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Sample records for driven vortex lattice

  1. Anomalies in vortex lattice dynamics driven by induced ac currents in superconducting films with magnetic arrays of two-fold symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, A. J.; Chiliotte, C. E.; Pasquini, G.; Bekeris, V.; Gomez, A.; del Valle, J.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Prieto, J. L.; Vicent, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the vortex lattice driven by ac induced currents in the critical state regime, for T > 0.70 TC. The samples are superconducting films grown on top of two-fold symmetry array of magnetic dots. In these heterostructures, the induced ac currents flow parallel to the short and to the long side of the pinning array in different areas of the samples simultaneously. This behavior produces remarkable effects in the vortex lattice dynamics. First of all, periodic features are observed in the ac susceptibility versus applied magnetic field measurements which are related to matching effects between the vortex lattices and the magnetic array. However, the vortex lattice reconfiguration observed in magnetotransport experiments is absent. Some of these features are revealed as maxima instead of being minima, indicating higher mobility at certain matching fields. Competing unstable vortex configurations could lead to increase vortex mobility precluding the reconfiguration transition. At high temperatures, where the matching effects show up, the magnetic permeability of the dots is the mechanism that governs the JC(T) behavior. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the pinning force FP(T) shows a temperature crossover related to an unexpected enhancement in vortex mobility. Vortex-vortex interaction and the interplay between trapped and interstitial vortices are a hint to explain these phenomena.

  2. Vortex lattice inhomogeneity in spatially inhomogeneous superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Daniel E.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2004-11-01

    A trapped degenerate Bose gas exhibits superfluidity with spatially nonuniform superfluid density. We show that the vortex distribution in such a highly inhomogeneous rotating superfluid is nevertheless nearly uniform. The inhomogeneity in vortex density, which diminishes in the rapid-rotation limit, is driven by the discrete way vortices impart angular momentum to the superfluid. This effect favors the highest vortex density in regions where the superfluid density is most uniform (e.g., the center of a harmonically trapped gas). A striking consequence of this is that the boson velocity deviates from a rigid-body form exhibiting a radial-shear flow past the vortex lattice.

  3. Fermi surface and order parameter driven vortex lattice structure transitions in twin-free YBa2Cu3O7.

    PubMed

    White, J S; Hinkov, V; Heslop, R W; Lycett, R J; Forgan, E M; Bowell, C; Strässle, S; Abrahamsen, A B; Laver, M; Dewhurst, C D; Kohlbrecher, J; Gavilano, J L; Mesot, J; Keimer, B; Erb, A

    2009-03-01

    We report on small-angle neutron scattering studies of the intrinsic vortex lattice (VL) structure in detwinned YBa2Cu3O7 at 2 K, and in fields up to 10.8 T. Because of the suppressed pinning to twin-domain boundaries, a new distorted hexagonal VL structure phase is stabilized at intermediate fields. It is separated from a low-field hexagonal phase of different orientation and distortion by a first-order transition at 2.0(2) T that is probably driven by Fermi surface effects. We argue that another first-order transition at 6.7(2) T, into a rhombic structure with a distortion of opposite sign, marks a crossover from a regime where Fermi surface anisotropy is dominant, to one where the VL structure and distortion is controlled by the order-parameter anisotropy. PMID:19392554

  4. Onset of motion and dynamic reordering of a vortex lattice.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohong; Andrei, Eva Y; Xiao, Z L; Shuk, P; Greenblatt, M

    2006-01-13

    Time resolved transport measurements on a driven vortex lattice in an undoped 2H-NbSe2 crystal show that the response to a current pulse is governed by healing of defects as the lattice evolves from a stationary to a moving steady state and that the response time reflects the degree of order in the initial vortex state. We find that stationary field cooled vortex lattices become more ordered with decreasing temperature and identify a temperature below which a qualitative change in the response signals the disappearance of topological defects.

