. However, by the second to third month during disinfectant exposure, the biofilm mean stiffness showed a 2- to 4-fold decrease, and the biofilm thickness increased to 110 ± 7-129 ± 8 μm, suggesting that the biofilms adapted to disinfectant exposure. After three months of the disinfectant exposure process, the disinfected biofilms showed 2-5 times higher mean stiffness (as determined by AFM) and 6-13-fold higher ratios of protein over polysaccharide, as determined by differential staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), than the nondisinfected groundwater biofilms. However, the disinfected biofilms and nondisinfected biofilms showed statistically similar thicknesses (t test, p > 0.05), suggesting that long-term disinfection may not significantly remove net biomass. This study showed how biofilm mechanical and structural properties vary in response to a complex DWDS environment, which will contribute to further research on the risk assessment and control of biofilm-associated-pathogens in DWDS.

  12. Batch process solar disinfection is an efficient means of disinfecting drinking water contaminated with Shigella dysenteriae type I.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, S C; Barer, M R; Devlin, L O; McGuigan, K G

    2004-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity rate caused by Shigella dysenteriae type I infection is increasing in the developing world each year. In this paper, the possibility of using batch process solar disinfection (SODIS) as an effective means of disinfecting drinking water contaminated with Sh. dysenteriae type I is investigated. Phosphate-buffered saline contaminated with Sh. dysenteriae type I was exposed to simulated solar conditions and the inactivation kinetics of this organism was compared with that of Sh. flexneri, Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella typhimurium. Recovery of injured Sh. dysenteriae type I may be improved by plating on medium supplemented with catalase or pyruvate. Sh. dysenteriae type I is very sensitive to batch process SODIS and is easily inactivated even during overcast conditions. Batch process SODIS is an appropriate intervention for use in developing countries during Sh. dysenteriae type I epidemics.

  13. Gestational and lactational effects in rats of sodium, sulfate, and concentrated disinfection by-products in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and animal toxicity studies have raised concerns regarding possible adverse health effects of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water (DW). Because many DBPs are unidentified, we sought to evaluate DW concentrates. In preparation for a multigenerational ...

  14. MUTAGENICITY IN SALMONELLA OF HALONITROMETHANES: A RECENTLY RECOGNIZED CLASS OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halonitromethanes (HNMs) are a recently identified class of disinfection by-products in drinking water. They include chloronitromethane (CHN), dichloronitromethane (DCNM), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), bromonitromethane (BNM), dibromonitromethane (DBNM), tribromonitromethane (TBN...

  15. Gestational and lactational effects in rats of sodium, sulfate, and concentrated disinfection by-products in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and animal toxicity studies have raised concerns regarding possible adverse health effects of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water (DW). Because many DBPs are unidentified, we sought to evaluate DW concentrates. In preparation for a multigenerational ...

  16. GESTATIONAL AND LACTATIONAL EFFECTS IN RATS OF SODIUM, SULFATE, AND CONCENTRATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and animal toxicity studies have raised concerns regarding possible adverse health effects of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water (DW). Because many DBPs are unidentified, we sought to evaluate DW concentrates. In preparation for a multigenerational ...

  17. Acceptability of solar disinfection of drinking water treatment in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Rochelle C; Harding, Anna K

    2005-10-01

    This research examines the acceptability of solar disinfection of drinking water (SODIS) in a village in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, using constructs from the Health Belief Model as a framework to identify local understandings of water, sanitation and health issues. There has been no published research on the acceptability of SODIS in household testing in Nepal. Understanding the context of water and water purity in Nepalese villages is essential to identify culturally appropriate interventions to improve the quality of drinking water and health. Forty households from the village census list were randomly selected and the senior woman in each household was asked to participate. Baseline data on water sources and behaviors were collected in March 2002, followed by training in SODIS. Follow-up data were collected in June and July 2002. Only 9% of households routinely adopted SODIS. Participants mentioned the benefit of treating water to reduce stomach ailments, but this did not outweigh the perceived barriers of heavy domestic and agricultural workloads, other cultural barriers, uncertainty about the necessity of treating the water, and lack of knowledge that untreated drinking water causes diarrhea. Strategies for developing safe water systems must include public health education about waterborne diseases, source water protection, and a motivational component to achieve implementation and sustained use. In addition, other options for disinfecting water should be provided, given the women's work constraints and low level of formal education.

  18. Assessing microbiological water quality in drinking water distribution systems with disinfectant residual using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Simon; Lipphaus, Patrick; Green, James; Parsons, Simon; Weir, Paul; Juskowiak, Kes; Jefferson, Bruce; Jarvis, Peter; Nocker, Andreas

    2014-11-15

    Flow cytometry (FCM) as a diagnostic tool for enumeration and characterization of microorganisms is rapidly gaining popularity and is increasingly applied in the water industry. In this study we applied the method to obtain a better understanding of total and intact cell concentrations in three different drinking water distribution systems (one using chlorine and two using chloramines as secondary disinfectants). Chloramine tended to result in lower proportions of intact cells than chlorine over a wider residual range, in agreement with existing knowledge that chloramine suppresses regrowth more efficiently. For chlorinated systems, free chlorine concentrations above 0.5 mg L(-1) were found to be associated with relatively low proportions of intact cells, whereas lower disinfectant levels could result in substantially higher percentages of intact cells. The threshold for chlorinated systems is in good agreement with guidelines from the World Health Organization. The fact that the vast majority of samples failing the regulatory coliform standard also showed elevated proportions of intact cells suggests that this parameter might be useful for evaluating risk of failure. Another interesting parameter for judging the microbiological status of water, the biological regrowth potential, greatly varied among different finished waters providing potential help for investment decisions. For its measurement, a simple method was introduced that can easily be performed by water utilities with FCM capability.

  19. Formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in 10 chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water supply systems.

    PubMed

    Liew, Deborah; Linge, Kathryn L; Joll, Cynthia A

    2016-09-01

    The presence of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) in drinking water supplies is a public health concern, particularly since some N-DBPs have been reported to be more toxic than the regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. In this paper, a comprehensive evaluation of the presence of N-DBPs in 10 drinking water supply systems in Western Australia is presented. A suite of 28 N-DBPs, including N-nitrosamines, haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloacetamides (HAAms) and halonitromethanes (HNMs), were measured and evaluated for relationships with bulk parameters in the waters before disinfection. A number of N-DBPs were frequently detected in disinfected waters, although at generally low concentrations (<10 ng/L for N-nitrosamines and <10 μg/L for other N-DBPs) and below health guideline values where they exist. While there were no clear relationships between N-DBP formation and organic nitrogen in the pre-disinfection water, N-DBP concentrations were significantly correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and ammonia, and these, in addition to high bromide in one of the waters, led to elevated concentrations of brominated HANs (26.6 μg/L of dibromoacetonitrile). There were significant differences in the occurrence of all classes of N-DBPs between chlorinated and chloraminated waters, except for HNMs, which were detected at relatively low concentrations in both water types. Trends observed in one large distribution system suggest that N-DBPs can continue to form or degrade within distribution systems, and redosing of disinfectant may cause further by-product formation.

  20. Occurrence and Comparative Toxicity of Haloacetaldehyde Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Clara H; Postigo, Cristina; Richardson, Susan D; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Kimura, Susana Y; Mariñas, Benito J; Barcelo, Damia; Liang, Pei; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of drinking water disinfection greatly reduced waterborne diseases. However, the reaction between disinfectants and natural organic matter in the source water leads to an unintended consequence, the formation of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs). The haloacetaldehydes (HALs) are the third largest group by weight of identified DBPs in drinking water. The primary objective of this study was to analyze the occurrence and comparative toxicity of the emerging HAL DBPs. A new HAL DBP, iodoacetaldehyde (IAL) was identified. This study provided the first systematic, quantitative comparison of HAL toxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rank order of HAL cytotoxicity is tribromoacetaldehyde (TBAL) ≈ chloroacetaldehyde (CAL) > dibromoacetaldehyde (DBAL) ≈ bromochloroacetaldehyde (BCAL) ≈ dibromochloroacetaldehyde (DBCAL) > IAL > bromoacetaldehyde (BAL) ≈ bromodichloroacetaldehyde (BDCAL) > dichloroacetaldehyde (DCAL) > trichloroacetaldehyde (TCAL). The HALs were highly cytotoxic compared to other DBP chemical classes. The rank order of HAL genotoxicity is DBAL > CAL ≈ DBCAL > TBAL ≈ BAL > BDCAL>BCAL ≈ DCAL>IAL. TCAL was not genotoxic. Because of their toxicity and abundance, further research is needed to investigate their mode of action to protect the public health and the environment.

  1. [Study for distribution level of disinfection byproducts in drinking water from six cities in China].

    PubMed

    Deng, Ying; Wei, Jianrong; E, Xueli; Wang, Wuyi; et al

    2008-03-01

    To find the distribution level and geographical variations of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. The samples were selected from water utilities in six cities (Daqing, Beijing, Tianjin, Zhengzhou, Changsha and Shenzhen) of China. The water source and technology of water treatment were investigated and the indices including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) in main DBPs and natural organic materials (NOM), pH, chlorine dosage and temperature were determined. In six cities the highest concentrations of TTHMs and THAAs in the distribution system were 92.8 microg/L and 40.0 microg/L, respectively. The concentration of every compound of THMs and HAAs was under the limit of standards for drinking water quality, but the concentrations of 'TTHMs at some samples were higher than the maximum acceptable level (MAC) defined by standards for drinking water quality. The geographical variations of THMs and HAAs in six cities were Zhengzhou > Tianjin > Daqing > Beijing > Shenzhen > Changsha and Changsha > Tianjin > Shenzhen > Daqing > Zhengzhou > Beijing, respectively. The levels of THMs of drinking water at Tianjin and Zhengzhou were higher than the others and the levels of HAAs of drinking water at Changsha, Tianjin and Shenzhen were higher than the others. The seasonal variations of both groups of THMs and HAAs were high in summer and low in winter. The pollution level of DBPs in drinking water from Chinese six cities were low. The concentration of DBPs related to seasonal. THMs distributed mainly to the North and HAAs distributed mainly to the South.

  2. Seasonal evaluation of disinfection by-products throughout two full-scale drinking water treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Cui, Chongwei; Yu, Shuili

    2017-07-01

    Carbonyl compounds can occur alpha-hydrogens or beta-diketones substitution reactions with disinfectants contributed to halogenated by-products formation. The objective of this research was to study the occurrence and fate of carbonyl compounds as ozonation by-products at two full-scale drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) using different disinfectants for one year. The quality of the raw water used in both plants was varied according to the season. The higher carbonyl compounds concentrations were found in raw water in spring. Up to 15 (as the sum of both DWTPs) of the 24 carbonyl compounds selected for this work were found after disinfection. The dominant carbonyl compounds were formaldehyde, glyoxal, methyl-glyoxal, fumaric, benzoic, protocatechuic and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid at both DWTPs. In the following steps in each treatment plant, the concentration patterns of these carbonyl compounds differed depending on the type of disinfectant applied. Benzaldehyde was the only aromatic aldehyde detected after oxidation with ozone in spring. As compared with DWTP 1, five new carbonyl compounds were formed (crotonaldehyde, benzaldehyde, formic, oxalic and malonic acid) disinfection by ozone, and the levels of the carbonyl compounds increased. In addition, pre-ozonation (PO) and main ozonation (OZ) increased the levels of carbonyl compounds, however coagulation/flocculation (CF), sand filtration (SF) and granular activated carbon filtration (GAC) decreased the levels of carbonyl compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solar disinfection of drinking water and diarrhoea in Maasai children: a controlled field trial.

    PubMed

    Conroy, R M; Elmore-Meegan, M; Joyce, T; McGuigan, K G; Barnes, J

    During December 1995-March 1996 in Kajiado Province, Kenya, 206 Maasai children, 5-16 years old, whose drinking water was contaminated with fecal coliform bacteria, were assigned 1.5 liter plastic bottles in which to store their drinking water. These bottles were re-used commercial table water bottles. The families of the children had only community sources for drinking water: 2 open water-holes and 1 tank fed from a piped supply. These water sources were not suited to chlorination. Scarce fuel and indoor air pollution precluded boiling water inside the hut. In the presence of their mothers, 108 children (the solar group) were told to fill the bottles with water at dawn, leave them in full sunlight on the roofs of their homes, and wait until midday before drinking from the bottles. The remaining 98 children (the control group) were told to leave the bottles in their homes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of solar disinfection on diarrheal disease in these Maasai children. Over a 12-week period, children in the solar group suffered fewer diarrhea episodes than those in the control group (4.1 vs. 4.5; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.66). They also were less likely to have diarrhea episodes severe enough to prevent them from doing their chores (1.7 vs. 2.3; AOR = 0.65). These findings suggest that solar disinfection of water may reduce diarrhea in communities with no access to other means of disinfection.

  4. Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Disinfection of Drinking Waters by Chlorination and Ozonation/Postchlorination Treatment Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes disinfection of the same source water by two commonly used disinfection treatment scenarios for purposes of subsequent concentration, chemical analysis, and toxicological evaluation. Accompanying articles in this issue of the Journal of Toxicology and Envir...

  5. Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Disinfection of Drinking Waters by Chlorination and Ozonation/Postchlorination Treatment Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes disinfection of the same source water by two commonly used disinfection treatment scenarios for purposes of subsequent concentration, chemical analysis, and toxicological evaluation. Accompanying articles in this issue of the Journal of Toxicology and Envir...

  6. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  7. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  8. THE ROLE OF GC-MS AND LC-MS IN THE DISCOVERY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has played a pivotal role in the discovery of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. DBPs are formed when disinfectants, such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide or chloramine, react with natural organic matter in the wate...

  9. THE ROLE OF GC/MS AND LC/MS IN THE DISCOVERY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has played a pivotal role in the discovery of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. DBPs are formed when disinfectants, such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramine, react with natural organic matter in the ...

  10. The occurrence of disinfection by-products in the drinking water of Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Golfinopoulos, Spyros K; Nikolaou, Anastasia D; Lekkas, Themistokles D

    2003-01-01

    Application of chlorination for the disinfection of drinking water results in the formation of a wide range of organic compounds, called disinfection by-products (DBPs), which occur due to the reaction of chlorine with natural organic materials. The occurrence of DBPs was studied in samples from four drinking-water treatment plants (WTPs) and from the distribution network of Athens, Greece. Twenty-four compounds, which belong to different categories of DBPs, were monitored, including trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloketones (HAKs), chloral hydrate (CH) and chloropicrin (CP). Sampling was performed monthly for a period of two years, from three different points at each WTP and from eight points atthe distribution network. Samples were analyzed by GC-ECD methods, which included pretreatment with liquid-liquid extraction for volatile DBPs and acidic methanol esterification for HAAs. The results of the analyses have shown the presence of disinfection by-products belonging to all categories studied in all water samples collected after prechlorination. The major categories of DBPs detected were THMs and HAAs, while the other volatile DBPs occurred at lower concentrations. The concentrations of DBPs did not in any case exceed the maximum contaminant levels (MCL) set by USEPA and WHO. However, monitoring these compounds needs to be continued, because their levels could increase due to changes in the quality of water entering the water treatment plants. Reduction of the concentrations of DBPs could be achieved by optimization of the chlorination conditions, taking into account the effect of time. Moreover, research on alternative disinfection methods (e.g. ozone, chlorine dioxide, chloramines) and their by-products should be conducted to evaluate their applicability in the case of the drinking water of Greece.

  11. Evaluation of bactericidal efficacy of silver ions on Escherichia coli for drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Satya P; Gopal, K

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is the development of a suitable process for the disinfection of drinking water by evaluating bactericidal efficacy of silver ions from silver electrodes. A prototype of a silver ioniser with silver electrodes and control unit has been fabricated. Silver ions from silver electrodes in water samples were estimated with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. A fresh culture of Escherichia coli (1.75 × 10(3) c.f.u./ml) was exposed to 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 ppb of silver ions in 100 ml of autoclaved tap water for 60 min. The effect of different pH and temperatures on bactericidal efficacy was observed at constant silver ion concentration (5 ppb) and contact time of 30 min. The maximum bactericidal activity (100%) was observed at 20 ppb of silver ion concentration indicating total disinfection after 20 min while minimum bactericidal activity (25%) was observed after 10 min at 01 ppb of silver ions. Likewise, 100% bactericidal activity was noticed with 2, 5 and 10 ppb of silver ions after 60, 50 and 40 min, respectively. Bactericidal activity at pH 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 was observed at 79.9%, 79.8%, 80.5%, 100% and 100%, respectively, whereas it was 80.4%, 88.3%, 100%, 100% and 100% at 10°C, 20°C, 30°C, 40°C and 50°C, respectively. The findings of this study revealed that very low concentrations of silver ions at pH 8-9 and temperature >20°C have bactericidal efficacy for total disinfection of drinking water. Silver ionisation is suitable for water disinfection and an appropriate alternative to chlorination which forms carcinogenic disinfection by-products.

  12. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated drinking-water disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloaretic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown.OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs ...

  13. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated drinking-water disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloaretic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown.OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs ...

  14. THE COMBINED CARCINOGENIC RISK FOR EXPOSURE TO MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS MAY BE LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Combined Carcinogenic Risk for Exposure to Mixtures of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products May be Less Than Additive

    Risk assessment methods for chemical mixtures in drinking water are not well defined. Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume...

  15. THE COMBINED CARCINOGENIC RISK FOR EXPOSURE TO MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS MAY BE LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Combined Carcinogenic Risk for Exposure to Mixtures of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products May be Less Than Additive

    Risk assessment methods for chemical mixtures in drinking water are not well defined. Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume...

  16. Feasibility of the silver-UV process for drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Butkus, Michael A; Talbot, Mark; Labare, Michael P

    2005-12-01

    A synergistic effect between cationic silver and UV radiation (silver-UV disinfection) has been observed that can appreciably enhance inactivation of viruses. The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of this technique for drinking water disinfection and evaluate the effects of selected impurities, found in fresh water, and common parameters on inactivation of the coliphage MS-2 with the silver-UV process. Turbidity (kaolin), calcium hardness, carbonate alkalinity, and pH did not significantly degrade inactivation. Inactivation was reduced in the presence of chloride, at concentrations greater than 30 mg/L, and in water samples with UV-254 absorbance values greater than ca. 0.1 cm(-1). Inactivation of MS-2 with silver-UV disinfection was also reduced at high phosphate concentrations (above ca. 5 mM). Silver-UV inactivation of MS-2 increased with increases in temperature between 10 and 20 degrees C. Silver-UV inactivation of MS-2 was increased by greater than 1-log over UV alone, in two untreated fresh water sources, which indicates that silver-UV may be a viable treatment technology. An assessment of operation and management costs suggests that an increase in inactivation of MS-2 with silver-UV disinfection could be economically beneficial.

  17. Effect of drinking water disinfection by-products in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aftab; Kurzawa-Zegota, Malgorzata; Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Gopalan, Rajendran C; Plewa, Michael J; Anderson, Diana

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated by the chemical disinfection of water and may pose hazards to public health. Two major classes of DBPs are found in finished drinking water: haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs). HAAs are formed following disinfection with chlorine, which reacts with iodide and bromide in the water. Previously the HAAs were shown to be cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic. To determine the effect of HAAs in human somatic and germ cells and whether oxidative stress is involved in genotoxic action. In the present study both somatic and germ cells have been examined as peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm. The effects of three HAA compounds: iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA) and chloroacetic acid (CAA) were investigated. After determining appropriate concentration responses, oxygen radical involvement with the antioxidants, butylated hydroxanisole (BHA) and the enzyme catalase, were investigated in the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay under alkaline conditions, >pH 13 and the micronucleus assay. In the Comet assay, BHA and catalase were able to reduce DNA damage in each cell type compared to HAA alone. In the micronucleus assay, micronuclei (MNi) were found in peripheral lymphocytes exposed to all three HAAs and catalase and BHA were in general, able to reduce MNi induction, suggesting oxygen radicals play a role in both assays. These observations are of concern to public health since both human somatic and germ cells show similar genotoxic responses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. New chlorinated amphetamine-type-stimulants disinfection-by-products formed during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Fontela, Maria; Pineda, Oriol; Ventura, Francesc; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2012-06-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated high removal rates of amphetamine-type-stimulants (ATSs) through conventional drinking water treatments; however the behaviour of these compounds through disinfection steps and their transformation into disinfection-by-products (DBPs) is still unknown. In this work, for the first time, the reactivity of some ATSs such as amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) with chlorine has been investigated under simulated and real drinking water treatment conditions in order to evaluate their ability to give rise to transformation products. Two new DBPs from these illicit drugs have been found. A common chlorinated-by-product (3-chlorobenzo)-1,3-dioxole, was identified for both MDA and MDEA while for MDMA, 3-chlorocatechol was found. The presence of these DBPs in water samples collected through drinking water treatment was studied in order to evaluate their formation under real conditions. Both compounds were generated through treatment from raw river water samples containing ATSs at concentration levels ranging from 1 to 15 ng/L for MDA and from 2.3 to 78 ng/L for MDMA. One of them, (3-chlorobenzo)-1,3-dioxole, found after the first chlorination step, was eliminated after ozone and GAC treatment while the MDMA DBP mainly generated after the postchlorination step, showed to be recalcitrant and it was found in final treated waters at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5.8 ng/L.

  19. Human cell toxicogenomic analysis of bromoacetic acid: a regulated drinking water disinfection by-product.

    PubMed

    Muellner, Mark G; Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Hudson, Matthew E; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2010-04-01

    The disinfection of drinking water is a major achievement in protecting the public health. However, current disinfection methods also generate disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many DBPs are cytotoxic, genotoxic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic and represent an important class of environmentally hazardous chemicals that may carry long-term human health implications. The objective of this research was to integrate in vitro toxicology with focused toxicogenomic analysis of the regulated DBP, bromoacetic acid (BAA) and to evaluate modulation of gene expression involved in DNA damage/repair and toxic responses, with nontransformed human cells. We generated transcriptome profiles for 168 genes with 30 min and 4 hr exposure times that did not induce acute cytotoxicity. Using qRT-PCR gene arrays, the levels of 25 transcripts were modulated to a statistically significant degree in response to a 30 min treatment with BAA (16 transcripts upregulated and nine downregulated). The largest changes were observed for RAD9A and BRCA1. The majority of the altered transcript profiles are genes involved in DNA repair, especially the repair of double strand DNA breaks, and in cell cycle regulation. With 4 hr of treatment the expression of 28 genes was modulated (12 upregulated and 16 downregulated); the largest fold changes were in HMOX1 and FMO1. This work represents the first nontransformed human cell toxicogenomic study with a regulated drinking water disinfection by-product. These data implicate double strand DNA breaks as a feature of BAA exposure. Future toxicogenomic studies of DBPs will further strengthen our limited knowledge in this growing area of drinking water research.

  20. Do Iodine Contrast Media Compounds Used for Medical Imaging Contribute to the Formation of Iodinated Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) have recently gained attention due to their cyto- and genotoxicity and increased formation in drinking water treated with chloramine, which has become an increasingly popular disinfectant in the United States. One of these—iodoacetic acid...

  1. Do Iodine Contrast Media Compounds Used for Medical Imaging Contribute to the Formation of Iodinated Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) have recently gained attention due to their cyto- and genotoxicity and increased formation in drinking water treated with chloramine, which has become an increasingly popular disinfectant in the United States. One of these—iodoacetic acid...

  2. Synergistic effect of solar radiation and solar heating to disinfect drinking water sources.

    PubMed

    Rijal, G K; Fujioka, R S

    2001-01-01

    Waterborne diseases are still common in developing countries as drinking water sources are contaminated and feasible means to reliably treat and disinfect these waters are not available. Many of these developing countries are in the tropical regions of the world where sunlight is plentiful. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combining solar radiation and solar heating to disinfect contaminated water using a modified Family Sol*Saver System (FSP). The non-UV transmittable cover sheet of the former FSP system was replaced with an UV transmittable plastic cover sheet to enable more wavelengths of sunlight to treat the water. Disinfection efficiency of both systems was evaluated based on reduction of the natural populations of faecal coliform, E. coli, enterococci, C. perfringens, total heterotrophic bacteria, hydrogen sulphide producing bacteria and FRNA virus. The results showed that under sunny and partly sunny conditions, water was heated to critical temperature (60 degrees C) in both the FSP systems inactivating more than 3 log (99.9%) of the concentrations of faecal coliform and E. coli to undetectable levels of < 1 CFU/100 mL within 2-5 h exposure to sunlight. However, under cloudy conditions, the two FSP systems did not reduce the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria to levels of < 1 CFU/100 mL. Nonetheless, sufficient evidence was obtained to show that UV radiation of sunlight plus heat worked synergistically to enhance the inactivation of faecal indicator bacteria. The relative log removal of indicator microorganism in the FSP treated water was total heterotrophic bacteria < C. perfringens < F RNA virus < enterococci < E. coli < faecal coliform. In summary, time of exposure to heat and radiation effects of sunlight were important in disinfecting water by solar units. The data indicated that direct radiation of sunlight worked synergistically with solar heating of the water to disinfect the water. Thus, effective

  3. Type of disinfectant in drinking water and patterns of mortality in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Zierler, S; Danley, R A; Feingold, L

    1986-11-01

    Chlorination has been the major strategy for disinfection of drinking water in the United States. Concern about the potential health effects of the reaction by-products of chlorine has prompted use of alternative strategies. One such method is chloramination, a treatment process that does not appear to have carcinogenic by-products, but may have less potent biocidal activity than chlorination. We examined the patterns of mortality of residents in Massachusetts who died between 1969 and 1983 and lived in communities using drinking water that was disinfected either by chlorine or chloramine. Comparison of type of disinfectant among 51,645 cases of deaths due to selected cancer sites and 214,988 controls who died from cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or pulmonary disease, or from lymphatic cancer showed small variation in the patterns of mortality. Bladder cancer was moderately associated with residence at death in a chlorinated community (mortality odds ratio = 1.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.3-2.2) in a logistic regression analysis using controls who died from lymphatic cancer. A slight excess of deaths from pneumonia and influenza was observed in communities whose residents drank chloraminated water compared to residents from chlorinated communities, as well as to all Massachusetts residents (standardized mortality ratio = 118, 95% confidence interval = 116-120 for chloraminated communities, and standardized mortality ratio = 98, 95% confidence interval = 95-100 for chlorinated communities). These results are intended to be preliminary and crude descriptions of the relationship under study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Formation and occurrence of new polar iodinated disinfection byproducts in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Li, Wenbin; An, Hao; Cui, Hao; Wang, Ying

    2016-02-01

    During drinking water disinfection, iodinated disinfection byproducts (I-DBPs) can be generated through reactions between iodide, disinfectants, and natural organic matter. Drinking water I-DBPs have been increasingly attracting attention as emerging organic pollutants as a result of their significantly higher toxicity and growth inhibition than their chloro- and bromo-analogues. In this study, by adopting ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry precursor ion scan, multiple reaction monitoring, and product ion scan analyses, 11 new polar I-DBPs with confirmed structures and eight new polar I-DBPs with proposed structures were detected in simulated drinking water samples. Chloramination of simulated raw waters containing natural organic matter with higher aromaticity produced higher levels of new phenolic I-DBPs. Formation of new polar I-DBPs and total organic iodine (TOI) was most favored in chloramination, followed by chlorine dioxide treatment, and relatively minor in chlorination. Lower pH in chloramination substantially enhanced the formation of new polar I-DBPs and TOI. NH2Cl and dissolved organic nitrogen could be important nitrogen sources and precursors for formation of the two new nitrogenous phenolic I-DBPs. Notably, in tap water samples collected from nine major cities located in the Yangtze River Delta region of China, seven of the 11 new polar I-DBPs with confirmed structures were detected at levels from 0.11 to 28 ng/L, and the two new nitrogenous phenolic I-DBPs were ubiquitous with concentrations from 0.12 to 24 ng/L, likely due to the relatively high dissolved organic nitrogen levels in regional source waters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Microbiological effectiveness and cost of boiling to disinfect drinking water in rural Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Thomas F; Thao, Do Hoang; Boisson, Sophie; Shipin, Oleg

    2008-06-15

    Despite certain shortcomings, boiling is still the most common means of treating water in the home and the benchmark against which alternative household-based disinfection and filtration methods must be measured. We assessed the microbiological effectiveness and cost of boiling among a vulnerable population relying on unimproved water sources and commonly practicing boiling as a means of disinfecting water. In a 12 week study among 50 households from a rural community in Vietnam, boiling was associated with a 97% reduction in geometric mean thermotolerant coliforms (TTCs) (p < 0.001). Despite high levels of faecal contamination in source water, 37% of stored water samples from self-reported boilers met the WHO standard for safe drinking water (0 TTC/100 mL), and 38.3% fell within the low risk category (1--10 TTC/100 mL). Nevertheless, 60.5% of stored drinking water samples were positive for TTC, with 22.2% falling into the medium risk category (11--100 TTC/100 mL). The estimated cost of wood used to boil water was US$ 0.272 per month for wood collectors and US$ 1.68 per month for wood purchasers, representing approximately 0.48% to 1.04%, respectively, of the average monthly income of participating households.

  6. Socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disinfection by-products in drinking water are chemical contaminants that have been associated with cancer and other adverse effects. Exposure occurs from consumption of tap water, inhalation and dermal absorption. Methods We determined the relationship between socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in 1271 controls from a multicentric bladder cancer case-control study in Spain. Information on lifetime drinking water sources, swimming pool attendance, showering-bathing practices, and socioeconomic status (education, income) was collected through personal interviews. Results The most highly educated subjects consumed less tap water (57%) and more bottled water (33%) than illiterate subjects (69% and 17% respectively, p-value = 0.003). These differences became wider in recent time periods. The time spent bathing or showering was positively correlated with attained educational level (p < 0.001). Swimming pool attendance was more frequent among highly educated subjects compared to the illiterate (odds ratio = 3.4; 95% confidence interval 1.6-7.3). Conclusions The most highly educated subjects were less exposed to chlorination by-products through ingestion but more exposed through dermal contact and inhalation in pools and showers/baths. Health risk perceptions and economic capacity may affect patterns of water consumption that can result in differences in exposure to water contaminants. PMID:21410938

  7. Socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water in Spain.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Cantor, Kenneth P; Villanueva, Cristina M; Tardon, Adonina; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Malats, Núria; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2011-03-16

    Disinfection by-products in drinking water are chemical contaminants that have been associated with cancer and other adverse effects. Exposure occurs from consumption of tap water, inhalation and dermal absorption. We determined the relationship between socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in 1271 controls from a multicentric bladder cancer case-control study in Spain. Information on lifetime drinking water sources, swimming pool attendance, showering-bathing practices, and socioeconomic status (education, income) was collected through personal interviews. The most highly educated subjects consumed less tap water (57%) and more bottled water (33%) than illiterate subjects (69% and 17% respectively, p-value = 0.003). These differences became wider in recent time periods. The time spent bathing or showering was positively correlated with attained educational level (p < 0.001). Swimming pool attendance was more frequent among highly educated subjects compared to the illiterate (odds ratio = 3.4; 95% confidence interval 1.6-7.3). The most highly educated subjects were less exposed to chlorination by-products through ingestion but more exposed through dermal contact and inhalation in pools and showers/baths. Health risk perceptions and economic capacity may affect patterns of water consumption that can result in differences in exposure to water contaminants.

  8. [Study on pipe material's influence on chlorine dioxide drinking water disinfection].

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Yue, Yinling; Ling, Bo; Zhang, Lan

    2010-09-01

    To study the pipe material's influence on chlorine dioxide drinking water disinfection. 0.8 mg/L chlorine dioxide solution was injected into 5 kinds of pipes respectively, PPR, PVC-U, Steel with Zinc coating, copper and PE pipes. Dipped free from light for 48 hours and the concentrations of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate were tested from samples taken from each kind of pipe at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours respectively. Chlorine dioxides decay rates in the water dipping the pipes increase as the dipping time increases and the decay of chlorine dioxide mainly occurs within 6 hours after the dipping. But for different pipe, the influence of decay differs. The consumption of chlorine dioxide of the metal pipes is more than that of the plastic pipes. And with 2 hours after the dipping experiment begins, the concentrations of the chlorite of the copper pipe and of the steel with zinc coating pipe increase quickly and reach the maximum concentration. But then the chlorite concentration decreases greatly. After dipped 24 hours, the chlorite in the water in the pipe can not be detected. For other plastic piples, all the chlorite concentrations in the dipping water increase as the dipping time increase. Compared with the start of the dipping experiment, the chlorate concentration in the dipping water of each pipe has no obvious change. The material of the water transportation pipe does have influence on chlorine dioxide drinking water disinfection.

  9. Effect of Disinfectant Exposure on Legionella pneumophila Associated with Simulated Drinking Water Biofilms: Release, Inactivation, and Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Huang, Conghui; Lin, Jie; Wu, Wenjing; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2017-02-21

    Legionella pneumophila, the most commonly identified causative agent in drinking water associated with disease outbreaks, can be harbored by and released from drinking water biofilms. In this study, the release of biofilm-associated L. pneumophila under simulated drinking water flow containing a disinfectant residual was examined. Meanwhile, the inactivation and infectivity (to amoebae) of the released L. pneumophila were studied. To simulate drinking water system conditions, biofilms were prepared under either disinfectant exposure (predisinfected biofilms) or disinfectant-free (untreated biofilms) conditions, respectively. For experiments with water flow containing a disinfectant to release the biofilm-associated L. pneumophila from these two types of biofilms, the L. pneumophila release kinetics values from predisinfected and untreated biofilms under flow condition were not statistically different (one-way ANOVA, p > 0.05). However, inactivation of the L. pneumophila released from predisinfected biofilms was 1-2 times higher and amoeba infectivity was 2-29 times lower than that from untreated biofilms. The higher disinfectant resistance of L. pneumophila released from untreated biofilms was presumably influenced by the detachment of a larger amount of biofilm material (determined by 16S rRNA qPCR) surrounding the released L. pneumophila. This study highlights the interaction among disinfectant residual, biofilms, and L. pneumophila, which provides guidelines to assess and control pathogen risk.

  10. Solar disinfection of drinking water contained in transparent plastic bottles: characterizing the bacterial inactivation process.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, K G; Joyce, T M; Conroy, R M; Gillespie, J B; Elmore-Meegan, M

    1998-06-01

    A series of experiments is reported to identify and characterize the inactivation process in operation when drinking water, heavily contaminated with a Kenyan isolate of Escherichia coli, is stored in transparent plastic bottles that are then exposed to sunlight. The roles of optical and thermal inactivation mechanisms are studied in detail by simulating conditions of optical irradiance, water turbidity and temperature, which were recorded during a series of solar disinfection measurements carried out in the Kenyan Rift Valley. Optical inactivation effects are observed even in highly turbid water (200 ntu) and at low irradiances of only 10 mW cm-2. Thermal inactivation is found to be important only at water temperatures above 45 degrees C, at which point strong synergy between optical and thermal inactivation processes is observed. The results confirm that, where strong sunshine is available, solar disinfection of drinking water is an effective, low cost method for improving water quality and may be of particular use to refugee camps in disaster areas. Strategies for improving bacterial inactivation are discussed.

