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Sample records for driven subcritical systems

  1. Safety and control of accelerator-driven subcritical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rief, H.; Takahashi, H.

    1995-10-01

    To study control and safety of accelertor driven nuclear systems, a one point kinetic model was developed and programed. It deals with fast transients as a function of reactivity insertion. Doppler feedback, and the intensity of an external neutron source. The model allows for a simultaneous calculation of an equivalent critical reactor. It was validated by a comparison with a benchmark specified by the Nuclear Energy Agency Committee of Reactor Physics. Additional features are the possibility of inserting a linear or quadratic time dependent reactivity ramp which may account for gravity induced accidents like earthquakes, the possibility to shut down the external neutron source by an exponential decay law of the form exp({minus}t/{tau}), and a graphical display of the power and reactivity changes. The calculations revealed that such boosters behave quite benignly even if they are only slightly subcritical.

  2. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  3. Detector positioning for the initial subcriticality level determination in accelerator-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, W.; Van Den Eynde, G.; Baeten, P.; Kochetkov, A.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Van Der Hagen, T. J. H. H.; Wols, F.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Thybault, H. E.

    2012-07-01

    Within the GUINEVERE project (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) carried out at SCK-CEN in Mol, the continuous deuteron accelerator GENEPI-3C was coupled to the VENUS-F fast simulated lead-cooled reactor. Today the FREYA project (Fast Reactor Experiments for hYbrid Applications) is ongoing to study the neutronic behavior of this Accelerator Driven System (ADS) during different phases of operation. In particular the set-up of a monitoring system for the subcriticality of an ADS is envisaged to guarantee safe operation of the installation. The methodology for subcriticality monitoring in ADS takes into account the determination of the initial subcriticality level, the monitoring of reactivity variations, and interim cross-checking. At start-up, the Pulsed Neutron Source (PNS) technique is envisaged to determine the initial subcriticality level. Thanks to its reference critical state, the PNS technique can be validated on the VENUS-F core. A detector positioning methodology for the PNS technique is set up in this paper for the subcritical VENUS-F core, based on the reduction of higher harmonics in a static evaluation of the Sjoestrand area method. A first case study is provided on the VENUS-F core. This method can be generalised in order to create general rules for detector positions and types for full-scale ADS. (authors)

  4. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument’s LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  5. Comparing the new generation accelerator driven subcritical reactor system (ADS) to traditional critical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemah, Elif; Akkaya, Recep; Tokgöz, Seyit Rıza

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the accelerator driven subcritical reactors have taken great interest worldwide. The Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been used to produce neutron in subcritical state by the external proton beam source. These reactors, which are hybrid systems, are important in production of clean and safe energy and conversion of radioactive waste. The ADS with the selection of reliability and robust target materials have been the new generation of fission reactors. In addition, in the ADS Reactors the problems of long-lived radioactive fission products and waste actinides encountered in the fission process of the reactor during incineration can be solved, and ADS has come to the forefront of thorium as fuel for the reactors.

  6. Disposition of Nuclear Waste Using Subcritical Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doolen, G.D.; Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.A.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-06-27

    ATW destroys virtually all the plutonium and higher actinides without reprocessing the spent fuel in a way that could lead to weapons material diversion. An ATW facility consists of three major elements: (1) a high-power proton linear accelerator; (2) a pyrochemical spent fuel treatment i waste cleanup system; (3) a liquid lead-bismuth cooled burner that produces and utilizes an intense source-driven neutron flux for transmutation in a heterogeneous (solid fuel) core. The concept is the result of many years of development at LANL as well as other major international research centers. Once demonstrated and developed, ATW could be an essential part of a global non-proliferation strategy for countries that could build up large quantities of plutonium from their commercial reactor waste. ATW technology, initially proposed in the US, has received wide and rapidly increasing attention abroad, especially in Europe and the Far East with major programs now being planned, organized and tided. Substantial convergence presently exists on the technology choices among the programs, opening the possibility of a strong and effective international collaboration on the phased development of the ATW technology.

  7. Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-12-31

    Spent fuel from nuclear power plants contains large quantities of Pu, other actinides, and fission products (FP). This creates challenges for permanent disposal because of the long half-lives of some isotopes and the potential for diversion of the fissile material. Two issues of concern for the US repository concept are: (1) long-term radiological risk peaking tens-of-thousands of years in the future; and (2) short-term thermal loading (decay heat) that limits capacity. An accelerator-driven neutron source can destroy actinides through fission, and can convert long-lived fission products to shorter-lived or stable isotopes. Studies over the past decade have established that accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) can have a major beneficial impact on the nuclear waste problem. Specifically, the ATW concept the authors are evaluating: (1) destroys over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroys over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separates Sr-90 and Cs-137; (4) separates uranium from the spent fuel; (5) produces electric power.

  8. Coupling MCNP-DSP and LAHET Monte Carlo Codes for Designing Subcriticality Monitors for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Rugama, Y. Munoz-Cobos, J.; Perez, R.

    2000-10-23

    The design of reactivity monitoring systems for accelerator-driven systems must be investigated to ensure that such systems remain subcritical during operation. The Monte Carlo codes LAHET and MCNP-DSP were combined together to facilitate the design of reactivity monitoring systems. The coupling of LAHET and MCNP-DSP provides a tool that can be used to simulate a variety of subcritical measurements such as the pulsed neutron, Rossi-{alpha}, or noise analysis measurements.

  9. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Day, Christy M.; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  10. Space-time analysis for reactivity determination in source-driven subcritical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, Viktoriya V.

    Increasing worldwide interests in accelerator-driven systems is related to their potential role in transmutation of the spent reactor fuel. Margin of safety expressed in terms of reactivity, measuring proximity to criticality, has to be properly addressed for such systems. Monitoring of reactivity enables us to predict performance of a nuclear system and prevent unforeseen accidents. However, due to the presence of a localized spallation source in an accelerator-driven subcritical system leads to a significantly different neutron flux shape than a source-free fundamental mode in critical systems. As a result, the simple point kinetics approach commonly used for determination of reactivity in critical systems does not account properly for space-time effects in accelerator-driven subcritical systems, yielding inaccurate estimates in reactivity. To overcome this problem and account properly for spatial and spectral effects in reactivity determination, a method directly combining measurements with numerical simulations of the experimental data is developed within a quasi-static formulation. This method provides space-time corrections to a variety of traditional point kinetics techniques and determines the reactivity essentially independent of the detector position, as long as sufficiently accurate information on the reactor configuration is provided. In the dissertation, the space-time corrections are derived for two well-known point kinetics methods: the area-ratio technique and the alpha-method. Numerical simulations performed with the FX2-TH diffusion theory code along with a space-time analysis of MUSE-4 pulsed source experimental data illustrate the applicability of the proposed methods for the determination of significant subcriticality levels in fast and thermal reactor systems. To perform space-time reactivity corrections at reduced computational cost, a modal-local method is developed for source-driven systems and tested with the ERANOS code. This dissertation

  11. Electron versus proton accelerator driven sub-critical system performance using TRIGA reactors at power

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Burgio, N.; D'Angelo, A.; Santagata, A.; Petrovich, C.; Schikorr, M.; Beller, D.; Felice, L. S.; Imel, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison of the performance of an electron accelerator-driven experiment, under discussion within the Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project, being conducted within the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and of the proton-driven experiment TRADE (TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment) originally planned at ENEA-Casaccia in Italy. Both experiments foresee the coupling to sub-critical TRIGA core configurations, and are aimed to investigate the relevant kinetic and dynamic accelerator-driven systems (ADS) core behavior characteristics in the presence of thermal reactivity feedback effects. TRADE was based on the coupling of an upgraded proton cyclotron, producing neutrons via spallation reactions on a tantalum (Ta) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 200 kW. RACE is based on the coupling of an Electron Linac accelerator, producing neutrons via photoneutron reactions on a tungsten-copper (W-Cu) or uranium (U) target, with the core driven at a maximum power around 50 kW. The paper is focused on analysis of expected dynamic power response of the RACE core following reactivity and/or source transients. TRADE and RACE target-core power coupling coefficients are compared and discussed. (authors)

  12. High order statistical signatures from source-driven measurements of subcritical fissile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, John Kelly

    1998-11-01

    This research focuses on the development and application of high order statistical analyses applied to measurements performed with subcritical fissile systems driven by an introduced neutron source. The signatures presented are derived from counting statistics of the introduced source and radiation detectors that observe the response of the fissile system. It is demonstrated that successively higher order counting statistics possess progressively higher sensitivity to reactivity. Consequently, these signatures are more sensitive to changes in the composition, fissile mass, and configuration of the fissile assembly. Furthermore, it is shown that these techniques are capable of distinguishing the response of the fissile system to the introduced source from its response to any internal or inherent sources. This ability combined with the enhanced sensitivity of higher order signatures indicates that these techniques will be of significant utility in a variety of applications. Potential applications include enhanced radiation signature identification of weapons components for nuclear disarmament and safeguards applications and augmented nondestructive analysis of spent nuclear fuel. In general, these techniques expand present capabilities in the analysis of subcritical measurements.

  13. A portable measurement system for subcriticality measurements by the Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Ragan, G.E.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    A portable measurement system consisting of a personal computer used as a Fourier analyzer and three detection channels (with associated electronics that provide the signals to analog-to-digital (A/D) convertors) has been assembled to measure subcriticality by the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method. 8 refs.

  14. The Physics Design for a Fusion Driven Sub-critical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Wu

    2002-11-01

    The Fusion Driven Sub-critical System (FDS) is a sub-critical nuclear energy system drive by fusion neutron source, which provides a feasible, safe, economic and highly efficient potential of disposing High Level Waste (HLW) and produce fission nuclear fuel as a early application of fusion technology. This paper reviews the past physics reactor design of fusion-fission hybrid reactor in China, and a low aspect ratio tokamak energy system that has been proposed, which aims at high β, good confinement, and steady-state operation in a compact configuration at modest field. The system includes a low aspect ratio tokamak as fusion neutron driver, a radioactivity clean nuclear power system as blanket and novel concept of liquid metal conductor as centre conductor post. Parameters of such kind reactor are the following. Major radius 1.4m, Minor radius 1m, plasma current 9.2MA, Toroidal field 2.5T, Plasma edge q=5, Average density 1.6 10^20m^3, Average temperature 10keV, Plasma volume 50m^3, Bootstrap current fraction 0.72, Fusion power 100MW, Drive power 28MW, Neutron wall loading 1.0MW/m-2. The plasma configuration is an important part in the low-A tokamak. The Eq code has been used to get a equilibrium. From this calculation, we have found a simple set of PF coils that satisfies the requirements of the large elongation plasma configuration and a vertical field with less curve field lines in the low-A tokamak. The natural elongation can be attributed mostly to differences in the current density profile. In order to determine the feasibility of the low-A tokamak operation, a transient simulation has been made which includes the equilibrium, transport and plasma position shape control in the low-A tokamak. A 1-1/2 equilibrium evolution code has been used to make this simulation. The code is two-dimensional time dependent free boundary simulation code that advances the MHD equations describing the transport time-scale evolution of a axisymmetric tokamak plasma.

  15. CFD Analysis and Design of Detailed Target Configurations for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Adam; Merzari, Elia; Sofu, Tanju; Zhong, Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-08-01

    High-fidelity analysis has been utilized in the design of beam target options for an accelerator driven subcritical system. Designs featuring stacks of plates with square cross section have been investigated for both tungsten and uranium target materials. The presented work includes the first thermal-hydraulic simulations of the full, detailed target geometry. The innovative target cooling manifold design features many regions with complex flow features, including 90 bends and merging jets, which necessitate three-dimensional fluid simulations. These were performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CCM+. Conjugate heat transfer was modeled between the plates, cladding, manifold structure, and fluid. Steady-state simulations were performed but lacked good residual convergence. Unsteady simulations were then performed, which converged well and demonstrated that flow instability existed in the lower portion of the manifold. It was established that the flow instability had little effect on the peak plate temperatures, which were well below the melting point. The estimated plate surface temperatures and target region pressure were shown to provide sufficient margin to subcooled boiling for standard operating conditions. This demonstrated the safety of both potential target configurations during normal operation.

  16. Conceptual design of minor actinides burner with an accelerator-driven subcritical system.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-11-04

    In the environmental impact study of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the limit of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for disposal is assessed at 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM), among which 63,000 MTHM are the projected SNF discharge from U.S. commercial nuclear power plants though 2011. Within the 70,000 MTHM of SNF in storage, approximately 115 tons would be minor actinides (MAs) and 585 tons would be plutonium. This study describes the conceptual design of an accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system intended to utilize (burn) the 115 tons of MAs. The ADS system consists of a subcritical fission blanket where the MAs fuel will be burned, a spallation neutron source to drive the fission blanket, and a radiation shield to reduce the radiation dose to an acceptable level. The spallation neutrons are generated from the interaction of a 1 GeV proton beam with a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or liquid lead target. In this concept, the fission blanket consists of a liquid mobile fuel and the fuel carrier can be LBE, liquid lead, or molten salt. The actinide fuel materials are dissolved, mixed, or suspended in the liquid fuel carrier. Therefore, fresh fuel can be fed into the fission blanket to adjust its reactivity and to control system power during operation. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to determine the overall parameters of an ADS system utilizing LBE as an example. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were studied for three fission blanket configurations that are similar except that the loaded amount of actinide fuel in the LBE is either 5, 7, or 10% of the total volume of the blanket, respectively. The neutron multiplication factor values of the three configurations are all approximately 0.98 and the MA initial inventories are each approximately 10 tons. Monte Carlo burnup simulations using the MCB5 code were performed to analyze the performance of the three conceptual ADS systems. Preliminary burnup analysis shows that all three conceptual ADS

  17. High-value use of weapons-plutonium by burning in molten salt accelerator-driven subcritical systems or reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.; Venneri, F.

    1993-11-01

    The application of thermal-spectrum molten-salt reactors and accelerator-driven subcritical systems to the destruction of weapons-return plutonium is considered from the perspective of deriving the maximum societal benefit. The enhancement of electric power production from burning the fertile fuel {sup 232}Th with the plutonium is evaluated. Also the enhancement of destruction of the accumulated waste from commercial nuclear reactors is considered using the neutron-rich weapons plutonium. Most cases examined include the concurrent transmutation of the long-lived actinide and fission product waste ({sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 126}Sn and {sup 79}Se).

  18. A portable measurement system for subcriticality measurements by the CF-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Ragan, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    A portable system has been assembled that is capable of measuring the subcriticality of fissile materials using the /sup 252/CF-source-driven neutron noise analysis method. The measurement system consists of a parallel-plate ionization chamber containing /sup 252/CF, two /sup 3/He proportional counters with their associated electronics, and a small computer containing anti-aliasing filters and A/D convertors. The system Fourier analyzes the digitized data and forms the appropriate auto and cross-power spectral densities. These spectra are used to form a ratio of spectral densities, G/sub 12/G/sub 13//G/sub 11/G/sub 23/, where 1 refers to the ionization chamber, and 2 and 3 refer to the /sup 3/He counters, from which subcriticality can be determined. The chamber and detectors are located appropriately near the fissile material. The system is capable of sampling signals at rates of up to 80 kHz and processing these data at rates of 2 kHz to form the appropriate spectra. The presently configured system is a two-channel system, hence the measurement of G/sub 12/, G/sub 13/, and G/sub 23/ must be done sequentially before the ratio of spectral densities is obtained. Future improvements of the system will allow simultaneous measurement of all spectra and will further reduce size, thereby enhancing portability. This measurement system can provide reliable, cost effective, and convenient determination of the subcriticality of a wide variety of fissile materials and moderators.

  19. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-15

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  20. The Transmutation of Nuclear Waste in the Two-Zone Subcritical System Driven by High- Intensity Neutron Generator - 12098

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V.O.; Gulik, V.I.; Pavlovych, V.M.

    2012-07-01

    The main problems of transmutation of high-level radioactive waste (minor actinides and long-lived fission products) are considered in our work. The range of radioactive waste of nuclear power is analyzed. The conditions under which the transmutation of radioactive waste will be most effective are analyzed too. The modeling results of a transmutation of the main radioactive isotopes are presented and discussed. The transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products are modeled in our work (minor actinides - Np-237, Am-241, Am-242, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245; long-lived fission products - I-129, Tc-99). The two-zone subcritical system is calculated with help of different neutron-physical codes (MCNP, Scale, Montebarn, Origen). The ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library used in above calculations. Thus, radioactive wastes can be divided into two main groups that need to be transmuted. The minor actinides form the first group and the long-lived fission products form the second one. For the purpose of effective transmutation these isotopes must be extracted from the spent nuclear fuel with the help of either PUREX technology or pyrometallurgical technology. The two-zone reactor system with fast and thermal regions is more effective for nuclear waste transmutation than the one-zone reactor. Modeling results show that nearly all radioactive wastes can be transmuted in the two-zone subcritical system driven by a high-intensity neutron generator with the external neutron source strength of 1.10{sup 13} n/sec. Obviously, transmutation rate will increase with a rise of the external neutron source strength. From the results above we can also see that the initial loading of radioactive isotopes into the reactor system should exceed by mass those isotopes that are finally produced. (authors)

  1. Accelerator Driven System Based on Plutonium Subcritical Reactor and 660 MeV Phasotron

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, V.A.; Barashenkov, V.S.; Buttsev, V.S.; Chultem, D.; Dudarev, S.Yu.; Furman, V.I.; Gudowski, W.; Janczyszyn, J.; Maltsev, A.A.; Onischenko, L.M.; Pogodajev, G.N.; Polanski, A.; Popov, Yu.P.; Puzynin, I.V.; Sissakian, A.N.; Taczanowski, S.

    1999-12-31

    The proposal presents a PLUTONIUM BASED ENERGY AMPLIFIER TESTING CONCEPT which employs a plutonium subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator. operating in the JINR (Dubna, Russia). To make the present conceptual design of the Plutonium Energy Amplifier we have chosen a nominal unit capacity of 20 kW (thermal). This corresponds to a multiplication coefficient, keff, between 0.94 and 0.95 and an energy gain about 20.

  2. Accelerator driven system based on plutonium subcritical reactor and 660 MeV phasotron

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Chultem, D.; Furman, V. I.; Maltsev, A. A.; Onischenko, L. M.; Pogodajev, G. N.; Popov, Yu. P.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.; Dudarev, S. Yu.; Gudowski, W.; Janczyszyn, J.; Polanski, A.; Taczanowski, S.

    1999-11-16

    The proposal presents a PLUTONIUM BASED ENERGY AMPLIFIER TESTING CONCEPT which employs a plutonium subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator, operating in the the JINR (Dubna, Russia). To make the present conceptual design of the Plutonium Energy Amplifier we have chosen a nominal unit capacity of 20 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff between 0.94 and 0.95 and the energetic gain about 20.

  3. Neutrino Physics with Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuffoli, Emilio

    2017-09-01

    Accelerator Driven Subcritical System (ADS) reactors are being developed around the world, to produce energy and, at the same time, to provide an efficient way to dispose of and to recycle nuclear waste. Used nuclear fuel, by itself, cannot sustain a chain reaction; however in ADS reactors the additional neutrons which are required will be supplied by a high-intensity accelerator. This accelerator will produce, as a by-product, a large quantity of {\\bar{ν }}μ via muon Decay At Rest (µDAR). Using liquid scintillators, it will be possible to to measure the CP-violating phase δCP and to look for experimental signs of the presence of sterile neutrinos in the appearance channel, testing the LSND and MiniBooNE anomalies. Even in the first stage of the project, when the beam energy will be lower, it will be possible to produce {\\bar{ν }}e via Isotope Decay At Rest (IsoDAR), which can be used to provide competitive bounds on sterile neutrinos in the disappearance channel. I will consider several experimental setups in which the antineutrinos are created using accelerators that will be constructed as part of the China-ADS program.

  4. Review of Subcritical Source-Driven Noise Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1999-11-01

    Subcritical source-driven noise measurements are simultaneous Rossia and randomly pulsed neutron measurements that provide measured quantities that can be related to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. In fact, subcritical source-driven noise measurements should be performed in lieu of Rossia measurements because of the additional information that is obtained from noise measurements such as the spectral ratio and the coherence functions. The basic understanding of source-driven noise analysis measurements can be developed from a point reactor kinetics model to demonstrate how the measured quantities relate to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor.

  5. Monte Carlo Modeling of Fast Sub-critical Assembly with MOX Fuel for Research of Accelerator-Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, A.; Barashenkov, V.; Puzynin, I.; Rakhno, I.; Sissakian, A.

    It is considered a sub-critical assembly driven with existing 660 MeV JINR proton accelerator. The assembly consists of a central cylindrical lead target surrounded with a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (PuO2 + UO2) and with reflector made of beryllium. Dependence of the energetic gain on the proton energy, the neutron multiplication coefficient, and the neutron energetic spectra have been calculated. It is shown that for subcritical assembly with a mixed-oxide (MOX) BN-600 fuel (28%PuO 2 + 72%UO2) with effective density of fuel material equal to 9 g/cm 3 , the multiplication coefficient keff is equal to 0.945, the energetic gain is equal to 27, and the neutron flux density is 1012 cm˜2 s˜x for the protons with energy of 660 MeV and accelerator beam current of 1 uA.

  6. Review of Subcritical Source-Driven Noise Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.

    1999-11-24

    Subcritical source-driven noise measurements are simultaneous Rossi-{alpha} and randomly pulsed neutron measurements that provide measured quantities that can be related to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. In fact, subcritical source-driven noise measurements should be performed in lieu of Rossi-{alpha} measurements because of the additional information that is obtained from noise measurements such as the spectral ratio and the coherence functions. The basic understanding of source-driven noise analysis measurements can be developed from a point reactor kinetics model to demonstrate how the measured quantities relate to the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. More elaborate models can also be developed using a generalized stochastic model. These measurements can be simulated using Monte Carlo codes to determine the subcritical neutron multiplication factor or to determine the sensitivity of calculations to nuclear cross section data. The interpretation of the measurement using a Monte Carlo method is based on a perturbation model for the relationship between the spectral ratio and the subcritical neutron multiplication factor. The subcritical source-driven noise measurement has advantages over other subcritical measurement methods in that reference measurements at delayed critical are not required for interpreting the measurements. Therefore, benchmark or in-situ subcritical measurements can be performed outside a critical experiment facility. Furthermore, a certain ratio of frequency spectra has been shown to be independent of detection efficiency thereby making the measurement more robust and unaffected by drifts or changes in instrumentation during the measurement. Criteria have been defined for application of this measurement method for benchmarks and in-situ subcritical measurements. An extension of the source-driven subcritical noise measurement has also been discussed that eliminates the few technical challenges for in-situ applications.

  7. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  8. Basic concept for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be used as a long-pulse neutron source for Condensed Matter research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivanco, R.; Ghiglino, A.; de Vicente, J. P.; Sordo, F.; Terrón, S.; Magán, M.; Perlado, J. M.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    A model for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be operated as a source of cold neutrons for Condensed Matter research is developed at the conceptual level. Its baseline layout relies upon proven accelerator, spalattion target and fuel array technologies, and consists in a proton accelerator able to deliver some 67.5 mA of proton beam with kinetic energy 0.6 GeV, a pulse length of 2.86 ms, and repetition rate of 14 Hz. The particle beam hits a target of conventional design that is surrounded by a multiplicative core made of fissile/fertile material, composed by a subcritical array of fuel bars made of aluminium Cermet cooled by light water poisoned with boric acid. Relatively low enriched uranium is chosen as fissile material. An optimisation of several parameters is carried out, using as components of the objective function several characteristics pertaining the cold neutron pulse. The results show that the optimal device will deliver up to 80% of the cold neutron flux expected for some of the ongoing projects using a significantly lower proton beam power than that managed in such projects. The total power developed within the core rises up to 22.8 MW, and the criticality range shifts to a final keff value of around 0.9 after the 50 days cycle.

  9. Physics analyses of an accelerator-driven sub-critical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naberezhnev, Dmitry G.; Gohar, Yousry; Bailey, James; Belch, Henry

    2006-06-01

    Physics analyses have been performed for an accelerator-driven sub-critical assembly as a part of the Argonne National Laboratory activity in preparation for a joint conceptual design with the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine. KIPT has a plan to construct an accelerator-driven sub-critical assembly targeted towards the medical isotope production and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. The external neutron source is produced either through photonuclear reactions in tungsten or uranium targets, or deuteron reactions in a beryllium target. KIPT intends using the high-enriched uranium (HEU) for the fuel of the sub-critical assembly. The main objective of this paper is to study the possibility of utilizing low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel instead of HEU fuel without penalizing the sub-critical assembly performance, in particular the neutron flux level. In the course of this activity, several studies have been carried out to investigate the main choices for the system's parameters. The external neutron source has been characterized and a pre-conceptual target design has been developed. Several sub-critical configurations with different fuel enrichments and densities have been considered. Based on our analysis, it was shown that the performance of the LEU fuel is comparable with that of the HEU fuel. The LEU fuel sub-critical assembly with 200-MeV electron energy and 100-kW electron beam power has an average total flux of ˜2.50×10 13 n/s cm 2 in the irradiation channels. The corresponding total facility power is ˜204 kW divided into 91 and 113 kW deposited in the target and sub-critical assemblies, respectively.

  10. Safety features of subcritical fluid fueled systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, C.R.

    1995-10-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology has been under study at Los Alamos for several years for application to nuclear waste treatment, tritium production, energy generation, and recently, to the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. Studies and evaluations performed to date at Los Alamos have led to a current focus on a fluid-fuel, fission system operating in a neutron source-supported subcritical mode, using molten salt reactor technology and accelerator-driven proton-neutron spallation. In this paper, the safety features and characteristics of such systems are explored from the perspective of the fundamental nuclear safety objectives that any reactor-type system should address. This exploration is qualitative in nature and uses current vintage solid-fueled reactors as a baseline for comparison. Based on the safety perspectives presented, such systems should be capable of meeting the fundamental nuclear safety objectives. In addition, they should be able to provide the safety robustness desired for advanced reactors. However, the manner in which safety objectives and robustness are achieved is very different from that associated with conventional reactors. Also, there are a number of safety design and operational challenges that will have to be addressed for the safety potential of such systems to be credible.

  11. Candidate molten salt investigation for an accelerator driven subcritical core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, E.; Baty, A.; Beneš, O.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Salanne, M.; Sattarov, A.

    2013-09-01

    We report a design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) that utilizes a fuel salt composed of NaCl and transuranic (TRU) chlorides. The ADSMS core is designed for fast neutronics (28% of neutrons >1 MeV) to optimize TRU destruction. The choice of a NaCl-based salt offers benefits for corrosion, operating temperature, and actinide solubility as compared with LiF-based fuel salts. A molecular dynamics (MD) code has been used to estimate properties of the molten salt system which are important for ADSMS design but have never been measured experimentally. Results from the MD studies are reported. Experimental measurements of fuel salt properties and studies of corrosion and radiation damage on candidate metals for the core vessel are anticipated. A special thanks is due to Prof. Paul Madden for introducing the ADSMS group to the concept of using the molten salt as the spallation target, rather than a conventional heavy metal spallation target. This feature helps to optimize this core as a Pu/TRU burner.

  12. Accelerator-driven subcritical facility:Conceptual design development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry; Bolshinsky, Igor; Naberezhnev, Dmitry; Duo, Jose; Belch, Henry; Bailey, James

    2006-06-01

    A conceptual design development of an accelerator-driven subcritical facility has been carried out in the preparation of a joint activity with Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine. The main functions of the facility are the medical isotope production and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. An electron accelerator is considered to drive the subcritical assembly. The neutron source intensity and spectrum have been studied. The energy deposition, spatial neutron generation, neutron utilization fraction, and target dimensions have been quantified to define the main target performance parameters, and to select the target material and beam parameters. Different target conceptual designs have been developed based the engineering requirements including heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux level with a Keff of 0.98. Different fuel materials, uranium enrichments, and reflector materials are considered in the design process. The possibility of using low enrichment uranium without penalizing the facility performance is carefully evaluated. The mechanical design of the facility has been developed to maximize its utility and minimize the time for replacing the target and the fuel assemblies. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements, upgrades, and new missions. In addition, it has large design margins to accommodate different operating conditions and parameters. In this paper, the conceptual design and the design analyses of the facility will be presented.

  13. Neutronics Study on Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems with Thorium-Based Fuel for Comparison Between Solid and Molten-Salt Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, Shunsuke; Ishibashi, Kenji; Tenzou, Hideki; Sasa, Toshinobu

    2002-06-15

    Since thorium is an abundant fertile material, there is hope for the thorium-cycle fuels for an accelerator driven subcritical system (ADS). The ADS utilizes neutrons, which are generated by high-energy protons of giga-electron-volt-grade, but cross sections for the interaction of high-energy particles are not available for use in current ADS engineering design. In this paper the neutron behavior in the ADS target based on the related experimental data is clarified, and the feasibility of the ADS regarding both the molten salts (Flibe: {sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ThF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4}, chloride: NaCl-ThCl{sub 4}-{sup 233}UCl{sub 4}) and oxide ([Th, {sup 233}U]O{sub 2}) fuels is examined. The difference between the experiment and the calculated result at the ADS high-energy region is discussed. In a comparison of the fuels, the time evolution of k{sub eff} and the beam current in the burning period are calculated. The calculated results suggest that the ADS with solid fuel has better future prospects than that with molten-salt fuels. The ADS with Flibe molten-salt fuel tends to require a high beam current and consequently needs the installation of a metallic spallation target and the continuous removal for fission products and protactinium. In comparison with the Flibe fuel, the ADS with chloride fuel has a flux distribution that is similar to a solid fuel reactor.

  14. A Proposal for a Subcritical Reactivity Meter based on Gandini and Salvatores' point kinetics equations for Multiplying Subcritical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Leticia N.; Dos Santos, Adimir

    2015-07-01

    Multiplying Subcritical Systems were for a long time poorly studied and its theoretical description remains with plenty open questions. Great interest on such systems arose partly due to the improvement of hybrid concepts, such as the Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS). Along with the need for new technologies to be developed, further study and understanding of subcritical systems are essential also in more practical situations, such as in the case of a PWR criticalization in their physical startup tests. Point kinetics equations are fundamental to continuously monitor the reactivity behavior to a possible variation of external sources intensity. In this case, quickly and accurately predicting power transients and reactivity becomes crucial. It is known that conventional Reactivity Meters cannot operate in subcritical levels nor describe the dynamics of multiplying systems in these conditions, by the very structure of the classical kinetic equations. Several theoretical models have been proposed to characterize the kinetics of such systems with special regard to the reactivity, as the one developed by Gandini and Salvatores among others. This work presents a discussion about the derivation of point kinetics equations for subcritical systems and the importance of considering the external source. From the point of view of the Gandini and Salvatores' point kinetics model and based on the experimental results provided by Lee and dos Santos, it was possible to develop an innovative approach. This article proposes an algorithm that describes the subcritical reactivity with external source, contributing to the advancement of studies in the field. (authors)

  15. Research program for the 660 MeV proton accelerator driven MOX-plutonium subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Buttseva, G. L.; Dudarev, S. Ju.; Polanski, A.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the research program of the Experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (25% PuO2+75% UO2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff=0.945, energetic gain G=30, and accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW.

  16. Materials Testing for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Molten Salt Fission System: A look at the Materials Science of Molten Salt Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Balachandran, Shreyas; Foley, David; Hartwig, Karl; McIntyre, Peter; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Pogue, Nathaniel; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2011-10-01

    For an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt fission core to survive its 50+ year fuel life, the primary vessel, heat exchanger, and various internal components must be made of materials that resist corrosion and radiation damage in a high-temperature environment, (500-800 C). An experimental study of the corrosion behavior of candidate metals in contact with molten salt is being conducted at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies. Initial experiments have been run on Nb, Ta, Ni, two zirconium alloys, Hastelloy-N, and a series of steel alloys to form a base line for corrosion in both chloride and bromide salt. Metal coupons were immersed in LiCl-KCl or LiBr-KBr at 700 C in an inert-atmosphere. Salt samples were extracted on a time schedule over a 24-hr period. The samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to determine concentrations of metals from corrosion. Preliminary results will be presented.

  17. High brightness 50 MeV Cyclotron for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Mann, Thomas; McIntyre, Peter; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2011-10-01

    The Accelerator Research Lab at Texas A&M University is developing new accelerator technology for a high-brightness, high-current cyclotron with capabilities that will be beneficial for applications to accelerator-driven subcritical fission, medical isotope production, and proton therapy. As a first embodiment of the technology, we are developing a detailed design for TAMU-50, a 50 MeV, 5 mA proton cyclotron with high beam brightness. In this presentation we present devices and beamline components for injection, extraction, controls and diagnostics. We emphasize the system integration and implementation of TAMU-50 for production of medical radioisotopes.

  18. Subcritical measurements using the /sup 252/Cf source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Kryter, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes recent measurements of the subcritical neutron multiplication factor using the /sup 252/Cf source-driven neutron noise analysis method. This work was supported by a program of collaboration between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan related to the development of fast breeder technology. The experiment reported consists of a configuration of two interacting tanks of uranyl nitrate aqueous solution with different uranium concentrations in each tank. The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method obtains the subcriticality from the signals of three detectors: the first, a parallel plate ionization chamber with /sup 252/Cf electroplated on one of its plates that is located in or near the system containing the fissile material, and produces an electrical pulse for every spontaneous fission that occurs and thereby serves as a timed source of fission neutrons; and the second and third detectors that are placed in or near the system containing fissile material and serve to detect particles from the fission chain multiplication process. 9 refs.

  19. Nonlinear excitation of subcritical fast ion-driven modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, M.; Itoh, K.; Ido, T.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kosuga, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Inagaki, S.; Osakabe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Shimizu, A.; Ida, K.; the LHD experiment Group

    2016-05-01

    In collisionless plasma, it is known that linearly stable modes can be destabilized (subcritically) by the presence of structures in phase-space. The growth of such structures is a nonlinear, kinetic mechanism, which provides a channel for free-energy extraction, different from conventional inverse Landau damping. However, such nonlinear growth requires the presence of a seed structure with a relatively large threshold in amplitude. We demonstrate that, in the presence of another, linearly unstable (supercritical) mode, wave-wave coupling can provide a seed, which can lead to subcritical instability by either one of two mechanisms. Both mechanisms hinge on a collaboration between fluid nonlinearity and kinetic nonlinearity. If collisional velocity diffusion is low enough, the seed provided by the supercritical mode overcomes the threshold for nonlinear growth of phase-space structure. Then, the supercritical mode triggers the conventional subcritical instability. If collisional velocity diffusion is too large, the seed is significantly below the threshold, but can still grow by a sustained collaboration between fluid and kinetic nonlinearities. Both of these subcritical instabilities can be triggered, even when the frequency of the supercritical mode is rapidly sweeping. These results were obtained by modeling the subcritical mode kinetically, and the impact of the supercritical mode by simple wave-wave coupling equations. This model is applied to bursty onset of geodesic acoustic modes in an LHD experiment. The model recovers several key features such as relative amplitude, timescales, and phase relations. It suggests that the strongest bursts are subcritical instabilities, with sustained collaboration between fluid and kinetic nonlinearities.

  20. ITEP Subcritical Neutron Generator driven by charged particle accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shvedov, O.V.; Chuvilo, I.V.; Vasiliev, V.V.

    1995-10-01

    A research facility prototype including a combination of a linear accelerator, a neutron generating target, a nuclear safety ensuring and means of its attainment for Subcritical Neutron Generator are considered. The scheme of the multiplying is shown. The assembly will be mounted in the body of the partly dismantled ITEP HWR. Requirements for subcritical assembly are worked out and their feasibility within the framework of the heavy-water blanket is shown. The facility`s application as a full-scale model of more powerful installations of this kind and for fundamental experimental research has been investigated.

  1. Operation and reactivity measurements of an accelerator driven subcritical TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, David Sean

    Experiments were performed at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) in 2005 and 2006 in which a 20 MeV linear electron accelerator operating as a photoneutron source was coupled to the TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General Atomics) Mark II research reactor at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) to simulate the operation and characteristics of a full-scale accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS). The experimental program provided a relatively low-cost substitute for the higher power and complexity of internationally proposed systems utilizing proton accelerators and spallation neutron sources for an advanced ADSS that may be used for the burning of high-level radioactive waste. Various instrumentation methods that permitted ADSS neutron flux monitoring in high gamma radiation fields were successfully explored and the data was used to evaluate the Stochastic Pulsed Feynman method for reactivity monitoring.

  2. Gravity-driven soap film dynamics in subcritical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auliel, M. I.; Castro, F.; Sosa, R.; Artana, G.

    2015-10-01

    We undertake the analysis of soap-film dynamics with the classical approach of asymptotic expansions. We focus our analysis in vertical soap film tunnels operating in subcritical regimes with elastic Mach numbers Me=O(10-1) . Considering the associated set of nondimensional numbers that characterize this flow, we show that the flow behaves as a two-dimensional (2D) divergence free flow with variable mass density. When the soap film dynamics agrees with that of a 2D and almost constant mass density flow, the regions where the second invariant of the velocity gradient is non-null correspond to regions where the rate of change of film thickness is non-negligible.

  3. High power ring methods and accelerator driven subcritical reactor application

    SciTech Connect

    Tahar, Malek Haj

    2016-08-07

    High power proton accelerators allow providing, by spallation reaction, the neutron fluxes necessary in the synthesis of fissile material, starting from Uranium 238 or Thorium 232. This is the basis of the concept of sub-critical operation of a reactor, for energy production or nuclear waste transmutation, with the objective of achieving cleaner, safer and more efficient process than today’s technologies allow. Designing, building and operating a proton accelerator in the 500-1000 MeV energy range, CW regime, MW power class still remains a challenge nowadays. There is a limited number of installations at present achieving beam characteristics in that class, e.g., PSI in Villigen, 590 MeV CW beam from a cyclotron, SNS in Oakland, 1 GeV pulsed beam from a linear accelerator, in addition to projects as the ESS in Europe, a 5 MW beam from a linear accelerator. Furthermore, coupling an accelerator to a sub-critical nuclear reactor is a challenging proposition: some of the key issues/requirements are the design of a spallation target to withstand high power densities as well as ensure the safety of the installation. These two domains are the grounds of the PhD work: the focus is on the high power ring methods in the frame of the KURRI FFAG collaboration in Japan: upgrade of the installation towards high intensity is crucial to demonstrate the high beam power capability of FFAG. Thus, modeling of the beam dynamics and benchmarking of different codes was undertaken to validate the simulation results. Experimental results revealed some major losses that need to be understood and eventually overcome. By developing analytical models that account for the field defects, one identified major sources of imperfection in the design of scaling FFAG that explain the important tune variations resulting in the crossing of several betatron resonances. A new formula is derived to compute the tunes and properties established that characterize the effect of the field imperfections on the

  4. The sup 252 Cf-source-driven noise measurements of unreflected uranium hydride cylinder subcriticality

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Pare, V.K.; Blakeman, E.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Subcritical neutron multiplication factors have been measured by the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method for unreflected, 15.0-cm-diam uranium hydride cylinders of varying heights. Because of the difficulty and cost of controlling the H/U ratio in damp uranium (93.2 wt% {sup 235}U) oxide power and fabricating sufficient material for experiments, few experiments have been performed with materials of low H/U ratios. These measurements may provide alternate information that can be used for verifying calculational methods since the H/U ratio for this material is 3.00. These measurements, which are the first application of this method to uranium hydride, were performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility in 1989. These measurements were used to demonstrate the capability of this measurement method for this type of material and to provide a benchmark experiment for calculational methods with slightly moderated systems. Previous experiments by this method were for a wide variety of well-moderated systems or unmoderated uranium metal cylinders.

  5. Neutronics of accelerator-driven subcritical fission for burning transuranics in used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, A.; Assadi, S.; Badgley, K.; Baty, A.; Comeaux, J.; Gerity, J.; Kellams, J.; Mcintyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Sooby, E.; Tsvetkov, P.; Rosaire, G.; Mann, T.

    2013-04-19

    We report the development of a conceptual design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). ADSMS is capable of destroying all of the transuranics at the same rate and proportion as they are produced in a conventional nuclear power plant. The ADSMS core is fueled solely by transuranics extracted from used nuclear fuel and reduces its radiotoxicity by a factor 10,000. ADSMS offers a way to close the nuclear fuel cycle so that the full energy potential in the fertile fuels uranium and thorium can be recovered.

  6. Burnup calculations for KIPT accelerator driven subcritical facility using Monte Carlo computer codes-MCB and MCNPX.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Zhong, Z.; Talamo, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-06-09

    electrons and the produced neutrons and photons but the current version of MCNPX doesn't support depletion/burnup calculation of the subcritical system with the generated neutron source from the target. MCB can perform neutron transport and burnup calculation for subcritical system using external neutron source, however it cannot perform electron transport calculations. To solve this problem, a hybrid procedure is developed by coupling these two computer codes. The user tally subroutine of MCNPX is developed and utilized to record the information of the each generated neutron from the photonuclear reactions resulted from the electron beam interactions. MCB reads the recorded information of each generated neutron thorough the user source subroutine. In this way, the neutron source generated by electron reactions could be utilized in MCB calculations, without the need for MCB to transport the electrons. Using the source subroutines, MCB could get the external neutron source, which is prepared by MCNPX, and perform depletion calculation for the driven subcritical facility.

  7. Superconducting Accelerating Structure for High-Current Cyclotrons for Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2011-10-01

    An accelerator driven molten salt fission core is being designed to provide reliable power by subcritical nuclear fission for the next few millennia. Fission is driven by proton beams from a flux-coupled stack of three high-current cyclotrons. A key innovation in attaining the needed beam current and efficiency is a superconducting Niobium rf accelerating cavity that can accelerate bunches in the 200 orbits uniformly. The unique design allows for several cavities to be stacked, and also provides uniform acceleration and eliminates higher order modes in the cyclotron. The design and properties of the superconducting cavity will increase the efficiency of the cyclotron and the overall energy amplification from the molten salt core by an order of magnitude compared to conventional designs.

  8. Spatial and spectral effects in subcritical system pulsed experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dulla, S.; Nervo, M.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate neutronic models are needed for the interpretation of pulsed experiments in subcritical systems. In this work, the extent of spatial and spectral effects in the pulse propagation phenomena is investigated and the analysis is applied to the GUINEVERE experiment. The multigroup cross section data is generated by the Monte Carlo SERPENT code and the neutronic evolution following the source pulse is simulated by a kinetic diffusion code. The results presented show that important spatial and spectral aspects need to be properly accounted for and that a detailed energy approach may be needed to adequately capture the physical features of the system to the pulse injection. (authors)

  9. Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-05-15

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part

  10. Spike avalanches in vivo suggest a driven, slightly subcritical brain state

    PubMed Central

    Priesemann, Viola; Wibral, Michael; Valderrama, Mario; Pröpper, Robert; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Geisel, Theo; Triesch, Jochen; Nikolić, Danko; Munk, Matthias H. J.

    2014-01-01

    In self-organized critical (SOC) systems avalanche size distributions follow power-laws. Power-laws have also been observed for neural activity, and so it has been proposed that SOC underlies brain organization as well. Surprisingly, for spiking activity in vivo, evidence for SOC is still lacking. Therefore, we analyzed highly parallel spike recordings from awake rats and monkeys, anesthetized cats, and also local field potentials from humans. We compared these to spiking activity from two established critical models: the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model, and a stochastic branching model. We found fundamental differences between the neural and the model activity. These differences could be overcome for both models through a combination of three modifications: (1) subsampling, (2) increasing the input to the model (this way eliminating the separation of time scales, which is fundamental to SOC and its avalanche definition), and (3) making the model slightly sub-critical. The match between the neural activity and the modified models held not only for the classical avalanche size distributions and estimated branching parameters, but also for two novel measures (mean avalanche size, and frequency of single spikes), and for the dependence of all these measures on the temporal bin size. Our results suggest that neural activity in vivo shows a mélange of avalanches, and not temporally separated ones, and that their global activity propagation can be approximated by the principle that one spike on average triggers a little less than one spike in the next step. This implies that neural activity does not reflect a SOC state but a slightly sub-critical regime without a separation of time scales. Potential advantages of this regime may be faster information processing, and a safety margin from super-criticality, which has been linked to epilepsy. PMID:25009473

  11. Spike avalanches in vivo suggest a driven, slightly subcritical brain state.

    PubMed

    Priesemann, Viola; Wibral, Michael; Valderrama, Mario; Pröpper, Robert; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Geisel, Theo; Triesch, Jochen; Nikolić, Danko; Munk, Matthias H J

    2014-01-01

    In self-organized critical (SOC) systems avalanche size distributions follow power-laws. Power-laws have also been observed for neural activity, and so it has been proposed that SOC underlies brain organization as well. Surprisingly, for spiking activity in vivo, evidence for SOC is still lacking. Therefore, we analyzed highly parallel spike recordings from awake rats and monkeys, anesthetized cats, and also local field potentials from humans. We compared these to spiking activity from two established critical models: the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model, and a stochastic branching model. We found fundamental differences between the neural and the model activity. These differences could be overcome for both models through a combination of three modifications: (1) subsampling, (2) increasing the input to the model (this way eliminating the separation of time scales, which is fundamental to SOC and its avalanche definition), and (3) making the model slightly sub-critical. The match between the neural activity and the modified models held not only for the classical avalanche size distributions and estimated branching parameters, but also for two novel measures (mean avalanche size, and frequency of single spikes), and for the dependence of all these measures on the temporal bin size. Our results suggest that neural activity in vivo shows a mélange of avalanches, and not temporally separated ones, and that their global activity propagation can be approximated by the principle that one spike on average triggers a little less than one spike in the next step. This implies that neural activity does not reflect a SOC state but a slightly sub-critical regime without a separation of time scales. Potential advantages of this regime may be faster information processing, and a safety margin from super-criticality, which has been linked to epilepsy.

  12. The Chain-Length Distribution in Subcritical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, Steven Douglas

    2000-06-01

    The individual fission chains that appear in any neutron multiplying system provide a means, via neutron noise analysis, to unlock a wealth of information regarding the nature of the system. This work begins by determining the probability density distributions for fission chain lengths in zero-dimensional systems over a range of prompt neutron multiplication constant (K) values. This section is followed by showing how the integral representation of the chain-length distribution can be used to obtain an estimate of the system's subcritical prompt multiplication (MP). The lifetime of the chains is then used to provide a basis for determining whether a neutron noise analysis will be successful in assessing the neutron multiplication constant, k, of the system in the presence of a strong intrinsic source. A Monte Carlo transport code, MC++, is used to model the evolution of the individual fission chains and to determine how they are influenced by spatial effects. The dissertation concludes by demonstrating how experimental validation of certain global system parameters by neutron noise analysis may be precluded in situations in which the system K is relatively low and in which realistic detector efficiencies are simulated.

  13. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael

    2013-04-19

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  14. Neutron spatial flux profile measurement in compact subcritical system using miniature neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Mayank; Desai, Shraddha S.; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Bajpai, Shefali; Patel, Tarun; Sinha, Amar

    2015-02-01

    A zero power multiplying assembly in subcritical regime serves as a benchmark for validating subcritical reactor physics. The utilization of a subcritical assembly for the determination of nuclear parameters in a multiplying medium requires a well-defined neutron flux to carry out the experiments. For this it is necessary to know the neutron flux profile inside a subcritical system. A compact subcritical assembly BRAHMMA has been developed in India. The experimental channels in this assembly are typically less than 8 mm diameter. This requires use of miniature detectors that can be mounted in these experimental channels. In this article we present the thermal neutron flux profile measurement in a compact subcritical system using indigenously developed miniature gas filled neutron detectors. These detectors were specially designed and fabricated considering the restrictive dimensional requirements of the subcritical core. Detectors of non-standard size with various sensitivities, from 0.4 to 0.001 cps/nv were used for neutron flux of interest ranging from 103 to 107 n-cm-2 s-1. A comparison of measured neutron flux using these detectors and simulated Monte Carlo calculations are also presented in this article.

  15. PNS and statistical experiments simulation in subcritical systems using Monte-Carlo method on example of Yalina-Thermal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovich, Sergey; Talamo, A.; Burnos, V.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Fokov, Yu.

    2014-06-01

    In subcritical systems driven by an external neutron source, the experimental methods based on pulsed neutron source and statistical techniques play an important role for reactivity measurement. Simulation of these methods is very time-consumed procedure. For simulations in Monte-Carlo programs several improvements for neutronic calculations have been made. This paper introduces a new method for simulation PNS and statistical measurements. In this method all events occurred in the detector during simulation are stored in a file using PTRAC feature in the MCNP. After that with a special code (or post-processing) PNS and statistical methods can be simulated. Additionally different shapes of neutron pulses and its lengths as well as dead time of detectors can be included into simulation. The methods described above were tested on subcritical assembly Yalina-Thermal, located in Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research SOSNY, Minsk, Belarus. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results was shown.

  16. A proton-driven, intense, subcritical, fission neutron source for radioisotope production

    SciTech Connect

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-10-01

    {sup 99m}Tc, the most frequently used radioisotope in nuclear medicine, is distributed as {sup 99}Mo=>{sup 99m}Tc generators. {sup 99}Mo is a fission product of {sup 235}U. To replace the aging nuclear reactors used today for this production, the author proposes to use a spallation neutron source, with neutron multiplication by fission. A 150 MeV, H{sup {minus}} cyclotron can produce a 225 kW proton beam with 50% total system energy efficiency. The proton beam would hit a molten lead target, surrounded by a water moderator and a graphite reflector, producing around 0.96 primary neutron per proton. The primary spallation neutrons, moderated, would strike secondary targets containing a subcritical amount of {sup 235}U. The assembly would show a k{sub eff} of 0.8, yielding a fivefold neutron multiplication. The thermal neutron flux at the targets location would be 2 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}.s, resulting in a fission power of 500 to 750 kW. One such system could supply the world demand in {sup 99}Mo, as well as other radioisotopes. Preliminary indications show that the cost would be lower than the cost of a commercial 10 MW isotope production reactor. The cost of operation, of disposal of radiowaste and of decommissioning should be significantly lower as well. Finally, the non-critical nature of the system would make it more acceptable for the public than a nuclear reactor and should simplify the licensing process.

  17. Super- and sub-critical regions in shocks driven by radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs

    PubMed Central

    Bemporad, Alessandro; Mancuso, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    White-light coronagraphic images of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO/LASCO C2 have been used to estimate the density jump along the whole front of two CME-driven shocks. The two events are different in that the first one was a “radio-loud” fast CME, while the second one was a “radio quiet” slow CME. From the compression ratios inferred along the shock fronts, we estimated the Alfvén Mach numbers for the general case of an oblique shock. It turns out that the “radio-loud” CME shock is initially super-critical around the shock center, while later on the whole shock becomes sub-critical. On the contrary, the shock associated with the “radio-quiet” CME is sub-critical at all times. This suggests that CME-driven shocks could be efficient particle accelerators at the shock nose only at the initiation phases of the event, if and when the shock is super-critical, while at later times they lose their energy and the capability to accelerate high energetic particles. PMID:25685431

  18. Super- and sub-critical regions in shocks driven by radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs.

    PubMed

    Bemporad, Alessandro; Mancuso, Salvatore

    2013-05-01

    White-light coronagraphic images of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO/LASCO C2 have been used to estimate the density jump along the whole front of two CME-driven shocks. The two events are different in that the first one was a "radio-loud" fast CME, while the second one was a "radio quiet" slow CME. From the compression ratios inferred along the shock fronts, we estimated the Alfvén Mach numbers for the general case of an oblique shock. It turns out that the "radio-loud" CME shock is initially super-critical around the shock center, while later on the whole shock becomes sub-critical. On the contrary, the shock associated with the "radio-quiet" CME is sub-critical at all times. This suggests that CME-driven shocks could be efficient particle accelerators at the shock nose only at the initiation phases of the event, if and when the shock is super-critical, while at later times they lose their energy and the capability to accelerate high energetic particles.

  19. A useful observable for estimating keff in fast subcritical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, Paolo; Borreani, Walter; Chersola, Davide; Lomonaco, Guglielmo; Ricco, Gianni; Ripani, Marco

    2017-09-01

    The neutron multiplication factor keff is a key quantity to characterize subcritical neutron multiplying devices and for understanting their physical behaviour, being related to the fundamental eigenvalue of Boltzmann transport equation. Both the maximum available power - and all quantities related to it, like, e.g. the effectiveness in burning nuclear wastes - as well as reactor kinetics and dynamics depend on keff. Nevertheless, keff is not directly measurable and its determination results from the solution of an inverse problem: minimizing model dependence of the solution for keff then becomes a critical issue, relevant both for practical and theoretical reasons.

  20. Conceptual design of thorium-fuelled Mitrailleuse accelerator-driven subcritical reactor using D-Be neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Y.; Kamei, T.

    2012-07-01

    A distributed accelerator is a charged-particle accelerator that uses a new acceleration method based on repeated electrostatic acceleration. This method offers outstanding benefits not possible with the conventional radio-frequency acceleration method, including: (1) high acceleration efficiency, (2) large acceleration current, and (3) lower failure rate made possible by a fully solid-state acceleration field generation circuit. A 'Mitrailleuse Accelerator' is a product we have conceived to optimize this distributed accelerator technology for use with a high-strength neutron source. We have completed the conceptual design of a Mitrailleuse Accelerator and of a thorium-fuelled subcritical reactor driven by a Mitrailleuse Accelerator. This paper presents the conceptual design details and approach to implementing the subcritical reactor core. We will spend the next year or so on detailed design work, and then will start work on developing a prototype for demonstration. If there are no obstacles in setting up a development organization, we expect to finish verifying the prototype's performance by the third quarter of 2015. (authors)

  1. Measuring alpha eigenvalue of a subcritical system by a intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Meng-chun; Gong, Jian; Peng, Tai-ping; Li, Zhong-bao; Zhang, Jian-hua; Tang, Deng-pan; Bai, Yun; Peng, Xian-jue; Zeng, Qing

    2015-07-01

    Intense-Pulsed-Neutron-Source (IPNS) technique is a new approach to measure the subcriticality of a reactor system, which has been theoretically analyzed by us while not been verified in experiment in other reference. In INPS technique the reactivity is derived via the system response to a prompt pulsed neutron source. The method utilizes very intense neutron pulses (about 1010 neutrons/pulse) with the duration ranging from 10 ns to 100 ns, which are generated by the dense plasma focus (DPF) device filled with pure DT mixture as the working gas. The neutron pulse in high intensity provides the opportunity to measure the signal using a scintillator and a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) (the intense pulse radiation measure method) with the flight distance of only twenty centimeters. The attenuation of the dense plasma focus device must be faster than the subcritical system so that the attenuation of the system can be researched. In this paper, after a neutron pulse is injected into the subcritical reactor, the subcriticality is determined by measuring the instantaneous characteristics of the leaking reactor neutron. The Monte Carlo analysis shows that, with the linear arrangement of the dense plasma focus, the subcritical system and the detector, the signal-to-noise ratio at the measure point meets the investigate requirement, in which the 14 MeV neutrons are attenuated by the subcritical system. The detector is close with the subcritical system to reduce the influence of the outer background and the spread of time-of-flight of the neutrons. The measure system utilizing gated detection technology is characterized with fast attenuation time and large linear current, the a value obtained with this method is 2.05 μs{sup -1} while the measurements using the {sup 252}Cf stochastic pulsed source method and the Rossi-a method were 2.18μs{sup -1} and 2.16μs{sup -1}.It showed that the measured result obtained with dense plasma focus instantaneous pulsed source is consistent

  2. Experimental study of subcritical laboratory magnetized collisionless shocks using a laser-driven magnetic piston

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, D. B. Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C.; Winske, D.