  5. Persistence of metastable vortex lattice domains in MgB2 in the presence of vortex motion.

    PubMed

    Rastovski, C; Schlesinger, K J; Gannon, W J; Dewhurst, C D; DeBeer-Schmitt, L; Zhigadlo, N D; Karpinski, J; Eskildsen, M R

    2013-09-01

    Recently, extensive vortex lattice metastability was reported in MgB2 in connection with a second-order rotational phase transition. However, the mechanism responsible for these well-ordered metastable vortex lattice phases is not well understood. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we studied the vortex lattice in MgB2 as it was driven from a metastable to the ground state through a series of small changes in the applied magnetic field. Our results show that metastable vortex lattice domains persist in the presence of substantial vortex motion and directly demonstrate that the metastability is not due to vortex pinning. Instead, we propose that it is due to the jamming of counterrotated vortex lattice domains which prevents a rotation to the ground state orientation.

  6. Persistence of Metastable Vortex Lattice Domains in MgB2 in the Presence of Vortex Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Rastovski, Catherine; Schlesinger, Kimberly; Gannon, William J; Dewhurst, Charles; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M; Zhigadlo, Nikolai; Karpinski, Janusz; Eskildsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Recently, extensive vortex lattice metastability was reported in MgB2 in connection with a second-order rotational phase transition. However, the mechanism responsible for these well-ordered metastable vortex lattice phases is not well understood. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we studied the vortex lattice in MgB2 as it was driven from a metastable to the ground state through a series of small changes in the applied magnetic field. Our results show that metastable vortex lattice domains persist in the presence of substantial vortex motion and directly demonstrate that the metastability is not due to vortex pinning. Instead, we propose that it is due to the jamming of counterrotated vortex lattice domains which prevents a rotation to the ground state orientation.

  7. Josephson vortex lattice in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. E.; Dodgson, M. J. W.

    2013-09-15

    Many superconducting materials are composed of weakly coupled conducting layers. Such a layered structure has a very strong influence on the properties of vortex matter in a magnetic field. This review focuses on the properties of the Josephson vortex lattice generated by the magnetic field applied in the direction of the layers. The theoretical description is based on the Lawrence-Doniach model in the London limit, which takes only the phase degree of freedom of the superconducting order parameter into account. In spite of its simplicity, this model leads to an amazingly rich set of phenomena. We review in detail the structure of an isolated vortex line and various properties of the vortex lattice, in both dilute and dense limits. In particular, we extensively discuss the influence of the layered structure and thermal fluctuations on the selection of lattice configurations at different magnetic fields.

  8. Vortex lattices in theory and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Capmbell, Laurence J.

    1988-01-01

    The formal simplicity of ideal point vortex systems in two dimensions has long attracted interest in both their exact solutions and in their capacity to simulate physical processes. Attention here is focused on infinite, two-fold periodic vortex arrays, including an expression for the energy density of an arbitrary vortex lattice (i.e., an arbitrary number of vortices with arbitrary strengths in a unit cell parallelogram of arbitrary shape). For the case of two vortices per unit cell, the morphology of stable lattices can be described completely. A non-trivial physical realization of such lattices is a rotating mixture of /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He at temperatures so low that both isotopic components are superfluid. The structure of the expected lattices is quite different from the usual triangular structure. Magnetic flux lines in high-temperature superconductors show a one-parameter family of degenerate ground state of the lattice due to the anisotropy of the vortex--vortex interaction. A final topic, closely related to Josephson-junction arrays, is the case of vortices confined to a grid. That is, the vortices interact pair-wise in the usual manner but are constrained to occupy only locations on an independent periodic grid. By using vortex relaxation methods in the continuum and then imposing the grid it is possible to find low-lying states extremely rapidly compared to previous Monte Carlo calculations. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Single vortex core recording in a magnetic vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitin, D.; Nissen, D.; Schädlich, P.; Arekapudi, S. S. P. K.; Albrecht, M.