  11. The effects of UV disinfection on drinking water quality in distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yonkyu; Choi, Young-June

    2010-01-01

    UV treatment is a cost-effective disinfection process for drinking water, but concerned to have negative effects on water quality in distribution system by changed DOM structure. In the study, the authors evaluated the effects of UV disinfection on the water quality in the distribution system by investigating structure of DOM, concentration of AOC, chlorine demand and DBP formation before and after UV disinfection process. Although UV treatment did not affect concentration of AOC and characteristics of DOM (e.g., DOC, UV(254,) SUVA(254), the ratio of hydrophilic/hydrophobic fractions, and distribution of molecular weight) significantly, the increase of low molecular fraction was observed after UV treatment, in dry season. Chlorine demand and THMFP are also increased with chlorination of UV treated water. This implies that UV irradiation can cleave DOM, but molecular weights of broken DOM are not low enough to be used directly by microorganisms in distribution system. Nonetheless, modification of DOM structure can affect water quality of distribution system as it can increase chlorine demands and DBPs formation by post-chlorination.

  12. Effect of disinfectant, water age, and pipe materials on bacterial and eukaryotic community structure in drinking water biofilm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Masters, Sheldon; Edwards, Marc A; Falkinham, Joseph O; Pruden, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Availability of safe, pathogen-free drinking water is vital to public health; however, it is impossible to deliver sterile drinking water to consumers. Recent microbiome research is bringing new understanding to the true extent and diversity of microbes that inhabit water distribution systems. The purpose of this study was to determine how water chemistry in main distribution lines shape the microbiome in drinking water biofilms and to explore potential associations between opportunistic pathogens and indigenous drinking water microbes. Effects of disinfectant (chloramines, chlorine), water age (2.3 days, 5.7 days), and pipe material (cement, iron, PVC) were compared in parallel triplicate simulated water distribution systems. Pyrosequencing was employed to characterize bacteria and terminal restriction fragment polymorphism was used to profile both bacteria and eukaryotes inhabiting pipe biofilms. Disinfectant and water age were both observed to be strong factors in shaping bacterial and eukaryotic community structures. Pipe material only influenced the bacterial community structure (ANOSIM test, P < 0.05). Interactive effects of disinfectant, pipe material, and water age on both bacteria and eukaryotes were noted. Disinfectant concentration had the strongest effect on bacteria, while dissolved oxygen appeared to be a major driver for eukaryotes (BEST test). Several correlations of similarity metrics among populations of bacteria, eukaryotes, and opportunistic pathogens, as well as one significant association between mycobacterial and proteobacterial operational taxonomic units, provides insight into means by which manipulating the microbiome may lead to new avenues for limiting the growth of opportunistic pathogens (e.g., Legionella) or other nuisance organisms (e.g., nitrifiers).

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES IN TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM FROM URINARY BLADDERS OF RATS EXPOSED TO DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Development of a Novel Method for Analysis of Transcriptional Changes in Transitional Epithelium from Urinary Bladders of Rats Exposed to Drinking Water Disinfection By- products.

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations that drink chemically disinfected drinking wa...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES IN TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM FROM URINARY BLADDERS OF RATS EXPOSED TO DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Development of a Novel Method for Analysis of Transcriptional Changes in Transitional Epithelium from Urinary Bladders of Rats Exposed to Drinking Water Disinfection By- products.

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations that drink chemically disinfected drinking wa...

  15. Occurrence and control of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in drinking water--a review.

    PubMed

    Bond, Tom; Huang, Jin; Templeton, Michael R; Graham, Nigel

    2011-10-01

    The presence of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs), including nitrosamines, cyanogen halides, haloacetonitriles, haloacetamides and halonitromethanes, in drinking water is of concern due to their high genotoxicity and cytotoxicity compared with regulated DBPs. Occurrence of N-DBPs is likely to increase if water sources become impacted by wastewater and algae. Moreover, a shift from chlorination to chloramination, an option for water providers wanting to reduce regulated DBPs such as trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), can also increase certain N-DBPs. This paper provides a critical review of the occurrence and control of N-DBPs. Data collated from surveys undertaken in the United States and Scotland were used to calculate that the sum of analysed halonitromethanes represented 3-4% of the mass of THMs on a median basis; with Pearson product moment correlation coefficients of 0.78 and 0.83 between formation of dihaloacetonitriles and that of THMs and HAAs respectively. The impact of water treatment processes on N-DBP formation is complex and variable. While coagulation and filtration are of moderate efficacy for the removal of N-DBP precursors, such as amino acids and amines, biofiltration, if used prior to disinfection, is particularly successful at removing cyanogen halide precursors. Oxidation before final disinfection can increase halonitromethane formation and decrease N-nitrosodimethylamine, and chloramination is likely to increase cyanogen halides and NDMA relative to chlorination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Disinfection efficiency of peracetic acid, alone and in combination with hypochlorite, against Mycobacterium avium in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Schiavano, G F; Sisti, M; De Santi, M; Brandi, G

    2006-01-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfectant with a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, but little is known about the feasibility of using it in the field of drinking water treatment. The aim of this study has been assess disinfectant efficacy of PAA, alone or in combination with hypochlorite, against M. avium in drinking water M. avium is a common opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised subjects that is able to survive and grow in drinking water distribution systems. In this study PAA did not show appreciable activity against the greater number of tested strains (16/21) up to 5 ppm of PAA, a weak activity was seen on 4 strains, while a significant reduction in viable cells (about 50%) was seen only on 1 strain after 48 h of treatment with 5 ppm of PAA. We also evidenced that M. avium was unaffected by chlorine concentration usually present in drinking water distribution system. Finally, the combination of PAA and sodium hypochlorite did not promote enhanced antimicrobial efficacy respect to the single disinfectants. In conclusion, our result would indicate that PAA is an unlikely candidate for the disinfection of drinking water from M. avium and further strategies are required to eliminate M. avium from drinking water system.

  17. Bioanalytical assessment of the formation of disinfection byproducts in a drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Neale, Peta A; Antony, Alice; Bartkow, Michael E; Farré, Maria José; Heitz, Anna; Kristiana, Ina; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2012-09-18

    Disinfection of drinking water is the most successful measure to reduce water-borne diseases and protect health. However, disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed from the reaction of disinfectants such as chlorine and monochloramine with organic matter may cause bladder cancer and other adverse health effects. In this study the formation of DBPs through a full-scale water treatment plant serving a metropolitan area in Australia was assessed using in vitro bioanalytical tools, as well as through quantification of halogen-specific adsorbable organic halogens (AOXs), characterization of organic matter, and analytical quantification of selected regulated and emerging DBPs. The water treatment train consisted of coagulation, sand filtration, chlorination, addition of lime and fluoride, storage, and chloramination. Nonspecific toxicity peaked midway through the treatment train after the chlorination and storage steps. The dissolved organic matter concentration decreased after the coagulation step and then essentially remained constant during the treatment train. Concentrations of AOXs increased upon initial chlorination and continued to increase through the plant, probably due to increased chlorine contact time. Most of the quantified DBPs followed a trend similar to that of AOXs, with maximum concentrations observed in the final treated water after chloramination. The mostly chlorinated and brominated DBPs formed during treatment also caused reactive toxicity to increase after chlorination. Both genotoxicity with and without metabolic activation and the induction of the oxidative stress response pathway showed the same pattern as the nonspecific toxicity, with a maximum activity midway through the treatment train. Although measured effects cannot be directly translated to adverse health outcomes, this study demonstrates the applicability of bioanalytical tools to investigate DBP formation in a drinking water treatment plant, despite bioassays and sample preparation not

  18. [Study advance and control measure on disinfection by-products in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianrong; Wang, Zhengang

    2004-01-01

    The related studies on the chemistry, toxicology, epidemiology, distribution level, hygienic standard or maximum contaminant level and control measure were summarized. The results showed that a lot of disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed during chlorination and trihaloromethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the two major groups of found in drinking water. From the present knowledge and health effects, the DBPs of most interest are THMs, HAAs, bromate and chlorite. The hygienic standard or maximum contaminant level of drinking water have been revised or supplemented. In order to decrease the chemical risk due to DBPs without compromising microbiological quality, the monitor parameters have been increased and maximum contaminant levels of the parameters have been controlled strictly.

  19. Nitrogenous disinfection byproducts in English drinking water supply systems: Occurrence, bromine substitution and correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bond, Tom; Templeton, Michael R; Mokhtar Kamal, Nurul Hana; Graham, Nigel; Kanda, Rakesh

    2015-11-15

    Despite the recent focus on nitrogenous disinfection byproducts in drinking water, there is limited occurrence data available for many species. This paper analyses the occurrence of seven haloacetonitriles, three haloacetamides, eight halonitromethanes and cyanogen chloride in 20 English drinking water supply systems. It is the first survey of its type to compare bromine substitution factors (BSFs) between the haloacetamides and haloacetonitriles. Concentrations of the dihalogenated haloacetonitriles and haloacetamides were well correlated. Although median concentrations of these two groups were lower in chloraminated than chlorinated surface waters, median BSFs for both in chloraminated samples were approximately double those in chlorinated samples, which is significant because of the higher reported toxicity of the brominated species. Furthermore, median BSFs were moderately higher for the dihalogenated haloacetamides than for the haloacetonitriles. This indicates that, while the dihalogenated haloacetamides were primarily generated from hydrolysis of the corresponding haloacetonitriles, secondary formation pathways also contributed. Median halonitromethane concentrations were remarkably unchanging for the different types of disinfectants and source waters: 0.1 μg · mgTOC(-1) in all cases. Cyanogen chloride only occurred in a limited number of samples, yet when present its concentrations were higher than the other N-DBPs. Concentrations of cyanogen chloride and the sum of the halonitromethanes were not correlated with any other DBPs.

  20. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  1. Drinking water disinfection byproduct iodoacetic acid induces tumorigenic transformation of NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Weiwei; Wang, Xia; Liu, Xiaolin; Jiang, Songhui; Pi, Jingbo; Zheng, Yuxin; He, Gengsheng; Qu, Weidong

    2013-06-04

    Iodoacetic acid (IAA) and iodoform (IF) are unregulated iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) found in drinking water. Their presence in the drinking water of China has not been documented. Recently, the carcinogenic potential of IAA and IF has been a concern because of their mutagenicity in bacteria and genotoxicity in mammalian cells. Therefore, we measured their concentrations in Shanghai drinking water and assessed their cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and ability to transform NIH3T3 cells to tumorigenic lines. The concentrations of IAA and IF in Shanghai drinking water varied between summer and winter with maximum winter levels of 2.18 μg/L IAA and 0.86 μg/L IF. IAA with a lethal concentration 50 (LC50) of 2.77 μM exhibited more potent cytotoxicity in NIH3T3 cells than IF (LC50 = 83.37 μM). IAA, but not IF, induced a concentration-dependent DNA damage measured by γ-H2AX staining and increased tail moment in single-cell gel electrophoresis. Neither IAA nor IF increased micronucleus frequency. Prolonged exposure of NIH3T3 cells to IAA increased the frequencies of transformed cells with anchorage-independent growth and agglutination with concanavalin A. IAA-transformed cells formed aggressive fibrosarcomas after inoculation into Balb/c nude mice. This study demonstrated that IAA has a biological activity that is consistent with a carcinogen and human exposure should be of concern.

  2. QUENCHING OF CHLORINATION DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION IN DRINKING WATER BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. (R825362)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactions between chlorine disinfectants, dissolved organic matter, and other chemicals in water form a series of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), that are toxic and subject to increasingly stringent regulations. Th...

  3. QUENCHING OF CHLORINATION DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION IN DRINKING WATER BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. (R825362)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactions between chlorine disinfectants, dissolved organic matter, and other chemicals in water form a series of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), that are toxic and subject to increasingly stringent regulations. Th...

  4. Why do people stop treating contaminated drinking water with Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS)?

    PubMed

    Tamas, Andrea; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2011-08-01

    Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS) is a simple method designed to treat microbiologically contaminated drinking water at household level. This article characterizes relapse behavior in comparison with continued SODIS use after a 7-month nonpromotion period. In addition, different subtypes among relapsers and continuers were assumed to diverge mainly in their intention to use SODIS and their degree of cognition intensity. Data were taken from a longitudinal SODIS promotion study. Cluster analyses were applied to find subtypes among 166 relapsers and 123 continuers. Overall relapsers have lower values for all psychological variables compared to overall continuers. A low-value and a high-value relapser subtype as well as a low-value and a high-value continuer subtype were found. Low-value relapsers differ from high-value relapsers in one central belief (taste), in affective connotation, social norms, and dissonance. Interestingly, high-value relapsers have values almost as high as low-value continuers, differing only in their degree of habit. Only high-value continuers seem to be stable and did not show a decrease in critical habit variables over time. The different subtypes are placed along the behavior change process, and possible interventions for each type are highlighted.

  5. Assessment of disinfection by-products in drinking water in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, D; Chung, Y; Choi, Y; Kim, J; Park, Y; Kum, H

    1999-01-01

    The main purpose of applying the chlorination process during water treatment is for disinfection. Research results, however, indicate that disinfection byproducts (DBPs) including trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloketones (HKs), and chloropicrin (CP) can be produced by the chlorination process. Some of these DBPs are known to be potential human carcinogens. This 3-year project is designed to establish a standard analysis procedure for DBPs in drinking water of this country and investigate the distribution and sources of specific DBPs. The occurrence level of DBPs in drinking water was below 50 micrograms/l in most cases. THMs in plant effluent accounted for 60% of all DBPs measured, whereas HAAs accounted for 20%, HANs 12%, HKs 5% and CP 3%. Chloroform was found to be the major THMs compound (77%), followed by bromodichloromethane (BDCM, 18%) and bromoform (BF, 3%). The concentration of DBPs formed in distribution systems increased from those detected in plant effluent. Comparison of humic acid and sewage as precursors for THMs formation showed that humic acid was the major THMs precursor. Results would play an important role in exposure assessment as a part of the risk assessment process, and would give basic information for establishment of DBPs reduction and management procedures.

  6. Predictive model for disinfection by-product in Alexandria drinking water, northern west of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Ali M; Hussona, Salah El-dien

    2013-10-01

    Chlorine has been utilized in the early stages of water treatment processes as disinfectant. Disinfection for drinking water reduces the risk of pathogenic infection but may pose a chemical threat to human health due to disinfection residues and their by-products (DBP) when the organic and inorganic precursors are present in water. In the last two decades, many modeling attempts have been made to predict the occurrence of DBP in drinking water. Models have been developed based on data generated in laboratory-scale and field-scale investigations. The objective of this paper is to develop a predictive model for DBP formation in the Alexandria governorate located at the northern west of Egypt based on field-scale investigations as well as laboratory-controlled experimentations. The present study showed that the correlation coefficient between trihalomethanes (THM) predicted and THM measured was R (2)=0.88 and the minimum deviation percentage between THM predicted and THM measured was 0.8 %, the maximum deviation percentage was 89.3 %, and the average deviation was 17.8 %, while the correlation coefficient between dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) predicted and DCAA measured was R (2)=0.98 and the minimum deviation percentage between DCAA predicted and DCAA measured was 1.3 %, the maximum deviation percentage was 47.2 %, and the average deviation was 16.6 %. In addition, the correlation coefficient between trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) predicted and TCAA measured was R (2)=0.98 and the minimum deviation percentage between TCAA predicted and TCAA measured was 4.9 %, the maximum deviation percentage was 43.0 %, and the average deviation was 16.0 %.

  7. [Study on effect of 3 types of drinking water emergent disinfection models in flood/waterlog areas].

    PubMed

    Ban, Haiqun; Li, Jin; Li, Xinwu; Zhang, Liubo

    2010-09-01

    To establish 3 drinking water emergent disinfection processing models, separated medicate dispensing, specific duty medicate dispensing, and centralized filtering, in flood/waterlog areas, and compare the effects of these 3 models on the drinking water disinfection processing. From October to December, 2008, 18 villages were selected as the trial field in Yanglinwei town, Xiantao city, Hubei province, which were divided into three groups, separated medicate dispensing, specific duty medicate dispensing, and centralized filtering. Every 2 weeks, drinking water source water, yielding water of emergency central filtrate water equipment (ECFWE) and container water in the kitchen were sampled and microbe indices of the water sample, standard plate-count bacteria, total coliforms, thermotolerant coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli were measured. The microbe pollution of the water of these 3 water source groups are heavy, all failed. The eliminating rate of the standard plate-count bacteria of the drinking water emergent centralized processing equipment is 99.95%; those of the separate medicate dispensing, specific duty medicate dispensing and centralized filtering are 81.93%, 99.67%, and 98.28%, respectively. The passing rates of the microbe indice of the resident contained water are 13.33%, 70.00%, and 43.33%, respectively. The difference has statistical significance. The drinking water disinfection effects of the centralized filtering model and of the specific duty medicate dispensing model are better than that of the separated medicate dispensing model in the flood/waterlog areas.

  8. Detection of genotoxic effects of drinking water disinfection by-products using Vicia faba bioassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Tan, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Zuo, Yu-Ting; Han, Xue; Liu, Na; Lu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Plant-based bioassays have gained wide use among the toxicological and/or ecotoxicological assessment procedures because of their simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, and reliability. The present study describes the use of Vicia faba (V. faba) micronucleus (MN) test and V. faba comet assay in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of disinfection by-products (DBPs) commonly found in chlorine-disinfected drinking water. Five haloacetic acids and three halogenated acetonitriles were chosen as representatives of DBPs in this study because they are of potentially great public health risk. Results of the MN test indicated that monochloroacetic acid (MCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), dibromoacetic acid (DBA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) caused a statistically significant increase in MN frequency in V. faba root tip cells. However, no genotoxic response was observed for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN). Results of the comet assay showed that all tested DBPs induced a statistically significant increase in genomic DNA damage to V. faba root tip cells. On considering the capacity to detect genomic damage of a different nature, we suggest that a combination of V. faba MN test and V. faba comet assay is a useful tool for the detection of genotoxic effects of DBPs. It is worthy of assessing the feasibility of using V. faba comet assay combined with V. faba MN test to screen for the genotoxic activity of chlorinated drinking water in future work.

  9. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN RATS TREATED WITH POTASSIUM BROMATE AND A MIXTUE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative DNA Damage and Repair in Rats Treated with Potassium Bromate and a Mixture of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    Public drinking water treated with chemical disint'ectants contains a complex mixture of disinfection by-products (D BPs). There is a need for m...

  10. EFFECTS OF 20 WEEK EXPOSURES IN FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY (S-D) RATS TO THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of 20 week exposures in female Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats to the drinking water disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid. A S Murr and J M Goldman, Endocrinol. Br., RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Res. Tri. Pk, NC. Sponsor: Audrey Cummings

    The drinking water disinfect...

  11. EFFECTS OF 20 WEEK EXPOSURES IN FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY (S-D) RATS TO DIBROMOACETIC ACID, A DRINKING WATER DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of 20 week exposures in female Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats to the drinking water disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid. A S Murr and J M Goldman, Endocrinol. Br., RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Res. Tri. Pk, NC. Sponsor: Audrey Cummings

    The drinking water disinfect...

  12. MUTAGENICITY IN SALMONELLA AND DNA DAMAGE IN THE CHO/COMET ASSAY INDUCED BY NITROHALOMETHANES, A NOVEL CLASS OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity in Salmonella and DNA Damage in the CHO/Comet Assay Induced by Nitrohalomethanes, a Novel Class of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products.

    Halomethanes are a class of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) whose genotoxicity has been studied extensi...

  13. EFFECTS OF 20 WEEK EXPOSURES IN FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY (S-D) RATS TO THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of 20 week exposures in female Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats to the drinking water disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid. A S Murr and J M Goldman, Endocrinol. Br., RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Res. Tri. Pk, NC. Sponsor: Audrey Cummings

    The drinking water disinfect...

  14. EFFECTS OF 20 WEEK EXPOSURES IN FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY (S-D) RATS TO DIBROMOACETIC ACID, A DRINKING WATER DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of 20 week exposures in female Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats to the drinking water disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid. A S Murr and J M Goldman, Endocrinol. Br., RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Res. Tri. Pk, NC. Sponsor: Audrey Cummings

    The drinking water disinfect...

  15. Modern approaches to the analysis of disinfection by-products in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Howard S

    2009-10-13

    The discovery and study of disinfection by-products (DBPs) of health and regulatory concern in drinking water have often been hampered by the lack of appropriate analytical methods, but, with the new tools and expertise now available to the drinking water industry, there is an opportunity to plug a major gap in our knowledge of the nature and identity of these chemicals. The challenge is that less than half of the halogenated by-products resulting from the chlorination of drinking water have been identified, and even less is known about those produced in waters treated with ozone, chloramines or chlorine dioxide. For the DBPs that have been identified, very little or no occurrence data exist for the unregulated chemicals to document how often a particular DBP is formed and in what quantity. The elucidation of the nature and identity of these by-products is hindered by two complicating factors. The first is the inherent aqueous solubility of many of these compounds, which renders their efficient extraction from water difficult to achieve. The second is the lack of established identity of specific potential by-products, which complicates targeted analytical approaches. This paper reviews existing and new methodologies that attempt to overcome some of these challenges.

  16. Tracking disinfection by-products and arsenic removal during various drinking water treatment trains.

    PubMed

    Tubić, Aleksandra; Dalmacija, Bozo; Agbaba, Jasmina; Ivancev-Tumbas, Ivana; Klasnja, Mile; Dalmacija, Milena

    2010-01-01

    In the central Banat region (Northern Serbia), groundwater is used as a drinking water source. Raw water originates from a 40-80 m and 100-150 m deep layer. It contains a high amount of natural organic matter (DOC = 9.17+/-0.87 mg C/L) with a trihalomethanes formation potential of 448+/-88.2 microg/L and a haloacetic acid formation potential of 174+/-68.9 microg/L. A high amount of arsenic (86.0+/-3.4 microg/L) is also found in this water. This study used a pilot-scale system to investigate the possibilities of combining polyaluminium chloride and ferrous-chloride to remove disinfection by-products precursors and arsenic by coagulation. Two treatment trains with different pre-treatment steps were investigated (ozone vs. H2O2/O3). For the final water polishing, filtration with granulated activated carbon (GAC) was applied. Both investigated treatment lines achieved a satisfactory chemical water quality. Simulation of disinfection conditions was performed and the contents of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids measured, to investigate whether the chemical quality of the water remained satisfactory over a 48 hour period.

  17. A randomized controlled trial of household-based flocculant-disinfectant drinking water treatment for diarrhea prevention in rural Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Mendoza, Carlos E; Lopez, M Beatriz; Alvarez, Maricruz; Hoekstra, Robert M; Olson, Christy A; Baier, Kathleen G; Keswick, Bruce H; Luby, Stephen P

    2003-10-01

    We conducted a study to determine if use of a new flocculant-disinfectant home water treatment reduced diarrhea. We randomly assigned 492 rural Guatemalan households to five different water treatment groups: flocculant-disinfectant, flocculant-disinfectant plus a customized vessel, bleach, bleach plus a vessel, and control. During one year of observation, residents of control households had 4.31 episodes of diarrhea per 100 person-weeks, whereas the incidence of diarrhea was 24% lower among residents of households receiving flocculant-disinfectant, 29% lower among those receiving flocculant-disinfectant plus vessel, 25% lower among those receiving bleach, and 12% lower among households receiving bleach plus vessel. In unannounced evaluations of home drinking water, free chlorine was detected in samples from 27% of flocculant-disinfectant households, 35% of flocculant-disinfectant plus vessel households, 35% of bleach households, and 43% of bleach plus vessel households. In a setting where diarrhea was a leading cause of death, intermittent use of home water treatment with flocculant-disinfectant decreased the incidence of diarrhea.

  18. A feasibility study of cumulative risk assessment methods for drinking water disinfection by-product mixtures.

    PubMed

    Teuschler, Linda K; Rice, Glenn E; Wilkes, Charles R; Lipscomb, John C; Power, Fred W

    Humans are exposed daily to complex mixtures of chemicals, including drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) via oral, dermal, and inhalation routes. Some positive epidemiological and toxicological studies suggest reproductive and developmental effects and cancer are associated with consumption of chlorinated drinking water. Thus, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted research to examine the feasibility of evaluating simultaneous exposures to multiple DBPs via all three exposure routes. A cumulative risk assessment approach was developed for DBP mixtures by combining exposure modeling and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling results with a new mixtures risk assessment method, the cumulative relative potency factors (CRPF) approach. Internal doses were estimated for an adult female and an adult male, each of reproductive age, and for a child (age 6 yr) inclusive of oral, dermal, and inhalation exposures. Estimates of the daily internal doses were made for 13 major DBPs, accounting for activity patterns that affect the amount of human contact time with drinking water (e.g., tap water consumed, time spent showering), building characteristics (e.g., household air volumes), and physicochemical properties of the DBPs (e.g., inhalation rates, skin permeability rates, blood: air partition coefficients). A novel cumulative risk assessment method, the CRPF approach, is advanced that integrates the principles of dose addition and response addition to produce multiple-route, chemical mixture risk estimates using total absorbed doses. Research needs to improve this approach are presented.

  19. Occurrence of bromate, chlorite and chlorate in drinking waters disinfected with hypochlorite reagents. Tracing their origins.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villanova, Rafael J; Oliveira Dantas Leite, M Vilani; Hernández Hierro, J Miguel; de Castro Alfageme, Santiago; García Hernández, Cristina

    2010-05-15

    Bromate was first reported as a disinfection by-product from ozonated waters, but more recently it has been reported also as a result of treatment using hypochlorite solutions worldwide. The aim of this study was to study the scope of this phenomenon in the drinking waters (n=509) of Castilla y León, Spain, and in the hypochlorite disinfectant reagents. Two thirds of the treated waters monitored were found to have bromate concentrations higher than 1 microg/l, and of them a median value of 8 microg/l and a maximum of 49 microg/l. These concentrations are higher than those reported so far, however, a great variability can be found. Median values for chlorite were of 5 microg/l, and of 119 microg/l for chlorate. Only 7 out of 40 hypochlorite feedstock solutions were negative for bromate, the rest showing a median of 1022 mg/l; and 4 out of 14 calcium hypochlorite pellets were also negative, the rest with a median of 240 mg/kg. Although bromate is cited as potentially added to water from calcium hypochlorite pellets, no reference is found in scientific literature regarding its real content. Chlorite (median 2646 mg/l) and chlorate (median 20,462 mg/l) and chlorite (median 695 mg/kg) and chlorate (median 9516 mg/kg) were also monitored, respectively, in sodium hypochlorite solutions and calcium hypochlorite pellets. The levels of chlorite and chlorate in water are considered satisfactory, but not those of bromate, undoubtedly owing to the high content of bromide in the raw brines employed by the chlor-alkali manufacturers. Depending on the manufacturer, the bromate concentrations in the treated waters may be very heterogeneous owing to the lack of specification for this contaminant in the disinfectant reagents -the European Norms EN 900 and 901 do not mention it.

  20. Occurrence of nitrogenous and carbonaceous disinfection byproducts in drinking water distributed in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang; Zhu, Haihui; Gan, Wenhui; Chen, Xue; Yang, Xin

    2017-12-01

    A 12-month sampling program was conducted throughout a drinking water distribution system in Shenzhen and the data from 251 samples provide a comprehensive picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of 17 species disinfection by-products (DBPs) in a city with subtropical monsoon climate. The carbonaceous disinfection by-product (C-DBPs) included four trihalomethanes (THMs), three trihaloacetaldehydes (THAs) and two haloketones (HKs). Their median concentrations over the entire period were 19.9 μg/L, 3.4 μg/L and 1.4 μg/L, respectively. The nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) monitored were four haloacetonitriles (HANs) and four haloacetamides (HAcAms). Their median levels were 2.0 μg/L and 1.5 μg/L, respectively. Low levels of brominated DBP species (bromine substitution factors ≤ 0.5) were observed. The BSF of each DBP class followed the trend: THMs ≈ DHAcAms > DHANs > THAs. All the DBP concentrations showed clear seasonal variations with the highest average concentrations in spring. Correlation analyses showed that the THMs and CH levels in Shenzhen drinking water could be used as statistical indicators of the levels of unregulated N-DBPs (0.4 < r < 0.7, p < 0.5). The results supplement the database of DBP occurrence in drinking water in China, and provide an important reference data set for DBP occurrence in cities with a subtropical monsoon climate around the world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Advances of study on assessing exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Ye, Bixiong; Wang, Wuyi

    2009-07-01

    DBP exposure assessment issues were addressed. The basic definition to exposure assessment was introduced. Recommended ideal set of drinking water quality parameters to collect for each water treatment plant and specific disinfection by-products to be considered for future studies to adequately characterize DBP exposure were sum up. Previous studies and shortcoming of DBP exposure assessment were discussed and considered. Two examples of DBP exposure assessment were used to explain the progress and method of assessment in detail. Various disciplines to develop better approaches for measuring DBP exposure and greater collaboration of epidemiologists with water utilities and regulators should be encouraged in order to make regulatory monitoring data more useful for epidemiologic studies.

  2. Exposure to drinking water disinfection by-products and pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Savitz, David A; Singer, Philip C; Herring, Amy H; Hartmann, Katherine E; Weinberg, Howard S; Makarushka, Christina

    2006-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that exposure to elevated levels of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) may cause pregnancy loss. In 2000-2004, the authors conducted a study in three US locations of varying DBP levels and evaluated 2,409 women in early pregnancy to assess their tap water DBP concentrations, water use, other risk factors, and pregnancy outcome. Tap water concentrations were measured in the distribution system weekly or biweekly. The authors considered DBP concentration and ingested amount and, for trihalomethanes only, bathing/showering and integrated exposure that included ingestion. On the basis of 258 pregnancy losses, they did not find an increased risk of pregnancy loss in relation to trihalomethane, haloacetic acid, or total organic halide concentrations; ingested amounts; or total exposure. In contrast to a previous study, pregnancy loss was not associated with high personal trihalomethane exposure (> or =75 micro g/liter and > or =5 glasses of water/day) (odds ratio = 1.1, 95% confidence interval: 0.7, 1.7). Sporadic elevations in risk were found across DBPs, most notably for ingested total organic halide (odds ratio = 1.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.0, 2.2 for the highest exposure quintile). These results provide some assurance that drinking water DBPs in the range commonly encountered in the United States do not affect fetal survival.

  3. Evidence of arsenic release promoted by disinfection by-products within drinking-water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Botsaris, George; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Kalyvas, Harris; Costa, Costas N

    2014-02-15

    Changes in disinfectant type could trigger a cascade of reactions releasing pipe-anchored metals/metalloids into finished water. However, the effect of pre-formed disinfection by-products on the release of sorbed contaminants (arsenic-As in particular) from drinking water distribution system pipe scales remains unexplored. A bench-scale study using a factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the independent and interaction effects of trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (HAA) on arsenic (As) release from either scales-only or scale-biofilm conglomerates (SBC) both anchored on asbestos/cement pipe coupons. A model biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was allowed to grow on select pipe coupons prior experimentation. Either TTHM or HAA individual dosing did not promote As release from either scales only or SBC, detecting <6 μg AsL(-1) in finished water. In the case of scales-only coupons, the combination of the highest spike level of TTHM and HAA significantly (p<0.001) increased dissolved and total As concentrations to levels up to 16 and 95 μg L(-1), respectively. Similar treatments in the presence of biofilm (SBC) resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in dissolved and total recoverable As up to 20 and 47 μg L(-1), respectively, exceeding the regulatory As limit. Whether or not, our laboratory-based results truly represent mechanisms operating in disinfected finished water in pipe networks remains to be investigated in the field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative genotoxicity of nitrosamine drinking water disinfection byproducts in Salmonella and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Elizabeth D; Hsu, Kang-Mei; Lagunas, Angelica; Mitch, William A; Plewa, Michael J

    2012-01-24

    Nitrosamine water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are an emerging class of non-halogenated, nitrogen-containing water contaminants. Five nitrosamine DBPs were analyzed for genotoxicity (N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA). Using Salmonella typhimurium strain YG7108 the descending rank order of mutagenicity was NDMA>NPIP>NMOR>NPYR; NDPhA was not mutagenic. We developed and calibrated an exogenous S9 mix that was highly effective in activating NDMA in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using the SCGE (Comet) assay. The descending rank order for genotoxicity was NDMA>NPIP>NMOR. NDPhA was genotoxic only at one concentration and NPYR was not genotoxic. The genotoxic potencies in S. typhimurium and CHO cells were highly correlated. Based on their comparative genotoxicity attention should be focused on the generation and occurrence of NDMA, NPIP and NMOR. Current drinking water disinfection processes may need to be modified such that the generation of nitrosamine DBPs is effectively limited in order to protect the environment and the public health. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Effect of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) on chloraminated disinfection attenuation in drinking water distribution system].

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Hui; Cai, Yun-Long; Zhou, Bin-Hui; Zhi, Xing-Hua

    2009-06-15

    The growth of microbe and formation of biofilm in water distribution system were important factors affecting the security of water quality. The number of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biofilm of a chloraminated drinking water distribution system in Shanghai was detected by MPN-Griess method, and the relations among AOB, nitrification and chloraminated disinfection were analyzed. Meanwhile, the effects of AOB on chloraminated disinfection fastness and attenuation by simulation experiment were studied. The result indicated that the number of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in pipe biofilm was between 1.0 x 10(2)-4.3 x 10(5) MPN/g dry biofilm. Correlation coefficients of AOB with ammonia, nitrite and nitrate were -0.563, 0.603 and -0.563. Correlation coefficients of AOB with total chlorine and mono-chloramine were -0.659 and -0.571. Fastness of AOB to chloramine was higher than heterotrophic bacteria and AOB can deplete more chloramine than HPC.

  6. The Occurrence and Toxicity of Disinfection Byproducts in European Drinking Waters in Relation with the HIWATE Epidemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Clara H.; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Siebert, Vincent R.; Anduri, Sridevi; Richardson, Susan D.; Daiber, Eric J.; McKague, A. Bruce; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Goslan, Emma H.; Luo, Wentai; Isabelle, Lorne M.; Pankow, James F.; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Cordier, Sylvaine; Edwards, Susan C.; Righi, Elena; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Plewa, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The HIWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection byproducts in drinking WATEr) project was a systematic analysis that combined the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes and other health effects with long term exposure to low levels of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in the European Union. The present study focused on the relationship of the occurrence and concentration of DBPs with in vitro mammalian cell toxicity. Eleven drinking water samples were collected from 5 European countries. Each sampling location corresponded with an epidemiological study for the HIWATE program. Over 90 DBPs were identified; the range in the number of DBPs and their levels reflected the diverse collection sites, different disinfection processes, and the different characteristics of the source waters. For each sampling site, chronic mammalian cell cytotoxicity correlated highly with the numbers of DBPs identified and the levels of DBP chemical classes. Although there was a clear difference in the genotoxic responses among the drinking waters, these data did not correlate as well with the chemical analyses. Thus, the agents responsible for the genomic DNA damage observed in the HIWATE samples may be due to unresolved associations of combinations of identified DBPs, unknown emerging DBPs that were not identified, or other toxic water contaminants. This study represents the first to integrate quantitative in vitro toxicological data with analytical chemistry and human epidemiologic outcomes for drinking water DBPs. PMID:22958121

  7. Occurrence and toxicity of disinfection byproducts in European drinking waters in relation with the HIWATE epidemiology study.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Clara H; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Siebert, Vincent R; Anduri, Sridevi; Richardson, Susan D; Daiber, Eric J; McKague, A Bruce; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M; Goslan, Emma H; Luo, Wentai; Isabelle, Lorne M; Pankow, James F; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Cordier, Sylvaine; Edwards, Susan C; Righi, Elena; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Plewa, Michael J

    2012-11-06

    The HIWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection byproducts in drinking WATEr) project was a systematic analysis that combined the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes and other health effects with long-term exposure to low levels of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in the European Union. The present study focused on the relationship of the occurrence and concentration of DBPs with in vitro mammalian cell toxicity. Eleven drinking water samples were collected from five European countries. Each sampling location corresponded with an epidemiological study for the HIWATE program. Over 90 DBPs were identified; the range in the number of DBPs and their levels reflected the diverse collection sites, different disinfection processes, and the different characteristics of the source waters. For each sampling site, chronic mammalian cell cytotoxicity correlated highly with the numbers of DBPs identified and the levels of DBP chemical classes. Although there was a clear difference in the genotoxic responses among the drinking waters, these data did not correlate as well with the chemical analyses. Thus, the agents responsible for the genomic DNA damage observed in the HIWATE samples may be due to unresolved associations of combinations of identified DBPs, unknown emerging DBPs that were not identified, or other toxic water contaminants. This study represents the first to integrate quantitative in vitro toxicological data with analytical chemistry and human epidemiologic outcomes for drinking water DBPs.