    2015-11-15

    Recent experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles have successfully generated subcritical magnetized collisionless shocks, allowing new laboratory studies of shock formation relevant to space shocks. The characteristics of these shocks are compared with new data in which no shock or a pre-shock formed. The results are consistent with theory and 2D hybrid simulations and indicate that the observed shock or shock-like structures can be organized into distinct regimes by coupling strength. With additional experiments on the early time parameters of the laser plasma utilizing Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, and fast-gate filtered imaging, these regimes are found to be in good agreement with theoretical shock formation criteria.

  3. Experimental study of subcritical laboratory magnetized collisionless shocks using a laser-driven magnetic piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Winske, D.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles have successfully generated subcritical magnetized collisionless shocks, allowing new laboratory studies of shock formation relevant to space shocks. The characteristics of these shocks are compared with new data in which no shock or a pre-shock formed. The results are consistent with theory and 2D hybrid simulations and indicate that the observed shock or shock-like structures can be organized into distinct regimes by coupling strength. With additional experiments on the early time parameters of the laser plasma utilizing Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, and fast-gate filtered imaging, these regimes are found to be in good agreement with theoretical shock formation criteria.

  4. Preliminary investigation of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven noise analysis method of subcriticality measurement in LWR fuel storage and initial loading applications

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method to measure subcriticality has been demonstrated in a variety of experimental configurations of fissile materials. Calculations for an approximately 4-m-dia configuration of light water reactor (LWR) fuel elements indicated the feasibility of measuring the subcriticality of large, loosely coupled arrays of LWR fuel elements by this same method. These analysis suggested application to the initial loading of both pressurized and boiling water reactors, zero-power testing of reactors (such as shutdown margin measurements after initial loading), light water reactor refueling, and safe storage of LWR spent fuel. In the fuel storage application, direct measurement of subcriticality in the actual fuel storage facilities provides the parameter which is directly related to criticality safety.

  5. Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-12-01

    Studies have shown that the repository long-term radiological risk is from the long-lived transuranics and the fission products Tc-99 and I-129, thermal loading concerns arise mainly form the short-lived fission products Sr-90 and Cs-137. In relation to the disposition of nuclear waste, ATW is expected to accomplish the following: (1) destroy over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroy over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separate Sr and Cs (short half-life isotopes); (4) separate uranium; (5) produce electricity. In the ATW concept, spent fuel would be shipped to a ATW site where the plutonium, other transuranics and selected long-lived fission products would be destroyed by fission or transmutation in their only pass through the facility. This approach contrasts with the present-day reprocessing practices in Europe and Japan, during which high purity plutonium is produced and used in the fabrication of fresh mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) that is shipped off-site for use in light water reactors.

  6. Neutronics for critical fission reactors and subcritical fission in hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2012-06-19

    The requirements of future innovative nuclear fuel cycles will focus on safety, sustainability and radioactive waste minimization. Critical fast neutron reactors and sub-critical, external source driven systems (accelerator driven and fusion-fission hybrids) have a potential role to meet these requirements in view of their physics characteristics. This paper provides a short introduction to these features.

  7. A small scale accelerator driven subcritical assembly development and demonstration experiment at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S. A.; Venneri, F.; Bowman, C. D.; Arthur, E. D.; Heighway, E.; Beard, C. A.; Bracht, R. R.; Buksa, J. J.; Chavez, W.; DeVolder, B. G.; Park, J. J.; Parker, R. B.; Pillai, C.; Pitcher, E.; Potter, R. C.; Reid, R. S.; Russell, G. J.; Trujillo, D. A.; Weinacht, D. J.; Wilson, W. B.

    1995-09-15

    A small scale experiment is described that will demonstrate many of the aspects of accelerator-driven transmutation technology. This experiment uses the high-power proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility accelerator and will be located in the Area-A experimental hall. Beam currents of up to 1 mA will be used to produce neutrons with a molten lead target. The target is surrounded by a molten salt and graphite moderator blanket. Fissionable material can be added to the molten salt to demonstrate plutonium burning or transmutation of commercial spent fuel or energy production from thorium. The experiment will be operated at power levels up to 5 MWt.

  8. Extravehicular mobility unit subcritical liquid oxygen storage and supply system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John; Martin, Timothy; Hodgson, ED

    1992-01-01

    The storage of life support oxygen in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit in the liquid state offers some advantages over the current method of storing the oxygen as a high pressure gas. Storage volume is reduced because of the increased density associated with liquid. The lower storage and operating pressures also reduce the potential for leakage or bursting of the storage tank. The potential for combustion resulting from adiabatic combustion of the gas within lines and components is substantially reduced. Design constraints on components are also relaxed due to the lower system pressures. A design study was performed to determine the requirements for a liquid storage system and prepare a conceptual design. The study involved four tasks. The first was to identify system operating requirements that influence or direct the design of the system. The second was to define candidate storage system concepts that could possibly satisfy the requirements. An evaluation and comparison of the candidate concepts was conducted in the third task. The fourth task was devoted to preparing a conceptual design of the recommended storage system and to evaluate concerns with integration of the concept into the EMU. The results are presented.

  9. Traveling pulse on a periodic background in parametrically driven systems.

    PubMed

    León, Alejandro O; Clerc, Marcel G; Coulibaly, Saliya

    2015-05-01

    Macroscopic systems with dissipation and time-modulated injection of energy, parametrically driven systems, can self-organize into localized states and/or patterns. We investigate a pulse that travels over a one-dimensional pattern in parametrically driven systems. Based on a minimal prototype model, we show that the pulses emerge through a subcritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation of the underlying pattern. We describe a simple physical system, a magnetic wire forced with a transverse oscillatory magnetic field, which displays these traveling pulses.

  10. Conception of electron beam-driven subcritical molten salt ultimate safety reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Abalin, S.S.; Alekseev, P.N.; Ignat`ev, V.V.

    1995-10-01

    This paper is a preliminary sketch of a conception to develop the {open_quotes}ultimate safety reactor{close_quotes} using modern reactor and accelerator technologies. This approach would not require a long-range R&D program. The ultimate safety reactor could produce heat and electric energy, expand the production of fuel, or be used for the transmutation of long-lived wastes. The use of the combined double molten salt reactor system allows adequate neutron multiplication to permit using an electron accelerator for the initial neutron flux. The general parameters of such a system are discussed in this paper.

  11. Subcritical and supercritical fuel injection and mixing in single and binary species systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arnab

    Subcritical and supercritical fluid injection using a single round injector into a quiescent atmosphere comprising single and binary species was investigated using optical diagnostics. Different disintegration and mixing modes are expected for the two cases. In the binary species case, the atmosphere comprised an inert gas of a different composition than that of the injected fluid. In single species case, the atmosphere consisted of the same species as that of the injected fluid. Density values were quantified and density gradient profiles were inferred from the experimental data. A novel method was applied for the detection of detailed structures throughout the entire jet center plane. Various combinations of injectant and chamber conditions were tested and a wide range of density ratios were covered. The subcritical cases demonstrated the importance of surface tension and inertial forces, while the supercritical cases showed no signs of surface tension and, in most situations, resembled the mixing characteristics of a gaseous jet injected into a gaseous environment. A comparison between the single and binary species systems has also been provided. A detailed laser calibration procedure was undertaken to account for the laser absorption through the gas and liquid phases and for fluorescence in the non-linear excitation regime for high laser pulse energy. Core lengths were measured for binary species cases and correlated with visualization results. An eigenvalue approach was taken to determine the location of maximum gradients for determining the core length. Jet divergence angles were also calculated and were found to increase with chamber-to-injectant density ratio for both systems. A model was proposed for the spreading angle dependence on density ratio for both single and binary species systems and was compared to existing theoretical studies and experimental work. Finally, a linear stability analysis was performed for the jet injected into both subcritical and

  12. Kinetic parameters for source driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.; Carta, M.; D'Angelo, A.

    2006-07-01

    The definition of the characteristic kinetic parameters of a subcritical source-driven system constitutes an interesting problem in reactor physics with important consequences for practical applications. Consistent and physically meaningful values of the parameters allow to obtain accurate results from kinetic simulation tools and to correctly interpret kinetic experiments. For subcritical systems a preliminary problem arises for the adoption of a suitable weighting function to be used in the projection procedure to derive a point model. The present work illustrates a consistent factorization-projection procedure which leads to the definition of the kinetic parameters in a straightforward manner. The reactivity term is introduced coherently with the generalized perturbation theory applied to the source multiplication factor ks, which is thus given a physical role in the kinetic model. The effective prompt lifetime is introduced on the assumption that a neutron generation can be initiated by both the fission process and the source emission. Results are presented for simplified configurations to fully comprehend the physical features and for a more complicated highly decoupled system treated in transport theory. (authors)

  13. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed.

  14. Out-of-equilibrium stationary states, percolation, and subcritical instabilities in a fully nonconservative system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génois, Mathieu; Hersen, Pascal; Bertin, Eric; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The exploration of the phase diagram of a minimal model for barchan fields leads to the description of three distinct phases for the system: stationary, percolable, and unstable. In the stationary phase the system always reaches an out-of-equilibrium, fluctuating, stationary state, independent of its initial conditions. This state has a large and continuous range of dynamics, from dilute—where dunes do not interact—to dense, where the system exhibits both spatial structuring and collective behavior leading to the selection of a particular size for the dunes. In the percolable phase, the system presents a percolation threshold when the initial density increases. This percolation is unusual, as it happens on a continuous space for moving, interacting, finite lifetime dunes. For extreme parameters, the system exhibits a subcritical instability, where some of the dunes in the field grow without bound. We discuss the nature of the asymptotic states and their relations to well-known models of statistical physics.

  15. Out-of-equilibrium stationary states, percolation, and subcritical instabilities in a fully nonconservative system.

    PubMed

    Génois, Mathieu; Hersen, Pascal; Bertin, Eric; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The exploration of the phase diagram of a minimal model for barchan fields leads to the description of three distinct phases for the system: stationary, percolable, and unstable. In the stationary phase the system always reaches an out-of-equilibrium, fluctuating, stationary state, independent of its initial conditions. This state has a large and continuous range of dynamics, from dilute-where dunes do not interact-to dense, where the system exhibits both spatial structuring and collective behavior leading to the selection of a particular size for the dunes. In the percolable phase, the system presents a percolation threshold when the initial density increases. This percolation is unusual, as it happens on a continuous space for moving, interacting, finite lifetime dunes. For extreme parameters, the system exhibits a subcritical instability, where some of the dunes in the field grow without bound. We discuss the nature of the asymptotic states and their relations to well-known models of statistical physics.

  16. Kinetics of accelerator driven devices

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.T.; Buksa, J.; Houts, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kinetic calculations were made to show that subcritical accelerator driven devices are robust and stable. The calculations show that large changes in reactivity that would lead to an uncontrollable excursion in a reactor would lead only to a new power level in subcritical device. Calculations were also made to show the rate of power changes resulting from startup and shutdown, and that methods also exist for continuously monitoring the reactivity of a subcritical system.

  17. Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission in a Molten Salt Core: Green Nuclear Power for the New Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Scientists at Texas A&M University, Brookhaven National Lab, and Idaho National Lab are developing a design for accelerator-drive subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). Three high-power proton beams are delivered to spallation targets in a molten salt core, where they provide ˜3% of the fast neutrons required to sustain 600 MW of fission. The proton beams are produced by a flux-coupled stack of superconducting strong-focusing cyclotrons. The fuel consists of a eutectic of sodium chloride with either spent nuclear fuel from a conventional U power reactor (ADSMS-U) or thorium (ADSMS-Th). The subcritical core cannot go critical under any failure mode. The core cannot melt down even if all power is suddenly lost to the facility for a prolonged period. The ultra-fast neutronics of the core makes it possible to operate in an isobreeding mode, in which neutron capture breeds the fertile nuclide into a fissile nuclide at the same rate that fission burns the fissile nuclide, and consumes 90% of the fertile inventory instead of the 5% consumed in the original use in a conventional power plant. The ultra-fast neutronics produces a very low equilibrium inventory of the long-lived minor actinides, ˜10^4 less than what is produced in conventional power plants. ADSMS offers a method to safely produce the energy needs for all mankind for the next 3000 years.

  18. Evaluation of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of LWR fuel storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method was evaluated to determine if it could be used to measure the subcriticality of storage casks of burnt light water reactor (LWR) fuel submerged in fuel storage pools, fully loaded and as they are being loaded. Measurements of k/sub eff/ would provide the parameter most directly related to the criticality safety of storage cask configurations of LWR fuel and could allow proper credit for fuel burnup without reliance on calculations. This, in turn, could lead to more cost-effective cask designs. Evaluation of the method for this application was based on experiments already completed at a critical experiments facility using arrays of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel pins typical of the size of storage cask configurations, the existence of neutron detectors that can function in shipping cask environments, and the ability to construct ionization chambers containing /sup 252/Cf of adequate intensity for these measurements.

  19. System Driven Workarounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael Marie

    2013-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) in a partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), participating carriers, and labor organizations. It is designed to improve the National Airspace System by collecting and studying reports detailing unsafe conditions and events in the aviation industry. Employees are able to report safety issues or concerns with confidentiality and without fear of discipline. Safety reports highlighting system driven workarounds for the aviation community highlight the human workaround for the complex aviation system.

  20. THE ENEA ADS PROJECT:. Accelerator Driven System Prototype R&D and Industrial Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherardi, Giuseppe

    2001-11-01

    Hybrid reactors (Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems, ADS), coupling an accelerator with a target and a sub-critical reactor, could simultaneously burn minor actinides and transmute long-lived fission products, while producing a consistent amount of electrical energy. A group of Italian research and development (R&D) organizations and industries have set up a team, which is studying the design issues related to the construction of an 80 MWth Experimental Facility. The planned activities and the (tentative) time schedule of the Italian program are presented.

  1. Stability of localized solutions in a subcritically unstable pattern-forming system under a global delayed control.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, B Y; Nepomnyashchy, A A; Golovin, A A

    2007-04-01

    The formation of spatially localized patterns in a system with subcritical instability under feedback control with delay is investigated within the framework of globally controlled Ginzburg-Landau equation. It is shown that feedback control can stabilize spatially localized solutions. With the increase of delay, these solutions undergo oscillatory instability that, for large enough control strength, results in the formation of localized oscillating pulses. With further increase of the delay the solution blows up.

  2. Application of Burnable Absorbers in an Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Wallenius, Jan; Tucek, Kamil; Carlsson, Johan; Gudowski, Waclaw

    2001-01-15

    The application of burnable absorbers (BAs) to minimize power peaking, reactivity loss, and capture-to-fission probabilities in an accelerator-driven waste transmutation system has been investigated. Boron-10-enriched B{sub 4}C absorber rods were introduced into a lead-bismuth-cooled core fueled with transuranic (TRU) discharges from light water reactors to achieve the smallest possible power peakings at beginning-of-life (BOL) subcriticality level of 0.97. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations show that a radial power peaking equal to 1.2 at BOL is attainable using a four-zone differentiation in BA content. Using a newly written Monte Carlo burnup code, reactivity losses were calculated to be 640 pcm per percent TRU burnup for unrecycled TRU discharges. Comparing to corresponding values in BA-free cores, BA introduction diminishes reactivity losses in TRU-fueled subcritical cores by {approx}20%. Radial power peaking after 300 days of operation at 1200-MW thermal power was <1.75 at a subcriticality level of {approx}0.92, which appears to be acceptable, with respect to limitations in cladding and fuel temperatures. In addition, the use of BAs yields significantly higher fission-to-capture probabilities in even-neutron-number nuclides. Fission-to-absorption probability ratio for {sup 241}Am equal to 0.33 was achieved in the configuration studied. Hence, production of the strong alpha-emitter {sup 242}Cm is reduced, leading to smaller fuel-swelling rates and pin pressurization. Disadvantages following BA introduction, such as increase of void worth and decrease of Doppler feedback in conjunction with small values of {beta}{sub eff}, need to be addressed by detailed studies of subcritical core dynamics.

  3. Multilane driven diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, A. I.; Evans, M. R.; Kafri, Y.; Tailleur, J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider networks made of parallel lanes along which particles hop according to driven diffusive dynamics. The particles also hop transversely from lane to lane, hence indirectly coupling their longitudinal dynamics. We present a general method for constructing the phase diagram of these systems which reveals that in many cases their physics reduce to that of single-lane systems. The reduction to an effective single-lane description legitimizes, for instance, the use of a single TASEP to model the hopping of molecular motors along the many tracks of a single microtubule. Then, we show how, in quasi-2D settings, new phenomena emerge due to the presence of non-zero transverse currents, leading, for instance, to strong ‘shear localization’ along the network.

  4. Smart friction driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Rainer; Gaul, Lothar

    2005-02-01

    Vibration properties of most assembled mechanical systems depend on frictional damping in joints. The nonlinear transfer behavior of the frictional interfaces often provides the dominant damping mechanism in a built-up structure and plays an important role in the vibratory response of the structure (Gaul and Nitsche 2001 Appl. Mech. Rev. 54 93-105). For improving the performance of systems, many studies have been carried out to predict, measure and/or enhance the energy dissipation of friction. To enhance the friction damping in joint connections a semi-active joint is investigated. A rotational joint connection is designed and manufactured such that the normal force in the friction interface can be influenced with a piezoelectric stack disc. With the piezoelectric device the normal force and thus the friction damping in the joint connection can be controlled. A control design method, namely semi-active control, is investigated. The recently developed LuGre friction model is used to describe the nonlinear transfer behavior of joints. This model is based on a bristle model and turns out to be highly suitable for systems assembled by such smart joints. Those systems can also be regarded as friction driven systems, since the energy flow is controlled by smart joints. The semi-active method is well suited for large space structures since the friction damping in joints turned out to be a major source of damping. To show the applicability of the proposed concept to large space structures a two-beam system representing a part of a large space structure is considered. Two flexible beams are connected with a semi-active joint connection. It can be shown that the damping of the system can be improved significantly by controlling the normal force in the semi-active joint connection. Experimental results validate the damping improvement due to the semi-active friction damping.

  5. Evaluation of the /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of LWR fuel storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1987-11-15

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method was evaluated to determine if it could be used to measure the subcriticality of storage casks of burnt LWR fuel submerged in fuel storage pools, fully loaded and as they are being loaded. The motivation for this evaluation was that measurements of k/sub eff/ would provide the parameter most directly related to the criticality safety of storage cask configurations of LWR fuel and could allow proper credit for fuel burnup without reliance on calculations. This in turn could lead to more cost-effective cask designs. Evaluation of the method for this application was based on (1) experiments already completed at a critical experiments facility using arrays of PWR fuel pins typical of the size of storage cask configurations, (2) the existence of neutron detectors that can function in shipping cask environments, and (3) the ability to construct ionization chambers containing /sup 252/Cf of adequate intensity for these measurements. These three considerations are discussed.

  6. Keno-Nr a Monte Carlo Code Simulating the Californium -252-SOURCE-DRIVEN Noise Analysis Experimental Method for Determining Subcriticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficaro, Edward Patrick

    The ^{252}Cf -source-driven noise analysis (CSDNA) requires the measurement of the cross power spectral density (CPSD) G_ {23}(omega), between a pair of neutron detectors (subscripts 2 and 3) located in or near the fissile assembly, and the CPSDs, G_{12}( omega) and G_{13}( omega), between the neutron detectors and an ionization chamber 1 containing ^{252}Cf also located in or near the fissile assembly. The key advantage of this method is that the subcriticality of the assembly can be obtained from the ratio of spectral densities,{G _sp{12}{*}(omega)G_ {13}(omega)over G_{11 }(omega)G_{23}(omega) },using a point kinetic model formulation which is independent of the detector's properties and a reference measurement. The multigroup, Monte Carlo code, KENO-NR, was developed to eliminate the dependence of the measurement on the point kinetic formulation. This code utilizes time dependent, analog neutron tracking to simulate the experimental method, in addition to the underlying nuclear physics, as closely as possible. From a direct comparison of simulated and measured data, the calculational model and cross sections are validated for the calculation, and KENO-NR can then be rerun to provide a distributed source k_ {eff} calculation. Depending on the fissile assembly, a few hours to a couple of days of computation time are needed for a typical simulation executed on a desktop workstation. In this work, KENO-NR demonstrated the ability to accurately estimate the measured ratio of spectral densities from experiments using capture detectors performed on uranium metal cylinders, a cylindrical tank filled with aqueous uranyl nitrate, and arrays of safe storage bottles filled with uranyl nitrate. Good agreement was also seen between simulated and measured values of the prompt neutron decay constant from the fitted CPSDs. Poor agreement was seen between simulated and measured results using composite ^6Li-glass-plastic scintillators at large subcriticalities for the tank of

  7. Onset condition of the subcritical geodesic acoustic mode instability in the presence of energetic-particle-driven geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kosuga, Y.; Lesur, M.; Ido, T.

    2016-05-15

    An analytic model is developed for understanding the abrupt onset of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in the presence of chirping energetic-particle-driven GAM (EGAM). This abrupt excitation phenomenon has been observed on LHD plasma. Threshold conditions for the onset of abrupt growth of GAM are derived, and the period doubling phenomenon is explained. The phase relation between the mother mode (EGAM) and the daughter mode (GAM) is also discussed. This result contributes to the understanding of “trigger problems” of laboratory and nature plasmas.

  8. Onset condition of the subcritical geodesic acoustic mode instability in the presence of energetic-particle-driven geodesic acoustic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kosuga, Y.; Lesur, M.; Ido, T.

    2016-05-01

    An analytic model is developed for understanding the abrupt onset of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in the presence of chirping energetic-particle-driven GAM (EGAM). This abrupt excitation phenomenon has been observed on LHD plasma. Threshold conditions for the onset of abrupt growth of GAM are derived, and the period doubling phenomenon is explained. The phase relation between the mother mode (EGAM) and the daughter mode (GAM) is also discussed. This result contributes to the understanding of "trigger problems" of laboratory and nature plasmas.

  9. Experimental Neutron Source Facility Based on Accelerator Driven System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry

    2010-06-01

    An experimental neutron source facility has been developed for producing medical isotopes, training young nuclear professionals, providing capability for performing reactor physics, material research, and basic science experiments. It uses a driven subcritical assembly with an electron accelerator. The neutrons driving the subcritical assembly were generated from the electron interactions with a target assembly. Tungsten or uranium target material is used for the neutron production through photonuclear reactions. The neutron source intensity, spectrum, and spatial distribution have been studied to maximize the neutron yield and satisfy different engineering requirements. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux intensity with a subcriticality of 0.98. Low enrichment uranium is used for the fuel material because it enhances the neutron source performance. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. Horizontal neutron channels are incorporated for performing basic research including cold neutron source. This paper describes the conceptual design and summarizes some of the related analyses.

  10. The physics design of accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear systems under study in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology program (ADTT) will allow the destruction of nuclear spent fuel and weapons-return plutonium, as well as the production of nuclear energy from the thorium cycle, without a long-lived radioactive waste stream. The subcritical systems proposed represent a radical departure from traditional nuclear concepts (reactors), yet the actual implementation of ADTT systems is based on modest extrapolations of existing technology. These systems strive to keep the best that the nuclear technology has developed over the years, within a sensible conservative design envelope and eventually manage to offer a safe, less expensive and more environmentally sound approach to nuclear power.

  11. The physics design of accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear systems under study in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology program (ADTT) will allow the destruction of nuclear spent fuel and weapons-return plutonium, as well as the production of nuclear energy from the thorium cycle, without a long-lived radioactive waste stream. The subcritical systems proposed represent a radical departure from traditional nuclear concepts (reactors), yet the actual implementation of ADTT systems is based on modest extrapolations of existing technology. These systems strive to keep the best that the nuclear technology has developed over the years, within a sensible conservative design envelope and eventually manage to offer a safer, less expensive and more environmentally sound approach to nuclear power.

  12. Hysteretic and intermittent regimes in the subcritical bifurcation of a quasi-one-dimensional system of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessup, Tommy; Coste, Christophe; Saint Jean, Michel

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we study the effects of white Gaussian additive thermal noise on a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional system of particles that are transversally confined, with short-range (non-Coulombic) interactions and periodic boundary conditions in the longitudinal direction. In such systems, there is a structural transition from a linear order to a staggered row, called the zigzag transition. There is a finite range of transverse confinement stiffnesses for which the stable configuration at zero temperature is a localized zigzag pattern surrounded by aligned particles, which evidences the subcriticality of the bifurcation. We show that these configurations remain stable for a wide temperature range. At zero temperature, the transition between a straight line and such localized zigzag patterns is hysteretic. We have studied the influence of thermal noise on the hysteresis loop. Its description is more difficult than at T =0 K since thermally activated jumps between the two configurations always occur and the system cannot stay forever in a unique metastable state. Two different regimes have to be considered according to the temperature value with respect to a critical temperature Tc(τobs) that depends on the observation time τobs. An hysteresis loop is still observed at low temperature, with a width that decreases as the temperature increases toward Tc(τobs) . In contrast, for T >Tc(τobs) the memory of the initial condition is lost by stochastic jumps between the configurations. The study of the mean residence times in each configuration gives a unique opportunity to precisely determine the barrier height that separates the two configurations, without knowing the complete energy landscape of this many-body system. We also show how to reconstruct the hysteresis loop that would exist at T =0 K from high-temperature simulations.

  13. Optimization of supercritical phase and combined supercritical/subcritical conversion of lignocellulose for hexose production by using a flow reaction system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Lu, Wen-Jing; Wu, Hua-Yong; Liu, Jin-Wen; Wang, Hong-Tao

    2012-12-01

    A flow reaction system was utilized to investigate lignocellulose conversion using combined supercritical/subcritical conditions for hexose production. Initially, investigation of cellulose hydrolysis in supercritical water and optimization of reaction parameters were done. Oligosaccharide yields reached over 30% at cellulose concentrations of 3-5 gL(-1) and reaction times of 6-10s at 375 °C, and 2.5-4 gL(-1) and 8-10s at 380 °C. Temperatures above 380 °C were not appropriate for the supercritical phase in the combined process. Subsequently, conversion of lignocellulosic materials under combined supercritical/subcritical conditions was studied. Around 30% hexose was produced from corn stalks under the optimal parameters for supercritical (380 °C, 23-24 MPa, 9-10s) and subcritical (240 °C, 8-9 MPa, 45-50s) phases. Flow systems utilizing the combined supercritical/subcritical technology present a promising method for lignocellulosic conversion. The results of this study provide an important guide for the operational optimization and practical application of the proposed system.

  14. Design and producing of fine-group cross section library HENDL3.0/FG for subcritical system

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, J.; Zeng, Q.; Xu, D.; Hu, L.; Long, P.

    2012-07-01

    To improve the accuracy of the neutron analyses for subcritical system with thermal fission blanket, a coupled neutron and photon (315 n + 42{gamma}) fine-group cross section library HENDL3.0/FG based on ENDF/B-VII, JEFF3.1 and JENDL3.3 was produced by FDS team. In order to test the availability and reliability of the HENDL3.0/FG data library, shielding and critical safety benchmarks were performed with VisualBUS code. The testing results indicated that the discrepancy between calculation and experimental values of nuclear parameters fell in a reasonable range. It showed that the nuclear data library had accuracy and availability. (authors)

  15. Dynamic response of an accelerator driven system to accelerator beam interruptions for criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, A.; Abanades, A.; Leon, P. T.; Sordo, F.; Martinez-Val, J. M.

    2008-06-01

    Subcritical nuclear reactors driven by intense neutron sources can be very suitable tools for nuclear waste transmutation, particularly in the case of minor actinides with very low fractions of delayed neutrons. A proper control of these systems needs to know at every time the absolute value of the reactor subcriticality (negative reactivity), which must be measured by fully reliable methods, usually conveying a short interruption of the accelerator beam in order to assess the neutron flux reduction. Those interruptions should be very short in time, for not disturbing too much the thermal magnitudes of the reactor. Otherwise, the cladding and the fuel would suffer from thermal fatigue produced by those perturbations, and the mechanical integrity of the reactor would be jeopardized. It is shown in this paper that beam interruptions of the order of 400 μs repeated every second would not disturb significantly the reactor thermal features, while enabling for an adequate measurement of the negative reactivity.

  16. Monte Carlo Modeling of Electronuclear Processes in Experimental Accelerator Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, Aleksander

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents results of Monte Carlo modeling of an experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating at the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. The mix of oxides (PuO2 + UO2) MOX fuel designed for the reactor will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly in Dubna is based on the core with a nominal unit capacity of 30 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff= 0.945 and the accelerator beam power of 1 kW.

  17. About the possibility of use of different types of targets as a neutron source for subcritical nuclear reactor driven by particle beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Avdeev, E.F.; Dorokhovich, S.L.; Chusov, I.A.

    1995-10-01

    The schemes of jet gas and liquid targets as well as the gastargets with a solid phase dispersion are introduced to use to receive the neutrons admitted to a subcritical reactor core. The possible variants of target position in the reactor are considered, target characteristics are calculated. The authors pay a great attention to the estimation of radioactive products yield receiving due to the interaction of the beam with the target.

  18. Absolute reactivity calibration of accelerator-driven systems after RACE-T experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, C. C.; Geslot, B.

    2006-07-01

    The RACE-T experiments that were held in november 2005 in the ENEA-Casaccia research center near Rome allowed us to improve our knowledge of the experimental techniques for absolute reactivity calibration at either startup or shutdown phases of accelerator-driven systems. Various experimental techniques for assessing a subcritical level were inter-compared through three different subcritical configurations SC0, SC2 and SC3, about -0.5, -3 and -6 dollars, respectively. The area-ratio method based of the use of a pulsed neutron source appears as the most performing. When the reactivity estimate is expressed in dollar unit, the uncertainties obtained with the area-ratio method were less than 1% for any subcritical configuration. The sensitivity to measurement location was about slightly more than 1% and always less than 4%. Finally, it is noteworthy that the source jerk technique using a transient caused by the pulsed neutron source shutdown provides results in good agreement with those obtained from the area-ratio technique. (authors)

  19. Properties of the Feynman-alpha method applied to accelerator-driven subcritical systems.

    PubMed

    Taczanowski, S; Domanska, G; Kopec, M; Janczyszyn, J

    2005-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of the Feynman-method with a simple code simulating the multiplication chain, confined to pertinent time-dependent phenomena has been done. The significance of its key parameters (detector efficiency and dead time, k-source and spallation neutrons multiplicities, required number of fissions etc.) has been discussed. It has been demonstrated that this method can be insensitive to properties of the zones surrounding the core, whereas is strongly affected by the detector dead time. In turn, the influence of harmonics in the neutron field and of the dispersion of spallation neutrons has proven much less pronounced.

  20. Th and U fuel photofission study by NTD for AD-MSR subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo D.; Davila, Jesus; Barros, Haydn; Pino, Felix; Barrera, Maria T.; Farina, Fulvio

    2015-07-01

    During the last decade a considerable effort has been devoted for developing energy generating systems based on advanced nuclear technology within the design concepts of GEN-IV. Thorium base fuel systems such as accelerator driven nuclear reactors are one of the often mentioned attractive and affordable options. Several radiotherapy linear accelerators are on the market and due to their reliability, they could be employed as drivers for subcritical liquid fuel assemblies. Bremsstrahlung photons with energies above 5.5MeV, induce (γ,n) and (e,e'n) reactions in the W-target. Resulting gamma radiation and photo or fission neutrons may be absorbed in target materials such as thorium and uranium isotopes to induce sustained fission or nuclear transmutation in waste radioactive materials. Relevant photo driven and photo-fission reaction cross sections are important for actinides 232Th, 238U and 237Np in the radiotherapy machines energy range of 10-20 MV. In this study we employ passive nuclear track detectors (NTD) to determine fission rates and neutron production rates with the aim to establish the feasibility for gamma and photo-neutron driven subcritical assemblies. To cope with these objectives a 20 MV radiotherapy machine has been employed with a mixed fuel target. Results will support further development for a subcritical assembly employing a thorium containing liquid fuel. It is expected that acquired technological knowledge will contribute to the Venezuelan nuclear energy program.

  1. Th and U fuel photofission study by NTD for AD-MSR subcritical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo D.; Barros, Haydn; Pino, Felix; Barrera, Maria T.; Farina, Fulvio; Davila, Jesus

    2015-07-23

    During the last decade a considerable effort has been devoted for developing energy generating systems based on advanced nuclear technology within the design concepts of GEN-IV. Thorium base fuel systems such as accelerator driven nuclear reactors are one of the often mentioned attractive and affordable options. Several radiotherapy linear accelerators are on the market and due to their reliability, they could be employed as drivers for subcritical liquid fuel assemblies. Bremsstrahlung photons with energies above 5.5MeV, induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions in the W-target. Resulting gamma radiation and photo or fission neutrons may be absorbed in target materials such as thorium and uranium isotopes to induce sustained fission or nuclear transmutation in waste radioactive materials. Relevant photo driven and photo-fission reaction cross sections are important for actinides {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np in the radiotherapy machines energy range of 10-20 MV. In this study we employ passive nuclear track detectors (NTD) to determine fission rates and neutron production rates with the aim to establish the feasibility for gamma and photo-neutron driven subcritical assemblies. To cope with these objectives a 20 MV radiotherapy machine has been employed with a mixed fuel target. Results will support further development for a subcritical assembly employing a thorium containing liquid fuel. It is expected that acquired technological knowledge will contribute to the Venezuelan nuclear energy program.

  2. Experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system at the Kyoto Univ. critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pyeon, C. H.; Yagi, T.; Lim, J. Y.; Misawa, T.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system (ADS) is conducted in the Kyoto Univ. Critical Assembly (KUCA). The experiments are carried out in both the critical and subcritical states for attaining the reaction rates of the thorium capture and fission reactions. In the critical system, the thorium plate irradiation experiment is carried out for the thorium capture and fission reactions. From the results of the measurements, the thorium fission reactions are obtained apparently in the critical system, and the C/E values of reaction rates show the accuracy of relative difference of about 30%. In the ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons and 100 MeV protons, the subcritical experiments are carried out in the thorium-loaded cores to obtain the capture reaction rates through the measurements of {sup 115}In(n, {gamma}){sup 116m}In reactions. The results of the experiments reveal the difference between the reaction rate distributions for the change in not only the neutron spectrum but also the external neutron source. The comparison between the measured and calculated reaction rate distributions demonstrates a discrepancy of the accuracy of reaction rate analyses of thorium capture reactions through the thorium-loaded ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons. Hereafter, kinetic experiments are planned to be carried out to deduce the delayed neutron decay constants and subcriticality using the pulsed neutron method. (authors)

  3. Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Roland

    2011-08-03

    Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical reactors as well as the thorium burning accelerator-driven energy amplifier proposed by Rubbia et al. An attractive alternative reactor design that used molten salt fuel was experimentally studied at ORNL in the 1960s, where a critical molten salt reactor was successfully operated using enriched U235 or U233 tetrafluoride fuels. These experiments give confidence that an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt reactor will work better than conventional reactors, having better efficiency due to their higher operating temperature, having the inherent safety of subcritical operation, and having constant purging of volatile radioactive elements to eliminate their accumulation and potential accidental release in dangerous amounts. Moreover, the requirements to drive a molten salt reactor can be considerably relaxed compared to a solid fuel reactor, especially regarding accelerator reliability and spallation neutron targetry, to the point that much of the required technology exists today. It is proposed that Project-X be developed into a prototype commercial machine to produce energy for the world by, for example, burning thorium in India and nuclear waste from conventional reactors in the USA.

  4. Transition to subcritical turbulence in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, F.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Roach, C. M.; Field, A. R.; Dorland, W.

    2016-12-01

    Tokamak turbulence, driven by the ion-temperature gradient and occurring in the presence of flow shear, is investigated by means of local, ion-scale, electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations (with both kinetic ions and electrons) of the conditions in the outer core of the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST). A parameter scan in the local values of the ion-temperature gradient and flow shear is performed. It is demonstrated that the experimentally observed state is near the stability threshold and that this stability threshold is nonlinear: sheared turbulence is subcritical, i.e. the system is formally stable to small perturbations, but, given a large enough initial perturbation, it transitions to a turbulent state. A scenario for such a transition is proposed and supported by numerical results: close to threshold, the nonlinear saturated state and the associated anomalous heat transport are dominated by long-lived coherent structures, which drift across the domain, have finite amplitudes, but are not volume filling; as the system is taken away from the threshold into the more unstable regime, the number of these structures increases until they overlap and a more conventional chaotic state emerges. Whereas this appears to represent a new scenario for transition to turbulence in tokamak plasmas, it is reminiscent of the behaviour of other subcritically turbulent systems, e.g. pipe flows and Keplerian magnetorotational accretion flows.

  5. Optimal protocols for slowly driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkowski, Patrick R.; DeWeese, Michael R.

    2015-09-01

    The design of efficient quantum information processing will rely on optimal nonequilibrium transitions of driven quantum systems. Building on a recently developed geometric framework for computing optimal protocols for classical systems driven in finite time, we construct a general framework for optimizing the average information entropy for driven quantum systems. Geodesics on the parameter manifold endowed with a positive semidefinite metric correspond to protocols that minimize the average information entropy production in finite time. We use this framework to explicitly compute the optimal entropy production for a simple two-state quantum system coupled to a heat bath of bosonic oscillators, which has applications to quantum annealing.

  6. Off-line coupling of subcritical water extraction with subcritical water chromatography via a sorbent trap and thermal desorption.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Lori J; Yang, Yu

    2003-05-15

    In this study, the off-line coupling of subcritical water extraction (SBWE) with subcritical water chromatography (SBWC) was achieved using a sorbent trap and thermal desorption. The sorbent trap was employed to collect the extracted analytes during subcritical water extraction. After the extraction, the trap was connected to the subcritical water chromatography system, and thermal desorption of the trapped analytes was performed before the SBWC run. The thermally desorbed analytes were then introduced into the subcritical water separation column and detected by a UV detector. Anilines and phenols were extracted from sand and analyzed using this off-line coupling technique. Subcritical water extraction of flavones from orange peel followed by subcritical water chromatographic separation was also investigated. The effects of water volume and extraction temperature on flavone recovery were determined. Because a sorbent trap was used to collect the extracted analytes, the sensitivity of this technique was greatly enhanced as compared to that of subcritical water extraction with solvent trapping. Since no organic solvent-water extractions were necessary prior to analysis, this technique eliminated any use of organic solvents in both extraction and chromatography processes.

  7. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of organic, wet wastes for carbon cycling in regenerative life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Luther, Amanda; Rabaey, Korneel; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter; Brilman, Wim

    2016-07-01

    For long-term human spaceflight missions, one of the major requirements is the regenerative life support system which has to be capable of recycling carbon, nutrients and water from both solid and liquid wastes generated by the crew and by the local production of food through living organisms (higher plants, fungi, algae, bacteria, …). The European Space Agency's Life Support System, envisioned by the MELiSSA project, consists of a 5 compartment artificial ecosystem, in which the waste receiving compartment (so-called compartment I or briefly 'CI') is based on thermophilic fermentation. However, as the waste generated by the crew compartment and food production compartment contain typical plant fibres (lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose), these recalcitrant fibres end up largely unaffected in the digestate (sludge) generated in the C-I compartment. Therefore, the C-I compartment has to be supplemented with a so-called fibre degradation unit (in short, FDU) for further oxidation or degradation of said plant fibres. A potential solution to degrading these plant fibres and other recalcitrant organics is their oxidation, by means of subcritical or supercritical water, into reusable CO2 while retaining the nutrients in an organic-free liquid effluent. By taking advantage of the altered physicochemical properties of water above or near its critical point (647 K, 22.1 MPa) - including increased solubility of non-polar compounds and oxygen, ion product and diffusivity - process conditions can be created for rapid oxidation of C into CO2. In this research, the oxidizer is provided as a hydrogen peroxide solution which, at elevated temperature, will dissociated into O2. The purpose of this study is to identify ideal process conditions which (a) ensure complete oxidation of carbon, (b) retaining the nutrients other than C in the liquid effluent and (c) require as little oxidizer as possible. Experiments were conducted on a continuous, tubular heated reactor and on batch

  8. Quasi-Periodically Driven Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdeny, Albert; Puig, Joaquim; Mintert, Florian

    2016-10-01

    Floquet theory provides rigorous foundations for the theory of periodically driven quantum systems. In the case of non-periodic driving, however, the situation is not so well understood. Here, we provide a critical review of the theoretical framework developed for quasi-periodically driven quantum systems. Although the theoretical footing is still under development, we argue that quasi-periodically driven quantum systems can be treated with generalisations of Floquet theory in suitable parameter regimes. Moreover, we provide a generalisation of the Floquet-Magnus expansion and argue that quasi-periodic driving offers a promising route for quantum simulations.

  9. Shock propagation in locally driven granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, Jilmy P.; Pathak, Sudhir N.; Das, Dibyendu; Rajesh, R.

    2017-09-01

    We study shock propagation in a system of initially stationary hard spheres that is driven by a continuous injection of particles at the origin. The disturbance created by the injection of energy spreads radially outward through collisions between particles. Using scaling arguments, we determine the exponent characterizing the power-law growth of this disturbance in all dimensions. The scaling functions describing the various physical quantities are determined using large-scale event-driven simulations in two and three dimensions for both elastic and inelastic systems. The results are shown to describe well the data from two different experiments on granular systems that are similarly driven.

  10. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron experiments : data processing and spatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    The YALINA-Booster experiments and analyses are part of the collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory of USA and the Joint Institute for Power & Nuclear Research - SOSNY of Belarus for studying the physics of accelerator driven systems for nuclear energy applications using low enriched uranium. The YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly is utilized for studying the kinetics of accelerator driven systems with its highly intensive D-T or D-D pulsed neutron source. In particular, the pulsed neutron methods are used to determine the reactivity of the subcritical system. This report examines the pulsed-neutron experiments performed in the YALINA-Booster facility with different configurations for the subcritical assembly. The 1141 configuration with 90% U-235 fuel and the 1185 configuration with 36% or 21% U-235 fuel are examined. The Sjoestrand area-ratio method is utilized to determine the reactivities of the different configurations. The linear regression method is applied to obtain the prompt neutron decay constants from the pulsed-neutron experimental data. The reactivity values obtained from the experimental data are shown to be dependent on the detector locations inside the subcritical assembly and the types of detector used for the measurements. In this report, Bell's spatial correction factors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo model to remove the detector dependences. The large differences between the reactivity values given by the detectors in the fast neutron zone of the YALINA-Booster are reduced after applying the spatial corrections. In addition, the estimated reactivity values after the spatial corrections are much less spatially dependent.

  11. Subcritical Noise Measurements with a Nickel-Reflected Plutonium Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jesson D. Hutchinson; John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    Subcritical measurements were conducted with an a-phase plutonium sphere reflected by nickel hemishells using the 252Cf Source-Driven Noise Analysis (CSDNA) method to provide criticality safety benchmark data. Measured configurations included a bare plutonium sphere as well as the plutonium sphere reflected by the following nickel thicknesses: 1.27, 2.54, 3.81, 5.08, and 7.62 cm. A certain ratio of spectral quantities was measured for each configuration which varies linearly with the keff of the system. In addition, two types of Monte Carlo calculations were employed: a modified version of MCNP to calculate the ratio of spectral quantities and a KCODE calculation. From the measured and computed quantities the multiplication of each configuration can be approximated. A comprehensive uncertainty analysis was then performed that includes uncertainties in the geometry and materials present in the system in addition to the uncertainties in the method and nuclear data.

  12. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  13. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: An accelerator-driven system for the destruction of nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revol, Jean-Pierre

    2003-07-01

    Progress in particle accelerator technology makes it possible to use a proton accelerator to produce energy and to destroy nuclear waste efficiently. The energy amplifier (EA) proposed by Carlo Rubbia and his group is a subcritical fast neutron system driven by a proton accelerator. It is particularly attractive for destroying, through fission, transuranic elements produced by presently operating nuclear reactors. The EA could also efficiently and at minimal cost transform long-lived fission fragments using the concept of adiabatic resonance crossing (ARC), recently tested at CERN with the TARC experiment. The ARC concept can be extended to several other domains of application (production of radioactive isotopes for medicine and industry, neutron research applications, etc.).

  14. Shielding analysis at the upper section of the accelerator-driven system.

    PubMed

    Sasa, Toshinobu; Yang, Jin An; Oigawa, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The proton beam duct of the accelerator-driven system (ADS) acts as a streaming path for spallation neutrons and photons and causes the activation of the magnets and other devices above the subcritical core. We have performed a streaming analysis at the upper section of the lead-bismuth target/cooled ADS (800 MWth). MCNPX was used to calculate the radiation dose from streamed neutrons and photons through the beam duct. For the secondary photon production calculation, cross sections for several actinides were substituted with plutonium because of the lack of gamma production cross section. From the results of this analysis, the neutron dose from the beam duct is seen to be about 20 orders higher than that of the bulk shield. The magnets and shield plug are heavily irradiated by streaming neutrons according to the DCHAIN-SP analysis.

  15. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power-driven steering systems. 169.623 Section 169.623... Machinery and Electrical Steering Systems § 169.623 Power-driven steering systems. (a) Power-driven steering... system must automatically resume operation after an electric power outage. (b) Control of power-driven...

  16. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power-driven steering systems. 169.623 Section 169.623... Machinery and Electrical Steering Systems § 169.623 Power-driven steering systems. (a) Power-driven steering... system must automatically resume operation after an electric power outage. (b) Control of power-driven...

  17. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  18. Topological effects in chiral symmetric driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Derek Y. H.; Gong, Jiangbin

    2014-11-01

    Recent years have seen a strong interest in topological effects within periodically driven systems. In this work, we explore topological effects in two closely related 2-dimensional driven systems described by Floquet operators possessing chiral symmetry (CS). Our numerical and analytical results suggest the following. First, the CS is associated with the existence of the anomalous counterpropagating (ACP) modes reported recently. Specifically, we show that a particular form of CS protects the ACP modes crossing the quasienergy band gap at ±π . We also find that these modes are only present along selected boundaries, suggesting that they are a weak topological effect. Second, we find that CS can give rise to protected 0 and π quasienergy modes, and that the number of these modes may increase without bound as we tune up certain system parameters. Like the ACP modes, these 0 and π modes also appear only along selected boundaries and thus appear to be a weak topological effect. This work represents a detailed study of weak topological effects in periodically driven systems. Our findings add to the still-growing knowledge on driven topological systems.

  19. Extending non-fatigue Mode I subcritical crack growth data to subcritical fatigue crack growth: Demonstration of the equivalence of the Charles' law and Paris law exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell; Eppes, Martha-Cary

    2016-04-01

    Paris's law connects fatigue-induced subcritical crack growth and fatigue loading. Environmentally-driven subcritical crack growth, while a random process, can be decomposed into a spectrum of cyclic processes, where each spectral component is governed by Paris's law. Unfortunately, almost no data exists concerning the Paris law exponent, m; rather, the great majority of existing sub-critical crack growth measurements on rock have been carried out via Mode I tensile tests, where corresponding data are generally correlated using Charles' law, and where the latter, similar to Paris's law, exposes a power law relationship between crack growth rate and stress intensity. In this study, a statistical argument is used to derive a simple, rigorous relationship between the all-important Paris law and Charles law exponents, m and n. This result has a significant practical implication: subcritical fatigue crack growth in rock, driven by various random environmental weathering processes can now be predicted using available Mode I stress corrosion indices, n.

  20. Reactor Dynamics Experiments with a Sub-Critical Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Yang, Y.; Wu, L.; Momota, H.

    2004-10-06

    A resurgence in use of nuclear power is now underway worldwide. However due to the shutdown of many university research reactors , student laboratories must rely more heavily on use of sub-critical assemblies. Here a driven sub-critical is described that uses a cylindrical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device to provide a fusion neutron source. The small IEC neutron source would be inserted in a fuel element position, with its power input controlled externally at a control panel. This feature opens the way to use of the critical assembly for a number of transient experiments such as sub-critical pulsing and neutron wave propagation. That in turn adds important new insights and excitement for the student teaching laboratory.

  1. Modeling new coal projects: supercritical or subcritical?

    SciTech Connect

    Carrino, A.J.; Jones, R.B.

    2006-11-15

    Decisions made on new build coal-fired plants are driven by several factors - emissions, fuel logistics and electric transmission access all provide constraints. The crucial economic decision whether to build supercritical or subcritical units often depends on assumptions concerning the reliability/availability of each technology, the cost of on-fuel operations including maintenance, the generation efficiencies and the potential for emissions credits at some future value. Modeling the influence of these key factors requires analysis and documentation to assure the assets actually meet the projected financial performance. This article addresses some of the issue related to the trade-offs that have the potential to be driven by the supercritical/subcritical decision. Solomon Associates has been collecting cost, generation and reliability data on coal-fired power generation assets for approximately 10 years using a strict methodology and taxonomy to categorize and compare actual plant operations data. This database provides validated information not only on performance, but also on alternative performance scenarios, which can provide useful insights in the pro forma financial analysis and models of new plants. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. MCNPX, MONK, and ERANOS analyses of the YALINA booster subcritical assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Aliberti, G.; Cao, Y.; Smith, D.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Serafimovich, I.

    2011-05-01

    This paper compares the numerical results obtained from various nuclear codes and nuclear data libraries with the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly (Minsk, Belarus) experimental results. This subcritical assembly was constructed to study the physics and the operation of accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) for transmuting the light water reactors (LWR) spent nuclear fuel. The YALINA Booster facility has been accurately modeled, with no material homogenization, by the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX (MCNP/MCB) and MONK. The MONK geometrical model matches that of MCNPX. The assembly has also been analyzed by the deterministic code ERANOS. In addition, the differences between the effective neutron multiplication factor and the source multiplication factors have been examined by alternative calculational methodologies. The analyses include the delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, generation time, neutron flux profiles, and spectra in various experimental channels. The accuracy of the numerical models has been enhanced by accounting for all material impurities and the actual density of the polyethylene material used in the assembly (the latter value was obtained by dividing the total weight of the polyethylene by its volume in the numerical model). There is good agreement between the results from MONK, MCNPX, and ERANOS. The ERANOS results show small differences relative to the other results because of material homogenization and the energy and angle discretizations.The MCNPX results match the experimental measurements of the {sup 3}He(n,p) reaction rates obtained with the californium neutron source.

  3. Sub-critical filtration conditions of commercial hollow-fibre membranes in a submerged anaerobic MBR (HF-SAnMBR) system: the effect of gas sparging intensity.

    PubMed

    Robles, A; Ruano, M V; García-Usach, F; Ferrer, J

    2012-06-01

    A submerged anaerobic MBR demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON®, Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was operated using municipal wastewater at high levels of mixed liquor total solids (MLTS) (above 22 g L(-1)). A modified flux-step method was applied to assess the critical flux (J(C)) at different gas sparging intensities. The results showed a linear dependency between J(C) and the specific gas demand per unit of membrane area (SGD(m)). J(C) ranged from 12 to 19 LMH at SGD(m) values of between 0.17 and 0.5 Nm(3) h(-1) m(-2), which are quite low in comparison to aerobic MBR. Long-term trials showed that the membranes operated steadily at fluxes close to the estimated J(C), which validates the J(C) obtained by this method. After operating the membrane for almost 2 years at sub-critical levels, no irreversible fouling problems were detected, and therefore, no chemical cleaning was conducted.

  4. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzynek, John

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  5. Phase shielding soliton in parametrically driven systems.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Marcel G; Garcia-Ñustes, Mónica A; Zárate, Yair; Coulibaly, Saliya

    2013-05-01

    Parametrically driven extended systems exhibit dissipative localized states. Analytical solutions of these states are characterized by a uniform phase and a bell-shaped modulus. Recently, a type of dissipative localized state with a nonuniform phase structure has been reported: the phase shielding solitons. Using the parametrically driven and damped nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we investigate the main properties of this kind of solution in one and two dimensions and develop an analytical description for its structure and dynamics. Numerical simulations are consistent with our analytical results, showing good agreement. A numerical exploration conducted in an anisotropic ferromagnetic system in one and two dimensions indicates the presence of phase shielding solitons. The structure of these dissipative solitons is well described also by our analytical results. The presence of corrective higher-order terms is relevant in the description of the observed phase dynamical behavior.

  6. Odd-frequency Superconductivity in Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triola, Christopher; Balatsky, Alexander

    We show that Berezinskii's classification of the symmetries of Cooper pair amplitudes in terms of parity under transformations that invert spin, space, time, and orbital degrees of freedom holds for driven systems even in the absence of translation invariance. We then discuss the conditions under which pair amplitudes which are odd in frequency can emerge in driven systems. Considering a model Hamiltonian for a superconductor coupled to an external driving potential, we investigate the influence of the drive on the anomalous Green's function, density of states, and spectral function. We find that the anomalous Green's function develops odd in frequency component in the presence of an external drive. Furthermore we investigate how these odd-frequency terms are related to satellite features in the density of states and spectral function. Supported by US DOE BES E 304.

  7. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power-driven steering systems. 169.623 Section 169.623... Machinery and Electrical Steering Systems § 169.623 Power-driven steering systems. (a) Power-driven steering... system must automatically resume operation after an electric power outage. (b) Control of...

  8. Energy-beam-driven rapid fabrication system

    DOEpatents

    Keicher, David M.; Atwood, Clinton L.; Greene, Donald L.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Harwell, Lane D.; Jeantette, Francisco P.; Romero, Joseph A.; Schanwald, Lee P.; Schmale, David T.

    2002-01-01

    An energy beam driven rapid fabrication system, in which an energy beam strikes a growth surface to form a molten puddle thereon. Feed powder is then injected into the molten puddle from a converging flow of feed powder. A portion of the feed powder becomes incorporated into the molten puddle, forcing some of the puddle contents to freeze on the growth surface, thereby adding an additional layer of material. By scanning the energy beam and the converging flow of feed powder across the growth surface, complex three-dimensional shapes can be formed, ready or nearly ready for use. Nearly any class of material can be fabricated using this system.

  9. Validation of the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code for calculating source-driven noise parameters of subcritical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes calculations performed to validate the modified version of the MCNP code, the MCNP-DSP, used for: the neutron and photon spectra of the spontaneous fission of californium 252; the representation of the detection processes for scattering detectors; the timing of the detection process; and the calculation of the frequency analysis parameters for the MCNP-DSP code.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-05-12

    This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

  11. Odd-frequency superconductivity in driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triola, Christopher; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    We show that Berezinskii's classification of the symmetries of Cooper pair amplitudes holds for driven systems even in the absence of translation invariance. We then consider a model Hamiltonian for a superconductor coupled to an external driving potential and, treating the drive as a perturbation, we investigate the corrections to the anomalous Green's function, density of states, and spectral function. We find that in the presence of an external drive the anomalous Green's function develops terms that are odd in frequency and that the same mechanism responsible for these odd-frequency terms generates additional features in the density of states and spectral function.