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the reversal characteristics of magnetic vortex cores in a two dimensional assembly of magnetic vortices. The vortex lattice was created by film deposition of 30-nm-thick permalloy onto large arrays of self-assembled spherical SiO2-particles with a diameter of 330 nm. The vortex core reversal was investigated by employing a write/read tester. This device uses a state-of-the-art magnetic recording head of a hard disc drive, which allows imaging as well as applying a local magnetic field pulse to individual vortices. The successful writing and reading of individual vortex cores is demonstrated, including a switching map, which indicates the switching behavior dependent on the relative position of the field pulse with respect to the vortex core.

  10. Vortex matter driven through mesoscopic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, P. H.; Kokubo, N.; Besseling, R.

    2004-08-01

    The dynamics of vortex matter confined to mesoscopic channels has been investigated by means of mode locking experiments. When vortices are coherently driven through the potential provided by static vortices pinned in the channel edges, interference between the washboard frequency of the moving vortex lattice and the frequency of the superimposed rf-drive causes (Shapiro-like) steps in the dc- I- V curves. The position of the voltage steps uniquely determines the number of moving rows in each channel. It also shows how the frustration between row spacing and channel width behaves as a function of magnetic field. Maxima in flow stress (∼ Ic) occur at mismatch conditions. They are related to the traffic-jam-like flow impedance caused by the disorder in the edges. At higher fields, near the 2D-melting line Bm( T), the mode-locking interference characteristic for crystalline motion, strongly depends on the velocity, i.e. the applied frequency at which the vortex motion is probed. The minimum velocity at which coherent motion could be observed, diverges when the melting line is approached from below. Above the melting line interference is absent for any frequency. These observations give the first direct evidence for a dynamic phase transition of vortex matter driven through a disorder potential as predicted by Koshelev and Vinokur.

  11. Optical vortex array in spatially varying lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Amit; Kumar, Manish; Senthilkumaran, P.; Joseph, Joby

    2016-04-01

    We present an experimental method based on a modified multiple beam interference approach to generate an optical vortex array arranged in a spatially varying lattice. This method involves two steps which are: numerical synthesis of a consistent phase mask by using two-dimensional integrated phase gradient calculations and experimental implementation of produced phase mask by utilizing a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. This method enables an independent variation of the orientation and period of the vortex lattice. As working examples, we provide the experimental demonstration of various spatially variant optical vortex lattices. We further confirm the existence of optical vortices by formation of fork fringes. Such lattices may find applications in size dependent trapping, sorting, manipulation and photonic crystals.

  12. Vortex lattice theory: A linear algebra approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamoun, George C.

    Vortex lattices are prevalent in a large class of physical settings that are characterized by different mathematical models. We present a coherent and generalized Hamiltonian fluid mechanics-based formulation that reduces all vortex lattices into a classic problem in linear algebra for a non-normal matrix A. Via Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), the solution lies in the null space of the matrix (i.e., we require nullity( A) > 0) as well as the distribution of its singular values. We demonstrate that this approach provides a good model for various types of vortex lattices, and makes it possible to extract a rich amount of information on them. The contributions of this thesis can be classified into four main points. The first is asymmetric equilibria. A 'Brownian ratchet' construct was used which converged to asymmetric equilibria via a random walk scheme that utilized the smallest singular value of A. Distances between configurations and equilibria were measured using the Frobenius norm ||·||F and 2-norm ||·||2, and conclusions were made on the density of equilibria within the general configuration space. The second contribution used Shannon Entropy, which we interpret as a scalar measure of the robustness, or likelihood of lattices to occur in a physical setting. Third, an analytic model was produced for vortex street patterns on the sphere by using SVD in conjunction with expressions for the center of vorticity vector and angular velocity. Equilibrium curves within the configuration space were presented as a function of the geometry, and pole vortices were shown to have a critical role in the formation and destruction of vortex streets. The fourth contribution entailed a more complete perspective of the streamline topology of vortex streets, linking the bifurcations to critical points on the equilibrium curves.

  13. Historical evolution of vortex-lattice methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the beginning and some orientation of the vortex-lattice method were given. The historical course of this method was followed in conjunction with its field of computational fluid dynamics, spanning the period from L.F. Richardson's paper in 1910 to 1975. The following landmarks were pointed out: numerical analysis of partial differential equations, lifting-line theory, finite-difference method, 1/4-3/4 rule, block relaxation technique, application of electronic computers, and advanced panel methods.