  8. Exposure estimates to disinfection by-products of chlorinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Weisel, C P; Kim, H; Haltmeier, P; Klotz, J B

    1999-02-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) of drinking water is multiroute and occurs in households serviced by municipal water treatment facilities that disinfect the water as a necessary step to halt the spread of waterborne infectious diseases. Biomarkers of the two most abundant groups of DBPs of chlorination, exhaled breath levels of trihalomethanes (THMs) and urinary levels of two haloacetic acids, were compared to exposure estimates calculated from in-home tap water concentrations and responses to a questionnaire related to water usage. Background THM breath concentrations were uniformly low. Strong relationships were identified between the THM breath concentrations collected after a shower and both the THM water concentration and the THM exposure from a shower, after adjusting for the postshower delay time in collecting the breath sample. Urinary haloacetic acid excretion rates were not correlated to water concentrations. Urinary trichloroacetic acid excretion rates were correlated with ingestion exposure, and that correlation was stronger in a subset of individuals who consumed beverages primarily within their home where the concentration measurements were made. No correlation was observed between an average 48-hr exposure estimate and the urinary dichloroacetic acid excretion rate, presumably because of its short biological half-life. Valid biomarkers were identified for DBP exposures, but the time between the exposure and sample collection should be considered to account for different metabolic rates among the DBPs. Further, using water concentration as an exposure estimate can introduce misclassification of exposure for DBPs whose primary route is ingestion due to the great variability in the amount of water ingested across a population.

  9. Exposure estimates to disinfection by-products of chlorinated drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, C P; Kim, H; Haltmeier, P; Klotz, J B

    1999-01-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) of drinking water is multiroute and occurs in households serviced by municipal water treatment facilities that disinfect the water as a necessary step to halt the spread of waterborne infectious diseases. Biomarkers of the two most abundant groups of DBPs of chlorination, exhaled breath levels of trihalomethanes (THMs) and urinary levels of two haloacetic acids, were compared to exposure estimates calculated from in-home tap water concentrations and responses to a questionnaire related to water usage. Background THM breath concentrations were uniformly low. Strong relationships were identified between the THM breath concentrations collected after a shower and both the THM water concentration and the THM exposure from a shower, after adjusting for the postshower delay time in collecting the breath sample. Urinary haloacetic acid excretion rates were not correlated to water concentrations. Urinary trichloroacetic acid excretion rates were correlated with ingestion exposure, and that correlation was stronger in a subset of individuals who consumed beverages primarily within their home where the concentration measurements were made. No correlation was observed between an average 48-hr exposure estimate and the urinary dichloroacetic acid excretion rate, presumably because of its short biological half-life. Valid biomarkers were identified for DBP exposures, but the time between the exposure and sample collection should be considered to account for different metabolic rates among the DBPs. Further, using water concentration as an exposure estimate can introduce misclassification of exposure for DBPs whose primary route is ingestion due to the great variability in the amount of water ingested across a population. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9924004

  10. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF HEALTH CONCERN IN DRINKING WATER: RESULTS OF A U.S. NATIONWIDE OCCURRENCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  11. Combining Mass Spectrometry and Toxicology for a Multi-Country European Epidemiologic Study on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking WATEr) project is the first systematic analysis that combines the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes with analytical chemistry and analytical biology in the European Union. This study...

  12. Combining Mass Spectrometry and Toxicology for a Multi-Country European Epidemiologic Study on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking WATEr) project is the first systematic analysis that combines the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes with analytical chemistry and analytical biology in the European Union. This study...

  13. EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) AND SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic Evaluation of the Potential Association between Exposure to Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products and Semen Quality
    *Morris, R; +Olshan, A; +Lansdell, L; *Jeffay, S; *Strader, L; *Klinefelter, G; *Perreault, S.

    * U.S. EPA/ORD/NHEERL/RTD/GEEBB, Research ...

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF PROTEINS INVOLVED IN TESTICULAR TOXICITY INDUCED BY HALOACID BY-PRODUCTS OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dibromoacetic acid (DBA), a prevalent disinfection by-product in drinking water, perturbs spermiogenesis in adult rats suggesting that Sertoli-germ cell communication is compromised. When isolated seminiferous tubules from rats exposed to DBA in vivo were cultured, quantitative a...

  15. RENAL CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) IN EKER RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RENAL CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING / WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) IN EKER RATS.

    Eker rats develop hereditary renal cell carcinoma secondary to a germline mutation in the tuberous sclerosis 2 tumor suppressor gene, and are highly suscepti...

  16. OCCURRENCE, GENOTOXICITY, AND CARCINOGENICITY OF EMERGING DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: A REVIEW AND ROADMAP FOR RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence, Genotoxicity, and Carcinogenicity of Emerging Disinfection By-products in Drinking Water: A Review and Roadmap for Research
    Summary of Paper
    What is study?
    This is the first review of the 30 year's research effort on the occurrence, genotoxicity,...

  17. Analysis, Occurrence and Toxicity of Haloacetaldehydes in Drinking Waters: Iodacetaldehyde as an Emerging Disinfection ByProduct.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated and brominated haloacetaldehydes (HALs) are consideredthe 3rd largest class of disinfection by-products (DBPs) by weight. The iodinatedHAL, iodoacetaldehyde, has been recently reported as an emerging DBP infinished drinking waters. Overall, iodinated DBPs, e.g., iodoa...

  18. Combining Mass Spectrometry and Toxicology for a Multi-Country European Epidemiologic Study on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking WATEr) project is the first systematic analysis that combines the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes with analytical chemistry and analytical biology in the European Union. This study...

  19. Combining Mass Spectrometry and Toxicology for a Multi-Country European Epidemiologic Study on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking WATEr) project is the first systematic analysis that combines the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes with analytical chemistry and analytical biology in the European Union. This study...

  20. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodo-acids were recently identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3...

  1. EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) AND SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic Evaluation of the Potential Association between Exposure to Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products and Semen Quality
    *Morris, R; +Olshan, A; +Lansdell, L; *Jeffay, S; *Strader, L; *Klinefelter, G; *Perreault, S.

    * U.S. EPA/ORD/NHEERL/RTD/GEEBB, Research ...

  2. BIOTRANSFORMATION AND GENOTOXICITY OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: DNA BINDING MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking water disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2) was
    previously shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium that overexpress rat glutathione
    transferase theta 1-1 (GSTT1-1). Several experimental approaches were undertaken in this study
    to inve...

  3. THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) WAS LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) W AS LESS THAN ADDITIVE.

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may under or over represent the actual biological res...

  4. OCCURRENCE, GENOTOXICITY, AND CARCINOGENICITY OF EMERGING DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: A REVIEW AND ROADMAP FOR RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence, Genotoxicity, and Carcinogenicity of Emerging Disinfection By-products in Drinking Water: A Review and Roadmap for Research
    Summary of Paper
    What is study?
    This is the first review of the 30 year's research effort on the occurrence, genotoxicity,...

  5. TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING ESI-MS AND ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research is to use a bio-assay directed approach to focus identification work on the most toxicologically important disinfection by-products. To this end, drinking water is being collected from full-scale treatment plants that use chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxi...

  6. TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING LC/MS AND LC/MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research is to use a bio-assay directed approach to focus identification work on the most toxicologically important disinfection by-products. To this end, drinking water is being collected from full-scale treatment plants that use chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxi...

  7. INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE GC/MS DECOMPOSITION OF TRIBROMONITROMETHANE IN DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tribromonitromethane (bromopicrin) has been found to be a disinfection by-product (DBP) in
    chlorinated1 and ozonated2 drinking water, and is structurally similar to dibromonitromethane,
    which has been indicated through structural analysis to be a possible carcinogen. Bromop...

  8. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodo-acids were recently identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3...

  9. ASSESSING EXPOSURE IN EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES TO DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: REPORT FROM AN INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inability to accurately assess exposure has been one of the major shortcomings of epidemiologic studies of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. A number of contributing factors include: (1) limited information on the identity, occurrence, toxicity and pharmacok...

  10. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF HEALTH CONCERN IN DRINKING WATER: RESULTS OF A U.S. NATIONWIDE OCCURRENCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  11. THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) WAS LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) W AS LESS THAN ADDITIVE.

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may under or over represent the actual biological res...

  12. BIOTRANSFORMATION AND GENOTOXICITY OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: DNA BINDING MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking water disinfection byproduct bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2) was
    previously shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium that overexpress rat glutathione
    transferase theta 1-1 (GSTT1-1). Several experimental approaches were undertaken in this study
    to inve...

  13. RENAL CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) IN EKER RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RENAL CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING / WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) IN EKER RATS.

    Eker rats develop hereditary renal cell carcinoma secondary to a germline mutation in the tuberous sclerosis 2 tumor suppressor gene, and are highly suscepti...

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF PROTEINS INVOLVED IN TESTICULAR TOXICITY INDUCED BY HALOACID BY-PRODUCTS OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dibromoacetic acid (DBA), a prevalent disinfection by-product in drinking water, perturbs spermiogenesis in adult rats suggesting that Sertoli-germ cell communication is compromised. When isolated seminiferous tubules from rats exposed to DBA in vivo were cultured, quantitative a...

  15. Quantification of pathogen inactivation efficacy by free chlorine disinfection of drinking water for QMRA.

    PubMed

    Petterson, S R; Stenström, T A

    2015-09-01

    To support the implementation of quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) for managing infectious risks associated with drinking water systems, a simple modeling approach for quantifying Log10 reduction across a free chlorine disinfection contactor was developed. The study was undertaken in three stages: firstly, review of the laboratory studies published in the literature; secondly, development of a conceptual approach to apply the laboratory studies to full-scale conditions; and finally implementation of the calculations for a hypothetical case study system. The developed model explicitly accounted for variability in residence time and pathogen specific chlorine sensitivity. Survival functions were constructed for a range of pathogens relying on the upper bound of the reported data transformed to a common metric. The application of the model within a hypothetical case study demonstrated the importance of accounting for variable residence time in QMRA. While the overall Log10 reduction may appear high, small parcels of water with short residence time can compromise the overall performance of the barrier. While theoretically simple, the approach presented is of great value for undertaking an initial assessment of a full-scale disinfection contactor based on limited site-specific information.

  16. Disinfection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis in drinking tap water using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Schiavano, Giuditta Fiorella; De Santi, Mauro; Sisti, Maurizio; Amagliani, Giulia; Brandi, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are resistant to conventional water treatments, and are opportunistic human pathogen, particularly in hospitalized patients. The aim of this investigation was to assess the effectiveness of an ultraviolet UV-C lamp treatment against Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis in drinking tap water. Ultraviolet treatments (0 - 192 mJ/cm(2)) were performed using UV lamp immerged onto cylindrical glass tubes containing artificially contaminated water. The results showed that susceptibility to UV varied considerably according to the strains and the diameter of the tube. With a dose of 32 mJ/cm(2), a significant inactivation (p<0.05) of 3 log (99.9%) or more was obtained in only five of the fourteen strains. To obtain a complete inactivation of all strains an irradiation of 192 mJ/cm(2) was needed, a dose that is much higher than the limits recommended by the international standards for UV disinfection of drinking water. In conclusion, it may be difficult to standardize a UV dose for the elimination of waterborne mycobacteria.

  17. Evaluation of thirteen haloacetic acids and ten trihalomethanes formation by peracetic acid and chlorine drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Xue, Runmiao; Shi, Honglan; Ma, Yinfa; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Inniss, Enos C; Adams, Craig D; Eichholz, Todd

    2017-09-15

    Free chlorine is a commonly used disinfectant in drinking water treatment. However, disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed during water disinfection. Haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs) are two major groups of DBPs. Iodo-HAAs and iodo-THMs (I-HAAs and I-THMs) are formed during the disinfection of the water containing high levels of iodide and are much more toxic than their chlorinated and brominated analogs. Peracetic acid (PAA) is a strong antimicrobial disinfectant that is expected to reduce the formation of HAAs and THMs during disinfection. In this study, the formations of thirteen HAAs and ten THMs, including the iodinated forms, have been investigated during PAA disinfection and chlorination as the comparison. The DBP formations under different iodide concentrations, pHs, and contact times were systematically investigated. Two types of commercial PAAs containing different concentrations of PAA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were studied. A solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was upgraded for THM analysis including I-THMs. HAAs were analyzed by following a recently developed high performance ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results show that the ratio of PAA and H2O2 concentration significantly affect the formation of I-THMs and I-HAAs. During PAA disinfection with lower PAA than H2O2, no detectable levels of THMs and HAAs were observed. During PAA disinfection with higher PAA than H2O2, low levels of monoiodoacetic acid, diiodoacetic acid, and iodoform were formed, and these levels were enhanced with the increase of iodide concentration. No significant quantities of chloro- or bromo-THMs and HAAs were formed during PAA disinfection treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Biological mechanism for the toxicity of haloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Pals, Justin A; Ang, Justin K; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    The halogenated acetic acids are a major class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) with five haloacetic acids regulated by the U.S. EPA. These agents are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. The decreasing toxicity rank order of the monohalogenated acetic acids (monoHAAs) is iodo- > bromo- > chloroacetic acid. We present data that the monoHAAs inhibit glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity in a concentration-dependent manner with the same rank order as above. The rate of inhibition of GAPDH and the toxic potency of the monoHAAs are highly correlated with their alkylating potential and the propensity of the halogen leaving group. This strong association between GAPDH inhibition and the monoHAA toxic potency supports a comprehensive mechanism for the adverse biological effects by this widely occurring class of regulated DBPs.

  19. Occurrence, profiling and prioritization of halogenated disinfection by-products in drinking water of China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huanhuan; Meng, Liping; Zhang, Haifeng; Yu, Jianwei; An, Wei; Hu, Jianying; Yang, Min

    2013-07-01

    The occurrence of 28 disinfection by-products (DBPs), which were divided into 5 groups, in 70 drinking water treatment plants in 31 cities across China was investigated, and the toxic potency of each DBP group was calculated using mammalian cell toxicity data from previous studies for profiling. Of the 28 DBPs, 21 were detected with an average frequency of detection of 50%. Trihalomethanes (THM4) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the most predominant species, whose median concentration levels were at 10.53 and 10.95 μg L(-1), respectively. Two of four iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) were detected, and the concentration of the I-THMs ranged from under the detection limit to 5.58 μg L(-1). The total concentration of haloacetonitriles (HANs) in different water samples ranged from under the limit of detection to 39.20 μg L(-1), with a median concentration of 1.11 μg L(-1). Two of four halonitromethanes (HNMs) were detected, and the maximum concentrations of chloronitromethane (CNM) and trichloronitromethane (TCNM) were 0.96 and 0.28 μg L(-1), respectively. HANs were found to be the most potent DBP group in terms of cytotoxicity, and HANs and HAAs had the same level of genotoxic potency. These results indicate that although at a low concentration level, the toxic potency of the unregulated HANs in drinking water may not be neglected.

  20. The epidemiology and possible mechanisms of disinfection by-products in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Grellier, James; Smith, Rachel; Iszatt, Nina; Bennett, James; Best, Nicky; Toledano, Mireille

    2009-10-13

    This paper summarizes the epidemiological evidence for adverse health effects associated with disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water and describes the potential mechanism of action. There appears to be good epidemiological evidence for a relationship between exposure to DBPs, as measured by trihalomethanes (THMs), in drinking water and bladder cancer, but the evidence for other cancers including colorectal cancer is inconclusive and inconsistent. There appears to be some evidence for an association between exposure to DBPs, specifically THMs, and little for gestational age/intrauterine growth retardation and, to a lesser extent, pre-term delivery, but evidence for relationships with other outcomes such as low birth weight, stillbirth, congenital anomalies and semen quality is inconclusive and inconsistent. Major limitations in exposure assessment, small sample sizes and potential biases may account for the inconclusive and inconsistent results in epidemiological studies. Moreover, most studies have focused on total THMs as the exposure metric, whereas other DBPs appear to be more toxic than the THMs, albeit generally occurring at lower levels in the water. The mechanisms through which DBPs may cause adverse health effects including cancer and adverse reproductive effects have not been well investigated. Several mechanisms have been suggested, including genotoxicity, oxidative stress, disruption of folate metabolism, disruption of the synthesis and/or secretion of placental syncytiotrophoblast-derived chorionic gonadotropin and lowering of testosterone levels, but further work is required in this area.

  1. Relationship of dietary iodide and drinking water disinfectants to thyroid function in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Holdsworth, G

    1986-01-01

    The importance of dietary iodide on the reported hypothyroid effect of drinking water disinfectants on thyroid function was investigated. Previous studies have also showed differences in the relative sensitivity of pigeons and rabbits to chlorinated water. Pigeons and rabbits were exposed for 3 months to diets containing high (950 ppb) or low (300 ppb) levels of iodide and to drinking water containing two levels of chlorine. Results showed that the high-iodide diet prevented the hypothyroid effect observed in pigeons given the low-iodide diet and chlorinated drinking water. Similar trends were observed in rabbits exposed to the same treatment; however, significant hypothyroid effects were not observed in this animal model. The factor associated with the observed effect of dietary iodide on the chlorine-induced change in thyroid function is unknown, as is the relative sensitivity of rabbits and pigeons to the effect of chlorine. Several factors may explain the importance of dietary iodide and the relative sensitivity of these species. For example, the iodine formed by the known reaction of chlorine with iodide could result in a decrease in the plasma level of iodide because of the relative absorption rates of iodide and iodine in the intestinal tract, and the various types and concentrations of chloroorganics (metabolites) formed in the diet following the exposure of various dietary constituents to chlorine could affect the thyroid function. The former factor was investigated in the present studies. Results do not confirm a consistent, significant reduction in the plasma level of iodide in rabbits and pigeons exposed to chlorinated water and the low-iodide diet. The latter factor is being investigated. PMID:3816728

  2. Relationship of dietary iodide and drinking water disinfectants to thyroid function in experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Holdsworth, G.

    1986-11-01

    The importance of dietary iodide on the reported hypothyroid effect of drinking water disinfectants on thyroid function was investigated. Previous studies have also showed differences in the relative sensitivity of pigeons and rabbits to chlorinated water. Pigeons and rabbits were exposed for 3 months to diets containing high (950 ppb) or low (300 ppb) levels of iodide and to drinking water containing two levels of chlorine. Results showed that the high-iodide diet prevented the hypothyroid effect observed in pigeons given the low-iodide diet and chlorinated drinking water. Similar trends were observed in rabbits exposed to the same treatment; however, significant hypothyroid effects were not observed in this animal model. The factor associated with the observed effect of dietary iodide on the chlorine-induced change in thyroid function is unknown, as is the relative sensitivity of rabbits and pigeons to the effect of chlorine. Several factors may explain the importance of dietary iodide and the relative sensitivity of these species. For example, the iodine formed by the known reaction of chlorine with iodide could result in a decrease in the plasma level of iodide because of the relative absorption rates of iodide and iodine in the intestinal tract, and the various types and concentrations of chloroorganics (metabolites) formed in the diet following the exposure of various dietary constituents to chlorine could affect the thyroid function. The former factor was investigated in the present studies. Results do not confirm a consistent, significant reduction in the plasma level of iodide in rabbits and pigeons exposed to chlorinated water and the low-iodide diet. The latter factor is being investigated.

  3. Developmental Toxicity Evaluations of Whole Mixtures of Disinfection By-products using Concentrated Drinking Water in Rats: Gestational and Lactational Effects of Sulfate and Sodium

    EPA Science Inventory

    A developmental toxicity bioassay was used in three experiments to evaluate drinking water concentrates for suitability in multigenerational studies. First, chlorinated water was concentrated 135 fold by reverse osmosis; select lost disinfection by-products were spiked back. Co...

  4. Developmental Toxicity Evaluations of Whole Mixtures of Disinfection By-products using Concentrated Drinking Water in Rats: Gestational and Lactational Effects of Sulfate and Sodium*

    EPA Science Inventory

    A developmental toxicity bioassay was used in three experiments to evaluate drinking water concentrates for suitability in multigenerational studies. First, chlorinated water was concentrated 135 fold by reverse osmosis; select lost disinfection by-products were spiked back. Conc...

  5. Developmental Toxicity Evaluations of Whole Mixtures of Disinfection By-products using Concentrated Drinking Water in Rats: Gestational and Lactational Effects of Sulfate and Sodium*

    EPA Science Inventory

    A developmental toxicity bioassay was used in three experiments to evaluate drinking water concentrates for suitability in multigenerational studies. First, chlorinated water was concentrated 135 fold by reverse osmosis; select lost disinfection by-products were spiked back. Conc...

  6. Developmental Toxicity Evaluations of Whole Mixtures of Disinfection By-products using Concentrated Drinking Water in Rats: Gestational and Lactational Effects of Sulfate and Sodium

    EPA Science Inventory

    A developmental toxicity bioassay was used in three experiments to evaluate drinking water concentrates for suitability in multigenerational studies. First, chlorinated water was concentrated 135 fold by reverse osmosis; select lost disinfection by-products were spiked back. Co...

  7. Identifying Carcinogenic Potentials of Drinking Water Disinfection Byproducts using Normal Human Colonocyte Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of disinfected surface waters to an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Approximately 600 byproducts (DBPs) have been identified for the major disinfectants currently in use and represent less than half of the total organic car...

  8. Identifying Carcinogenic Potentials of Drinking Water Disinfection Byproducts using Normal Human Colonocyte Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of disinfected surface waters to an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Approximately 600 byproducts (DBPs) have been identified for the major disinfectants currently in use and represent less than half of the total organic car...

  9. Enhanced formation of disinfection byproducts in shale gas wastewater-impacted drinking water supplies.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kimberly M; Zeng, Teng; Harkness, Jennifer; Vengosh, Avner; Mitch, William A

    2014-10-07

    The disposal and leaks of hydraulic fracturing wastewater (HFW) to the environment pose human health risks. Since HFW is typically characterized by elevated salinity, concerns have been raised whether the high bromide and iodide in HFW may promote the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and alter their speciation to more toxic brominated and iodinated analogues. This study evaluated the minimum volume percentage of two Marcellus Shale and one Fayetteville Shale HFWs diluted by fresh water collected from the Ohio and Allegheny Rivers that would generate and/or alter the formation and speciation of DBPs following chlorination, chloramination, and ozonation treatments of the blended solutions. During chlorination, dilutions as low as 0.01% HFW altered the speciation toward formation of brominated and iodinated trihalomethanes (THMs) and brominated haloacetonitriles (HANs), and dilutions as low as 0.03% increased the overall formation of both compound classes. The increase in bromide concentration associated with 0.01-0.03% contribution of Marcellus HFW (a range of 70-200 μg/L for HFW with bromide = 600 mg/L) mimics the increased bromide levels observed in western Pennsylvanian surface waters following the Marcellus Shale gas production boom. Chloramination reduced HAN and regulated THM formation; however, iodinated trihalomethane formation was observed at lower pH. For municipal wastewater-impacted river water, the presence of 0.1% HFW increased the formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during chloramination, particularly for the high iodide (54 ppm) Fayetteville Shale HFW. Finally, ozonation of 0.01-0.03% HFW-impacted river water resulted in significant increases in bromate formation. The results suggest that total elimination of HFW discharge and/or installation of halide-specific removal techniques in centralized brine treatment facilities may be a better strategy to mitigate impacts on downstream drinking water treatment plants than altering

  10. Solar water disinfection

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Collier, R.

    1996-11-01

    Non-potable drinking water is a major problem for much of the world`s population. It has been estimated that from 15 to 20 million children under the age of 5 die from diarrheal conditions brought on by infected drinking water every year. This is equivalent to a fully-loaded DC-10 crashing every ten minutes of every day, 365 days a year. Heat is one of the most effective methods of disinfecting drinking water. Using conventional means of heating water (heating on an open-flamed stove) results in an extremely energy-intensive process. The main obstacle is that for areas of the world where potable water is a problem, fuel supplies are either too expensive, not available, or the source of devastating environmental problems (deforestation). The apparatus described is a solar-powered water disinfection device that can overcome most if not all of the barriers that presently limit technological solutions to drinking water problems. It uses a parabolic trough solar concentrator with a receiver tube that is also a counterflow heat exchanger. The system is totally self-contained utilizing a photovoltaic-powered water pump, and a standard automotive thermostat for water flow control. The system is designed for simplicity, reliability and the incorporation of technology readily accessible in most areas of the world. Experiments at the Florida Solar Energy Center have demonstrated up to 2,500 liters of safe drinking water per day with 28 square meters of solar concentrator.

  11. Reproductive and developmental effects of disinfection by-products in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Reif, J S; Hatch, M C; Bracken, M; Holmes, L B; Schwetz, B A; Singer, P C

    1996-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have reported associations between the consumption of chlorinated drinking water and reproductive and developmental effects. Here we review the available epidemiologic data, assess the hazard potential posed by exposure to disinfection by-products, identify critical data gaps, and offer recommendations for further research. The epidemiologic evidence supporting associations between exposure to water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and adverse pregnancy outcomes is sparse, and positive findings should be interpreted cautiously. The methods used during the early stages of research in this area have been diverse. Variability in exposure assessment and endpoints makes it difficult to synthesize or combine the available data. Exposure misclassification and unmeasured confounding may have lead to bias in risk estimation. Future studies of reproductive outcome and exposure to chlorinated water should use improved methods for exposure assessment to 1) assure selection of appropriate exposure markers, 2) assess seasonal and annual fluctuations in DBPs, 3) assess variability within the distribution system, and 4) assess exposure through multiple routes such as bathing and showering, as well as consumption. Population-based studies should be conducted to evaluate male and female fertility, conception delay, growth retardation, and specific birth defects. The reproductive and developmental effects of exposure to DBPs could be efficiently explored in ongoing investigations by incorporating valid exposure markers and relevant questionnaire information. Future studies should make use of naturally occurring variability in the concentrations of DBPs and may incorporate biomarkers of exposure and effect in their design. Epidemiologic investigations should be conducted in parallel with laboratory-based and animal studies in a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach. PMID:8930546

  12. Monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products inhibit follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian antral follicles in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Clara H.; Gao, Liying; Dettro, Tyler; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Ricke, William A.; Plewa, Michael J.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Water disinfection greatly reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases, but the reaction between disinfectants and natural organic matter in water leads to the formation of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). DBPs have been shown to be toxic, but their effects on the ovary are not well defined. This study tested the hypothesis that monohalogenated DBPs (chloroacetic acid, CAA; bromoacetic acid, BAA; iodoacetic acid, IAA) inhibit antral follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian follicles. Antral follicles were isolated and cultured with either vehicle or DBPs (0.25–1.00 mM of CAA; 2–15 µM of BAA or IAA) for 48 and 96 h. Follicle growth was measured every 24 h and the media were analyzed for estradiol levels at 96 h. Exposure to DBPs significantly inhibited antral follicle growth and reduced estradiol levels compared to controls. These data demonstrate that DBP exposure caused ovarian toxicity in vitro. PMID:27151372

  13. Monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products inhibit follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian antral follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Clara H; Gao, Liying; Dettro, Tyler; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Ricke, William A; Plewa, Michael J; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-07-01

    Water disinfection greatly reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases, but the reaction between disinfectants and natural organic matter in water leads to the formation of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). DBPs have been shown to be toxic, but their effects on the ovary are not well defined. This study tested the hypothesis that monohalogenated DBPs (chloroacetic acid, CAA; bromoacetic acid, BAA; iodoacetic acid, IAA) inhibit antral follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian follicles. Antral follicles were isolated and cultured with either vehicle or DBPs (0.25-1.00mM of CAA; 2-15μM of BAA or IAA) for 48 and 96h. Follicle growth was measured every 24h and the media were analyzed for estradiol levels at 96h. Exposure to DBPs significantly inhibited antral follicle growth and reduced estradiol levels compared to controls. These data demonstrate that DBP exposure caused ovarian toxicity in vitro.

  14. Estimating Potential Increased Bladder Cancer Risk Due to Increased Bromide Concentrations in Sources of Disinfected Drinking Waters.

    PubMed

    Regli, Stig; Chen, Jimmy; Messner, Michael; Elovitz, Michael S; Letkiewicz, Frank J; Pegram, Rex A; Pepping, T J; Richardson, Susan D; Wright, J Michael

    2015-11-17

    Public water systems are increasingly facing higher bromide levels in their source waters from anthropogenic contamination through coal-fired power plants, conventional oil and gas extraction, textile mills, and hydraulic fracturing. Climate change is likely to exacerbate this in coming years. We estimate bladder cancer risk from potential increased bromide levels in source waters of disinfecting public drinking water systems in the United States. Bladder cancer is the health end point used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in its benefits analysis for regulating disinfection byproducts in drinking water. We use estimated increases in the mass of the four regulated trihalomethanes (THM4) concentrations (due to increased bromide incorporation) as the surrogate disinfection byproduct (DBP) occurrence metric for informing potential bladder cancer risk. We estimate potential increased excess lifetime bladder cancer risk as a function of increased source water bromide levels. Results based on data from 201 drinking water treatment plants indicate that a bromide increase of 50 μg/L could result in a potential increase of between 10(-3) and 10(-4) excess lifetime bladder cancer risk in populations served by roughly 90% of these plants.

  15. Culture-dependent enumeration methods failed to simultaneously detect disinfectant-injured and genetically modified Escherichia coli in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Liu, Lu; Yang, Dong; Liu, Wei-Li; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Qu, Hong-Mei; Qiu, Zhi-Gang; Hou, Ai-Ming; Wang, Da-Ning; Ding, Chen-Shi; Li, Jun-Wen; Guo, Jian-Hua; Jin, Min

    2017-05-24

    Underestimation of Escherichia coli in drinking water, an indicator microorganism of sanitary risk, may result in potential risks of waterborne diseases. However, the detection of disinfectant-injured or genetically modified (GM) E. coli has been largely overlooked so far. To evaluate the accuracy of culture-dependent enumeration with regard to disinfectant-injured and GM E. coli, chlorine- or ozone-injured wild-type (WT) and GM E. coli were prepared and characterized. Then, water samples contaminated with these E. coli strains were assayed by four widely used methods, including lactose tryptose broth-based multiple-tube fermentation (MTF), m-endo-based membrane filtration method (MFM), an enzyme substrate test (EST) known as Colilert, and Petrifilm-based testing slip method (TSM). It was found that MTF was the most effective method to detect disinfectant-injured WT E. coli (with 76.9% trials detecting all these bacteria), while this method could not effectively detect GM E. coli (with uninjured bacteria undetectable and a maximal detection rate of 21.5% for the injured). The EST was the only method which enabled considerable enumeration of uninjured GM E. coli, with a detection rate of over 93%. However, the detection rate declined to lower than 45.4% once the GM E. coli was injured by disinfectants. The MFM was invalid for both disinfectant-injured and GM E. coli. This is the first study to report the failure of these commonly used enumeration methods to simultaneously detect disinfectant-injured and GM E. coli. Thus, it highlights the urgent requirement for the development of a more accurate and versatile enumeration method which allows the detection of disinfectant-injured and GM E. coli on the assessment of microbial quality of drinking water.

  16. Characterization of soluble microbial products as precursors of disinfection byproducts in drinking water supply.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Lin; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xie, Yue-Feng; Tang, Hao

    2014-02-15

    Water pollution by wastewater discharge can cause the problem of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water supply. In this study, DBP formation characteristics of soluble microbial products (SMPs) as the main products of wastewater organic biodegradation were investigated. The results show that SMPs can act as DBP precursors in simulated wastewater biodegradation process. Under the experimental conditions, stabilized SMPs had DBPFP (DBP formation potential) yield of around 5.6 μmol mmol(-1)-DOC (dissolved organic carbon) and DBP speciation profile different from that of the conventional precursor, natural organic matter (NOM). SMPs contained polysaccharides, proteins, and humic-like substances, and the latter two groups can act as reactive DBP precursors. SMP fraction with molecular weight of <1 kDa accounted for 85% of the organic carbon and 65% of the DBP formation. As small SMP molecules are more difficult to remove by conventional water treatment processes, more efforts are needed to control wastewater-derived DBP problem in water resource management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Precursors of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in drinking water--a critical review and analysis.

    PubMed

    Bond, Tom; Templeton, Michael R; Graham, Nigel

    2012-10-15

    In recent years research into the formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) in drinking water - including N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), the haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloacetamides (HAcAms), cyanogen halides (CNX) and halonitromethanes (HNMs) - has proliferated. This is partly due to their high reported toxicity of N-DBPs. In this review paper information about the formation yields of N-DBPs from model precursors, and about environmental precursor occurrence, has been employed to assess the amount of N-DBP formation that is attributable to known precursors. It was calculated that for HANs and HAcAms, the concentrations of known precursors - mainly free amino acids are insufficient to account for the observed concentrations of these N-DBP groups. However, at least in some waters, a significant proportion of CNX and NDMA formation can be explained by known precursors. Identified N-DBP precursors tend to be of low molecular weight and low electrostatic charge relative to bulk natural organic matter (NOM). This makes them recalcitrant to removal by water treatment processes, notably coagulation, as confirmed by a number of bench-scale studies. However, amino acids have been found to be easier to remove during water treatment than would be suggested by the known molecular properties of the individual free amino acids.

  18. Disinfection characteristics of the dissolved organic fractions at several stages of a conventional drinking water treatment plant in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen-Ye; Gu, Ji-Dong; Li, Hai-Bo; Li, Xiao-Yan; Leung, Kenneth Mei-Yee

    2009-12-30

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences many aspects of drinking water treatment, including the formation of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) when disinfectants are applied. DOM was isolated and fractionated using membrane ultra-filtration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to eight individual fractions based on molecular weight cut-offs from a conventional surface water treatment plant (WTP) in Guangzhou of PR China. Molecular weights of these eight fractions were further calibrated using high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and they ranged from 0.36 to 182.6 kDa. Fractions with molecular weight <0.80 kDa obtained by YC-05 UF membrane and RO were the major ones in all four stages of the water treatment processes; both ZM-500 and YM-100 membranes showed the highest removal efficiency when coupling with conventional coagulation and sedimentation processes. The elemental analysis showed that YC-05 fraction had greater polarity and aromaticity than any of the others. Furthermore, disinfection characteristics and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) were determined for all DOM fractions obtained in this study. YC-05 fraction was the major precursor for trihalomethane (THMs) formation among the samples tested and could be removed effectively by particulate activated carbon (PAC) adsorption. RO fraction could not be removed by PAC adsorption and, as a result, consumed more chlorine in the disinfection process. The results suggested that advanced drinking water treatment should focus on the removal of low molecular weight DOM in the source water.