  12. Model driven laboratory information management systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Gennari, John H; Brinkley, James F

    2006-01-01

    Scientists in small research labs need more robust tools than spreadsheets to manage their data. However, no suitable laboratory information management systems (LIMS) are readily available; they are either too costly or too complex. We have therefore developed Seedpod, a model driven LIMS that allows users to create an integrated model of a LIMS without programming. Seedpod then automati-cally produces a relational database from the model, and dynamically generates a web-based graphical user interface. Our goal is to make LIMS easier to use by decreasing development time and cost, thereby allowing researchers to focus on producing and collecting data.

  13. Experimental results from the VENUS-F critical reference state for the GUINEVERE accelerator driven system project

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, W.; Baeten, P.; Kochetkov, A.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J.; Ban, G.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marie, N.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Thyebault, H.E.; Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Mellier, F.

    2012-12-15

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutron pulses at the lead Venus Reactor) project was launched in 2006 within the framework of FP6 EUROTRANS in order to validate online reactivity monitoring and subcriticality level determination in accelerator driven systems (ADS). Therefore, the VENUS reactor at SCK.CEN in Mol, Belgium, was modified towards a fast core (VENUS-F) and coupled to the GENEPI-3C accelerator built by CNRS. The accelerator can operate in both continuous and pulsed mode. The VENUS-F core is loaded with enriched Uranium and reflected with solid lead. A well-chosen critical reference state is indispensable for the validation of the online subcriticality monitoring methodology. Moreover, a benchmarking tool is required for nuclear data research and code validation. In this paper, the design and the importance of the critical reference state for the GUINEVERE project are motivated. The results of the first experimental phase on the critical core are presented. The control rods worth is determined by the positive period method and the application of the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method allows the determination of the worth of the safety rods. The results are implemented in the VENUS-F core certificate for full exploitation of the critical core. (authors)

  14. Experimental results from the VENUS-F critical reference state for the GUINEVERE accelerator driven system project

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, W.; Baeten, P.; Ban, G.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Kochetkov, A.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Marie, N.; Mellier, F.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; Thyebault, H. E.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-07-01

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutron pulses at the lead Venus Reactor) project was launched in 2006 within the framework of FP6 EUROTRANS in order to validate on-line reactivity monitoring and subcriticality level determination in Accelerator Driven Systems. Therefore the VENUS reactor at SCK.CEN in Mol (Belgium) was modified towards a fast core (VENUS-F) and coupled to the GENEPI-3C accelerator built by CNRS The accelerator can operate in both continuous and pulsed mode. The VENUS-F core is loaded with enriched Uranium and reflected with solid lead. A well-chosen critical reference state is indispensable for the validation of the on-line subcriticality monitoring methodology. Moreover a benchmarking tool is required for nuclear data research and code validation. In this paper the design and the importance of the critical reference state for the GUINEVERE project are motivated. The results of the first experimental phase on the critical core are presented. The control rods worth is determined by the rod drop technique and the application of the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method allows the determination of the worth of the safety rods. The results are implemented in the VENUS-F core certificate for full exploitation of the critical core. (authors)

  15. Thermalization of field driven quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Fotso, H.; Mikelsons, K.; Freericks, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in how quantum systems thermalize after a sudden change, because unitary evolution should preclude thermalization. The eigenstate thermalization hypothesis resolves this because all observables for quantum states in a small energy window have essentially the same value; it is violated for integrable systems due to the infinite number of conserved quantities. Here, we show that when a system is driven by a DC electric field there are five generic behaviors: (i) monotonic or (ii) oscillatory approach to an infinite-temperature steady state; (iii) monotonic or (iv) oscillatory approach to a nonthermal steady state; or (v) evolution to an oscillatory state. Examining the Hubbard model (which thermalizes under a quench) and the Falicov-Kimball model (which does not), we find both exhibit scenarios (i–iv), while only Hubbard shows scenario (v). This shows richer behavior than in interaction quenches and integrability in the absence of a field plays no role. PMID:24736404

  16. Variational functions in driven open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Matthias; Stenholm, Stig

    2003-03-01

    We consider the Lindblad-type master equation of an open system. We address the question how to construct a functional of the quantum state which displays a monotonic behavior in time. This thus defines uniquely the direction of time in the system. As the generator of time evolution is not a Hermitian operator, the theory requires the considerations of right and left eigenstates. In this paper we assume them to form two complete bases, which allows us to construct the desired quantity. This can be interpreted as a generalized entropy functional. We show how the construction is carried out in the general case, and we illustrate the theory by solving the case of an externally driven and damped two-level system. The treatment is related to earlier work in the field, and its possible relation to time inversion is discussed.

  17. Thermalization of field driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotso, H.; Mikelsons, K.; Freericks, J. K.

    2014-04-01

    There is much interest in how quantum systems thermalize after a sudden change, because unitary evolution should preclude thermalization. The eigenstate thermalization hypothesis resolves this because all observables for quantum states in a small energy window have essentially the same value; it is violated for integrable systems due to the infinite number of conserved quantities. Here, we show that when a system is driven by a DC electric field there are five generic behaviors: (i) monotonic or (ii) oscillatory approach to an infinite-temperature steady state; (iii) monotonic or (iv) oscillatory approach to a nonthermal steady state; or (v) evolution to an oscillatory state. Examining the Hubbard model (which thermalizes under a quench) and the Falicov-Kimball model (which does not), we find both exhibit scenarios (i-iv), while only Hubbard shows scenario (v). This shows richer behavior than in interaction quenches and integrability in the absence of a field plays no role.

  18. Upper Subcritical Calculations Based on Correlated Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Rearden, Bradley T; Mueller, Don; Marshall, William BJ J; Scaglione, John M; Dunn, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The American National Standards Institute and American Nuclear Society standard for Validation of Neutron Transport Methods for Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations defines the upper subcritical limit (USL) as “a limit on the calculated k-effective value established to ensure that conditions calculated to be subcritical will actually be subcritical.” Often, USL calculations are based on statistical techniques that infer information about a nuclear system of interest from a set of known/well-characterized similar systems. The work in this paper is part of an active area of research to investigate the way traditional trending analysis is used in the nuclear industry, and in particular, the research is assessing the impact of the underlying assumption that the experimental data being analyzed for USL calculations are statistically independent. In contrast, the multiple experiments typically used for USL calculations can be correlated because they are often performed at the same facilities using the same materials and measurement techniques. This paper addresses this issue by providing a set of statistical inference methods to calculate the bias and bias uncertainty based on the underlying assumption that the experimental data are correlated. Methods to quantify these correlations are the subject of a companion paper and will not be discussed here. The newly proposed USL methodology is based on the assumption that the integral experiments selected for use in the establishment of the USL are sufficiently applicable and that experimental correlations are known. Under the assumption of uncorrelated data, the new methods collapse directly to familiar USL equations currently used. We will demonstrate our proposed methods on real data and compare them to calculations of currently used methods such as USLSTATS and NUREG/CR-6698. Lastly, we will also demonstrate the effect experiment correlations can have on USL calculations.

  19. Mission Success Driven Space System Sparing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezevic, J.

    1995-01-01

    Among the maintenance resources, the spare parts are the most difficult to predict. Items in the space systems are very different from the point of view of reliability, cost, weight, volume, etc. The different combinations of spares make different contribution to the: mission success, spare investment, volume occupied and weight. Hence, the selection of spares for a mission planned must take into account all of these features. This paper presents the generic mission success driven sparing model developed, for the complex space systems. The mathematical analysis used in the model enables the user to select the most suitable selection of the spare package for the mission planned. The illustrative examples presented clearly demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of the model introduced.

  20. Periodically driven three-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmoe, M. B.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of a three-level system (ThLS) sinusoidally driven in both longitudinal and transverse directions and in the presence of a uniaxial anisotropy D entering the generic Hamiltonian through the zero-energy splitting term D (Sz)2 where Sz is the projection of the spin vector along the quantization direction. As a consequence of the addition of this term, the order of the symmetry group of the Hamiltonian is increased by a unit and we observe a sequence of cascaded SU(3) Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana (LZSM) interferometers. The study is carried out by analytically and numerically calculating the probabilities of nonadiabatic and adiabatic evolutions. For nonadiabatic evolutions, two main approximations based on the weak and strong driving limits are discussed by comparing the characteristic frequency of the longitudinal drive with the amplitudes of driven fields. For each of the cases discussed, our analytical results quite well reproduce the gross temporal profile of the exact numerical probabilities. This allows us to check the range of validity of analytical results and confirm our assumptions. For adiabatic evolutions, a general theory is constructed allowing for the description of adiabatic passages in arbitrary ThLSs in which direct transitions between states with extremal spin projections are forbidden. A compact formula for adiabatic evolutions is derived and numerically tested for some illustrative cases. Interference patterns demonstrating multiple LZSM transitions are reported. Applications of our results to the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond are discussed.

  1. Driven topological systems in the classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Callum W.; Öhberg, Patrik; Valiente, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Periodically driven quantum systems can exhibit topologically nontrivial behavior, even when their quasienergy bands have zero Chern numbers. Much work has been conducted on noninteracting quantum-mechanical models where this kind of behavior is present. However, the inclusion of interactions in out-of-equilibrium quantum systems can prove to be quite challenging. On the other hand, the classical counterpart of hard-core interactions can be simulated efficiently via constrained random walks. The noninteracting model, proposed by Rudner et al. [Phys. Rev. X 3, 031005 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevX.3.031005], has a special point for which the system is equivalent to a classical random walk. We consider the classical counterpart of this model, which is exact at a special point even when hard-core interactions are present, and show how these quantitatively affect the edge currents in a strip geometry. We find that the interacting classical system is well described by a mean-field theory. Using this we simulate the dynamics of the classical system, which show that the interactions play the role of Markovian, or time-dependent disorder. By comparing the evolution of classical and quantum edge currents in small lattices, we find regimes where the classical limit considered gives good insight into the quantum problem.

  2. An ontology-driven, diagnostic modeling system.

    PubMed

    Haug, Peter J; Ferraro, Jeffrey P; Holmen, John; Wu, Xinzi; Mynam, Kumar; Ebert, Matthew; Dean, Nathan; Jones, Jason

    2013-06-01

    To present a system that uses knowledge stored in a medical ontology to automate the development of diagnostic decision support systems. To illustrate its function through an example focused on the development of a tool for diagnosing pneumonia. We developed a system that automates the creation of diagnostic decision-support applications. It relies on a medical ontology to direct the acquisition of clinic data from a clinical data warehouse and uses an automated analytic system to apply a sequence of machine learning algorithms that create applications for diagnostic screening. We refer to this system as the ontology-driven diagnostic modeling system (ODMS). We tested this system using samples of patient data collected in Salt Lake City emergency rooms and stored in Intermountain Healthcare's enterprise data warehouse. The system was used in the preliminary development steps of a tool to identify patients with pneumonia in the emergency department. This tool was compared with a manually created diagnostic tool derived from a curated dataset. The manually created tool is currently in clinical use. The automatically created tool had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.920 (95% CI 0.916 to 0.924), compared with 0.944 (95% CI 0.942 to 0.947) for the manually created tool. Initial testing of the ODMS demonstrates promising accuracy for the highly automated results and illustrates the route to model improvement. The use of medical knowledge, embedded in ontologies, to direct the initial development of diagnostic computing systems appears feasible.

  3. Microscale Waste Heat Driven Cooling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-02

    Concept Slow, expensive, one‐at‐a‐time process Nickel  Brazing  Lower Cost Method Can  braze  50 – 200 in single furnace run (vs 1 – 2 using Diffusion  Bonding...Potential Use of Continuous Belt‐Type Furnace Nickel  Brazing  Technical Issues  Micro channel size reduction and/or blockage Amount of Alloy...Future Microscale Waste Heat Driven Cooling System Microscale Heat Exchanger Manufacturing Development Brazing at 100% Success Minimal Full Channel

  4. Investigation of Lead Target Nuclei Used on Accelerator-Driven Systems for Tritium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Aydin, A.

    2012-02-01

    High-current proton accelerators are being researched at Los Alamos National Laboratory and other laboratories for accelerator production of tritium, transmuting long-lived radioactive waste into shorter-lived products, converting excess plutonium, and producing energy. These technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. Through ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions, neutrons are produced and are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial fusion power plant. Rubbia succeeded in a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier. This plant is to be known the accelerator-driven system (ADS). The ADS can be used for production of neutrons in spallation neutron source and they can act as an intense neutron source in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, capable of incinerating nuclear waste and of producing energy. Thorium and Uranium are nuclear fuels and Lead, Bismuth, Tungsten are the target nuclei in these reactor systems. The spallation targets can be Pb, Bi, W, etc. isotopes and these target material can be liquid or solid. Naturally Lead includes the 204Pb (%1.42), 206Pb (%24.1), 207Pb (%22.1) and 208Pb (%52.3) isotopes. The design of ADS systems and also a fusion-fission hybrid reactor systems require the knowledge of a wide range of better data. In this study, by using Hartree-Fock method with an effective nucleon-nucleon Skyrme interactions rms nuclear charge radii, rms nuclear mass radii, rms nuclear proton, neutron radii and neutron skin thickness were calculated for the 204, 206, 208Pb isotopes . The calculated results have been compared with those of the compiled experimental and theoretical values of other studies.

  5. Nucleation in periodically driven electrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Dykman, M. I.; Rabitz, H.; Vugmeister, B. E.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bocarsly, A. B.

    1999-06-01

    We calculate both the exponent and the prefactor in the nucleation rate of a periodically driven system. Nucleation dynamics is described by the Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution of the nuclei over their size. This distribution is found using the concept of the most probable (optimal) nucleation path. The results apply in a broad range of driving force amplitudes, from weak to moderately strong forces where the nucleation rate is changed exponentially strongly, and also in the broad range of the driving frequencies, from low-frequency driving, where the system follows the force adiabatically, to high-frequency nonadiabatic driving. For strong driving forces, the time dependence of the nucleation rate changes from strongly nonsinusoidal to a weak with the increasing frequency of driving. The response of the nucleation rate to the driving force is described in terms of logarithmic susceptibility (LS), which can be obtained from the optimal nucleation path in the absence of the driving. LS is a smooth function of frequency, and therefore even a driving force with comparatively high frequency can change the modulation rate exponentially strongly. LS and the Faraday current are calculated for simple models of electrochemical systems, where the ac driving is produced by modulation of the electrode potential. We also suggest how to find LS from measurements of the average nucleation rate.

  6. Conceptual Design of Multicell Nuclear Power Installation Driven by Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov Chuvilo, Sv, IV; Danilov, Mm; Katarzhnov, Yd; Kushin, Vv; Nedopekin Rogov, Vg, Vi

    1997-05-01

    The problem of nuclear safety and reliability of power installation based on accelerator-driver. The maximum reliability of electronuclear power installation may be reached by designing it as sum of several subcritical multiplying assemblies each driven by individual accelerator. Every cell is insulated from neutron fluxes of other cells while connects with common output collector of the heat transport medium which connected with turbine assembly and electric generator via heat-exchange steam generator. The variants of one-cell unit driven with 800 MeV proton accelerator and 6-cell system driven with 30 MeV deuteron linacs are considered. It is shown, that in multicell system for neutron multiplying factor increase it is profitable to use blankets in the form of sectionalized subcritical multiplying assemblies with cells separated by neutron gates.

  7. Retention behavior of phenols, anilines, and alkylbenzenes in liquid chromatographic separations using subcritical water as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Jones, A D; Eaton, C D

    1999-09-01

    The unique characteristic of subcritical water is its widely tunable physical properties. For example, the polarity (measured by dielectric constant) of water is significantly decreased by raising water temperature. At temperatures of 200-250 °C (under moderate pressure to keep water in the liquid state), the polarity of pure water is similar to that of pure methanol or acetonitrile at ambient conditions. Therefore, pure subcritical water may be able to serve as the mobile phase for reversed-phase separations. To investigate the retention behavior in subcritical water separation, the retention factors of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene), phenol, aniline, and their derivatives have been determined using subcritical water, methanol/water, and acetonitrile/water systems. Subcritical water separations were also performed using alumina, silica-bonded C18, and poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) columns to study the influence of the stationary phase on analyte retention under subcritical water conditions.

  8. Benchmarking criticality safety calculations with subcritical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    Calculation of the neutron multiplication factor at delayed criticality may be necessary for benchmarking calculations but it may not be sufficient. The use of subcritical experiments to benchmark criticality safety calculations could result in substantial savings in fuel material costs for experiments. In some cases subcritical configurations could be used to benchmark calculations where sufficient fuel to achieve delayed criticality is not available. By performing a variety of measurements with subcritical configurations, much detailed information can be obtained which can be compared directly with calculations. This paper discusses several measurements that can be performed with subcritical assemblies and presents examples that include comparisons between calculation and experiment where possible. Where not, examples from critical experiments have been used but the measurement methods could also be used for subcritical experiments.

  9. System driven technology selection for future European launch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocco, P.; Ramusat, G.; Sirbi, A.; Bouilly, Th.; Lavelle, F.; Cardone, T.; Fischer, H.; Appel, S.

    2015-02-01

    In the framework of the next generation launcher activity at ESA, a top-down approach and a bottom-up approach have been performed for the identification of promising technologies and alternative conception of future European launch vehicles. The top-down approach consists in looking for system-driven design solutions and the bottom-up approach features design solutions leading to substantial advantages for the system. The main investigations have been focused on the future launch vehicle technologies. Preliminary specifications have been used in order to permit sub-system design to find the major benefit for the overall launch system. The development cost, non-recurring and recurring cost, industrialization and operational aspects have been considered as competitiveness factors for the identification and down-selection of the most interesting technologies. The recurring cost per unit payload mass has been evaluated. The TRL/IRL has been assessed and a preliminary development plan has been traced for the most promising technologies. The potentially applicable launch systems are Ariane and VEGA evolution. The main FLPP technologies aim at reducing overall structural mass, increasing structural margins for robustness, metallic and composite containment of cryogenic hydrogen and oxygen propellants, propellant management subsystems, elements significantly reducing fabrication and operational costs, avionics, pyrotechnics, etc. to derive performing upper and booster stages. Application of the system driven approach allows creating performing technology demonstrators in terms of need, demonstration objective, size and cost. This paper outlines the process of technology down selection using a system driven approach, the accomplishments already achieved in the various technology fields up to now, as well as the potential associated benefit in terms of competitiveness factors.

  10. Subcritical growth of natural hydraulic fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garagash, D.

    2014-12-01

    Joints are the most common example of brittle tensile failure in the crust. Their genesis at depth is linked to the natural hydraulic fracturing, which requires pore fluid pressure in excess of the minimum in situ stress [Pollard and Aidyn, JSG1988]. Depending on the geological setting, high pore pressure can result form burial compaction of interbedded strata, diagenesis, or tectonics. Common to these loading scenarios is slow build-up of pore pressure over a geological timescale, until conditions for initiation of crack growth are met on favorably oriented/sized flaws. The flaws can vary in size from grain-size cracks in igneous rocks to a fossil-size flaws in clastic rock, and once activated, are inferred to propagate mostly subcritically [Segall JGR 1984; Olson JGR 1993]. Despite many observational studies of natural hydraulic fractures, the modeling attempts appear to be few [Renshaw and Harvey JGR 1994]. Here, we use boundary integral formulation for the pore fluid inflow from the permeable rock into a propagating joint [Berchenko et al. IJRMMS 1997] coupled with the criteria for subcritical propagation assisted by the environmental effects of pore fluid at the crack tip to solve for the evolution of a penny-shape joint, which, in interbedded rock, may eventually evolve to short-blade geometry (propagation confined to a bed). Initial growth is exceedingly slow, paced by the stress corrosion reaction kinetics at the crack tip. During this stage the crack is fully-drained (i.e. the fluid pressure in the crack is equilibrated with the ambient pore pressure). This "slow" stage is followed by a rapid acceleration, driven by the increase of the mechanical stress intensity factor with the crack length, towards the terminal joint velocity. We provide an analytical expression for the latter as a function of the rock diffusivity, net pressure loading at the initiation (or flaw lengthscale), and parameters describing resistance to fracture growth. Due to a much slower

  11. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    In systems subjected to long-term loading, subcritical crack growth is the principal mechanism causing the time-dependent deformation and failure of rocks. Subcritical crack growth is environmentally-assisted crack growth, which can allow cracks to grow over a long period of time at stresses far smaller than their failure strength and at tectonic strain rates. The characteristics of subcritical crack growth can be described by a relationship between the stress intensity factor and the crack velocity. This study presents the results of studies conducted to validate the constant stress-rate test for determining subcritical crack growth parameters in Coconino sandstone, compared with the conventional testing method, the double torsion test. The results of the constant stress-rate test are in good agreement with the results of double torsion test. More importantly, the stress-rate tests can determine the parameter A with a much smaller standard deviation than the double torsion test. Thus the constant stress-rate test seems to be both a valid and preferred test method for determining the subcritical crack growth parameters in rocks. We investigated statistical aspects of the constant stress-rate test. The effects of the number of tests conducted on the subcritical crack growth parameters were examined and minimum specimen numbers were determined. The mean and standard deviation of the subcritical crack growth parameters were obtained by randomly selecting subsets from the original strength data. In addition, the distribution form of the subcritical crack growth parameters and the relation between the parameter n and A were determined. We extended the constant stress-rate test technique to modes II and III subcritical crack growth in rocks. The experimental results of the modes I, II and III tests show that the values of the subcritical crack growth parameters are similar to each other. The subcritical crack growth parameter n value for Coconino sandstone has the range

  12. Documentation Driven Development for Complex Real-Time Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    REPORT Documentation Driven Development for Complex Real-Time Systems 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This paper presents a novel approach...5000 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE b. ABSTRACT UU c. THIS PAGE UU 2. REPORT TYPE Old Reprint 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 5d...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - Documentation Driven Development for Complex Real-Time Systems Report Title ABSTRACT This paper presents a novel

  13. Proliferation Potential of Accelerator-Drive Systems: Feasibility Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Riendeau, C.D.; Moses, D.L.; Olson, A.P.

    1998-11-01

    Accelerator-driven systems for fissile materials production have been proposed and studied since the early 1950s. Recent advances in beam power levels for small accelerators have raised the possibility that such use could be feasible for a potential proliferator. The objective of this study is to review the state of technology development for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources and subcritical reactors. Energy and power requirements were calculated for a proton accelerator-driven neutron spallation source and subcritical reactors to produce a significant amount of fissile material--plutonium.

  14. ENHANCED ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN SUBCRITICAL WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2000-07-01

    This project involved designing and performing preliminary electrochemical experiments in subcritical water. An electrochemical cell with substantially better performance characteristics than presently available was designed, built, and tested successfully. The electrochemical conductivity of subcritical water increased substantially with temperature, e.g., conductivities increased by a factor of 120 when the temperature was increased from 25 to 250 C. Cyclic voltammograms obtained with platinum and nickel demonstrated that the voltage required to produce hydrogen and oxygen from water can be dropped by a factor of three in subcritical water compared to the voltages required at ambient temperatures. However, no enhancement in the degradation of 1,2-dichlorobenzene and the polychlorinated biphenyl 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl was observed with applied potential in subcritical water.

  15. Subcritical patterns and dissipative solitons due to intracavity photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gomila, Damia; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2007-10-15

    Manipulation of the bifurcation structure of nonlinear optical systems via intracavity photonic crystals is demonstrated. In particular, subcritical regions between spatially periodic states are stabilized by modulations of the material's refractive index. An family of dissipative solitons within this bistability range due to the intracavity photonic crystal is identified and characterized in both one and two transverse dimensions. Nontrivial snaking of the modulated-cavity soliton solutions is also presented.

  16. Droplet turbulence interactions under subcritical and supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coy, E. B.; Greenfield, S. C.; Ondas, M. S.; Song, Y.-H.; Spegar, T. D.; Santavicca, D. A.

    1993-11-01

    The goal of this research is to experimentally characterize the behavior of droplets in vaporizing liquid sprays under conditions typical of those encountered in high pressure combustion systems such as liquid fueled rocket engines. Of particular interest are measurements of droplet drag, droplet heating, droplet vaporization, droplet distortion, and secondary droplet breakup, under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. The paper presents a brief description of the specific accomplishments which have been made over the past year.

  17. Droplet turbulence interactions under subcritical and supercritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, E. B.; Greenfield, S. C.; Ondas, M. S.; Song, Y.-H.; Spegar, T. D.; Santavicca, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this research is to experimentally characterize the behavior of droplets in vaporizing liquid sprays under conditions typical of those encountered in high pressure combustion systems such as liquid fueled rocket engines. Of particular interest are measurements of droplet drag, droplet heating, droplet vaporization, droplet distortion, and secondary droplet breakup, under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. The paper presents a brief description of the specific accomplishments which have been made over the past year.

  18. Energy-driven pattern formation in planar dipole-dipole systems in the presence of weak noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent-Dobias, Jaron; Bernoff, Andrew J.

    2015-03-01

    We study pattern formation in planar fluid systems driven by intermolecular cohesion (which manifests as a line tension) and dipole-dipole repulsion, which are observed in physical systems including ferrofluids in Hele-Shaw cells and Langmuir layers. When the dipolar repulsion is sufficiently strong, domains undergo forked branching reminiscent of viscous fingering. A known difficulty with these models is that the energy associated with dipole-dipole interactions is singular at small distances. Following previous work, we demonstrate how to ameliorate this singularity and show that in the macroscopic limit only the scale of the microscopic details relative to the macroscopic extent of a system is relevant and develop an expression for the system energy that depends only on a generalized line tension Λ that in turn depends logarithmically on that scale. We conduct numerical studies that use energy minimization to find equilibrium states. Following the subcritical bifurcations from the circle, we find a few highly symmetric stable shapes, but nothing that resembles the observed diversity of experimental and dynamically simulated domains. The application of a weak random background to the energy landscape stabilizes a wide range of domain morphologies recovering the diversity observed experimentally. With this technique, we generate a large sample of qualitatively realistic shapes and use them to create an empirical model for extracting Λ with high accuracy using only a shape's perimeter and morphology.

  19. Data driven propulsion system weight prediction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerth, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the research was to develop a method to predict the weight of paper engines, i.e., engines that are in the early stages of development. The impetus for the project was the Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) project, where engineers need to evaluate alternative engine designs. Since the SSTO is a performance driven project the performance models for alternative designs were well understood. The next tradeoff is weight. Since it is known that engine weight varies with thrust levels, a model is required that would allow discrimination between engines that produce the same thrust. Above all, the model had to be rooted in data with assumptions that could be justified based on the data. The general approach was to collect data on as many existing engines as possible and build a statistical model of the engines weight as a function of various component performance parameters. This was considered a reasonable level to begin the project because the data would be readily available, and it would be at the level of most paper engines, prior to detailed component design.

  20. Data-driven optimization of dynamic reconfigurable systems of systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Conrad S.; Eddy, John P.

    2010-11-01

    This report documents the results of a Strategic Partnership (aka University Collaboration) LDRD program between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne. The project is titled 'Data-Driven Optimization of Dynamic Reconfigurable Systems of Systems' and was conducted during FY 2009 and FY 2010. The purpose of this study was to determine and implement ways to incorporate real-time data mining and information discovery into existing Systems of Systems (SoS) modeling capabilities. Current SoS modeling is typically conducted in an iterative manner in which replications are carried out in order to quantify variation in the simulation results. The expense of many replications for large simulations, especially when considering the need for optimization, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification, can be prohibitive. In addition, extracting useful information from the resulting large datasets is a challenging task. This work demonstrates methods of identifying trends and other forms of information in datasets that can be used on a wide range of applications such as quantifying the strength of various inputs on outputs, identifying the sources of variation in the simulation, and potentially steering an optimization process for improved efficiency.

  1. Application of the EA-MC Code Package to the Design of Accelerator-Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadi, Y.

    The Monte Carlo method (MC) is currently used to simulate the real time behaviour of a sub-critical system [1,2] like for instance the Energy Amplifier Demonstration Facility (EADF). The advantage of this method is that it can be made intrinsically free of unwanted approximations, provided that (i) the relevant cross sections are well known - a necessity of any method of computation - and (ii) the actual geometry is sufficiently well modeled. For instance a variety of processes with many different particles in the final state as well as detailed angular distributions can be taken correctly into account and there is no real limit to the complexity of the geometry and the number of separate components. This technique also ensures continuity between the simulation of the high energy, proton induced initial cascade, for which MC is the only formalism [3,4], and the subsequent sub-critical, fission dominated nuclear cascade. Therefore MC constitutes a superb tool to simulate realistically both the ordinary operation and a variety of transients in sub-critical or critical systems.

  2. Entropic contributions in Langevin equations for anisotropic driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de los Santos, Francisco; Garrido, Pedro L.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2001-07-01

    We report on analytical results for a series of anisotropic driven systems in the context of a recently proposed Langevin equation approach. In a recent paper (P.L. Garrido et al., Phys. Rev. E 61 (2000) R4683) we have pointed out that entropic contributions, over-looked in previous works, are crucial in order to obtain suitable Langevin descriptions of driven lattice gases. Here, we present a more detailed derivation and justification of the entropic term for the standard driven lattice gas, and also we extend the improved approach to other anisotropic driven systems, namely: (i) the randomly driven lattice gas, (ii) the two-temperature model and, (iii) the bi-layer lattice gas. It is shown that the two-temperature model and the lattice gas driven either by a random field or by an uniform infinite one are members of the same universality class. When the drive is uniform and finite the ‘standard’ theory is recovered. A Langevin equation describing the phenomenology of the bi-layer lattice gas is also presented.

  3. Subcritical Hopf bifurcations in low-density jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanhang; Gupta, Vikrant; Li, Larry K. B.

    2016-11-01

    Low-density jets are known to bifurcate from a steady state (a fixed point) to self-excited oscillations (a periodic limit cycle) when the Reynolds number increases above a critical value corresponding to the Hopf point, ReH . In the literature, this Hopf bifurcation is often considered to be supercritical because the self-excited oscillations appear only when Re > ReH . However, we find that under some conditions, there exists a hysteretic bistable region at ReSN < Re < ReH , where ReSN denotes a saddle-node bifurcation point. This shows that the Hopf bifurcation can also be subcritical, which has three main implications. First, low-density jets could be triggered into self-excited oscillations even when Re < ReH . Second, in the modeling of low-density jets, the subcritical or supercritical nature of the Hopf bifurcation should be taken into account because the former is caused by cubic nonlinearity whereas the latter is caused by square nonlinearity. Third, the response of the system to external forcing and noise depends on its proximity to the bistable region. Therefore, when investigating the forced response of low-density jets, it is important to consider whether the Hopf bifurcation is subcritical or supercritical.

  4. Subcritical transmutation of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Christopher M.

    2011-07-01

    A series of fuel cycle simulations were performed using CEA's reactor physics code ERANOS 2.0 to analyze the transmutation performance of the Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor (SABR). SABR is a fusion-fission hybrid reactor that combines the leading sodium cooled fast reactor technology with the leading tokamak plasma technology based on ITER physics. Two general fuel cycles were considered for the SABR system. The first fuel cycle is one in which all of the transuranics from light water reactors are burned in SABR. The second fuel cycle is a minor actinide burning fuel cycle in which all of the minor actinides and some of the plutonium produced in light water reactors are burned in SABR, with the excess plutonium being set aside for starting up fast reactors in the future. The minor actinide burning fuel cycle is being considered in European Scenario Studies. The fuel cycles were evaluated on the basis of TRU/MA transmutation rate, power profile, accumulated radiation damage, and decay heat to the repository. Each of the fuel cycles are compared against each other, and the minor actinide burning fuel cycles are compared against the EFIT transmutation system, and a low conversion ratio fast reactor.

  5. Feedback control of subcritical oscillatory instabilities.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2006-04-01

    Feedback control of a subcritical oscillatory instability is investigated in the framework of a globally-controlled complex Ginzburg-Landau equation that describes the nonlinear dynamics near the instability threshold. The control is based on a feedback loop between the system linear growth rate and the maximum of the amplitude of the emerging pattern. It is shown that such control can suppress the blow up and result in the formation of spatially localized pulses similar to oscillons. In the one-dimensional case, depending on the values of the linear and nonlinear dispersion coefficients, several types of the pulse dynamics are possible in which the computational domain contains: (i) a single stationary pulse; (ii) several coexisting stationary pulses; (iii) competing pulses that appear one after another at random locations so that at each moment of time there is only one pulse in the domain; (iv) spatiotemporally chaotic system of short pulses; (v) spatially-synchronized pulses. Similar dynamic behavior is found also in the two-dimensional case. The effect of the feedback delay is also studied. It is shown that the increase of the delay leads to an oscillatory instability of the pulses and the formation of pulses with oscillating amplitude.

  6. Effects of Pb and Bi cross sections on ATW subcriticality predictions.

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, H. S.; Yang, W. S.

    1999-06-25

    The accelerator-driven transmutation of waste (ATW) system has been proposed for transmuting the long-lived radioactive nuclei of high-level waste to stable or short-lived species. In recent ATW design concepts, lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), consisting of 44.5% Pb and 55.5% Bi by weight is used as the spallation target, system coolant, and reflector. Because of the excellent neutron reflection properties of LBE, the subcriticality level of ATW is quite sensitive to the cross sections of lead and bismuth. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of these cross sections on subcriticality and other core characteristics of ATW and to compare the results obtained using cross sections in different evaluated nuclear data files. The effects of lead and bismuth cross sections on the core characteristics of ATW were studied using 33 group cross section sets derived from the ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-V, JENDL-3.2, and BROND-2.2 nuclear data. A 2000 MW(thermal) ATW configuration similar to that described in Reference 1 was used in this study. In this configuration, the spallation target region is 55 cm high and 25 cm in radius, and is surrounded by a 15-cm thick LBE buffer. The adjacent fueled region is {approximately}65 cm thick and 200 cm high. The volume fractions of fuel, coolant, and structure are 25.7%, 59.3%, and 15%, respectively. The metal alloy fuel is composed of roughly 70% zirconium, 25% transuranics (TRU), and 5% Tc-99 by weight. A thick LBE reflector surrounds the whole core; its axial thickness is 250 cm, and its radial thickness is 295.2 cm.

  7. The GUINEVERE experiment: First PNS measurements in a lead moderated sub-critical fast core

    SciTech Connect

    Thyebault, H. E.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Lehaut, G.; Marie, N.; Ban, G.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) experimental program is dedicated to the study of Accelerator Driven System reactivity monitoring. It was partly carried out within the EUROTRANS integrated project (EURATOM FP6). GUINEVERE consists in coupling the fast core of the VENUS-F reactor (SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)), composed of enriched uranium and solid lead, with a T(d,n) neutron source provided by the GENEPI-3C deuteron accelerator. This neutron source can be operated in several modes: pulsed mode, continuous mode and also continuous mode with short beam interruptions (the so called 'beam trips'). In the past, the key questions of the reactivity control and monitoring in a subcritical system were studied in the MUSE experiments (1998-2004). These experiments highlighted the difficulty to determine precisely the reactivity with a single technique. This led to investigate a new strategy which is based on the combination of the relative reactivity monitoring via the core power to beam current relationship with absolute reactivity cross-checks during programmed beam interruptions. Consequently, to determine the reactivity, several dynamical techniques of reactivity determination have to be compared. In addition, their accuracy for absolute reactivity determination must be evaluated using a reference reactivity determination technique (from a critical state: rod drop and MSM measurements). The first sub-critical configuration which was studied was around k{sub eff} = 0.96 (SCI). Pulsed Neutron Source experiments (PNS) were carried out. The neutron population decrease was measured using fission chambers in different locations inside the core and the reflector. Neutron population time decrease was analyzed using fitting techniques and the Area Method Results obtained for the SCI reactivity will be shown, discussed and compared to the reference value given by the MSM method. (authors)

  8. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2003-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  9. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2002-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  10. Cygnus Performance in Subcritical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, S. Lutz, C. Mitton, et al.

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources with the following specifications: 4-rad dose at 1 m, 1-mm spot size, 50-ns pulse length, 2.25-MeV endpoint energy. The facility is located in an underground tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site. Here SubCritical Experiments (SCEs) are performed to study the dynamic properties of plutonium. The Cygnus sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for these tests. Since SCEs are single-shot, high-value events - reliability and reproducibility are key issues. Enhanced reliability involves minimization of failure modes through design, inspection, and testing. Many unique hardware and operational features were incorporated into Cygnus to insure reliability. Enhanced reproducibility involves normalization of shot-to-shot output also through design, inspection, and testing. The first SCE to utilize Cygnus, Armando, was executed on May 25, 2004. A year later, April - May 2005, calibrations using a plutonium step wedge were performed. The results from this series were used for more precise interpretation of the Armando data. In the period February - May 2007 Cygnus was fielded on Thermos, which is a series of small-sample plutonium shots using a one-dimensional geometry. Pulsed power research generally dictates frequent change in hardware configuration. Conversely, SCE applications have typically required constant machine settings. Therefore, while operating during the past four years we have accumulated a large database for evaluation of machine performance under highly consistent operating conditions. Through analysis of this database Cygnus reliability and reproducibility on Armando, Step Wedge, and Thermos is presented.

  11. Energy and particle currents in a driven integrable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, D.; Prelovšek, P.; Mierzejewski, M.

    2014-11-01

    We study the ratio of the energy and particle currents (jE/jN ) in an integrable one-dimensional system of interacting fermions. Both currents are driven by a finite (nonzero) dc electric field. In doped insulators, where the local conserved quantities saturate the so-called Mazur bound on the charge stiffness, jE/jN agrees with the linear-response theory, even though such agreement may be violated for each current alone. However, in the metallic regime with a nonsaturated Mazur bound, the ratio jE/jN in a driven system is shown to be much larger than predicted by the linear-response theory.

  12. Dynamic Data Driven Applications Systems (DDDAS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-03

    response) – Earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, wildfires, floods , landslides, tsunamis, … • Critical Infrastructure systems – Electric-powergrid...Computational Workflow Diagram SHM Sensitivity analysis, optimization, control codes: Ensemble runs (launched in parallel) using stochastic collocation...Unlimited Distribution DDDAS Approach To Volcanic Ash Transport & Dispersal Forecast A. Patra, M. Bursik, E. B. Pitman, P. Singla, T. Singh, M. Jones

  13. Portable database driven control system for SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Howry, S.; Gromme, T.; King, A.; Sullenberger, M.

    1985-04-01

    The new computer control system software for SPEAR is presented as a transfer from the PEP system. Features of the target ring (SPEAR) such as symmetries, magnet groupings, etc., are all contained in a design file which is read by both people and computer. People use it as documentation; a program reads it to generate the database structure, which becomes the center of communication for all the software. Geometric information, such as element positions and lengths, and CAMAC I/O routing information is entered into the database as it is developed. Since application processes refer only to the database and since they do so only in generic terms, almost all of this software (representing more then fifteen man years) is transferred with few changes. Operator console menus (touchpanels) are also transferred with only superficial changes for the same reasons. The system is modular: the CAMAC I/O software is all in one process; the menu control software is a process; the ring optics model and the orbit model are separate processes, each of which runs concurrently with about 15 others in the multiprogramming environment of the VAX/VMS operating system. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Database Driven Web Systems for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Steve; Fenton, Ray

    1999-01-01

    Provides technical information on publishing to the Web. Demonstrates some new applications in database publishing. Discusses the difference between static and database-drive Web pages. Reviews failures and successes of a Web database system. Addresses the question of how to build a database-drive Web site, discussing connectivity software, Web…

  15. Benchmark Analysis of Subcritical Noise Measurements on a Nickel-Reflected Plutonium Metal Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Jesson Hutchinson

    2009-09-01

    Subcritical experiments using californium source-driven noise analysis (CSDNA) and Feynman variance-to-mean methods were performed with an alpha-phase plutonium sphere reflected by nickel shells, up to a maximum thickness of 7.62 cm. Both methods provide means of determining the subcritical multiplication of a system containing nuclear material. A benchmark analysis of the experiments was performed for inclusion in the 2010 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Benchmark models have been developed that represent these subcritical experiments. An analysis of the computed eigenvalues and the uncertainty in the experiment and methods was performed. The eigenvalues computed using the CSDNA method were very close to those calculated using MCNP5; however, computed eigenvalues are used in the analysis of the CSDNA method. Independent calculations using KENO-VI provided similar eigenvalues to those determined using the CSDNA method and MCNP5. A slight trend with increasing nickel-reflector thickness was seen when comparing MCNP5 and KENO-VI results. For the 1.27-cm-thick configuration the MCNP eigenvalue was approximately 300 pcm greater. The calculated KENO eigenvalue was about 300 pcm greater for the 7.62-cm-thick configuration. The calculated results were approximately the same for a 5-cm-thick shell. The eigenvalues determined using the Feynman method are up to approximately 2.5% lower than those determined using either the CSDNA method or the Monte Carlo codes. The uncertainty in the results from either method was not large enough to account for the bias between the two experimental methods. An ongoing investigation is being performed to assess what potential uncertainties and/or biases exist that have yet to be properly accounted for. The dominant uncertainty in the CSDNA analysis was the uncertainty in selecting a neutron cross-section library for performing the analysis of the data. The uncertainty in the

  16. HERCULES: A Pattern Driven Code Transformation System

    SciTech Connect

    Kartsaklis, Christos; Hernandez, Oscar R; Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Ilsche, Thomas; Joubert, Wayne; Graham, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    New parallel computers are emerging, but developing efficient scientific code for them remains difficult. A scientist must manage not only the science-domain complexity but also the performance-optimization complexity. HERCULES is a code transformation system designed to help the scientist to separate the two concerns, which improves code maintenance, and facilitates performance optimization. The system combines three technologies, code patterns, transformation scripts and compiler plugins, to provide the scientist with an environment to quickly implement code transformations that suit his needs. Unlike existing code optimization tools, HERCULES is unique in its focus on user-level accessibility. In this paper we discuss the design, implementation and an initial evaluation of HERCULES.

  17. Spontaneous rotation in a driven mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    We show that a mass free to circulate around a shaken pivot point exhibits resonance-like effects and large amplitude dynamics even though there is no natural frequency in the system, simply through driving under geometrical constraint. We find that synchronization between force and mass occurs over a wide range of forcing amplitudes and frequencies, even when the forcing axis is dynamically, and randomly, changed. Above a critical driving amplitude the mass will spontaneously rotate, with a fractal boundary dividing clockwise and anti-clockwise rotations. We show that this has significant implications for energy harvesting, with large output power over a wide frequency range. We examine also the effect of driving symmetry on the resultant dynamics, and show that if the shaking is circular the motion becomes constrained, whereas for anharmonic rectilinear shaking the dynamics may become chaotic, with the system mimicking that of the kicked rotor.

  18. Onsager Coefficients in Periodically Driven Systems.

    PubMed

    Proesmans, Karel; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2015-08-28

    We evaluate the Onsager matrix for a system under time-periodic driving by considering all its Fourier components. By application of the second law, we prove that all the fluxes converge to zero in the limit of zero dissipation. Reversible efficiency can never be reached at finite power. The implication for an Onsager matrix, describing reduced fluxes, is that its determinant has to vanish. In the particular case of only two fluxes, the corresponding Onsager matrix becomes symmetric.

  19. Application-driven design of auralization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begault, Durand R.

    2004-05-01

    Acoustical environmental simulation (auralization) involves rendering a binaural signal that articulates simultaneously the positional information of a sound source and the source's acoustic and vibratory interaction with its environmental context. This places significant challenges on both the modeling and rendering components of such a system. Overcoming real-time limitations of processors can be accomplished by implementing rendering limits based on auditory threshold data for both early reflections and late reverberant energy. However, final assessment of system quality is dependent on the specific task or goal of the simulation. The use of auralization in accomplishing a telerobotic task requires head tracking and low latency, while environmental cues such as obstacles with acoustic reflections can be simplified and exaggerated beyond veridical representation. Contrasting this is the task of assessing speech intelligibility of an emergency public address system, or the quality of a space for musical performance, requiring a more accurate level of simulation of acoustical materials and sound-source characteristics. Modeling accuracy is complicated by such factors as the level of variance in the absorptive and diffusive properties of materials in terms of their real-world application. Assessment of auralization quality must therefore involve a best estimate of significant factors for a particular application.

  20. Waste heat driven absorption refrigeration process and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1982-01-01

    Absorption cycle refrigeration processes and systems are provided which are driven by the sensible waste heat available from industrial processes and other sources. Systems are disclosed which provide a chilled water output which can be used for comfort conditioning or the like which utilize heat from sensible waste heat sources at temperatures of less than 170.degree. F. Countercurrent flow equipment is also provided to increase the efficiency of the systems and increase the utilization of available heat.

  1. Identifying Data-Driven Instructional Systems. Research to Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    The study summarized in this research to practice brief, "Creating data-driven instructional systems in school: The new instructional leadership," Halverson, R., Grigg, J., Pritchett, R., & Thomas, C. (2015), "Journal of School Leadership," 25. 447-481, investigated whether student outcome improvements were linked to the…

  2. Butterfly Floquet Spectrum in Driven SU(2) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiao; Gong Jiangbin

    2009-06-19

    The Floquet spectrum of a class of driven SU(2) systems is shown to display a butterfly pattern with multifractal properties. The level crossing between Floquet states of the same parity or different parities is studied. The results are relevant to studies of fractal statistics, quantum chaos, coherent destruction of tunneling, and the validity of mean-field descriptions of Bose-Einstein condensates.

  3. Experimental investigation of an explosive-driven pulse power system

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, T.J.; Hanson, D.L.; Cnare, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The results obtained in the test of a pulse-power system composed of an explosively driven compressed magnetic-field current generator driving an explosive opening switch and a 20 nH inductive load are presented. It is shown that microsecond risetime, multimegampere current pulses can be produced by this technique.

  4. Impact of intermediate and high energy nuclear data on the neutronic safety parameters of MYRRHA accelerator driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovskiy, Alexey; Çelik, Yurdunaz; Eynde, Gert Van den

    2017-09-01

    Perturbation of external neutron source can cause significant local power changes transformed into undesired safety-related events in an accelerator driven system. Therefore for the accurate design of MYRRHA sub-critical core it is important to evaluate the uncertainty of power responses caused by the uncertainties in nuclear reaction models describing the particle transport from primary proton energy down to the evaluated nuclear data table range. The calculations with a set of models resulted in quite low uncertainty on the local power caused by significant perturbation of primary neutron yield from proton interactions with lead and bismuth isotopes. The considered accidental event of prescribed proton beam shape loss causes drastic increase in local power but does not practically change the total core thermal power making this effect difficult to detect. In the same time the results demonstrate a correlation between perturbed local power responses in normal operation and misaligned beam conditions indicating that generation of covariance data for proton and neutron induced neutron multiplicities for lead and bismuth isotopes is needed to obtain reliable uncertainties for local power responses.

  5. Neutron cross-sections above 20 MeV for design and modeling of accelerator driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2007-02-01

    One of the outstanding new developments in the field of partitioning and transmutation (P{&}T) concerns accelerator-driven systems (ADS) which consist of a combination of a high-power, high-energy accelerator, a spallation target for neutron production and a sub-critical reactor core. The development of the commercial critical reactors of today motivated a large effort on nuclear data up to about 20 MeV, and presently several million data points can be found in various data libraries. At higher energies, data are scarce or even non-existent. With the development of nuclear techniques based on neutrons at higher energies, nowadays there is a need also for higher-energy nuclear data. To provide alternative to this lack of data, a wide program on neutron-induced data related to ADS for P{&}T is running at the 20-180 MeV neutron beam facility at `The Svedberg Laboratory' (TSL), Uppsala. The programme encompasses studies of elastic scattering, inelastic neutron production, i.e., (n, xn') reactions, light-ion production, fission and production of heavy residues. Recent results are presented and future program of development is outlined.

  6. Fluctuation loops in noise-driven linear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanta, Akhil; Neu, John C.; Teitsworth, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal structure of most probable fluctuation pathways to rarely occurring states is a central problem in the study of noise-driven, nonequilibrium dynamical systems. When the underlying system does not possess detailed balance, the optimal fluctuation pathway to a particular state and relaxation pathway from that state may combine to form a looplike structure in the system phase space called a fluctuation loop. Here, fluctuation loops are studied in a linear circuit model consisting of coupled R C elements, where each element is driven by its own independent noise source. Using a stochastic Hamiltonian approach, we determine the optimal fluctuation pathways, and analytically construct corresponding fluctuation loops. To quantitatively characterize fluctuation loops, we study the time-dependent area tensor that is swept out by individual stochastic trajectories in the system phase space. At long times, the area tensor scales linearly with time, with a coefficient that precisely vanishes when the system satisfies detailed balance.

  7. Precision medicine driven by cancer systems biology.

    PubMed

    Filipp, Fabian V

    2017-03-07

    Molecular insights from genome and systems biology are influencing how cancer is diagnosed and treated. We critically evaluate big data challenges in precision medicine. The melanoma research community has identified distinct subtypes involving chronic sun-induced damage and the mitogen-activated protein kinase driver pathway. In addition, despite low mutation burden, non-genomic mitogen-activated protein kinase melanoma drivers are found in membrane receptors, metabolism, or epigenetic signaling with the ability to bypass central mitogen-activated protein kinase molecules and activating a similar program of mitogenic effectors. Mutation hotspots, structural modeling, UV signature, and genomic as well as non-genomic mechanisms of disease initiation and progression are taken into consideration to identify resistance mutations and novel drug targets. A comprehensive precision medicine profile of a malignant melanoma patient illustrates future rational drug targeting strategies. Network analysis emphasizes an important role of epigenetic and metabolic master regulators in oncogenesis. Co-occurrence of driver mutations in signaling, metabolic, and epigenetic factors highlights how cumulative alterations of our genomes and epigenomes progressively lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation. Precision insights have the ability to identify independent molecular pathways suitable for drug targeting. Synergistic treatment combinations of orthogonal modalities including immunotherapy, mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, epigenetic inhibitors, and metabolic inhibitors have the potential to overcome immune evasion, side effects, and drug resistance.

  8. Anomalous broadening in driven dissipative Rydberg systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulier, Thomas; Goldschmidt, Elizabeth; Brown, Roger; Koller, Silvio; Young, Jeremy; Gorshkov, Alexey; Rolston, Steven; Porto, James

    2016-05-01

    Due to their strong, long-range, coherently-controllable interactions, Rydberg atoms have been proposed as a basis for quantum information processing and simulation of many-body physics. Using the coherent dynamics of such highly excited atomic states, however, requires addressing challenges posed by the dense spectrum of Rydberg levels, the detrimental effects of spontaneous emission, and strong interactions. We report the observation of interaction-induced broadening of the two-photon 5s-18s Rydberg transition in ultra-cold 87Rb atoms, trapped in a 3D optical lattice. The measured linewidth increases by nearly two orders of magnitude with increasing atomic density and excitation strength, with corresponding suppression of resonant scattering and enhancement of off-resonant scattering. We attribute the increased linewidth to resonant dipole-dipole interactions of 18s atoms with spontaneously created populations of nearby Rydberg p-states. This dephasing mechanism implies that the timescales available for the coherent addressing of such systems are dramatically shortened, hampering many recent proposals to use Rydberg-dressed atoms for quantum simulation. Now at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt.

  9. Many-body energy localization transition in periodically driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    D’Alessio, Luca; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-06-15

    According to the second law of thermodynamics the total entropy of a system is increased during almost any dynamical process. The positivity of the specific heat implies that the entropy increase is associated with heating. This is generally true both at the single particle level, like in the Fermi acceleration mechanism of charged particles reflected by magnetic mirrors, and for complex systems in everyday devices. Notable exceptions are known in noninteracting systems of particles moving in periodic potentials. Here the phenomenon of dynamical localization can prevent heating beyond certain threshold. The dynamical localization is known to occur both at classical (Fermi–Ulam model) and at quantum levels (kicked rotor). However, it was believed that driven ergodic systems will always heat without bound. Here, on the contrary, we report strong evidence of dynamical localization transition in both classical and quantum periodically driven ergodic systems in the thermodynamic limit. This phenomenon is reminiscent of many-body localization in energy space. -- Highlights: •A dynamical localization transition in periodically driven ergodic systems is found. •This phenomenon is reminiscent of many-body localization in energy space. •Our results are valid for classical and quantum systems in the thermodynamic limit. •At critical frequency, the short time expansion for the evolution operator breaks down. •The transition is associated to a divergent time scale.

  10. Group decision support system for customer-driven product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhihang; Chen, Hang; Chen, Kuen; Che, Ada

    2000-10-01

    This paper describes the work on the development of a group decision support system for customer driven product design. The customer driven is to develop products, which meet all customer requirements in whole life cycle of products. A process model of decision during product primary design is proposed to formulate the structured, semi-structured and unstructured decision problems. The framework for the decision support system is presented that integrated both advances in the group decision making and distributed artificial intelligent. The system consists of the product primary design tool kit and the collaborative platform with multi-agent structure. The collaborative platform of the system and the product primary design tool kit, including the VOC (Voice of Customer) tool, QFD (Quality Function Deployment) tool, the Conceptual design tool, Reliability analysis tool and the cost and profit forecasting tool, are indicated.

  11. A Network Architecture for Data-Driven Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    29 5.1 Single Node Data-Driven Computer System ... .......... .31 5.2 LSMSIU with Data Sensitivity Parameter Implementation . . 33 6.1 M68000 Based...stbnport the validity of the major architecture design. The system was decigned using readily available Motorola MC68000 microprocessor computei boards...documentation illustrating all features of the M68000 ECB is available in t7]. The hardware schematics for a single LS4STU ring network node is

  12. Automated control of hierarchical systems using value-driven methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugh, George E.; Burke, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    An introduction is given to the Value-driven methodology, which has been successfully applied to solve a variety of difficult decision, control, and optimization problems. Many real-world decision processes (e.g., those encountered in scheduling, allocation, and command and control) involve a hierarchy of complex planning considerations. For such problems it is virtually impossible to define a fixed set of rules that will operate satisfactorily over the full range of probable contingencies. Decision Science Applications' value-driven methodology offers a systematic way of automating the intuitive, common-sense approach used by human planners. The inherent responsiveness of value-driven systems to user-controlled priorities makes them particularly suitable for semi-automated applications in which the user must remain in command of the systems operation. Three examples of the practical application of the approach in the automation of hierarchical decision processes are discussed: the TAC Brawler air-to-air combat simulation is a four-level computerized hierarchy; the autonomous underwater vehicle mission planning system is a three-level control system; and the Space Station Freedom electrical power control and scheduling system is designed as a two-level hierarchy. The methodology is compared with rule-based systems and with other more widely-known optimization techniques.