  14. The Acoustically Driven Vortex Cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Spencer B.; Gee, Kent L.

    2014-03-01

    Vortex cannons have been used by physics teachers for years, mostly to teach the continuity principle. In its simplest form, a vortex cannon is an empty coffee can with a hole cut in the bottom and the lid replaced. More elaborate models can be purchased through various scientific suppliers under names such as "Air Cannon"2 and "Airzooka."3 We will briefly discuss the uses of a vortex cannon in teaching and a new type of vortex cannon for teaching.

  15. The Acoustically Driven Vortex Cannon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Spencer B.; Gee, Kent L.

    2014-01-01

    Vortex cannons have been used by physics teachers for years, mostly to teach the continuity principle. In its simplest form, a vortex cannon is an empty coffee can with a hole cut in the bottom and the lid replaced. More elaborate models can be purchased through various scientific suppliers under names such as "Air Cannon" and…

  16. Simulating infinite vortex lattices in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingarelli, Luca; Keaveny, Eric E.; Barnett, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    We present an efficient framework to numerically treat infinite periodic vortex lattices in rotating superfluids described by the Gross-Pitaevskii theory. The commonly used split-step Fourier (SSF) spectral methods are inapplicable to such systems as the standard Fourier transform does not respect the boundary conditions mandated by the magnetic translation group. We present a generalisation of the SSF method which incorporates the correct boundary conditions by employing the so-called magnetic Fourier transform. We test the method and show that it reduces to known results in the lowest-Landau-level regime. While we focus on rotating scalar superfluids for simplicity, the framework can be naturally extended to treat multicomponent systems and systems under more general ‘synthetic’ gauge fields.

  17. Fluctuating pancake vortices revealed by dissipation of Josephson vortex lattice.

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. E.; Buzdin, A. I.; Kakeya, I.; Yamamoto, T.; Kadowaki, K.

    2011-06-01

    In strongly anisotropic layered superconductors in tilted magnetic fields, the Josephson vortex lattice coexists with the lattice of pancake vortices. Due to the interaction between them, the dissipation of the Josephson vortex lattice is very sensitive to the presence of the pancake vortices. If the c-axis magnetic field is smaller than the corresponding lower critical field, the pancake stacks are not formed but the individual pancakes may exist in the fluctuational regime either near the surface in large-size samples or in the central region for small-size mesas. We calculate the contribution of such fluctuating pancake vortices to the c-axis conductivity of the Josephson vortex lattice and compare the theoretical results with measurements on small mesas fabricated out of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} crystals. A fingerprint of fluctuating pancakes is a characteristic exponential dependence of the c-axis conductivity observed experimentally. Our results provide strong evidence of the existence of the fluctuating pancakes and their influence on the Josephson vortex lattice dissipation.

  18. Vortex lattice disorder in pseudorandom potential in rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithun, T.; Porsezian, K.; Dey, Bishwajyoti

    2016-05-01

    We numerically study the vortex lattice dynamics in presence of pseudorandom potential in rotating Bose-Einstein condensate. The rotating condensate displays highly ordered triangular vortex lattice. In presence of pseudorandom potential the vortex lattice gets distorted. The histogram of the distances between each pair of the vortices shows how the long-range order of the triangular vortex lattice is destroyed in presence of pseudorandom potential.

  19. Creation of vortex lattices by a wavefront division.

    PubMed

    Masajada, J; Popiolek-Masajada, A; Leniec, M

    2007-04-16

    The Young's double-slit experiment is one of the most popular stories in the history of physics. This paper, like many others, has emerged from the Young's idea. It investigates the diffraction of the plane or spherical wave produced by three or four small holes in an opaque screen. It was noticed that the interference field contained a lattice of optical vortices which were equivalent to those produced in optical vortex interferometer. The vortex lattice generated by the three holes possessed some unique properties from which the analytical formulae for vortex points position were derived. We also pointed out the differences between our case and the double-slit experiment. Finally, some remarks on possible applications of our arrangement are discussed briefly. These theoretical considerations are illustrated with the use of experimental results.