  19. A picture of polar iodinated disinfection byproducts in drinking water by (UPLC/)ESI-tqMS.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guoyu; Zhang, Xiangru

    2009-12-15

    Iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are generally more toxic than their chlorinated and brominated analogues. Up to date, only a few iodinated DBPs in drinking water have been identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In this work, a method for fast selective detection of polar iodinated DBPs was developed using an electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (ESI-tqMS) by conducting precursor ion scan of iodide at m/z 126.9. With such a method, pictures of polar iodinated DBPs in chlorinated, chloraminated, and chlorine-ammonia treated water samples were achieved. By coupling state-of-the-art ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) to the ESI-tqMS, structures of 17 iodinated DBPs were tentatively proposed. The results fully demonstrate that, with respect to the DBP number/levels among the three disinfection processes, chloramination generally generated the most/highest iodinated DBPs, chlorination generally produced the fewest/lowest iodinated DBPs, and chlorine-ammonia sequential treatment formed iodinated DBPs lying in between; the numbers of iodinated DBPs in chloraminated Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) and Humic Acid (SRHA) were nearly the same, but the levels of aliphatic iodinated DBPs were higher in the chloraminated SRFA while the levels of aromatic iodinated DBPs were higher in the chloraminated SRHA; a couple of nitrogenous iodinated DBPs were found in chloramination and chlorine-ammonia treatment. The ratio of total organic iodine levels in chlorine-ammonia sequential treatment and chloramination could be expressed as a function of the lag time of ammonia addition.

  20. Toxicity of drinking water disinfection byproducts: cell cycle alterations induced by the monohaloacetonitriles.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Yukako; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-07

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are a chemical class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that form from reactions between disinfectants and nitrogen-containing precursors, the latter more prevalent in water sources impacted by algae bloom and municipal wastewater effluent discharge. HANs, previously demonstrated to be genotoxic, were investigated for their effects on the mammalian cell cycle. Treating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with monoHANs followed by the release from the chemical treatment resulted in the accumulation of abnormally high DNA content in cells over time (hyperploid). The potency for the cell cycle alteration followed the order: iodoacetonitrile (IAN) > bromoacetonitrile (BAN) ≫ chloroacetonitrile (CAN). Exposure to 6 μM IAN, 12 μM BAN and 900 μM CAN after 26 h post-treatment incubation resulted in DNA repair; however, subsequent cell cycle alteration effects were observed. Cell proliferation of HAN-treated cells was suppressed for as long as 43 to 52 h. Enlarged cell size was observed after 52 h post-treatment incubation without the induction of cytotoxicity. The HAN-mediated cell cycle alteration was mitosis- and proliferation-dependent, which suggests that HAN treatment induced mitosis override, and that HAN-treated cells proceeded into S phase and directly into the next cell cycle. Cells with multiples genomes would result in aneuploidy (state of abnormal chromosome number and DNA content) at the next mitosis since extra centrosomes could compromise the assembly of bipolar spindles. There is accumulating evidence of a transient tetraploid state proceeding to aneuploidy in cancer progression. Biological self-defense systems to ensure genomic stability and to eliminate tetraploid cells exist in eukaryotic cells. A key tumor suppressor gene, p53, is oftentimes mutated in various types of human cancer. It is possible that HAN disruption of the normal cell cycle and the generation of aberrant cells with an abnormal number of

  1. Travelers' Health: Water Disinfection for Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... with and use simple methods to ensure safe drinking water. Several methods are scalable and some can be ... supplemented with filtration to remove resistant oocysts from drinking water. Cloudy water contains substances that will neutralize disinfectant, ...

  2. Chemistry, Toxicity and Health Risk Assessment of Drinking Water Disinfection ByProducts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of oxidizing chemicals (such as chlorine, ozone and chloramines) used to control waterborne pathogens with natural organic material and other substances in water. DBP mixture composition varies as a function of geographic ...

  3. Chemistry, Toxicity and Health Risk Assessment of Drinking Water Disinfection ByProducts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of oxidizing chemicals (such as chlorine, ozone and chloramines) used to control waterborne pathogens with natural organic material and other substances in water. DBP mixture composition varies as a function of geographic ...

  4. Exopolymeric substances from drinking water biofilms: Dynamics of production and relation with disinfection by products.

    PubMed

    Lemus Pérez, M F; Rodríguez Susa, M

    2017-06-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) as an external matrix of biofilm could react with disinfectants in drinking water networks forming disinfection by-products (DBP). Based on an experimental setup using two chlorine conditions-biofilm 1 (2.6 ± 0.8 mgCl/L) and biofilm 2 (0.7 ± 0.2 mg Cl/L)-samples of biofilms were recovered during 9 campaigns and EPS were extracted. Analyses of SUVA, fluorescence and amino acid (AA) content were carried out on the EPS to observe variation over time and correlations with DBP formation potential (DBPfp) after chlorination. SUVA values were under 2 L/mgC*m showing that both EPS were hydrophilic. Slightly higher SUVA in biofilm 2 with low variation over time was observed. Fluorescence showed that aromatic proteins and fulvic like substances were the principal components and increased in biofilm 1 over time. AA decreased with time, and higher values of alanine, threonine, proline and isoleucine were observed in biofilm 2. Based on general associations, the SUVA of biofilm 2 correlated well with chloroform (CF) (r = 0.80). Generally, in both biofilms, tryptophan-like substances were negatively correlated with DBP while humic acid-like substances correlated positively, but with low indexes (r = 0.3-0.6). Correlations of data from individual sampling increased the indices (r over 0.8), suggesting a temporal influence of other factors on DBPfp such as inorganics, filtered water and the structural composition of EPS. In biofilm 1, Br-haloacetic acids (Br-HAA), dibromoacetonitrile and bromochloro acetonitrile were inversely associated with arginine and valine, as were di and trichloropropanone to arginine. On the contrary, in biofilm 2, the following amino acids correlated positively with DBP: alanine with Br-HAA, alanine with CF, alanine with N-DBP (chloropicrin, di and tri-chloro acetonitrile), and valine with CF. As this is the first report about the relation between temporal variation of EPS and DBPfp of biofilms in two different

  5. INFLUENCE OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID ON RAT ESTROUS CYCLICITY AND OVARIAN FOLLICULAR STEROID RELEASE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking water disinfection by-product, dibromoacetic acid (DBA) has been reported to affect gonadal functions in the male rat. However, there is little information regarding its influence on female reproductive activity. Consequently, the present study investigated the eff...

  6. DIBROMOACETIC ACID, A PREVALENT BY-PRODUCT OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION, COMPROMISES THE SYNTHESIS OF SPECIFIC SEMINFEROUS TUBULE PROTEINS FOLLOWING BOTH IN VIVO AND IN VITRO EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Dibromoacetic acid(DBA) is a byproduct of drinking water disinfection that alters spermatogenesis in adult male rats. To identify a mechanism by which DBA alters spermatogenesis, seminiferous tubules representing specific groups of spermatogenic stages were expos...

  7. Occurrence, Synthesis and Mammalian Cell Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Haloacetamides: An Emerging Class of Nitrogenous Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haloacetamides, a class of emerging nitrogenous drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs), were analyzed for their chronic cytotoxicity and for the induction of genomic DNA damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  8. Component-Based and Whole-Mixture Techniques for Addressing the Toxicity Of Drinking-Water Disinfection By-Product Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    To conduct the health-effect studies described in subsequent articles, concentrated aqueous mixtures of disinfection byproducts were required for the two separate treatment trains described in the preceding article. To accomplish this, the finished drinking waters from each trea...

  9. INFLUENCE OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID ON RAT ESTROUS CYCLICITY AND OVARIAN FOLLICULAR STEROID RELEASE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking water disinfection by-product, dibromoacetic acid (DBA) has been reported to affect gonadal functions in the male rat. However, there is little information regarding its influence on female reproductive activity. Consequently, the present study investigated the eff...

  10. DIBROMOACETIC ACID, A PREVALENT BY-PRODUCT OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION, COMPROMISES THE SYNTHESIS OF SPECIFIC SEMINFEROUS TUBULE PROTEINS FOLLOWING BOTH IN VIVO AND IN VITRO EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Dibromoacetic acid(DBA) is a byproduct of drinking water disinfection that alters spermatogenesis in adult male rats. To identify a mechanism by which DBA alters spermatogenesis, seminiferous tubules representing specific groups of spermatogenic stages were expos...

  11. Component-Based and Whole-Mixture Techniques for Addressing the Toxicity Of Drinking-Water Disinfection By-Product Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    To conduct the health-effect studies described in subsequent articles, concentrated aqueous mixtures of disinfection byproducts were required for the two separate treatment trains described in the preceding article. To accomplish this, the finished drinking waters from each trea...

  12. Mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis of drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Plewa, Michael J; Kargalioglu, Yahya; Vankerk, Danielle; Minear, Roger A; Wagner, Elizabeth D

    2002-01-01

    Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays were used to analyze drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) AS52 cells. The DBPs were chosen because they are common in drinking water, resulting from conventional disinfection using chlorination and chloramination. Data were also available to compare these results with cytotoxicity and mutagenicity studies in Salmonella typhimurium. The rank order in decreasing chronic cytotoxicity measured in a microplate-based assay was bromoacetic acid (BA) > 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone (MX) > dibromoacetic acid (DBA) > chloroacetic acid (CA) > KBrO(3) > tribromoacetic acid (TBA) > EMS (ethylmethanesulfonate, positive control) > dichloroacetic acid (DCA) > trichloroacetic acid (TCA). The induction of DNA strand breaks by these agents was measured by alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE, comet assay) and the rank order in decreasing genotoxicity was BA > MX > CA > DBA > TBA > EMS > KBrO(3), while DCA and TCA were refractory. BA was more cytotoxic (31x) and genotoxic (14x) than MX in CHO cells. BA was over 400x more genotoxic than potassium bromate. The brominated haloacetic acids (HAAs) were more cytotoxic and genotoxic than their chlorinated analogs. The HAAs expressed a statistically significant inverse relationship in CHO cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity as a function of increased numbers of halogen atoms per molecule. A quantitative comparison was conducted with results from a previous study with cytotoxicity and mutagenicity in S. typhimurium. There was no correlation between chronic CHO cell and bacterial cell cytotoxicity. DBP-induced CHO cell cytotoxicity was not related to mutagenic potency in S. typhimurium. Cytotoxicity in CHO cells was statistically significant and highly correlated to CHO cell genotoxicity. Finally, we determined that the DBP genotoxic potency in CHO cells and the mutagenic potency in S. typhimurium were not related. This suggests that

  13. Determinants of disinfectant pretreatment efficacy for nitrosamine control in chloraminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Daniel L; Krasner, Stuart W; von Gunten, Urs; Mitch, William A

    2015-11-01

    Utilities using chloramines need strategies to mitigate nitrosamine formation to meet potential future nitrosamine regulations. The ability to reduce NDMA formation under typical post-chloramination conditions of pretreatment with ultraviolet light from a low pressure mercury lamp (LPUV), free chlorine (HOCl), ozone (O3), and UV light from a medium pressure mercury lamp (MPUV) were compared at exposures relevant to drinking water treatment. The order of efficacy after application to waters impacted by upstream wastewater discharges was O3 > HOCl ≈ MPUV > LPUV. NDMA precursor abatement generally did not correlate well between oxidants, and waters exhibited different behaviors with respect to pH and temperature, suggesting a variety of source-dependent NDMA precursors. For wastewater-impacted waters, the observed pH dependence for precursor abatement suggested the important role of secondary or tertiary amine precursors. Although hydroxyl radicals did not appear to be important for NDMA precursor abatement during O3 or MPUV pretreatment, the efficacy of MPUV correlated strongly with dissolved organic carbon concentration (p = 0.01), suggesting alternative indirect photochemical pathways. The temperature dependences during pre- and post-disinfection indicated that NDMA formation is likely to increase during warm seasons for O3 pretreatment, decrease for HOCl pretreatment, and remain unchanged for MPUV treatment, although seasonal changes in source water quality may counteract the temperature effects. For two waters impacted by relatively high polyDADMAC coagulant doses, pretreatment with HOCl, O3, and MPUV increased NDMA formation during post-chloramination. For O3 pretreatment, hydroxyl radicals likely led to precursor formation from the polymer in the latter tests. MPUV treatment of polymer-impacted water increased subsequent NDMA formation through an indirect photochemical process. Many factors may mitigate the importance of this increased NDMA formation

  14. Assessment of Reproductive Effects of Complex Mixtures of Disinfection By-Products in a Multi-Generational Rat Bioassay of Drinking Water Concentrates - Monterey

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address concerns raised by epidemiology studies, we conducted a multigenerational reproductive toxicity study in rats using a “whole” mixture of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Raw water was concentrated ~130 fold, chlorinated, and provided as drinking water to...

  15. Assessment of reproductive effects on complex mixtures of disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay of drinking water concentrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address concerns raised by epidemiology studies, we conducted a multigenerational reproductive toxicity study in rats using a “whole” mixture of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Raw water was concentrated ~130 fold, chlorinated, and provided as drinking water to...

  16. Assessment of Reproductive Effects of Complex Mixtures of Disinfection By-Products in a Multi-Generational Rat Bioassay of Drinking Water Concentrates - Monterey

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address concerns raised by epidemiology studies, we conducted a multigenerational reproductive toxicity study in rats using a “whole” mixture of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Raw water was concentrated ~130 fold, chlorinated, and provided as drinking water to...

  17. Assessment of reproductive effects on complex mixtures of disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay of drinking water concentrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address concerns raised by epidemiology studies, we conducted a multigenerational reproductive toxicity study in rats using a “whole” mixture of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Raw water was concentrated ~130 fold, chlorinated, and provided as drinking water to...

  18. Household based treatment of drinking water with flocculant-disinfectant for preventing diarrhoea in areas with turbid source water in rural western Kenya: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Crump, John A; Otieno, Peter O; Slutsker, Laurence; Keswick, Bruce H; Rosen, Daniel H; Hoekstra, R Michael; Vulule, John M; Luby, Stephen P

    2005-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect on prevalence of diarrhoea and mortality of household based treatment of drinking water with flocculant-disinfectant, sodium hypochlorite, and standard practices in areas with turbid water source in Africa. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial over 20 weeks. Setting Family compounds, each containing several houses, in rural western Kenya. Participants 6650 people in 605 family compounds. Intervention Water treatment: flocculant-disinfectant, sodium hypochlorite, and usual practice (control). Main outcome measures Prevalence of diarrhoea and all cause mortality. Escherichia coli concentration, free residual chlorine concentration, and turbidity in household drinking water as surrogates for effectiveness of water treatment. Results In children < 2 years old, compared with those in the control compounds, the absolute difference in prevalence of diarrhoea was –25% in the flocculant-disinfectant arm (95% confidence interval –40 to –5) and –17% in the sodium hypochlorite arm (–34 to 4). In all age groups compared with control, the absolute difference in prevalence was –19% in the flocculant-disinfectant arm (–34 to –2) and –26% in the sodium hypochlorite arm (–39 to –9). There were significantly fewer deaths in the intervention compounds than in the control compounds (relative risk of death 0.58, P = 0.036). Fourteen per cent of water samples from control compounds had E coli concentrations < 1 CFU/100 ml compared with 82% in flocculant-disinfectant and 78% in sodium hypochlorite compounds. The mean turbidity of drinking water was 8 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) in flocculant-disinfectant households, compared with 55 NTU in the two other compounds (P < 0.001). Conclusions In areas of turbid water, flocculant-disinfectant was associated with a significant reduction in diarrhoea among children < 2 years. This health benefit, combined with a significant reduction in turbidity, suggests that the flocculant-disinfectant

  19. Application of ultrasound and quartz sand for the removal of disinfection byproducts from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Dong, Lili; Luo, Zhen; Cui, Xiaochun; Liu, Jiancong; Liu, Zhongmou; Huo, Mingxin

    2014-04-01

    To the best of our knowledge, little information is available on the combined use of ultrasound (US) and quartz sand (QS) in the removal of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from drinking water. This study investigates the removal efficiency for 12 DBPs from drinking water by 20 kHz sonolytic treatment, QS adsorption, and their combination. Results indicate that DBPs with logKow≤1.12 could not be sonolysized; for logKow≥1.97, more than 20% removal efficiency was observed, but the removal efficiency was unrelated to logKow. DBPs containing a nitro group are more sensitive to US than those that comprise nitrile, hydrogen, and hydroxyl groups. Among the 12 investigated DBPs, 9 could be adsorbed by QS adsorption. The adsorption efficiency ranged from 12% for 1,1-dichloro-2-propanone to 80% for trichloroacetonitrile. A synergistic effect was found between the US and QS on DBPs removal, and all the 12 DBPs could be effectively removed by the combined use of US and QS. In the presence of US, part of the QS particles were corroded into small particles which play a role in increasing the number of cavitation bubbles and reducing cavitation bubble size and then improve the removal efficiency of DBPs. On the other hand, the presence of US enhances the DBP mass transfer rate to cavitation bubbles and quartz sand. In addition, sonolytic treatment led to a slight decrease of pH, and TOC values decreased under all the three treatment processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Solar radiation disinfection of drinking water at temperate latitudes: inactivation rates for an optimised reactor configuration.

    PubMed

    Davies, C M; Roser, D J; Feitz, A J; Ashbolt, N J

    2009-02-01

    Solar radiation-driven inactivation of bacteria, virus and protozoan pathogen models was quantified in simulated drinking water at a temperate latitude (34 degrees S). The water was seeded with Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium sporogenes spores, and P22 bacteriophage, each at ca 1x10(5) mL(-1), and exposed to natural sunlight in 30-L reaction vessels. Water temperature ranged from 17 to 39 degrees C during the experiments lasting up to 6h. Dark controls showed little inactivation and so it was concluded that the inactivation observed was primarily driven by non-thermal processes. The optimised reactor design achieved S90 values (cumulative exposure required for 90% reduction) for the test microorganisms in the range 0.63-1.82 MJ m(-2) of Global Solar Exposure (GSX) without the need for TiO2 as a catalyst. High turbidity (840-920 NTU) only reduced the S(90) value by <40%. Further, when all S90 means were compared this decrease was not statistically significant (prob.>0.05). However, inactivation was significantly reduced for E. faecalis and P22 when the transmittance of UV wavelengths was attenuated by water with high colour (140 PtCo units) or a suboptimally transparent reactor lid (prob.<0.05). S90 values were consistent with those measured by other researchers (ca 1-10 MJ m(-2)) for a range of waters and microorganisms. Although temperatures required for SODIS type pasteurization were not produced, non-thermal inactivation alone appeared to offer a viable means for reliably disinfecting low colour source waters by greater than 4 orders of magnitude on sunny days at 34 degrees S latitude.

  1. IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: DOES LC/ESI-MS/MS OFFER AN ADVANTAGE OVER GC/NCI-MS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  2. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE FROM POTASSIUM BROMATE EXPOSURE IN LONG-EVANS RATS IS NOT ENHANCED BY A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public drinking water treated with chemical disinfectants contains a complex mixture of disinfection by-products (DBPs) for which the relative toxicity of the mixtures needs to be characterized to accurately assess risk. Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a by-product from ozonation of...

  3. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE FROM POTASSIUM BROMATE EXPOSURE IN LONG-EVANS RATS IS NOT ENHANCED BY A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public drinking water treated with chemical disinfectants contains a complex mixture of disinfection by-products (DBPs) for which the relative toxicity of the mixtures needs to be characterized to accurately assess risk. Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a by-product from ozonation of...

  4. IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: DOES LC/ESI-MS/MS OFFER AN ADVANTAGE OVER GC/NCI-MS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  5. Halogenating reaction activity of aromatic organic compounds during disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gaimei; Chen, Xiaodong

    2009-04-30

    The halogenating reactions of five aromatic organic compounds (AOCs) with aqueous chlorine (HOCl/OCl(-)) and aqueous bromine (HOBr/OBr(-)) were studied with an aim to compare the formation properties of haloacetic acids (HAAs) for the corresponding chlorination or bromination reactions of AOCs, respectively. The experiment results indicated that the HAAs substitution efficiency for the bromination reactions of AOCs was greater than that for the chlorination reactions, and the formation of HAAs had a strong dependence on the chemical structure of AOCs. The chlorination or bromination reaction activities for the AOCs with electron donating functional groups were higher than that for them with electron withdrawing functional groups. The kinetic experiments indicated that the reactions of aqueous bromine with phenol were faster than those of aqueous chlorine with phenol and the halogen consumption exhibited rapid initial and slower consumption stages for the reactions of phenol with aqueous chlorine and bromine, respectively. In addition, the HAAs production for the chlorination reaction of phenol decreased with the increase of pH. These conclusions could provide the valuable information for the effective control of the disinfection by-products during drinking water treatment operation.

  6. Glutathione-Mediated Detoxification of Halobenzoquinone Drinking Water Disinfection Byproducts in T24 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hongquan; Le, X. Chris; Li, Xing-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Halobenzoquinones (HBQs) are a new class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and are capable of producing reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative damage to proteins and DNA in T24 human bladder carcinoma cells. However, the exact mechanism of the cytotoxicity of HBQs is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of glutathione (GSH) and GSH-related enzymes including glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in defense against HBQ-induced cytotoxicity in T24 cells. The HBQs are 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ), 2,6-dichloro-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DCMBQ), 2,3,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TriCBQ), and 2,6-dibromobenzoquinone (DBBQ). We found that depletion of cellular GSH could sensitize cells to HBQs and extracellular GSH supplementation could attenuate HBQ-induced cytotoxicity. HBQs caused significant cellular GSH depletion and increased cellular GST activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Our mass spectrometry study confirms that HBQs can conjugate with GSH, explaining in part the mechanism of GSH depletion by HBQs. The effects of HBQs on GPx activity are compound dependent; DCMBQ and DBBQ decrease cellular GPx activities, whereas DCBQ and TriCBQ have no significant effects. Pearson correlation analysis shows that the cellular GSH level is inversely correlated with ROS production and cellular GST activity in HBQ-treated cells. These results support a GSH and GSH-related enzyme-mediated detoxification mechanism of HBQs in T24 cells. PMID:24812012

  7. Glutathione-mediated detoxification of halobenzoquinone drinking water disinfection byproducts in T24 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hongquan; Le, X Chris; Li, Xing-Fang

    2014-10-01

    Halobenzoquinones (HBQs) are a new class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and are capable of producing reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative damage to proteins and DNA in T24 human bladder carcinoma cells. However, the exact mechanism of the cytotoxicity of HBQs is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of glutathione (GSH) and GSH-related enzymes including glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in defense against HBQ-induced cytotoxicity in T24 cells. The HBQs are 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ), 2,6-dichloro-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DCMBQ), 2,3,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TriCBQ), and 2,6-dibromobenzoquinone (DBBQ). We found that depletion of cellular GSH could sensitize cells to HBQs and extracellular GSH supplementation could attenuate HBQ-induced cytotoxicity. HBQs caused significant cellular GSH depletion and increased cellular GST activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Our mass spectrometry study confirms that HBQs can conjugate with GSH, explaining in part the mechanism of GSH depletion by HBQs. The effects of HBQs on GPx activity are compound dependent; DCMBQ and DBBQ decrease cellular GPx activities, whereas DCBQ and TriCBQ have no significant effects. Pearson correlation analysis shows that the cellular GSH level is inversely correlated with ROS production and cellular GST activity in HBQ-treated cells. These results support a GSH and GSH-related enzyme-mediated detoxification mechanism of HBQs in T24 cells.

  8. Disinfection efficacy of chlorine and peracetic acid alone or in combination against Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Maurizio; Brandi, Giorgio; De Santi, Mauro; Rinaldi, Laura; Schiavano, Giuditta F

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fungicidal activity of chlorine and peracetic acid in drinking water against various pathogenic Aspergillus spp. and Candida albicans strains. A. nidulans exhibited the greatest resistance, requiring 10 ppm of chlorine for 30 min contact time for a complete inactivation. Under the same experimental conditions, peracetic acid was even less fungicidal. In this case, A. niger proved to be the most resistant species (50 ppm for 60 min for complete inactivation). All Aspergillus spp. were insensitive to 10 ppm even with extended exposure (>5 h). The combination of chlorine and peracetic acid against Aspergillus spp. did not show synergistic effects except in the case of A. flavus. Complete growth inhibition of C. albicans was observed after about 3 h contact time with 0.2 ppm. C. albicans was less sensitive to peracetic acid. Hence the concentrations of chlorine that are usually present in drinking water distribution systems are ineffective against several Aspergillus spp. and peracetic acid cannot be considered an alternative to chlorine for disinfecting drinking water. The combination of the two biocides is not very effective in eliminating filamentous fungi at the concentrations permitted for drinking water disinfection.

  9. The effect of inorganic precursors on disinfection byproduct formation during UV-chlorine/chloramine drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Bonnie A; Dotson, Aaron D; Linden, Karl G; Weinberg, Howard S

    2012-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is being increasingly used in drinking water treatment. It is important to understand how its application to different types of water may influence finished water quality, particularly as anthropogenic activity continues to impact the quality of source waters. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of inorganic precursors on the formation of regulated and unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during UV irradiation of surface waters when combined with chlorination or chloramination. Samples were collected from three drinking water utilities supplied by source waters with varying organic and inorganic precursor content. The filtered samples were treated in the laboratory with a range of UV doses delivered from low pressure (LP, UV output at 253.7 nm) and medium pressure (MP, polychromatic UV output 200-400 nm) mercury lamps followed by chlorination or chloramination, in the presence and absence of additional bromide and nitrate. The regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were not affected by UV pretreatment at disinfection doses (40-186 mJ/cm²). With higher doses (1000 mJ/cm²), trihalomethane formation was increased 30-40%. While most effects on DBPs were only observed with doses much higher than typically used for UV disinfection, there were some effects on unregulated DBPs at lower doses. In nitrate-spiked samples (1-10 mg N/L), chloropicrin formation doubled and increased three- to six-fold with 40 mJ/cm² MP UV followed by chloramination and chlorination, respectively. Bromopicrin formation was increased in samples containing bromide (0.5-1 mg/L) and nitrate (1-10 mg N/L) when pretreated with LP or MP UV (30-60% with 40 mJ/cm² LP UV and four- to ten-fold increase with 40 mJ/cm² MP UV, after subsequent chlorination). The formation of cyanogen chloride doubled and increased three-fold with MP UV doses of 186 and 1000 mJ/cm², respectively, when followed by chloramination in nitrate-spiked samples but

  10. Impact of UV disinfection combined with chlorination/chloramination on the formation of halonitromethanes and haloacetonitriles in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amisha D; Dotson, Aaron D; Linden, Karl G; Mitch, William A

    2011-04-15

    The application of UV disinfection in water treatment is increasing due to both its effectiveness against protozoan pathogens, and the perception that its lack of chemical inputs would minimize disinfection byproduct formation. However, previous research has indicated that treatment of nitrate-containing drinking waters with polychromatic medium pressure (MP), but not monochromatic (254 nm) low pressure (LP), UV lamps followed by chlorination could promote chloropicrin formation. To better understand this phenomenon, conditions promoting the formation of the full suite of chlorinated halonitromethanes and haloacetonitriles were studied. MP UV/postchlorination of authentic filter effluent waters increased chloropicrin formation up to an order of magnitude above the 0.19 μg/L median level in the U.S. EPA's Information Collection Rule database, even at disinfection-level fluences (<300 mJ/cm(2)) and nitrate/nitrite concentrations (1.0 mg/L-N) relevant to drinking waters. Formation was up to 2.5 times higher for postchlorination than for postchloramination. Experiments indicated that the nitrating agent, NO(2)(•), generated during nitrate photolysis, was primarily responsible for halonitromethane promotion. LP UV treatment up to 1500 mJ/cm(2) did not enhance halonitromethane formation. Although MP UV/postchloramination enhanced dichloroacetonitrile formation with Sigma-Aldrich humic acid, formation was not significant in field waters. Prechlorination/MP UV nearly doubled chloropicrin formation compared to MP UV/postchlorination, but effects on haloacetonitrile formation were not significant.

  11. THE HEALTHY MEN STUDY: A MODEL APPROACH FOR EXAMINING POTENTIAL MALE REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Healthy Men Study (HMS) is a prospective multisite community study on drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and male reproductive health. We are testing whether exposure to DBPs in drinking water may be associated with altered semen quality, a hypothesis derived from...

  12. THE HEALTHY MEN STUDY: A MODEL APPROACH FOR EXAMINING POTENTIAL MALE REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Healthy Men Study (HMS) is a prospective multisite community study on drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and male reproductive health. We are testing whether exposure to DBPs in drinking water may be associated with altered semen quality, a hypothesis derived from...

  13. INTERRELATIONSHIPS AMONG EPIGENETIC MECHANISMS FOR RISK ASSESSMENT OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID, A DRINKING WATER BY-PRODUCT OF THE CHLORINE DISINFECTION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reauthorization of The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1996 requires the EPA to develop a priority list of chemicals that are present in drinking water and to conduct research into the modes and mechanisms of action by which they produce adverse effects. The disinfection by-produc...

  14. Identification and characterization of phenylacetonitrile as a nitrogenous disinfection byproduct derived from chlorination of phenylalanine in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Deng, Jing; Feng, Jiao; Shanaiah, Narasimhamurthy; Smiley, Elizabeth; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-10-01

    Unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs), originating from chlorination of the precursor amino acid phenylalanine in aqueous systems, were identified in laboratory reactions and distributed tap. The major N-DBP identified was phenylacetonitrile, and minor DBPs of benzyl chloride, phenylacetaldehyde, 2-chlorobenzyl cyanide, and 2, 6-diphenylpyridine were also formed. Phenylacetonitrile was generated through decarboxylation, dechlorination and/or hydrolysis processes. With an aromatic structure, phenylacetonitrile has an unpleasant odor of various descriptors and an odor threshold concentration of 0.2 ppt-v as measured through gas chromatography-olfactometry. The half-life of phenylacetonitrile in reagent water and chlorinated water at 19 °C were 121 h and 792 h, respectively. The occurrence of phenylacetonitrile as an N-DBP in tap water was investigated for the first time; the results revealed that μg/L concentrations were present in nine different distributed drinking waters in China and the United States. Phenylacetonitrile deteriorates the aesthetic quality of drinking water and may present risk due to its prolonged existence in drinking water, especially in the presence of residual chlorine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of organic matter and disinfection by-products in membrane backwash water from drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Gu, Ping; Zhong, Zijie; Yang, Dong; He, Wenjie; Han, Hongda

    2009-09-15

    Two pilot-scale membrane plants were set up to produce drinking water, and membrane backwash water was discharged during the production process. This work studied the characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in membrane backwash water from submerged microfiltration (MBWS) and pressurized ultrafiltration (MBWP) both of which are coupled with the pre-coagulation process. The results showed that the two waters had similar molecular weight (MW) distributions. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) in MBWS and MBWP were both mainly distributed in MW>30 kDa and MW<1 kDa, and UV(254) was mainly in MW<1 kDa. For Luan River water (LRW, the raw water for the two pilot-scale membrane plants in this study), organic matter enriched in membrane backwash water was mainly in sizes of MW>30 kDa. In addition, organic matter with MW>10 kDa was higher in MBWP than in MBWS. The quality of membrane backwash water was influenced by the changes in LRW quality during different periods. The quality of membrane backwash water was worse in alga-laden period than in normal period and organic matter concentrations in MW<1 kDa increased significantly in this period. The small size DOM in membrane backwash water was more reactive to form trihalomethanes (THMs) in the disinfection process. The variability of specific UV absorbance and THMFP/DOC was consistent in membrane backwash water.

  16. A Summary of Publications on the Development of Mode-of-Action Information and Statistical Tools for Evaluating Health Outcomes from Drinking Water Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical contaminants are formed as a consequence of chemical disinfection of public drinking waters. Chemical disinfectants, which are used to kill harmful microorganisms, react with natural organic matter (NOM), bromide, iodide, and other compounds, forming complex mixtures...

  17. A Summary of Publications on the Development of Mode-of-Action Information and Statistical Tools for Evaluating Health Outcomes from Drinking Water Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical contaminants are formed as a consequence of chemical disinfection of public drinking waters. Chemical disinfectants, which are used to kill harmful microorganisms, react with natural organic matter (NOM), bromide, iodide, and other compounds, forming complex mixtures...

  18. Silver nanoparticle-alginate composite beads for point-of-use drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shihong; Huang, Rixiang; Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Jie; Lau, Boris L T; Wiesner, Mark R

    2013-08-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)-alginate composite beads were synthesized using three different approaches as filler materials of packed columns for simultaneous filtration-disinfection as an alternative portable water treatment process. The prepared composite beads were packed into a column through which Escherichia coli containing water was filtered to evaluate the disinfection efficacy. Excellent disinfection performance (no detectable viable colony) was achieved with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) as short as 1 min (the shortest tested) with the SGR (Simultaneous-Gelation-Reduction) and AR (Adsorption-Reduction) beads that were prepared using in situ reduction of Ag(+). Comparatively, the SGR beads released significantly less Ag(+)/AgNPs than the AR beads did within the same HRT. From the results of this study it was identified that SGR may be the best choice among all three different synthesis approaches in that the SGR beads can achieve satisfactory bactericidal performance with a relatively low material consumption rate.

  19. Mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the haloacetic acids, a major class of drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Plewa, Michael J; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Richardson, Susan D; Wagner, Elizabeth D

    2010-01-01

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water, wastewaters and recreational pool waters. Currently, five HAAs [bromoacetic acid (BAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA); designated as HAA5] are regulated by the U.S. EPA, at a maximum contaminant level of 60 μg/L for the sum of BAA, DBAA, CAA, DCAA, and TCAA. We present a comparative systematic analysis of chronic cytotoxicity and acute genomic DNA damaging capacity of 12 individual HAAs in mammalian cells. In addition to the HAA5, we analyzed iodoacetic acid (IAA), diiodoacetic acid (DiAA), bromoiodoacetic acid (BIAA), tribromoacetic acid (TBAA), chlorodibromoacetic acid (CDBAA), bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA), and bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA). Their rank order of chronic cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells was IAA > BAA > TBAA > CDBAA > DIAA > DBAA > BDCAA > BCAA > CAA > BIAA > TCAA > DCAA. The rank order for genotoxicity was IAA > BAA > CAA > DBAA > DIAA > TBAA > BCAA > BIAA > CDBAA. DCAA, TCAA, and BDCAA were not genotoxic. The trend for both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity is iodinated HAAs > brominated HAAs > chlorinated HAAs. The use of alternative disinfectants other than chlorine generates new DBPs and alters their distribution. Systematic, comparative, in vitro toxicological data provides the water supply community with information to consider when employing alternatives to chlorine disinfection. In addition, these data aid in prioritizing DBPs and their related compounds for future in vivo toxicological studies and risk assessment.