  13. Adiabatic perturbation theory and geometry of periodically-driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Phillip; Bukov, Marin; D'Alessio, Luca; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Vajna, Szabolcs; Kolodrubetz, Michael

    2017-05-01

    We give a systematic review of the adiabatic theorem and the leading non-adiabatic corrections in periodically-driven (Floquet) systems. These corrections have a two-fold origin: (i) conventional ones originating from the gradually changing Floquet Hamiltonian and (ii) corrections originating from changing the micro-motion operator. These corrections conspire to give a Hall-type linear response for non-stroboscopic (time-averaged) observables allowing one to measure the Berry curvature and the Chern number related to the Floquet Hamiltonian, thus extending these concepts to periodically-driven many-body systems. The non-zero Floquet Chern number allows one to realize a Thouless energy pump, where one can adiabatically add energy to the system in discrete units of the driving frequency. We discuss the validity of Floquet Adiabatic Perturbation Theory (FAPT) using five different models covering linear and non-linear few and many-particle systems. We argue that in interacting systems, even in the stable high-frequency regimes, FAPT breaks down at ultra slow ramp rates due to avoided crossings of photon resonances, not captured by the inverse-frequency expansion, leading to a counter-intuitive stronger heating at slower ramp rates. Nevertheless, large windows in the ramp rate are shown to exist for which the physics of interacting driven systems is well captured by FAPT.

  14. A Model-Driven Development Method for Management Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Keinosuke; Mori, Naoki

    Traditionally, a Management Information System (MIS) has been developed without using formal methods. By the informal methods, the MIS is developed on its lifecycle without having any models. It causes many problems such as lack of the reliability of system design specifications. In order to overcome these problems, a model theory approach was proposed. The approach is based on an idea that a system can be modeled by automata and set theory. However, it is very difficult to generate automata of the system to be developed right from the start. On the other hand, there is a model-driven development method that can flexibly correspond to changes of business logics or implementing technologies. In the model-driven development, a system is modeled using a modeling language such as UML. This paper proposes a new development method for management information systems applying the model-driven development method to a component of the model theory approach. The experiment has shown that a reduced amount of efforts is more than 30% of all the efforts.

  15. Subcritical convection in an internally heated layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Linyan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2017-06-01

    Thermal convection in a horizontal layer with uniform internal heating and stress-free constant-temperature boundaries is analyzed numerically. The work is motivated by the questions arising in the development of liquid metal batteries, in which convection is induced by the Joule heating of electrolyte. It is demonstrated that three-dimensional convection cells exist at subcritical Rayleigh numbers.

  16. Traveling density wave models for earthquakes and driven threshold systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, John B.; Klein, W.; Gross, Susanna; Ferguson, C. D.

    1997-07-01

    Driven threshold systems are now used to model sandpiles, earthquakes, magnetic depinning transitions, integrate-and-fire neural networks, and driven foams. We analyze a physically motivated model which has many of the same properties as the hard threshold models, but in which all of the nonequilibrium physics is obtained from a Lyapunov functional. The ideas apply to mean-field systems, and lead to a number of predictions, including scaling exponents and metastable lifetimes for nucleating droplets. The former predictions are supported, for example, by data observed for earthquake fault systems. An interesting consequence of the model is that time appears as a scaling field, leading to temporal scaling laws similar to those observed in nature.

  17. Subcritical water extraction of flavoring and phenolic compounds from cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum).

    PubMed

    Khuwijitjaru, Pramote; Sayputikasikorn, Nucha; Samuhasaneetoo, Suched; Penroj, Parinda; Siriwongwilaichat, Prasong; Adachi, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) powder was treated with subcritical water at 150 and 200°C in a semi-continuous system at a constant flow rate (3 mL/min) and pressure (6 MPa). Major flavoring compounds, i.e., cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, cinnamyl alcohol and coumarin, were extracted at lower recoveries than the extraction using methanol, suggesting that degradation of these components might occur during the subcritical water treatment. Caffeic, ferulic, p-coumaric, protocatechuic and vanillic acids were identified from the subcritical water treatment. Extraction using subcritical water was more effective to obtain these acids than methanol (50% v/v) in both number of components and recovery, especially at 200°C. Subcritical water treatment at 200°C also resulted in a higher total phenolic content and DPPH radical scavenging activity than the methanol extraction. The DPPH radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content linearly correlated but the results suggested that the extraction at 200°C might result in other products that possessed a free radical scavenging activity other than the phenolic compounds.

  18. Dynamics of parabolic problems with memory. Subcritical and critical nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study the long-time behavior of the solutions of non-autonomous parabolic equations with memory in cases when the nonlinear term satisfies subcritical and critical growth conditions. In order to do this, we show that the family of processes associated to original systems with heat source f(x, t) being translation bounded in Lloc 2 ( R ; L 2 ( Ω ) ) is dissipative in higher energy space M α , 0 < α ≤ 1, and possesses a compact uniform attractor in M 0 .

  19. Dynamic steady state of periodically driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Basalaev, M. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Using the density matrix formalism, we prove the existence of the periodic steady state for an arbitrary periodically driven system described by linear dynamic equations. This state has the same period as the modulated external influence, and it is realized as an asymptotic solution (t →+∞ ) due to relaxation processes. The presented derivation simultaneously contains a simple and effective computational algorithm (without using either the Floquet or Fourier formalisms), which automatically guarantees a full account of all frequency components. As a particular example, for three-level Λ system we calculate the line shape and field-induced shift of the dark resonance formed by the field with a periodically modulated phase. Also we have analytically solved a basic theoretical problem of the direct frequency comb spectroscopy, when the two-level system is driven by the periodic sequence of rectangular pulses. In this case, the radical dependence of the spectroscopy line shape on pulse area is found. Moreover, the existence of quasiforbidden spectroscopic zones, in which the Ramsey fringes are significantly reduced, is predicted. Our results have a wide area of applications in laser physics, spectroscopy, atomic clocks, and magnetometry. Also they can be useful for any area of quantum physics where periodically driven systems are considered.

  20. Theory of many-body localization in periodically driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abanin, Dmitry A.; De Roeck, Wojciech; Huveneers, François

    2016-09-15

    We present a theory of periodically driven, many-body localized (MBL) systems. We argue that MBL persists under periodic driving at high enough driving frequency: The Floquet operator (evolution operator over one driving period) can be represented as an exponential of an effective time-independent Hamiltonian, which is a sum of quasi-local terms and is itself fully MBL. We derive this result by constructing a sequence of canonical transformations to remove the time-dependence from the original Hamiltonian. When the driving evolves smoothly in time, the theory can be sharpened by estimating the probability of adiabatic Landau–Zener transitions at many-body level crossings. In all cases, we argue that there is delocalization at sufficiently low frequency. We propose a phase diagram of driven MBL systems.

  1. Energy Exchange in Driven Open Quantum Systems at Strong Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrega, Matteo; Solinas, Paolo; Sassetti, Maura; Weiss, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    The time-dependent energy transfer in a driven quantum system strongly coupled to a heat bath is studied within an influence functional approach. Exact formal expressions for the statistics of energy dissipation into the different channels are derived. The general method is applied to the driven dissipative two-state system. It is shown that the energy flows obey a balance relation, and that, for strong coupling, the interaction may constitute the major dissipative channel. Results in analytic form are presented for the particular value K =1/2 of strong Ohmic dissipation. The energy flows show interesting behaviors including driving-induced coherences and quantum stochastic resonances. It is found that the general characteristics persists for K near 1/2 .

  2. Theory of many-body localization in periodically driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanin, Dmitry A.; De Roeck, Wojciech; Huveneers, François

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory of periodically driven, many-body localized (MBL) systems. We argue that MBL persists under periodic driving at high enough driving frequency: The Floquet operator (evolution operator over one driving period) can be represented as an exponential of an effective time-independent Hamiltonian, which is a sum of quasi-local terms and is itself fully MBL. We derive this result by constructing a sequence of canonical transformations to remove the time-dependence from the original Hamiltonian. When the driving evolves smoothly in time, the theory can be sharpened by estimating the probability of adiabatic Landau-Zener transitions at many-body level crossings. In all cases, we argue that there is delocalization at sufficiently low frequency. We propose a phase diagram of driven MBL systems.

  3. Flaming 2 π kinks in parametrically driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrios-Caro, E.; Clerc, M. G.; Leon, A. O.

    2016-11-01

    Macroscopic extended systems with dissipation and injection of energy can exhibit particlelike solutions. Dissipative kinks with an oscillatory cloak and a family of localized states that connect uniform symmetric states in a magnetic wire forced with a transversal oscillatory magnetic field and in a parametrically driven damped pendula chain are studied. The oscillatory cloak is composed of evanescent waves emitted at the kink position and generated by a resonant mechanism. These waves mediate the kink interaction and generate a family of localized states.

  4. Entanglement replication in driven dissipative many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Zippilli, S; Paternostro, M; Adesso, G; Illuminati, F

    2013-01-25

    We study the dissipative dynamics of two independent arrays of many-body systems, locally driven by a common entangled field. We show that in the steady state the entanglement of the driving field is reproduced in an arbitrarily large series of inter-array entangled pairs over all distances. Local nonclassical driving thus realizes a scale-free entanglement replication and long-distance entanglement distribution mechanism that has immediate bearing on the implementation of quantum communication networks.

  5. Electrically Driven General Systems for UAV’s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    systems are discussed in this paper. First the Barracuda M-05 UAV Demonstrator and second the 270 VDC More Electric Aircraft project launched by the...German Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement (BWB). 3.1 Barracuda M-05 The Barracuda M-05 is a company founded unmanned...test flight. Figure 4 showed a picture of the first flight. Figure 4: Barracuda M-05 First Flight With respect to electrically driven

  6. Flaming 2π kinks in parametrically driven systems.

    PubMed

    Berrios-Caro, E; Clerc, M G; Leon, A O

    2016-11-01

    Macroscopic extended systems with dissipation and injection of energy can exhibit particlelike solutions. Dissipative kinks with an oscillatory cloak and a family of localized states that connect uniform symmetric states in a magnetic wire forced with a transversal oscillatory magnetic field and in a parametrically driven damped pendula chain are studied. The oscillatory cloak is composed of evanescent waves emitted at the kink position and generated by a resonant mechanism. These waves mediate the kink interaction and generate a family of localized states.

  7. Keldysh field theory for driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Sieberer, L M; Buchhold, M; Diehl, S

    2016-09-01

    Recent experimental developments in diverse areas-ranging from cold atomic gases to light-driven semiconductors to microcavity arrays-move systems into the focus which are located on the interface of quantum optics, many-body physics and statistical mechanics. They share in common that coherent and driven-dissipative quantum dynamics occur on an equal footing, creating genuine non-equilibrium scenarios without immediate counterpart in equilibrium condensed matter physics. This concerns both their non-thermal stationary states and their many-body time evolution. It is a challenge to theory to identify novel instances of universal emergent macroscopic phenomena, which are tied unambiguously and in an observable way to the microscopic drive conditions. In this review, we discuss some recent results in this direction. Moreover, we provide a systematic introduction to the open system Keldysh functional integral approach, which is the proper technical tool to accomplish a merger of quantum optics and many-body physics, and leverages the power of modern quantum field theory to driven open quantum systems.

  8. Keldysh field theory for driven open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieberer, L. M.; Buchhold, M.; Diehl, S.

    2016-09-01

    Recent experimental developments in diverse areas—ranging from cold atomic gases to light-driven semiconductors to microcavity arrays—move systems into the focus which are located on the interface of quantum optics, many-body physics and statistical mechanics. They share in common that coherent and driven-dissipative quantum dynamics occur on an equal footing, creating genuine non-equilibrium scenarios without immediate counterpart in equilibrium condensed matter physics. This concerns both their non-thermal stationary states and their many-body time evolution. It is a challenge to theory to identify novel instances of universal emergent macroscopic phenomena, which are tied unambiguously and in an observable way to the microscopic drive conditions. In this review, we discuss some recent results in this direction. Moreover, we provide a systematic introduction to the open system Keldysh functional integral approach, which is the proper technical tool to accomplish a merger of quantum optics and many-body physics, and leverages the power of modern quantum field theory to driven open quantum systems.

  9. Data-Driven H∞ Control for Nonlinear Distributed Parameter Systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Huang, Tingwen; Wu, Huai-Ning; Yang, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    The data-driven H∞ control problem of nonlinear distributed parameter systems is considered in this paper. An off-policy learning method is developed to learn the H∞ control policy from real system data rather than the mathematical model. First, Karhunen-Loève decomposition is used to compute the empirical eigenfunctions, which are then employed to derive a reduced-order model (ROM) of slow subsystem based on the singular perturbation theory. The H∞ control problem is reformulated based on the ROM, which can be transformed to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Isaacs (HJI) equation, theoretically. To learn the solution of the HJI equation from real system data, a data-driven off-policy learning approach is proposed based on the simultaneous policy update algorithm and its convergence is proved. For implementation purpose, a neural network (NN)- based action-critic structure is developed, where a critic NN and two action NNs are employed to approximate the value function, control, and disturbance policies, respectively. Subsequently, a least-square NN weight-tuning rule is derived with the method of weighted residuals. Finally, the developed data-driven off-policy learning approach is applied to a nonlinear diffusion-reaction process, and the obtained results demonstrate its effectiveness.

  10. Hydrodynamic Limit of Condensing Two-Species Zero Range Processes with Sub-critical Initial Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirr, Nicolas; Stamatakis, Marios G.; Zimmer, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    Two-species condensing zero range processes (ZRPs) are interacting particle systems with two species of particles and zero range interaction exhibiting phase separation outside a domain of sub-critical densities. We prove the hydrodynamic limit of nearest neighbour mean zero two-species condensing ZRP with bounded local jump rate for sub-critical initial profiles, i.e., for initial profiles whose image is contained in the region of sub-critical densities. The proof is based on H.T. Yau's relative entropy method, which relies on the existence of sufficiently regular solutions to the hydrodynamic equation. In the particular case of the species-blind ZRP, we prove that the solutions of the hydrodynamic equation exist globally in time and thus the hydrodynamic limit is valid for all times.

  11. Hydrodynamic Limit of Condensing Two-Species Zero Range Processes with Sub-critical Initial Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirr, Nicolas; Stamatakis, Marios G.; Zimmer, Johannes

    2017-07-01

    Two-species condensing zero range processes (ZRPs) are interacting particle systems with two species of particles and zero range interaction exhibiting phase separation outside a domain of sub-critical densities. We prove the hydrodynamic limit of nearest neighbour mean zero two-species condensing ZRP with bounded local jump rate for sub-critical initial profiles, i.e., for initial profiles whose image is contained in the region of sub-critical densities. The proof is based on H.T. Yau's relative entropy method, which relies on the existence of sufficiently regular solutions to the hydrodynamic equation. In the particular case of the species-blind ZRP, we prove that the solutions of the hydrodynamic equation exist globally in time and thus the hydrodynamic limit is valid for all times.

  12. New superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Hans-Udo; Baumgarten, Christian; Geisler, Andreas; Heese, Jürgen; Hobl, Achim; Krischel, Detlef; Schillo, Michael; Schmidt, Stefan; Timmer, Jan

    2005-12-01

    Since one and a half decades ACCEL is investing in development and engineering of state of the art particle-therapy systems. A new medical superconducting 250 MeV proton cyclotron with special focus on the present and future beam requirements of fast scanning treatment systems has been designed. The first new ACCEL medical proton cyclotron is under commissioning at PSI for their PROSCAN proton therapy facility having undergone successful factory tests especially of the closed loop cryomagnetic system. The second cyclotron is part of ACCEL's integrated proton therapy system for Europe's first clinical center, RPTC in Munich. The cyclotron, the energy selection system, the beamline as well as the four gantries and patient positioners have been installed. The scanning system and major parts of the control software have already been tested. We will report on the concept of ACCEL's superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems and the current status of the commissioning work at PSI and RPTC.

  13. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.; Walter, J. W.; Kristiansen, M.; Altgilbers, L. L.

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  14. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM SUBCRITICAL WATER WITH ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Steven B. Hawthorne; Arnaud J. Lagadec

    1999-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that controlling the temperature (and to a lesser extent, the pressure) of water can dramatically change its ability to extract organics and inorganics from matrices ranging from soils and sediments to waste sludges and coal. The dielectric constant of water can be changed from about 80 (a very polar solvent) to <5 (similar to a nonpolar organic solvent) by controlling the temperature (from ambient to about 400 C) and pressure (from about 5 to 350 bar). The EERC has shown that hazardous organic pollutants such as pesticides, PACS (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can be completely removed from soils, sludges, and sediments at temperatures (250 C) and pressures (<50 atm) that are much milder than typically used for supercritical water processes (temperature >374 C, pressure >221 atm). In addition, the process has been demonstrated to be particularly effective for samples containing very high levels of contaminants (e.g., part per thousand). Current projects include demonstrating the subcritical water remediation process at the pilot scale using an 8-liter system constructed under separate funding during 1997. To date, subcritical water has been shown to be an effective extraction fluid for removing a variety of organic pollutants from soils and sludges contaminated with fossil fuel products and waste products, including PACS from soil (e.g., town gas sites), refining catalysts, and petroleum tank bottom sludges; PCBs from soil and sediments; toxic gasoline components (e.g., benzene) from soil and waste sludge; and phenols from petroleum refinery sludges. The obvious need to clean the wastewater from subcritical water processes led to preliminary experiments with activated carbon placed in line after the extractor. Initial experiments were performed before and after cooling the extractant water (e.g., with water at 200 C and with water cooled to 25 C

  15. A phrase-driven grammar system for interactive data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Yun; Neumann, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    A Phrase-Driven Grammar System (PDGS) is a novel GUI for facilitating the visualization of data. The PDGS integrates data source applications and external visualization tools into its framework and functions as a middle-layer application to coordinate their operations. It allows users to formulate data query and visualization descriptions by selecting graphical icons in a menu or on a map. To specify data query and visualization intuitively and efficiently, we designed Graphical User Interface and a natural-language-like grammar, Phrase-Driven Grammar (PDG). The formulation of PDG data query and visualization descriptions is a constrained natural-language phrase building process. PDG phrases produce graphical visualizations of the data query, allowing users to interactively explore meaningful data relationships, trends, and exceptions.

  16. Integrated systems for pulsed-power driven inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, M. E.; Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Sinars, D. B.; McBride, R. D.; Vesey, R. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Vandevender, J. P.; Waisman, E. M.; Hansen, D. L.; Owen, A. C.; Jones, J. F.; Romero, J. A.; McKenney, J.

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed power fusion concepts integrate: (i) directly-magnetically-driven fusion targets that absorb large energies (10 MJ), (ii) efficient, rep-rated driver modules, (iii) compact, scalable, integrated driver architectures, (iv) driver-to-target coupling techniques with standoff and driver protection, and (v) long lifetime fusion chambers shielded by vaporizing blankets and thick liquid walls. Large fusion yields (3-30 GJ) and low rep-rates (0.1-1 Hz) may be an attractive path for IFE. Experiments on the ZR facility are validating physics issues for magnetically driven targets. Scientific breakeven (fusion energy = fuel energy) may be possible in the next few years. Plans for system development and integration will be discussed. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Data-driven visibility enhancement using multi-camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Dai, Qionghai

    2010-04-01

    In bad weather conditions, with the presence of haze, fog or smoke, atmospheric particles attenuate the direct irradiance from the scene and scatter light to form airlight. Thus, visibility is decreased and may endanger important applications, such as outdoor surveillance or visual navigation for landing and taking off aircrafts. This paper proposes a novel method for visibility enhancement in bad weather conditions based on multi-view camera system. The main advantage of this method lies in the ability to solve ambiguities caused by texture-less, lack of color and contrast, while where most existing methods fail. The proposed system consists of two main components. First is a data-driven approach to extract template priors that are matched with current capturing dynamic scene images. A fixed multi-camera system is utilized to record dynamic scene appearances under different illuminations, in different time, seasons and weather conditions to construct the database which is explored to extract template models containing only static background objects and obtain corresponding scene structures in a data-driven manner. Second is dehazing based on current dynamic scene depth updated by fusing template depth with real-time multi-view stereo matching depth in foreground object regions. The proposed system achieves real-time and robust performances through combinations of data-driven prior extraction and dynamic scene depth optimization. Moreover, estimated weather condition parameters and the real-time reconstructed dynamic scene model are both useful byproducts. We believe that the proposed system is the first to dehaze based on multi-view camera system. An application based on airport surveillance demonstrates its effectiveness.

  18. The Nonlinear Dynamics of Time Dependent Subcritical Baroclinic Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedlosky, J.; Flierl, G. R.

    2006-12-01

    vacillations and turbulence. When the most unstable wave is not the longest wave in the system we have observed a cascade up scale to longer waves. Indeed, this classically subcritical flow shows most of the qualitative character of a strongly supercritical flow. This supports previous suggestions of the important role of background time dependence in maintaining the atmospheric and oceanic synoptic eddy field.

  19. Subcritical string and large N QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Charles B.

    2008-10-15

    We pursue the possibility of using subcritical string theory in 4 spacetime dimensions to establish a string dual for large N QCD. In particular we study the even G-parity sector of the 4 dimensional Neveu-Schwarz dual resonance model as the natural candidate for this string theory. Our point of view is that the open string dynamics given by this model will determine the appropriate subcritical closed string theory, a tree level background of which should describe the sum of planar multiloop open string diagrams. We examine the one-loop open string diagram, which contains information about the closed string spectrum at weak coupling. Higher loop open string diagrams will be needed to determine closed string interactions. We also analyze the field theory limit of the one-loop open string diagram and recover the correct running coupling behavior of the limiting gauge theory.

  20. Traffic and related self-driven many-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk

    2001-10-01

    Since the subject of traffic dynamics has captured the interest of physicists, many surprising effects have been revealed and explained. Some of the questions now understood are the following: Why are vehicles sometimes stopped by ``phantom traffic jams'' even though drivers all like to drive fast? What are the mechanisms behind stop-and-go traffic? Why are there several different kinds of congestion, and how are they related? Why do most traffic jams occur considerably before the road capacity is reached? Can a temporary reduction in the volume of traffic cause a lasting traffic jam? Under which conditions can speed limits speed up traffic? Why do pedestrians moving in opposite directions normally organize into lanes, while similar systems ``freeze by heating''? All of these questions have been answered by applying and extending methods from statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics to self-driven many-particle systems. This article considers the empirical data and then reviews the main approaches to modeling pedestrian and vehicle traffic. These include microscopic (particle-based), mesoscopic (gas-kinetic), and macroscopic (fluid-dynamic) models. Attention is also paid to the formulation of a micro-macro link, to aspects of universality, and to other unifying concepts, such as a general modeling framework for self-driven many-particle systems, including spin systems. While the primary focus is upon vehicle and pedestrian traffic, applications to biological or socio-economic systems such as bacterial colonies, flocks of birds, panics, and stock market dynamics are touched upon as well.

  1. Driven Open Quantum Systems and Floquet Stroboscopic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, S.; Cerrillo, J.; Bastidas, V. M.; Angelakis, D. G.; Brandes, T.

    2016-12-01

    We provide an analytic solution to the problem of system-bath dynamics under the effect of high-frequency driving that has applications in a large class of settings, such as driven-dissipative many-body systems. Our method relies on discrete symmetries of the system-bath Hamiltonian and provides the time evolution operator of the full system, including bath degrees of freedom, without weak-coupling or Markovian assumptions. An interpretation of the solution in terms of the stroboscopic evolution of a family of observables under the influence of an effective static Hamiltonian is proposed, which constitutes a flexible simulation procedure of nontrivial Hamiltonians. We instantiate the result with the study of the spin-boson model with time-dependent tunneling amplitude. We analyze the class of Hamiltonians that may be stroboscopically accessed for this example and illustrate the dynamics of system and bath degrees of freedom.

  2. Data-Driven Assistance Functions for Industrial Automation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windmann, Stefan; Niggemann, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The increasing amount of data in industrial automation systems overburdens the user in process control and diagnosis tasks. One possibility to cope with these challenges consists of using smart assistance systems that automatically monitor and optimize processes. This article deals with aspects of data-driven assistance systems such as assistance functions, process models and data acquisition. The paper describes novel approaches for self-diagnosis and self-optimization, and shows how these assistance functions can be integrated in different industrial environments. The considered assistance functions are based on process models that are automatically learned from process data. Fault detection and isolation is based on the comparison of observations of the real system with predictions obtained by application of the process models. The process models are further employed for energy efficiency optimization of industrial processes. Experimental results are presented for fault detection and energy efficiency optimization of a drive system.

  3. Neutron Detector Signal Processing to Calculate the Effective Neutron Multiplication Factor of Subcritical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-06-01

    This report describes different methodologies to calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor of subcritical assemblies by processing the neutron detector signals using MATLAB scripts. The subcritical assembly can be driven either by a spontaneous fission neutron source (e.g. californium) or by a neutron source generated from the interactions of accelerated particles with target materials. In the latter case, when the particle accelerator operates in a pulsed mode, the signals are typically stored into two files. One file contains the time when neutron reactions occur and the other contains the times when the neutron pulses start. In both files, the time is given by an integer representing the number of time bins since the start of the counting. These signal files are used to construct the neutron count distribution from a single neutron pulse. The built-in functions of MATLAB are used to calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor through the application of the prompt decay fitting or the area method to the neutron count distribution. If the subcritical assembly is driven by a spontaneous fission neutron source, then the effective multiplication factor can be evaluated either using the prompt neutron decay constant obtained from Rossi or Feynman distributions or the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method.

  4. Advances in Optimizing Weather Driven Electric Power Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A. D.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States (and global) energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. The National Energy with Weather System Simulator (NEWS) is a mathematical optimization tool that allows the construction of weather-driven energy sources that will work in harmony with the needs of the system. For example, it will match the electric load, reduce variability, decrease costs, and abate carbon emissions. One important test run included existing US carbon-free power sources, natural gas power when needed, and a High Voltage Direct Current power transmission network. This study shows that the costs and carbon emissions from an optimally designed national system decrease with geographic size. It shows that with achievable estimates of wind and solar generation costs, that the US could decrease its carbon emissions by up to 80% by the early 2030s, without an increase in electric costs. The key requirement would be a 48 state network of HVDC transmission, creating a national market for electricity not possible in the current AC grid. These results were found without the need for storage. Further, we tested the effect of changing natural gas fuel prices on the optimal configuration of the national electric power system. Another test that was carried out was an extension to global regions. The extension study shows that the same properties found in the US study extend to the most populous regions of the planet. The extra test is a simplified version of the US study, and is where much more research can be carried out. We compare our results to other model results.

  5. A universal piezo-driven ultrasonic cell microinjection system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haibo; Mills, James K; Lu, Cong; Sun, Dong

    2011-08-01

    Over the past decade, the rapid development of biotechnologies such as gene injection, in-vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and drug development have led to great demand for highly automated, high precision equipment for microinjection. Recently a new cell injection technology using piezo-driven pipettes with a very small mercury column was proposed and successfully applied in ICSI to a variety of mammal species. Although this technique significantly improves the survival rates of the ICSI process, shortcomings due to the toxicity of mercury and damage to the cell membrane due to large lateral tip oscillations of the injector pipette may limit its application. In this paper, a new cell injection system for automatic batch injection of suspended cells is developed. A new design of the piezo-driven cell injector is proposed for automated suspended cell injection. This new piezo-driven cell injector design relocates the piezo oscillation actuator to the injector pipette which eliminates the vibration effect on other parts of the micromanipulator. A small piezo stack is sufficient to perform the cell injection process. Harmful lateral tip oscillations of the injector pipette are reduced substantially without the use of a mercury column. Furthermore, ultrasonic vibration micro-dissection (UVM) theory is utilized to analyze the piezo-driven cell injection process, and the source of the lateral oscillations of the injector pipette is investigated. From preliminary experiments of cell injection of a large number of zebrafish embryos (n = 200), the injector pipette can easily pierce through the cell membrane at a low injection speed and almost no deformation of the cell wall, and with a high success rate(96%) and survival rate(80.7%) This new injection approach shows good potential for precision injection with less damage to the injected cells.

  6. Development and analysis of a metal-fueled accelerator-driven burner

    SciTech Connect

    Lypsch, F.; Hill, R.N.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the safety characteristics of an accelerator driven metal fueled fast system to a critical core on a consistent basis to determine how these characteristics are affected solely by subcritically of the system. To accomplish this an accelerator proton beam/tungsten neutron source model is surrounded by a subcritical blanket using metallic fuel and sodium as coolant. The consequences of typical accident transients, namely unprotected transient overpower (TOP), loss of heat sink (LOHS), and loss of flow (LOP) were calculated for the hybrid system and compared to corresponding results for a metal-fueled fast reactor. Results indicate that the subcritical system exhibits superior performance for TOP (reactivity-induced) transits; however, only in the critical system are reactivity feedbacks able to cause passive shutdown in the LOHS ad LOP events. Therefore, for a full spectrum of accident initiators considered, the overall safety behavior of accelerator-driven metal-fueled systems can neither be concluded to be worse nor to be better than advanced reactor designs which rely on passive safety features.

  7. The use of linear superconducting electron accelerator for subcritical reactor driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guk, I. S.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Kononenko, S. G.; Peev, F. A.; Tarasenko, A. S.; van der Wiel, M.; Botman, J. I. M.

    2008-12-01

    At the National Science Centre, Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (NSC KIPT) the possibility of creating an installation with a subcritical reactor driven by an electron accelerator is examined. To obtain the maximal stream of neutrons from a neutron-producing target at a minimal density of energy emission, the electron energy should be in the range of 100-200 MeV and the size of the target should be as large as possible. Other important requirements are beam continuity with time and long-term stability of the accelerator parameters. The variants of using the superconducting linear accelerator on the basis of a TESLA accelerating structure as of subcritical reactor driver are considered. The basic design parameters and characteristics of this installation are presented.

  8. Driven harmonic oscillator as a quantum simulator for open systems

    SciTech Connect

    Piilo, Jyrki; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2006-09-15

    We show theoretically how a driven harmonic oscillator can be used as a quantum simulator for the non-Markovian damped harmonic oscillator. In the general framework, our results demonstrate the possibility to use a closed system as a simulator for open quantum systems. The quantum simulator is based on sets of controlled drives of the closed harmonic oscillator with appropriately tailored electric field pulses. The non-Markovian dynamics of the damped harmonic oscillator is obtained by using the information about the spectral density of the open system when averaging over the drives of the closed oscillator. We consider single trapped ions as a specific physical implementation of the simulator, and we show how the simulator approach reveals physical insight into the open system dynamics, e.g., the characteristic quantum mechanical non-Markovian oscillatory behavior of the energy of the damped oscillator, usually obtained by the non-Lindblad-type master equation, can have a simple semiclassical interpretation.

  9. Integrative Systems Biology for Data Driven Knowledge Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Casey S.; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2015-01-01

    Integrative systems biology is an approach that brings together diverse high throughput experiments and databases to gain new insights into biological processes or systems at molecular through physiological levels. These approaches rely on diverse high-throughput experimental techniques that generate heterogeneous data by assaying varying aspects of complex biological processes. Computational approaches are necessary to provide an integrative view of these experimental results and enable data-driven knowledge discovery. Hypotheses generated from these approaches can direct definitive molecular experiments in a cost effective manner. Using integrative systems biology approaches, we can leverage existing biological knowledge and large-scale data to improve our understanding of yet unknown components of a system of interest and how its malfunction leads to disease. PMID:21044756

  10. Fluctuations of work in nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Suomela, S; Salmilehto, J; Savenko, I G; Ala-Nissila, T; Möttönen, M

    2015-02-01

    We extend the quantum jump method to nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems in a way that allows for an accurate account of the external driving in the system-environment interaction. Using this framework, we construct the corresponding trajectory-dependent work performed on the system and derive the integral fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality for nearly adiabatic driving. We show that such identities hold as long as the stochastic dynamics and work variable are consistently defined. We numerically study the emerging work statistics for a two-level quantum system and find that the conventional diabatic approximation is unable to capture some prominent features arising from driving, such as the continuity of the probability density of work. Our results reveal the necessity of using accurate expressions for the drive-dressed heat exchange in future experiments probing jump time distributions.

  11. Assessment of americium and curium transmutation in magnesia based targets in different spectral zones of an experimental accelerator driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeck, W.; Malambu, E.; Sobolev, V. P.; Aït Abderrahim, H.

    2006-06-01

    The potential to incinerate minor actinides (MA) in a sub-critical accelerator-driven system (ADS) is a subject of study in several countries where nuclear power plants are present. The performance of the MYRRHA experimental ADS, as to the transmutation of Am and Cm in the inert matrix fuel (IMF) samples consisting of 40 vol.% (Cm0.1Am0.5Pu0.4)O1.88 fuel and 60 vol.% MgO matrix with a density of 6.077 g cm-3 in three various spectrum regions, were analysed at the belgian nuclear research centre SCK · CEN. The irradiation period of 810 effective full power days (EFPD) followed by a storage period of 2 years was considered. The ALEPH code system currently under development at SCK · CEN was used to carry out this study. The total amount of MA is shown to decrease in all three considered cases. For Am, the decrease is the largest in the reflector (89% decrease) but at the cost of a net Cm production (92% increase). In the two other positions (inside the core region), 20-30% of Am has disappeared but with a lower production of Cm (between 7% and 11%). In the reflector, a significant build-up of long-lived 245Cm, 246Cm, 247Cm and 248Cm was also observed while the production of these isotopes is 10-1000 times smaller in the core. The reduction of the Pu content is also the highest in the reflector position (41%). In the other positions the incinerated amount of Pu is much smaller: 1-5%.

  12. Data driven uncertainty evaluation for complex engineered system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boyuan; Huang, Shuangxi; Fan, Wenhui; Xiao, Tianyuan; Humann, James; Lai, Yuyang; Jin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Complex engineered systems are often difficult to analyze and design due to the tangled interdependencies among their subsystems and components. Conventional design methods often need exact modeling or accurate structure decomposition, which limits their practical application. The rapid expansion of data makes utilizing data to guide and improve system design indispensable in practical engineering. In this paper, a data driven uncertainty evaluation approach is proposed to support the design of complex engineered systems. The core of the approach is a data-mining based uncertainty evaluation method that predicts the uncertainty level of a specific system design by means of analyzing association relations along different system attributes and synthesizing the information entropy of the covered attribute areas, and a quantitative measure of system uncertainty can be obtained accordingly. Monte Carlo simulation is introduced to get the uncertainty extrema, and the possible data distributions under different situations is discussed in detail. The uncertainty values can be normalized using the simulation results and the values can be used to evaluate different system designs. A prototype system is established, and two case studies have been carried out. The case of an inverted pendulum system validates the effectiveness of the proposed method, and the case of an oil sump design shows the practicability when two or more design plans need to be compared. This research can be used to evaluate the uncertainty of complex engineered systems completely relying on data, and is ideally suited for plan selection and performance analysis in system design.

  13. Neutron noise measurements at the Delphi subcritical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Szieberth, M.; Klujber, G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; De Haas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents the results and evaluations of a comprehensive set of neutron noise measurements on the Delphi subcritical assembly of the Delft Univ. of Technology. The measurements investigated the effect of different source distributions (inherent spontaneous fission and {sup 252}Cf) and the position of the detectors applied (both radially and vertically). The evaluation of the measured data has been performed by the variance-to-mean ratio (VTMR, Feynman-{alpha}), the autocorrelation (ACF, Rossi-{alpha}) and the cross-correlation (CCF) methods. The values obtained for the prompt decay constant show a strong bias, which depends both on the detector position and on the source distribution. This is due to the presence of higher modes in the system. It has been observed that the {alpha} value fitted is higher when the detector is close to the boundary of the core or to the {sup 252}Cf point-source. The higher alpha-modes have also been observed by fitting functions describing two alpha-modes. The successful set of measurement also provides a good basis for further theoretical investigations including the Monte Carlo simulation of the noise measurements and the calculation of the alpha-modes in the Delphi subcritical assembly. (authors)

  14. Sub-critical insonification of buried elastic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljkovic, Irena; Schmidt, Henrik

    2002-11-01

    In a shallow water environment a high frequency high grazing angle mine-hunting sonar approach is vastly limited by the coverage rate, making the detection and classification of buried objects using subcritical grazing incidence an attractive alternative. One of the central issues in mine countermeasurements regarding the physics of scattering from spherical shells is the isolation and the analysis of the resonant excitations of the system distinguishing the manmade elastic targets from rocks or other clutter. Burial of an elastic target in the seabed results in a variety of modifications to the scattered response caused by different physical mechanisms, geometric constrains, and intrinsic sediment properties. The aim of this research is to identify, analyze, and explain the fundamental effects of the sediment and the proximity of the seabed interface on the scattering of sound from elastic spherical shells insonified using low frequencies at subcritical incident angles. A new, comprehensive understanding of the goats98 experimental data was obtained distinguishing the effects of the acoustics environment from the resonant signature of a buried elastic target. To achieve this and to further investigate the more intricate details of the scattering process, a numerically improved, OASES-3D modeling framework was used. [Work supported by ONR.

  15. Nuclear data needs for accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Young, P.G.

    1994-07-01

    The possibilities of several new technologies based on use of intense, medium-energy proton accelerators are being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The potential new areas include destruction of long-lived components of nuclear waste, plutonium burning, energy production, and production of tritium. The design, assessment, and safety analysis of potential facilities involves the understanding of complex combinations of nuclear processes, which in turn places new requirements on nuclear data that transcend the traditional needs of the fission and fusion reactor communities. In this paper an assessment of the nuclear data needs for systems currently being considered in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies program is given.

  16. Coherent long-range thermoelectrics in nonadiabatic driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Marcos, F.; Platero, G.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate direct energy and heat transfer between two distant sites of a triple quantum dot connected to reservoirs, where one of the edge dots is driven by an ac-gate voltage. We theoretically propose how to implement heat and cooling engines mediated by long-range photoassisted transport. Additionally, we propose a simple setup to heat up coherently the two reservoirs symmetrically and a mechanism to store energy in the closed system. The present proposals can be experimentally implemented and easily controlled by tuning the external parameters.

  17. Decoherence and Relaxation in Driven Circuit QED Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, Stephan; Brosco, Valentina; Schoen, Gerd; Fedorov, Arkady; Shnirman, Alexander

    2008-11-07

    Recent experiments on quantum state engineering with superconducting circuits realized concepts originally introduced in the field of quantum optics. Motivated by one such experiment we investigate a Josephson qubit coupled to a slow LC oscillator with frequency much lower than the qubit's energy splitting. The qubit is ac-driven to perform Rabi oscillations, and the Rabi frequency is tuned to resonance with the oscillator. The properties of this driven circuit QED system depend strongly on relaxation and decoherence effects in the qubit. We investigate both one-photon and two-photon qubit-oscillator coupling, the latter being dominant at the symmetry point of the qubit. When the qubit driving frequency is blue detuned, we find that the system exhibits lasing behavior; for red detuning the qubit cools the oscillator. Similar behavior is expected in an accessible range of parameters for a Josephson qubit coupled to a nano-mechanical oscillator. In a different parameter regime, furthering the analogies between superconducting and quantum optical systems, we investigate Sisyphus damping, which is the key element of the Sisyphus cooling protocol, as well as its exact opposite, Sisyphus amplification.

  18. Model-Driven Development of Control System Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chaudhuri, S.; Ahuja, A. L.; Natarajan, S.; Vin, H.

    2009-09-01

    The control software for large real-time systems such as radio-telescopes is generally developed from scratch on a customized basis. The cost and effort involved may be reduced by the use of existing frameworks, components and tools, however the conceptualization, design synthesis and realization of the system still requires a massive and complex engineering process. In this paper, we discuss the design of a model-driven framework that generates much of the control and monitoring software automatically based on higher-level specifications. The design of our framework is guided by the observation that for any system, independent of its specific purpose and elements, the control software performs the same set of functions: communicate, verify, coordinate and issue commands to various sub-systems (actuators); and collect, process, transmit, visualize and archive data produced by sub-systems (sensors). The machine control problem is formulated as a recursive hierarchical composition of control nodes, each of which achieves its function by coordinating its subsystems. Control software for each node is generated from specifications of its control logic, data acquisition and processing, and events detection and handling. We developed a prototype implementation of the concept for fusion reactor control, and validated its generality by reconfiguring the prototype to control the antennas of a radio-telescope. This data-driven approach to machine control software development has the promise to not only simplify initial system software development, but greatly reduce the time and effort for maintenance and evolution of the software over the system lifetime.

  19. Fluctuation theorem in driven nonthermal systems with quenched disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, C J; Drocco, J A

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the fluctuation theorem of Evans and Searles can be used to characterize the class of dynamics that arises in nonthermal systems of collectively interacting particles driven over random quenched disorder. By observing the frequency of entropy-destroying trajectories, we show that there are specific dynamical regimes near depinning in which this theorem holds. Hence the fluctuation theorem can be used to characterize a significantly wider class of non-equilibrium systems than previously considered. We discuss how the fluctuation theorem could be tested in specific systems where noisy dynamics appear at the transition from a pinned to a moving phase such as in vortices in type-II superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and dislocation dynamics.

  20. Data-driven system to predict academic grades and dropout.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Sergi; Puertas, Eloi; Igual, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the role of a tutor is more important than ever to prevent students dropout and improve their academic performance. This work proposes a data-driven system to extract relevant information hidden in the student academic data and, thus, help tutors to offer their pupils a more proactive personal guidance. In particular, our system, based on machine learning techniques, makes predictions of dropout intention and courses grades of students, as well as personalized course recommendations. Moreover, we present different visualizations which help in the interpretation of the results. In the experimental validation, we show that the system obtains promising results with data from the degree studies in Law, Computer Science and Mathematics of the Universitat de Barcelona.

  1. Plug nozzles: The ultimate customer driven propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aukerman, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study applying the plug cluster nozzle concept to the propulsion system for a typical lunar excursion vehicle. Primary attention for the design criteria is given to user defined factors such as reliability, low volume, and ease of propulsion system development. Total thrust and specific impulse are held constant in the study while other parameters are explored to minimize the design chamber pressure. A brief history of the plug nozzle concept is included to point out the advanced level of technology of the concept and the feasibility of exploiting the variables considered in this study. The plug cluster concept looks very promising as a candidate for consideration for the ultimate customer driven propulsion system.

  2. Driven spin systems as quantum thermodynamic machines: Fundamental limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrich, Markus J.; Mahler, Günter; Michel, Mathias

    2007-05-01

    We show that coupled two-level systems like qubits studied in quantum-information processing can be used as a thermodynamic machine. At least three qubits or spins are necessary and they must be arranged in a chain. The system is interfaced between two split baths and the working spin in the middle is externally driven. The machine performs Carnot-type cycles and is able to work as a heat pump or engine depending on the temperature difference of the baths, ΔT , and the energy difference in the spin system, ΔE . It can be shown that the efficiency is a function of ΔT and ΔE .

  3. Recommender Systems on the Web: A Model-Driven Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Gonzalo; Domínguez, Francisco; Salvatori, Stefano

    Recommendation techniques have been increasingly incorporated in e-commerce applications, supporting clients in identifying those items that best fit their needs. Unfortunately, little effort has been made to integrate these techniques into methodological proposals of Web development, discouraging the adoption of engineering approaches to face the complexity of recommender systems. This paper introduces a proposal to develop Web-based recommender systems from a model-driven perspective, specifying the elements of recommendation algorithms from a high abstraction level. Adopting the item-to-item approach, this proposal adopts the conceptual models of an existing Web development process to represent the preferences of users for different items, the similarity between obtained from different algorithms, and the selection and ordering of the recommended items according to a predicted rating value. Along with systematizing the development of these systems, this approach permits to evaluate different algorithms with minor changes at conceptual level, simplifying their mapping to final implementations.

  4. Data-driven system to predict academic grades and dropout

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, Sergi; Puertas, Eloi

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the role of a tutor is more important than ever to prevent students dropout and improve their academic performance. This work proposes a data-driven system to extract relevant information hidden in the student academic data and, thus, help tutors to offer their pupils a more proactive personal guidance. In particular, our system, based on machine learning techniques, makes predictions of dropout intention and courses grades of students, as well as personalized course recommendations. Moreover, we present different visualizations which help in the interpretation of the results. In the experimental validation, we show that the system obtains promising results with data from the degree studies in Law, Computer Science and Mathematics of the Universitat de Barcelona. PMID:28196078

  5. Design of Stirling-driven vapor-compression system

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, N.

    1998-07-01

    Stirling engines have many unique advantages including higher thermal efficiencies, preferable exhaust gas characteristics, multi-fuel usage, and low noise and vibration. On the other hand, heat pump systems are very attractive for space heating and cooling and industrial usage because of their potential to save energy. Especially, there are many environmental merits of Stirling-driven vapor-compression (SDVC) systems. This paper introduces a design method for the SDVC based on reliable mathematical methods for Stirling and Rankine cycles with reliable thermophysical information for refrigerants. The model treats a kinematic Stirling engine and a scroll compressor coupled by a belt. Some experimental coefficients are used to formulate the SDVC items. The obtained results show the performance behavior of the SDVC in detail. The measured performance of the actual system agrees with the calculated results. Furthermore, the calculated results indicate attractive SDVC performance using alternative refrigerants.

  6. Data driven CAN node reliability assessment for manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leiming; Yuan, Yong; Lei, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The reliability of the Controller Area Network(CAN) is critical to the performance and safety of the system. However, direct bus-off time assessment tools are lacking in practice due to inaccessibility of the node information and the complexity of the node interactions upon errors. In order to measure the mean time to bus-off(MTTB) of all the nodes, a novel data driven node bus-off time assessment method for CAN network is proposed by directly using network error information. First, the corresponding network error event sequence for each node is constructed using multiple-layer network error information. Then, the generalized zero inflated Poisson process(GZIP) model is established for each node based on the error event sequence. Finally, the stochastic model is constructed to predict the MTTB of the node. The accelerated case studies with different error injection rates are conducted on a laboratory network to demonstrate the proposed method, where the network errors are generated by a computer controlled error injection system. Experiment results show that the MTTB of nodes predicted by the proposed method agree well with observations in the case studies. The proposed data driven node time to bus-off assessment method for CAN networks can successfully predict the MTTB of nodes by directly using network error event data.

  7. A Saturnian cam current system driven by asymmetric thermospheric heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. G. A.

    2011-02-01

    We show that asymmetric heating of Saturn's thermosphere can drive a current system consistent with the magnetospheric ‘cam’ proposed by Espinosa, Southwood & Dougherty. A geometrically simple heating distribution is imposed on the Northern hemisphere of a simplified three-dimensional global circulation model of Saturn's thermosphere. Currents driven by the resulting winds are calculated using a globally averaged ionosphere model. Using a simple assumption about how divergences in these currents close by flowing along dipolar field lines between the Northern and Southern hemispheres, we estimate the magnetic field perturbations in the equatorial plane and show that they are broadly consistent with the proposed cam fields, showing a roughly uniform field implying radial and azimuthal components in quadrature. We also identify a small longitudinal phase drift in the cam current with radial distance as a characteristic of a thermosphere-driven current system. However, at present our model does not produce magnetic field perturbations of the required magnitude, falling short by a factor of ˜100, a discrepancy that may be a consequence of an incomplete model of the ionospheric conductance.

  8. Feedback control of subcritical Turing instability with zero mode.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Kanevsky, Y; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2009-04-01

    A global feedback control of a system that exhibits a subcritical monotonic instability at a nonzero wave number (short-wave or Turing instability) in the presence of a zero mode is investigated using a Ginzburg-Landau equation coupled to an equation for the zero mode. This system is studied analytically and numerically. It is shown that feedback control, based on measuring the maximum of the pattern amplitude over the domain, can stabilize the system and lead to the formation of localized unipulse stationary states or traveling solitary waves. It is found that the unipulse traveling structures result from an instability of the stationary unipulse structures when one of the parameters characterizing the coupling between the periodic pattern and the zero mode exceeds a critical value that is determined by the zero mode damping coefficient.

  9. Distributed monitoring system for electric-motor-driven compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Castleberry, K.N.

    1996-01-01

    Personnel in the Instrumentation and Controls Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in association with the United States Enrichment corporation (USEC), the Navy, and various Department of Energy sponsors, have been involved in the development and application of motor-current signature analysis (CSA) for several years. In that time CSA has proven to not only be useful for manually applied periodic monitoring of electrically driven equipment but it has also been demonstrated to be well suited for dedicated monitoring systems in industrial settings. Recent work has resulted in the development and installation of a system that can monitor up to 640 motor and compressor stages for various aerodynamic conditions in the gas compressors and electrical problems in the drive motors. This report describes a demonstration of that technology installed on 80 stages at each of the two USEC uranium enrichment plants.

  10. An AC drive system for a battery driven moped

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, S.; Saha, S.; Sharon, M.; Sundersingh, V.P.

    1995-12-31

    A petrol driven moped is converted to an electric one by replacing the petrol engine by a three phase 1.5 HR, AC squirrel cage induction motor drive system. The motor voltage rating selected is 200 V to keep the DC boost voltage level to a reasonable value.f the power source used is a high energy density, 24 V, 110 Ah, Ni-Zn battery. A modified indirect current controlled step-up chopper as well as a standard push-pull DC-DC boost converter is studied for the boost scheme. A simple three phase quasi-square wave inverter is designed along with suitable protection for driving the motor. Successful trial test of the system has been conducted at the laboratory.

  11. Order and Symmetry Breaking in the Fluctuations of Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizón-Escamilla, N.; Pérez-Espigares, C.; Garrido, P. L.; Hurtado, P. I.

    2017-09-01

    Dynamical phase transitions (DPTs) in the space of trajectories are one of the most intriguing phenomena of nonequilibrium physics, but their nature in realistic high-dimensional systems remains puzzling. Here we observe for the first time a DPT in the current vector statistics of an archetypal two-dimensional (2D) driven diffusive system and characterize its properties using the macroscopic fluctuation theory. The complex interplay among the external field, anisotropy, and vector currents in 2D leads to a rich phase diagram, with different symmetry-broken fluctuation phases separated by lines of first- and second-order DPTs. Remarkably, different types of 1D order in the form of jammed density waves emerge to hinder transport for low-current fluctuations, revealing a connection between rare events and self-organized structures which enhance their probability.

  12. Two-dimensional localized chaotic patterns in parametrically driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzagasti, Deterlino; Laroze, David; Pleiner, Harald

    2017-05-01

    We study two-dimensional localized patterns in weakly dissipative systems that are driven parametrically. As a generic model for many different physical situations we use a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation that contains parametric forcing, damping, and spatial coupling. The latter allows for the existence of localized pattern states, where a finite-amplitude uniform state coexists with an inhomogeneous one. In particular, we study numerically two-dimensional patterns. Increasing the driving forces, first the localized pattern dynamics is regular, becomes chaotic for stronger driving, and finally extends in area to cover almost the whole system. In parallel, the spatial structure of the localized states becomes more and more irregular, ending up as a full spatiotemporal chaotic structure.

  13. Classification of topological phases in periodically driven interacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Else, Dominic V.; Nayak, Chetan

    2016-05-01

    We consider topological phases in periodically driven (Floquet) systems exhibiting many-body localization, protected by a symmetry G . We argue for a general correspondence between such phases and topological phases of undriven systems protected by symmetry Z ⋊G where the additional Z accounts for the discrete time-translation symmetry. Thus, for example, the bosonic phases in d spatial dimensions without intrinsic topological order [symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases] are classified by the cohomology group Hd +1[Z ⋊G ,U (1 ) ] . For unitary symmetries, we interpret the additional resulting Floquet phases in terms of the lower-dimensional SPT phases that are pumped to the boundary during one time step. These results also imply the existence of novel symmetry-enriched topological (SET) orders protected solely by the periodicity of the drive.

  14. A solar pond driven distillation and power production system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. H.; Leboeuf, C. M.; Waddington, D.

    In this paper a solar pond driven distillation and power production system is described. The storage layer of the solar pond serves as the holding tank for the concentrated brine effluent from the distillation process as well as the collector and storage medium for solar energy used to heat incoming salty river water. Steam from the distillation process expands through a turbine/generator combination to provide power for the water circulation and vacuum pumps of the system. Water from the surface mixed layer of the pond is used to condense the steam. The closely integrated distillation and power production system converts an incoming stream of brackish or saline water into an outlet stream of the required purity. Salt and power are also products of the system. A thermodynamic analysis of the energy and mass balances of the system has been performed and a performance model of the system has been developed. This has been used to size the system for the application of desalting saline tributaries of the Colorado River.

  15. Self-organization in a driven dissipative plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Dasgupta, B.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-02-01

    We perform a fully self-consistent three-dimensional numerical simulation for a compressible, dissipative magnetoplasma driven by large-scale perturbations, that contain a fairly broad spectrum of characteristic modes, ranging from largest scales to intermediate scales and down to the smallest scales, where the energy of the system is dissipated by collisional (ohmic) and viscous dissipations. Additionally, our simulation includes nonlinear interactions amongst a wide range of fluctuations that are initialized with random spectral amplitudes, leading to the cascade of spectral energy in the inertial range spectrum, and takes into account large-scale as well as small-scale perturbations that may have been induced by the background plasma fluctuations, as well as the non-adiabatic exchange of energy leading to the migration of energy from the energy-containing modes or randomly injected energy driven by perturbations and further dissipated by the smaller scales. Besides demonstrating the comparative decays of the total energy and the dissipation rate of the energy, our results show the existence of a perpendicular component of the current, thus clearly confirming that the self-organized state is non-force free.

  16. Regularization of chaos by noise in electrically driven nanowire systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessari, Peyman; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Chae, Junseok; Park, Cheol Woo; Lee, GyuWon

    2014-04-01

    The electrically driven nanowire systems are of great importance to nanoscience and engineering. Due to strong nonlinearity, chaos can arise, but in many applications it is desirable to suppress chaos. The intrinsically high-dimensional nature of the system prevents application of the conventional method of controlling chaos. Remarkably, we find that the phenomenon of coherence resonance, which has been well documented but for low-dimensional chaotic systems, can occur in the nanowire system that mathematically is described by two coupled nonlinear partial differential equations, subject to periodic driving and noise. Especially, we find that, when the nanowire is in either the weakly chaotic or the extensively chaotic regime, an optimal level of noise can significantly enhance the regularity of the oscillations. This result is robust because it holds regardless of whether noise is white or colored, and of whether the stochastic drivings in the two independent directions transverse to the nanowire are correlated or independent of each other. Noise can thus regularize chaotic oscillations through the mechanism of coherence resonance in the nanowire system. More generally, we posit that noise can provide a practical way to harness chaos in nanoscale systems.

  17. Solar pond-driven distillation and power production system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Leboeuf, C. M.; Waddington, D.

    1981-12-01

    A solar pond driven distillation and power production system is described. The storage layer of the solar pond serves as the holding tank for the concentrated brine effluent from the distillation process as well as the collector and storage medium for solar energy used to heat incoming salty river water. Steam from the distillation process expands through a turbine/generator combination to provide power for the water circulation and vacuum pumps of the system. Water from the surface mixed layer of the pond is used to condense the steam. The closely integrated distillation and power production system converts an incoming stream of brackish or saline water into an outlet stream of the required purity. Salt and power are also products of the system. A thermodynamic analysis of the energy and mass balances of the system was performed and a performance model of the system is developed. This model is used to compute the requirements for desalting several saline tributaries of the Colorado River.

  18. Two coupled, driven Ising spin systems working as an engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Debarshi; Nandi, Joydip; Jayannavar, A. M.; Marathe, Rahul

    2017-05-01

    Miniaturized heat engines constitute a fascinating field of current research. Many theoretical and experimental studies are being conducted that involve colloidal particles in harmonic traps as well as bacterial baths acting like thermal baths. These systems are micron-sized and are subjected to large thermal fluctuations. Hence, for these systems average thermodynamic quantities, such as work done, heat exchanged, and efficiency, lose meaning unless otherwise supported by their full probability distributions. Earlier studies on microengines are concerned with applying Carnot or Stirling engine protocols to miniaturized systems, where system undergoes typical two isothermal and two adiabatic changes. Unlike these models we study a prototype system of two classical Ising spins driven by time-dependent, phase-different, external magnetic fields. These spins are simultaneously in contact with two heat reservoirs at different temperatures for the full duration of the driving protocol. Performance of the model as an engine or a refrigerator depends only on a single parameter, namely the phase between two external drivings. We study this system in terms of fluctuations in efficiency and coefficient of performance (COP). We find full distributions of these quantities numerically and study the tails of these distributions. We also study reliability of the engine. We find the fluctuations dominate mean values of efficiency and COP, and their probability distributions are broad with power law tails.

  19. Two coupled, driven Ising spin systems working as an engine.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debarshi; Nandi, Joydip; Jayannavar, A M; Marathe, Rahul

    2017-05-01

    Miniaturized heat engines constitute a fascinating field of current research. Many theoretical and experimental studies are being conducted that involve colloidal particles in harmonic traps as well as bacterial baths acting like thermal baths. These systems are micron-sized and are subjected to large thermal fluctuations. Hence, for these systems average thermodynamic quantities, such as work done, heat exchanged, and efficiency, lose meaning unless otherwise supported by their full probability distributions. Earlier studies on microengines are concerned with applying Carnot or Stirling engine protocols to miniaturized systems, where system undergoes typical two isothermal and two adiabatic changes. Unlike these models we study a prototype system of two classical Ising spins driven by time-dependent, phase-different, external magnetic fields. These spins are simultaneously in contact with two heat reservoirs at different temperatures for the full duration of the driving protocol. Performance of the model as an engine or a refrigerator depends only on a single parameter, namely the phase between two external drivings. We study this system in terms of fluctuations in efficiency and coefficient of performance (COP). We find full distributions of these quantities numerically and study the tails of these distributions. We also study reliability of the engine. We find the fluctuations dominate mean values of efficiency and COP, and their probability distributions are broad with power law tails.

  20. K/sub infinity/-meter concept verified via subcritical-critical TRIGA experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ocampo Mansilla, H.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents a technique for building a device to measure the k/sub infinity/ of a spent nuclear fuel assembly discharged from the core of a nuclear power plant. The device, called a k/sub infinity/-meter, consists of a cross-shaped subcritical assembly, two artificial neutron sources, and two separate neutron counting systems. The central position of the subcritical assembly is used to measure k/sub infinity/ of the spent fuel assembly. The initial subcritical assembly is calibrated to determine its k/sub eff/ and verify the assigned k/sub infinity/ of a selected fuel assembly placed in the central position. Count rates are taken with the fuel assembly of known k/sub infinity/'s placed in the central position and then repeated with a fuel assembly of unknown k/sub infinity/ placed in the central position. The count rate ratio of the unknown fuel assembly to the known fuel assembly is used to determine the k/sub infinity/ of the unknown fuel assembly. The k/sub infinity/ of the unknown fuel assembly is represented as a polynomial function of the count rate ratios. The coefficients of the polynomial equation are determined using the neutronic codes LEOPARD and EXTERMINATOR-II. The analytical approach has been validated by performing several subcritical/critical experiments, using the Penn State Breazeale TRIGA Reactor (PSBR), and comparing the experimental results with the calculations.

  1. Subcritical water extraction of lipids from wet algal biomass

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Shuguang; Reddy, Harvind K.; Schaub, Tanner; Holguin, Francisco Omar

    2016-05-03

    Methods of lipid extraction from biomass, in particular wet algae, through conventionally heated subcritical water, and microwave-assisted subcritical water. In one embodiment, fatty acid methyl esters from solids in a polar phase are further extracted to increase biofuel production.

  2. Aperiodically Driven Integrable Systems and Their Emergent Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Sourav; Sen, Arnab; Sen, Diptiman

    2017-07-01

    Does a closed quantum many-body system that is continually driven with a time-dependent Hamiltonian finally reach a steady state? This question has only recently been answered for driving protocols that are periodic in time, where the long-time behavior of the local properties synchronizes with the drive and can be described by an appropriate periodic ensemble. Here, we explore the consequences of breaking the time-periodic structure of the drive with additional aperiodic noise in a class of integrable systems. We show that the resulting unitary dynamics leads to new emergent steady states in at least two cases. While any typical realization of random noise causes eventual heating to an infinite-temperature ensemble for all local properties in spite of the system being integrable, noise that is self-similar in time leads to an entirely different steady state (which we dub the "geometric generalized Gibbs ensemble") that emerges only after an astronomically large time scale. To understand the approach to the steady state, we study the temporal behavior of certain coarse-grained quantities in momentum space that fully determine the reduced density matrix for a subsystem with size much smaller than the total system. Such quantities provide a concise description for any drive protocol in integrable systems that are reducible to a free-fermion representation.

  3. Multi-source driven capillary plane radiation air conditioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Juanjuan; Qu, Mofeng; Wang, Huasheng; Ni, Shiyao

    2017-08-01

    A new absorption refrigeration system, which is driven by solar energy, biomass energy and geothermal energy simultaneously, was designed with capillaries as its radiation surface. Likewise, variations of water temperature in the capillaries with the change in both time and its flow rate were experimentally researched as well as how COP of the system varies with the surrounding temperature. The following conclusions have been obtained: Common refrigeration demand can be met by the system after its operation in 1 hour; with the increase in water flow rate in the capillaries, its temperature, which drops down after an increase, gets its peak value at the flow rate of 4.5-5.5 L/min; COP of the system decreases with the rise of surrounding temperature, thus it's better to keep it from direct sunlight. With the utilization of natural energy and the structure of capillaries, the system's advantages in simple structure, low cost, environment-friendly working process and nice performance lead to promising application prospects, especially in residence refrigeration in countryside.

  4. Statistics of the dissipated energy in driven diffusive systems.

    PubMed

    Lasanta, A; Hurtado, Pablo I; Prados, A

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the physics of non-equilibrium systems remains one of the major open questions in statistical physics. This problem can be partially handled by investigating macroscopic fluctuations of key magnitudes that characterise the non-equilibrium behaviour of the system of interest; their statistics, associated structures and microscopic origin. During the last years, some new general and powerful methods have appeared to delve into fluctuating behaviour that have drastically changed the way to address this problem in the realm of diffusive systems: macroscopic fluctuation theory (MFT) and a set of advanced computational techniques that make it possible to measure the probability of rare events. Notwithstanding, a satisfactory theory is still lacking in a particular case of intrinsically non-equilibrium systems, namely those in which energy is not conserved but dissipated continuously in the bulk of the system (e.g. granular media). In this work, we put forward the dissipated energy as a relevant quantity in this case and analyse in a pedagogical way its fluctuations, by making use of a suitable generalisation of macroscopic fluctuation theory to driven dissipative media.

  5. Observation of subcritical geodesic acoustic mode excitation in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Itoh, K.; Lesur, M.; Osakabe, M.; Shimizu, A.; Ogawa, K.; Nishiura, M.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Kosuga, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2017-07-01

    The abrupt and strong excitation of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) has been found in the large helical device (LHD), when the frequency of a chirping energetic particle-driven GAM (EGAM) approaches twice that of the GAM frequency. The temporal evolution of the phase relation between the abrupt GAM and the chirping EGAM is common in all events. The result indicates a coupling between the GAM and the EGAM. In addition, the nonlinear evolution of the growth rate of the GAM is observed, and there is a threshold in the amplitude of the GAM for the appearance of nonlinear behavior. A threshold in the amplitude of the EGAM for the abrupt excitation of the GAM is also observed. According to one theory (Lesur et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 015003, Itoh et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Rep. 42 418) the observed abrupt phenomenon can be interpreted as the excitation of the subcritical instability of the GAM. The excitation of a subcritical instability requires a trigger and a seed with sufficient amplitude. The observed threshold in the amplitude of the GAM seems to correspond with the threshold in the seed, and the threshold in the amplitude of the EGAM seems to correspond with the threshold in the magnitude of the trigger. Thus, the observed threshold supports the interpretation that the abrupt phenomenon is the excitation of a subcritical instability of the GAM.

  6. Flyer Velocity Characteristics of the Laser-Driven Miniflyer System

    SciTech Connect

    Gehr, R.J.; Harper, R.W.; Robbins, D.L.; Rupp, T.D.; Sheffield, S.A.; Stahl, D.B.

    1999-07-01

    The laser-driven MiniFlyer system is used to launch a small, thin flyer plate for impact on a target. Consequently, it is an indirect drive technique that de-couples the shock from the laser beam profile. The flyer velocity can be controlled by adjustment of the laser energy. The upper limits on the flyer velocity involve the ability of the substrate window to transmit the laser light without absorbing, reflecting, etc.; i.e., a maximum amount of laser energy is directly converted into kinetic energy of the flyer plate. We have investigated the use of sapphire, quartz, and BK-7 glass as substrate windows. In the past, a particular type of sapphire has been used for nearly all MiniFlyer experiments. Results of this study in terms of the performance of these window materials, based on flyer velocity, are discussed.

  7. Intelligent fuzzy controller for event-driven real time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantner, Janos; Patyra, Marek; Stachowicz, Marian S.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the known linguistic models are essentially static, that is, time is not a parameter in describing the behavior of the object's model. In this paper we show a model for synchronous finite state machines based on fuzzy logic. Such finite state machines can be used to build both event-driven, time-varying, rule-based systems and the control unit section of a fuzzy logic computer. The architecture of a pipelined intelligent fuzzy controller is presented, and the linguistic model is represented by an overall fuzzy relation stored in a single rule memory. A VLSI integrated circuit implementation of the fuzzy controller is suggested. At a clock rate of 30 MHz, the controller can perform 3 MFLIPS on multi-dimensional fuzzy data.

  8. Conformal Invariance in Driven Diffusive Systems at High Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karevski, D.; Schütz, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider space-time correlations in driven diffusive systems which undergo a fluctuation into a regime with an atypically large current or dynamical activity. For a single conserved mass we show that the spatiotemporal density correlations in one space dimension are fully determined by conformal field theory with central charge c =1 , corresponding to a ballistic universality class with dynamical exponent z =1 . The full phase diagram for general atypical behavior exhibits the conformally invariant regime and, for atypically low current or activity, a region of phase separation. The phase transition line between these two regimes corresponds to typical behavior and the dynamics belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class with dynamical exponent z =3 /2 , except for a diffusive point with z =2 . The exact universal dynamical structure function is obtained in explicit form from the one-dimensional asymmetric simple exclusion process with periodic and open boundaries in the limit of maximal current.

  9. Linear Response Theory for Thermally Driven Quantum Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, V.; Ogata, Y.; Pillet, C.-A.

    2006-05-01

    This note is a continuation of our recent paper [V. Jakšić Y. Ogata, and C.-A. Pillet, The Green-Kubo formula and Onsager reciprocity relations in quantum statistical mechanics. Commun. Math. Phys. in press.] where we have proven the Green-Kubo formula and the Onsager reciprocity relations for heat fluxes in thermally driven quantum open systems. In this note we extend the derivation of the Green-Kubo formula to heat and charge fluxes and discuss some other generalizations of the model and results of [V. Jakšić Y. Ogata and C.-A. Pillet, The Green-Kubo formula and Onsager reciprocity relations in quantum statistical mechanics. Commun. Math. Phys. in press.].

  10. High gain driven right leg circuit for dry electrode systems.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Federico N; Spinelli, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an improved driven right leg (DRL) circuit compensation together with a practical implementation. The proposed design allows to increase common mode voltage attenuation compared with the widely used dominant pole compensation while maintaining the same proven stability margin and design criteria, and requiring only a modification of its passive feedback network. A sample implementation of the proposed DRL was obtained estimating the values of interference model parameters for a dry electrode measurement system. A dominant pole compensated DRL with the same stability margin was also implemented in order to experimentally validate the proposed design against this established alternative. Measurements were conducted under both controlled and uncontrolled interference conditions. The proposed compensation experimentally demonstrated achieving a better reduction of power line harmonics, with a peak comparative improvement of around 18  dB at 50  Hz.

  11. Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu.

    2002-09-15

    The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

  12. Conformal Invariance in Driven Diffusive Systems at High Currents.

    PubMed

    Karevski, D; Schütz, G M

    2017-01-20

    We consider space-time correlations in driven diffusive systems which undergo a fluctuation into a regime with an atypically large current or dynamical activity. For a single conserved mass we show that the spatiotemporal density correlations in one space dimension are fully determined by conformal field theory with central charge c=1, corresponding to a ballistic universality class with dynamical exponent z=1. The full phase diagram for general atypical behavior exhibits the conformally invariant regime and, for atypically low current or activity, a region of phase separation. The phase transition line between these two regimes corresponds to typical behavior and the dynamics belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class with dynamical exponent z=3/2, except for a diffusive point with z=2. The exact universal dynamical structure function is obtained in explicit form from the one-dimensional asymmetric simple exclusion process with periodic and open boundaries in the limit of maximal current.

  13. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA-booster subcritical assembly part 1: analytical models and main neutronics parameters.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-09-11

    This study was carried out to model and analyze the YALINA-Booster facility, of the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus, with the long term objective of advancing the utilization of accelerator driven systems for the incineration of nuclear waste. The YALINA-Booster facility is a subcritical assembly, driven by an external neutron source, which has been constructed to study the neutron physics and to develop and refine methodologies to control the operation of accelerator driven systems. The external neutron source consists of Californium-252 spontaneous fission neutrons, 2.45 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Deuterium reactions, or 14.1 MeV neutrons from Deuterium-Tritium reactions. In the latter two cases a deuteron beam is used to generate the neutrons. This study is a part of the collaborative activity between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research of Belarus. In addition, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a coordinated research project benchmarking and comparing the results of different numerical codes with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility and ANL has a leading role coordinating the IAEA activity. The YALINA-Booster facility has been modeled according to the benchmark specifications defined for the IAEA activity without any geometrical homogenization using the Monte Carlo codes MONK and MCNP/MCNPX/MCB. The MONK model perfectly matches the MCNP one. The computational analyses have been extended through the MCB code, which is an extension of the MCNP code with burnup capability because of its additional feature for analyzing source driven multiplying assemblies. The main neutronics parameters of the YALINA-Booster facility were calculated using these computer codes with different nuclear data libraries based on ENDF/B-VI-0, -6, JEF-2.2, and JEF-3.1.

  14. Properties of rice stem extracts obtained by using subcritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Tangkhavanich, Boonnakhom; Kobayashi, Takashi; Adachi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Rice stems were subjected to a subcritical fluid treatment at 230 °C, using ethanol or acetone at a dilution of 0-100% in water. The obtained extracts were determined for their yield, carbohydrate content, phenolic content, DPPH radical scavenging ability, and color. The highest yield and carbohydrate content were achieved with the subcritical 20% (v/v) organic solvent, while the highest phenolic content was obtained with subcritical 80% (v/v) acetone. The highest radical scavenging ability was achieved with subcritical 60% (v/v) ethanol and 80% (v/v) acetone. The lightness of the extracts obtained with subcritical ethanol and acetone was negatively correlation with their radical scavenging ability (R=-0.85). The relationship between the lightness and phenolic content of the extracts was not significant, suggesting that other substances in the extract could also possess radical scavenging ability.

  15. Operational Characteristics of an Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Kimpland, Robert Herbert

    2016-11-28

    Operational characteristics represent the set of responses that a nuclear system exhibits during normal operation. Operators rely on this behavior to assess the status of the system and to predict the consequences of off-normal events. These characteristics largely refer to the relationship between power and system operating conditions. The static and dynamic behavior of a chain-reacting system, operating at sufficient power, is primarily governed by reactivity effects. The science of reactor physics has identified and evaluated a number of such effects, including Doppler broadening and shifts in the thermal neutron spectrum. Often these reactivity effects are quantified in the form of feedback coefficients that serve as coupling coefficients relating the neutron population and the physical mechanisms that drive reactivity effects, such as fissile material temperature and density changes. The operational characteristics of such nuclear systems usually manifest themselves when perturbations between system power (neutron population) and system operating conditions arise. Successful operation of such systems requires the establishment of steady equilibrium conditions. However, prior to obtaining the desired equilibrium (steady-state) conditions, an approach from zero-power (startup) must occur. This operational regime may possess certain limiting system conditions that must be maintained to achieve effective startup. Once steady-state is achieved, a key characteristic of this operational regime is the level of stability that the system possesses. Finally, a third operational regime, shutdown, may also possess limiting conditions of operation that must be maintained. This report documents the operational characteristics of a “generic” Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution (ADFS) system during the various operational regimes of startup, steady-state operation, and shutdown. Typical time-dependent behavior for each operational regime will be illustrated, and key system

  16. The Development of a Laser-Driven Flyer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, M. W.; Field, J. E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes recent advances to a laser-driven flyer system. In this technique, laser-induced plasma is used to drive miniature flyer plates at velocities approaching 10 km/s. The flyers are launched from substrate-backed metal films and are typically less than 1 mm in diameter and a few microns thick. The system has found application in detonics, high-strain rate testing and micrometeorite simulation. Recent advances described here are concerned with manipulating the flyer profile and enhancing performance. A fiber-optic delivery system is used to alter the spatial intensity distribution of the launch pulse. High-speed photography was used to verify the effectiveness of this technique as illustrated by the excellent correlation between beam profile and flyer shape. A technique using bi-layered films was developed with a view to improving the energy efficiency of the system. The kinetic energy of flyers launched with the additional layer was found to be enhanced by a factor of near three.

  17. Archetype Model-Driven Development Framework for EHR Web System

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Eizen; Ishihara, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This article describes the Web application framework for Electronic Health Records (EHRs) we have developed to reduce construction costs for EHR sytems. Methods The openEHR project has developed clinical model driven architecture for future-proof interoperable EHR systems. This project provides the specifications to standardize clinical domain model implementations, upon which the ISO/CEN 13606 standards are based. The reference implementation has been formally described in Eiffel. Moreover C# and Java implementations have been developed as reference. While scripting languages had been more popular because of their higher efficiency and faster development in recent years, they had not been involved in the openEHR implementations. From 2007, we have used the Ruby language and Ruby on Rails (RoR) as an agile development platform to implement EHR systems, which is in conformity with the openEHR specifications. Results We implemented almost all of the specifications, the Archetype Definition Language parser, and RoR scaffold generator from archetype. Although some problems have emerged, most of them have been resolved. Conclusions We have provided an agile EHR Web framework, which can build up Web systems from archetype models using RoR. The feasibility of the archetype model to provide semantic interoperability of EHRs has been demonstrated and we have verified that that it is suitable for the construction of EHR systems. PMID:24523991

  18. Development of an implantable motor-driven assist pump system.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Y; Okamoto, E; Hirano, A; Mikami, T

    1990-02-01

    A motor-driven artificial pump and its transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) system have been developed. The artificial pump consists of a high-speed dc brushless motor driving a ball screw and magnetic coupling mechanism between the blood pump and ball screw. The ball screw transfers high-speed rotary motion into low-speed rectilinear motion by a single component. Magnetic coupling enables active blood filling without applying an excess negative pressure to the pump. The transcutaneous transformer is formed from a pair of concave/convex ferrite cores. This design minimizes lateral motion of the external core. Information on motor voltage is transmitted through the skin by infrared pulses. The motor voltage is regulated by controlling the duty ratio of the square pulse supplied to the primary coil. Pump flow of 5.6 l/min was obtained with a mean outlet pressure of 100 mmHg at a drive rate of 100 bpm under preload of 15 mmHg. The performance of synchronous pumping has been very satisfactory. Continuous pumping was maintained by the backup battery in the case of interruption of TET. 24 W were transmitted by TET system with 78 percent of efficiency. Temperature rise of the internal core was 0.2 C. The developed system is promising as an implantable assist pump system.

  19. A Humidity-Driven Prediction System for Influenza Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrastarson, H. T.; Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of absolute (or specific) humidity conditions as a leading explanation for the seasonal behavior of influenza outbreaks in temperate regions. If the timing and intensity of seasonal influenza outbreaks can be forecast, this would be of great value for public health response efforts. We have developed and implemented a SIRS (Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered-Susceptible) type numerical prediction system that is driven by specific humidity to predict influenza outbreaks. For the humidity, we have explored using both satellite data from the AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) instrument as well as ERA-Interim re-analysis data. We discuss the development, testing, sensitivities and limitations of the prediction system and show results for influenza outbreaks in the United States during the years 2010-2014 (modeled in retrospect). Comparisons are made with other existing prediction systems and available data for influenza outbreaks from Google Flu Trends and the CDC (Center for Disease Control), and the incorporation of these datasets into the forecasting system is discussed.

  20. Archetype Model-Driven Development Framework for EHR Web System.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinji; Kimura, Eizen; Ishihara, Ken

    2013-12-01

    This article describes the Web application framework for Electronic Health Records (EHRs) we have developed to reduce construction costs for EHR sytems. The openEHR project has developed clinical model driven architecture for future-proof interoperable EHR systems. This project provides the specifications to standardize clinical domain model implementations, upon which the ISO/CEN 13606 standards are based. The reference implementation has been formally described in Eiffel. Moreover C# and Java implementations have been developed as reference. While scripting languages had been more popular because of their higher efficiency and faster development in recent years, they had not been involved in the openEHR implementations. From 2007, we have used the Ruby language and Ruby on Rails (RoR) as an agile development platform to implement EHR systems, which is in conformity with the openEHR specifications. We implemented almost all of the specifications, the Archetype Definition Language parser, and RoR scaffold generator from archetype. Although some problems have emerged, most of them have been resolved. We have provided an agile EHR Web framework, which can build up Web systems from archetype models using RoR. The feasibility of the archetype model to provide semantic interoperability of EHRs has been demonstrated and we have verified that that it is suitable for the construction of EHR systems.

  1. Critical quasienergy states in driven many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidas Valencia, Victor Manuel; Engelhardt, Georg; Perez-Fernandez, Pedro; Vogl, Malte; Brandes, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is characterized by non-analyticities of ground-state properties at the critical points. Recently it has been shown that quantum criticality emerges also in excited states of the system, which is referred to as an excited-state quantum phase transition (ESQPT). This kind of quantum criticality is intimately related to a level clustering at critical energies, which results in a logarithmic singularity in the density of states. Most of the previous studies on quantum criticality in excited states have been focused on time independent systems. Here we study spectral singularities that appear in periodically-driven many-body systems and show how the external control allows one to engineer geometrical features of the quasienergy landscape. In particular, we study singularities in the quasienergy spectrum of a fully-connected network consisting of two-level systems with time-dependent interactions. We discuss the characteristic signatures of these singularities in observables like the magnetization, which should be measurable with current technology. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support by the DFG via grants BRA 1528/7, BRA 1528/8, SFB 910 (V.M.B., T.B.), the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (Grants No. FIS2011-28738-C02-01) and Junta de Andalucia (Grants No. FQM160).

  2. Design, economic and system considerations of large wind-driven generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, G. E.; Lotker, M.; Meier, R. C.; Brierley, D.

    1976-01-01

    The increased search for alternative energy sources has lead to renewed interest and studies of large wind-driven generators. This paper presents the results and considerations of such an investigation. The paper emphasizes the concept selection of wind-driven generators, system optimization, control system design, safety aspects, economic viability on electric utility systems and potential electric system interfacing problems.

  3. Design, economic and system considerations of large wind-driven generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, G. E.; Lotker, M.; Meier, R. C.; Brierley, D.

    1976-01-01

    The increased search for alternative energy sources has lead to renewed interest and studies of large wind-driven generators. This paper presents the results and considerations of such an investigation. The paper emphasizes the concept selection of wind-driven generators, system optimization, control system design, safety aspects, economic viability on electric utility systems and potential electric system interfacing problems.

  4. Plutonium Critical Mass Curve Comparison to Mass at Upper Subcritical Limit (USL) Using Whisper

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise; Zhang, Ning

    2016-09-27

    Whisper is computational software designed to assist the nuclear criticality safety analyst with validation studies with the MCNP® Monte Carlo radiation transport package. Standard approaches to validation rely on the selection of benchmarks based upon expert judgment. Whisper uses sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) methods to select relevant benchmarks to a particular application or set of applications being analyzed. Using these benchmarks, Whisper computes a calculational margin. Whisper attempts to quantify the margin of subcriticality (MOS) from errors in software and uncertainties in nuclear data. The combination of the Whisper-derived calculational margin and MOS comprise the baseline upper subcritical limit (USL), to which an additional margin may be applied by the nuclear criticality safety analyst as appropriate to ensure subcriticality. A series of critical mass curves for plutonium, similar to those found in Figure 31 of LA-10860-MS, have been generated using MCNP6.1.1 and the iterative parameter study software, WORM_Solver. The baseline USL for each of the data points of the curves was then computed using Whisper 1.1. The USL was then used to determine the equivalent mass for plutonium metal-water system. ANSI/ANS-8.1 states that it is acceptable to use handbook data, such as the data directly from the LA-10860-MS, as it is already considered validated (Section 4.3 4) “Use of subcritical limit data provided in ANSI/ANS standards or accepted reference publications does not require further validation.”). This paper attempts to take a novel approach to visualize traditional critical mass curves and allows comparison with the amount of mass for which the keff is equal to the USL (calculational margin + margin of subcriticality). However, the intent is to plot the critical mass data along with USL, not to suggest that already accepted handbook data should have new and more rigorous requirements for validation.

  5. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, F.; Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition, (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems. S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, A.M. Zagoskin, F. Nori, Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields, Phys. Rev. A 75, 063414 (2007). S. Ashhab et al, unpublished.

  6. Subcritical neutron generator-test facility for nuclear waste transmutation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chuvilo, I.V.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kozodaev, A.M.

    1995-10-01

    The development of the optimal design of high power facility for NPP transmutation and for a number of applications can not be carried out without preliminary tests of much cheaper prototypes. It has been proposed to combine in new test facility 36 MeV Linac ISTRA constructed in ITEP, original Be target and subcritical blanket that will be mounted on the place of partly disassembled heavy water ITEP experimental reactor. The basic parameters of Linac, schemes of the target and blanket are described. It will provide the direct experiments on installation which can be considered as prototype for future linac driven high power facilities.

  7. Double dissociation between action-driven and perception-driven conflict resolution invoking anterior versus posterior brain systems.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Tilman; Müller-Oehring, Eva M; Vinco, Shara; Hoeft, Fumiko; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V

    2009-11-01

    The ability to select and integrate relevant information in the presence of competing irrelevant information can be enhanced by advance information to direct attention and guide response selection. Attentional preparation can reduce perceptual and response conflict, yet little is known about the neural source of conflict resolution, whether it is resolved by modulating neural responses for perceptual selection to emphasize task-relevant information or for action selection to inhibit pre-potent responses to interfering information. We manipulated perceptual information that either matched or did not match the relevant color feature of an upcoming Stroop stimulus and recorded hemodynamic brain responses to these events. Longer reaction times to incongruent than congruent color-word Stroop stimuli indicated conflict; however, conflict was even greater when a color cue correctly predicted the Stroop target's color (match) than when it did not (nonmatch). A predominantly anterior network was activated for Stroop-match and a predominantly posterior network was activated for Stroop-nonmatch. Thus, when a stimulus feature did not match the expected feature, a perceptually-driven posterior attention system was engaged, whereas when interfering, automatically-processed semantic information required inhibition of pre-potent responses, an action-driven anterior control system was engaged. These findings show a double dissociation of anterior and posterior cortical systems engaging in different types of control for perceptually-driven and action-driven conflict resolution.

  8. Analysis of Intelligent Transportation Systems Using Model-Driven Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Isabel, Alberto; Fuentes-Fernández, Rubén

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSs) integrate information, sensor, control, and communication technologies to provide transport related services. Their users range from everyday commuters to policy makers and urban planners. Given the complexity of these systems and their environment, their study in real settings is frequently unfeasible. Simulations help to address this problem, but present their own issues: there can be unintended mistakes in the transition from models to code; their platforms frequently bias modeling; and it is difficult to compare works that use different models and tools. In order to overcome these problems, this paper proposes a framework for a model-driven development of these simulations. It is based on a specific modeling language that supports the integrated specification of the multiple facets of an ITS: people, their vehicles, and the external environment; and a network of sensors and actuators conveniently arranged and distributed that operates over them. The framework works with a model editor to generate specifications compliant with that language, and a code generator to produce code from them using platform specifications. There are also guidelines to help researchers in the application of this infrastructure. A case study on advanced management of traffic lights with cameras illustrates its use. PMID:26083232

  9. Analysis of Intelligent Transportation Systems Using Model-Driven Simulations.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Isabel, Alberto; Fuentes-Fernández, Rubén

    2015-06-15

    Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSs) integrate information, sensor, control, and communication technologies to provide transport related services. Their users range from everyday commuters to policy makers and urban planners. Given the complexity of these systems and their environment, their study in real settings is frequently unfeasible. Simulations help to address this problem, but present their own issues: there can be unintended mistakes in the transition from models to code; their platforms frequently bias modeling; and it is difficult to compare works that use different models and tools. In order to overcome these problems, this paper proposes a framework for a model-driven development of these simulations. It is based on a specific modeling language that supports the integrated specification of the multiple facets of an ITS: people, their vehicles, and the external environment; and a network of sensors and actuators conveniently arranged and distributed that operates over them. The framework works with a model editor to generate specifications compliant with that language, and a code generator to produce code from them using platform specifications. There are also guidelines to help researchers in the application of this infrastructure. A case study on advanced management of traffic lights with cameras illustrates its use.

  10. Record-breaking avalanches in driven threshold systems.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Robert; Davidsen, Jörn; Tiampo, Kristy F

    2013-05-01

    Record-breaking avalanches generated by the dynamics of several driven nonlinear threshold models are studied. Such systems are characterized by intermittent behavior, where a slow buildup of energy is punctuated by an abrupt release of energy through avalanche events, which usually follow scale-invariant statistics. From the simulations of these systems it is possible to extract sequences of record-breaking avalanches, where each subsequent record-breaking event is larger in magnitude than all previous events. In the present work, several cellular automata are analyzed, among them the sandpile model, the Manna model, the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model, and the forest-fire model to investigate the record-breaking statistics of model avalanches that exhibit temporal and spatial correlations. Several statistical measures of record-breaking events are derived analytically and confirmed through numerical simulations. The statistics of record-breaking avalanches for the four models are compared to those of record-breaking events extracted from the sequences of independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. It is found that the statistics of record-breaking avalanches for the above cellular automata exhibit behavior different from that observed for i.i.d. random variables, which in turn can be used to characterize complex spatiotemporal dynamics. The most pronounced deviations are observed in the case of the OFC model with a strong dependence on the conservation parameter of the model. This indicates that avalanches in the OFC model are not independent and exhibit spatiotemporal correlations.

  11. Expert system driven fuzzy control application to power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoukalas, L.H.; Berkan, R.C.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Uhrig, R.E.

    1990-12-31

    For the purpose of nonlinear control and uncertainty/imprecision handling, fuzzy controllers have recently reached acclaim and increasing commercial application. The fuzzy control algorithms often require a ``supervisory`` routine that provides necessary heuristics for interface, adaptation, mode selection and other implementation issues. Performance characteristics of an on-line fuzzy controller depend strictly on the ability of such supervisory routines to manipulate the fuzzy control algorithm and enhance its control capabilities. This paper describes an expert system driven fuzzy control design application to nuclear reactor control, for the automated start-up control of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. The methodology is verified through computer simulations using a valid nonlinear model. The necessary heuristic decisions are identified that are vitally important for the implemention of fuzzy control in the actual plant. An expert system structure incorporating the necessary supervisory routines is discussed. The discussion also includes the possibility of synthesizing the fuzzy, exact and combined reasoning to include both inexact concepts, uncertainty and fuzziness, within the same environment.

  12. Transition state theory for activated systems with driven anharmonic barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revuelta, F.; Craven, Galen T.; Bartsch, Thomas; Borondo, F.; Benito, R. M.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2017-08-01

    Classical transition state theory has been extended to address chemical reactions across barriers that are driven and anharmonic. This resolves a challenge to the naive theory that necessarily leads to recrossings and approximate rates because it relies on a fixed dividing surface. We develop both perturbative and numerical methods for the computation of a time-dependent recrossing-free dividing surface for a model anharmonic system in a solvated environment that interacts strongly with an oscillatory external field. We extend our previous work, which relied either on a harmonic approximation or on periodic force driving. We demonstrate that the reaction rate, expressed as the long-time flux of reactive trajectories, can be extracted directly from the stability exponents, namely, Lyapunov exponents, of the moving dividing surface. Comparison to numerical results demonstrates the accuracy and robustness of this approach for the computation of optimal (recrossing-free) dividing surfaces and reaction rates in systems with Markovian solvation forces. The resulting reaction rates are in strong agreement with those determined from the long-time flux of reactive trajectories.

  13. Transition state theory for activated systems with driven anharmonic barriers.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, F; Craven, Galen T; Bartsch, Thomas; Borondo, F; Benito, R M; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2017-08-21

    Classical transition state theory has been extended to address chemical reactions across barriers that are driven and anharmonic. This resolves a challenge to the naive theory that necessarily leads to recrossings and approximate rates because it relies on a fixed dividing surface. We develop both perturbative and numerical methods for the computation of a time-dependent recrossing-free dividing surface for a model anharmonic system in a solvated environment that interacts strongly with an oscillatory external field. We extend our previous work, which relied either on a harmonic approximation or on periodic force driving. We demonstrate that the reaction rate, expressed as the long-time flux of reactive trajectories, can be extracted directly from the stability exponents, namely, Lyapunov exponents, of the moving dividing surface. Comparison to numerical results demonstrates the accuracy and robustness of this approach for the computation of optimal (recrossing-free) dividing surfaces and reaction rates in systems with Markovian solvation forces. The resulting reaction rates are in strong agreement with those determined from the long-time flux of reactive trajectories.

  14. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  15. Subcritical-Water Extraction of Organics from Solid Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank; Patrick, Steven; Kirby, James; Bickler, Donald; Willis, Peter; Pelletier, Christine; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for extracting organic compounds from soils, sands, and other solid matrix materials utilizes water at subcritical temperature and pressure as a solvent. The apparatus, called subcritical water extractor (SCWE), is a prototype of subsystems of future instrumentation systems to be used in searching for organic compounds as signs of past or present life on Mars. An aqueous solution generated by an apparatus like this one can be analyzed by any of a variety of established chromatographic or spectroscopic means to detect the dissolved organic compound( s). The apparatus can be used on Earth: indeed, in proof-of-concept experiments, SCWE was used to extract amino acids from soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile), which was chosen because the dryness and other relevant soil conditions there approximate those on Mars. The design of the apparatus is based partly on the fact that the relative permittivity (also known as the dielectric constant) of liquid water varies with temperature and pressure. At a temperature of 30 C and a pressure of 0.1 MPa, the relative permittivity of water is 79.6, due to the strong dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions between individual molecular dipoles. As the temperature increases, increasing thermal energy causes increasing disorientation of molecular dipoles, with a consequent decrease in relative permittivity. For example, water at a temperature of 325 C and pressure of 20 MPa has a relative permittivity of 17.5, which is similar to the relative permittivities of such nonpolar organic solvents as 1-butanol (17.8). In the operation of this apparatus, the temperature and pressure of water are adjusted so that the water can be used in place of commonly used organic solvents to extract compounds that have dissimilar physical and chemical properties.

  16. OPIC: Ontology-driven Patient Information Capturing System for Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Zhao, Meng; Luo, Lingyun; Bozorgi, Alireza; Gupta, Deepak; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of paper or document-based forms for capturing patient information in various clinical settings, for example in epilepsy centers, is a critical barrier for large-scale, multi-center research studies that require interoperable, consistent, and error-free data collection. This challenge can be addressed by a web-accessible and flexible patient data capture system that is supported by a common terminological system to facilitate data re-usability, sharing, and integration. We present OPIC, an Ontology-driven Patient Information Capture (OPIC) system that uses a domain-specific epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) to (1) support structured entry of multi-modal epilepsy data, (2) proactively ensure quality of data through use of ontology terms in drop-down menus, and (3) identify and index clinically relevant ontology terms in free-text fields to improve accuracy of subsequent analytical queries (e.g. cohort identification). EpSO, modeled using the Web Ontology Language (OWL), conforms to the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and terminological commission. OPIC has been developed using agile software engineering methodology for rapid development cycles in close collaboration with domain expert and end users. We report the result from the initial deployment of OPIC at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UH CMC) epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) as part of the NIH-funded project on Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Preliminary user evaluation shows that OPIC has achieved its design objectives to be an intuitive patient information capturing system that also reduces the potential for data entry errors and variability in use of epilepsy terms. PMID:23304354

  17. OPIC: Ontology-driven Patient Information Capturing system for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Satya S; Zhao, Meng; Luo, Lingyun; Bozorgi, Alireza; Gupta, Deepak; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of paper or document-based forms for capturing patient information in various clinical settings, for example in epilepsy centers, is a critical barrier for large-scale, multi-center research studies that require interoperable, consistent, and error-free data collection. This challenge can be addressed by a web-accessible and flexible patient data capture system that is supported by a common terminological system to facilitate data re-usability, sharing, and integration. We present OPIC, an Ontology-driven Patient Information Capture (OPIC) system that uses a domain-specific epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) to (1) support structured entry of multi-modal epilepsy data, (2) proactively ensure quality of data through use of ontology terms in drop-down menus, and (3) identify and index clinically relevant ontology terms in free-text fields to improve accuracy of subsequent analytical queries (e.g. cohort identification). EpSO, modeled using the Web Ontology Language (OWL), conforms to the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and terminological commission. OPIC has been developed using agile software engineering methodology for rapid development cycles in close collaboration with domain expert and end users. We report the result from the initial deployment of OPIC at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UH CMC) epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) as part of the NIH-funded project on Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Preliminary user evaluation shows that OPIC has achieved its design objectives to be an intuitive patient information capturing system that also reduces the potential for data entry errors and variability in use of epilepsy terms.

  18. Polychlorinated biphenyls degradation in subcritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doctor, Ninad; Yang, Larry; Yang, Yu

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the degradation of PCB-118, PCB-156, and PCB-180 congeners under subcritical conditions has been investigated. Stainless reaction vessels were used to carry out the heating of reaction mixtures. Liquid-liquid extraction of the reaction mixtures was conducted prior to GC analysis. Approximately 30% PCBs were degraded by 30% hydrogen peroxide after 24 hours of reaction time but without heating the mixtures. The percent degradation of PCBs was however improved to approximately 60% after heating the mixtures at 300 °C for an hour. In general, the PCB degradation efficiency was enhanced by increasing the reaction temperature from 300 and 350 °C. The percent degradation of PCBs was mostly improved by increasing the heating time from 1 hour to 6 hours. In addition, increasing the percentage of hydrogen peroxide significantly increases the rate of PCB destruction.

  19. Microdeformation and subcritical cracking in chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, Anne; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deformation processes in chalks, both in relation to changing pore fluids and stress conditions has been of great interest as chalk is an important reservoir rock for both hydrocarbons and ground water. Lately it has also gained interest as a potential reservoir rock for captured CO2. Chalks are composed of large amounts of biogenic calcite grains, the skeletal debris of marine microorganisms. Its deformation is highly time and stress dependent, and governed by a transition from distributed to localized deformation at the onset of yield, affected by mechanisms such as subcritical crack growth and pore collapse. We present a microdeformation rig which makes use of thermal expansion as a means of subjecting small samples to strictly controlled tensile stresses. High resolution imaging provides resolutions down to 0.5 micrometers, enabling study of pore scale processes during slow deformation. Examples of localized and distributed deformation are presented.

  20. Massive subcritical compact arrays of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Two experimental critical-approach programs are reported. Both were performed at the Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colorado; and both date back to the late 1960s. Both involve very large arrays of massive plutonium ingots. These ingots had been cast in the foundry at the Rocky Flats Plant as part of their routine production operations; they were not specially prepared for either study. Consequently, considerable variation in ingot mass is encountered. This mass varied between approximately 7 kg and a little more than 10 kg. One program, performed in the spring of 1969, involved stacked arrays of ingots contained within cylindrical, disk-shaped, thin, steel cans. This program studied four arrays defined by the pattern of steel cans in a single layer. The four were: 1 x N, 3 x N, 2 x 2 x N, and 3 x 3 x N. The second was a tightly-packed, triangular-pitched patterns; the last two were square-pitched patterns. The other program, performed about a year earlier, involved similar ingots also contained in similar steel cans, but these canned plutonium ingots were placed in commercial steel drums. This study pertained to one-, two-, and three-layered horizontal arrays of drums. All cases proved to be well subcritical. Most would have remained subcritical had the parameters of the array under study been continued infinitely beyond the reciprocal multiplication safety limit. In one case for the drum arrays, an uncertain extrapolation of the data of the earlier program suggests that criticality might have eventually been attained had several thousand additional kilograms of plutonium been available for use.

  1. Carbon dioxide modified subcritical water chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fogwill, Michael O; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2008-07-18

    A novel method of increasing the elution strength in subcritical water chromatography (SWC) by adding CO2 to the water mobile phase is presented. Since the polarity of water reduces dramatically with increasing temperature, this property is used in SWC to create an isocratic mobile phase with tunable elutropic strength in reversed-phase separations. Unfortunately, thermal stability of the stationary phase dictates the upper temperature limit and therefore also the minimum available mobile phase polarity. As a result SWC is often not very effective at eluting non-polar analytes. However, when CO2 is blended into subcritical water, a considerable reduction in mobile phase polarity results and improves such separations. For example, in conventional SWC 1-octanol is not observed to elute from a PRP-1 column after several hours at the maximum column temperature of 200 degrees C. In contrast to this, when CO2 is present at 180atm (1atm=101325Pa) in the mobile phase, 1-octanol elutes with good peak shape in less than 4min at only 100 degrees C. The technique is applied to the separation of a variety of analytes which have previously been challenging or even not possible to analyze by conventional SWC. Further, the ability to use temperature and composition programming with the blended CO2/water mobile phase in SWC is also presented and discussed. Overall, the developed method considerably extends the range of non-polar analytes amenable to SWC analysis, while maintaining the beneficial conventional SWC features of flame ionization detection and environmental compatibility.

  2. Ultraintense Laser-Driven Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Plane Symmetric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamo, James

    We consider the relativistic hydrodynamics of a plane symmetric, charged fluid system driven by an ultra-violent, ultra-intense laser. The resulting particle motion will be relativistic due to the strength of the laser. The fluid will accelerate violently with respect to an observer in the laboratory, so although the arena for the evolution is a smooth Minkowski spacetime, methods of general relativity will be invoked. Many systems in relativity can be cast into field theories, and we first extend the variational formulation of special relativity to laser-matter interactions. From this, a full set of four Euler equations arise that govern the hydrodynamics of a general 4-dimensional laser-matter system. The plane symmetry, however, naturally gives rise to two Killing vectors. This allows for a 2+2 reduction process to be used to analyze the system. This will allow for a reformulation of the 4-dimensional system of interacting particles as a 2-dimensional system of interacting plasma sheets. The transverse particle motion is shown to produce a change in the "effective mass" of the plasma sheets, which allows one to consider the sheets as a single entity. To achieve this, we first give the details of this 2+2 formalism and show how it can be used to write the underlying space time as a product of a base manifold and transverse Euclidean planes. We then establish a natural isomorphism between the geometrical objects (vectors, covectors, and tensors) on these manifolds. By examining the effects of this procedure in the LAB and comoving coordinate systems, we establish a coordinate transformation between them. Finally, we apply the results of the 2+2 split to the 4-dimensional Euler equations, which admit two constants of motion. This allows for us to define a plasma sheet as an equivalence class of particles whose spacetime positions differ only longitudinally and define a sheet proper time. Furthermore, the notion of particle thermodynamics can be, and is, generalized

  3. Thermopower Wave-Driven Hybrid Supercapacitor Charging System.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongjoon; Hwang, Hayoung; Yeo, Taehan; Seo, Byungseok; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-11-16

    The development of new energy sources and harvesting methods has increased with the rapid development of multiscale wireless and portable systems. A thermopower wave (TW) is a potential portable energy source that exhibits a high power density. TWs generate electrical energy via the transport of charges inside micro- or nanostructured materials. This transport is induced by self-propagating combustion. Despite the high specific power of TWs, the generation of energy by TWs is transient, making a TW device a one-time use source, which is a critical limitation on the further advancement of this technology. Herein, we first report the development of a hybrid supercapacitor charging system driven by consecutive TWs to accumulate multiple amounts of energy generated by the repetitive combustion of the chemical fuel. In this study, hybrid layers composed of a supercapacitor (poly(vinyl alcohol)/MnO2/nickel) and solid fuel layer (nitrocellulose film) were fabricated as one integrated platform. Combustion was initiated by the ignition of the fuel layer, resulting in the production of electrical energy, attributed to the potential difference between two electrodes, and the transport of charges inside one of the electrodes. Electrical energy could simultaneously and directly charge the supercapacitor, and the discharged voltage could be significantly increased in comparison with the voltage level before the application of a TW. Furthermore, the application of multiple TWs in succession in the hybrid supercapacitor charging system successfully allowed for stack voltage amplification, which was synchronized to each TW. The results of this study could be used to understand the underlying phenomena for charging supercapacitors with the variation of thermal energy and to advance the application of TWs as more efficient, practical energy sources.

  4. Dynamic data driven bidirectional reflectance distribution function measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauyoks, Stephen E.; Freda, Sam; Marciniak, Michael A.

    2014-09-01

    The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is a fitted distribution function that defines the scatter of light off of a surface. The BRDF is dependent on the directions of both the incident and scattered light. Because of the vastness of the measurement space of all possible incident and reflected directions, the calculation of BRDF is usually performed using a minimal amount of measured data. This may lead to poor fits and uncertainty in certain regions of incidence or reflection. A dynamic data driven application system (DDDAS) is a concept that uses an algorithm on collected data to influence the collection space of future data acquisition. The authors propose a DDD-BRDF algorithm that fits BRDF data as it is being acquired and uses on-the-fly fittings of various BRDF models to adjust the potential measurement space. In doing so, it is hoped to find the best model to fit a surface and the best global fit of the BRDF with a minimum amount of collection space.

  5. Solar flares and avalanches in driven dissipative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Bromund, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    The contention of Lu and Hamilton (1991) that the energy release process in solar flares can be understood as avalanches of many small reconnection events is further developed. The dynamics of the complex magnetized plasma of solar active regions is modeled with a simple driven dissipative system, consisting of a vector field with local instabilities that cause rapid diffusion of the field. It is argued that the avalanches in this model are analogous to solar flares. The distributions of avalanches in this model are compared with the solar flare frequency distributions obtained from ISEE 3/ICE satellite observations. Quantitative agreement is found with the energy, peak luminosity, and duration distributions over four orders of magnitude in flare energy, from the largest flares down to the completeness limit of the observations. It is predicted that the power-law solar flare frequency distributions will be found to continue downward with the same logarithmic slopes to an energy of about 3 x 10 exp 25 ergs and duration of about 0.3 s, with deviations from power-law behavior below these values.

  6. Cosine edge modes in a periodically driven quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satija, Indubala I.; Zhao, Erhai

    2016-12-01

    Time-periodic (Floquet) topological phases of matter exhibit bulk-edge relationships that are more complex than static topological insulators and superconductors. Finding the edge modes unique to driven systems usually requires numerics. Here we present a minimal two-band model of Floquet topological insulators and semimetals in two dimensions where all the bulk and edge properties can be obtained analytically. It is based on the extended Harper model of quantum Hall effect at flux one-half. We show that periodical driving gives rise to a series of phases characterized by a pair of integers. The model has a most striking feature: the spectrum of the edge modes is always given by a single cosine function, ω (ky) ∝cosky where ky is the wave number along the edge, as if it is freely dispersing and completely decoupled from the bulk. The cosine mode is robust against the change in driving parameters. It also persists in the semimetallic phases with Dirac points.

  7. Solar flares and avalanches in driven dissipative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Bromund, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    The contention of Lu and Hamilton (1991) that the energy release process in solar flares can be understood as avalanches of many small reconnection events is further developed. The dynamics of the complex magnetized plasma of solar active regions is modeled with a simple driven dissipative system, consisting of a vector field with local instabilities that cause rapid diffusion of the field. It is argued that the avalanches in this model are analogous to solar flares. The distributions of avalanches in this model are compared with the solar flare frequency distributions obtained from ISEE 3/ICE satellite observations. Quantitative agreement is found with the energy, peak luminosity, and duration distributions over four orders of magnitude in flare energy, from the largest flares down to the completeness limit of the observations. It is predicted that the power-law solar flare frequency distributions will be found to continue downward with the same logarithmic slopes to an energy of about 3 x 10 exp 25 ergs and duration of about 0.3 s, with deviations from power-law behavior below these values.

  8. Magnetically driven microrobotic system for cancer cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Lucarini, G; Iacovacci, V; Ricotti, L; Comisso, N; Dario, P; Menciassi, A

    2015-08-01

    Lab-on-a-chip applications, such as single cell manipulation and targeted delivery of chemicals, could greatly benefit from mobile untethered microdevices able to move in fluidic environments by using magnetic fields. In this paper a magnetically driven microrobotic system enabling the controlled locomotion of objects placed at the air/liquid interface is proposed and exploited for cell manipulation. In particular authors report the design, fabrication and testing of a polymeric thin film-based magnetic microrobot (called "FilmBot") used as a support for navigating cancer cells. By finely controlling magnetic film locomotion, it is possible to navigate the cells by exploiting their adhesion to the film without affecting their integrity. Preliminary in vitro tests demonstrated that the magnetic thin film is able to act as substrate for T24 bladder cancer cells without affecting their viability and that film locomotion can be magnetically controlled (with a magnetic field and a gradient of 6 mT and 0.6 T/m, respectively) along specific directions, with a mean speed of about 3 mm/s.

  9. Event-Driven Random-Access-Windowing CCD Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve; Portillo, Angel; Ortiz, Gerardo; Alexander, James; Lam, Raymond; Liu, William

    2004-01-01

    A charge-coupled-device (CCD) based high-speed imaging system, called a realtime, event-driven (RARE) camera, is undergoing development. This camera is capable of readout from multiple subwindows [also known as regions of interest (ROIs)] within the CCD field of view. Both the sizes and the locations of the ROIs can be controlled in real time and can be changed at the camera frame rate. The predecessor of this camera was described in High-Frame-Rate CCD Camera Having Subwindow Capability (NPO- 30564) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 12 (December 2002), page 26. The architecture of the prior camera requires tight coupling between camera control logic and an external host computer that provides commands for camera operation and processes pixels from the camera. This tight coupling limits the attainable frame rate and functionality of the camera. The design of the present camera loosens this coupling to increase the achievable frame rate and functionality. From a host computer perspective, the readout operation in the prior camera was defined on a per-line basis; in this camera, it is defined on a per-ROI basis. In addition, the camera includes internal timing circuitry. This combination of features enables real-time, event-driven operation for adaptive control of the camera. Hence, this camera is well suited for applications requiring autonomous control of multiple ROIs to track multiple targets moving throughout the CCD field of view. Additionally, by eliminating the need for control intervention by the host computer during the pixel readout, the present design reduces ROI-readout times to attain higher frame rates. This camera (see figure) includes an imager card consisting of a commercial CCD imager and two signal-processor chips. The imager card converts transistor/ transistor-logic (TTL)-level signals from a field programmable gate array (FPGA) controller card. These signals are transmitted to the imager card via a low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS) cable

  10. Experimental investigation of static ice refrigeration air conditioning system driven by distributed photovoltaic energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. F.; Li, M.; Luo, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Yu, Q. F.; Hassanien, R. H. E.

    2016-08-01

    The static ice refrigeration air conditioning system (SIRACS) driven by distributed photovoltaic energy system (DPES) was proposed and the test experiment have been investigated in this paper. Results revealed that system energy utilization efficiency is low because energy losses were high in ice making process of ice slide maker. So the immersed evaporator and co-integrated exchanger were suggested in system structure optimization analysis and the system COP was improved nearly 40%. At the same time, we have researched that ice thickness and ice super-cooled temperature changed along with time and the relationship between system COP and ice thickness was obtained.

  11. Astrobionibbler: In Situ Microfluidic Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, A. C.; Fisher, A. M.; Takano, N.; Fors-Francis, K.; Sherrit, S.; Grunthaner, F.

    2016-10-01

    A fluidic-chip based instrument for subcritical water extraction (SCWE) of amino acids and other organics from powder samples has been developed. A variety of soil analog extractions have been performed to better understand SCWE capabilities.

  12. Structural changes in microcrystalline cellulose in subcritical water treatment.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Lasse K; Zuckerstätter, Gerhard; Penttilä, Paavo A; Milacher, Walter; Habicht, Wilhelm; Serimaa, Ritva; Kruse, Andrea; Sixta, Herbert

    2011-07-11

    Subcritical water is a high potential green chemical for the hydrolysis of cellulose. In this study microcrystalline cellulose was treated in subcritical water to study structural changes of the cellulose residues. The alterations in particle size and appearance were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and those in the degree of polymerization (DP) and molar mass distributions by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Further, changes in crystallinity and crystallite dimensions were quantified by wide-angle X-ray scattering and (13)C solid-state NMR. The results showed that the crystallinity remained practically unchanged throughout the treatment, whereas the size of the remaining cellulose crystallites increased. Microcrystalline cellulose underwent significant depolymerization in subcritical water. However, depolymerization leveled off at a relatively high degree of polymerization. The molar mass distributions of the residues showed a bimodal form. We infer that cellulose gets dissolved in subcritical water only after extensive depolymerization.

  13. Pressure recovery, drag, and subcritical stability characteristics of conical supersonic diffusers with boundary-layer removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obey, Leonard T; Englert, Gerald W; Nussdorfer, Theodore J , Jr

    1952-01-01

    A study of two 20 degrees half-angle, low mass-flow ratio conical supersonic inlets with cone boundary-layer bleed was made on a 16-inch ram-jet engine in the Lewis 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel. A greater stable subcritical range of operation was obtained with the bleed inlets than with the corresponding inlet without boundary-layer bleed. The drag added by the bleed system was small.