  20. Genotoxic and clastogenic effects of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa F; Hoyos-Giraldo, Luz Stella; Londoño-Velasco, Elizabeth; Reyes-Carvajal, Ingrid; Saavedra-Trujillo, Diana; Carvajal-Varona, Silvio; Sánchez-Gómez, Adalberto; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-06-15

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second-most prevalent class of drinking water disinfection by-products formed by chemical disinfectants. Previous studies have determined DNA damage and repair of HAA-induced lesions in mammalian and human cell lines; however, little is known of the genomic DNA and chromosome damage induced by these compounds in primary human cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and clastogenic effects of the monoHAA disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes. All monoHAAs were genotoxic in primary human lymphocytes, the rank order of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity was IAA > BAA > CAA. After 6 h of repair time, only 50% of the DNA damage (maximum decrease in DNA damage) was repaired compared to the control. This demonstrates that primary human lymphocytes are less efficient in repairing the induced damage by monoHAAs than previous studies with mammalian cell lines. In addition, the monoHAAs induced an increase in the chromosome aberration frequency as a measurement of the clastogenic effect of these compounds. These results coupled with genomic technologies in primary human cells and other mammalian non-cancerous cell lines may lead to the identification of biomarkers that may be employed in feedback loops to aid water chemists and engineers in the overall goal of producing safer drinking water.

  1. INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY-BASED TOXICOLOGY STUDIES ON DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS (DBPS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    DBPs are formed by reactions of chemical disinfectants with natural organic matter in the source water. Although more than 300 DBPs are known, many remain unidentified; for chlorination, known DBPs account for ~50% of the mass of total organic halide. Toxicological evaluation o...

  2. Non-PRASA Drinking Water Research on UV Disinfection in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA and InterAmerican University of San German worked with water treatment operators from Patillas, Puerto Rico on the installation, training and testing of pretreatment/UV disinfection systems in the communities of La Sofia and Apeadero. This presentation provides path...

  3. Non-PRASA Drinking Water Research on UV Disinfection in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA and InterAmerican University of San German worked with water treatment operators from Patillas, Puerto Rico on the installation, training and testing of pretreatment/UV disinfection systems in the communities of La Sofia and Apeadero. This presentation provides path...

  4. Neurological impairment in fetal mouse brain by drinking water disinfectant byproducts.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ahmed E; Campbell, Gerald A; Jacob, Sam

    2005-08-01

    Developmental exposure to environmental chemicals may have detrimental effects on embryonic brains that could play a major role in the etio-pathology of fetal and adult neurological diseases. The exact mechanism by which prenatal exposures to environmental agents, such as drinking water disinfectant byproducts (DBP), cause neurological impairment in fetus is not known. Our objective is to examine the impact of prenatal exposure to DBP on fetal brain development. Pregnant CD-1 mice, at the sixth day of gestation (GD-6), received a daily (GD-6-GD-18) oral dose of chloroacetonitrile (CAN, 25 ppm), a member of DBP. To assess fetal brain uptake of CAN, several animals were injected with a tracer dose of 2-[(14)C]-CAN (333 microCi/kg, i.v.), at GD-12 and processed for quantitative in situ micro whole-body autoradiography (QIMWBA) at 1 and 24 h after treatment. The remaining animals continued receiving CAN until GD-18 when fetal brains were processed for biochemical determination of oxidative stress (OS) or prepared for histological examinations. The results indicate a rapid placental transfer and fetal brain uptake of 2-[(14)C]-CAN/metabolites in cortical areas and hippocampus. In treated animals 3-fold decrease in glutathione (GSH), 1.3-fold increase in lipid peroxidation and 1.4-fold increase in DNA oxidation were detected as compared to control. DeOlmos cupric silver staining of fetal brains indicated significant increase in cortical neurodegeneration in treated animals. Immunohistochemical labeling (TUNEL) of apoptotic nuclei in the cortices and choroid plexuses were also increased in treated animals as compared to control. In conclusion, CAN crosses the placental and fetal blood-brain barriers and induces OS that triggered apoptotic neurodegenration in fetal brain. Future studies will examine the molecular mechanisms of these events and its impact on neural development of offspring.

  5. Drinking water biofilms on copper and stainless steel exhibit specific molecular responses towards different disinfection regimes at waterworks.

    PubMed

    Jungfer, Christina; Friedrich, Frank; Varela Villarreal, Jessica; Brändle, Katharina; Gross, Hans-Jürgen; Obst, Ursula; Schwartz, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Biofilms growing on copper and stainless steel substrata in natural drinking water were investigated. A modular pilot-scale distribution facility was installed at four waterworks using different raw waters and disinfection regimes. Three-month-old biofilms were analysed using molecular biology and microscopy methods. High total cell numbers, low counts of actively respiring cells and low numbers of cultivable bacteria indicated the high abundance of viable but not cultivable bacteria in the biofilms. The expression of the recA SOS responsive gene was detected and underlined the presence of transcriptionally active bacteria within the biofilms. This effect was most evident after UV disinfection, UV oxidation and UV disinfection with increased turbidity at waterworks compared to chemically treated and non-disinfected systems. Furthermore, live/dead staining techniques and environmental scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed the presence of living and intact bacteria in biofilms on copper substrata. Cluster analyses of DGGE profiles demonstrated differences in the composition of biofilms on copper and steel materials.

  6. Disinfection of drinking water contaminated with Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts under natural sunlight and using the photocatalyst TiO2.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Hermida, Fernando; Ares-Mazás, Elvira; McGuigan, Kevin G; Boyle, Maria; Sichel, Cosima; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar

    2007-09-25

    The results of a batch-process solar disinfection (SODIS) and solar photocatalytic disinfection (SPCDIS) on drinking water contaminated with Cryptosporidium are reported. Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst suspensions were exposed to natural sunlight in Southern Spain and the oocyst viability was evaluated using two vital dyes [4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and propidium iodide (PI)]. SODIS exposures (strong sunlight) of 8 and 12h reduced oocyst viability from 98% (+/-1.3%) to 11.7% (+/-0.9%) and 0.3% (+/-0.33%), respectively. SODIS reactors fitted with flexible plastic inserts coated with TiO2 powder (SPCDIS) were found to be more effective than those which were not. After 8 and 16 h of overcast and cloudy solar irradiance conditions, SPCDIS reduced oocyst viability from 98.3% (+/-0.3%) to 37.7% (+/-2.6%) and 11.7% (+/-0.7%), respectively, versus to that achieved using SODIS of 81.3% (+/-1.6%) and 36.0% (+/-1.0%), respectively. These results confirm that solar disinfection of drinking water can be an effective household intervention against Cryptosporidium contamination.

  7. Use of reflectors to enhance the synergistic effects of solar heating and solar wavelengths to disinfect drinking water sources.

    PubMed

    Rijal, G K; Fujioka, R S

    2003-01-01

    Aluminum reflectors were added to solar units designed to inactivate faecal microorganisms (faecal coliform, E. coli, enterococci, FRNA coliphage, C. perfringens) in stream water and diluted sewage by the two mechanisms (solar heat, solar UV) known to inactivate microorganisms. During sunny conditions, solar units with and without reflectors inactivated E. coli to <1 CFU/100 ml to meet drinking water standards. Solar units with reflectors disinfected the water sooner by increasing the water temperature by 8-10 degrees C to 64-75 degrees C. However, FRNA coliphages were still detected in these samples, indicating that this treatment may not inactivate pathogenic human enteric viruses. During cloudy conditions, reflectors only increased the water temperature by 3-4 degrees C to a maximum of 43-49 degrees C and E. coli was not completely inactivated. Under sunny and cloudy conditions, the UV wavelengths of sunlight worked synergistically with increasing water temperatures and were able to disinfect microorganisms at temperatures (45-56 degrees C), which were not effective in inactivating microorganisms. Relative resistance to the solar disinfecting effects were C. perfringens > FRNA coliphages > enterococci > E. coli > faecal coliform.

  8. Genotoxic potential of by-products in drinking water in relation to water disinfection: survey of pre-ozonated and post-chlorinated drinking water by Ames-test.

    PubMed

    Sujbert, László; Rácz, Gergely; Szende, Béla; Schröder, Heinz C; G Müller, Werner E; Török, Géza

    2006-02-15

    Mutagenic potential of drinking water samples derived from ranneywells was studied. 100-100 l of untreated (rough) and ozone-treated as well as chlorinated-disinfected water were dropped on and adsorbed by macroreticular resin columns (Serdolit PAD-III and Amberlite XAD-2). The adsorbed material was desorbed by methanol and dichloromethane. After elimination of the solvents by vacuum distillation the adsorbed material was dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. The mutagenic activity was tested in the Ames-Salmonella/rat liver microsome system. The tester strains were TA-98 and TA-100. The material adsorbed to Serdolit PAD-III from rough and also disinfected water did not induce mutagenicity in case of the TA-98 tester strain, irrespective of activation by liver microsomes. However, the material adsorbed to Amberlite XAD-2 exerted mutagenic effect on the TA-98 tester strain, with and without liver microsome activation, both in case of rough and disinfected water. The TA-100 tester strain showed mutation after, but not without activation, when treated with the material adsorbed by either Serdolit PAD-III or Amberlite XAD-2, in case of rough water. Material derived from disinfected water and adsorbed to Serdolit PAD-III, caused mutation of the TA tester strain also only after activation. The material derived from disinfected water and adsorbed to Amberlite XAD-2 proved to be mutagenic to the TA-100 tester strain both without and after activation. Mutagenic activity was exerted by the amount of concentrates derived from 0.28 to 0.83 l of rough and 0.83-2.5l of disinfected water. The mutagenic activity of drinking water raises the possibility of carcinogenic effect, too. Search for alternative methods of water disinfection may be recommended.

  9. A New Group of Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Water: Trihalo-hydroxy-cyclopentene-diones.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Li, Wenbin; Li, Aimin; Zhou, Qing; Shi, Peng; Wang, Ying

    2016-07-19

    We report the detection, synthesis, preparative isolation, structure characterization and identification, and formation of a new group of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs): trihalo-hydroxy-cyclopentene-diones (trihalo-HCDs). With ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/electrospray ionization-triple quadruple mass spectrometry analyses (full scans, multiple reaction monitoring, and product ion scans) and high-resolution mass spectrometry analyses (full scans), the new group of DBPs was identified with formulae and proposed with structures. However, due to a lack of commercially available standard compounds, structure identification of this new group of DBPs was challenging. 2,4,6-Trihydroxybenzaldehyde was found to be a good precursor for the synthesis of the tribromo species (m/z 345/347/349/351) in the new group of DBPs by reacting with bromine at a 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde-to-bromine molar ratio of 1:8. With UPLC/photodiode array analysis (simultaneous 2- and 3-dimensional operations), the new DBP was determined to have a maximum UV absorption at the wavelength of 280 nm. Through isolation with high performance liquid chromatography/UV-triggered collections followed by lyophilization, the pure standard of the new DBP was obtained. Characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the pure standard of the new DBP was finally identified to be tribromo-HCD, and thus the new group of DBPs was identified to be trihalo-HCDs. On the basis of the disclosed structure, formation pathways of tribromo-HCD through reactions of three different precursors and bromine were proposed and partially verified. Moreover, increasing the bromide level in source water shifted the formation of trihalo-HCDs from being more chlorinated to being more brominated; with an increase in the contact time from 1 h to 5 d, the formation of trihalo-HCDs kept increasing in chloramination, whereas they kept decreasing in chlorination; with an increase in the pH from 6

  10. Assessing exposure in epidemiologic studies to disinfection by-products in drinking water: report from an international workshop.

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Tye E; Hrudey, Steve E; Krasner, Stuart W; Nuckols, Jay R; Richardson, Susan D; Singer, Philip; Mendola, Pauline; Dodds, Linda; Weisel, Clifford; Ashley, David L; Froese, Kenneth L; Pegram, Rex A; Schultz, Irvin R; Reif, John; Bachand, Annette M; Benoit, Frank M; Lynberg, Michele; Poole, Charles; Waller, Kirsten

    2002-01-01

    The inability to accurately assess exposure has been one of the major shortcomings of epidemiologic studies of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. A number of contributing factors include a) limited information on the identity, occurrence, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of the many DBPs that can be formed from chlorine, chloramine, ozone, and chlorine dioxide disinfection; b) the complex chemical interrelationships between DBPs and other parameters within a municipal water distribution system; and c) difficulties obtaining accurate and reliable information on personal activity and water consumption patterns. In May 2000, an international workshop was held to bring together various disciplines to develop better approaches for measuring DBP exposure for epidemiologic studies. The workshop reached consensus about the clear need to involve relevant disciplines (e.g., chemists, engineers, toxicologists, biostatisticians and epidemiologists) as partners in developing epidemiologic studies of DBPs in drinking water. The workshop concluded that greater collaboration of epidemiologists with water utilities and regulators should be encouraged in order to make regulatory monitoring data more useful for epidemiologic studies. Similarly, exposure classification categories in epidemiologic studies should be chosen to make results useful for regulatory or policy decision making. PMID:11834463

  11. Characterization of biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system with UV/Cl2 disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Li, Xiaoxiao; Hu, Chun; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-09-01

    The effect of UV/Cl2 disinfection on the biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). Passivation occurred more rapidly in the AR with UV/Cl2 than in the one with Cl2 alone, decreasing iron release for higher corrosivity of water. Based on functional gene, pyrosequencing assays and principal component analysis, UV disinfection not only reduced the required initial chlorine dose, but also enhanced denitrifying functional bacteria advantage in the biofilm of corrosion scales. The nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Dechloromonas exhibited the greatest corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4 in the AR with UV/Cl2, while the rhizobia Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium, and the NRB Sphingomonas, Brucella producing siderophores had weaker corrosion-inhibition effect by capturing iron in the AR with Cl2. These results indicated that the microbial redox cycling of iron was possibly responsible for higher corrosion inhibition and lower effect of water Larson-Skold Index (LI) changes on corrosion. This finding could be applied toward the control of water quality in drinking water distribution systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Occurrence of carboxylic acids in different steps of two drinking-water treatment plants using different disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Sánchez, Beatriz; Ballesteros, Evaristo; Gallego, Mercedes

    2014-03-15

    The occurrence of 35 aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids within two full scale drinking-water treatment plants was evaluated for the first time in this research. At the intake of each plant (raw water), the occurrence of carboxylic acids varied according to the quality of the water source although in both cases 13 acids were detected at average concentrations of 6.9 and 4.7 μg/L (in winter). In the following steps in each treatment plant, the concentration patterns of these compounds differed depending on the type of disinfectant applied. Thus, after disinfection by chloramination, the levels of the acids remained almost constant (average concentration, 6.3 μg/L) and four new acids were formed (butyric, 2-methylbutyric, 3-hydroxybenzoic and 2-nitrobenzoic) at low levels (1.1-5 μg/L). When ozonation/chlorination was used, the total concentration of the carboxylic acids in the raw water sample (4.7 μg/L) increased up to 6 times (average concentration, 26.3 μg/L) after disinfection and 6 new acids (mainly aromatic) were produced at high levels (3.5-100 μg/L). Seasonal variations of the carboxylic acids under study showed that in both plants, maximum levels of all the analytes were reached in the coldest months (autumn and winter), aromatic acids only being found in those seasons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Combined use of active chlorine and coagulants for drinking water purification and disinfection].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Zholdakova, Z I; Poliakova, E E; Kir'ianova, L F; Miasnikov, I N; Tul'skaia, E A; Artemova, T Z; Ivanova, L V; Dmitrieva, R A; Doskina, T V

    2004-01-01

    The authors made an experimental study of the efficiency of water purification procedures based on the combined use of active chlorine and coagulants and hygienically evaluated the procedures. The study included the evaluation of water disinfection with various coagulants and active chlorine; the investigation of the processes of production of deleterious organic chlorine compounds; the assessment of the quality of water after its treatment. The coagulants representing aluminum polyoxychloride: RAX-10 (AQUA-AURATE 10) and RAX-18 (AQUA-AURATE 18), and aluminum sulfate, technically pure grade were tested. The treatment of river water with the coagulants RAX-10 and RAX-18, followed by precipitation, filtration, and chlorination under laboratory conditions, was shown to result in water disinfection to the levels complying with the requirements described in SanPiN 2.1.4.1074-01. RAX-18 showed the best disinfecting activity against total and heat-tolerant coliform bacteria, but also to the highly chlorine-resistant microrganisms--the spores of sulfite-reducing Clostridia, phages, and viruses. Since the coagulants have an increased sorptive capacity relative to humus and other organic substances, substitution of primary chlorination for coagulant treatment may induce a reduction in the risk of formation of oncogenically and mutagenically hazardous chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  14. Occurrence of regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products in small drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) was investigated in the drinking water of small systems in two provinces in Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Quebec (QC), through an intensive sampling program. Sixteen DBPs were studied: four trihalomethanes (THMs), five haloacetic acids (HAAs), four haloacetonitriles (HANs), one halonitromethane, chloropikrin (CPK) and two haloketones (HKs). Average measured concentrations of these compounds were much higher than those reported in the literature for medium and large systems. The measured average value for THMs was 75 μg L(-1) (Stdv=69μgL(-1)); HAAs, 77 μg L(-1) (Stdv=75 μg L(-1)); HANs, 2.5 μg L(-1) (Stdv=1.8 μg L(-1)); CPK, 0.4 μg L(-1) (Stdv=0.3 μg L(-1)) and HKs, 6.0 μg L(-1) (Stdv=4.5 μg L(-1)). The gap (some 10 times difference) between the average levels of regulated DBPs (THMs, HAAs) and non-regulated DBPs (HANs, CPK and HKs) is comparable to that observed in large systems where the occurrence of the same compounds has been reported. Generally, investigated DBPs followed a comparable seasonal evolution during the year: they decreased between the fall and winter and then increased to eventually reach a maximum in late summer. This trend was less observable in NL than in QC. However, observed seasonal fluctuations of DBPs were less considerable than those observed in medium and large systems located in similar temperate environments reported in the literature. Spatial variations from the plant to the extremities were high and comparable to those observed in large systems, which is surprising, considering the smaller size of distribution networks supplying small communities. Generally speaking, the results support the premise that problems associated with implementing treatment that removes DBP precursors in water submitted to chlorination can increase population exposure to these contaminants in small systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF POLAR DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A qualitative method using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization followed by analysis with liquid chromatography (LC)/negative ion-electrospray mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for identifying polar aldehydes and ketones in ozonated drinking water. This method offe...

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF POLAR DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A qualitative method using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization followed by analysis with liquid chromatography (LC)/negative ion-electrospray mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for identifying polar aldehydes and ketones in ozonated drinking water. This method offe...

  17. MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR RISK MANAGEMENT OF DRINKING WATER TREATMENT; II. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: HALOACETIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk management of drinking water relies on quality analytical data. Analytical methodology can often be adapted from environmental monitoring sources. However, risk management sometimes presents special analytical challenges because data may be needed from a source for which n...

  18. Contribution of the Antibiotic Chloramphenicol and Its Analogues as Precursors of Dichloroacetamide and Other Disinfection Byproducts in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Krasner, Stuart W; Gao, Naiyun; Templeton, Michael R; Yin, Daqiang

    2016-01-05

    Dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm), a disinfection byproduct, has been detected in drinking water. Previous research showed that amino acids may be DCAcAm precursors. However, other precursors may be present. This study explored the contribution of the antibiotic chloramphenicol (CAP) and two of its analogues (thiamphenicol, TAP; florfenicol, FF) (referred to collectively as CAPs), which occur in wastewater-impacted source waters, to the formation of DCAcAm. Their formation yields were compared to free and combined amino acids, and they were investigated in filtered waters from drinking-water-treatment plants, heavily wastewater-impacted natural waters, and secondary effluents from wastewater treatment plants. CAPs had greater DCAcAm formation potential than two representative amino acid precursors. However, in drinking waters with ng/L levels of CAPs, they will not contribute as much to DCAcAm formation as the μg/L levels of amino acids. Also, the effect of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) on DCAcAm formation from CAPs in real water samples during subsequent chlorination was evaluated. Preoxidation of CAPs with AOPs reduced the formation of DCAcAm during postchlorination. The results of this study suggest that CAPs should be considered as possible precursors of DCAcAm, especially in heavily wastewater-impacted waters.

  19. Silver-based Antibacterial Surfaces for Drinking Water Disinfection - An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risks associated with current disinfection techniques, including the formation of disinfection by-products and multi-drug resistant bacterial species, have prompted the exploration of advanced disinfection methods. One such technique employs silver nanoparticles incorporation on ...

  20. Silver-based Antibacterial Surfaces for Drinking Water Disinfection - An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risks associated with current disinfection techniques, including the formation of disinfection by-products and multi-drug resistant bacterial species, have prompted the exploration of advanced disinfection methods. One such technique employs silver nanoparticles incorporation on ...

  1. Characterization and determination of chloro- and bromo-benzoquinones as new chlorination disinfection byproducts in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuli; Qin, Feng; Boyd, Jessica M; Anichina, Janna; Li, Xing-Fang

    2010-06-01

    We report the characterization and determination of 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone and three new disinfection byproducts (DBPs): 2,6-dichloro-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, 2,3,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone, and 2,6-dibromo-1,4-benzoquinone. These haloquinones are suspected bladder carcinogens and are likely produced during drinking water disinfection treatment. However, detection of these haloquinones is challenging, and consequently, they have not been characterized as DBPs until recently. We have developed an electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry technique based on our observation of unique ionization processes. These chloro- and bromo-quinones were ionized through a reduction step to form [M + H](-) under negative electrospray ionization. Tandem mass spectra and accurate mass measurements of these compounds showed major product ions, [M + H - HX](-), [M + H - HX - CO](-), [M + H - CO](-), and/or X(-) (where X represents Cl or Br). The addition of 0.25% formic acid to water samples was found to effectively stabilize the haloquinones in water and to improve the ionization for analysis. These improvements were rationalized from the estimates of pK(a) values (5.8-6.3) of these haloquinones. The method of tandem mass spectrometry detection, combined with sample preservation, solid phase extraction, and liquid chromatography separation, enabled the detection of haloquinones in chlorinated water samples collected from a drinking water treatment plant. The four haloquinones were detected only in drinking water after chlorination treatment, with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 165 ng/L, but were not detectable in the untreated water. This method will be useful for future studies of occurrence, formation pathways, toxicity, and control of these new halogenated DBPs.

  2. Sample Enrichment for Bioanalytical Assessment of Disinfected Drinking Water: Concentrating the Polar, the Volatiles, and the Unknowns.

    PubMed

    Stalter, Daniel; Peters, Leon I; O'Malley, Elissa; Tang, Janet Yat-Man; Revalor, Marion; Farré, Maria José; Watson, Kalinda; von Gunten, Urs; Escher, Beate I

    2016-06-21

    Enrichment methods used in sample preparation for the bioanalytical assessment of disinfected drinking water result in the loss of volatile and hydrophilic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and hence likely tend to underestimate biological effects. We developed and evaluated methods that are compatible with bioassays, for extracting nonvolatile and volatile DBPs from chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water to minimize the loss of analytes. For nonvolatile DBPs, solid-phase extraction (SPE) with TELOS ENV as solid phase performed superior compared to ten other sorbents. SPE yielded >70% recovery of nonpurgeable adsorbable organic halogens (AOX). For volatile DBPs, cryogenic vacuum distillation performed unsatisfactorily. Purge and cold-trap with crushed ice serving as condensation nuclei achieved recoveries of 50-100% for trihalomethanes and haloacetonitriles and approximately 60-90% for purged AOX from tap water. We compared the purgeable versus the nonpurgeable fraction by combining purge-and-trap extraction with SPE. The purgeable DBP fraction enriched with the purge-and-trap method exerted a lower oxidative stress response in mammalian cells than the nonpurgeable DBPs enriched with SPE after purging, while contributions of both fractions to bacterial cytotoxicity was more variable. 37 quantified DBPs explained almost the entire AOX in the purge-and-trap extracts, but <16% in the SPE extracts demonstrating that the nonpurgeable fraction is dominated by unknown DBPs.

  3. Human cell toxicogenomic analysis links reactive oxygen species to the toxicity of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts

    PubMed Central

    Pals, Justin; Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Xia, Menghang; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Plewa, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts has been linked to adverse health risks. The monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are generated as byproducts during the disinfection of drinking water and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. Iodoacetic acid toxicity was mitigated by antioxidants, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. Other monoHAAs may share a similar mode of action. Each monoHAA generated a significant concentration-response increase in the expression of a β-lactamase reporter under the control of the Antioxidant Response Element (ARE). The monoHAAs generated oxidative stress with a rank order of IAA > BAA >> CAA; this rank order was observed with other toxicological endpoints. Toxicogenomic analysis was conducted with a non-transformed human intestinal epithelial cell line (FHs 74 Int). Exposure to the monoHAAs altered the transcription levels of multiple oxidative stress responsive genes, indicating that each exposure generated oxidative stress. The transcriptome profiles showed an increase in TXNRD1 and SRXN1, suggesting peroxiredoxin proteins had been oxidized during monoHAA exposures. Three sources of reactive oxygen species were identified, the hypohalous acid generating peroxidase enzymes LPO and MPO, NADPH-dependent oxidase NOX5, and PTGS2 (COX-2) mediated arachidonic acid metabolism. Each monoHAA exposure caused an increase in COX-2 mRNA levels. These data provide a functional association between monoHAA exposure and adverse health outcomes such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and cancer. PMID:24050308

  4. WATER DISINFECTION PRACTICE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The current review of canteen water disinfection proceeded along three general lines. A summary has been prepared of the information available from...the literature on canteen water disinfection. The current opinions of two outstanding investigators in the field of disinfection have been solicited in

  5. Balancing the risks and benefits of drinking water disinfection: disability adjusted life-years on the scale.

    PubMed

    Havelaar, A H; De Hollander, A E; Teunis, P F; Evers, E G; Van Kranen, H J; Versteegh, J F; Van Koten, J E; Slob, W

    2000-04-01

    To evaluate the applicability of disability adjusted life-years (DALYs) as a measure to compare positive and negative health effects of drinking water disinfection, we conducted a case study involving a hypothetical drinking water supply from surface water. This drinking water supply is typical in The Netherlands. We compared the reduction of the risk of infection with Cryptosporidium parvum by ozonation of water to the concomitant increase in risk of renal cell cancer arising from the production of bromate. We applied clinical, epidemiologic, and toxicologic data on morbidity and mortality to calculate the net health benefit in DALYs. We estimated the median risk of infection with C. parvum as 10(-3)/person-year. Ozonation reduces the median risk in the baseline approximately 7-fold, but bromate is produced in a concentration above current guideline levels. However, the health benefits of preventing gastroenteritis in the general population and premature death in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome outweigh health losses by premature death from renal cell cancer by a factor of > 10. The net benefit is approximately 1 DALY/million person-years. The application of DALYs in principle allows us to more explicitly compare the public health risks and benefits of different management options. In practice, the application of DALYs may be hampered by the substantial degree of uncertainty, as is typical for risk assessment.

  6. Solar Radiation Disinfection of Drinking Water at Temperate Latitudes: Inactivation rates for an optimized reactor configuration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar radiation-driven inactivation of bacteria, virus and protozoan pathogen models was quantified in simulated drinking water at a temperate latitude (34°S). The water was seeded with Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium sporogenes spores, and P22 bacteriophage, each at ca 1 x 10...

  7. Solar Radiation Disinfection of Drinking Water at Temperate Latitudes: Inactivation rates for an optimized reactor configuration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar radiation-driven inactivation of bacteria, virus and protozoan pathogen models was quantified in simulated drinking water at a temperate latitude (34°S). The water was seeded with Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium sporogenes spores, and P22 bacteriophage, each at ca 1 x 10...

  8. Cyto- and genotoxic profile of groundwater used as drinking water supply before and after disinfection.

    PubMed

    Pellacani, C; Cassoni, F; Bocchi, C; Martino, A; Pinto, G; Fontana, F; Furlini, M; Buschini, A

    2016-12-01

    The assessment of the toxicological properties of raw groundwater may be useful to predict the type and quality of tap water. Contaminants in groundwater are known to be able to affect the disinfection process, resulting in the formation of substances that are cytotoxic and/or genotoxic. Though the European directive (98/83/EC, which establishes maximum levels for contaminants in raw water (RW)) provides threshold levels for acute exposure to toxic compounds, the law does not take into account chronic exposure at low doses of pollutants present in complex mixture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cyto- and genotoxic load in the groundwater of two water treatment plants in Northern Italy. Water samples induced cytotoxic effects, mainly observed when human cells were treated with RW. Moreover, results indicated that the disinfection process reduced cell toxicity, independent of the biocidal used. The induction of genotoxic effects was found, in particular, when the micronucleus assay was carried out on raw groundwater. These results suggest that it is important to include bio-toxicological assays as additional parameters in water quality monitoring programs, as their use would allow the evaluation of the potential risk of groundwater for humans.

  9. Effect of batch-process solar disinfection on survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Hermida, F; Castro-Hermida, J A; Ares-Mazás, E; Kehoe, S C; McGuigan, K G

    2005-03-01

    The results of batch-process solar disinfection (SODIS) of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water are reported. Oocyst suspensions were exposed to simulated sunlight (830 W m(-2)) at 40 degrees C. Viability assays (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole [DAPI]/propidium iodide and excystation) and infectivity tests (Swiss CD-1 suckling mice) were performed. SODIS exposures of 6 and 12 h reduced oocyst infectivity from 100% to 7.5% (standard deviation = 2.3) and 0% (standard deviation = 0.0), respectively.

  10. Effect of Batch-Process Solar Disinfection on Survival of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Hermida, F.; Castro-Hermida, J. A.; Ares-Mazás, E.; Kehoe, S. C.; McGuigan, K. G.

    2005-01-01

    The results of batch-process solar disinfection (SODIS) of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water are reported. Oocyst suspensions were exposed to simulated sunlight (830 W m−2) at 40°C. Viability assays (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole [DAPI]/propidium iodide and excystation) and infectivity tests (Swiss CD-1 suckling mice) were performed. SODIS exposures of 6 and 12 h reduced oocyst infectivity from 100% to 7.5% (standard deviation = 2.3) and 0% (standard deviation = 0.0), respectively. PMID:15746372

  11. Effects of thermal treatment on halogenated disinfection by-products in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wu, W W; Benjamin, M M; Korshin, G V

    2001-10-01

    The influence of heating or boiling on the formation and behavior of disinfection by-products (DBPs) was investigated in DBP-spiked reagent water, municipal tap water, and synthetic water containing chlorinated aquatic humic substances. Thermal cleavage of larger halogenated species leads to both formation of smaller chlorinated molecules (including THMs and HAAs) and dechlorination of organics. In parallel with their formation from larger molecules, THMs can be volatilized, and this latter process dominates the change in their concentration when water is boiled. HAAs are not volatile, but they can be destroyed by chemical reactions at elevated temperatures, with the net effect being loss of trihalogenated HAAs and either formation or loss of less chlorinated HAAs. Although other identifiable DBPs can be generated at slightly elevated temperatures, in most cases their concentrations decline dramatically when the solution is heated.

  12. Disinfection byproduct formation in reverse-osmosis concentrated and lyophilized natural organic matter from a drinking water source.

    PubMed

    Pressman, Jonathan G; McCurry, Daniel L; Parvez, Shahid; Rice, Glenn E; Teuschler, Linda K; Miltner, Richard J; Speth, Thomas F

    2012-10-15

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by natural organic matter (NOM) temporal variability. NOM preservation by lyophilization (freeze-drying) has been long practiced to address this issue; however, its applicability for drinking water research has been limited because the selected NOM sources are atypical of most drinking water sources. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that reconstituted NOM from a lyophilized reverse-osmosis (RO) concentrate of a typical drinking water source closely represents DBP formation in the original NOM. A preliminary experiment assessed DBP formation kinetics and yields in concentrated NOM, which demonstrated that chlorine decays faster in concentrate, in some cases leading to altered DBP speciation. Potential changes in NOM reactivity caused by lyophilization were evaluated by chlorination of lyophilized and reconstituted NOM, its parent RO concentrate, and the source water. Bromide lost during RO concentration was replaced by adding potassium bromide prior to chlorination. Although total measured DBP formation tended to decrease slightly and unidentified halogenated organic formation tended to increase slightly as a result of RO concentration, the changes associated with lyophilization were minor. In lyophilized NOM reconstituted back to source water TOC levels and then chlorinated, the concentrations of 19 of 21 measured DBPs, constituting 96% of the total identified DBP mass, were statistically indistinguishable from those in the chlorinated source water. Furthermore, the concentrations of 16 of 21 DBPs in lyophilized NOM reconstituted back to the RO concentrate TOC levels, constituting 86% DBP mass, were statistically indistinguishable from those in the RO concentrate. This study suggests that lyophilization can be used to preserve concentrated NOM without substantially altering the precursors to DBP formation.

  13. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes. PMID:7151762

  14. Genotoxicity of a Low-Dose Nitrosamine Mixture as Drinking Water Disinfection Byproducts in NIH3T3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Qin, Ming; Dong, Lei; Lv, Jia-Ying; Wang, Xia

    2017-01-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms), which can arise as byproducts of disinfection agents, are reportedly found in drinking water, and their potential carcinogenicity is a concern; however, little research exists regarding the genotoxicity or carcinogenicity of NAms exposure as a low-dose mixture. The three most common NAms components in China's drinking water are N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA). Thus, we measured the genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of these compounds and measured the cell cycle and gene expression. The data show that exposure to the NAms-mixture doubled the revertants in the TA98 and TA100 S. typhimurium strains and increased the DNA double-strand breaks and the micronuclear frequency in the NIH3T3 cells compared to a single exposure. After long-term NAms mixture exposure, a malignant transformation of NIH3T3 and a significantly increased G2/M distribution were observed. Furthermore, P53, CDK1, P38, CDC25A and CyclinB expressions were down-regulated in the NAms-mixture exposure group; however, P21 and GADD45A genes were up-regulated. Interestingly, the CHK1/CHK2 and CDC25A genes had two responses, depending on the NAms concentrations. Thus, we observed mutagenic, genotoxic and carcinogenic effects after a low-dose NAms-mixture exposure in drinking water, and DNA repair and apoptosis pathways may contribute to these adverse effects.

  15. Genotoxicity of a Low-Dose Nitrosamine Mixture as Drinking Water Disinfection Byproducts in NIH3T3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-yan; Qin, Ming; Dong, Lei; Lv, Jia-ying; Wang, Xia

    2017-01-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms), which can arise as byproducts of disinfection agents, are reportedly found in drinking water, and their potential carcinogenicity is a concern; however, little research exists regarding the genotoxicity or carcinogenicity of NAms exposure as a low-dose mixture. The three most common NAms components in China's drinking water are N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA). Thus, we measured the genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of these compounds and measured the cell cycle and gene expression. The data show that exposure to the NAms-mixture doubled the revertants in the TA98 and TA100 S. typhimurium strains and increased the DNA double-strand breaks and the micronuclear frequency in the NIH3T3 cells compared to a single exposure. After long-term NAms mixture exposure, a malignant transformation of NIH3T3 and a significantly increased G2/M distribution were observed. Furthermore, P53, CDK1, P38, CDC25A and CyclinB expressions were down-regulated in the NAms-mixture exposure group; however, P21 and GADD45A genes were up-regulated. Interestingly, the CHK1/CHK2 and CDC25A genes had two responses, depending on the NAms concentrations. Thus, we observed mutagenic, genotoxic and carcinogenic effects after a low-dose NAms-mixture exposure in drinking water, and DNA repair and apoptosis pathways may contribute to these adverse effects. PMID:28924367

  16. Frequency of use controls chemical leaching from drinking-water containers subject to disinfection.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Shine, James P

    2011-12-15

    Microbial-, and chemical-based burden of disease associated with lack of access to safe water continues to primarily impact developing countries. Cost-effective health risk-mitigating measures, such as of solar disinfection applied to microbial-contaminated water stored in plastic bottles have been increasingly tested in developing countries adversely impacted by epidemic water-borne diseases. Public health concerns associated with chemical leaching from water packaging materials led us to investigate the magnitude and variability of antimony (Sb) and bromine (Br) leaching from reused plastic containers (polyethylene terephthalate, PET; and polycarbonate, PC) subject to UV and/or temperature-driven disinfection. The overall objective of this study was to determine the main and interactive effects of temperature, UV exposure duration, and frequency of bottle reuse on the extent of leaching of Sb and Br from plastic bottles into water. Regardless of UV exposure duration, frequency of reuse (up to 27 times) was the major factor that linearly increased Sb leaching from PET bottles at all temperatures tested (13-47 °C). Leached Sb concentrations (∼360 ng L(-1)) from the highly reused (27 times) PET bottles (minimal Sb leaching from PC bottles, <15 ng L(-1)) did not pose a serious risk to human health according to current daily Sb acceptable intake estimates. Leached Br concentrations from both PET and PC containers (up to ∼15 μg L(-1)) did not pose a consumer health risk either, however, no acceptable daily dose estimates exist for oral ingestion of organo-brominated, or other plasticizers/additives compounds if they were to be found in bottled water at much lower concentrations. Additional research on potential leaching of organic chemicals from water packaging materials is deemed necessary under relevant environmental conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MEASUREMENT AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work was to develop an analytical method to quantify these five iodo-acids (iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3-methylbutenedioic acid) in drinking water, measure their oc...

  18. Viruses in non-disinfected groundwater supplying municipal drinking water and the human health risk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Groundwater supplies for drinking water are frequently contaminated with human gastrointestinal viruses. Stemming from this knowledge, the US EPA promulgated the Groundwater Rule, yet the number of illnesses in the nation that can be attributed to groundwater-borne viruses is unmeasured....

  19. Development and evaluation of a reflective solar disinfection pouch for treatment of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Walker, D Carey; Len, Soo-Voon; Sheehan, Brita

    2004-04-01

    A second-generation solar disinfection (SODIS) system (pouch) was constructed from food-grade, commercially available packaging materials selected to fully transmit and amplify the antimicrobial properties of sunlight. Depending upon the season, water source, and challenge organism, culturable bacteria were reduced between 3.5 and 5.5 log cycles. The system was also capable of reducing the background presumptive coliform population in nonsterile river water below the level of detection. Similar experiments conducted with a model virus, the F-specific RNA bacteriophage MS2, indicated that the pouch was slightly less efficient, reducing viable plaques by 3.5 log units in comparison to a 5.0 log reduction of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O18:H11 within the same time period. These results suggest that water of poor microbiological quality can be improved by using a freely available resource (sunlight) and a specifically designed plastic pouch constructed of food-grade packaging materials.

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Reflective Solar Disinfection Pouch for Treatment of Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D. Carey; Len, Soo-Voon; Sheehan, Brita

    2004-01-01

    A second-generation solar disinfection (SODIS) system (pouch) was constructed from food-grade, commercially available packaging materials selected to fully transmit and amplify the antimicrobial properties of sunlight. Depending upon the season, water source, and challenge organism, culturable bacteria were reduced between 3.5 and 5.5 log cycles. The system was also capable of reducing the background presumptive coliform population in nonsterile river water below the level of detection. Similar experiments conducted with a model virus, the F-specific RNA bacteriophage MS2, indicated that the pouch was slightly less efficient, reducing viable plaques by 3.5 log units in comparison to a 5.0 log reduction of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O18:H11 within the same time period. These results suggest that water of poor microbiological quality can be improved by using a freely available resource (sunlight) and a specifically designed plastic pouch constructed of food-grade packaging materials. PMID:15066858

  1. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, Indiana, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high and low r...

  2. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, Indiana, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high and low r...

  3. Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to iron and cement-mortar drinking water infrastructure in a model system using disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Jeffrey G; Meiners, Greg; Heckman, Lee; Rice, Eugene W; Hall, John

    2017-02-01

    Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to common drinking water infrastructure surfaces was evaluated using a variety of disinfectants. Corroded iron and cement-mortar lined iron represented the infrastructure surfaces, and were conditioned in a 23 m long, 15 cm diameter (75 ft long, 6 in diameter) pilot-scale drinking water distribution pipe system. Decontamination was evaluated using increased water velocity (flushing) alone at 0.5 m s(-1) (1.7 ft s(-1)), as well as free chlorine (5 and 25 mg L(-1)), monochloramine (25 mg L(-1)), chlorine dioxide (5 and 25 mg L(-1)), ozone (2.0 mg L(-1)), peracetic acid 25 mg L(-1)) and acidified nitrite (0.1 mol L(-1) at pH 2 and 3), all followed by flushing at 0.3 m s(-1) (1 ft s(-1)). Flushing alone reduced the adhered spores by 0.5 and 2.0 log10 from iron and cement-mortar, respectively. Log10 reduction on corroded iron pipe wall coupons ranged from 1.0 to 2.9 at respective chlorine dioxide concentrations of 5 and 25 mg L(-1), although spores were undetectable on the iron surface during disinfection at 25 mg L(-1). Acidified nitrite (pH 2, 0.1 mol L(-1)) yielded no detectable spores on the iron surface during the flushing phase after disinfection. Chlorine dioxide was the best performing disinfectant with >3.0 log10 removal from cement-mortar at 5 and 25 mg L(-1). The data show that free chlorine, monochloramine, ozone and chlorine dioxide followed by flushing can reduce adhered spores by > 3.0 log10 on cement-mortar. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Inactivation and injury of total coliform bacteria after primary disinfection of drinking water by TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Luigi

    2009-06-15

    In this study the potential application of TiO(2) photocatalysis as primary disinfection system of drinking water was investigated in terms of coliform bacteria inactivation and injury. As model water the effluent of biological denitrification unit for nitrate removal from groundwater, which is characterized by high organic matter and bacteria release, was used. The injury of photocatalysis on coliform bacteria was characterized by means of selective (mEndo) and less selective (mT7) culture media. Different catalyst loadings as well as photolysis and adsorption effects were investigated. Photocatalysis was effective in coliform bacteria inactivation (91-99% after 60 min irradiation time, depending on both catalyst loading and initial density of coliform bacteria detected by mEndo), although no total removal was observed after 60 min irradiation time. The contribution of adsorption mechanism was significant (60-98% after 60 min, depending on catalyst loading) compared to previous investigations probably due to the nature of source water rich in particulate organic matter and biofilm. Photocatalysis process did not result in any irreversible injury (98.8% being the higher injury) under investigated conditions, thus a bacteria regrowth may take place under optimum environment conditions if any final disinfection process (e.g., chlorine or chlorine dioxide) is not used.

  5. Differences in influence patterns between groups predicting the adoption of a solar disinfection technology for drinking water in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Moser, Stephanie; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2008-08-01

    The lack of safe drinking water is one of the major problems faced by developing countries. The consequences of contaminated water are diseases such as diarrhea, one of the main causes of infant mortality. Because of its simplicity, solar water-disinfection technology provides a good way of treating water at the household level. Despite its obvious advantages and considerable promotional activities, this innovation has had rather a slow uptake. We conducted a field survey in which 644 households in Bolivia were interviewed in order to gain insights on motivations that resulted in adopting the technology. The aim was to examine possible differences in the predictors for adopting this technology during the diffusion process using the theory of innovation diffusion. Our findings indicate that early adoption was predicted by increased involvement in the topic of drinking water and that adoption in the middle of the diffusion process was predicted by increased involvement by opinion leaders and by recognition of a majority who supported the technology. Finally, late adoption was predicted by recognition that a majority had already adopted. Suggestions for future promotional strategies are outlined.

  6. Removal of soluble microbial products as the precursors of disinfection by-products in drinking water supplies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Lin; Li, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Water pollution worsens the problem of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water supply. Biodegradation of wastewater organics produces soluble microbial products (SMPs), which can be important DBP precursors. In this laboratory study, a number of enhanced water treatment methods for DBP control, including enhanced coagulation, ozonation, and activated carbon adsorption, were evaluated for their effectiveness in treating SMP-containing water for the DBP reduction purpose. The results show that enhanced coagulation with alum could remove SMPs only marginally and decrease the DBP formation potential (DBPFP) of the water by less than 20%. Although ozone could cause destruction of SMPs in water, the overall DBPFP of the water did not decrease but increased after ozonation. In contrast, adsorption by granular activated carbon could remove the SMP organics from water by more than 60% and reduce the DBPFP by more than 70%. It is apparent that enhanced coagulation and ozonation are not suitable for the removal of SMPs as DBP precursors from polluted water, although enhanced coagulation has been commonly used to reduce the DBP formation caused by natural organic matter. In comparison, activated carbon adsorption is shown as a more effective means to remove the SMP content from water and hence to control the wastewater-derived DBP problem in water supply.

  7. Solar photo-oxidative disinfection of drinking water: preliminary field observations.

    PubMed

    Reed, R H; Mani, S K; Meyer, V

    2000-06-01

    The feasibility of using solar photo-oxidation to inactivate faecal bacterial contaminants in drinking water has been evaluated under field conditions in India and South Africa. Freshly drawn samples from all six test water sources were low in dissolved oxygen, at 13-40% of the air saturation value. However, vigorous mixing followed by exposure to full-strength sunlight in transparent plastic containers (1-25 l capacity) caused a rapid decrease in the counts of faecal indicator bacteria, giving complete inactivation within 3-6 h, with no evidence of reactivation. These results demonstrate that solar photo-oxidation may provide a practical, low-cost approach to the improvement of drinking water quality in developing countries with consistently sunny climates.

  8. COMPONENT-BASED AND WHOLE-MIXTURE TECHNIQUES FOR ADDRESSING THE TOXICITY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Chemical disinfection of water is of direct public health benefit as it results in decreased waterborne illness. The chemicals used to disinfect water react with naturally occurring organic matter and bromide in the source water, resulting in the formation of a m...

  9. CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN A RAT MODEL OF HEREDITARY RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinogenicity of Individual and a Mixture of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products in a Rat Model of Hereditary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Eker rats develop hereditary renal cell carcinoma secondary to a germline mutation in the tuberous sclerosis 2 (Tsc2) gene and are ligh...

  10. Meeting in Canada: Chlorinated vs. Chloraminated Drinking Water: Toxicity-Based Identification of Disinfection By-Products Using ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because epidemiologic studies have shown that they are associated with bladder cancer and adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations. There is almost no information on high molecular weight DBPs (>...

  11. MEETING IN CHINA: CHLORINATED VS. CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER: TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING ESI-MS AND ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because epidemiologic studies have shown that they are associated with bladder cancer and adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and some cause cancer in laboratory animals. As a result, the U...

  12. CHLORINATED VS. CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER: TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING ESI-MS AND ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  13. CHLORINATED VS. CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER: TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING ESI-MS AND ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  14. TWENTY WEEK EXPOSURES TO THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID: REPRODUCTIVE CYCLICITY AND STEROID CONCENTRATIONS IN THE FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Elevated gavage exposures to the drinking water disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid (DBA) have been found to disrupt estrous cyclicity in the rat and induce increases in estradiol concentrations in both cycling (day of estrus) and ovariectomized/estradiol-impla...

  15. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECTS OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT, SODIUM CHLORITE, IN FEMALE B6C3F1 MICE: A DRINKING WATER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of the Disinfection By-product, Sodium chlorite, in Female B6C3f1 mice: A Drinking Water Study.

    Niel A. Karrow, Tal, L. Guo, J. Ann McCay, Greg W. Johnson, Ronnetta D. Brown, Debrorah L. Musgrove, Dori R. Germolec, Robert W. Lueb...

  16. CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN A RAT MODEL OF HEREDITARY RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinogenicity of Individual and a Mixture of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products in a Rat Model of Hereditary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Eker rats develop hereditary renal cell carcinoma secondary to a germline mutation in the tuberous sclerosis 2 (Tsc2) gene and are ligh...

  17. Meeting in Canada: Chlorinated vs. Chloraminated Drinking Water: Toxicity-Based Identification of Disinfection By-Products Using ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because epidemiologic studies have shown that they are associated with bladder cancer and adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations. There is almost no information on high molecular weight DBPs (>...

  18. MEETING IN CHINA: CHLORINATED VS. CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER: TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING ESI-MS AND ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because epidemiologic studies have shown that they are associated with bladder cancer and adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and some cause cancer in laboratory animals. As a result, the U...

  19. DISRUPTION IN RAT ESTROUS CYCLICITY BY THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID: RELATIONSHIP TO A SUPPRESSION ON ESTRADIOL METABOLISM?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption in Rat Estrous Cyclicity by the Drinking Water Disinfectant By-Product Dibromoacetic Acid: Relationship to A Suppression on Estradiol Metabolism?

    Ashley S. Murr and Jerome M. Goldman, Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division National Health and En...

  20. ALTERATION OF ESTROUS CYCLICITY BY THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID: RELATIONSHIP TO AN EFFECT ON ESTRADIOL METABOLISM?

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of chemicals formed by disinfection of municipal drinking water have been suspected to cause reproductive alterations in humans and test animals. One class of these chemicals, the haloacetic acids, have been reported to alter a number of rat testicular endpoints, includ...

  1. ALTERATION OF ESTROUS CYCLICITY BY THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID: RELATIONSHIP TO AN EFFECT ON ESTRADIOL METABOLISM?

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of chemicals formed by disinfection of municipal drinking water have been suspected to cause reproductive alterations in humans and test animals. One class of these chemicals, the haloacetic acids, have been reported to alter a number of rat testicular endpoints, includ...

  2. DISRUPTION IN RAT ESTROUS CYCLICITY BY THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID: RELATIONSHIP TO A SUPPRESSION ON ESTRADIOL METABOLISM?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption in Rat Estrous Cyclicity by the Drinking Water Disinfectant By-Product Dibromoacetic Acid: Relationship to A Suppression on Estradiol Metabolism?

    Ashley S. Murr and Jerome M. Goldman, Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division National Health and En...

  3. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECTS OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT, SODIUM CHLORITE, IN FEMALE B6C3F1 MICE: A DRINKING WATER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of the Disinfection By-product, Sodium chlorite, in Female B6C3f1 mice: A Drinking Water Study.

    Niel A. Karrow, Tal, L. Guo, J. Ann McCay, Greg W. Johnson, Ronnetta D. Brown, Debrorah L. Musgrove, Dori R. Germolec, Robert W. Lueb...

  4. Identification of developmentally toxic drinking water disinfection byproducts and evaluation of data relevant to mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Colman, Joan; Rice, Glenn E.; Wright, J. Michael; Hunter, E. Sidney; Teuschler, Linda K.; Lipscomb, John C.; Hertzberg, Richard C.; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Fransen, Margaret; Osier, Mark; Narotsky, Michael G.

    2011-07-15

    Reactions between chemicals used to disinfect drinking water and compounds present in source waters produce chemical mixtures containing hundreds of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although the results have been somewhat inconsistent, some epidemiological studies suggest associations may exist between DBP exposures and adverse developmental outcomes. The potencies of individual DBPs in rodent and rabbit developmental bioassays suggest that no individual DBP can account for the relative risk estimates reported in the positive epidemiologic studies, leading to the hypothesis that these outcomes could result from the toxicity of DBP mixtures. As a first step in a mixtures risk assessment for DBP developmental effects, this paper identifies developmentally toxic DBPs and examines data relevant to the mode of action (MOA) for DBP developmental toxicity. We identified 24 developmentally toxic DBPs and four adverse developmental outcomes associated with human DBP exposures: spontaneous abortion, cardiovascular defects, neural tube defects, and low birth weight infancy. A plausible MOA, involving hormonal disruption of pregnancy, is delineated for spontaneous abortion, which some epidemiologic studies associate with total trihalomethane and bromodichloromethane exposures. The DBP data for the other three outcomes were inadequate to define key MOA steps.

  5. Application of effect-directed analysis to identify mutagenic nitrogenous disinfection by-products of advanced oxidation drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Vughs, D; Baken, K A; Kolkman, A; Martijn, A J; de Voogt, P

    2016-07-22

    Advanced oxidation processes are important barriers for organic micropollutants in (drinking) water treatment. It is however known that medium pressure UV/H2O2 treatment may lead to mutagenicity in the Ames test, which is no longer present after granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Many nitrogen-containing disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) result from the reaction of photolysis products of nitrate with (photolysis products of) natural organic material (NOM) during medium pressure UV treatment of water. Identification of the N-DBPs and the application of effect-directed analysis to combine chemical screening results with biological activity would provide more insight into the relation of specific N-DBPs with the observed mutagenicity and was the subject of this study. To this end, fractions of medium pressure UV-treated and untreated water extracts were prepared using preparative HPLC and tested using the Ames fluctuation test. In addition, high-resolution mass spectrometry was performed on all fractions to assess the presence of N-DBPs. Based on toxicity data and read across analysis, we could identify five N-DBPs that are potentially genotoxic and were present in relatively high concentrations in the fractions in which mutagenicity was observed. The results of this study offer opportunities to further evaluate the identity and potential health concern of N-DBPs formed during advanced oxidation UV drinking water treatment.

  6. Drinking-Water Disinfection By-products and Semen Quality: A Cross-Sectional Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Yi-Xin; Xie, Shao-Hua; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yong-Zhe; Li, Min; Yue, Jing; Li, Yu-Feng; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) has been demonstrated to impair male reproductive health in animals, but human evidence is limited and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the association between exposure to drinking-water DBPs and semen quality in a Chinese population. Methods: We recruited 2,009 men seeking semen analysis from the Reproductive Center of Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China, between April 2011 and May 2012. Each man provided a semen sample and a urine sample. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, sperm motility, and sperm count. As a biomarker of exposure to drinking-water DBPs, trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) was measured in the urine samples. Results: The mean (median) urinary TCAA concentration was 9.58 (7.97) μg/L (interquartile range, 6.01–10.96 μg/L). Compared with men with urine TCAA in the lowest quartile, increased adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated for below-reference sperm concentration in men with TCAA in the second and fourth quartiles (OR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.19, 2.69 and OR = 1.51; 95% CI: 0.98, 2.31, respectively), for below-reference sperm motility in men with TCAA in the second and third quartiles (OR = 1.46; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.90 and OR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.70, respectively), and for below-reference sperm count in men with TCAA in the second quartile (OR 1.62; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.55). Nonmonotonic associations with TCAA quartiles were also estimated for semen parameters modeled as continuous outcomes, although significant negative associations were estimated for all quartiles above the reference level for sperm motility. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that exposure to drinking-water DBPs may contribute to decreased semen quality in humans. Citation: Zeng Q, Wang YX, Xie SH, Xu L, Chen YZ, Li M, Yue J, Li YF, Liu AL, Lu WQ. 2014. Drinking-water disinfection by-products and semen quality: a cross-sectional study in China. Environ Health Perspect 122:741–746; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp

  7. Evaluating Evidence for Association of Human Bladder Cancer with Drinking-Water Chlorination Disinfection By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Hrudey, Steve E.; Backer, Lorraine C.; Humpage, Andrew R.; Krasner, Stuart W.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Moore, Lee E.; Singer, Philip C.; Stanford, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (CxDBPs) is prevalent in populations using chlorination-based methods to disinfect public water supplies. Multifaceted research has been directed for decades to identify, characterize, and understand the toxicology of these compounds, control and minimize their formation, and conduct epidemiologic studies related to exposure. Urinary bladder cancer has been the health risk most consistently associated with CxDBPs in epidemiologic studies. An international workshop was held to (1) discuss the qualitative strengths and limitations that inform the association between bladder cancer and CxDBPs in the context of possible causation, (2) identify knowledge gaps for this topic in relation to chlorine/chloramine-based disinfection practice(s) in the United States, and (3) assess the evidence for informing risk management. Epidemiological evidence linking exposures to CxDBPs in drinking water to human bladder cancer risk provides insight into causality. However, because of imprecise, inaccurate, or incomplete estimation of CxDBPs levels in epidemiologic studies, translation from hazard identification directly to risk management and regulatory policy for CxDBPs can be challenging. Quantitative risk estimates derived from toxicological risk assessment for CxDBPs currently cannot be reconciled with those from epidemiologic studies, notwithstanding the complexities involved, making regulatory interpretation difficult. Evidence presented here has both strengths and limitations that require additional studies to resolve and improve the understanding of exposure response relationships. Replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations with further elaboration of exposure assessment is needed to strengthen the knowledge base needed to better inform effective regulatory approaches. PMID:26309063

  8. Evaluating Evidence for Association of Human Bladder Cancer with Drinking-Water Chlorination Disinfection By-Products.

    PubMed

    Hrudey, Steve E; Backer, Lorraine C; Humpage, Andrew R; Krasner, Stuart W; Michaud, Dominique S; Moore, Lee E; Singer, Philip C; Stanford, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (CxDBPs) is prevalent in populations using chlorination-based methods to disinfect public water supplies. Multifaceted research has been directed for decades to identify, characterize, and understand the toxicology of these compounds, control and minimize their formation, and conduct epidemiologic studies related to exposure. Urinary bladder cancer has been the health risk most consistently associated with CxDBPs in epidemiologic studies. An international workshop was held to (1) discuss the qualitative strengths and limitations that inform the association between bladder cancer and CxDBPs in the context of possible causation, (2) identify knowledge gaps for this topic in relation to chlorine/chloramine-based disinfection practice(s) in the United States, and (3) assess the evidence for informing risk management. Epidemiological evidence linking exposures to CxDBPs in drinking water to human bladder cancer risk provides insight into causality. However, because of imprecise, inaccurate, or incomplete estimation of CxDBPs levels in epidemiologic studies, translation from hazard identification directly to risk management and regulatory policy for CxDBPs can be challenging. Quantitative risk estimates derived from toxicological risk assessment for CxDBPs currently cannot be reconciled with those from epidemiologic studies, notwithstanding the complexities involved, making regulatory interpretation difficult. Evidence presented here has both strengths and limitations that require additional studies to resolve and improve the understanding of exposure response relationships. Replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations with further elaboration of exposure assessment is needed to strengthen the knowledge base needed to better inform effective regulatory approaches.

  9. Chlorination Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water and Congenital Anomalies: Review and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Martinez, David; Grellier, James; Bennett, James; Best, Nicky; Iszatt, Nina; Vrijheid, Martine; Toledano, Mireille B.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to review epidemiologic evidence, provide summary risk estimates of the association between exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) and congenital anomalies, and provide recommendations for future studies. Data sources and extraction We included all published epidemiologic studies that evaluated a relationship between an index of DBP exposure (treatment, water source, DBP measurements, and both DBP measurements and personal characteristics) and risk of congenital anomalies. When three or more studies examined the same exposure index and congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain a summary risk estimate comparing the highest exposure group with the lowest exposure group. When five or more studies examined total trihalomethane (TTHM) exposure and a specific congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain exposure–response risk estimates per 10 μg/L TTHM. Data synthesis For all congenital anomalies combined, the meta-analysis gave a statistically significant excess risk for high versus low exposure to water chlorination or TTHM [17%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3–34] based on a small number of studies. The meta-analysis also suggested a statistically significant excess risk for ventricular septal defects (58%; 95% CI, 21–107), but this was based on only three studies, and there was little evidence of an exposure–response relationship. We observed no statistically significant relationships in the other meta-analyses. We found little evidence for publication bias, except for urinary tract defects and cleft lip and palate. Conclusion Although some individual studies have suggested an association between chlorination disinfection by-products and congenital anomalies, meta-analyses of all currently available studies demonstrate little evidence of such an association. PMID:20019896

  10. Reproductive Toxicity of a Mixture of Regulated Drinking-Water Disinfection By-Products in a Multigenerational Rat Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Klinefelter, Gary R.; Goldman, Jerome M.; DeAngelo, Anthony B.; Best, Deborah S.; McDonald, Anthony; Strader, Lillian F.; Murr, Ashley S.; Suarez, Juan D.; George, Michael H.; Hunter, E. Sidney; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown. Objective We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs in a multigenerational reproductive toxicity bioassay. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed (parental, F1, and F2 generations) from gestation day 0 of the parental generation to postnatal day (PND) 6 of the F2 generation to a realistically proportioned mixture of THMs and HAAs at 0, 500×, 1,000×, or 2,000× of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Results Maternal water consumption was reduced at ≥ 1,000×; body weights were reduced at 2,000×. Prenatal and postnatal survival were unaffected. F1 pup weights were unaffected at birth but reduced at 2,000× on PND6 and at ≥ 1,000× on PND21. Postweaning F1 body weights were reduced at 2,000×, and water consumption was reduced at ≥ 500×. Males at 2,000× had a small but significantly increased incidence of retained nipples and compromised sperm motility. Onset of puberty was delayed at 1,000× and 2,000×. F1 estrous cycles and fertility were unaffected, and F2 litters showed no effects on pup weight or survival. Histologically, P0 (parental) dams had nephropathy and adrenal cortical pathology at 2,000×. Conclusions A mixture of regulated DBPs at up to 2,000× the MCLs had no adverse effects on fertility, pregnancy maintenance, prenatal survival, postnatal survival, or birth weights. Delayed puberty at ≥ 1,000× may have been secondary to reduced water consumption. Male nipple retention and compromised sperm motility at 2,000× may have been secondary to reduced body weights. Citation Narotsky MG, Klinefelter GR, Goldman JM, DeAngelo AB, Best DS, McDonald A, Strader LF, Murr AS, Suarez JD, George MH, Hunter ES III, Simmons JE. 2015. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated

  11. Human cell toxicogenomic analysis linking reactive oxygen species to the toxicity of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Pals, Justin; Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Xia, Menghang; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts has been linked to adverse health risks. The monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are generated as byproducts during the disinfection of drinking water and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. Iodoacetic acid toxicity was mitigated by antioxidants, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. Other monoHAAs may share a similar mode of action. Each monoHAA generated a significant concentration-response increase in the expression of a β-lactamase reporter under the control of the antioxidant response element (ARE). The monoHAAs generated oxidative stress with a rank order of iodoacetic acid (IAA) > bromoacetic acid (BAA) ≫ chloroacetic acid (CAA); this rank order was observed with other toxicological end points. Toxicogenomic analysis was conducted with a nontransformed human intestinal epithelial cell line (FHs 74 Int). Exposure to the monoHAAs altered the transcription levels of multiple oxidative stress responsive genes, indicating that each exposure generated oxidative stress. The transcriptome profiles showed an increase in thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1) and sulfiredoxin (SRXN1), suggesting peroxiredoxin proteins had been oxidized during monoHAA exposures. Three possible sources of reactive oxygen species were identified, the hypohalous acid generating peroxidase enzymes lactoperoxidase (LPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent oxidase 5 (NOX5), and PTGS2 (COX-2) mediated arachidonic acid metabolism. Each monoHAA exposure caused an increase in COX-2 mRNA levels. These data provide a functional association between monoHAA exposure and adverse health outcomes such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and cancer.

  12. Validation of urinary trichloroacetic acid as a biomarker of exposure to drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Gabos, Stephan; Schopflocher, Donald; Li, Xing-Fang; Gati, Wendy P; Hrudey, Steve E

    2009-09-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water represent a public health issue and a challenge for epidemiology to provide evidence towards the causation of various hypothesized health effects. Validation of a biomarker of exposure to DBPs is a strategy to achieve progress which has been advocated. The objective of this study was to validate urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) excretion as a biomarker of exposure to DBPs in an experimental exposure cohort. A total of 52 healthy women participated in the study. Participants consumed supplied tap water for 15 d and provided urine and blood samples for TCAA measurements. The findings revealed that (1) background levels of TCAA in urine and blood were readily detectable, (2) TCAA levels in blood and urine increased with increased amounts of TCAA ingested, (3) the correlations between measurements of TCAA ingestion and urinary excretion were modest (r=0.66, p<0.001) based on one days' sampling and high (r=0.77-0.83, p<0.001) based on two to four days' sampling, (4) the correlations between measurements of TCAA ingestion and blood TCAA concentration were high (r=0.80, p<0.001) and (5) multiple days' urinary TCAA measures improved the prediction of TCAA ingestion through urinary TCAA excretion. TCAA can be a valid biomarker of exposure for DBPs in drinking water.

  13. Health impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water in Europe: HIWATE.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Smith, Rachel; Golfinopoulos, Spyros; Best, Nicky; Bennett, James; Aggazzotti, Gabriella; Righi, Elena; Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Bucchini, Luca; Cordier, Sylvaine; Villanueva, Cristina M; Moreno, Victor; La Vecchia, Carlo; Bosetti, Cristina; Vartiainen, Terttu; Rautiu, Radu; Toledano, Mireille; Iszatt, Nina; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2009-06-01

    There appears to be very good epidemiological evidence for a relationship between chlorination by-products, as measured by trihalomethanes (THMs), in drinking water and bladder cancer, but the evidence for other cancers, including colorectal cancer appears to be inconclusive and inconsistent. There appears to be some evidence for a relationship between chlorination by-products, as measured by THMs, and small for gestational age (SGA)/intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and preterm delivery, but evidence for other outcomes such as low birth weight (LBW), stillbirth, congenital anomalies and semen quality appears to be inconclusive and inconsistent.The overall aim of the HIWATE study is to investigate potential human health risks (e.g. bladder and colorectal cancer, premature births, SGA, semen quality, stillbirth, congenital anomalies) associated with long-term exposure to low levels of disinfectants (such as chlorine) and DBPs occurring in water for human consumption and use in the food industry. The study will comprise risk-benefit analyses including quantitative assessments of risk associated with microbial contamination of drinking water versus chemical risk and will compare alternative treatment options. The outcome will be improved risk assessment and better information for risk management. The work is divided into different topics (exposure assessment, epidemiology, risk assessment and management) and studies.

  14. Multiple linear regression modeling of disinfection by-products formation in Istanbul drinking water reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Uyak, Vedat; Ozdemir, Kadir; Toroz, Ismail

    2007-06-01

    Oxidation of raw water with chlorine results in formation of trihalomethanes (THM) and haloacetic acids (HAA). Factors affecting their concentrations have been found to be organic matter type and concentration, pH, temperature, chlorine dose, contact time and bromide concentration, but the mechanisms of their formation are still under investigation. Within this scope, chlorination experiments have been conducted with water reservoirs from Terkos, Buyukcekmece and Omerli lakes, Istanbul, with different water quality regarding bromide concentration and organic matter content. The factors studied were pH, contact time, chlorine dose, and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA). The determination of disinfection by-products (DBP) was carried out by gas chromatography techniques. Statistical analysis of the results was focused on the development of multiple regression models for predicting the concentrations of total THM and total HAA based on the use of pH, contact time, chlorine dose, and SUVA. The developed models provided satisfactory estimations of the concentrations of the DBP and the model regression coefficients of THM and HAA are 0.88 and 0.61, respectively. Further, the Durbin-Watson values confirm the reliability of the two models. The results indicate that under these experimental conditions which indicate the variations of pH, chlorine dosages, contact time, and SUVA values, the formation of THM and HAA in water can be described by the multiple linear regression technique.

  15. Limnoithona sinensis as refuge for bacteria: protection from UV radiation and chlorine disinfection in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Cai, Bo; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we tested the potential of Limnoithona sinensis to provide its attached bacteria refuge against disinfection. The experimental results indicated that in water devoid of zooplankton, both UV radiation and chlorine disinfection significantly decreased the viability of free-living bacteria. In the presence of L. sinensis, however, the attached bacteria could survive and rapidly recover from disinfection. This demonstrated that L. sinensis provided protection from external damage to various aquatic bacteria that were attached to its body. The surviving bacteria remained on L. sinensis after disinfection exposure, which enabled a rapid increase in the bacterial population followed by their subsequent release into the surrounding water. Compared with UV radiation, chlorine disinfection was more effective in terms of inactivating attached bacteria. Both UV radiation and chlorine disinfection had little effect in terms of preventing the spread of undesirable bacteria, due to the incomplete inactivation of the bacteria associated with L. sinensis.

  16. Biostability and disinfectant by-product formation in drinking water blended with UF-treated filter backwash water.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M E; Gagnon, G A; Alam, Z; Andrews, R C

    2008-04-01

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate the impact of blending membrane-treated water treatment plant (WTP) residuals with plant-filtered water on finished water quality in terms of biostability and disinfectant by-product (DBP) formation. Filter backwash water (FBWW) was treated with a pilot-scale ultrafiltration (UF) membrane to produce permeate that was blended with plant-finished water. The batch studies involved storing samples for a specified time with a disinfectant residual to simulate residence time in the distribution system. Both chlorinated and non-chlorinated FBWW streams were evaluated, and the experimental design incorporated free chlorine, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide in parallel to a model system that did not receive a disinfectant dose. The results of the study found that blending 10% UF-treated FBWW with plant-filtered water did not have an impact on water biostability as monitored with heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs) or DBP concentrations as monitored by TTHM and HAA5 concentrations. However, the presence of preformed THM and HAA species found in chlorinated FBWW streams may result in higher levels of initial DBP concentrations in blended water matrices, and could have a significant impact on finished water quality in terms of meeting specific DBP guidelines or regulations.

  17. Disinfection byproduct formation in drinking water sources: A case study of Yuqiao reservoir.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Hongyan; He, Xizhen; Zhang, Yan; Du, Tingting; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Li, Yao

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the potential formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during chlorination and chloramination of 20 water samples collected from different points of Yuqiao reservoir in Tianjin, China. The concentrations of dissolved organic matter and ammonia decreased downstream the reservoir, while the specific UV absorbance (SUVA: the ratio of UV254 to dissolved organic carbon) increased [from 0.67 L/(mg*m) upstream to 3.58 L/(mg*m) downstream]. The raw water quality played an important role in the formation of DBPs. During chlorination, haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the major DBPs formed in most of the water samples, followed by trihalomethanes (THMs). CHCl3 and CHCl2Br were the major THM species, while trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) were the major HAA species. Chloramination, on the other hand, generally resulted in lower concentrations of THMs (CHCl3), HAAs (TCAA and DCAA), and haloacetonitriles (HANs). All the species of DBPs formed had positive correlations with the SUVA values, and HANs had the highest one (R(2) = 0.8). The correlation coefficients between the analogous DBP yields and the SUVA values in chlorinated samples were close to those in chloraminated samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. UV disinfection and flocculation-chlorination sachets to reduce hepatitis E virus in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Latorre, Laura; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Sommer, Regina; Rosina, Girones

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) is a major cause of waterborne outbreaks in areas with poor sanitation. As safe water supplies are the keystone for preventing HEV outbreaks, data on the efficacy of disinfection treatments are urgently needed. Here, we evaluated the ability of UV radiation and flocculation-chlorination sachets (FCSs) to reduce HEV in water matrices. The HEV-p6-kernow strain was replicated in the HepG2/C3A cell line, and we quantified genome number using qRT-PCR and infectivity using an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). UV irradiation tests using low-pressure radiation showed inactivation kinetics for HEV of 99.99% with a UV fluence of 232J/m(2) (IC 95%, 195,02-269,18). Moreover, the FCSs preparations significantly reduced viral concentrations in both water matrices, although the inactivation results were under the baseline of reduction (4.5 LRV) proposed by WHO guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. [Disinfection and degradation of 2,4-DCP with UV-radiation and on-line ozone in drinking water treatmeant].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaomin; Song, Qiang; Hu, Chun; Wang, Yizhong; Qu, Jiuhui

    2002-09-01

    A type reactor with on-line O3 was used to do further research of the disinfection of total bacteria, E. coli and degradation of 2,4-DCP. The result was obtained in the following conditions. Only UV-radiation, O3 applied by other machine and by the reactor itself, and other conditions were changed to study the disinfection and degradation. The result showed the satisfied effect of disinfection and degradation would be achieved by using UV/O3 applied outside and when the flow rate was about 400 L.h-1, on-line O3 could be produced and make high efforts to enhance disinfection and degradation. The method of UV/O3 was a promising technology in the treatment of drinking water.