  14. Image analysis driven single-cell analytics for systems microbiology.

    PubMed

    Balomenos, Athanasios D; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Aspridou, Zafiro; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P; Manolakos, Elias S

    2017-04-04

    Time-lapse microscopy is an essential tool for capturing and correlating bacterial morphology and gene expression dynamics at single-cell resolution. However state-of-the-art computational methods are limited in terms of the complexity of cell movies that they can analyze and lack of automation. The proposed Bacterial image analysis driven Single Cell Analytics (BaSCA) computational pipeline addresses these limitations thus enabling high throughput systems microbiology. BaSCA can segment and track multiple bacterial colonies and single-cells, as they grow and divide over time (cell segmentation and lineage tree construction) to give rise to dense communities with thousands of interacting cells in the field of view. It combines advanced image processing and machine learning methods to deliver very accurate bacterial cell segmentation and tracking (F-measure over 95%) even when processing images of imperfect quality with several overcrowded colonies in the field of view. In addition, BaSCA extracts on the fly a plethora of single-cell properties, which get organized into a database summarizing the analysis of the cell movie. We present alternative ways to analyze and visually explore the spatiotemporal evolution of single-cell properties in order to understand trends and epigenetic effects across cell generations. The robustness of BaSCA is demonstrated across different imaging modalities and microscopy types. BaSCA can be used to analyze accurately and efficiently cell movies both at a high resolution (single-cell level) and at a large scale (communities with many dense colonies) as needed to shed light on e.g. how bacterial community effects and epigenetic information transfer play a role on important phenomena for human health, such as biofilm formation, persisters' emergence etc. Moreover, it enables studying the role of single-cell stochasticity without losing sight of community effects that may drive it.

  15. Exploring How Weathering Related Stresses and Subcritical Crack Growth May Influence the Size of Sediment Produced From Different Rock Types.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, M. C.; Hallet, B.; Hancock, G. S.; Mackenzie-Helnwein, P.; Keanini, R.

    2016-12-01

    The formation and diminution of rock debris, sediment and soil at and near Earth's surface is driven in large part by in situ, non-transport related, rock cracking. Given the relatively low magnitude stresses that arise in surface and near-surface settings, this production and diminution of granular material is likely strongly influenced and/or driven by subcritical crack growth (Eppes et al., 2016), cracking that occurs under stress loading conditions much lower than a rock's strength as typically measured in the laboratory under rapid loading. Despite a relatively sound understanding of subcritical crack growth through engineering and geophysical studies, its geomorphic and sedimentologic implications have only been minimally explored. Here, based on existing studies, we formulate several hypotheses to predict how weathering-induced stresses combined with the subcritical crack growth properties of rock may influence sediment size distribution. For example, subcritical crack growth velocity (v) can be described by v = CKIn where KI is the mode I (simple opening mode) stress intensity factor, a function of tensile stress at the crack tip and crack length; C is a rock- and environment-dependent constant; and n is material constant, the subcritical crack growth index. Fracture length and spacing in rock is strongly dependent on n, where higher n values result in fewer, more distally spaced cracks (e.g. Olsen, 1993). Thus, coarser sediment might be expected from rocks with higher n values. Weathering-related stresses such as thermal stresses and mineral hydration, however, can disproportionally stress boundaries between minerals with contrasting thermal or chemical properties and orientation, resulting in granular disintegration. Thus, rocks with properties favorable to inducing these stresses might produce sediment whose size is reflective of its constituent grains. We begin to test these hypotheses through a detailed examination of crack and rock characteristics in

  16. Exponential decay of spatial correlation in driven diffusive system: A universal feature of macroscopic homogeneous state.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-25

    Driven diffusive systems have been a paradigm for modelling many physical, chemical, and biological transport processes. In the systems, spatial correlation plays an important role in the emergence of a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and exhibits rich features such as pronounced oscillations. However, the lack of analytical results of spatial correlation precludes us from fully understanding the effect of spatial correlation on the dynamics of the system. Here we offer precise analytical predictions of the spatial correlation in a typical driven diffusive system, namely facilitated asymmetric exclusion process. We find theoretically that the correlation between two sites decays exponentially as their distance increases, which is in good agreement with numerical simulations. Furthermore, we find the exponential decay is a universal property of macroscopic homogeneous state in a broad class of 1D driven diffusive systems. Our findings deepen the understanding of many nonequilibrium phenomena resulting from spatial correlation in driven diffusive systems.

  17. Exponential decay of spatial correlation in driven diffusive system: A universal feature of macroscopic homogeneous state

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Driven diffusive systems have been a paradigm for modelling many physical, chemical, and biological transport processes. In the systems, spatial correlation plays an important role in the emergence of a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and exhibits rich features such as pronounced oscillations. However, the lack of analytical results of spatial correlation precludes us from fully understanding the effect of spatial correlation on the dynamics of the system. Here we offer precise analytical predictions of the spatial correlation in a typical driven diffusive system, namely facilitated asymmetric exclusion process. We find theoretically that the correlation between two sites decays exponentially as their distance increases, which is in good agreement with numerical simulations. Furthermore, we find the exponential decay is a universal property of macroscopic homogeneous state in a broad class of 1D driven diffusive systems. Our findings deepen the understanding of many nonequilibrium phenomena resulting from spatial correlation in driven diffusive systems. PMID:26804770

  18. Buckle Driven Delamination in Thin Hard Film Compliant Substrate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, N. R.; Reedy, E. D.; Corona, E.; Adams, D. P.; Kennedy, M. S.; Cordill, M. J.; Bahr, D. F.

    2010-06-01

    Deformation and fracture of thin films on compliant substrates are key factors constraining the performance of emerging flexible substrate devices. [1-3] These systems often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films and stretchable interconnects where differing properties induce high normal and shear stresses. [4] As long as the films remain bonded to the substrates, they may deform far beyond their freestanding form. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure. [3] Experimentally it is very difficult to measure properties in these systems at sub-micron and nanoscales. Theoretically it is very difficult to determine the contributions from the films, interfaces, and substrates. As a result our understanding of deformation and fracture behavior in compliant substrate systems is limited. This motivated a study of buckle driven delamination of thin hard tungsten films on pure PMMA substrates. The films were sputter deposited to thicknesses of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 400 nm with a residual compressive stress of 1.7 GPa. An aluminum oxide interlayer was added on several samples to alter interfacial composition. Buckles formed spontaneously on the PMMA substrates following film deposition. On films without the aluminum oxide interlayer, an extensive network of small telephone cord buckles formed following deposition, interspersed with regions of larger telephone cord buckles. (Figure 1) On films with an aluminum oxide interlayer, telephone cord buckles formed creating a uniform widely spaced pattern. Through-substrate optical observations revealed matching buckle patterns along the film-substrate interface indicating that delamination occurred for large and small buckles with and without an interlayer. The coexistence of large and small buckles on the same substrate led to two distinct behaviors as shown in Figure 2 where normalized buckle heights are plotted against normalized film stress. The behaviors deviate significantly from

  19. Buckle driven delamination in thin hard film compliant substrate systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Cordill, Megan J.; Adams, David Price; Moody, Neville Reid; Corona, Edmundo; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2010-06-01

    Deformation and fracture of thin films on compliant substrates are key factors constraining the performance of emerging flexible substrate devices. These systems often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films and stretchable interconnects where differing properties induce high normal and shear stresses. As long as the films remain bonded to the substrates, they may deform far beyond their freestanding form. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure. Experimentally it is very difficult to measure properties in these systems at sub-micron and nanoscales. Theoretically it is very difficult to determine the contributions from the films, interfaces, and substrates. As a result our understanding of deformation and fracture behavior in compliant substrate systems is limited. This motivated a study of buckle driven delamination of thin hard tungsten films on pure PMMA substrates. The films were sputter deposited to thicknesses of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 400 nm with a residual compressive stress of 1.7 GPa. An aluminum oxide interlayer was added on several samples to alter interfacial composition. Buckles formed spontaneously on the PMMA substrates following film deposition. On films without the aluminum oxide interlayer, an extensive network of small telephone cord buckles formed following deposition, interspersed with regions of larger telephone cord buckles. On films with an aluminum oxide interlayer, telephone cord buckles formed creating a uniform widely spaced pattern. Through-substrate optical observations revealed matching buckle patterns along the film-substrate interface indicating that delamination occurred for large and small buckles with and without an interlayer. The coexistence of large and small buckles on the same substrate led to two distinct behaviors as shown in Figure 2 where normalized buckle heights are plotted against normalized film stress. The behaviors deviate significantly from behavior predicted by

  20. Evaluation of lightning accommodation systems for wind-driven turbine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankaitis, H.

    1982-01-01

    Wind-driven turbine generators are being evaluated as an alternative source of electric energy. Areas of favorable location for the wind-driven turbines (high wind density) coincide with areas of high incidence of thunderstorm activity. These locations, coupled with the 30-m or larger diameter rotor blades, make the wind-driven turbine blades probable terminations for lightning strikes. Several candidate systems of lightning accommodation for composite-structural-material blades were designed and their effectiveness evaluated by submitting the systems to simulated lightning strikes. The test data were analyzed and system design were reviewed on the basis of the analysis.

  1. Measurements of the subcriticality using advanced technique of shooting source during operation of NPP reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, G. V.; Petrov, V. V.; Bobylyov, V. T.; Butov, R. I.; Zhukov, A. M.; Sladkov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    According to the rules of nuclear safety, the measurements of the subcriticality of reactors should be carried out in the process of performing nuclear hazardous operations. An advanced technique of shooting source of neutrons is proposed to meet this requirement. As such a source, a pulsed neutron source (PNS) is used. In order to realize this technique, it is recommended to enable a PNS with a frequency of 1-20 Hz. The PNS is stopped after achieving a steady-state (on average) number of neutrons in the reactor volume. The change in the number of neutrons in the reactor volume is measured in time with an interval of discreteness of ˜0.1 s. The results of these measurements with the application of a system of point-kinetics equations are used in order to calculate the sought subcriticality. The basic idea of the proposed technique used to measure the subcriticality is elaborated in a series of experiments on the Kvant assembly. The conditions which should be implemented in order to obtain a positive result of measurements are formulated. A block diagram of the basic version of the experimental setup is presented, whose main element is a pulsed neutron generator.

  2. Measurements of the subcriticality using advanced technique of shooting source during operation of NPP reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, G. V. Petrov, V. V.; Bobylyov, V. T.; Butov, R. I.; Zhukov, A. M.; Sladkov, A. A.

    2014-12-15

    According to the rules of nuclear safety, the measurements of the subcriticality of reactors should be carried out in the process of performing nuclear hazardous operations. An advanced technique of shooting source of neutrons is proposed to meet this requirement. As such a source, a pulsed neutron source (PNS) is used. In order to realize this technique, it is recommended to enable a PNS with a frequency of 1–20 Hz. The PNS is stopped after achieving a steady-state (on average) number of neutrons in the reactor volume. The change in the number of neutrons in the reactor volume is measured in time with an interval of discreteness of ∼0.1 s. The results of these measurements with the application of a system of point-kinetics equations are used in order to calculate the sought subcriticality. The basic idea of the proposed technique used to measure the subcriticality is elaborated in a series of experiments on the Kvant assembly. The conditions which should be implemented in order to obtain a positive result of measurements are formulated. A block diagram of the basic version of the experimental setup is presented, whose main element is a pulsed neutron generator.

  3. Advances in pulsed-power-driven radiography system design.

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Salvador; Hinshelwood, David D.; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Cordova, Steve Ray; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Weber, Bruce V.; Welch, Dale Robert; Shelton, Bradley Allen; Sceiford, Matthew E.; Cooperstein, Gerald; Gignac, Raymond Edward; Puetz, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David Vincent; Barker, Dennis L.; Van De Valde, David M.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Wilkins, Frank Lee; Molina, Isidro; Jaramillo, Deanna M.; Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Bailey, Vernon Leslie; Maenchen, John Eric; Johnson, David Lee; Griffin, Fawn A.; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Smith, Ian

    2004-07-01

    Flash x-ray radiography has undergone a transformation in recent years with the resurgence of interest in compact, high intensity pulsed-power-driven electron beam sources. The radiographic requirements and the choice of a consistent x-ray source determine the accelerator parameters, which can be met by demonstrated Induction Voltage Adder technologies. This paper reviews the state of the art and the recent advances which have improved performance by over an order of magnitude in beam brightness and radiographic utility.

  4. Reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kazeem Bode

    The uncertainties in the continuous supply of fossil fuels from the crisis-ridden oil-rich region of the world is fast shifting focus on the need to utilize cellulosic biomass and develop more efficient technologies for its conversion to fuels and chemicals. One such technology is the rapid degradation of cellulose in supercritical water without the need for an enzyme or inorganic catalyst such as acid. This project focused on the study of reaction kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis in subcritical and supercritical water. Cellulose reactions at hydrothermal conditions can proceed via the homogeneous route involving dissolution and hydrolysis or the heterogeneous path of surface hydrolysis. The work is divided into three main parts. First, the detailed kinetic analysis of cellulose reactions in micro- and tubular reactors was conducted. Reaction kinetics models were applied, and kinetics parameters at both subcritical and supercritical conditions were evaluated. The second major task was the evaluation of yields of water soluble hydrolysates obtained from the hydrolysis of cellulose and starch in hydrothermal reactors. Lastly, changes in molecular weight distribution due to hydrothermolytic degradation of cellulose were investigated. These changes were also simulated based on different modes of scission, and the pattern generated from simulation was compared with the distribution pattern from experiments. For a better understanding of the reaction kinetics of cellulose in subcritical and supercritical water, a series of reactions was conducted in the microreactor. Hydrolysis of cellulose was performed at subcritical temperatures ranging from 270 to 340 °C (tau = 0.40--0.88 s). For the dissolution of cellulose, the reaction was conducted at supercritical temperatures ranging from 375 to 395 °C (tau = 0.27--0.44 s). The operating pressure for the reactions at both subcritical and supercritical conditions was 5000 psig. The results show that the rate-limiting step in

  5. Mesoscopic approach to subcritical fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Maycon S.; Vieira, André P.; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate a model for fatigue crack growth in which damage accumulation is assumed to follow a power law of the local stress amplitude, a form that can be generically justified on the grounds of the approximately self-similar aspect of microcrack distributions. Our aim is to determine the relation between model ingredients and the Paris exponent governing subcritical crack-growth dynamics at the macroscopic scale, starting from a single small notch propagating along a fixed line. By a series of analytical and numerical calculations, we show that, in the absence of disorder, there is a critical damage-accumulation exponent γ , namely γc=2 , separating two distinct regimes of behavior for the Paris exponent m . For γ >γc , the Paris exponent is shown to assume the value m =γ , a result that proves robust against the separate introduction of various modifying ingredients. Explicitly, we deal here with (i) the requirement of a minimum stress for damage to occur, (ii) the presence of disorder in local damage thresholds, and (iii) the possibility of crack healing. On the other hand, in the regime γ <γc , the Paris exponent is seen to be sensitive to the different ingredients added to the model, with rapid healing or a high minimum stress for damage leading to m =2 for all γ <γc , in contrast with the linear dependence m =6 -2 γ observed for very long characteristic healing times in the absence of a minimum stress for damage. Upon the introduction of disorder on the local fatigue thresholds, which leads to the possible appearance of multiple cracks along the propagation line, the Paris exponent tends to m ≈4 for γ ≲2 while retaining the behavior m =γ for γ ≳4 .

  6. Event-driven management algorithm of an Engineering documents circulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenkov, V.; Zebzeev, A.; Gromakov, E.

    2015-04-01

    Development methodology of an engineering documents circulation system in the design company is reviewed. Discrete event-driven automatic models using description algorithms of project management is offered. Petri net use for dynamic design of projects is offered.

  7. Evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, A. S.; Hsieh, W. H.; Kuo, K. K.; Brown, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions was studied experimentally and theoretically. In experiments, the evaporation rate and surface temperature were measured for LOX strand vaporizing in helium environments at pressures ranging from 5 to 68 atmospheres. Gas sampling and chromatography analysis were also employed to profile the gas composition above the LOX surface for the purpose of model validation. A comprehensive theoretical model was formulated and solved numerically to simulate the evaporation process of LOX at high pressures. The model was based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentrations for a multicomponent system, with consideration of gravitational body force, solubility of ambient gases in liquid, and variable thermophysical properties. Good agreement between predictions and measured oxygen mole fraction profiles was obtained. The effect of pressure on the distribution of the Lewis number, as well as the effect of variable diffusion coefficient, were further examined to elucidate the high-pressure transport behavior exhibited in the LOX vaporization process.

  8. Evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, A. S.; Hsieh, W. H.; Kuo, K. K.; Brown, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The evaporation of LOX under supercritical and subcritical conditions was studied experimentally and theoretically. In experiments, the evaporation rate and surface temperature were measured for LOX strand vaporizing in helium environments at pressures ranging from 5 to 68 atmospheres. Gas sampling and chromatography analysis were also employed to profile the gas composition above the LOX surface for the purpose of model validation. A comprehensive theoretical model was formulated and solved numerically to simulate the evaporation process of LOX at high pressures. The model was based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentrations for a multicomponent system, with consideration of gravitational body force, solubility of ambient gases in liquid, and variable thermophysical properties. Good agreement between predictions and measured oxygen mole fraction profiles was obtained. The effect of pressure on the distribution of the Lewis number, as well as the effect of variable diffusion coefficient, were further examined to elucidate the high-pressure transport behavior exhibited in the LOX vaporization process.

  9. Research on influence factor about the dynamic characteristic of armored vehicle hydraulic-driven fan system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Zhiqiang; Mao, Feiyue; Liu, Xiangbo; Li, Huaying; Han, Shousong

    2017-01-01

    In view of the large power of armored vehicle cooling system, the demand for high fan speed control and energy saving, this paper expounds the basic composition and principle of hydraulic-driven fan system and establishes the mathematical model of the system. Through the simulation analysis of different parameters, such as displacement of motor and working volume of fan system, the influences of performance parameters on the dynamic characteristic of hydraulic-driven fan system are obtained, which can provide theoretical guidance for system optimization design.

  10. Transient Thermo-Hydraulic Analysis of the Windowless Target System for the Lead Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Accelerator Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Fosco; Ferri, Roberta; Moreau, Vincent

    2006-07-01

    The target system, whose function is to supply an external neutron source to the ADS sub-critical core to sustain the neutron chain reaction, is the most critical part of an ADS being subject to severe thermo-mechanical loading and material damage due to accelerator protons and fission neutrons. A windowless option was chosen as reference configuration for the target system of the LBE-cooled ADS within the European PDS-XADS project in order to reduce the material damage and to increase its life. This document deals with the thermo-hydraulic results of the calculations performed with STAR-CD and RELAP5 codes for studying the behaviour of the windowless target system during off-normal operating conditions. It also reports a description of modifications properly implemented in the codes needed for this analysis. The windowless target system shows a satisfactory thermo-hydraulic behaviour for the analysed accidents, except for the loss of both pumps without proton beam shut-off and the beam trips lasting more than one second. (authors)

  11. Numerical simulation of nonlinear dynamical systems driven by commutative noise

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, F. Biscay, R.J.; Jimenez, J.C.; Cruz, H. de la

    2007-10-01

    The local linearization (LL) approach has become an effective technique for the numerical integration of ordinary, random and stochastic differential equations. One of the reasons for this success is that the LL method achieves a convenient trade-off between numerical stability and computational cost. Besides, the LL method reproduces well the dynamics of nonlinear equations for which other classical methods fail. However, in the stochastic case, most of the reported works has been focused in Stochastic Differential Equations (SDE) driven by additive noise. This limits the applicability of the LL method since there is a number of interesting dynamics observed in equations with multiplicative noise. On the other hand, recent results show that commutative noise SDEs can be transformed into a random differential equation (RDE) by means of a random diffeomorfism (conjugacy). This paper takes advantages of such conjugacy property and the LL approach for defining a LL scheme for SDEs driven by commutative noise. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by means of numerical simulations.

  12. Event-driven contrastive divergence for spiking neuromorphic systems

    PubMed Central

    Neftci, Emre; Das, Srinjoy; Pedroni, Bruno; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) and Deep Belief Networks have been demonstrated to perform efficiently in a variety of applications, such as dimensionality reduction, feature learning, and classification. Their implementation on neuromorphic hardware platforms emulating large-scale networks of spiking neurons can have significant advantages from the perspectives of scalability, power dissipation and real-time interfacing with the environment. However, the traditional RBM architecture and the commonly used training algorithm known as Contrastive Divergence (CD) are based on discrete updates and exact arithmetics which do not directly map onto a dynamical neural substrate. Here, we present an event-driven variation of CD to train a RBM constructed with Integrate & Fire (I&F) neurons, that is constrained by the limitations of existing and near future neuromorphic hardware platforms. Our strategy is based on neural sampling, which allows us to synthesize a spiking neural network that samples from a target Boltzmann distribution. The recurrent activity of the network replaces the discrete steps of the CD algorithm, while Spike Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) carries out the weight updates in an online, asynchronous fashion. We demonstrate our approach by training an RBM composed of leaky I&F neurons with STDP synapses to learn a generative model of the MNIST hand-written digit dataset, and by testing it in recognition, generation and cue integration tasks. Our results contribute to a machine learning-driven approach for synthesizing networks of spiking neurons capable of carrying out practical, high-level functionality. PMID:24574952

  13. Event-driven contrastive divergence for spiking neuromorphic systems.

    PubMed

    Neftci, Emre; Das, Srinjoy; Pedroni, Bruno; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs) and Deep Belief Networks have been demonstrated to perform efficiently in a variety of applications, such as dimensionality reduction, feature learning, and classification. Their implementation on neuromorphic hardware platforms emulating large-scale networks of spiking neurons can have significant advantages from the perspectives of scalability, power dissipation and real-time interfacing with the environment. However, the traditional RBM architecture and the commonly used training algorithm known as Contrastive Divergence (CD) are based on discrete updates and exact arithmetics which do not directly map onto a dynamical neural substrate. Here, we present an event-driven variation of CD to train a RBM constructed with Integrate & Fire (I&F) neurons, that is constrained by the limitations of existing and near future neuromorphic hardware platforms. Our strategy is based on neural sampling, which allows us to synthesize a spiking neural network that samples from a target Boltzmann distribution. The recurrent activity of the network replaces the discrete steps of the CD algorithm, while Spike Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) carries out the weight updates in an online, asynchronous fashion. We demonstrate our approach by training an RBM composed of leaky I&F neurons with STDP synapses to learn a generative model of the MNIST hand-written digit dataset, and by testing it in recognition, generation and cue integration tasks. Our results contribute to a machine learning-driven approach for synthesizing networks of spiking neurons capable of carrying out practical, high-level functionality.

  14. Analysis of subcritical experiments using fresh and spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zino, John Frederick

    1999-11-01

    This research investigated the concepts associated with crediting the burnup of spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purposes of criticality safety. To accomplish this, a collaborative experimental research program was undertaken between Westinghouse, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) facility and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the program was to characterize the subcritical behavior of a small array of fresh and spent MURR fuel assemblies using the 252Cf Source-driven noise technique. An aluminum test rig was built which was capable of holding up to four, highly enriched (93.15 wt.% 235U) MURR fuel assemblies in a 2 x 2 array. The rig was outfitted with one source and four detector drywells which allowed researchers to perform active neutron noise measurements on the array of fuel assemblies. The 1 atmosphere gas 3He neutron detectors used to perform the measurements were quenched with CF4 gas to allow improved discrimination of the neutron signals in the very high gamma-ray fields associated with spent fuel (˜8000 R/hr). In addition, the detector drywells were outfitted with 1″ lead collars to provide additional gamma-ray shielding from the spent fuel. Reactivity changes were induced in the subcritical lattice by replacing individual fresh assemblies (in a 4-assembly array) with spent assemblies of known, maximum burnup (143 Mw-D). The absolute and relative measured reactivity changes were then compared to those predicted by three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations. The purpose of these comparisons was to investigate the accuracy of modern transport theory depletion calculations to accurately simulate the reactivity effects of burnup in spent nuclear fuel. A total of seven subcritical measurements were performed at the MURR reactor facility on July 20th and 27th, 1998. These measurements generated several estimates of prompt neutron decay constants (alpha) and ratios of spectral densities through frequency correlations

  15. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    information to analysts evaluating spent fuel subcriticality. The original purpose of the subcritical measurements was to validate computer model predictions that spent N Reactor fuel of a particular, typical exposure (2740 MWd/t) had a critical mass equal to twice that of unexposed fuel of the same type. The motivation for performing this work was driven by the need to increase spent fuel storage limits. These subcritical measurements confirmed the computer model predictions.

  16. Subcritical-supercritical bifurcation crossover in directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Williams, L.; Cummins, H. )

    1994-12-01

    The Mullins-Sekerka planar-cellular instability in directional solidification should be subcritical when the partition coefficient [ital k][lt]0.45 and latent heat is ignored. However, Merchant and Davis [Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 63], 573 (1989)] predicted that as the solute concentration is reduced, the increasingly important thermal diffusion field would lead to a crossover from a subcritical to a supercritical bifurcation. We have performed directional solidification experiments on a series of succinonitrile samples containing different concentrations of Coumarin 152, and have found preliminary evidence for the predicted crossover at a concentration [ital C][sub [ital t

  17. Driven diffusive systems with mutually interactive Langmuir kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuijk, H. D.; Rens, R.; Vahabi, M.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Sharma, A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the simple one-dimensional driven model, the totally asymmetric exclusion process, coupled to mutually interactive Langmuir kinetics. This model is motivated by recent studies on clustering of motor proteins on microtubules. In the proposed model, the attachment and detachment rates of a particle are modified depending upon the occupancy of neighboring sites. We first obtain continuum mean-field equations and in certain limiting cases obtain analytic solutions. We show how mutual interactions increase (decrease) the effects of boundaries on the phase behavior of the model. We perform Monte Carlo simulations and demonstrate that our analytical approximations are in good agreement with the numerics over a wide range of model parameters. We present phase diagrams over a selective range of parameters.

  18. Time-independent approximations for periodically driven systems with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahav, Saar; Geva, Eli; Fishman, Shmuel

    2005-03-01

    The classical dynamics of a particle that is driven by a rapidly oscillating potential (with frequency ω ) is studied. The motion is separated into a slow part and a fast part that oscillates around the slow part. The motion of the slow part is found to be described by a time-independent equation that is derived as an expansion in orders of ω-1 (in this paper terms to the order ω-3 are calculated explicitly). This time-independent equation is used to calculate the attracting fixed points and their basins of attraction. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical solutions of the original time-dependent problem.

  19. Radiolytic Gas-Driven Cryovolcanism in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Cooper, Paul D.; Sittler, Edward C.; Sturner, Steven J.; Rymer, Abigail M.; Hill, Matthew E.

    2007-01-01

    Water ices in surface crusts of Europa, Enceladus, Saturn's main rings, and Kuiper Belt Objects can become heavily oxidized from radiolytic chemical alteration of near-surface water ice by space environment irradiation. Oxidant accumulations and gas production are manifested in part through observed H2O2 on Europa. tentatively also on Enceladus, and found elsewhere in gaseous or condensed phases at moons and rings of Jupiter and Saturn. On subsequent chemical contact in sub-surface environments with significant concentrations of primordially abundant reductants such as NH3 and CH4, oxidants of radiolytic origin can react exothermically to power gas-driven cryovolcanism. The gas-piston effect enormously amplifies the mass flow output in the case of gas formation at basal thermal margins of incompressible fluid reservoirs. Surface irradiation, H2O2 production, NH3 oxidation, and resultant heat, gas, and gas-driven mass flow rates are computed in the fluid reservoir case for selected bodies. At Enceladus the oxidant power inputs are comparable to limits on nonthermal kinetic power for the south polar plumes. Total heat output and plume gas abundance may be accounted for at Enceladus if plume activity is cyclic in high and low "Old Faithful" phases, so that oxidants can accumulate during low activity phases. Interior upwelling of primordially abundant NH3 and CH4 hydrates is assumed to resupply the reductant fuels. Much lower irradiation fluxes on Kuiper Belt Objects require correspondingly larger times for accumulation of oxidants to produce comparable resurfacing, but brightness and surface composition of some objects suggest that such activity may be ongoing.

  20. Reflections on demand-oriented and demand-driven care within the current health care system.

    PubMed

    Rijckmans, Madeleine; Garretsen, Henk; Rijckmans, Jean-François; Janssen, Richard

    2007-12-01

    The authors describe models for the approach to demand-orientated and demand-driven health care as experienced in the Netherlands. The practical operation of the scheme is discussed including implications for financing and other aspects of regulation. The paper concludes that at present a demand-orientated system is feasible, but changes of a fundamental nature would be necessary to institute a successful operation of demand-driven health care, at least in the country the subject of this study.

  1. Data-driven Applications for the Sun-Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Advances in observational and data mining techniques allow extracting information from the large volume of Sun-Earth observational data that can be assimilated into first principles physical models. However, equations governing Sun-Earth phenomena are typically nonlinear, complex, and high-dimensional. The high computational demand of solving the full governing equations over a large range of scales precludes the use of a variety of useful assimilative tools that rely on applied mathematical and statistical techniques for quantifying uncertainty and predictability. Effective use of such tools requires the development of computationally efficient methods to facilitate fusion of data with models. This presentation will provide an overview of various existing as well as newly developed data-driven techniques adopted from atmospheric and oceanic sciences that proved to be useful for space physics applications, such as computationally efficient implementation of Kalman Filter in radiation belts modeling, solar wind gap-filling by Singular Spectrum Analysis, and low-rank procedure for assimilation of low-altitude ionospheric magnetic perturbations into the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetospheric model. Reduced-order non-Markovian inverse modeling and novel data-adaptive decompositions of Sun-Earth datasets will be also demonstrated.

  2. Enzyme catalyzed electricity-driven water softening system.

    PubMed

    Arugula, Mary A; Brastad, Kristen S; Minteer, Shelley D; He, Zhen

    2012-12-10

    Hardness in water, which is caused by divalent cations such as calcium and magnesium ions, presents a major water quality problem. Because hard water must be softened before use in residential applications, there is great interest in the saltless water softening process because, unlike ion exchange softeners, it does not introduce additional ions into water. In this study, a saltless hardness removal driven by bioelectrochemical energy produced through enzymatic oxidation of glucose was proposed and investigated. Glucose dehydrogenase was coated on a carbon electrode to catalyze glucose oxidation in the presence of NAD⁺ as a cofactor/mediator and methylene green as an electrocatalyst. The results showed that electricity generation stimulated hardness removal compared with non-electricity conditions. The enzymatic water softener worked upon a 6h batch operation per day for eight days, and achieved an average hardness removal of 46% at a high initial concentration of 800 mg/L as CaCO₃. More hardness was removed at a lower initial concentration. For instance, at 200mg/L as CaCO₃ the enzymatic water softener removed 76.4±4.6% of total hardness. The presence of magnesium ions decreased hardness removal because of its larger hydrated radius than calcium ions. The enzymatic water softener removed 70-80% of total hardness from three actual hard water samples. These results demonstrated a proof-of-concept that enzyme catalyzed electricity generation can be used to soften hard water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Subcritical measurements with a cylindrical tank of Pu-U nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.; King, W.T.

    1997-04-01

    This series of measurements with a mixed Pu-U nitrate solution (280 g Pu/liter, 180 g U/liter) in a 35.54-cm-diam cylindrical tank provides a wide variety of experimental data for subcritical configurations that can be used to verify calculational methods and nuclear data. The Pu contained 7.85 wt% {sup 240}Pu and the uranium was natural uranium. The measurements performed were: inverse count rate, prompt neutron decay constants, inverse kinetics, and frequency analysis by the {sup 252}Cf source driven method. These data are presented in sufficient detail that the results of the experiments can be calculated directly. For purposes of extrapolating to the delayed critical height the ratio of spectral densities was linear with height and thus provided the best estimate of critical height.

  4. A Subcritical, Gas-Cooled Fast Transmutation Reactor with a Fusion Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W.M.; Beavers, V.L.; Casino, W.A.; Cheatham, J.R.; Friis, Z.W.; Green, R.D.; Hamilton, W.R.; Haufler, K.W.; Hutchinson, J.D.; Lackey, W.J.; Lorio, R.A.; Maddox, J.W.; Mandrekas, J.; Manzoor, A.A.; Noelke, C.A.; Oliveira, C. de; Park, M.; Tedder, D.W.; Terry, M.R.; Hoffman, E.A.

    2005-05-15

    A design is presented for a subcritical, He-cooled fast reactor, driven by a tokamak D-T fusion neutron source, for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The reactor is fueled with coated transuranic (TRU) particles and is intended for the deep-burn (>90%) transmutation of the TRUs in SNF without reprocessing of the coated fuel particles. The reactor design is based on the materials, fuel, and separations technologies under near-term development in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Program and on the plasma physics and fusion technologies under near-term development in the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program, with the objective of intermediate-term ({approx}2040) deployment. The physical and performance characteristics and research and development requirements of such a reactor are described.

  5. Industrial process driven system requirements for PSII applications

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, C.P.

    1997-10-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a room temperature, plasma-based surface enhancement technology which is being commercialized through the efforts of a group of companies. A number of issues are critical to the successful design and operation of a commercial PSII system. These include overall vacuum system design, plasma source requirements and plasma-target interaction considerations, pulsed, high voltage sub-system (typically referred to as modulator) requirements, and target requirements and limitations. Critical system components are outlined and overall system design will be briefly covered.

  6. Application of nonlinear time series models to driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, N.F. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    In our laboratory we have been engaged in an effort to model nonlinear systems using time series methods. Our objectives have been, first, to understand how the time series response of a nonlinear system unfolds as a function of the underlying state variables, second, to model the evolution of the state variables, and finally, to predict nonlinear system responses. We hope to address the relationship between model parameters and system parameters in the near future. Control of nonlinear systems based on experimentally derived parameters is also a planned topic of future research. 28 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Subcritical crack growth behavior of dispersion oxide ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Armin; Begand, Sabine; Oberbach, Thomas; Telle, Rainer; Fischer, Horst

    2010-10-01

    Zirconia (Y-TZP) is used as material for components of implants and prostheses because of its high short-term strength. The mechanical long-term reliability, however, is limited for Y-TZP because of hydrothermal aging effects and a pronounced tendency for subcritical crack growth. The hypothesis of this study was that a substantial amount of alumina in a zirconia matrix can help to significantly suppress subcritical crack growth and thereby improve the mechanical long-term reliability. The Weibull parameters as well as the parameters of the subcritical crack growth were determined for Alumina, Y-TZP, and two dispersion ceramics, that is Alumina Toughened Zirconia (ATZ, 20% alumina/80% Y-TZP), and Zirconia Toughened Alumina (ZTA, 75% alumina/25% Y-TZP). The long-term failure probability as a function of service time was predicted for the four ceramics. The parameter n of the subcritical crack growth was approx. 80% higher for ATZ compared to Y-TZP. In consequence, the estimated lifetime revealed a significant better mechanical long-term reliability for ATZ. It can be concluded that tailored dispersion oxide ceramics can address the aging problem of monolithic zirconia. This makes ATZ very interesting for components of joint replacement as well as for dental prostheses and implants.

  8. Extraction of antioxidants from Chlorella sp. using subcritical water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, S. M.; Mustapa Kamal, S. M.; Harun, M. R.; Omar, R.; Siajam, S. I.

    2017-06-01

    Chlorella sp. microalgae is one of the main source of natural bioactive compounds used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Subcritical water extraction is the technique that offers an efficient, non-toxic, and environmental-friendly method to obtain natural ingredients. In this work, the extracts of Chlorella sp. microalgae was evaluated in terms of: chemical composition, extraction (polysaccharides) yield and antioxidant activity, using subcritical water extraction. Extractions were performed at temperatures ranging from 100°C to 300°C. The results show that by using subcritical water, the highest yield of polysaccharides is 23.6 that obtained at 150°C. Analysis on the polysaccharides yield show that the contents were highly influenced by the extraction temperature. The individual antioxidant activity were evaluated by in vitro assay using a free radical method. In general, the antioxidant activity of the extracts obtained at different water temperatures was high, with values of 31.08-54.29 . The results indicated that extraction by subcritical water was effective and Chlorella sp. can be a useful source of natural antioxidants.

  9. Subcritical Destabilization of African Easterly Waves by Saharan Mineral Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, T. R.; Grogan, D.; Chen, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical framework is presented that exposes the radiative-dynamical relationships that govern the subcritical destabilization of African easterly waves (AEWs) by Saharan mineral dust (SMD) aerosols. The framework is built on coupled equations for quasigeostrophic potential vorticity, temperature, and SMD mixing ratio. A perturbation analysis yields, for a subcritical, but otherwise arbitrary, zonal-mean background state, analytical expressions for the growth rate and frequency of the AEWs. The expressions are functions of the domain-averaged wave activity, which is primarily modulated by the background potential vorticity gradient, Doppler-shifted phase speed, and spatial variations in the background SMD field. Using an idealized version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model that is coupled to an interactive dust model, a linear analysis shows, in agreement with the theoretical prediction, that for a realistic, subcritical African easterly jet (AEJ) and background SMD distribution consistent with observations, the SMD destabilizes the AEWs and slows their eastward propagation. The SMD-induced growth rates are commensurate with those obtained in previous dust-free studies in which the AEWs grow on AEJs that are supercritical with respect to the threshold for barotropic-baroclinic instability. The clarity of the theoretical framework can serve as a tool for understanding and predicting the effects of SMD aerosols on the linear instability of AEWs in subcritical, zonally averaged AEJs.

  10. Subcritical crack-growth behavior in advanced silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Ajay

    Advanced silicon nitride ceramics (Sisb3Nsb4) are leading candidates for structural components in gas turbine and reciprocating engines. However, widespread use of these materials has been deterred due to their low fracture toughness under tensile loads. In the last decade, novel processing techniques have allowed extrinsic toughening of this material through grain bridging processes. The extrinsic toughening mechanisms, however, are prone to subcritical crack-growth processes through environmental, mechanical and high temperature degradation mechanisms. Understanding these failure mechanisms is critical for long term reliability and design. In the first part of this study, fracture and environmentally-assisted subcritical crack-growth processes were examined in bulk Y-Si-Al-O-N oxynitride glasses with compositions typical of the grain boundary phase of silicon nitride ceramics. Both long crack as well as short crack behavior were investigated to establish a reliable fracture toughness value and to elucidate the anomalous densification behavior of the oxynitride glass under indentation loads. Environmentally assisted subcritical crack-growth processes were studied in inert, moist and wet environments under both cyclic and static loading conditions and compared to commercial soda lime and borosilicate glasses. The second part of this study involved the effect of loading, microstructure and temperature on subcritical crack-growth behavior in silicon nitride ceramics. Crack-growth rates under an alternating applied stress intensity were compared to those under static loads. The effect of microstructure on fatigue crack-growth rates was determined in silicon nitrides sintered using different processing techniques and with different grain sizes. Unique experimental techniques were used to determine subcritical crack-growth behavior from room temperature to elevated temperatures of 1250sp°C. Frictional wear models were used to explain the trends in experimental data at

  11. Exact Free Energy Functional for a Driven Diffusive Open Stationary Nonequilibrium System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, J. L.; Speer, E. R.

    2002-06-01

    We obtain the exact probability exp[-LF({ρ(x)})] of finding a macroscopic density profile ρ(x) in the stationary nonequilibrium state of an open driven diffusive system, when the size of the system L-->∞. F, which plays the role of a nonequilibrium free energy, has a very different structure from that found in the purely diffusive case. As there, F is nonlocal, but the shocks and dynamic phase transitions of the driven system are reflected in nonconvexity of F, in discontinuities in its second derivatives, and in non-Gaussian fluctuations in the steady state.

  12. Exact free energy functional for a driven diffusive open stationary nonequilibrium system.

    PubMed

    Derrida, B; Lebowitz, J L; Speer, E R

    2002-07-15

    We obtain the exact probability exp[-LF([rho(x)])] of finding a macroscopic density profile rho(x) in the stationary nonequilibrium state of an open driven diffusive system, when the size of the system L-->infinity. F, which plays the role of a nonequilibrium free energy, has a very different structure from that found in the purely diffusive case. As there, F is nonlocal, but the shocks and dynamic phase transitions of the driven system are reflected in nonconvexity of F, in discontinuities in its second derivatives, and in non-Gaussian fluctuations in the steady state.

  13. Continuous Energy Improvement in Motor Driven Systems - A Guidebook for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert A. McCoy and John G. Douglass

    2014-02-01

    This guidebook provides a step-by-step approach to developing a motor system energy-improvement action plan. An action plan includes which motors should be repaired or replaced with higher efficiency models, recommendations on maintaining a spares inventory, and discussion of improvements in maintenance practices. The guidebook is the successor to DOE’s 1997 Energy Management for Motor Driven Systems. It builds on its predecessor publication by including topics such as power transmission systems and matching driven equipment to process requirements in addition to motors.

  14. A smart telerobotic system driven by monocular vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defigueiredo, R. J. P.; Maccato, A.; Wlczek, P.; Denney, B.; Scheerer, J.

    1994-01-01

    A robotic system that accepts autonomously generated motion and control commands is described. The system provides images from the monocular vision of a camera mounted on a robot's end effector, eliminating the need for traditional guidance targets that must be predetermined and specifically identified. The telerobotic vision system presents different views of the targeted object relative to the camera, based on a single camera image and knowledge of the target's solid geometry.

  15. Model-Driven Test Generation of Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easwaran, Arvind; Hall, Brendan; Schweiker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a novel test generation technique for distributed systems. Utilizing formal models and formal verification tools, spe cifically the Symbolic Analysis Laboratory (SAL) tool-suite from SRI, we present techniques to generate concurrent test vectors for distrib uted systems. These are initially explored within an informal test validation context and later extended to achieve full MC/DC coverage of the TTEthernet protocol operating within a system-centric context.

  16. Battery-driven miniature LDA system with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damp, S.

    1988-06-01

    A one-component miniature system with dimensions of 11 by 4 by 4 cubic centimeters for laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) is described. As power supply a 12V battery or any other source with the capability to drive a current up to 200mA can be used. The system contains the whole electronics to drive the used laser diode is a safe way. The electronics to amplify and buffer the LDA-signal which is received by a PIN-diode is included. The output of the system can directly fit a filterbank for example. Possible applications in rough environments are mentioned. Measurements show the reliability of the system.

  17. Influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Kashiwaya, Koki; Nishida, Yuki; , Toshinori, Ii

    2017-06-01

    Understanding subcritical crack growth in rock is essential for determining appropriate measures to ensure the long-term integrity of rock masses surrounding structures and for construction from rock material. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated experimentally, focusing on the influence of the surrounding environment on the relationship between the crack velocity and stress intensity factor. The crack velocity increased with increasing temperature and/or relative humidity. In all cases, the crack velocity increased with increasing stress intensity factor. However, for Carrara marble (CM) in air, we observed a region in which the crack velocity still increased with temperature, but the increase in the crack velocity with increasing stress intensity factor was not significant. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth observed in glass in air. Region II in glass is controlled by mass transport to the crack tip. In the case of rock, the transport of water to the crack tip is important. In general, Region II is not observed for subcritical crack growth in rock materials, because rocks contain water. Because the porosity of CM is very low, the amount of water contained in the marble is also very small. Therefore, our results imply that we observed Region II in CM. Because the crack velocity increased in both water and air with increasing temperature and humidity, we concluded that dry conditions at low temperature are desirable for the long-term integrity of a carbonate rock mass. Additionally, mass transport to the crack tip is an important process for subcritical crack growth in rock with low porosity.

  18. Physics considerations involved in the use of insoluble poisons as an alternate means of ensuring subcriticality in the rotary fuel dissolver

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1984-08-01

    While the use of soluble neutron poisons coupled with mass control is sufficient to guarantee subcriticality in the rotary fuel dissolver, an alternate means of ensuring subcriticality was also investigated from a reactor physics viewpoint. The scheme proposed in this report relies on the use of 0.25-in. diam stainless-steel-clad B/sub 4/C pellets which could be mixed uniformly with the sheared fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) as it is being fed to the dissolver. The calculations described herein show that an infinite system of the type just described would be safely subcritical (k/sub infinity/ less than or equal to 0.95) at all H/Pu ratios as long as the relative volume of FFTF fuel in the dry system does not exceed 34%. The operational complexities and equipment modifications necessary to employ this method of criticality control have not been examined. 5 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  19. Operability driven space system concept with high leverage technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    One of the common objectives of future launch and space transfer systems is to achieve low-cost and effective operational capability by automating processes from pre-launch to the end of mission. Hierarchical and integrated mission management, system management, autonomous GN&C, and integrated micro-nano avionics technologies are critical to extend or revitalize the exploitation of space. Essential to space transfer, orbital systems, Earth-To-Orbit (ETO), commercial and military aviation, and planetary systems are these high leverage hardware and software technologies. This paper covers the driving issues, goals, and requirements definition supported with typical concepts and utilization of multi-use technologies. The approach and method results in a practical system architecture and lower level design concepts. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Operability driven space system concept with high leverage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Henry H.

    1997-01-01

    One of the common objectives of future launch and space transfer systems is to achieve low-cost and effective operational capability by automating processes from pre-launch to the end of mission. Hierarchical and integrated mission management, system management, autonomous GN&C, and integrated micro-nano avionics technologies are critical to extend or revitalize the exploitation of space. Essential to space transfer, orbital systems, Earth-To-Orbit (ETO), commercial and military aviation, and planetary systems are these high leverage hardware and software technologies. This paper covers the driving issues, goals, and requirements definition supported with typical concepts and utilization of multi-use technologies. The approach and method results in a practical system architecture and lower level design concepts.

  1. Observation-Driven Configuration of Complex Software Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Aled

    2010-06-01

    The ever-increasing complexity of software systems makes them hard to comprehend, predict and tune due to emergent properties and non-deterministic behaviour. Complexity arises from the size of software systems and the wide variety of possible operating environments: the increasing choice of platforms and communication policies leads to ever more complex performance characteristics. In addition, software systems exhibit different behaviour under different workloads. Many software systems are designed to be configurable so that policies can be chosen to meet the needs of various stakeholders. For complex software systems it can be difficult to accurately predict the effects of a change and to know which configuration is most appropriate. This thesis demonstrates that it is useful to run automated experiments that measure a selection of system configurations. Experiments can find configurations that meet the stakeholders' needs, find interesting behavioural characteristics, and help produce predictive models of the system's behaviour. The design and use of ACT (Automated Configuration Tool) for running such experiments is described, in combination a number of search strategies for deciding on the configurations to measure. Design Of Experiments (DOE) is discussed, with emphasis on Taguchi Methods. These statistical methods have been used extensively in manufacturing, but have not previously been used for configuring software systems. The novel contribution here is an industrial case study, applying the combination of ACT and Taguchi Methods to DC-Directory, a product from Data Connection Ltd (DCL). The case study investigated the applicability of Taguchi Methods for configuring complex software systems. Taguchi Methods were found to be useful for modelling and configuring DC- Directory, making them a valuable addition to the techniques available to system administrators and developers.

  2. Towards Ontology-Driven Information Systems: Guidelines to the Creation of New Methodologies to Build Ontologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    This research targeted the area of Ontology-Driven Information Systems, where ontology plays a central role both at development time and at run time of Information Systems (IS). In particular, the research focused on the process of building domain ontologies for IS modeling. The motivation behind the research was the fact that researchers have…

  3. Microcontroller-driven fluid-injection system for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kasas, S; Alonso, L; Jacquet, P; Adamcik, J; Haeberli, C; Dietler, G

    2010-01-01

    We present a programmable microcontroller-driven injection system for the exchange of imaging medium during atomic force microscopy. Using this low-noise system, high-resolution imaging can be performed during this process of injection without disturbance. This latter circumstance was exemplified by the online imaging of conformational changes in DNA molecules during the injection of anticancer drug into the fluid chamber.

  4. Towards Ontology-Driven Information Systems: Guidelines to the Creation of New Methodologies to Build Ontologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    This research targeted the area of Ontology-Driven Information Systems, where ontology plays a central role both at development time and at run time of Information Systems (IS). In particular, the research focused on the process of building domain ontologies for IS modeling. The motivation behind the research was the fact that researchers have…

  5. Probabilistic density function method for nonlinear dynamical systems driven by colored noise

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a probability density function (PDF) method for a system of nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations driven by colored noise. The method provides an integro-differential equation for the temporal evolution of the joint PDF of the system's state, which we close by means of a modified Large-Eddy-Diffusivity-type closure. Additionally, we introduce the generalized local linearization (LL) approximation for deriving a computable PDF equation in the form of the second-order partial differential equation (PDE). We demonstrate the proposed closure and localization accurately describe the dynamics of the PDF in phase space for systems driven by noise with arbitrary auto-correlation time. We apply the proposed PDF method to the analysis of a set of Kramers equations driven by exponentially auto-correlated Gaussian colored noise to study the dynamics and stability of a power grid.

  6. Hamiltonian-Driven Adaptive Dynamic Programming for Continuous Nonlinear Dynamical Systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Wunsch, Donald; Yin, Yixin

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a Hamiltonian-driven framework of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) for continuous time nonlinear systems, which consists of evaluation of an admissible control, comparison between two different admissible policies with respect to the corresponding the performance function, and the performance improvement of an admissible control. It is showed that the Hamiltonian can serve as the temporal difference for continuous-time systems. In the Hamiltonian-driven ADP, the critic network is trained to output the value gradient. Then, the inner product between the critic and the system dynamics produces the value derivative. Under some conditions, the minimization of the Hamiltonian functional is equivalent to the value function approximation. An iterative algorithm starting from an arbitrary admissible control is presented for the optimal control approximation with its convergence proof. The implementation is accomplished by a neural network approximation. Two simulation studies demonstrate the effectiveness of Hamiltonian-driven ADP.

  7. Data analysis using a data base driven graphics animation system

    SciTech Connect

    Schwieder, D.H.; Stewart, H.D.; Curtis, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    A graphics animation system has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assist engineers in the analysis of large amounts of time series data. Most prior attempts at computer animation of data involve the development of large and expensive problem-specific systems. This paper discusses a generalized interactive computer animation system designed to be used in a wide variety of data analysis applications. By using relational data base storage of graphics and control information, considerable flexibility in design and development of animated displays is achieved.

  8. Combustion driven ammonia generation strategies for passive ammonia SCR system

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Joel G.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Szekely, Jr., Gerald A.; Najt, Paul M.

    2016-12-06

    A method for controlling ammonia generation in an exhaust gas feedstream output from an internal combustion engine equipped with an exhaust aftertreatment system including a first aftertreatment device includes executing an ammonia generation cycle to generate ammonia on the first aftertreatment device. A desired air-fuel ratio output from the engine and entering the exhaust aftertreatment system conducive for generating ammonia on the first aftertreatment device is determined. Operation of a selected combination of a plurality of cylinders of the engine is selectively altered to achieve the desired air-fuel ratio entering the exhaust aftertreatment system.

  9. Optical response in a laser-driven quantum pseudodot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, D. Gul; Sakiroglu, S.; Ungan, F.; Yesilgul, U.; Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Sokmen, I.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the intense laser-induced optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a two-dimensional quantum pseudodot system under an uniform magnetic field. The effects of non-resonant, monochromatic intense laser field upon the system are treated within the framework of high-frequency Floquet approach in which the system is supposed to be governed by a laser-dressed potential. Linear and nonlinear absorption coefficients and relative changes in the refractive index are obtained by means of the compact-density matrix approach and iterative method. The results of numerical calculations for a typical GaAs quantum dot reveal that the optical response depends strongly on the magnitude of external magnetic field and characteristic parameters of the confinement potential. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the intense laser field modifies the confinement and thereby causes remarkable changes in the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the system.

  10. Periodically driven ergodic and many-body localized quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ponte, Pedro; Chandran, Anushya; Papić, Z.; Abanin, Dmitry A.

    2015-02-15

    We study dynamics of isolated quantum many-body systems whose Hamiltonian is switched between two different operators periodically in time. The eigenvalue problem of the associated Floquet operator maps onto an effective hopping problem. Using the effective model, we establish conditions on the spectral properties of the two Hamiltonians for the system to localize in energy space. We find that ergodic systems always delocalize in energy space and heat up to infinite temperature, for both local and global driving. In contrast, many-body localized systems with quenched disorder remain localized at finite energy. We support our conclusions by numerical simulations of disordered spin chains. We argue that our results hold for general driving protocols, and discuss their experimental implications.

  11. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... necessary ancillary device (motor, pump, valve, etc.); (2) A pilot light to indicate operation of each power... and overload of electric motors. (c) Overcurrent protection for steering system electric circuits...

  12. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... necessary ancillary device (motor, pump, valve, etc.); (2) A pilot light to indicate operation of each power... and overload of electric motors. (c) Overcurrent protection for steering system electric circuits...

  13. A clinician-driven home care delivery system.

    PubMed

    August, D A; Faubion, W C; Ryan, M L; Haggerty, R H; Wesley, J R

    1993-12-01

    The financial, entrepreneurial, administrative, and legal forces acting within the home care arena make it difficult for clinicians to develop and operate home care initiatives within an academic setting. HomeMed is a clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery system wholly owned by the University of Michigan. The advantages of a clinician-directed system include: Assurance that clinical and patient-based factors are the primary determinants of strategic and procedural decisions; Responsiveness of the system to clinician needs; Maintenance of an important role for the referring physician in home care; Economical clinical research by facilitation of protocol therapy in ambulatory and home settings; Reduction of lengths of hospital stays through clinician initiatives; Incorporation of outcome analysis and other research programs into the mission of the system; Clinician commitment to success of the system; and Clinician input on revenue use. Potential disadvantages of a clinician-based system include: Entrepreneurial, financial, and legal naivete; Disconnection from institutional administrative and data management resources; and Inadequate clinician interest and commitment. The University of Michigan HomeMed experience demonstrates a model of clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery that has been innovative, profitable, and clinically excellent, has engendered broad physician, nurse, pharmacist, and social worker enthusiasm, and has supported individual investigator clinical protocols as well as broad outcomes research initiatives. It is concluded that a clinician-initiated and -directed home care program is feasible and effective, and in some settings may be optimal.

  14. Self-Powered Electrospinning System Driven by a Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Li, Congju; Yin, Yingying; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Jiaona; Luo, Jianjun; Tang, Wei; Cao, Ran; Yuan, Zuqing; Li, Nianwu; Du, Xinyu; Wang, Chunru; Zhao, Shuyu; Liu, Yuebo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-09-22

    Broadening the application area of the triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) is one of the research emphases in the study of the TENGs, whose output characteristic is high voltage with low current. Here we design a self-powered electrospinning system, which is composed of a rotating-disk TENG (R-TENG), a voltage-doubling rectifying circuit (VDRC), and a simple spinneret. The R-TENG can generate an alternating voltage up to 1400 V. By using a voltage-doubling rectifying circuit, a maximum constant direct voltage of 8.0 kV can be obtained under the optimal configuration and is able to power the electrospinning system for fabricating various polymer nanofibers, such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyamide-6 (PA6), polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF), and thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU). The system demonstrates the capability of a TENG for high-voltage applications, such as manufacturing nanofibers by electrospinning.

  15. Patterning in systems driven by nonlocal external forces.

    PubMed

    Luneville, L; Mallick, K; Pontikis, V; Simeone, D

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on systems displaying domain patterns resulting from competing external and internal dynamics. To this end, we introduce a Lyapunov functional capable of describing the steady states of systems subject to external forces, by adding nonlocal terms to the Landau Ginzburg free energy of the system. Thereby, we extend the existing methodology treating long-range order interactions, to the case of external nonlocal forces. By studying the quadratic term of this Lyapunov functional, we compute the phase diagram in the temperature versus external field and we determine all possible modulated phases (domain patterns) as a function of the external forces and the temperature. Finally, we investigate patterning in chemical reactive mixtures and binary mixtures under irradiation, and we show that the last case opens the path toward micro-structural engineering of materials.