  20. Factors influencing disinfection by-products formation in drinking water of six cities in China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bixiong; Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Linsheng; Wei, Jianrong; E, Xueli

    2009-11-15

    Based on the measured chemical and physical data in drinking water from six cities in China, the factors including total organic carbon (TOC), ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV(254)), pH, applied chlorine dosage, temperature, concentrations of bromide ion and several chemical elements which possibly affect the formation of trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA) have been studied. The results showed that: in all factors, TOC and UV(254) have definite correlations with total THM, but have nonsignificant relationships with total HAA. In the studied pH range of 6.5-8.5 for drinking water, the total THM concentration increased with the increasing of pH value, but the total HAA concentration slightly decreased. A low but significant relationship (r=0.26, p<0.01) occurred between total THM and applied chlorine dosage. Similar relationship (r=0.21, p<0.01) was found between total HAA and applied chlorine dosage. When the water temperature was low, the variation of THMs and HAAs was little, but in warmer water, the concentration of THMs and HAAs varied quickly. The extent of bromine incorporation into the DBPs increases with increasing bromide ion concentration. Based on the effect of chemical elements for the DBPs remove effect, the polyferric chloride could be a preferred flocculant agent in waterworks.

  1. Human health risk assessment of chlorinated disinfection by-products in drinking water using a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Hamidin, Nasrul; Yu, Qiming Jimmy; Connell, Des W

    2008-07-01

    The presence of chlorinated disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water is a public health issue, due to their possible adverse health effects on humans. To gauge the risk of chlorinated DBPs on human health, a risk assessment of chloroform (trichloromethane (TCM)), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), bromoform (tribromomethane (TBM)), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in drinking water was carried out using probabilistic techniques. Literature data on exposure concentrations from more than 15 different countries and adverse health effects on test animals as well as human epidemiological studies were used. The risk assessment showed no overlap between the highest human exposure dose (EXP(D)) and the lowest human equivalent dose (HED) from animal test data, for TCM, BDCM, DBCM, TBM, DCAA and TCAA. All the HED values were approximately 10(4)-10(5) times higher than the 95th percentiles of EXP(D). However, from the human epidemiology data, there was a positive overlap between the highest EXP(D) and the lifetime average daily doses (LADD(H)) for TCM, BDCM, DCAA and TCAA. This suggests that there are possible adverse health risks such as a small increased incidence of cancers in males and developmental effects on infants. However, the epidemiological data comprised several risk factors and exposure classification levels which may affect the overall results.

  2. Impacts of drinking water pretreatments on the formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Templeton, Michael R; Yin, Daqiang

    2011-12-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including both nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) and carbonaceous DBPs (C-DBPs), was investigated by analyzing chlorinated water samples following the application of three pretreatment processes: (i) powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption; (ii) KMnO(4) oxidation and (iii) biological contact oxidation (BCO), coupled with conventional water treatment processes. PAC adsorption can remove effectively the precursors of chloroform (42.7%), dichloroacetonitrile (28.6%), dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) (27.2%) and trichloronitromethane (35.7%), which were higher than that pretreated by KMnO(4) oxidation and/or BCO process. The removal efficiency of dissolved organic carbon by BCO process (76.5%)--was superior to that by PAC adsorption (69.9%) and KMnO(4) oxidation (61.4%). However, BCO increased the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentration which caused more N-DBPs to be formed during subsequent chlorination. Soluble microbial products including numerous DON compounds were produced in the BCO process and were observed to play an essential role in the formation of DCAcAm in particular.

  3. Batch solar disinfection inactivates oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum and cysts of Giardia muris in drinking water.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, K G; Méndez-Hermida, F; Castro-Hermida, J A; Ares-Mazás, E; Kehoe, S C; Boyle, M; Sichel, C; Fernández-Ibáñez, P; Meyer, B P; Ramalingham, S; Meyer, E A

    2006-08-01

    To determine whether batch solar disinfection (SODIS) can be used to inactivate oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum and cysts of Giardia muris in experimentally contaminated water. Suspensions of oocysts and cysts were exposed to simulated global solar irradiation of 830 W m(-2) for different exposure times at a constant temperature of 40 degrees C. Infectivity tests were carried out using CD-1 suckling mice in the Cryptosporidium experiments and newly weaned CD-1 mice in the Giardia experiments. Exposure times of > or =10 h (total optical dose c. 30 kJ) rendered C. parvum oocysts noninfective. Giardia muris cysts were rendered completely noninfective within 4 h (total optical dose >12 kJ). Scanning electron microscopy and viability (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole/propidium iodide fluorogenic dyes and excystation) studies on oocysts of C. parvum suggest that inactivation is caused by damage to the oocyst wall. Results show that cysts of G. muris and oocysts of C. parvum are rendered completely noninfective after batch SODIS exposures of 4 and 10 h (respectively) and is also likely to be effective against waterborne cysts of Giardia lamblia. These results demonstrate that SODIS is an appropriate household water treatment technology for use as an emergency intervention in aftermath of natural or man-made disasters against not only bacterial but also protozoan pathogens.

  4. Disinfection of model indicator organisms in a drinking water pilot plant by using PEROXONE.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, R L; Stewart, M H; Liang, S; McGuire, M J

    1989-01-01

    at an applied ozone dosage of 2.0 mg/liter (and a 4-min contact time) when the H2O2/O3 ratio was less than or equal to 0.5. Comparative disinfection experiments indicated that free chlorine was the most potent bactericidal agent, followed (in descending order of effectiveness) by ozone, PEROXONE, and chloramines. These results indicate that the PEROXONE process must be optimized for each source water to achieve microbicidal effectiveness. PMID:2679383

  5. Drinking-water disinfection by-products and semen quality: a cross-sectional study in China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Yi-Xin; Xie, Shao-Hua; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yong-Zhe; Li, Min; Yue, Jing; Li, Yu-Feng; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) has been demonstrated to impair male reproductive health in animals, but human evidence is limited and inconsistent. We examined the association between exposure to drinking-water DBPs and semen quality in a Chinese population. We recruited 2,009 men seeking semen analysis from the Reproductive Center of Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China, between April 2011 and May 2012. Each man provided a semen sample and a urine sample. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, sperm motility, and sperm count. As a biomarker of exposure to drinking-water DBPs, trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) was measured in the urine samples. The mean (median) urinary TCAA concentration was 9.58 (7.97) μg/L (interquartile range, 6.01-10.96 μg/L). Compared with men with urine TCAA in the lowest quartile, increased adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated for below-reference sperm concentration in men with TCAA in the second and fourth quartiles (OR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.19, 2.69 and OR = 1.51; 95% CI: 0.98, 2.31, respectively), for below-reference sperm motility in men with TCAA in the second and third quartiles (OR = 1.46; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.90 and OR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.70, respectively), and for below-reference sperm count in men with TCAA in the second quartile (OR 1.62; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.55). Nonmonotonic associations with TCAA quartiles were also estimated for semen parameters modeled as continuous outcomes, although significant negative associations were estimated for all quartiles above the reference level for sperm motility. Our findings suggest that exposure to drinking-water DBPs may contribute to decreased semen quality in humans.

  6. Use of the Comet test and micronucleus assay on human white blood cells for in vitro assessment of genotoxicity induced by different drinking water disinfection protocols.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Francesca; Buschini, Annamaria; Rossi, Carlo; Poli, Paola; Forti, Giorgio Cantelli; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2005-08-01

    Surface water disinfection can lead to the formation of mutagenic/carcinogenic by-products derived from reactions with naturally occurring inorganic compounds. We investigated the feasibility and potential usefulness of an integrated approach to genotoxicity analysis of drinking water. The approach employed the Comet and micronucleus (MN) assays to evaluate the DNA and chromosomal damage produced by water extracts in human blood cells. Surface water samples from Lago Trasimeno (Italy) were collected in different seasons (July 2000, October 2000, February 2001, and June 2001), and samples were disinfected with sodium hypochloride (NaClO), chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)), or peracetic acid (PAA). Extracts of untreated and treated water were incubated with primary human leukocytes. The Comet assay revealed both strong seasonal variations and differences between samples processed by the three disinfection protocols. The three disinfectants increased the genotoxicity of the water collected in July 2000 and October 2000, with PAA producing the greatest amount of DNA damage. Extracts of raw water collected in February 2001 produced so much DNA damage that the relative genotoxic potentials of the three disinfectants could not be evaluated. No increase in MN frequency was detected in any of the samples. The multi-endpoint MN assay indicated, however, that our study samples (especially the sample collected in the February 2001) were cytotoxic. We conclude that this integrated approach to genotoxicity assessment may be useful both for the quality control of raw drinking water and to help compare the potential health risks associated with alternative disinfection processes. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Seasonal evaluation of the presence of 46 disinfection by-products throughout a drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Maria; Montesinos, Isabel; Cardador, M J; Silva, Manuel; Gallego, Mercedes

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we studied a total of 46 regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) including 10 trihalomethanes (THMs), 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs), 6 halonitromethanes (HNMs), 6 haloacetonitriles (HANs) and 11 aldehydes at different points in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) and its distribution network. Determining an increased number of compounds and using accurate, sensitive analytical methodologies for new DBPs can be useful to overcome some challenges encountered in the comprehensive assessment of the quality and safety of drinking water. This paper provides a detailed picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of DBP concentrations from raw water to distribution network. Samples were collected on a monthly basis at seven different points in the four seasons of a year to acquire robust data for DBPs and supplementary quality-related water parameters. Only 5 aldehydes and 2 HAAs were found in raw water. Chlorine dioxide caused the formation of 3 new aldehydes (benzaldehyde included), 5 HAAs and chloroform. The concentrations of DBPs present in raw water were up to 6 times higher in the warmer seasons (spring and summer). The sedimentation process further increased their concentrations and caused the formation of three new ones. Sand filtration substantially removed aldehydes and HAAs (15-50%), but increased the levels of THMs, HNMs and HANs by up to 70%. Chloramination raised the levels of 8 aldehydes and 7 HAAs; also, it caused the formation of monoiodoacetic acid, dibromochloromethane, dichloroiodomethane and bromochloroacetonitrile. Therefore, this treatment increases the levels of existing DBPs and leads to the formation of new ones to a greater extent than does chlorine dioxide. Except for 5 aldehydes, the 23 DBPs encountered at the DWTP exit were found at increased concentrations in the warmer seasons (HAAs by about 50% and THMs by 350%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Drinking Water Disinfection By-products, Genetic Polymorphisms, and Birth Outcomes in a European Mother-Child Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kogevinas, Manolis; Bustamante, Mariona; Gracia-Lavedán, Esther; Ballester, Ferran; Cordier, Sylvaine; Costet, Nathalie; Espinosa, Ana; Grazuleviciene, Regina; Danileviciute, Asta; Ibarluzea, Jesus; Karadanelli, Maria; Krasner, Stuart; Patelarou, Evridiki; Stephanou, Euripides; Tardón, Adonina; Toledano, Mireille B; Wright, John; Villanueva, Cristina M; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2016-11-01

    We examined the association between exposure during pregnancy to trihalomethanes, the most common water disinfection by-products, and birth outcomes in a European cohort study (Health Impacts of Long-Term Exposure to Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water). We took into account exposure through different water uses, measures of water toxicity, and genetic susceptibility. We enrolled 14,005 mothers (2002-2010) and their children from France, Greece, Lithuania, Spain, and the UK. Information on lifestyle- and water-related activities was recorded. We ascertained residential concentrations of trihalomethanes through regulatory records and ad hoc sampling campaigns and estimated route-specific trihalomethane uptake by trimester and for whole pregnancy. We examined single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variants in disinfection by-product metabolizing genes in nested case-control studies. Average levels of trihalomethanes ranged from around 10 μg/L to above the regulatory limits in the EU of 100 μg/L between centers. There was no association between birth weight and total trihalomethane exposure during pregnancy (β = 2.2 g in birth weight per 10 μg/L of trihalomethane, 95% confidence interval = 3.3, 7.6). Birth weight was not associated with exposure through different routes or with specific trihalomethane species. Exposure to trihalomethanes was not associated with low birth weight (odds ratio [OR] per 10 μg/L = 1.02, 95% confidence interval = 0.95, 1.10), small-for-gestational age (OR = 0.99, 0.94, 1.03) and preterm births (OR = 0.98, 0.9, 1.05). We found no gene-environment interactions for mother or child polymorphisms in relation to preterm birth or small-for-gestational age. In this large European study, we found no association between birth outcomes and trihalomethane exposures during pregnancy in the total population or in potentially genetically susceptible subgroups. (See video abstract at http://links.lww.com/EDE/B104.).

  9. Evaluation of Drinking Water Disinfectant Byproducts Compliance Data as an Indirect Measure for Short-Term Exposure in Humans.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Shahid; Frost, Kali; Sundararajan, Madhura

    2017-05-20

    In the absence of shorter term disinfectant byproducts (DBPs) data on regulated Trihalomethanes (THMs) and Haloacetic acids (HAAs), epidemiologists and risk assessors have used long-term annual compliance (LRAA) or quarterly (QA) data to evaluate the association between DBP exposure and adverse birth outcomes, which resulted in inconclusive findings. Therefore, we evaluated the reliability of using long-term LRAA and QA data as an indirect measure for short-term exposure. Short-term residential tap water samples were collected in peak DBP months (May-August) in a community water system with five separate treatment stations and were sourced from surface or groundwater. Samples were analyzed for THMs and HAAs per the EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) standard methods (524.2 and 552.2). The measured levels of total THMs and HAAs were compared temporally and spatially with LRAA and QA data, which showed significant differences (p < 0.05). Most samples from surface water stations showed higher levels than LRAA or QA. Significant numbers of samples in surface water stations exceeded regulatory permissible limits: 27% had excessive THMs and 35% had excessive HAAs. Trichloromethane, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid were the major drivers of variability. This study suggests that LRAA and QA data are not good proxies of short-term exposure. Further investigation is needed to determine if other drinking water systems show consistent findings for improved regulation.

  10. Evaluation of Drinking Water Disinfectant Byproducts Compliance Data as an Indirect Measure for Short-Term Exposure in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Shahid; Frost, Kali; Sundararajan, Madhura

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of shorter term disinfectant byproducts (DBPs) data on regulated Trihalomethanes (THMs) and Haloacetic acids (HAAs), epidemiologists and risk assessors have used long-term annual compliance (LRAA) or quarterly (QA) data to evaluate the association between DBP exposure and adverse birth outcomes, which resulted in inconclusive findings. Therefore, we evaluated the reliability of using long-term LRAA and QA data as an indirect measure for short-term exposure. Short-term residential tap water samples were collected in peak DBP months (May–August) in a community water system with five separate treatment stations and were sourced from surface or groundwater. Samples were analyzed for THMs and HAAs per the EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) standard methods (524.2 and 552.2). The measured levels of total THMs and HAAs were compared temporally and spatially with LRAA and QA data, which showed significant differences (p < 0.05). Most samples from surface water stations showed higher levels than LRAA or QA. Significant numbers of samples in surface water stations exceeded regulatory permissible limits: 27% had excessive THMs and 35% had excessive HAAs. Trichloromethane, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid were the major drivers of variability. This study suggests that LRAA and QA data are not good proxies of short-term exposure. Further investigation is needed to determine if other drinking water systems show consistent findings for improved regulation. PMID:28531123

  11. MONITORING FOR AEROMONAS SPECIES AFTER TREATMENT WITH COMMON DRINKING WATER DISINFECTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of Aeromonas spp. To free chlorine, chloramine and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection was determined. Aeromonas hydrophila is a contaminant listed on the USEPA's 1998 Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). Experiments using free chlorine indicated that the Aeromonas spp. ...

  12. MONITORING FOR AEROMONAS SPECIES AFTER TREATMENT WITH COMMON DRINKING WATER DISINFECTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of Aeromonas spp. To free chlorine, chloramine and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection was determined. Aeromonas hydrophila is a contaminant listed on the USEPA's 1998 Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). Experiments using free chlorine indicated that the Aeromonas spp. ...

  13. Analysis and occurrence of odorous disinfection by-products from chlorination of amino acids in three different drinking water treatment plants and corresponding distribution networks.

    PubMed

    Brosillon, Stephan; Lemasle, Marguerite; Renault, Emilie; Tozza, Dominique; Heim, Veronique; Laplanche, Alain

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have established that odorous and stable chloraldimines are formed during amino acid chlorination in drinking water treatment. In order to identify at low level (10(-8) M) the presence of these odorous disinfection by-products in drinking water matrixes an analytical method was developed by using head space apparatus (HS) combined with a sorbent trap system linked to a GC with a mass spectrometer detector (HS/Trap/GC/MS). The analyses were carried out in three different drinking water supplies from the Paris area, during the four seasons. Free amino acids were monitored at the inlet of the plant. The odorous disinfection by-products were analyzed at the outlet of each drinking water treatment plant and the different distribution networks were connected to the corresponding plant. The results confirmed that the odorous chloraldimines are produced during chlorination of free amino acids in three different matrixes in different seasons throughout the year (N-chloroisobutaldimine; N-chloromethyl-2-butaldimine; N-chloromethyl-3-butaldimine (6-10 nM). The analytical method (HS/Trap/GC/MS) used to monitor odorous disinfection by-products appeared to be adapted for the detection of these by-products at nM level.

  14. Mammalian cell DNA damage and repair kinetics of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Yukako; Pals, Justin; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2009-11-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second most common class of chlorinated water disinfection by-products (DBPs). The single cell gel electrophoresis genotoxicity assay using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was modified to include liquid holding recovery time to measure genomic DNA damage and repair kinetics of three monoHAAs: chloroacetic acid (CAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA), and iodoacetic acid (IAA). The rank order of genotoxic potency was IAA > BAA > CAA from previous research. The concentration of each HAA was chosen to generate approximately the same level of genotoxic damage. No cytotoxicity was expressed during the 24 h liquid holding period. Nuclei from CHO cells treated with BAA showed the lowest rate of DNA repair (t(50) = 296 min) compared to that of CAA or IAA (t(50) = 134 and 84 min, respectively). The different rates of genomic repair expressed by IAA or CAA versus BAA suggest that different distributions of DNA lesions are induced. The use of DNA repair coupled with genomic technologies may lead to the understanding of the biological and genetic mechanisms involved in toxic responses induced by DBPs.

  15. Disinfection byproduct formation during biofiltration cycle: Implications for drinking water production.

    PubMed

    Delatolla, R; Séguin, C; Springthorpe, S; Gorman, E; Campbell, A; Douglas, I

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of biofiltration to reduce the formation potential of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Particularly, the work investigates the effect of the duration of the filter cycle on the formation potential of total trihalomethanes (TTHM) and five species of haloacetic acids (HAA5), dissolved oxygen (DO), organic carbon, nitrogen and total phosphorous concentrations along with biofilm coverage of the filter media and biomass viability of the attached cells. The study was conducted on a full-scale biologically active filter, with anthracite and sand media, at the Britannia water treatment plant (WTP), located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The formation potential of both TTHMs and HAA5s decreased due to biofiltration. However the lowest formation potentials for both groups of DBPs and or their precursors were observed immediately following a backwash event. Hence, the highest percent removal of DBPs was observed during the early stages of the biofiltration cycle, which suggests that a higher frequency of backwashing will reduce the formation of DBPs. Variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM) analysis shows that biofilm coverage of anthracite and sand media increases as the filtration cycle progressed, while biomass viability analysis demonstrates that the percentage of cells attached to the anthracite and sand media also increases as the filtration cycle progresses. These results suggest that the development and growth of biofilm on the filters increases the DPB formation potential.

  16. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated drinking-water disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay.

    PubMed

    Narotsky, Michael G; Klinefelter, Gary R; Goldman, Jerome M; DeAngelo, Anthony B; Best, Deborah S; McDonald, Anthony; Strader, Lillian F; Murr, Ashley S; Suarez, Juan D; George, Michael H; Hunter, E Sidney; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2015-06-01

    Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown. We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs in a multigenerational reproductive toxicity bioassay. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed (parental, F1, and F2 generations) from gestation day 0 of the parental generation to postnatal day (PND) 6 of the F2 generation to a realistically proportioned mixture of THMs and HAAs at 0, 500×, 1,000×, or 2,000× of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Maternal water consumption was reduced at ≥ 1,000×; body weights were reduced at 2,000×. Prenatal and postnatal survival were unaffected. F1 pup weights were unaffected at birth but reduced at 2,000× on PND6 and at ≥ 1,000× on PND21. Postweaning F1 body weights were reduced at 2,000×, and water consumption was reduced at ≥ 500×. Males at 2,000× had a small but significantly increased incidence of retained nipples and compromised sperm motility. Onset of puberty was delayed at 1,000× and 2,000×. F1 estrous cycles and fertility were unaffected, and F2 litters showed no effects on pup weight or survival. Histologically, P0 (parental) dams had nephropathy and adrenal cortical pathology at 2,000×. A mixture of regulated DBPs at up to 2,000× the MCLs had no adverse effects on fertility, pregnancy maintenance, prenatal survival, postnatal survival, or birth weights. Delayed puberty at ≥ 1,000× may have been secondary to reduced water consumption. Male nipple retention and compromised sperm motility at 2,000× may have been secondary to reduced body weights.

  17. Effect of ozonation and UV irradiation with direct filtration on disinfection and disinfection by-product precursors in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Amirsardari, Y; Yu, Q; Willams, P

    2001-09-01

    Pilot plant studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of pre-ozonation and ultraviolet irradiation on disinfection, disinfection by-product precursors and water quality in a direct filtration water treatment system. Disinfection parameters including total coliforms, faecal coliforms and heterotrophic plate count were investigated. Total organic carbon (TOC), trihalomethanes (THMs), total organic halides (TOX), filtered water turbidity and colour were also evaluated. It was found that advanced pre-oxidation processes (ozonation and UV irradiation) significantly increase the level of disinfection of raw water. Removal of total trihalomethanes and total organic halides precursors improved with ozonation and UV irradiation, compared to no oxidation treatment in direct filtration and/or in conventional water treatment. All coliforms (total and faecal) were completely destroyed by ozonation alone, and also with ozonation in conjunction with UV irradiation. However, the heterotrophic plate count was not significantly reduced at an ozone residual concentration of 0.1 mg l(-1). This suggests that disinfection efficiency is strongly influenced by competition reactions of organic and inorganic compounds with ozone. Precursors of total trihalomethanes and total organic halides were reduced by 90% and 98%, respectively, with advanced pre-oxidation processes. Water quality parameters were improved by the pre-ozonation and UV irradiation treatment system.

  18. Disinfection by-product formation following chlorination of drinking water: artificial neural network models and changes in speciation with treatment.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pranav; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2010-09-01

    Artificial neural network (ANN) models were developed to predict disinfection by-product (DBP) formation during municipal drinking water treatment using the Information Collection Rule Treatment Studies database complied by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The formation of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), and total organic halide (TOX) upon chlorination of untreated water, and after conventional treatment, granular activated carbon treatment, and nanofiltration were quantified using ANNs. Highly accurate predictions of DBP concentrations were possible using physically meaningful water quality parameters as ANN inputs including dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, ultraviolet absorbance at 254nm and one cm path length (UV(254)), bromide ion concentration (Br(-)), chlorine dose, chlorination pH, contact time, and reaction temperature. This highlights the ability of ANNs to closely capture the highly complex and non-linear relationships underlying DBP formation. Accurate simulations suggest the potential use of ANNs for process control and optimization, comparison of treatment alternatives for DBP control prior to piloting, and even to reduce the number of experiments to evaluate water quality variations when operating conditions are changed. Changes in THM and HAA speciation and bromine substitution patterns following treatment are also discussed.

  19. Poor efficacy of residual chlorine disinfectant in drinking water to inactivate waterborne pathogens in distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Payment, P

    1999-08-01

    To evaluate the inactivating power of residual chlorine in a distribution system, test microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, bacteriophage phi-X 170, and poliovirus type 1) were added to drinking water samples obtained from two water treatment plants and their distribution system. Except for Escherichia coli, microorganisms remained relatively unaffected in water from the distribution systems tested. When sewage was added to the water samples, indigenous thermotolerant coliforms were inactivated only when water was obtained from sites very close to the treatment plant and containing a high residual chlorine concentration. Clostridium perfringens was barely inactivated, suggesting that the most resistant pathogens such as Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, and human enteric viruses would not be inactivated. Our results suggest that the maintenance of a free residual concentration in a distribution system does not provide a significant inactivation of pathogens, could even mask events of contamination of the distribution, and thus would provide only a false sense of safety with little active protection of public health. Recent epidemiological studies that have suggested a significant waterborne level of endemic gastrointestinal illness could then be explained by undetected intrusions in the distribution system, intrusions resulting in the infection of a small number of individuals without eliciting an outbreak situation.

  20. Reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine: Implications for herbicide transformation during drinking water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Chusaksri, Sarinma; Sutthivaiyakit, Somyote; Sedlak, David L; Sutthivaiyakit, Pakawadee

    2012-03-30

    Phenylurea herbicides have been known to contaminate surface waters serving as potable supplies. To access the potential for transformation of these compounds during drinking water treatment, reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine at different pHs were investigated. The effect of substitution at the amino-N on the rate of transformation depends upon pH. Under acidic conditions, all of the phenylurea studied except 3,4-dichloro-3'-N-methylphenylurea (3,4-DCMPU) exhibited third-order kinetics, second order with respect to chlorine and first order with respect to phenylurea, while the reactions of 3,4-DCMPU were first order with respect to both chlorine and the organic compound. Under neutral and alkaline conditions, all compounds exhibited second-order kinetics that was first order with respect to chlorine and the organic compound. Apparent second-order rate constants at 25°C and pH 7 were 0.76 ± 0.16, 0.52 ± 0.11, 0.39 ± 0.02, 0.27 ± 0.04 and 0.23 ± 0.05 M(-1)s(-1) for phenylurea, 3, 4-dichlorophenylurea, 3, 4-DCMPU, metoxuron and monuron, respectively. Studies of the chlorination products, monitored by LC/MS/MS, under different pH values indicated the reaction to take place at both N atoms and also at ortho- and para- positions of the phenylurea aromatic group. The main chlorinating species were found to be different in different pH ranges. Under conditions typically encountered in drinking water treatment systems, transformation of these compounds by chlorine will be incomplete.

  1. [Effects of bromide and ferric ions on formation of tri-halomethanes during disinfection of drinking water by chlorine].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Wang, Jing; Ge, Yuan-Xin; Ma, Hong-Mei; Zhao, Jian-Fu

    2007-06-01

    Effects of bromide and ferric ions on the formation and distribution of tri-halomethanes (THMs) have been investigated. As disinfection by-product (DBP) model precursors of natural water, humic acid solutions were used and a series of experiments were conducted. The results showed that bromide in this reaction system not only contributed to the increase of brominated species, but also the total tri-halomethanes. When the concentration of Br(-) was 1.0 mg/L, the total amount of produced THMs reached to 270% of that without bromide ions. In the presence of bromide, ferric ions decreased the production of THMs at pH 6, but increased the production of THMs at pH 8, especially for the amount of tri-bromomethanes. When the concentration of Fe3+ was 5 mg/L, the amount of produced tri-bromomethanes had an increment of 54% (from 51.7 microg/L to 79.4 microg/L), and the total amount of THMs increased from 113.49 microg/L to 162.09 microg/L. Bromide ions had a significant effect on carcinogenicity risk in disinfection of drinking water by chlorine, and the co-existence of ferric ion and bromide in alkalescent environment can result in the biggest challenge on carcinogenicity risk. Under the condition of 0.2 mg/L Br(-), 5 mg/L Fe3+ and pH 6, the carcinogenicity risk increased 2.5 times than that without Br(-) and Fe3+, and much higher increment of 5.1 times appeared when pH was 8.

  2. Fingerprinting the reactive toxicity pathways of 50 drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Stalter, Daniel; O'Malley, Elissa; von Gunten, Urs; Escher, Beate I

    2016-03-15

    A set of nine in vitro cellular bioassays indicative of different stages of the cellular toxicity pathway was applied to 50 disinfection by-products (DBPs) to obtain a better understanding of the commonalities and differences in the molecular mechanisms of reactive toxicity of DBPs. An Eschericia coli test battery revealed reactivity towards proteins/peptides for 64% of the compounds. 98% activated the NRf2-mediated oxidative stress response and 68% induced an adaptive stress response to genotoxic effects as indicated by the activation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. All DBPs reactive towards DNA in the E. coli assay and activating p53 also induced oxidative stress, confirming earlier studies that the latter could trigger DBP's carcinogenicity. The energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital ELUMO as reactivity descriptor was linearly correlated with oxidative stress induction for trihalomethanes (r(2)=0.98) and haloacetamides (r(2)=0.58), indicating that potency of these DBPs is connected to electrophilicity. However, the descriptive power was poor for haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloacetonitriles (r(2) (<) 0.06). For HAAs, we additionally accounted for speciation by including the acidity constant with ELUMO in a two-parameter multiple linear regression model. This increased r(2) to >0.80, indicating that HAAs' potency is connected to both, electrophilicity and speciation. Based on the activation of oxidative stress response and the soft electrophilic character of most tested DBPs we hypothesize that indirect genotoxicity-e.g., through oxidative stress induction and/or enzyme inhibition-is more plausible than direct DNA damage for most investigated DBPs. The results provide not only a mechanistic understanding of the cellular effects of DBPs but the effect concentrations may also serve to evaluate mixture effects of DBPs in water samples.

  3. Evaluating the similarity of complex drinking-water disinfection by-product mixtures: overview of the issues.

    PubMed

    Rice, Glenn E; Teuschler, Linda K; Bull, Richard J; Simmons, Jane E; Feder, Paul I

    2009-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to complex mixtures of environmental chemical contaminants, which arise as releases from sources such as engineering procedures, degradation processes, and emissions from mobile or stationary sources. When dose-response data are available for the actual environmental mixture to which individuals are exposed (i.e., the mixture of concern), these data provide the best information for dose-response assessment of the mixture. When suitable data on the mixture itself are not available, surrogate data might be used from a sufficiently similar mixture or a group of similar mixtures. Consequently, the determination of whether the mixture of concern is "sufficiently similar" to a tested mixture or a group of tested mixtures is central to the use of whole mixture methods. This article provides an overview for a series of companion articles whose purpose is to develop a set of biostatistical, chemical, and toxicological criteria and approaches for evaluating the similarity of drinking-water disinfection by-product (DBPs) complex mixtures. Together, the five articles in this series serve as a case study whose techniques will be relevant to assessing similarity for other classes of complex mixtures of environmental chemicals. Schenck et al. (2009) describe the chemistry and mutagenicity of a set of DBP mixtures concentrated from five different drinking-water treatment plants. Bull et al. (2009a, 2009b) describe how the variables that impact the formation of DBP affect the chemical composition and, subsequently, the expected toxicity of the mixture. Feder et al. (2009a, 2009b) evaluate the similarity of DBP mixture concentrates by applying two biostatistical approaches, principal components analysis, and a nonparametric "bootstrap" analysis. Important factors for determining sufficient similarity of DBP mixtures found in this research include disinfectant used; source water characteristics, including the concentrations of bromide and total organic carbon

  4. Effect of hypochlorite-based disinfectants on inactivation of murine norovirus and attempt to eliminate or prevent infection in mice by addition to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, Kazuhiro; Taharaguchi, Motoko; Sakai, Koji; Takagi, Hirotaka; Tohya, Yukinobu; Yamada, Yasuko K

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro efficacy of weak acid hypochlorous solution (WAHS) against murine norovirus (MNV) by plaque assay and compared the efficacy with diluted NaOCl (Purelox) and 70% ethanol. WAHS was as effective as 70% ethanol and diluted Purelox for 0.5-min reactions. For 0.5-min reactions in the presence of mouse feces emulsion, the efficacy of WHAS and 1:600 diluted Purelox was decreased, reducing the virus titers by 2.3 and 2.6 log10, respectively, while 70% ethanol reduced the titer by more than 5 log10. However, WAHS showed more than 5 log10 reductions for the 5-min reaction even in the presence of feces emulsion. Since WAHS showed enough efficacy in inactivating MNV in vitro, we tried to eliminate MNV from MNV-infected mice by substituting WAHS for their drinking water. However, MNV was found to be positive in feces of mice drinking WAHS by an RT-nested PCR and plaque assay. To investigate whether hypochlorite-based disinfectants could prevent infection of a mouse with MNV, WAHS or 1:6,000 diluted Purelox was substituted for the drinking water of mice for 2 or 4 weeks, and then the mice were placed in a cage with an MNV-infected mouse. The supply of disinfectants was continued after cohabitation, but MNV was detected in the feces of all the mice at 1 week after cohabitation. In this study, we tried to eliminate and prevent MNV infection from mice by supplying hypochlorite-based disinfectants as an easy and low-cost method. Unfortunately, drinking disinfectants was ineffective, so it is important to keep the facility environment clean by use of effective disinfectants. Also, animals introduced into facilities should be tested as MNV free by quarantine and periodically confirmed as MNV free by microbiological monitoring.

  5. Effect of Hypochlorite-Based Disinfectants on Inactivation of Murine Norovirus and Attempt to Eliminate or Prevent Infection in Mice by Additionto Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Takimoto, Kazuhiro; Taharaguchi, Motoko; Sakai, Koji; Takagi, Hirotaka; Tohya, Yukinobu; Yamada, Yasuko K

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro efficacy of weak acid hypochlorous solution (WAHS) against murine norovirus (MNV) by plaque assay and compared the efficacy with diluted NaOCl (Purelox) and 70% ethanol. WAHS was as effective as 70% ethanol and diluted Purelox for 0.5-min reactions. For 0.5-min reactions in the presence of mouse feces emulsion, the efficacy of WHAS and 1:600 diluted Purelox was decreased, reducing the virus titers by 2.3 and 2.6 log10, respectively, while 70% ethanol reduced the titer by more than 5 log10. However, WAHS showed more than 5 log10 reductions for the 5-min reaction even in the presence of feces emulsion. Since WAHS showed enough efficacy in inactivating MNV in vitro, we tried to eliminate MNV from MNV-infected mice by substituting WAHS for their drinking water. However, MNV was found to be positive in feces of mice drinking WAHS by an RT-nested PCR and plaque assay. To investigate whether hypochlorite-based disinfectants could prevent infection of a mouse with MNV, WAHS or 1:6,000 diluted Purelox was substituted for the drinking water of mice for 2 or 4 weeks, and then the mice were placed in a cage with an MNV-infected mouse. The supply of disinfectants was continued after cohabitation, but MNV was detected in the feces of all the mice at 1 week after cohabitation. In this study, we tried to eliminate and prevent MNV infection from mice by supplying hypochlorite-based disinfectants as an easy and low-cost method. Unfortunately, drinking disinfectants was ineffective, so it is important to keep the facility environment clean by use of effective disinfectants. Also, animals introduced into facilities should be tested as MNV free by quarantine and periodically confirmed as MNV free by microbiological monitoring. PMID:23903059

  6. Integrated disinfection by-products mixtures research: comprehensive characterization of water concentrates prepared from chlorinated and ozonated/postchlorinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Susan D; Thruston, Alfred D; Krasner, Stuart W; Weinberg, Howard S; Miltner, Richard J; Schenck, Kathleen M; Narotsky, Michael G; McKague, A Bruce; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the disinfection by-product (DBP) characterization portion of a series of experiments designed for comprehensive chemical and toxicological evaluation of two drinking-water concentrates containing highly complex mixtures of DBPs. This project, called the Four Lab Study, involved the participation of scientists from four laboratories and centers of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development, along with collaborators from the water industry and academia, and addressed toxicologic effects of complex DBP mixtures, with an emphasis on reproductive and developmental effects that are associated with DBP exposures in epidemiologic studies. Complex mixtures of DBPs from two different disinfection schemes (chlorination and ozonation/postchlorination) were concentrated successfully, while maintaining a water matrix suitable for animal studies. An array of chlorinated/brominated/iodinated DBPs was created. The DBPs were relatively stable over the course of the animal experiments, and a significant portion of the halogenated DBPs formed in the drinking water was accounted for through a comprehensive qualitative and quantitative identification approach. DBPs quantified included priority DBPs that are not regulated but have been predicted to produce adverse health effects, as well as those currently regulated in the United States and those targeted during implementation of the Information Collection Rule. New by-products were also reported for the first time. These included previously undetected and unreported bromo- and chloroacids, iodinated compounds, bromo- and iodophenols, and bromoalkyltins.

  7. Free Available Chlorine Disinfection Criteria for Fixed Army Installation Primary Drinking Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    low temperature and high pH test conditions. All the enteroviruses exhibited anomalous 2-stage disinfection kinetics at pH 5, making disinfection of... enteroviruses and f 2 zoliphage at pH 9 by 20 to qo percent. Kinetics for the R. colt strains also showed an enhanced rate at pH 9. The high pH buffer- cation... enteroviruses at pH 9 was shown tso be due to chlorine-sp cific aggrega- tion. Overall, data showed that the pathogenic viruses teste [polio I (Brunhilde

  8. Field study on evaluation of the efficacy and usability of two disinfectants for drinking water treatment at small cattle breeders and dairy cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Asmaa N

    2016-03-01

    The hygienic quality of drinking water for cattle originated from different sources together with the efficacy and usability of two types of disinfectants against waterborne pathogens were assessed for small cattle breeders and dairy cattle farms. A total of 120 drinking water samples were collected from water troughs representing three different water sources commonly used for cattle drinking (tap, underground and surface water; n = 65, 25, and 30, respectively). Collected samples were cultured for isolation and identification of pathogenic bacteria using serological techniques and PCR. The bactericidal efficacy of the disinfectants, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) 50%, at different concentrations were evaluated by the determination of total viable and coliform counts of water prior and postwater treatment. In small cattle breeders, Escherichia coli was the most prevalent bacterial isolates from surface water (56.7%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (36.7%), Salmonella spp. (26.7%), Streptococcus faecalis (23.3%), Shigella flexneri (16.7%), Proteus spp. (16.7%), and Klebsiella pneumonae (10.0 %) at X(2) = 9, P ≤ 0.01. Prior to the use of disinfectants, the averages of total bacterial and coliform counts were the highest in surface water (3.56 × 10(7), 240.0, and 38.0 CFU/100 ml, respectively). It has been found that hydrogen peroxide 50% at a concentration of 35 mg/l had a lethal effect (100 %) on indicator microorganisms compared with NaDCC at concentration of 2 mg/l. In conclusion, the higher bacterial contaminants in drinking water were found in surface water followed by tap water, particularly for small cattle breeders. Therefore, the usage of more hygienic water troughs with their regular treatment by hydrogen peroxide 50% at concentration of 35 mg/l is highly recommended to control waterborne bacteria and consequently improve and maintain the animal health.

  9. Spatio-temporal variability of non-regulated disinfection by-products within a drinking water distribution network.

    PubMed

    Mercier Shanks, Catherine; Sérodes, Jean-Baptiste; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2013-06-01

    The non-regulated disinfection by-products (NrDBP) targeted in this study include four haloacetonitriles (trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN); dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN); bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN)); one halonitromethane (trichloronitromethane, better known under the name chloropicrin (CPK)); and two haloketones (1,1-dichloro-2-propanone (11DCPone) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2-propanone (111TCPone)). This study provides a detailed picture of the spatial and temporal variability of these NrDBP concentrations throughout a drinking water distribution system located in a region with major seasonal climate variations. The results obtained show that the concentrations of the investigated NrDBPs varied significantly according to time and location. The average concentrations of TCAN, DCAN, CKP and 111TCPone were significantly higher in summer. Surprisingly, the average concentrations of 11DCPone were significantly higher in winter. For BCAN and DBAN, the average concentrations observed in winter were higher, but not in a statistically significant way. On the other hand, the four HANs, CPK and 111TCPone generally had spatial profiles involving an increase of the concentrations along the network according to increasing water residence times, whereas 11DCPone overall had a profile where concentrations increased at the beginning of the network, followed by a drop in the concentrations towards the ends of the network. In spite of certain disparities in the individual spatio-temporal variation profiles, strong correlations were generally observed between NrDBPs, and trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Therefore, THMs and HAAs could be good statistical indicators of the presence of NrDBPs in the drinking water of the system under study.

  10. Effect of temperature and disinfection strategies on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in a bench-scale drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Pintar, Katarina D M; Slawson, Robin M

    2003-04-01

    The establishment of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), a group of autotrophic microorganisms responsible for nitrification in chloraminated distribution systems, was studied in a bench-scale distribution system. The potential significance of temperature and disinfectant residual associated with chloramination in full-scale drinking water distribution systems was assessed. Biofilm development was primarily monitored using AOB abundance and nitrite concentrations. The bench-scale system was initially operated under typical North American summer (22 degrees C) and fall (12 degrees C) temperatures, representing optimal and less optimal growth ranges for these microorganisms. Additional experimentation investigated AOB establishment at a suboptimal winter distribution system temperature of 6 degrees C. The effect of chloramine residual on AOB establishment was studied at higher (0.2-0.6mg/L) and lower (0.05-0.1mg/L) ranges, using a 3:1 (w/w) chlorine:ammonia dosing ratio. Conditions were selected to represent those typically found in a North American distribution system, in areas of low flow and longer retention times, respectively. Finally, the effect of a free chlorine residual on an established nitrifying biofilm was briefly examined. Results clearly indicate that AOB development occurs at all examined temperatures, as well as at selected monochloramine residuals. The maintenance of a disinfectant residual was difficult at times, but was more inhibitory to the nitrifying biofilm than the lower temperature. It can be concluded from the data that nitrification may not be adequately inhibited during the winter months, which may result in more advanced stages of nitrification the following season. Free chlorination can be effective in controlling AOB activity in the short term, but may not prevent reestablishment of a nitrifying biofilm upon return to chloramination.

  11. [Degradation Kinetics and Formation of Disinfection By-products During Linuron Chlorination in Drinking Water].

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao; Hu, Chen-yan; Cheng, Ming; Gu, Jian

    2015-05-01

    Chlorination degradation of linuron was studied using the common disinfectant sodium hypochlorite, the effects of chlorine dosage, pH value, bromine ion concentrationand temperature were systematically investigated, and the formation characteristics of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during the chlorination reaction was analyzed. The results showed that the chlorination degradation kinetics of linuron by sodium hypochlorite could be well described by the second-order kinetic model. Moreover, pH values had a great impact on the degradation reaction, and the rate constant reached the maximum level at pH 7, and the base elementary reaction rate constants of HOCl and OCl- with linuron were 4.84 x 10(2) L · (mol · h)(-1) and 3.80 x 10(2) L · (mol · h)(-1), respectively. The reaction rate decreased with the addition of bromide ion and increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, many kinds of disinfection by- products were produced during the chlorination degradation of linuron, including CF, DCAN, TCNM and halogen acetone. Under conditions of different solution pH and different bromide ion concentrations, there would be significant difference in the types and concentrations of disinfection by-products.

  12. DETERMINATION OF NEW CARBONYL-CONTAINING DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Only a subset of all disinfection by-products were targeted for an intense occurrence study during the Information Collection Rule. Among 50 additional compounds selected for study because of their potential for significant toxicity, a group of carbonyl-containing compounds is be...

  13. Multi-species biofilms defined from drinking water microorganisms provide increased protection against chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Schwering, Monika; Song, Joanna; Louie, Marie; Turner, Raymond J; Ceri, Howard

    2013-09-01

    A model biofilm, formed of multiple species from environmental drinking water, including opportunistic pathogens, was created to explore the tolerance of multi-species biofilms to chlorine levels typical of water-distribution systems. All species, when grown planktonically, were killed by concentrations of chlorine within the World Health Organization guidelines (0.2-5.0 mg l(-1)). Higher concentrations (1.6-40-fold) of chlorine were required to eradicate biofilm populations of these strains, ~70% of biofilms tested were not eradicated by 5.0 mg l(-1) chlorine. Pathogenic bacteria within the model multi-species biofilms had an even more substantial increase in chlorine tolerance; on average ~700-1100 mg l(-1) chlorine was required to eliminate pathogens from the biofilm, 50-300-fold higher than for biofilms comprising single species. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms showed distinct 3D structures and multiple cell morphologies and arrangements. Overall, this study showed a substantial increase in the chlorine tolerance of individual species with co-colonization in a multi-species biofilm that was far beyond that expected as a result of biofilm growth on its own.

  14. Disinfection by-products of chlorine dioxide (chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes): Occurrence in drinking water in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Otoum, Fatima; Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Ahmed, Talaat A; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed; Ali, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water, namely, chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes (THMs), was investigated. Two-hundred-ninety-four drinking water samples were collected from seven desalination plants (DPs), four reservoirs (R), and eight mosques (M) distributed within various locations in southern and northern Qatar. The ClO2 concentration levels ranged from 0.38 to <0.02 mg L(-1), with mean values of 0.17, 0.12, and 0.04 mg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorite levels varied from 13 μg L(-1) to 440 μg L(-1), with median values varying from 13 to 230 μg L(-1), 77-320 μg L(-1), and 85-440 μg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorate levels varied from 11 μg L(-1) to 280 μg L(-1), with mean values varying from 36 to 280 μg L(-1), 11-200 μg L(-1), and 11-150 μg L(-1) in the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The average concentration of THMs was 5 μg L(-1), and the maximum value reached 77 μg L(-1) However, all of the DBP concentrations fell within the range of the regulatory limits set by GSO 149/2009, the World Health Organization (WHO), and Kahramaa (KM).

  15. Developmental Toxicity of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products to Embryos of the African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-10

    developmental toxicity tests with embryos of the South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis used to evaluate four individual DWDB; bromodichloromethane...SUBJECT TERMS Developmental toxicity; FETAX; water disinfection by-products; frogs ; Xenopus laevis; embryo malformations; embryo mortality...Disinfection By-Products to Embryos of the African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis) L. M. Brennan,1 M. W. Toussaint,1 D. M. Kumsher,1 W. E. Dennis,’ A. B

  16. Solar and photocatalytic disinfection of protozoan, fungal and bacterial microbes in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Lonnen, J; Kilvington, S; Kehoe, S C; Al-Touati, F; McGuigan, K G

    2005-03-01

    The ability of solar disinfection (SODIS) and solar photocatalytic (TiO(2)) disinfection (SPC-DIS) batch-process reactors to inactivate waterborne protozoan, fungal and bacterial microbes was evaluated. After 8 h simulated solar exposure (870 W/m(2) in the 300 nm-10 microm range, 200 W/m(2) in the 300-400 nm UV range), both SPC-DIS and SODIS achieved at least a 4 log unit reduction in viability against protozoa (the trophozoite stage of Acanthamoeba polyphaga), fungi (Candida albicans, Fusarium solani) and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli). A reduction of only 1.7 log units was recorded for spores of Bacillus subtilis. Both SODIS and SPC-DIS were ineffective against the cyst stage of A. polyphaga.

  17. [Viruses in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Botzenhart, K

    2007-03-01

    Viruses in drinking water can cause infectious diseases. In the past, hepatitis A and E were the most frequently observed drinking- water-borne viral infections, but in recent years several small- and large-scale norovirus epidemics have been described, even in Europe. All virus species spread via drinking water are of fecal origin. They are regularly identified in waste water even after conventional multi-stage water treatment. The approved disinfection methods can cope with these viruses if they are not integrated in larger particles. For this reason particle separation is particularly important in water treatment. Virological tests are not reliable enough to ensure that drinking water is sufficiently virus-free. The examination of 100 mL of water for E. coli and coliform bacteria is not adequate proof either. If potentially contaminated raw water is used, consumer safety must be ensured by calculating the performance of water treatment plants on a case-by-case basis. Such a calculation takes into account the virus load of the raw water, the efficiency of the physical and chemical particle elimination steps and the effect of disinfection. Those factors which determine the effectiveness of disinfection, namely concentration and exposure time or UV radiation strength, must be adjusted according to the risk of viral infection, and calculated settings must be adhered to, even if favorable E. coli levels may make them seem excessive.

  18. Human health risk analysis from disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking and bathing water of some Indian cities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human health risk assessment from exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) during drinking and bathing water vary from country to country as per life expectancy, body mass index, water consumption pattern and individual concentration of DBPs component, etc. Methods Present study considered average direct water intake per person for adult males and females as 4 & 3 L/day, respectively as per Indian literature for risk evaluation from another component of pollutant. While other important factor like average life expectancy, body weight & body surface area for male and female were considered 64 & 67 years, 51.9 & 45.4 Kg and 1.54 & 1.38 m2 respectively as per Indian Council of Medical Research and WHO report. The corresponding lifetime cancer risk of the formed THMs to human beings was estimated by the USEPA and IRIS method as per Indian population. Results The total cancer risk reached 8.99 E-04 and 8.92 E-04 for males and females, respectively, the highest risk from THMs seems to be from the inhalation route followed by ingestion and dermal contacts. Conclusions The multipath way evaluations of lifetime cancer risks for THMs exposure through ingestion, dermal absorption, and inhalation exposure were examined at the highest degree of danger. Results reveals that water containing THMs of the selected water treatment plant of the eastern part of India was unsafe in terms of risk evaluation through inhalation and ingestion, while dermal route of risk was found very close to permissible limit of USEPA. Sensitivity analysis shows that every input parameter is sole responsible for total risk potential, whereas exposure duration playing important role for estimation of total risk. PMID:24872885

  19. Detection, formation and occurrence of 13 new polar phenolic chlorinated and brominated disinfection byproducts in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Wang, Ying; Li, Aimin; Xu, Bin; Xian, Qiming; Shuang, Chendong; Shi, Peng; Zhou, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Recently, 13 new polar phenolic chlorinated and brominated disinfection byproducts (Cl- and Br-DBPs) were identified and quantified in simulated chlorinated drinking water by adopting product ion scan, precursor ion scan, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analyses using ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-tqMS). The 13 new DBPs have been drawing increasing concern not only because they possess significantly higher growth inhibition, developmental toxicity, and chronic cytotoxicity than commonly known aliphatic DBPs, but also because they act as intermediate DBPs that can decompose to form the U.S. EPA regulated DBPs. In this study, through MS parameter optimization of the UPLC/ESI-tqMS MRM analysis, the instrument detection and quantitation limits of the 13 new DBPs were substantially lowered to 0.42-6.44 and 1.35-16.51 μg/L, respectively. The total levels of the 13 new DBPs formed in chlorination were much higher than those formed in chloramination within a contact time of 3 d. In chlorination, the 13 new DBPs formed quickly and decomposed rapidly, and their total concentration kept on decreasing with contact time. In chloramination, the levels of the dominant species (i.e., trihalo-phenols) firstly increased and then decreased with contact time, whereas the levels of the other new DBPs were relatively low and kept on increasing with contact time. An increasing of pH from 6.0 to 9.0 decreased the formation of the 13 new DBPs by 57.8% and 62.3% in chlorination and chloramination, respectively. Gallic acid was found to be present in various simulated and real source water samples and was demonstrated to be a precursor of the 13 new DBPs with elucidated formation pathways. Furthermore, 12 of the 13 new DBPs were detected in 16 tap water samples obtained from major cities in East China, at total levels from 9.5 to 329.8 ng/L. The concentrations of the new DBPs were higher in samples

  20. Faecal contamination of drinking water sources of Dhaka city during the 2004 flood in Bangladesh and use of disinfectants for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Sirajul Islam, M; Brooks, A; Kabir, M S; Jahid, I K; Shafiqul Islam, M; Goswami, D; Nair, G B; Larson, C; Yukiko, W; Luby, S

    2007-07-01

    To describe the extent of faecal pollution and point of use water treatment strategy during and after the 2004 flood in Dhaka. A total of 300 water samples were collected from 20 different drinking water sources in Kamalapur, Dhaka city from August 2004 to January 2005. The level of faecal contamination was estimated using measurements of faecal indicator bacteria (total coliforms, faecal coliforms and faecal streptococci) and isolation of Vibrio cholerae was carried out following standard procedures. Total dissolved solids, dissolved oxygen, hardness, chloride and pH were also monitored. The efficacy of four disinfectants including Halotab, Zeoline-200, alum potash and bleaching powder were tested as point of use water treatment agents. The unacceptable level of contamination of total coliforms (TC), faecal coliforms (FC) and faecal streptococci (FS) ranged from 23.8% to 95.2%, 28.6% to 95.2% and 33.3% to 90.0%, respectively. The isolation rates of V. cholerae O1 and O139 were both 0.33%, and non-O1/non-O139 was 7.0%. Water collected during and after floods was contaminated with TC, FC, FS and V. cholerae. Although alum potash, bleaching powder, Halotab and Zeoline-200 were all effective general disinfectants, Halotab and Zeoline-200 were superior to bleaching powder and alum potash against FC. During and after floods, point of use water treatment could reduce waterborne diseases among flood-affected people.

  1. Pyruvate Remediation of Cell Stress and Genotoxicity Induced by Haloacetic Acid Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Dad, Azra; Jeong, Clara H.; Pals, Justin A.; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Plewa, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are a major class of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. We propose a model of toxic action based on monoHAA-mediated inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a target cytosolic enzyme. This model predicts that GAPDH inhibition by the monoHAAs will lead to a severe reduction of cellular ATP levels and repress the generation of pyruvate. A loss of pyruvate will lead to mitochondrial stress and genomic DNA damage. We found a concentration-dependent reduction of ATP in Chinese hamster ovary cells after monoHAA treatment. ATP reduction per pmol monoHAA followed the pattern of iodoacetic acid (IAA) > bromoacetic acid (BAA) >> chloroacetic acid (CAA), which is the pattern of potency observed with many toxicological endpoints. Exogenous supplementation with pyruvate enhanced ATP levels and attenuated monoHAA-induced genomic DNA damage as measured with single cell gel electrophoresis. These data were highly correlated with the SN2 alkylating potentials of the monoHAAs and with the induction of toxicity. The results from this study strongly support the hypothesis that GAPDH inhibition and the possible subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species is linked with the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity, and neurotoxicity of these DBPs. PMID:23893730

  2. Pyruvate remediation of cell stress and genotoxicity induced by haloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Dad, Azra; Jeong, Clara H; Pals, Justin A; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are a major class of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. We propose a model of toxic action based on monoHAA-mediated inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a target cytosolic enzyme. This model predicts that GAPDH inhibition by the monoHAAs will lead to a severe reduction of cellular ATP levels and repress the generation of pyruvate. A loss of pyruvate will lead to mitochondrial stress and genomic DNA damage. We found a concentration-dependent reduction of ATP in Chinese hamster ovary cells after monoHAA treatment. ATP reduction per pmol monoHAA followed the pattern of iodoacetic acid (IAA) > bromoacetic acid (BAA) > chloroacetic acid (CAA), which is the pattern of potency observed with many toxicological endpoints. Exogenous supplementation with pyruvate enhanced ATP levels and attenuated monoHAA-induced genomic DNA damage as measured with single cell gel electrophoresis. These data were highly correlated with the SN 2 alkylating potentials of the monoHAAs and with the induction of toxicity. The results from this study strongly support the hypothesis that GAPDH inhibition and the possible subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species is linked with the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity, and neurotoxicity of these DBPs. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Multiple-barrier disinfection by chlorination and UV irradiation for desalinated drinking waters: chlorine photolysis and accelerated lamp-sleeve fouling effects.

    PubMed

    Wait, Isaac W

    2008-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to quantify interaction effects between UV irradiation and chlorination for desalinated drinking water. The rate of chlorine photolysis in desalinated water was characterized using a low-pressure UV lamp and chlorine doses typical of drinking water treatment and was found to be lower than reported photolysis rates for treated surface water. Results indicate that, for most desalinated water applications, reduction in free chlorine is likely to be limited, but, depending on the UV dose used, not necessarily negligible. Investigation of the potential for reactor lamp-sleeve fouling included mineral speciation and solubility modeling and showed that chlorination of desalinated water before UV disinfection may increase lamp-sleeve fouling, particularly for point-of-use reactors. UV irradiation before chlorination may minimize fouling. Overall results point to the variable nature of UV lamp-sleeve fouling and chlorine photolysis and an intrinsic dependence on local water chemistry conditions.

  4. Spatial variations in the occurrence of potentially genotoxic disinfection by-products in drinking water distribution systems in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Wang, Donghong; Xu, Xiong; Xu, Meijia; Wang, Zijian

    2017-09-11

    We investigated the occurrence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) with genotoxic potential in plant effluent and distribution water samples from four drinking water treatment plants in two Chinese cities using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry. We tested the samples for 37 DBPs with genotoxic potential, which we had previously identified and prioritized in water under controlled laboratory conditions. Thirty of these DBPs were found in the water samples at detection frequencies of between 10% and 100%, and at concentrations between 3.90 and 1.77 × 10(3) ng/L. Of the DBPs detected, the concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloropropan-2-one were highest, and ranged from 299 to 1.77 × 10(3) ng/L with an average of 796 ng/L. The concentrations of 6-chloro-2-N-propan-2-yl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine and 2,6-ditert-butylcyclohexa-2,5-diene-1,4-dione were also much higher, and ranged from 107 to 721 ng/L, and from 152 to 504 ng/L, respectively. Concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloropropan-2-one, 2-chloro-1-phenylethanone, 2,2-dichloro-1-phenylethanone and 6-chloro-2-N-propan-2-yl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine were highest at or near the treatment plants and decreased with increasing distance from the plants. Patterns in the concentrations of benzaldehyde, 2-phenylpropan-2-ol, and 1-methylnaphthalene differed between plants. The levels of DBPs such as 4-ethylbenzaldehyde, (E)-non-2-enal, and 1-phenylethanone were relatively constant within the distribution systems, even at the furthest sampling points (20 km < d < 30 km). A risk assessment showed that there was no risk to human health. It is, however, important to note that, because of limited availability of toxicity data, only five DBPs were evaluated in this study. The risks to health associated with exposure to the target potentially genotoxic DBPs should not be ignored because of their prolonged existence in drinking water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel combined solar pasteurizer/TiO2 continuous-flow reactor for decontamination and disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, José María; Durán, Antonio; Martín, Israel San; Acevedo, Alba María

    2017-02-01

    A new combined solar plant including an annular continuous-flow compound parabolic collector (CPC) reactor and a pasteurization system was designed, built, and tested for simultaneous drinking water disinfection and chemical decontamination. The plant did not use pumps and had no electricity costs. First, water continuously flowed through the CPC reactor and then entered the pasteurizer. The temperature and water flow from the plant effluent were controlled by a thermostatic valve located at the pasteurizer outlet that opened at 80 °C. The pasteurization process was simulated by studying the effect of heat treatment on the death kinetic parameters (D and z values) of Escherichia coli K12 (CECT 4624). 99.1% bacteria photo-inactivation was reached in the TiO2-CPC system (0.60 mg cm(-2) TiO2), and chemical decontamination in terms of antipyrine degradation increased with increasing residence time in the TiO2-CPC system, reaching 70% degradation. The generation of hydroxyl radicals (between 100 and 400 nmol L(-1)) was a key factor in the CPC system efficiency. Total thermal bacteria inactivation was attained after pasteurization in all cases. Chemical degradation and bacterial photo-inactivation in the TiO2-CPC system were improved with the addition of 150 mg L(-1) of H2O2, which generated approximately 2000-2300 nmol L(-1) of HO(●) radicals. Finally, chemical degradation and bacterial photo-inactivation kinetic modelling in the annular CPC photoreactor were evaluated. The effect of the superficial liquid velocity on the overall rate constant was also studied. Both antipyrine degradation and E. coli photo-inactivation were found to be controlled by the catalyst surface reaction rate.

  6. [Testing the efficacy of disinfectants during drinking water treatment. A new experimental set-up at the German EPA (Umweltbundesamt - UBA)].

    PubMed

    Grützmacher, G; Bartel, H; Althoff, H W; Clemen, S

    2007-03-01

    A set-up for experiments in the flow-through mode was constructed in order to test the efficacy of substances used for disinfecting water during drinking water treatment. A flow-through mode - in contrast to experiments under stationary conditions (so-called batch experiments) - was chosen, because this experimental design allows experiments to be carried out under constant conditions for an extended time (up to one week) and because efficacy testing is possible repeatedly, simultaneously and under exactly the same conditions for short (about 0.5 min) and also longer (about 47 min) contact times. With this experimental design the effect of biofilms along the inner pipe surfaces can be included in the observations. The construction of the experimental set-up is based on experience with laboratory flow-through systems that were installed by the UBA's drinking water department (formerly Institute for Water-, Soil- and Air Hygiene (WaBoLu) Institute) for testing disinfection with chlorine. In the first step, a test pipe for the simulation of a water works situation was installed. Water of different qualities can be mixed in large volumes beforehand so that the experimental procedure can be run with constant water quality for a minimum of one week. The kinetics of the disinfection reaction can be observed by extracting samples from eight sampling ports situated along the test pipe. In order to assign exact residence times to each of the sampling ports, tracer experiments were performed prior to testing disinfectant efficacy. This paper gives the technical details of the experimental set-up and presents the results of the tracer experiments to provide an introduction with respect to its potential.

  7. Innovative method for prioritizing emerging disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water on the basis of their potential impact on public health.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Armelle; Forestier, Delphine; Lenes, Dorothée; Benanou, David; Jacob, Severine; Arfi, Catherine; Lambolez, Lucie; Levi, Yves

    2010-05-01

    Providing microbiologically safe drinking water is a major public health issue. However, chemical disinfection can produce unintended health hazards involving disinfection by-products (DBPs). In an attempt to clarify the potential public health concerns associated with emerging disinfection by-products (EDBPs), this study was intended to help to identify those suspected of posing potential related health effects. In view of the ever-growing list of EDBPs in drinking water and the lack of consensus about them, we have developed an innovative prioritization method that would allow us to address this issue. We first set up an exhaustive database including all the current published data relating to EDBPs in drinking water (toxicity, occurrence, epidemiology and international or local guidelines/regulations). We then developed a ranking method intended to prioritize the EDBPs. This method, which was based on a calculation matrix with different coefficients, was applied to the data regarding their potential contribution to the health risk assessment process. This procedure allowed us to identify and rank three different groups of EDBPs: Group I, consisting of the most critical EDBPs with regard to their potential health effects, has moderate occurrence but the highest toxicity. Group II has moderate to elevated occurrence and is associated with relevant toxicity, and Group III has very low occurrence and unknown or little toxicity. The EDBPs identified as posing the greatest potential risk using this method were as follows: NDMA and other nitrosamines, MX and other halofuranones, chlorate, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol, hydrazine, and two unregulated halomethanes, dichloromethane and tetrachloromethane. Our approach allowed us to define the EDBPs that it is most important to monitor in order to assess population exposure and related public health issues, and thus to improve drinking water treatment and distribution. It is also

  8. STRAIN COMPARISON IN PREGNANT RATS OF ENDOCRINE RESPONSE TO BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: A DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a trihalomethane, is a by-product of the chlorination of drinking water. In an epidemiological study, consumption of drinking water with high levels of BDCM was associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion in pregnant women (Waller et al....

  9. Drinking Water Disinfection By-Product Rules and Climate Change Effects - A Glimpse of Current and Future Trends

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Drinking water quality at the consumer's tap is the center piece of U.S. drinking water regulations to protect people's health. Recently promulgated Stage II DBP rules are an example, which requires a system approach in a multi-barrier strategy for compliance and risk managemen...

  10. STRAIN COMPARISON IN PREGNANT RATS OF ENDOCRINE RESPONSE TO BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: A DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a trihalomethane, is a by-product of the chlorination of drinking water. In an epidemiological study, consumption of drinking water with high levels of BDCM was associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion in pregnant women (Waller et al....

  11. [Formation Mechanism of the Disinfection By-product 1, 1-Dichloroacetone in Drinking Water].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun-sheng; Meng, Zhuang; Xu, Yang-yang; Miao, Jia

    2015-05-01

    A novel method using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as extractant and 1,2-dibromopropane as internal standard for the determination of the disinfection by-producs 1,1-dichloroacetone (DCAce) by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was described. The formation process of DCAce and its influencing factors were discussed with L-leucine as the precursor during the chloramination process. The results indicated that the DCAce production increased with the increase of chloramine dosage when the chloramine addition was in the range of 5-30 mg · L(-1). The DCAce amount produced under alkaline condition was higher than those produced under the neutral and acidic conditions, and the DCAce amount reduced with the increase of pH value. Temperature was another important factor that affected the DCAce formation from methylamine especially in the range of 15-35°C , and the higher the temperature, the more the DCAce produced. The formation process of DCAce from L-leucine by chloramine consisted of a series of complicated reactions, including substitution, oxidation, bond breaking, amino diazotization, reduction and so on, and eventually DCAce was formed.

  12. Comparative human cell toxicogenomic analysis of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    The monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs), iodoacetic, bromoacetic and chloroacetic acids are toxic disinfection byproducts. In vitro toxicological end points were integrated with DNA damage and repair pathway-focused toxicogenomic analyses to evaluate monoHAA-induced alterations of gene expression in normal nontransformed human cells. When compared to concurrent control transcriptome profiles, metabolic pathways involved in the cellular responses to toxic agents were identified and provided insight into the biological mechanisms of toxicity. Using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery to analyze the gene array data, the majority of the altered transcriptome profiles were associated with genes responding to DNA damage or those regulating cell cycle or apoptosis. The major pathways involved with altered gene expression were ATM, MAPK, p53, BRCA1, BRCA2, and ATR. These latter pathways highlight the involvement of DNA repair, especially the repair of double strand DNA breaks. All of the resolved pathways are involved in human cell stress response to DNA damage and regulate different stages in cell cycle progression or apoptosis.

  13. Temporal variability in urinary levels of drinking water disinfection byproducts dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid among men.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xin; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Le; Huang, Yue-Hui; Lu, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Peng; He, Meng-Jie; Huang, Xin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2014-11-01

    Urinary haloacetic acids (HAAs), such as dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), have been suggested as potential biomarkers of exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs). However, variable exposure to and the short elimination half-lives of these biomarkers can result in considerable variability in urinary measurements, leading to exposure misclassification. Here we examined the variability of DCAA and TCAA levels in the urine among eleven men who provided urine samples on 8 days over 3 months. The urinary concentrations of DCAA and TCAA were measured by gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detection. We calculated the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to characterize the within-person and between-person variances and computed the sensitivity and specificity to assess how well single or multiple urine collections accurately determined personal 3-month average DCAA and TCAA levels. The within-person variance was much higher than the between-person variance for all three sample types (spot, first morning, and 24-h urine samples) for DCAA (ICC=0.08-0.37) and TCAA (ICC=0.09-0.23), regardless of the sampling interval. A single-spot urinary sample predicted high (top 33%) 3-month average DCAA and TCAA levels with high specificity (0.79 and 0.78, respectively) but relatively low sensitivity (0.47 and 0.50, respectively). Collecting two or three urine samples from each participant improved the classification. The poor reproducibility of the measured urinary DCAA and TCAA concentrations indicate that a single measurement may not accurately reflect individual long-term exposure. Collection of multiple urine samples from one person is an option for reducing exposure classification errors in studies exploring the effects of DBP exposure on reproductive health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This encyclopedic entry deals with various aspects of microbiology as it relates to drinking water treatment. The use of microbial indicators for assessing fecal contamination is discussed as well as current national drinking water regulations (U.S. EPA) and guidelines proposed ...

  15. Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This encyclopedic entry deals with various aspects of microbiology as it relates to drinking water treatment. The use of microbial indicators for assessing fecal contamination is discussed as well as current national drinking water regulations (U.S. EPA) and guidelines proposed ...

  16. Epidermal hyperplasia in mouse skin following treatment with alternative drinking water disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M; Bull, R J; Schamer, M; Long, R E

    1986-11-01

    Female SENCAR mice were treated with aqueous solutions of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorine dioxide (ClO2), and monochloramine (NH2Cl) by whole body exposure (except head) for a 10-min period for 4 days in the first experiment and for 1 day (except NH2Cl) in the second experiment. Animals were sacrificed the day following the last treatment (experiment 1) or on day 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 10, and 12 following treatment (experiment 2), and skin thickness was measured by light microscopy at X400 by use of an eyepiece micrometer. Concentrations of disinfectants were 1, 10, 100, 300, and 1000 mg/L, for experiment 1 and 1000 mg/L for experiment 2. Thickness of the interfollicular epidermis (IFE) for control animals was 15.4 +/- 1.5 micron. After 4 days of treatment at 1000 mg/L, HOCl and ClO2 increased thickness to 39 +/- 7.0 and 40.2 +/- 11.8, and NaOCl increased thickness to 25.2 +/- 6.1 micron. Only HOCl and ClO2 were tested at 300 mg/L, yielding an IFE thickness of 30.0 +/- 13.1 and 16.8 +/- 0.8 micron, respectively. The response to HOCl was found to be dose-related; the minimally effective dose was 100 mg/L. In earlier, preliminary tests to determine optimum treatment schedule, the response to HOCl appeared to be maximal after 4 days of treatment and tended to decrease with further treatment. The time-course study following a single treatment of 1000 mg/L HOCl, however, showed a progression of IFE thickening of from 18.3 +/- 1.4 at 1 day to 30.8 +/- 8.0 at 8 days, decreasing to 19.1 +/- 6.2 micron at 12 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. [Formation process of nitrogenous disinfection byproduct trichloronitromethane in drinking water and its influencing factors].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun-Sheng; Zou, Bang-Wen; Miao, Jia; Fu, Yang-Ping