  16. Patterning in systems driven by nonlocal external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luneville, L.; Mallick, K.; Pontikis, V.; Simeone, D.

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on systems displaying domain patterns resulting from competing external and internal dynamics. To this end, we introduce a Lyapunov functional capable of describing the steady states of systems subject to external forces, by adding nonlocal terms to the Landau Ginzburg free energy of the system. Thereby, we extend the existing methodology treating long-range order interactions, to the case of external nonlocal forces. By studying the quadratic term of this Lyapunov functional, we compute the phase diagram in the temperature versus external field and we determine all possible modulated phases (domain patterns) as a function of the external forces and the temperature. Finally, we investigate patterning in chemical reactive mixtures and binary mixtures under irradiation, and we show that the last case opens the path toward micro-structural engineering of materials.

  17. Becoming customer-driven: one health system's story.

    PubMed

    Bagnell, A

    1998-01-01

    Market research was done by Crozer-Keystone Health System to better understand the new health care consumer. The information will assist in developing, promoting, and delivering products and services of maximum value to current and prospective consumers. The system is responding by bundling and delivering products and services around consumer-based dimensions, developing new and better ways to improve customer convenience, access, and service. Operationalizing these initiatives for change involves building an information infrastructure of extensive content and customer databases, using new technologies to customize communications and ultimately service components.

  18. Mission-driven evaluation of imaging system quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Alain Philippe; Ferhani, Ouamar; Primot, Jéro‸Me

    2001-12-01

    Image-quality criteria are usually intended to achieve the best possible image at a given sampling rate, which is ill-suited to applications where the detection of well-defined geometric and radiometric properties of scenes or objects are paramount. The quality criterion developed here for designing observation systems is based on properties of the objects to be viewed. It is thus an object-oriented imaging quality criterion rather than an image-oriented one. We also propose to go beyond optimization and calibrate a numerical scale that can be used to rate the quality of the service delivered by any observation system.

  19. Entropy Production in Nonlinear, Thermally Driven Hamiltonian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, Jean-Pierre; Pillet, Claude-Alain; Rey-Bellet, Luc

    1999-04-01

    We consider a finite chain of nonlinear oscillators coupled at its ends to two infinite heat baths which are at different temperatures. Using our earlier results about the existence of a stationary state, we show rigorously that for arbitrary temperature differences and arbitrary couplings, such a system has a unique stationary state. (This extends our earlier results for small temperature differences.) In all these cases, any initial state will converge (at an unknown rate) to the stationary state. We show that this stationary state continually produces entropy. The rate of entropy production is strictly negative when the temperatures are unequal and is proportional to the mean energy flux through the system

  20. OASIS-V: A Data-Base Driven CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, Michael K.; Spencer, Judson

    1979-01-01

    The system consists of a single program with data bases containing the material to be displayed. Editing, loading, and other support programs were written to transfer the burden of material and maintenance tasks from the user to the computer. (Author/IRT)

  1. Performance Assessment of a Large Scale Pulsejet- Driven Ejector System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Litke, Paul J.; Schauer, Frederick R.; Bradley, Royce P.; Hoke, John L.

    2006-01-01

    Unsteady thrust augmentation was measured on a large scale driver/ejector system. A 72 in. long, 6.5 in. diameter, 100 lb(sub f) pulsejet was tested with a series of straight, cylindrical ejectors of varying length, and diameter. A tapered ejector configuration of varying length was also tested. The objectives of the testing were to determine the dimensions of the ejectors which maximize thrust augmentation, and to compare the dimensions and augmentation levels so obtained with those of other, similarly maximized, but smaller scale systems on which much of the recent unsteady ejector thrust augmentation studies have been performed. An augmentation level of 1.71 was achieved with the cylindrical ejector configuration and 1.81 with the tapered ejector configuration. These levels are consistent with, but slightly lower than the highest levels achieved with the smaller systems. The ejector diameter yielding maximum augmentation was 2.46 times the diameter of the pulsejet. This ratio closely matches those of the small scale experiments. For the straight ejector, the length yielding maximum augmentation was 10 times the diameter of the pulsejet. This was also nearly the same as the small scale experiments. Testing procedures are described, as are the parametric variations in ejector geometry. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for general scaling of pulsed thrust ejector systems

  2. Forecast and virtual weather driven plant disease risk modeling system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We describe a system in use and development that leverages public weather station data, several spatialized weather forecast types, leaf wetness estimation, generic plant disease models, and online statistical evaluation. Convergent technological developments in all these areas allow, with funding f...

  3. Companion-driven dynamics in hot Jupiter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Henry; Batygin, Konstantin; Knutson, Heather A.; Lewis, Nikole K.; de Wit, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Hot Jupiters are giant planets found on orbits that lie in close proximity to their host stars. In this region, the process of tidal dissipation is believed to be generally efficient, and should act to circularize planetary orbits on timescales much shorter than the inferred ages of the observed stars. However, at time of writing, one in six known hot Jupiters have eccentricities inconsistent with zero at the three sigma level and about one in twelve have eccentricities greater than 0.2. This discrepancy hints at the existence of a dynamical mechanism that acts to maintain hot Jupiter eccentricities in face of tidal dissipation for extended periods of time. Our recent radial velocity (RV) and direct imaging surveys find that 70% of hot Jupiter systems are expected to host a distant planetary or stellar mass companion. In this work, we examine whether dynamical interactions with these long period companions could be responsible for the excited hot Jupiter eccentricities. Specifically, we consider the one of the most eccentric known hot Jupiter systems, HAT-P-2, as a case study. The inner planet in this system has a mass approximately ten times that of Jupiter, a semi-major axis of 0.07 AU, and an orbital eccentricity of 0.5. Long-term radial velocity monitoring has revealed the presence of an even more massive outer companion located beyond 4 AU with a partially constrained orbit. We examine different dynamical scenarios for this system in order to determine whether or not this outer companion might be responsible for the inner planet's unusually large orbital eccentricity, and make predictions for the short-term orbital evolution of the system.

  4. RBAC Driven Least Privilege Architecture For Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Julie; Markham, Mark

    2014-01-25

    The concept of role based access control (RBAC) within the IT environment has been studied by researchers and was supported by NIST (circa 1992). This earlier work highlighted the benefits of RBAC which include reduced administrative workload and policies which are easier to analyze and apply. The goals of this research were to expand the application of RBAC in the following ways. • Apply RBAC to the control systems environment: The typical RBAC model within the IT environment is used to control a user’s access to files. Within the control system environment files are replaced with measurement (e.g., temperature) and control (e.g. valve) points organized as a hierarchy of control assets (e.g. a boiler, compressor, refinery unit). Control points have parameters (e.g., high alarm limit, set point, etc.) associated with them. The RBAC model is extended to support access to points and their parameters based upon roles while at the same time allowing permissions for the points to be defined at the asset level or point level directly. In addition, centralized policy administration with distributed access enforcement mechanisms was developed to support the distributed architecture of distributed control systems and SCADA. • Extend the RBAC model to include access control for software and devices: The established RBAC approach is to assign users to roles. This work extends that notion by first breaking the control system down into three layers 1) users, 2) software and 3) devices. An RBAC model is then created for each of these three layers. The result is that RBAC can be used to define machine-to-machine policy enforced via the IP security (IPsec) protocol. This highlights the potential to use RBAC for machine-to-machine connectivity within the internet of things. • Enable dynamic policy based upon the operating mode of the system: The IT environment is generally static with respect to policy. However, large cyber physical systems such as industrial controls have

  5. Measurable Control System Security through Ideal Driven Technical Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Sean McBride; Marie Farrar; Zachary Tudor

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security National Cyber Security Division supported development of a small set of security ideals as a framework to establish measurable control systems security. Based on these ideals, a draft set of proposed technical metrics was developed to allow control systems owner-operators to track improvements or degradations in their individual control systems security posture. The technical metrics development effort included review and evaluation of over thirty metrics-related documents. On the bases of complexity, ambiguity, or misleading and distorting effects the metrics identified during the reviews were determined to be weaker than necessary to aid defense against the myriad threats posed by cyber-terrorism to human safety, as well as to economic prosperity. Using the results of our metrics review and the set of security ideals as a starting point for metrics development, we identified thirteen potential technical metrics - with at least one metric supporting each ideal. Two case study applications of the ideals and thirteen metrics to control systems were then performed to establish potential difficulties in applying both the ideals and the metrics. The case studies resulted in no changes to the ideals, and only a few deletions and refinements to the thirteen potential metrics. This led to a final proposed set of ten core technical metrics. To further validate the security ideals, the modifications made to the original thirteen potential metrics, and the final proposed set of ten core metrics, seven separate control systems security assessments performed over the past three years were reviewed for findings and recommended mitigations. These findings and mitigations were then mapped to the security ideals and metrics to assess gaps in their coverage. The mappings indicated that there are no gaps in the security ideals and that the ten core technical metrics provide significant coverage of standard security issues with 87% coverage. Based

  6. Generating a fractal butterfly Floquet spectrum in a class of driven SU(2) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiao; Gong Jiangbin

    2010-02-15

    A scheme for generating a fractal butterfly Floquet spectrum, first proposed by Wang and Gong [Phys. Rev. A 77, 031405(R) (2008)], is extended to driven SU(2) systems such as a driven two-mode Bose-Einstein condensate. A class of driven systems without a link with the Harper-model context is shown to have an intriguing butterfly Floquet spectrum. The found butterfly spectrum shows remarkable deviations from the known Hofstadter's butterfly. In addition, the level crossings between Floquet states of the same parity and between Floquet states of different parities are studied and highlighted. The results are relevant to studies of fractal statistics, quantum chaos, and coherent destruction of tunneling, as well as the validity of mean-field descriptions of Bose-Einstein condensates.

  7. Delay-driven irregular spatiotemporal patterns in a plankton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Canrong; Zhang, Lai

    2013-07-01

    An inhomogeneous distribution of species density over physical space is a widely observed scenario in plankton systems. Understanding the mechanisms resulting in these spatial patterns is a central topic in plankton ecology. In this paper we explore the impact of time delay on spatiotemporal patterns in a prey-predator plankton system. We find that time delay can trigger the emergence of irregular spatial patterns via a Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, a phase transition from a regular spiral pattern to an irregular one was observed and the latter gradually replaced the former and persisted indefinitely. The characteristic length of the emergent spatial pattern is consistent with the scale of plankton patterns observed in field studies.

  8. Hemodynamically Driven Vein Graft Remodeling: A Systems Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Berceli, Scott A.; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Garbey, Marc; Jiang, Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Despite intense investigation over several decades to understand the mechanisms of vein graft failure, few therapeutic modalities have emerged. Emphasis using standard reductionist approaches has been focused on cataloging the components involved in the early events following vein graft implantation, but limited insight has been gained in understanding the dynamic interaction of these components. We propose that the application of systems theory offers the opportunity for significant advances in this area. Focused on modeling the dynamic relationships that define living organisms, systems biology provides the necessary tools to further our understanding of the complex series of overlapping biologic events on surgical implantation of the vein graft. Through the use of ordinary differential equation and agent-based modeling techniques, we present our ongoing efforts to define the nonlinear interactions between hemodynamics and vascular adaptation. PMID:19426605

  9. Data assimilation techniques for driven, sparsely observed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    The successful assimilation of data into physics-based geospace and heliospheric models requires rethinking the filtering techniques currently employed in fields such as tropospheric weather modeling. In the realm of Ionospheric-Thermospheric modeling, the estimation of system drivers is a critical component of any reliable data assimilation technique. How to best estimate and apply these drivers, however, remains an open question and active area of research. In an effort to account for the driver/response time-delay characteristics of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere system, we experiment with iterative model re-initialization while estimating time-dependent solar and geophysical drivers. A year-long simulation is carried out for 2003, during which, the novel technique greatly reduces the RMS error relative to observations, and demonstrates a clear potential for the improvement of density specification and forecast.

  10. Delay-driven irregular spatiotemporal patterns in a plankton system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Canrong; Zhang, Lai

    2013-07-01

    An inhomogeneous distribution of species density over physical space is a widely observed scenario in plankton systems. Understanding the mechanisms resulting in these spatial patterns is a central topic in plankton ecology. In this paper we explore the impact of time delay on spatiotemporal patterns in a prey-predator plankton system. We find that time delay can trigger the emergence of irregular spatial patterns via a Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, a phase transition from a regular spiral pattern to an irregular one was observed and the latter gradually replaced the former and persisted indefinitely. The characteristic length of the emergent spatial pattern is consistent with the scale of plankton patterns observed in field studies.

  11. Floquet Dynamics of Boundary-Driven Systems at Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdanier, William; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Vasseur, Romain; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-06-01

    A quantum critical system described at low energy by a conformal field theory (CFT) and subjected to a time-periodic boundary drive displays multiple dynamical regimes, depending on the drive frequency. We compute the behavior of quantities including the entanglement entropy and Loschmidt echo, confirming analytic predictions from field theory by exact numerics on the transverse field Ising model and demonstrate universality by adding nonintegrable perturbations. The dynamics naturally separate into three regimes: a slow-driving limit, which has an interpretation as multiple quantum quenches with amplitude corrections from CFT; a fast-driving limit, in which the system behaves as though subject to a single quantum quench; and a crossover regime displaying heating. The universal Floquet dynamics in all regimes can be understood using a combination of boundary CFT and Kibble-Zurek scaling arguments.

  12. Design Tools for Dynamic, Data-Driven, Stream Mining Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    new methods for integrated modeling and optimization of real-time 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT... classification modes), we develop systematic methods for exploring complex, multidimensional design spaces associated with dynamic stream mining systems, and... stages in my career as a iii PhD student, current and past members of the research group have helped me enormously. I would like to thank Dr. William

  13. Modeling the Thermosphere as a Driven-Dissipative Thermodynamic System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    which dissipates the excess energy once the driver is lessened. This type of system is described by a differential equation of the same form as that...the solar wind caused by high-speed streams ( HSS ) result in low levels of geomagnetic activity and can therefore impact the thermosphere via... HSS , coronal holes (Temmer, et al., 2007). Similarly Lei et al., 2008, found a 9-day periodic variation in neutral density observations from the

  14. Extending TOPS: Ontology-driven Anomaly Detection and Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.; Michaelis, A.

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) is a flexible modeling software system that integrates ecosystem models with frequent satellite and surface weather observations to produce ecosystem nowcasts (assessments of current conditions) and forecasts useful in natural resources management, public health and disaster management. We have been extending the Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) to include a capability for automated anomaly detection and analysis of both on-line (streaming) and off-line data. In order to best capture the knowledge about data hierarchies, Earth science models and implied dependencies between anomalies and occurrences of observable events such as urbanization, deforestation, or fires, we have developed an ontology to serve as a knowledge base. We can query the knowledge base and answer questions about dataset compatibilities, similarities and dependencies so that we can, for example, automatically analyze similar datasets in order to verify a given anomaly occurrence in multiple data sources. We are further extending the system to go beyond anomaly detection towards reasoning about possible causes of anomalies that are also encoded in the knowledge base as either learned or implied knowledge. This enables us to scale up the analysis by eliminating a large number of anomalies early on during the processing by either failure to verify them from other sources, or matching them directly with other observable events without having to perform an extensive and time-consuming exploration and analysis. The knowledge is captured using OWL ontology language, where connections are defined in a schema that is later extended by including specific instances of datasets and models. The information is stored using Sesame server and is accessible through both Java API and web services using SeRQL and SPARQL query languages. Inference is provided using OWLIM component integrated with Sesame.

  15. Systems biology driven software design for the research enterprise

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, John; Cavnor, Christopher; Killcoyne, Sarah; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2008-01-01

    Background In systems biology, and many other areas of research, there is a need for the interoperability of tools and data sources that were not originally designed to be integrated. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of systems biology, and its association with high throughput experimental platforms, there is an additional need to continually integrate new technologies. As scientists work in isolated groups, integration with other groups is rarely a consideration when building the required software tools. Results We illustrate an approach, through the discussion of a purpose built software architecture, which allows disparate groups to reuse tools and access data sources in a common manner. The architecture allows for: the rapid development of distributed applications; interoperability, so it can be used by a wide variety of developers and computational biologists; development using standard tools, so that it is easy to maintain and does not require a large development effort; extensibility, so that new technologies and data types can be incorporated; and non intrusive development, insofar as researchers need not to adhere to a pre-existing object model. Conclusion By using a relatively simple integration strategy, based upon a common identity system and dynamically discovered interoperable services, a light-weight software architecture can become the focal point through which scientists can both get access to and analyse the plethora of experimentally derived data. PMID:18578887

  16. Systems biology driven software design for the research enterprise.

    PubMed

    Boyle, John; Cavnor, Christopher; Killcoyne, Sarah; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2008-06-25

    In systems biology, and many other areas of research, there is a need for the interoperability of tools and data sources that were not originally designed to be integrated. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of systems biology, and its association with high throughput experimental platforms, there is an additional need to continually integrate new technologies. As scientists work in isolated groups, integration with other groups is rarely a consideration when building the required software tools. We illustrate an approach, through the discussion of a purpose built software architecture, which allows disparate groups to reuse tools and access data sources in a common manner. The architecture allows for: the rapid development of distributed applications; interoperability, so it can be used by a wide variety of developers and computational biologists; development using standard tools, so that it is easy to maintain and does not require a large development effort; extensibility, so that new technologies and data types can be incorporated; and non intrusive development, insofar as researchers need not to adhere to a pre-existing object model. By using a relatively simple integration strategy, based upon a common identity system and dynamically discovered interoperable services, a light-weight software architecture can become the focal point through which scientists can both get access to and analyse the plethora of experimentally derived data.

  17. A generic task-driven multi-agent telemedicine system.

    PubMed

    Nageba, Ebrahim; Fayn, Jocelyne; Rubel, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Pervasive Telemedicine is an emerging research discipline, which focuses on the development and the application of ubiquitous computing technology for healthcare purposes. However, the current telemedicine systems lack to be self adaptable to handle different types of data such as vital biosignals, images, video and textual data. In addition, they do not use the full capabilities of the computing devices on which they run. Unfortunately, the existing telemedicine systems do not pay enough attention to the quality level of their offered services nor offer adequate resources management for meeting bandwidth and end-to-end communication delays. In this paper we propose an information and communication architecture of a generic telemedicine system based on a knowledge base and intelligent agents interacting each with the other in a synergetic way to perform several medical tasks for a high level of quality of service (QoS). The medical assistance to skiers and high mountains resorts residents will be used in particular as an example of applicability scenario and models personalization.

  18. PHELIX: design of transformer-driven linear implosion system

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Atchison, Walter L; Rousculp, Chris L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2008-01-01

    Experiments involving electromagnetically-imploded, solid-density liners can be achieved at reduced cost and energy if we start with a scale-size based on diagnostic resolution, rather than on the largest capacitor bank or generator we could bring to bear. For minimum resolution of 100 microns or less, many useful experiments could be performed with initial liner diameters that are factors of two to three smaller than used on high-energy systems, such as Atlas, thereby reducing energy requirements to sub-megajoule levels. Reduction in scale-size, however, also decreases the inductance change associated with liner motion relative to other inductances in the circuit. To improve coupling efficiency to liner kinetic energy, we invoke a current step-up transformer. Scaling relations have been developed for reducing the size and energy of such systems and compared with detailed numerical simulations. We discuss these calculations and describe the engineering embodiment of the resulting design for a system called PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment).

  19. Effects of interactions on periodically driven dynamically localized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Adhip; Sen, Diptiman

    2017-01-01

    It is known that there are lattice models in which noninteracting particles get dynamically localized when periodic δ -function kicks are applied with a particular strength. We use both numerical and analytical methods to study the effects of interactions in three different models in one dimension. The systems we have considered include spinless fermions with interactions between nearest-neighbor sites, the Hubbard model of spin-1/2 fermions, and the Bose-Hubbard model with on-site interactions. We derive effective Floquet Hamiltonians up to second order in the time period of kicking. Using these we show that interactions can give rise to a variety of interesting results such as two-body bound states in all three models and dispersionless few-particle bound states with more than two particles for spinless fermions and bosons. We substantiate these results by exact diagonalization and stroboscopic time evolution of systems with a few particles. We derive a pseudo-spin-1/2 limit of the Bose-Hubbard system in the thermodynamic limit and show that a special case of this has an exponentially large number of degenerate eigenstates of the effective Hamiltonian. Finally, we study the effect of changing the strength of the δ -function kicks slightly away from perfect dynamical localization; we find that a single particle remains dynamically localized for a long time after which it moves ballistically.

  20. A cable-driven locomotor training system for restoration of gait in human SCI.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Hornby, T George; Landry, Jill M; Roth, Heidi; Schmit, Brian D

    2011-02-01

    A novel cable-driven robotic locomotor training system was developed to provide compliant assistance/resistance forces to the legs during treadmill training in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Eleven subjects with incomplete SCI were recruited to participate in two experiments to test the feasibility of the robotic gait training system. Specifically, 10 subjects participated in one experimental session to test the characteristics of the robotic gait training system and one subject participated in repeated testing sessions over 8 weeks with the robotic device to test improvements in locomotor function. Limb kinematics were recorded in one experiment to evaluate the system characteristics of the cable-driven locomotor trainer and the overground gait speed and 6 min walking distance were evaluated at pre, 4 and 8 weeks post treadmill training of a single subject as well. The results indicated that the cable driven robotic gait training system improved the kinematic performance of the leg during treadmill walking and had no significant impact on the variability of lower leg trajectory, suggesting a high backdrivability of the cable system. In addition, results from a patient with incomplete SCI indicated that prolonged robotic gait training using the cable robot improved overground gait speed. Results from this study suggested that a cable driven robotic gait training system is effective in improving leg kinematic performance, yet allows variability of gait kinematics. Thus, it seems feasible to improve the locomotor function in human SCI using this cable driven robotic system, warranting testing with a larger group of patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Data-driven systems and system-driven data: the story of the Flanders Heritage Inventory (1995-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Daele, K.; Meganck, L.; Mortier, S.

    2015-08-01

    Over the past 20 years, heritage inventories in Flanders (Belgium) have evolved from printed books to digital inventories. It is obvious that a system that publishes a digital inventory needs to adapt to the user requirements. But, after years of working with a digital inventory system, it has become apparent that not only has the system been developed to the users needs, but also that user practice and the resulting data have been shaped by the system. Thinking about domain models and thesauri influenced our thinking about our methodology of surveying. Seeing our data projected on a common basemap led us to realise how intertwined and interdependent different types of heritage can be. The need for structured metadata has impressed upon us the need for good quality data, guaranteed by data entry standards, validation tools, and a strict editing workflow. Just as the researchers have transitioned from seeing their respective inventories as being significantly different to actually seeing the similarities between them, the information specialists have come to the realisation that there are synergies that can be achieved with other systems, both within and outside of our organisation. Deploying our inventories on the web has also changed how we communicate with the general public. Newer channels such as email and social media have enabled a more interactive way of communicating. But throughout the years, one constant has remained. While we do not expect the systems to live on, we do want the data in them to be available to future generations.

  2. Maximum Principle for General Controlled Systems Driven by Fractional Brownian Motions

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yuecai; Hu Yaozhong; Song Jian

    2013-04-15

    We obtain a maximum principle for stochastic control problem of general controlled stochastic differential systems driven by fractional Brownian motions (of Hurst parameter H>1/2). This maximum principle specifies a system of equations that the optimal control must satisfy (necessary condition for the optimal control). This system of equations consists of a backward stochastic differential equation driven by both fractional Brownian motions and the corresponding underlying standard Brownian motions. In addition to this backward equation, the maximum principle also involves the Malliavin derivatives. Our approach is to use conditioning and Malliavin calculus. To arrive at our maximum principle we need to develop some new results of stochastic analysis of the controlled systems driven by fractional Brownian motions via fractional calculus. Our approach of conditioning and Malliavin calculus is also applied to classical system driven by standard Brownian motions while the controller has only partial information. As a straightforward consequence, the classical maximum principle is also deduced in this more natural and simpler way.

  3. Nonlinear response of driven systems in weak turbulence theory

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Pekker, M.S.; Wong, H.V.; Wong, K.L.

    1995-11-01

    A method is presented for predicting the saturation levels and particle transport in weakly unstable systems where there are a discrete number of modes. Conditions are established for either steady state or pulsating responses when several modes are excited for cases where there is and there is not resonance overlap. The conditions for achieving different levels of saturation are discussed. Depending on details, the saturation level can be quite low, where only a small fraction of the available free energy is released to waves, or the saturation level can be quite high, with almost a complete conversion of free energy to wave energy coupled with rapid transport.

  4. AN UPGRADE OF MAGNET-FIELD-DRIVEN TIMING SYSTEMS AT THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    TIAN, Y.; OERTER, B.

    2005-10-10

    An upgrade of the main magnet-field-driven timing systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and Booster accelerators will be described in this paper. A novel approach using content addressable memory (CAM) is applied to overcome a weakness in the previous systems, which required a reproducible dwell field for proper operation. Upgraded from a multibus-based system to a VME-based system, the new timing system also proves easier to maintain and to diagnose. Details of the system architecture, as well as its application in other timing systems will be discussed.

  5. Antimatter Driven P-B11 Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammash, Terry; Martin, James; Godfroy, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    One of the major advantages of using P-B11 fusion fuel is that the reaction produces only charged particles in the form of three alpha particles and no neutrons. A fusion concept that lends itself to this fuel cycle is the Magnetically Insulated Inertial Confinement Fusion (MICF) reactor whose distinct advantage lies in the very strong magnetic field that is created when an incident particle (or laser) beam strikes the inner wall of the target pellet. This field serves to thermally insulate the hot plasma from the metal wall thereby allowing thc plasma to burn for a long time and produce a large energy magnification. If used as a propulsion device, we propose using antiprotons to drive the system which we show to be capable of producing very large specific impulse and thrust. By way of validating the confinement propenies of MICF we will address a proposed experiment in which pellets coated with P-B11 fuel at the appropriate ratio will be zapped by a beam of antiprotons that enter the target through a hole. Calculations showing the density and temperature of the generated plasma along with the strength of the magnetic field and other properties of the system will be presented and discussed.

  6. Boundary driven open quantum many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prosen, Tomaž

    2014-01-08

    In this lecture course I outline a simple paradigm of non-eqjuilibrium quantum statistical physics, namely we shall study quantum lattice systems with local, Hamiltonian (conservative) interactions which are coupled to the environment via incoherent processes only at the system's boundaries. This is arguably the simplest nontrivial context where one can study far from equilibrium steady states and their transport properties. We shall formulate the problem in terms of a many-body Markovian master equation (the so-called Lindblad equation, and some of its extensions, e.g. the Redfield eqaution). The lecture course consists of two main parts: Firstly, and most extensively we shall present canonical Liouville-space many-body formalism, the so-called 'third quantization' and show how it can be implemented to solve bi-linear open many-particle problems, the key peradigmatic examples being the XY spin 1/2 chains or quasi-free bosonic (or harmonic) chains. Secondly, we shall outline several recent approaches on how to approach exactly solvable open quantum interacting many-body problems, such as anisotropic Heisenberg ((XXZ) spin chain or fermionic Hubbard chain.

  7. Reentrant condensation transition in a two species driven diffusive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daga, Bijoy

    2017-07-01

    We study an interacting box-particle system on a one-dimensional periodic ring involving two species of particles A and B. In this model, from a randomly chosen site, a particle of species A can hop to its right neighbor with a rate that depends on the number of particles of the species B at that site. On the other hand, particles of species B can be transferred between two neighboring sites with rates that depends on the number of particles of species B at the two adjacent sites-this process however can occur only when the two sites are devoid of particles of the species A. We study condensation transition for a specific choice of rates and find that the system shows a reentrant phase transition of species A -the species A passes successively through fluid-condensate-fluid phases as the coupling parameter between the dynamics of the two species is varied. On the other hand, the transition of species B is from condensate to fluid phase and hence does not show reentrant feature.

  8. Dynamically enriched topological orders in driven two-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Andrew C.; Morimoto, Takahiro

    2017-04-01

    Time-periodic driving of a quantum system can enable new dynamical topological phases of matter that could not exist in thermal equilibrium. We investigate two related classes of dynamical topological phenomena in 2D systems: Floquet symmetry-protected topological phases (FSPTs) and Floquet enriched topological orders (FETs). By constructing solvable lattice models for a complete set of 2D bosonic FSPT phases, we show that bosonic FSPTs can be understood as topological pumps which deposit loops of 1D SPT chains onto the boundary during each driving cycle, which protects a nontrivial edge state by dynamically tuning the edge to a self-dual point poised between the 1D SPT and trivial phases of the edge. By coupling these FSPT models to dynamical gauge fields, we construct solvable models of FET orders in which anyon excitations are dynamically transmuted into topologically distinct anyon types during each driving period. These bosonic FSPT and gauged FSPT models are classified by group cohomology methods. In addition, we also construct examples of "beyond cohomology" FET orders, which can be viewed as topological pumps of 1D topological chains formed of emergent anyonic quasiparticles.

  9. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.; Nori, Franco

    2007-06-15

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems.

  10. Fault tolerant filtering and fault detection for quantum systems driven by fields in single photon states

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Qing Dong, Daoyi Petersen, Ian R.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this paper is to solve the fault tolerant filtering and fault detection problem for a class of open quantum systems driven by a continuous-mode bosonic input field in single photon states when the systems are subject to stochastic faults. Optimal estimates of both the system observables and the fault process are simultaneously calculated and characterized by a set of coupled recursive quantum stochastic differential equations.

  11. Colloquium: Homochirality: Symmetry breaking in systems driven far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yukio; Hyuga, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Subsequent to the discovery of chirality of organic molecules by Pasteur, living organisms have been found to utilize biomolecules of only one handedness. The origin of this homochirality in life still remains unknown. It is believed that homochirality is attained in two stages: the initial creation of a chirality bias and its subsequent amplification to pure chirality. In the last two decades, two novel experiments have established the second stage in different fields: Soai and co-workers achieved the amplification of enantiomeric excess in the production of chiral organic molecules, and Viedma obtained homochirality in the solution growth of sodium chlorate crystals. These experiments are explained by a theory with a nonlinear evolution equation for the chiral order parameter; nonlinear processes in reactions or in crystal growth induce enantiomeric excess amplification, and the recycling of achiral elements ensures homochirality. Recycling drives the system to a state far from equilibrium with a free energy higher than that of the equilibrium state.

  12. Challenge-Driven Attention: Interacting Frontal and Brainstem Systems

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Rajeev D. S.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2007-01-01

    The world is an unpredictable place, presenting challenges that fluctuate from moment to moment. However, the neural systems for responding to such challenges are far from fully understood. Using fMRI, we studied an audiovisual task in which the trials' difficulty and onset times varied unpredictably. Two regions were found to increase their activation for challenging trials, with their activities strongly correlated: right frontal cortex and the brainstem. The frontal area matched regions found in previous human studies of cognitive control, and activated in a graded manner with increasing task difficulty. The brainstem responded only to the most difficult trials, showing a phasic activity pattern paralleling locus coeruleus recordings in monkeys. These results reveal a bridge between animal and human studies, and suggest interacting roles for the brainstem and right frontal cortex: the brainstem may signal that an attentional challenge is occurring, while right frontal cortex allocates cognitive resources in response. PMID:18958217

  13. Generation of squeezing in a driven many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Boguslawski, Matthew; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate, the non-linear spin-dependent collisional interactions can create entanglement and squeezing. Typically, the condensate is initialized at an unstable fixed point of the phase space, and subsequent free evolution under a time-independent Hamiltonian creates the squeezed state. Alternatively, it is possible to generate squeezing by driving the system localized at a stable fixed point. Here, we demonstrate that periodic modulation of the Hamiltonian can generate highly squeezed states. Our measurements show -5 dB of squeezing, limited by the detection, but calculations indicate that a theoretical potential of -20 dB of squeezing. We discuss the advantages of this method compared with the typical techniques.

  14. Dynamical Symmetry Breaking and Phase Transitions in Driven Diffusive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Yongjoo; Kafri, Yariv; Lecomte, Vivien

    2017-01-01

    We study the probability distribution of a current flowing through a diffusive system connected to a pair of reservoirs at its two ends. Sufficient conditions for the occurrence of a host of possible phase transitions both in and out of equilibrium are derived. These transitions manifest themselves as singularities in the large deviation function, resulting in enhanced current fluctuations. Microscopic models which implement each of the scenarios are presented, with possible experimental realizations. Depending on the model, the singularity is associated either with a particle-hole symmetry breaking, which leads to a continuous transition, or in the absence of the symmetry with a first-order phase transition. An exact Landau theory which captures the different singular behaviors is derived.

  15. Consistency in experiments on multistable driven delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Neus; Larger, Laurent; Fischer, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the consistency properties in the responses of a nonlinear delay optoelectronic intensity oscillator subject to different drives, in particular, harmonic and self-generated waveforms. This system, an implementation of the Ikeda oscillator, is operating in a closed-loop configuration, exhibiting its autonomous dynamics while the drive signals are additionally introduced. Applying the same drive multiple times, we compare the dynamical responses of the optoelectronic oscillator and quantify the degree of consistency among them via their correlation. Our results show that consistency is not restricted to conditions close to the first Hopf bifurcation but can be found in a broad range of dynamical regimes, even in the presence of multistability. Finally, we discuss the dependence of consistency on the nature of the drive signal.

  16. Quantum-classical correspondence principles for locally nonequilibrium driven systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Many of the core concepts and (especially field-theoretic) tools of statistical mechanics have developed within the context of thermodynamic equilibrium, where state variables are all taken to be charges, meaning that their values are inherently preserved under reversal of the direction of time. A principle concern of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics is to understand the emergence and stability of currents, quantities whose values change sign under time reversal. Whereas the correspondence between classical charge-valued state variables and their underlying statistical or quantum ensembles is quite well understood, the study of currents away from equilibrium has been more fragmentary, with classical descriptions relying on the asymmetric auxiliary-field formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose (and often restricted to the Markovian assumption of Doi and Peliti), while quantum descriptions employ a symmetric two-field formalism introduced by Schwinger and further clarified by Keldysh. In this paper we demonstrate that for quantum ensembles in which superposition is not violated by very strong conditions of decoherence, there is a large natural generalization of the principles and tools of equilibrium, which not only admits but requires the introduction of current-valued state variables. For these systems, not only do Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) and Schwinger-Keldysh (SK) field methods both exist, in some cases they provide inequivalent classical and quantum descriptions of identical ensembles. With these systems for examples, we can both study the correspondence between classical and quantum descriptions of currents, and also clarify the nature of the mapping between the structurally homologous but interpretationally different MSR and SK formalisms.

  17. Accelerator-driven nuclear synergetic systems-an overview of the research activities in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, H.; Baecklin, A.; Carius, S.

    1995-10-01

    The rapid development of the accelerator technology which enables the construction of reliable and very intense neutron sources has initiated a growing interest for accelerator driven transmutation systems in Sweden. After the Specialist Meeting on Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology for Radwaste and other Applications on 24-28 June 1991 at Saltsjoebaden, Sweden, the research activities oriented towards accelerator-driven systems have been started at several research centers in Sweden. Also the governmental agencies responsible for the spent fuel policy showed a positive attitude to these activities through a limited financial support, particularly for studies of the safety aspects of these systems. Also the nuclear power industry and utilities show a positive interest in the research on these concepts. The present paper presents an overview of the Swedish research activities on accelerator-driven systems and the proposed future coordination, organizations and prospects for this research in the context of the national nuclear energy and spent fuel policy. The Swedish perspective for international cooperation is also described.

  18. Broadband EM radiation amplification by means of a monochromatically driven two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Andrey V.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that a two-level quantum system possessing dipole moment operator with permanent non-equal diagonal matrix elements and driven by external semiclassical monochromatic high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) (laser) field can amplify EM radiation waves of much lower frequency.

  19. Legislation for a Demand-Driven System. Go8 Backgrounder 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    One of several important pieces of higher education legislation in Parliament in 2011 is the "Higher Education Support Act Amendment ("Demand-Driven System and Other Measures") Bill". As its title makes clear, this Bill is intended to bring into effect the Government's commitment (announced in March 2009) to uncap the supply of…

  20. Laser frequency down-conversion by means of a monochromatically driven two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Andrey V.

    2016-09-01

    Conditions are found under which a simple two-level quantum system possessing dipole moment operator with permanent non-equal diagonal matrix elements and driven by external semiclassical monochromatic high-frequency EM (laser) field can radiate continuously at much lower frequency. Possible ways to experimental observation and practical implementation of the predicted effect for a wide range of applications are discussed.

  1. High Power Cyclotrons for Accelerator Driven System (ADS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretta, Luciano

    2012-03-01

    We present an accelerator module based on a injector cyclotron and a Superconducting Ring Cyclotron (SRC) able to accelerate H2+ molecules. H2+ molecules are extracted from the SRC stripping the binding electron by a thin carbon foil. The SRC will be able to deliver proton beam with maximum energy of 800 MeV and a maximum power of 8 MW. This module is forecasted for the DAEdALUS (Decay At rest Experiment for δcp At Laboratory for Underground Science) experiment, which is a neutrino experiment proposed by groups of MIT and Columbia University. Extensive beam dynamics studies have been carrying out in the last two years and proved the feasibility of the design. The use of H2+ molecules beam has three main advantages: 1) it reduces the space charge effects, 2) because of stripping extraction, it simplifies the extraction process w.r.t. single turn extraction and 3) we can extract more than one beam out of one SRC. A suitable upgraded version of the cyclotron module able to deliver up to 10MW beam is proposed to drive ADS. The accelerator system which is presented, consists of having three accelerators modules. Each SRC is equipped with two extraction systems delivering two beams each one with a power up to 5 MW. Each accelerator module, feeds both the two reactors at the same time. The three accelerators modules assure to maintain continuity in functioning of the two reactors. In normal operation, all the three accelerators module will deliver 6.6 MW each one, just in case one of the three accelerator module will be off, due to a fault or maintenance, the other two modules are pushed at maximum power of 10 MW. The superconducting magnetic sector of the SRC, as well as the normal conducting sector of the injector cyclotron, is calculated with the TOSCA module of OPERA3D. Here the main features of the injector cyclotron, of the SRC and the beam dynamic along the cyclotrons are presented.

  2. Effective Hamiltonians, prethermalization, and slow energy absorption in periodically driven many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanin, Dmitry A.; De Roeck, Wojciech; Ho, Wen Wei; Huveneers, François

    2017-01-01

    We establish some general dynamical properties of quantum many-body systems that are subject to a high-frequency periodic driving. We prove that such systems have a quasiconserved extensive quantity H*, which plays the role of an effective static Hamiltonian. The dynamics of the system (e.g., evolution of any local observable) is well approximated by the evolution with the Hamiltonian H* up to time τ*, which is exponentially large in the driving frequency. We further show that the energy absorption rate is exponentially small in the driving frequency. In cases where H* is ergodic, the driven system prethermalizes to a thermal state described by H* at intermediate times t ≲τ* , eventually heating up to an infinite-temperature state after times t ˜τ* . Our results indicate that rapidly driven many-body systems generically exhibit prethermalization and very slow heating. We briefly discuss implications for experiments which realize topological states by periodic driving.

  3. Sensor Driven Intelligent Control System For Plasma Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.; Campbell, V.B.

    1998-02-23

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Innovative Computing Technologies, Inc. (IC Tech) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) was undertaken to contribute to improved process control for microelectronic device fabrication. Process data from an amorphous silicon thin film deposition experiment was acquired to validate the performance of an intelligent, adaptive, neurally-inspired control software module designed to provide closed loop control of plasma processing machines used in the microelectronics industry. Data acquisition software was written using LabView The data was collected from an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source, which was available for this project through LMES's RF/Microwave Technology Center. Experimental parameters measured were RF power, RF current and voltage on the antenna delivering power to the plasma, hydrogen and silane flow rate, chamber pressure, substrate temperature and H-alpha optical emission. Experimental results obtained were poly-crystallin silicon deposition rate, crystallinity, crystallographic orientation and electrical conductivity. Owing to experimental delays resulting from hardware failures, it was not possible to assemble a complete data for IC Tech use within the time and resource constraints of the CRADA. IC Tech was therefore not able to verify the performance of their existing models and control structures and validate model performance under this CRADA.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Acoustically Driven Bubble Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, Connor; Lie, Jie; Dault, Daniel; Balasubramaniam, Shanker; Piermarocchi, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    The development of modalities for precise, targeted drug delivery has become increasingly important in medical care in recent years. Assemblages of microbubbles steered by acoustic pressure fields present one potential vehicle for such delivery. Modeling the collective response of multi-bubble systems to an intense, externally applied ultrasound field requires accurately capturing acoustic interactions between bubbles and the externally applied field, and their effect on the evolution of bubble kinetics. In this work, we present a methodology for multiphysics simulation based on an efficient transient boundary integral equation (TBIE) coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) to compute trajectories of multiple acoustically interacting bubbles in an ideal fluid under pulsed acoustic excitation. For arbitrary configurations of spherical bubbles, the TBIE solver self-consistently models transient surface pressure distributions at bubble-fluid interfaces due to acoustic interactions and relative potential flows induced by bubble motion. Forces derived from the resulting pressure distributions act as driving terms in the MD update at each timestep. The resulting method efficiently and accurately captures individual bubble dynamics for clouds containing up to hundreds of bubbles.

  5. Magnetic viscosity: outbursts and outflows in accretion driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meintjes, P. J.; Breedt, E.

    In this paper magnetic viscosity is investigated in magnetized accretion discs. It will be shown that the effective coupling between the magnetic field of a slow-rotator and an accretion disc, can be a very effective mechanism to drive episodes of high mass accretion onto the surface of a compact object. Outside the corotation radius, angular momentum is effectively transferred outwards through a propeller-type process from the magnetospheric field and magnetic bubbles that are formed as a result of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which can result in a centrifugal barrier and accumulation of disc matter outside the corotation radius which will become unstable at some point, triggering enhanced inward mass advection as a result of a magneto-gravitational instability. This may lead to periods of enhanced mass accretion and associated disc brightening, which may explain the dwarf novae phenomenon in certain disc accreting cataclysmic variables. This may be accompanied by mass outflows from the disc and possible non-thermal emission. The description of magnetic viscosity presented in this paper will rely on the values of two constants, i.e. the Hartmann and Reynolds numbers of the magnetized disc plasma. For both these numbers above unity, magnetic stresses in the disc can play a very important role in the kinematics of the plasma in disc accreting systems.

  6. Transient nature of Arctic spring systems driven by subglacial meltwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidegger, J. M.; Bense, V. F.; Grasby, S. E.

    2012-06-01

    In the High Arctic, supra- and proglacial springs occur at Borup Fiord Pass, Ellesmere Island. Spring waters are sulfur bearing and isotope analysis suggests springs are fed by deeply circulating glacial meltwater. However, the mechanism maintaining spring flow is unclear in these areas of thick permafrost which would hamper the discharge of deep groundwater to the surface. It has been hypothesized that fracture zones along faults focus groundwater which discharges initially underneath wet-based parts of the ice. With thinning ice, the spring head is exposed to surface temperatures, tens of degrees lower than temperatures of pressure melting, and permafrost starts to develop. Numerical modeling of coupled heat and fluid flow suggest that focused groundwater discharge should eventually be cut off by permafrost encroaching into the feeding channel of the spring. Nevertheless, our model simulations show that these springs can remain flowing for millennia depending on the initial flow rate and ambient surface temperature. These systems might provide a terrestrial analog for the possible occurrence of Martian springs recharged by polar ice caps.

  7. Sequential extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Latawiec, Agnieszka E; Reid, Brian J

    2010-02-01

    A rapid sequential subcritical (superheated) water extraction method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and sediment is presented. Decreasing the polarity of water by successive increase of the extraction temperature from 50 degrees C to 200 degrees C at the moderate pressure (10.3MPa) enabled selective, non-exhaustive extractions to be performed. Concurrent with increasing temperatures to 150 degrees C there was an increase in PAH extraction efficiencies. For the majority of determinations no significant differences between extractions at 150 degrees C and 200 degrees C were observed. Varied extraction efficiencies of PAHs at the same extraction conditions reflected dissimilarities between environmental matrices investigated. Selective subcritical water extraction of PAHs was proportional to their octanol-water partition coefficients. This technique may be applicable in evaluation of risks associated with PAH contaminated sites and in assessments of their bioremediation potential.

  8. Subcritical crack growth and mechanical weathering: a new consideration of how moisture influences rock erosion rates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Keanini, Russell; Hancock, Gregory S.

    2016-04-01

    The contributions of moisture to the mechanical aspects of rock weathering and regolith production are poorly quantified. In particular, geomorphologists have largely overlooked the role of subcritical crack growth processes in physical weathering and the fact that moisture strongly influences the rates of those processes. This influence is irrespective of the function that moisture plays in stress loading mechanisms like freezing or hydration. Here we present a simple numerical model that explores the efficacy of subcritical crack growth in granite rock subaerially exposed under a range of moisture conditions. Because most weathering-related stress loading for rocks found at, or near, Earth's surface (hereafter surface rocks) is cyclic, we modeled crack growth using a novel combination of Paris' Law and Charles' Law. This combination allowed us to apply existing empirically-derived data for the stress corrosion index of Charles' Law to fatigue cracking. For stress, we focused on the relatively straightforward case of intergranular stresses that arise during solar-induced thermal cycling by conductive heat transfer, making the assumption that such stresses represent a universal minimum weathering stress experienced by all surface rocks. Because all other tensile weathering-related stresses would be additive in the context of crack growth, however, our model can be adapted to include other stress loading mechanisms. We validated our calculations using recently published thermal-stress-induced cracking rates. Our results demonstrate that 1) weathering-induced stresses as modeled herein, and as published by others, are sufficient to propagate fractures subcritically over long timescales with or without the presence of water 2) fracture propagation rates increase exponentially with respect to moisture, specifically relative humidity 3) fracture propagation rates driven by thermal cycling are strongly dependent on the magnitude of diurnal temperature ranges and the

  9. Piezoelectric vibration-driven locomotion systems - Exploiting resonance and bistable dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Wang, K. W.

    2017-03-01

    While a piezoelectric-based vibration-driven system is an excellent candidate for actuating small-size crawling-type locomotion robots, it has the major drawback of limited stroke output that would severely constraint the system's locomotion performance. In this paper, to advance the state of the art, we propose two novel designs of piezoelectric vibration-driven locomotion systems. The first utilizes the resonant amplification concept, and the second explores the design of a bistable device. While these two ideas have been explored for piezoelectric actuation amplification in general, they have never been exploited for crawling-type robotic locomotion. Numerical analyses on both systems reveal that resonance and bistability can substantially increase the systems' average locomotion speed. Moreover, this research shows that with bistability, the system is able to output high average locomotion speed in a wider frequency band, possess multiple locomotion modes, and achieve fast switches among them. Through proof-of-concept prototypes, the predicted locomotion performance improvements brought by resonance and bistability are verified. Finally, the basin stability is evaluated to systematically describe the occurring probability of certain locomotion behavior of the bistable system, which would provide useful guideline to the design and control of bistable vibration-driven locomotion systems.

  10. A thermodynamic analysis of propagating subcritical cracks with cohesive zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the so-called energetic approach to fracture with particular attention to the issue of energy dissipation due to crack propagation are applied to the case of a crack with cohesive zone. The thermodynamic admissibility of subcritical crack growth (SCG) is discussed together with some hypotheses that lead to the derivation of SCG laws. A two-phase cohesive zone model for discontinuous crack growth is presented and its thermodynamics analyzed, followed by an example of its possible application.

  11. Breaking rocks made easy: subcritical processes and tectonic predesign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtlaender, Anne; Krautblatter, Michael

    2017-04-01

    In geomorphic studies, to change in landforms, e.g. by rock slope failure, fluvial or glacial erosion, a threshold is commonly assumed, which is crossed either by an increase in external driving or a decrease of internal resisting forces, respectively. If the threshold is crossed, bedrock breaks and slope fails, rivers incise and glaciers plug and sew their bed. Here we put forward a focus on the decrease of the resisting forces, as an increase in the driving forces, to match the strength of bedrock, is not that likely. We suggest that the degradation of resisting forces of bedrock can be better explained by subcritical processes like creep, fatigue and stress corrosion interplaying with tectonic predesign. Both concepts, subcritical processes and tectonic predesign have been issued in the last century, but have not been widely accepted nor have their assumptions been explicitly stressed in recent case studies. Moreover both concepts profit especially on scale issues if merged. Subcritical crack growth, includes different mechanisms promoting fractures well below the ultimate strength. Single infinitesimal but irreversible damage and deformations are induced in the material over time. They interact with inherent microstructural flaws and low applied stresses, limiting local strength and macroscopic behavior of bedrock. This reissues the concept of tectonic predesigned, as proposed by A.E. Scheidegger, which not only encompasses structural features that determine the routing of drainage patterns and shear planes, e.g. joints, faults and foliations, but also the (neo)tectonic stress-field and the (in-situ) strain state of bedrocks and mountains. Combining subcritical processes and tectonic predesign we can better explain, why and where we see a dissected, eroded and geomorphic divers' landscape. In this conceptual framework actual magnitudes of the driving forces are accounted for and so is the nature of the bedrock material, to better understand the trajectories of

  12. Subcritical dynamo bifurcation in the Taylor-Green flow.

    PubMed

    Ponty, Y; Laval, J-P; Dubrulle, B; Daviaud, F; Pinton, J-F

    2007-11-30

    We report direct numerical simulations of dynamo generation for flow generated using a Taylor-Green forcing. We find that the bifurcation is subcritical and show its bifurcation diagram. We connect the associated hysteretic behavior with hydrodynamics changes induced by the action of the Lorentz force. We show the geometry of the dynamo magnetic field and discuss how the dynamo transition can be induced when an external field is applied to the flow.

  13. Optimal switching policy for performance enhancement of distributed parameter systems based on event-driven control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wen-Ying; Cui, Bao-Tong; Lou, Xu-Yang; Li, Wen

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to improve the performance of a class of distributed parameter systems for the optimal switching of actuators and controllers based on event-driven control. It is assumed that in the available multiple actuators, only one actuator can receive the control signal and be activated over an unfixed time interval, and the other actuators keep dormant. After incorporating a state observer into the event generator, the event-driven control loop and the minimum inter-event time are ultimately bounded. Based on the event-driven state feedback control, the time intervals of unfixed length can be obtained. The optimal switching policy is based on finite horizon linear quadratic optimal control at the beginning of each time subinterval. A simulation example demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed policy.

  14. Storm-driven pesticide dynamics in a catchment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Rebecca; Freer, Jim; Michaelides, Katerina; Hurley, Steven; Howden, Nicholas; Bull, Ian

    2013-04-01

    hydrograph peaks indicating pesticides are moved directly from hillslopes to the fluvial environment by surface runoff. During storm events, individual pesticide concentrations in streams were found to be greater than 2 µg µl-1 in the dissolved phase. Depending on the compound chemical properties, some pesticides can also be transported adsorbed to sediments. Together, these processes generate elevated concentrations of pesticide in surface water systems and cause contamination by transport and deposition of pesticides in the lower reaches of the catchment.

  15. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron e xperiments: detector dead time and apatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    In almost every detector counting system, a minimal dead time is required to record two successive events as two separated pulses. Due to the random nature of neutron interactions in the subcritical assembly, there is always some probability that a true neutron event will not be recorded because it occurs too close to the preceding event. These losses may become rather severe for counting systems with high counting rates, and should be corrected before any utilization of the experimental data. This report examines the dead time effects for the pulsed neutron experiments of the YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly. The nonparalyzable model is utilized to correct the experimental data due to dead time. Overall, the reactivity values are increased by 0.19$ and 0.32$ after the spatial corrections for the YALINA-Booster 36% and 21% configurations respectively. The differences of the reactivities obtained with He-3 long or short detectors at the same detector channel diminish after the dead time corrections of the experimental data for the 36% YALINA-Booster configuration. In addition, better agreements between reactivities obtained from different experimental data sets are also observed after the dead time corrections for the 21% YALINA-Booster configuration.

  16. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-22

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

  17. Hierarchy of boundary-driven phase transitions in multispecies particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkov, Vladislav; Salerno, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Interacting systems with K driven particle species on an open chain or chains that are coupled at the ends to boundary reservoirs with fixed particle densities are considered. We classify discontinuous and continuous phase transitions that are driven by adiabatic change of boundary conditions. We build minimal paths along which any given boundary-driven phase transition (BDPT) is observed and we reveal kinetic mechanisms governing these transitions. Combining minimal paths, we can drive the system from a stationary state with all positive characteristic speeds to a state with all negative characteristic speeds, by means of adiabatic changes of the boundary conditions. We show that along such composite paths, one generically encounters Z discontinuous and 2(K-Z) continuous BDPT’s, with Z taking values 0⩽Z⩽K depending on the path. As model examples, we consider solvable exclusion processes with product measure states and K=1,2,3 particle species and a nonsolvable two-way traffic model. Our findings are confirmed by numerical integration of hydrodynamic limit equations and by Monte Carlo simulations. Results extend straightforwardly to a wide class of driven diffusive systems with several conserved particle species.

  18. A new costing model in hospital management: time-driven activity-based costing system.

    PubMed

    Öker, Figen; Özyapıcı, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Traditional cost systems cause cost distortions because they cannot meet the requirements of today's businesses. Therefore, a new and more effective cost system is needed. Consequently, time-driven activity-based costing system has emerged. The unit cost of supplying capacity and the time needed to perform an activity are the only 2 factors considered by the system. Furthermore, this system determines unused capacity by considering practical capacity. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the efficiency of the time-driven activity-based costing system and to display how it can be applied in a health care institution. A case study was conducted in a private hospital in Cyprus. Interviews and direct observations were used to collect the data. The case study revealed that the cost of unused capacity is allocated to both open and laparoscopic (closed) surgeries. Thus, by using the time-driven activity-based costing system, managers should eliminate the cost of unused capacity so as to obtain better results. Based on the results of the study, hospital management is better able to understand the costs of different surgeries. In addition, managers can easily notice the cost of unused capacity and decide how many employees to be dismissed or directed to other productive areas.

  19. Numerical Study on Fokker-Planck Equation of Bistable System Driven by Colored Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiheng; Hu, Gang; L, Schoendorff; H, Risken

    1992-06-01

    A finite difference method is used to solve a Fokker-Planck equation of bistable system with Landau potential. The detailed dynamical relaxation process in the case of large correlation time is manifested via the phenomena including the saddle point appearance, the hole formation and distortion. The method is used to obtain the stationary solutions of Fokker-Planck equation of bistable system driven by rather weak noise.

  20. Hybrid vehicle powertrain system with power take-off driven vehicle accessory

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, Kevin D.; Bockelmann, Thomas R.; Zou, Zhanijang; Hope, Mark E.; Kang, Xiaosong; Carpenter, Jeffrey L.

    2006-09-12

    A hybrid vehicle powertrain system includes a first prime mover, a first prime mover driven power transmission mechanism having a power take-off adapted to drive a vehicle accessory, and a second prime mover. The second prime mover is operable to drive the power transmission mechanism alone or in combination with the first prime mover to provide power to the power take-off through the power transmission mechanism. The invention further includes methods for operating a hybrid vehicle powertrain system.

  1. Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy System Driven by a Monolithic Semiconductor Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merghem, K.; Busch, S. F.; Lelarge, F.; Koch, M.; Ramdane, A.; Balzer, J. C.

    2017-08-01

    A fiber coupled terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz TDS) system which is driven by a pulsed monolithic semiconductor laser is presented. A bandwidth of over 0.6 THz with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 45 dB has been achieved at a wavelength of 1550 nm. This concept could pave the way towards ultra-compact and low-cost THz TDS systems.

  2. A packet based, data driven telemetry system for autonomous experimental sub-orbital spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Kalibjian, J.R.

    1993-04-26

    A data driven telemetry system is described that responds to the rapid nature in which experimental satellite telemetry content is changed during the development process. It also meets the needs of a diverse experiment which the many phases of a mission may contain radically different types of telemetry data. The system emphasizes mechanisms for achieving high redundancy of critical data. A practical example of such an implementation, Brilliant Pebbles Flight Experiment Three (FE-3), is cited.

  3. Adjustable microstep-driven system of the step motor controlled by a single-chip computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinghui; Mei, Anhua

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents the frequency-fixing pulse width modulation and adjustable microstep- driven system of a step motor controlled by the MCS-51 single-chip computer. The system uses single-voltage driving. The proprietary software is configured in the system. On the same supporting hardware, the numbers of the microstep can be changed from zero to 255 by operating the keyboard. The rotating speed, direction, and displacement can be controlled directly. The system applies the technology of the digital frequency-fixing PWM and the feedback control, of the microcurrent for electromagnetic noise elimination and low power losses. The curve of the experiment proves that the system has good quality.

  4. Dual phase separation in a two-dimensional driven diffusive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qing-Yi; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin

    2017-05-01

    This paper studies a bidirectional multilane driven diffusive system with two type of particles. Phase separation phenomenon emerges in the system. In particular, a novel dual phase separation could be observed under certain circumstance. Mean field analysis has been carried out, which indicates that occurrence of phase separation might be related to minimization of system current. Specifically, the occurrence of dual phase separation is due to (i) existence of a local minimum in the fundamental diagram of flow rate J versus density ρ and (ii) ∂ J / ∂ ρ|ρ=1 < 0. Our findings offer sights to understand deeply dynamic features of multilane transportation system, especially phase separation of nonequilibrium state systems.

  5. Chaos control and synchronization in Bragg acousto-optic bistable systems driven by a separate chaotic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we propose a new scheme to achieve chaos control and synchronization in Bragg acousto-optic bistable systems. In the scheme, we use the output of one system to drive two identical chaotic systems. Using the maximal conditional Lyapunov exponent (MCLE) as the criterion, we analyze the conditions for realizing chaos synchronization. Numerical calculation shows that the two identical systems in chaos with negative MCLEs and driven by a chaotic system can go into chaotic synchronization whether or not they were in chaos initially. The two systems can go into different periodic states from chaos following an inverse period-doubling bifurcation route as well when driven by a periodic system.

  6. The Dimensionality of Stochasticaly Driven Systems and the Limits of Predictability of Magnetospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, B.; Doxas, I.; Cary, J. R.; Horton, W.

    2001-12-01

    In contrast to tropospheric weather, where the solar radiation is essentially constant, the solar wind has periods of large excursions. It can therefore be argued that the limits of predicatability of the Solar-Wind driven Magnetosphere-Ionosphere System has two components, the intrinsic deterministic chaos of the magnetospheric dynamics, which can be observed even during extended periods of constant driving, as in magnetic cloud events, and the externally imposed variation of the Solar Wind driver.l The variability due to the driver is explored by considering the properties of well known stochastic systems, like the Lorenz and Rossler systems, under various driving conditions. We show that the observed propoerties of the combined system (eg dimensionality) exhibit an abrupt transition from that of the driven system to that of the driver. The transitions takes place at a normalized driving amplitude (amplitude of driver over amplitude of driven system) equal to unity, and has a half-width of less than a factor of two. The narrow width of the transition region suggests that the external component of unpredictability is limited to transitions between well defined stochastic states.

  7. Dynamic Data Driven Applications Systems (DDDAS) modeling for automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Seetharaman, Guna; Darema, Frederica

    2013-05-01

    The Dynamic Data Driven Applications System (DDDAS) concept uses applications modeling, mathematical algorithms, and measurement systems to work with dynamic systems. A dynamic systems such as Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) is subject to sensor, target, and the environment variations over space and time. We use the DDDAS concept to develop an ATR methodology for multiscale-multimodal analysis that seeks to integrated sensing, processing, and exploitation. In the analysis, we use computer vision techniques to explore the capabilities and analogies that DDDAS has with information fusion. The key attribute of coordination is the use of sensor management as a data driven techniques to improve performance. In addition, DDDAS supports the need for modeling from which uncertainty and variations are used within the dynamic models for advanced performance. As an example, we use a Wide-Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) application to draw parallels and contrasts between ATR and DDDAS systems that warrants an integrated perspective. This elementary work is aimed at triggering a sequence of deeper insightful research towards exploiting sparsely sampled piecewise dense WAMI measurements - an application where the challenges of big-data with regards to mathematical fusion relationships and high-performance computations remain significant and will persist. Dynamic data-driven adaptive computations are required to effectively handle the challenges with exponentially increasing data volume for advanced information fusion systems solutions such as simultaneous target tracking and ATR.

  8. Interaction of soil, water and TNT during degradation of TNT on contaminated soil using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Kalderis, Dimitrios; Hawthorne, Steven B; Clifford, Anthony A; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2008-11-30

    Subcritical water was used at laboratory scale to reveal information with respect to the degradation mechanism of TNT on contaminated soil. Highly contaminated soil (12% TNT) was heated with water at four different temperatures, 150, 175, 200 and 225 degrees C and samples were obtained at appropriate time intervals. At the same time, similar experiments were performed with TNT spiked on to clean soil, sand and pure water in order to compare and eliminate various factors that may be present in the more complex contaminated soil system. Subcritical water was successful at remediating TNT-contaminated soil. TNT destruction percentages ranged between 98 and 100%. The aim of this work was to study the soil-water-contaminant interaction and determine the main physical parameters that affect TNT degradation. It was shown that the rate-limiting step of the process is the extraction/diffusion of TNT molecules from the soil core to the soil surface, where they degrade. Additionally, it was determined that the soil matrix also catalyses degradation to a lesser extent. Autocatalytic effects were not clearly observed.

  9. Transient climate changes in a perturbed parameter ensemble of emissions-driven earth system model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James M.; Booth, Ben B. B.; Boulton, Chris A.; Clark, Robin T.; Harris, Glen R.; Lowe, Jason A.; Sexton, David M. H.

    2014-11-01

    We describe results from a 57-member ensemble of transient climate change simulations, featuring simultaneous perturbations to 54 parameters in the atmosphere, ocean, sulphur cycle and terrestrial ecosystem components of an earth system model (ESM). These emissions-driven simulations are compared against the CMIP3 multi-model ensemble of physical climate system models, used extensively to inform previous assessments of regional climate change, and also against emissions-driven simulations from ESMs contributed to the CMIP5 archive. Members of our earth system perturbed parameter ensemble (ESPPE) are competitive with CMIP3 and CMIP5 models in their simulations of historical climate. In particular, they perform reasonably well in comparison with HadGEM2-ES, a more sophisticated and expensive earth system model contributed to CMIP5. The ESPPE therefore provides a computationally cost-effective tool to explore interactions between earth system processes. In response to a non-intervention emissions scenario, the ESPPE simulates distributions of future regional temperature change characterised by wide ranges, and warm shifts, compared to those of CMIP3 models. These differences partly reflect the uncertain influence of global carbon cycle feedbacks in the ESPPE. In addition, the regional effects of interactions between different earth system feedbacks, particularly involving physical and ecosystem processes, shift and widen the ESPPE spread in normalised patterns of surface temperature and precipitation change in many regions. Significant differences from CMIP3 also arise from the use of parametric perturbations (rather than a multimodel ensemble) to represent model uncertainties, and this is also the case when ESPPE results are compared against parallel emissions-driven simulations from CMIP5 ESMs. When driven by an aggressive mitigation scenario, the ESPPE and HadGEM2-ES reveal significant but uncertain impacts in limiting temperature increases during the second half

  10. Experiments on Substrate Erosion via Subcritical Turbidity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, B.; Mohrig, D.; Buttles, J.

    2006-12-01

    system. This experiment points out turbulence generated near the bed is not the only contributor to sediment transport in relatively thin, subcritical turbidity currents. Turbulence produced by breaking internal waves at the current-ambient fluid interface can augment vertical mixing throughout the entire current affecting local sediment transport and patterns of bed erosion and deposition.

  11. Stability synthesis of control system in current fed inverter driven induction motor

    SciTech Connect

    Veda, R.; Irisa, T.; Ito, T.; Mochizuki, T.; Sonoda, T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of synthesizing a stabilizing control system in current fed inverter driven induction motor (CFIDIM). The method is focused on rotor dynamics and a concept of ''damping torque coefficient (DTC)'' is introduced concerning the electrical torque. At first the control system is synthesized on the assumption that an induction motor is driven by an ideally controllable current source. Then perturbed linearized technique indicates that the system can be stabilized if the stator current or frequency is controlled so as to make the DTC positive by feeding back a signal composed of rotor speed. Next, based on this fact, an approach of synthesizing the converter output voltage is presented under a fixed stator frequency. This result clarifies that the stable operation can be achieved by controlling the voltage in proportion to the acceleration of rotor speed or the deviation of electrical torque. These analytical results are verified with laboratory field tests.

  12. All-optically driven system in ultrasonic wave-based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen; Wu, Nan; Zhou, Jingcheng; Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic wave based structural health monitoring (SHM) is an innovative method for nondestructive detection and an area of growing interest. This is due to high demands for wireless detection in the field of structural engineering. Through optically exciting and detecting ultrasonic waves, electrical wire connections can be avoided, and non-contact SHM can be achieved. With the combination of piezoelectric transducer (PZT) (which possesses high heat resistance) and the noncontact detection, this system has a broad range of applications, even in extreme conditions. This paper reports an all-optically driven SHM system. The resonant frequencies of the PZT transducers are sensitive to a variety of structural damages. Experimental results have verified the feasibility of the all-optically driven SHM system.

  13. Motion-driven electrochromic reactions for self-powered smart window system.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Min-Hsin; Lin, Long; Yang, Po-Kang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-05-26

    The self-powered system is a promising concept for wireless networks due to its independent and sustainable operations without an external power source. To realize this idea, the triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) was recently invented, which can effectively convert ambient mechanical energy into electricity to power up portable electronics. In this work, a self-powered smart window system was realized through integrating an electrochromic device (ECD) with a transparent TENG driven by blowing wind and raindrops. Driven by the sustainable output of the TENG, the optical properties, especially the transmittance of the ECD, display reversible variations due to electrochemical redox reactions. The maximum transmittance change at 695 nm can be reached up to 32.4%, which is comparable to that operated by a conventional electrochemical potentiostat (32.6%). This research is a substantial advancement toward the practical application of nanogenerators and self-powered systems.

  14. Evaluation of Elbow Stretch Reflex Using a Portable Hand-driven Isokinetic System in Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jeong-Hwan; Song, Chul-Gyu; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Park, Sung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate normal healthy persons without spasticity to observe normal findings of the elbow stretch reflex using a newly developed, portable, hand-driven spasticity-measuring system. Method Thirty normal persons without any disease involving the central or peripheral nervous system were enrolled in this study. The portable hand-driven isokinetic system is able to measure the joint angle, angular velocity, electromyographic (EMG) signals, and torque during elbow passive extension-flexion. One set of 10 passive elbow extension and flexion movements was performed for data acquisition at each angular velocity, including 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 degrees per second (°/sec). Electromyographic data were collected from the biceps brachii and the triceps brachii. Torque data were collected from sensors around the wrist. Results We were able to detect EMG activity and torque in all subjects by using the new portable hand-driven isokinetic system. EMG activity and torque increased with incremental increase of angular velocities. The joint angle of maximal EMG activity according to different angular velocities did not show any significant difference (116°-127° in elbow extension and 37°-66° in elbow flexion). The joint angles of maximal torque according to different angular velocities were not significantly different either. Conclusion Using the portable hand-driven isokinetic system on the elbows of normal subjects, we were able to obtain expected results. By considering our normal findings of the elbow stretch reflex using this system, we propose that the various aspects of spasticity-related data can be measured successfully. PMID:22506169

  15. Chemistry technology base and fuel cycle of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.A.

    1997-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system, a description of the pyrochemistry technology base and the fuel cycle for the system. The pyrochemistry technology base consists of four processes: direct oxide reduction, reductive extraction, electrorefining, and electrowinning. Each process and its utility is described. The fuel cycle is described for a liquid metal-based system with the focus being the conversion of commercial spent nuclear fuel to fuel for the transmutation system. Fission product separation and actinide recycle processes are also described.

  16. Keldysh approach to periodically driven systems with a fermionic bath: Nonequilibrium steady state, proximity effect, and dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong E.; Levchenko, Alex; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2017-03-01

    We study properties of a periodically driven system coupled to a thermal bath. As a nontrivial example, we consider a periodically driven metallic system coupled to a superconducting bath. The effect of the superconductor on the driven system is twofold: it (a) modifies density of states in the metal via the proximity effect and (b) acts as a thermal bath for light-excited quasiparticles. Using Keldysh formalism, we calculate, nonperturbatively in the system-bath coupling, the steady-state properties of the system and obtain nonequilibrium distribution function. The latter allows one to calculate observable quantities which can be spectroscopically measured in tunneling experiments.

  17. Subcritical crack growth in a chemically reactive environment-implications for caprock integrity for CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Z.; Eichhubl, P.; Callahan, O. A.; Major, J. R.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    Seal integrity of cap-rock is a critical constraint on the long term performance of CO2 containment site. During fluid migration, the coupled geochemical reaction of minerals and geomechanical deformation of rock matrix may affect the seal integrity. The potential leakage of injected CO2 from cap-rock through preexisting fractures/faults represents a major concern associated with geological storage of CO2. To address the fundamental question of CO2 leakage through subcritical growth of fractures driven by chemically reactive fluid across caprocks, we build a Dugdale cohesive model. Ahead of the physical crack tip, a narrow band of cohesive zone is assumed to exist with the upper and lower cohesive surfaces held by the cohesive traction. In the vicinity of the crack tip, minerals dissolve due to the acidic environment and migrate from the physical crack tip into the cohesive zone causing damage of rock matrix in the form of a reduction of cohesive traction.Focusing on the dissolution of calcite and following the stress corrosion theory, we assume the degradation of cohesive traction is linearly proportional to the concentration of Ca2+whose evolution follows the reactive diffusion equation. Using a critical crack opening displacement criterion, the subcritical propagation behavior of crack due to stress corrosion is captured and the rate-limiting effects including the chemical reactions to produce the Ca2+ and the transport of minerals along the newly generated fracture cohesive zone are incorporated. Subcritical crack growth rate under different chemical environment conditions is examined and compared with the experimental fracture mechanics testing.

  18. Visualization-based decision support for value-driven system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibor, Elliott

    In the past 50 years, the military, communication, and transportation systems that permeate our world, have grown exponentially in size and complexity. The development and production of these systems has seen ballooning costs and increased risk. This is particularly critical for the aerospace industry. The inability to deal with growing system complexity is a crippling force in the advancement of engineered systems. Value-Driven Design represents a paradigm shift in the field of design engineering that has potential to help counteract this trend. The philosophy of Value-Driven Design places the desires of the stakeholder at the forefront of the design process to capture true preferences and reveal system alternatives that were never previously thought possible. Modern aerospace engineering design problems are large, complex, and involve multiple levels of decision-making. To find the best design, the decision-maker is often required to analyze hundreds or thousands of combinations of design variables and attributes. Visualization can be used to support these decisions, by communicating large amounts of data in a meaningful way. Understanding the design space, the subsystem relationships, and the design uncertainties is vital to the advancement of Value-Driven Design as an accepted process for the development of more effective, efficient, robust, and elegant aerospace systems. This research investigates the use of multi-dimensional data visualization tools to support decision-making under uncertainty during the Value-Driven Design process. A satellite design system comprising a satellite, ground station, and launch vehicle is used to demonstrate effectiveness of new visualization methods to aid in decision support during complex aerospace system design. These methods are used to facilitate the exploration of the feasible design space by representing the value impact of system attribute changes and comparing the results of multi-objective optimization formulations

  19. General Purpose Data-Driven Online System Health Monitoring with Applications to Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.; Spirkovska, Lilly; Schwabacher, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Modern space transportation and ground support system designs are becoming increasingly sophisticated and complex. Determining the health state of these systems using traditional parameter limit checking, or model-based or rule-based methods is becoming more difficult as the number of sensors and component interactions grows. Data-driven monitoring techniques have been developed to address these issues by analyzing system operations data to automatically characterize normal system behavior. System health can be monitored by comparing real-time operating data with these nominal characterizations, providing detection of anomalous data signatures indicative of system faults, failures, or precursors of significant failures. The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) is a general purpose, data-driven system health monitoring software tool that has been successfully applied to several aerospace applications and is under evaluation for anomaly detection in vehicle and ground equipment for next generation launch systems. After an introduction to IMS application development, we discuss these NASA online monitoring applications, including the integration of IMS with complementary model-based and rule-based methods. Although the examples presented in this paper are from space operations applications, IMS is a general-purpose health-monitoring tool that is also applicable to power generation and transmission system monitoring.

  20. Probabilistic density function method for nonlinear dynamical systems driven by colored noise.

    PubMed

    Barajas-Solano, David A; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M

    2016-05-01

    We present a probability density function (PDF) method for a system of nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations driven by colored noise. The method provides an integrodifferential equation for the temporal evolution of the joint PDF of the system's state, which we close by means of a modified large-eddy-diffusivity (LED) closure. In contrast to the classical LED closure, the proposed closure accounts for advective transport of the PDF in the approximate temporal deconvolution of the integrodifferential equation. In addition, we introduce the generalized local linearization approximation for deriving a computable PDF equation in the form of a second-order partial differential equation. We demonstrate that the proposed closure and localization accurately describe the dynamics of the PDF in phase space for systems driven by noise with arbitrary autocorrelation time. We apply the proposed PDF method to analyze a set of Kramers equations driven by exponentially autocorrelated Gaussian colored noise to study nonlinear oscillators and the dynamics and stability of a power grid. Numerical experiments show the PDF method is accurate when the noise autocorrelation time is either much shorter or longer than the system's relaxation time, while the accuracy decreases as the ratio of the two timescales approaches unity. Similarly, the PDF method accuracy decreases with increasing standard deviation of the noise.

  1. Probabilistic density function method for nonlinear dynamical systems driven by colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a probability density function (PDF) method for a system of nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations driven by colored noise. The method provides an integrodifferential equation for the temporal evolution of the joint PDF of the system's state, which we close by means of a modified large-eddy-diffusivity (LED) closure. In contrast to the classical LED closure, the proposed closure accounts for advective transport of the PDF in the approximate temporal deconvolution of the integrodifferential equation. In addition, we introduce the generalized local linearization approximation for deriving a computable PDF equation in the form of a second-order partial differential equation. We demonstrate that the proposed closure and localization accurately describe the dynamics of the PDF in phase space for systems driven by noise with arbitrary autocorrelation time. We apply the proposed PDF method to analyze a set of Kramers equations driven by exponentially autocorrelated Gaussian colored noise to study nonlinear oscillators and the dynamics and stability of a power grid. Numerical experiments show the PDF method is accurate when the noise autocorrelation time is either much shorter or longer than the system's relaxation time, while the accuracy decreases as the ratio of the two timescales approaches unity. Similarly, the PDF method accuracy decreases with increasing standard deviation of the noise.

  2. Accelerator-driven assembly for plutonium transformation (ADAPT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyle, Greorgy J. Van; Todosow, Michael; Powell, James; Schweitzer, Donald

    1995-01-01

    A particle accelerator-driven spallation target and corresponding blanket region are proposed for the ultimate disposition of weapons-grade plutonium being retired from excess nuclear weapons in the U.S. and Russia. The highly fissle plutonium is contained within .25 to .5 cm diameter silicon-carbide coated graphite beads, which are cooled by helium, within the slightly subcritical blanket region. Major advantages include very high one-pass burnup (over 90%), a high integrity waste form (the coated beads), and operation in a subcritical mode, thereby minimizing the vulnerability to the positive reativity feedbacks often associated with plutonium fuel.

  3. An accelerator-driven reactor for meeting future energy demand

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yang, Y.; Yu, A.

    1997-12-31

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor which avoids encountering a shortage of Pu during a high growth rate in the production of nuclear energy. Furthermore, the necessity of the early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options along with high neutron economy for producing the fuel, for transmuting high-level waste such as minor actinides, and for efficiently converting excess and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel.

  4. A Diffusive System Driven by a Battery or by a Smoothly Varying Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.; Lebowitz, J. L.

    2010-08-01

    We consider the steady state of a one dimensional diffusive system, such as the symmetric simple exclusion process (SSEP) on a ring, driven by a battery at the origin or by a smoothly varying field along the ring. The battery appears as the limiting case of a smoothly varying field, when the field becomes a delta function at the origin. We find that in the scaling limit the long range pair correlation functions of the system driven by a battery are very different from the ones known in the steady state of the SSEP maintained out of equilibrium by contact with two reservoirs, even when the steady state density profiles are identical in both models.

  5. High-frequency approximation for periodically driven quantum systems from a Floquet-space perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, André; Anisimovas, Egidijus

    2015-09-01

    We derive a systematic high-frequency expansion for the effective Hamiltonian and the micromotion operator of periodically driven quantum systems. Our approach is based on the block diagonalization of the quasienergy operator in the extended Floquet Hilbert space by means of degenerate perturbation theory. The final results are equivalent to those obtained within a different approach (Rahav et al 2003 Phys. Rev. A 68 013820), (Goldman and Dalibard 2014 Phys. Rev. X 4 031027) and can also be related to the Floquet-Magnus expansion (Casas et al 2001 J. Phys. A 34 3379). We discuss that the dependence on the driving phase, which plagues the latter, can lead to artifactual symmetry breaking. The high-frequency approach is illustrated using the example of a periodically driven Hubbard model. Moreover, we discuss the nature of the approximation and its limitations for systems of many interacting particles.

  6. Current Trends and New Challenges of Databases and Web Applications for Systems Driven Biological Research

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasaiah, Pradeep Kumar; Kim, Do Han

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic and rapidly evolving nature of systems driven research imposes special requirements on the technology, approach, design and architecture of computational infrastructure including database and Web application. Several solutions have been proposed to meet the expectations and novel methods have been developed to address the persisting problems of data integration. It is important for researchers to understand different technologies and approaches. Having familiarized with the pros and cons of the existing technologies, researchers can exploit its capabilities to the maximum potential for integrating data. In this review we discuss the architecture, design and key technologies underlying some of the prominent databases and Web applications. We will mention their roles in integration of biological data and investigate some of the emerging design concepts and computational technologies that are likely to have a key role in the future of systems driven biomedical research. PMID:21423387

  7. Effects of pulse shape on strongly driven two-level systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, C. W. S.

    2011-12-15

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of a two-level system driven by strong nonresonant electromagnetic pulses as a function of pulse intensity and detuning. We have explored the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the transition probability as a function of pulse area for five different temporal profiles: Lorentzian, Lorentzian squared, hyperbolic secant, hyperbolic secant squared, and Gaussian. The two-level system consists of a fine-structure doublet in sodium Rydberg states coupled by Raman transitions driven through far-off-resonance intermediate states. The pulses are in the microwave regime and have high fidelity and uniform intensity. Experiments show that, despite the similarity in the pulse shapes, the behavior of the population transfer versus intensity depends dramatically on the temporal shape and that the spectral properties and area of the pulse do not adequately describe the response.

  8. Current trends and new challenges of databases and web applications for systems driven biological research.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasaiah, Pradeep Kumar; Kim, Do Han

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic and rapidly evolving nature of systems driven research imposes special requirements on the technology, approach, design and architecture of computational infrastructure including database and Web application. Several solutions have been proposed to meet the expectations and novel methods have been developed to address the persisting problems of data integration. It is important for researchers to understand different technologies and approaches. Having familiarized with the pros and cons of the existing technologies, researchers can exploit its capabilities to the maximum potential for integrating data. In this review we discuss the architecture, design and key technologies underlying some of the prominent databases and Web applications. We will mention their roles in integration of biological data and investigate some of the emerging design concepts and computational technologies that are likely to have a key role in the future of systems driven biomedical research.

  9. A new engine-driven canal preparation system with electronic canal measuring capability.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, C; Yoshioka, T; Suda, H

    1997-12-01

    A new cordless engine-driven root canal preparation system has been developed that electronically monitors the location of the file tip and the torque applied to the file during all instrumentation procedures. The Root ZX is mounted inside the handpiece to measure the canal length. The engine is driven with a rechargeable battery, and it works more than 40 minutes without a recharge. Nickel-titanium files are used for this preparation system. The file is rotated at 240 to 280 rpms. When the file tip reaches the apical constriction, the revolution of the file can be automatically reversed (Auto-apical-reverse mechanism). If there is too much torque, the rotation is automatically reversed (Auto-torque-reverse mechanism). These automatic functions promise a safer engine preparation of the canal with nickel-titanium files.

  10. Corner-Space Renormalization Method for Driven-Dissipative Two-Dimensional Correlated Systems.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, S; Le Boité, A; Storme, F; Baksic, A; Ciuti, C

    2015-08-21

    We present a theoretical method to study driven-dissipative correlated quantum systems on lattices with two spatial dimensions (2D). The steady-state density matrix of the lattice is obtained by solving the master equation in a corner of the Hilbert space. The states spanning the corner space are determined through an iterative procedure, using eigenvectors of the density matrix of smaller lattice systems, merging in real space two lattices at each iteration and selecting M pairs of states by maximizing their joint probability. The accuracy of the results is then improved by increasing the dimension M of the corner space until convergence is reached. We demonstrate the efficiency of such an approach by applying it to the driven-dissipative 2D Bose-Hubbard model, describing lattices of coupled cavities with quantum optical nonlinearities.

  11. Floquet–Magnus theory and generic transient dynamics in periodically driven many-body quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Tomotaka; Mori, Takashi; Saito, Keiji

    2016-04-15

    This work explores a fundamental dynamical structure for a wide range of many-body quantum systems under periodic driving. Generically, in the thermodynamic limit, such systems are known to heat up to infinite temperature states in the long-time limit irrespective of dynamical details, which kills all the specific properties of the system. In the present study, instead of considering infinitely long-time scale, we aim to provide a general framework to understand the long but finite time behavior, namely the transient dynamics. In our analysis, we focus on the Floquet–Magnus (FM) expansion that gives a formal expression of the effective Hamiltonian on the system. Although in general the full series expansion is not convergent in the thermodynamics limit, we give a clear relationship between the FM expansion and the transient dynamics. More precisely, we rigorously show that a truncated version of the FM expansion accurately describes the exact dynamics for a certain time-scale. Our theory reveals an experimental time-scale for which non-trivial dynamical phenomena can be reliably observed. We discuss several dynamical phenomena, such as the effect of small integrability breaking, efficient numerical simulation of periodically driven systems, dynamical localization and thermalization. Especially on thermalization, we discuss a generic scenario on the prethermalization phenomenon in periodically driven systems. -- Highlights: •A general framework to describe transient dynamics for periodically driven systems. •The theory is applicable to generic quantum many-body systems including long-range interacting systems. •Physical meaning of the truncation of the Floquet–Magnus expansion is rigorously established. •New mechanism of the prethermalization is proposed. •Revealing an experimental time-scale for which non-trivial dynamical phenomena can be reliably observed.

  12. Evaluating data-driven causal inference techniques in noisy physical and ecological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, C.; Larsen, L.

    2016-12-01

    Causal inference from observational time series challenges traditional approaches for understanding processes and offers exciting opportunities to gain new understanding of complex systems where nonlinearity, delayed forcing, and emergent behavior are common. We present a formal evaluation of the performance of convergent cross-mapping (CCM) and transfer entropy (TE) for data-driven causal inference under real-world conditions. CCM is based on nonlinear state-space reconstruction, and causality is determined by the convergence of prediction skill with an increasing number of observations of the system. TE is the uncertainty reduction based on transition probabilities of a pair of time-lagged variables. With TE, causal inference is based on asymmetry in information flow between the variables. Observational data and numerical simulations from a number of classical physical and ecological systems: atmospheric convection (the Lorenz system), species competition (patch-tournaments), and long-term climate change (Vostok ice core) were used to evaluate the ability of CCM and TE to infer causal-relationships as data series become increasingly corrupted by observational (instrument-driven) or process (model-or -stochastic-driven) noise. While both techniques show promise for causal inference, TE appears to be applicable to a wider range of systems, especially when the data series are of sufficient length to reliably estimate transition probabilities of system components. Both techniques also show a clear effect of observational noise on causal inference. For example, CCM exhibits a negative logarithmic decline in prediction skill as the noise level of the system increases. Changes in TE strongly depend on noise type and which variable the noise was added to. The ability of CCM and TE to detect driving influences suggest that their application to physical and ecological systems could be transformative for understanding driving mechanisms as Earth systems undergo change.

  13. Dynamic phases, clustering, and chain formation for driven disk systems in the presence of quenched disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; McDermott, D.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Reichhardt, C.

    2017-04-01

    We numerically examine the dynamic phases and pattern formation of two-dimensional monodisperse repulsive disks driven over random quenched disorder. We show that there is a series of distinct dynamic regimes as a function of increasing drive, including a clogged or pile-up phase near depinning, a homogeneous disordered flow state, and a dynamically phase separated regime consisting of high-density crystalline regions surrounded by a low density of disordered disks. At the highest drives the disks arrange into one-dimensional moving chains. The phase separated regime has parallels with the phase separation observed in active matter systems, but arises from a distinct mechanism consisting of the combination of nonequilibrium fluctuations with density-dependent mobility. We discuss the pronounced differences between this system and previous studies of driven particles with longer-range repulsive interactions moving over random substrates, such as superconducting vortices or electron crystals, where dynamical phase separation and distinct one-dimensional moving chains are not observed. Our results should be generic to a broad class of systems in which the particle-particle interactions are short ranged, such as sterically interacting colloids or Yukawa particles with strong screening driven over random pinning arrays, superconducting vortices in the limit of small penetration depths, or quasi-two-dimensional granular matter flowing over rough landscapes.

  14. Wind-Driven Wireless Networked System of Mobile Sensors for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoodi, Faranak; Murphy, Neil

    2013-01-01

    A revolutionary way is proposed of studying the surface of Mars using a wind-driven network of mobile sensors: GOWON. GOWON would be a scalable, self-powered and autonomous distributed system that could allow in situ mapping of a wide range of environmental phenomena in a much larger portion of the surface of Mars compared to earlier missions. It could improve the possibility of finding rare phenomena such as "blueberries' or bio-signatures and mapping their occurrence, through random wind-driven search. It would explore difficult terrains that were beyond the reach of previous missions, such as regions with very steep slopes and cluttered surfaces. GOWON has a potentially long life span, as individual elements can be added to the array periodically. It could potentially provide a cost-effective solution for mapping wide areas of Martian terrain, enabling leaving a long-lasting sensing and searching infrastructure on the surface of Mars. The system proposed here addresses this opportunity using technology advances in a distributed system of wind-driven sensors, referred to as Moballs.

  15. System Modeling and Building Energy Simulations of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Mahderekal, Isaac; Vineyard, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To improve the system performance of a gas engine driven heat pump (GHP) system, an analytical modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated with a detailed vapor compression heat pump system design model. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using the desiccant system the sensible heat ratio (SHR- sensible heat ratio) can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% at rated operating conditions. In addtion,using EnergyPlus, building energy simulations have been conducted to assess annual energy consumptions of GHP in sixteen US cities, and the performances are compared to a baseline unit, which has a electrically-driven air conditioner with the seasonal COP of 4.1 for space cooling and a gas funace with 90% fuel efficiency for space heating.

  16. Preliminary design concept of a subcritical reactor using available resources

    SciTech Connect

    Churnetski, E.L.; Hoyny, V.; Chaudhuri, B.R.; Taprantzis, A.; Yavas, A.

    1993-12-31

    During the Fall 1993 semester, a project was initiated within the Nuclear Engineering Department of the University of Tennessee with the objective of developing a design for a subcritical reactor with maximized multiplication factor using materials currently available. Such a device, if constructed, would serve as a teaching tool for the Department of Nuclear Engineering. Design work was conducted as a large number of computer calculations, with trial pile configurations based on fundamental nuclear engineering principles, in an effort to maximize multiplication factor through fuel element geometry, moderator type, fissile/moderator ratio, and reflector character. The principal objective of the design group for the early phase of this project was to present several possible ``baseline`` reactor designs and identify directions for improvements. For the sake of calculational ease, the cores analyzes to date have been of nearly cubic shape. The SCALE CSAS25 software which runs KENO.Va, a Monte Carlo code, was used for all neutronics calculations. The baseline reactors resulting from work to date are cuboidal in shape and graphite reflected. Two types of fuel element geometries are proposed, a typical triangular pitch rod lattice and an arrangement of discrete fuel slugs placed in a lattice corresponding to body centered cubic packing. The latter arrangement provides slightly higher multiplication factors than the former. Calculations were performed for both graphite and heavy water moderation with heavy water moderation producing considerably higher multiplication factors, as expected. In general, the maximum k{sub eff} for the reactors are in the range of 0.5 to 0.9, well subcritical, except in the cases of the extreme possible values of fuel assay where critical configurations are possible. In these cases, designs with reduced fuel loading are recommended to assure a subcritical multiplication factor.

  17. Anisotropic etching of monocrystalline silicon under subcritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pereyra, Nestor Gabriel

    Sub- and supercritical fluids remain an underexploited resource for materials processing. Around its critical point a common compound such as water behaves like a different substance exhibiting changes in its properties that modify its behavior as a solvent and unlock reaction paths not viable in other conditions. In the subcritical region water's properties can be directed by controlling temperature and pressure. Water and silicon are two of the most abundant, versatile, environmentally non-harmful, and simplest substances on Earth. They are among the most researched and best-known substances. Both are ubiquitous and essential for present-day world. Silicon is fundamental in semiconductor fabrication, microelectromechanical systems, and photovoltaic cells. Wet etching of silicon is a fabrication strategy shared by these three applications. Processing of silicon requires large amounts of water, often involving dangerous and environmentally hazardous chemicals. Yet, minimal knowledge is available on the ways high temperature water interacts with crystalline silicon. The purpose of this project is to identify and implement a method for the modification of monocrystalline silicon surfaces with three important characteristics: 1) requires minimal amounts of added chemicals, 2) controllability of morphological features formed, 3) reduced processing time. This will be accomplished by subjecting crystalline silicon to diluted alkaline solutions working in the subcritical region of water. This approach allows for variations on surface morphologies and etching rates by adapting the reactions conditions, with focus on composition and temperature of the solutions used. The work reported discusses the techniques used for producing surfaces with a variety of morphologies that ultimately allowed to create patterns and textures on silicon wafers, using highly diluted alkaline solutions that can be used for photovoltaic applications. These morphologies were created with a

  18. Theoretical prediction of airplane stability derivatives at subcritical speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulinius, J.; Clever, W.; Nieman, A.; Dunn, K.; Gaither, B.

    1973-01-01

    The theoretical development and application is described of an analysis for predicting the major static and rotary stability derivatives for a complete airplane. The analysis utilizes potential flow theory to compute the surface flow fields and pressures on any configuration that can be synthesized from arbitrary lifting bodies and nonplanar thick lifting panels. The pressures are integrated to obtain section and total configuration loads and moments due side slip, angle of attack, pitching motion, rolling motion, yawing motion, and control surface deflection. Subcritical compressibility is accounted for by means of the Gothert similarity rule.

  19. An electronic flash lamp system to replace the traditional explosively driven light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stigman, William L.; Kihara, Ronald; Scarpetti, Raymond D.

    2003-07-01

    Electronic flash lamps are being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These lamps are intended to replace the traditional explosively driven Argon-gas filled light sources (Argon candles) that are currently used to provide illumination for high speed rotating mirror-framing cameras. At Livermore, we are developing an electronic flash lamp system that can match or exceed the light output of a traditional Argon candle. These systems utilize a Plasma Arc Lamp developed by PRISM Science Inc of Woburn, MA, USA. In the past, high-speed photography requiring explosively driven light sources were a one-time-only even that destroyed fixtures and optical alignment. The electronic flash lamp system, utilizing the Plasma ArC Lamp, will replace the explosively driven lighting systems and provide the capability to dry run experimental setups and repeat tests without damage to the experimental set-up. The electronic flash lamp system eliminates the problem of collateral damage to the experiment and does not add to the overall amount of explosives needed for single test. Since the Pulsed-Power driver is remotely located, only the flash lamp itself is destroyed when the explosive shot is fired. The flexible geometry of this light source also enables the user to create complex light patterns as well as photograph very large areas with a single lighting system. This electronic flash lamp system will provide an extremely bright, stable, and repeatable light source for rotating-mirror framing cameras operating at one million frames per second, using both black & white or color films. The design of the Pulsed-Power driver and the flash lamp, along with experimental data and results will be discussed.

  20. An Electronic Flash Lamp System to Replace the Traditional, Explosively-Driven Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stigman, W L; Kihara, R; Scarpetti, R D

    2002-09-25

    Electronic flash lamps are being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These lamps are intended to replace the traditional explosively driven Argon-gas filled light sources (Argon candles) that are currently used to provide illumination for high speed rotating mirror-framing cameras. At Livermore, we are developing an electronic flash lamp system that can match or exceed the light output of a traditional Argon candle. These systems utilize a Plasma Arc Lamp developed by PRISM Science Inc of Chatham, MA, USA. In the past, high-speed photography requiring explosively driven light sources were a one-time-only event that destroyed fixtures and optical alignment. The electronic flash lamp system, utilizing the Plasma Arc Lamp, will replace the explosively driven lighting systems and provide the capability to dry run experimental setups and repeat tests without damage to the experimental set-up. The electronic flash lamp system eliminates the problem of collateral damage to the experiment and does not add to the overall amount of explosives needed for a single test. Since the Pulsed-Power driver is remotely located, only the flash lamp itself is destroyed when the explosive shot is fired. The flexible geometry of this light source also enables the user to create complex light patterns as well as photograph very large areas with a single lighting system. This electronic flash lamp system will provide an extremely bright, stable, and repeatable light source for rotating-mirror framing cameras operating at one million frames per second, using both black & white or color films. The design of the Pulsed-Power driver and the flash lamp, along with experimental data and results will be discussed.

  1. Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Derek

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless shocks - supersonic plasma flows in which the interaction length scale is much shorter than the collisional mean free path - are common phenomena in space and astrophysical systems, including the solar wind, coronal mass ejections, supernovae remnants, and the jets of active galactic nuclei. These systems have been studied for decades, and in many the shocks are believed to efficiently accelerate particles to some of the highest observed energies. Only recently, however, have laser and diagnostic capabilities evolved sufficiently to allow the detailed study in the laboratory of the microphysics of collisionless shocks over a large parameter regime. We present experiments that demonstrate the formation of collisionless shocks utilizing the Phoenix laser laboratory and the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. We also show recent observations of magnetized collisionless shocks on the Omega EP laser facility that extend the LAPD results to higher laser energy, background magnetic field, and ambient plasma density, and that may be relevant to recent experiments on strongly driven magnetic reconnection. Lastly, we discuss a new experimental regime for shocks with results from high-repetition (1 Hz), volumetric laser-driven measurements on the LAPD. These large parameter scales allow us to probe the formation physics of collisionless shocks over several Alfvénic Mach numbers (MA), from shock precursors (magnetosonic solitons with MA < 1) to subcritical (MA < 3) and supercritical (MA > 3) shocks. The results show that collisionless shocks can be generated using a laser-driven magnetic piston, and agree well with both 2D and 3D hybrid and PIC simulations. Additionally, using radiation-hydrodynamic modeling and measurements from multiple diagnostics, the different shock regimes are characterized with dimensionless formation parameters, allowing us to place disparate experiments in a common and predictive framework.

  2. Population inversion in a strongly driven two-level system at far-off resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youyuan; Lötstedt, Erik; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2017-09-01

    The population transfer dynamics in a strongly driven two-level system is studied. It is shown that population inversion can be efficiently achieved when a laser pulse whose photon energy is about half of the energy separation of the two levels is turned on suddenly. This situation is realized when a neutral atom or molecule is ionized at the peak of the laser field, followed by the laser-driven population transfer among two states of an atomic or molecular ion. The mechanism of the efficient population transfer for an ion effectively exposed to a laser field with a sudden turn-on is examined by numerical calculations based on the quasi-stationary Floquet theory.

  3. Dynamics of energy transport and entropy production in ac-driven quantum electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Moskalets, Michael; Sánchez, David; Arrachea, Liliana

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the time-resolved energy transport and the entropy production in ac-driven quantum coherent electron systems coupled to multiple reservoirs at finite temperature. At slow driving, we formulate the first and second laws of thermodynamics valid at each instant of time. We identify heat fluxes flowing through the different pieces of the device and emphasize the importance of the energy stored in the contact and central regions for the second law of thermodynamics to be instantaneously satisfied. In addition, we discuss conservative and dissipative contributions to the heat flux and to the entropy production as a function of time. We illustrate these ideas with a simple model corresponding to a driven level coupled to two reservoirs with different chemical potentials.

  4. Thermodynamic stability of driven open systems and control of phase separation by electro-autocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Martin Z

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by the possibility of electrochemical control of phase separation, a variational theory of thermodynamic stability is developed for driven reactive mixtures, based on a nonlinear generalization of the Cahn-Hilliard and Allen-Cahn equations. The Glansdorff-Prigogine stability criterion is extended for driving chemical work, based on variations of nonequilibrium Gibbs free energy. Linear stability is generally determined by the competition of chemical diffusion and driven autocatalysis. Novel features arise for electrochemical systems, related to controlled total current (galvanostatic operation), concentration-dependent exchange current (Butler-Volmer kinetics), and negative differential reaction resistance (Marcus kinetics). The theory shows how spinodal decomposition can be controlled by solo-autocatalytic charge transfer, with only a single faradaic reaction. Experimental evidence is presented for intercalation and electrodeposition in rechargeable batteries, and further applications are discussed in solid state ionics, electrovariable optics, electrochemical precipitation, and biological pattern formation.

  5. Improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations of systems that undergo temperature-driven phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, L.; Castro-Palacio, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    Recently, Velazquez and Curilef proposed a methodology to extend Monte Carlo algorithms based on a canonical ensemble which aims to overcome slow sampling problems associated with temperature-driven discontinuous phase transitions. We show in this work that Monte Carlo algorithms extended with this methodology also exhibit a remarkable efficiency near a critical point. Our study is performed for the particular case of a two-dimensional four-state Potts model on a square lattice with periodic boundary conditions. This analysis reveals that the extended version of Metropolis importance sampling is more efficient than the usual Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster algorithms. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology to improve the efficiency of MC simulations of systems that undergo any type of temperature-driven phase transition.

  6. Cytoskeletal motor-driven active self-assembly in in vitro systems

    DOE PAGES

    Lam, A. T.; VanDelinder, V.; Kabir, A. M. R.; ...

    2015-11-11

    Molecular motor-driven self-assembly has been an active area of soft matter research for the past decade. Because molecular motors transform chemical energy into mechanical work, systems which employ molecular motors to drive self-assembly processes are able to overcome kinetic and thermodynamic limits on assembly time, size, complexity, and structure. Here, we review the progress in elucidating and demonstrating the rules and capabilities of motor-driven active self-assembly. Lastly, we focus on the types of structures created and the degree of control realized over these structures, and discuss the next steps necessary to achieve the full potential of this assembly mode whichmore » complements robotic manipulation and passive self-assembly.« less

  7. Cytoskeletal motor-driven active self-assembly in in vitro systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, A. T.; VanDelinder, V.; Hess, H.; Bachand, G. D.

    2015-11-11

    Molecular motor-driven self-assembly has been an active area of soft matter research for the past decade. Because molecular motors transform chemical energy into mechanical work, systems which employ molecular motors to drive self-assembly processes are able to overcome kinetic and thermodynamic limits on assembly time, size, complexity, and structure. Here, we review the progress in elucidating and demonstrating the rules and capabilities of motor-driven active self-assembly. Lastly, we focus on the types of structures created and the degree of control realized over these structures, and discuss the next steps necessary to achieve the full potential of this assembly mode which complements robotic manipulation and passive self-assembly.

  8. Cytoskeletal motor-driven active self-assembly in in vitro systems

    DOE PAGES

    Lam, A. T.; VanDelinder, V.; Kabir, A. M. R.; ...

    2015-11-11

    Molecular motor-driven self-assembly has been an active area of soft matter research for the past decade. Because molecular motors transform chemical energy into mechanical work, systems which employ molecular motors to drive self-assembly processes are able to overcome kinetic and thermodynamic limits on assembly time, size, complexity, and structure. Here, we review the progress in elucidating and demonstrating the rules and capabilities of motor-driven active self-assembly. Lastly, we focus on the types of structures created and the degree of control realized over these structures, and discuss the next steps necessary to achieve the full potential of this assembly mode whichmore » complements robotic manipulation and passive self-assembly.« less

  9. Improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations of systems that undergo temperature-driven phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, L; Castro-Palacio, J C

    2013-07-01

    Recently, Velazquez and Curilef proposed a methodology to extend Monte Carlo algorithms based on a canonical ensemble which aims to overcome slow sampling problems associated with temperature-driven discontinuous phase transitions. We show in this work that Monte Carlo algorithms extended with this methodology also exhibit a remarkable efficiency near a critical point. Our study is performed for the particular case of a two-dimensional four-state Potts model on a square lattice with periodic boundary conditions. This analysis reveals that the extended version of Metropolis importance sampling is more efficient than the usual Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster algorithms. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology to improve the efficiency of MC simulations of systems that undergo any type of temperature-driven phase transition.

  10. A pneumatically driven inkjet printing system for highly viscous microdroplet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, In Ho; Kim, Joonwon

    2016-12-01

    This paper introduces a pneumatically driven inkjet printing system that forms highly viscous microdroplets in the nanoliter volume range. The printing system has a unique printing mechanism that uses a flexible membrane and an effective backflow stopper. While typical inkjet systems can handle liquids with a limited range of viscosity due to energy loss by viscous dissipation at the nozzle and ineffective backflow management within their systems, our printing system can print liquids with viscosity as high as 384.5 cP. In the viscosity range 1-384.5 cP, we investigated printing characteristics such as printed droplet volume, standoff distance, and maximum possible frequency. The droplet formation showed outstanding reliability, with the droplet volume exhibiting a coefficient of variation less than 1.07 %. Our printing system can be directly used in inkjet applications with functional liquids over a broad viscosity range.

  11. Topological phase transitions in finite-size periodically driven translationally invariant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yang; Rigol, Marcos

    2017-08-01

    It is known that, in the thermodynamic limit, the Chern number of a translationally invariant system cannot change under unitary time evolutions that are smooth in momentum space. Yet a real-space counterpart of the Chern number, the Bott index, has been shown to change in periodically driven systems with open boundary conditions. Here we prove that the Bott index and the Chern number are identical in translationally invariant systems in the thermodynamic limit. Using the Bott index, we show that, in finite-size translationally invariant systems, a Fermi sea under a periodic drive that is turned on slowly can acquire a different topology from that of the initial state. This can happen provided that the gap-closing points in the thermodynamic limit are absent in the discrete Brillouin zone of the finite system. Hence, in such systems, a periodic drive can be used to dynamically prepare topologically nontrivial states starting from topologically trivial ones.

  12. Quantum system driven by incoherent a.c fields: Multi-crossing Landau Zener dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jipdi, M. N.; Fai, L. C.; Tchoffo, M.

    2016-10-01

    The paper investigates the multi-crossing dynamics of a Landau-Zener (LZ) system driven by two sinusoidal a.c fields applying the Dynamic Matrix approach (DMA). The system is shown to follow one-crossing and multi-crossing dynamics for low and high frequency regime respectively. It is shown that in low frequency regime, the resonance phenomenon occurs and leads to the decoupling of basis states; the effective gap vanishes and then the complete blockage of the system. For high frequency, the system achieves multi-crossing dynamics with two fictitious crossings; the system models a Landau-Zener-Stückelberg (LZS) interferometer with critical parameters that tailor probabilities. The system is then shown to depend only on the phase that permits the easiest control with possible application in implementing logic gates.

  13. Particle dynamics in a symmetrically driven underdamped inhomogeneous periodic potential system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkongor, D.; Saikia, S.; Jayannavar, A. M.; Mahato, Mangal C.; Reenbohn, W. L.

    2017-05-01

    Though stochastic resonance was usually shown to occur in bistable systems whereas ratchet effect necessarily occurs in periodic potential systems, it was conjectured [Nature 369, 181 (1994), ibid 369,271 (1994)] that these two non-equilibrium phenomena have some commonalities. Since for proper comparison both the phenomena need to occur in the same system, in the present work, we show first that stochastic resonance too occurs in periodic potential system, and then, in addition show that the ratchet effect also occurs in the same parameter space of the system where stochastic resonance occurs. In order to obtain ratchet effect we consider periodic non-uniformity of the friction coefficient of the medium to provide the necessary asymmetry in the symmetrically driven sinusoidal potential system. However, the temperature at which stochastic resonance occurs is different from the temperature at which ratchet current peaks.

  14. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    and four (4) spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data, such as the uncertainty in fuel exposure impact on reactivity and the pulse neutron data evaluation methodology, failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements supply useful information to analysts evaluating spent fuel subcriticality. The original purpose of the subcritical measurements was to validate computer model predictions that spent N Reactor fuel of a particular, typical exposure (2740 MWd/t) had a critical mass equal to twice that of unexposed fuel of the same type. The motivation for performing this work was driven by the need to increase spent fuel storage limits. These subcritical measurements confirmed the computer model predictions.

  15. Beyond Floquet theory: new paradigms for robust topological phenomena in strongly driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudner, Mark; Levin, Michael; Berg, Erez

    2012-02-01

    The discoveries of the quantized Hall effect [1] and Thouless' quantized adiabatic pumping [2] revealed the existence of a new class of extremely robust quantum phenomena which can be observed with high fidelity, largely independent of sample details. The immunity of these remarkable effects to a variety of perturbations can be understood in terms of a topological structure associated with the systems' wave functions. The rapid development of powerful tools for controlling solid state and atomic systems over the last decade has motivated the exploration of topological phenomena in driven systems. Recently, Kitagawa and coworkers [3] discussed analogs of previously known topological phenomena in terms of the Floquet operators of periodically-driven systems. Intriguingly, this work also revealed new robust phenomena, such as the existence of robust chiral edge modes in a 2D system with vanishing Chern numbers for all bulk Floquet bands. Here we construct the topological invariant which distinguishes phases with and without chiral edge modes, and discuss generalizations to other 1D and 2D systems. [4pt] [1] K. von Klitzing, G. Dorda, and M. Pepper, Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 494 (1980).[0pt] [2] D. J. Thouless, Phys. Rev. B 27, 6083 (1983).[0pt] [3] T. Kitagawa, et al., Phys. Rev. B 82, 235114 (2010).

  16. Floquet-Magnus theory and generic transient dynamics in periodically driven many-body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Tomotaka; Mori, Takashi; Saito, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    This work explores a fundamental dynamical structure for a wide range of many-body quantum systems under periodic driving. Generically, in the thermodynamic limit, such systems are known to heat up to infinite temperature states in the long-time limit irrespective of dynamical details, which kills all the specific properties of the system. In the present study, instead of considering infinitely long-time scale, we aim to provide a general framework to understand the long but finite time behavior, namely the transient dynamics. In our analysis, we focus on the Floquet-Magnus (FM) expansion that gives a formal expression of the effective Hamiltonian on the system. Although in general the full series expansion is not convergent in the thermodynamics limit, we give a clear relationship between the FM expansion and the transient dynamics. More precisely, we rigorously show that a truncated version of the FM expansion accurately describes the exact dynamics for a certain time-scale. Our theory reveals an experimental time-scale for which non-trivial dynamical phenomena can be reliably observed. We discuss several dynamical phenomena, such as the effect of small integrability breaking, efficient numerical simulation of periodically driven systems, dynamical localization and thermalization. Especially on thermalization, we discuss a generic scenario on the prethermalization phenomenon in periodically driven systems.

  17. Effective temperature in an interacting, externally driven, vertex system: theory and experiment on artificial spin ice

    SciTech Connect

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Li, Jiie; Ke, Xianglin; Lammert, Paul E; Schiffer, Peter; Crespi, Vincent H

    2009-01-01

    Frustrated arrays of interacting single-domain nanomagnets provide important model systems for statistical mechanics, because they map closely onto well-studied vertex models and are amenable to direct imaging and custom engineering. Although these systems are manifestly athermal, they demonstrate that the statistical properties of both hexagonal and square lattices can be described by an effective temperature based on the magnetostatic energy of the arrays. This temperature has predictive power for the moment configurations and is intimately related to how the moments are driven by an oscillating external field.

  18. Non-adiabatic effects on the optical response of driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregoso, Benjamin M.; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Moore, Joel

    Periodically driven systems have received renewed interest due to their capacity to engineer non-trivial effective Hamiltonians. A characteristic of such systems is how they respond to weak periodicity-breaking drive, as for example when a laser is pulsed instead of continuous wave. We develop semi-classical equations of motion of a wave packet in the presence of electric and magnetic fields which are turned on non-adiabatically. We then show the emergence of significant corrections to electronic collective excitations and optical responses of topological insulator surface states, Weyl metals and semiconductor mono-chalcogenides.

  19. Event-Driven Control for Networked Control Systems With Quantization and Markov Packet Losses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongjiu; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Jinhui

    2016-05-23

    In this paper, event-driven is used in a networked control system (NCS) which is subjected to the effect of quantization and packet losses. A discrete event-detector is used to monitor specific events in the NCS. Both an arbitrary region quantizer and Markov jump packet losses are also considered for the NCS. Based on zoom strategy and Lyapunov theory, a complete proof is given to guarantee mean square stability of the closed-loop system. Stabilization of the NCS is ensured by designing a feedback controller. Lastly, an inverted pendulum model is given to show the advantages and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  20. Suppression of Multiphoton Resonances in Driven Quantum Systems via Pulse Shape Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Dumont, Joey; Lefebvre, Catherine; MacLean, Steve

    2017-08-01

    This Letter demonstrates control over multiphoton absorption processes in driven two-level systems, which include, for example, superconducting qubits or laser-irradiated graphene, through spectral shaping of the driving pulse. Starting from calculations based on Floquet theory, we use differential evolution, a general purpose optimization algorithm, to find the Fourier coefficients of the driving function that suppress a given multiphoton resonance in the strong field regime. We show that the suppression of the transition probability is due to the coherent superposition of high-order Fourier harmonics which closes the dynamical gap between the Floquet states of the two-level system.