  20. Vortex-Lattice Utilization. [in aeronautical engineering and aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The many novel, innovative, and unique implementations and applications of the vortex-lattice method to aerodynamic design and analysis which have been performed by Industry, Government, and Universities were presented. Although this analytical tool is not new, it continues to be utilized and refined in the aeronautical community.

  1. Vortex penetration depth of organic superconductors: Evidence for vortex lattice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Tea, N.H.; Giannetta, R.W.; Salamon, M.B.; Williams, J.M.; Wang, H.H.; Geiser, U.

    1997-07-01

    The authors observe a crossover field H* in the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the rf vortex penetration depth in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br for {rvec H}{sub dc}{parallel}{cflx b}-axis. They find that H* can be described quantitatively by the 3D Lindemann melting theory; thus, it corresponds to the melting of the vortex lattice in {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br and lies very close to the irreversibility line. In the vortex-liquid state, they argue that the saturation of the vortex penetration depth in a magnetic field results from the finite size of the sample. The results do not have the scaling form predicted by the Coffey-Clem model in contrast to previous findings.

  2. Stabilization of active matter by flow-vortex lattices and defect ordering

    PubMed Central

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Adamer, Michael F.; Thampi, Sumesh P.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to cellular monolayers, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements and exhibit turbulent-like and chaotic patterns. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and through numerical simulations, that the crossover between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened, can be achieved by using friction as a control parameter. Moreover, we discover unexpected vortex ordering at this wet–dry crossover. We show that the self organization of vortices into lattices is accompanied by the spatial ordering of topological defects leading to active crystal-like structures. The emergence of vortex lattices, which leads to the positional ordering of topological defects, suggests potential applications in the design and control of active materials. PMID:26837846

  3. Stabilization of active matter by flow-vortex lattices and defect ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Adamer, Michael F.; Thampi, Sumesh P.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-02-01

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to cellular monolayers, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements and exhibit turbulent-like and chaotic patterns. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and through numerical simulations, that the crossover between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened, can be achieved by using friction as a control parameter. Moreover, we discover unexpected vortex ordering at this wet-dry crossover. We show that the self organization of vortices into lattices is accompanied by the spatial ordering of topological defects leading to active crystal-like structures. The emergence of vortex lattices, which leads to the positional ordering of topological defects, suggests potential applications in the design and control of active materials.

  4. Stabilization of active matter by flow-vortex lattices and defect ordering.

    PubMed

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Adamer, Michael F; Thampi, Sumesh P; Yeomans, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to cellular monolayers, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements and exhibit turbulent-like and chaotic patterns. Here we demonstrate both theoretically and through numerical simulations, that the crossover between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened, can be achieved by using friction as a control parameter. Moreover, we discover unexpected vortex ordering at this wet-dry crossover. We show that the self organization of vortices into lattices is accompanied by the spatial ordering of topological defects leading to active crystal-like structures. The emergence of vortex lattices, which leads to the positional ordering of topological defects, suggests potential applications in the design and control of active materials. PMID:26837846

  5. Enhancement of long-range correlations in a 2D vortex lattice by an incommensurate 1D disorder potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillamon, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Cordoba, R.; Sese, J.; de Teresa, J. M.; Ibarra, R.

    In two dimensional (2D) systems, theory has proposed that random disorder destroys long range correlations driving a transition to a glassy state. Here, I will discuss new insights into this issue obtained through the direct visualization of the critical behaviour of a 2D superconducting vortex lattice formed in a thin film with a smooth 1D thickness modulation. Using scanning tunneling microscopy at 0.1K, we have tracked the modification in the 2D vortex arrangements induced by the 1D thickness modulation while increasing the vortex density by three orders of magnitude. Upon increasing the field, we observed a two-step order-disorder transition in the 2D vortex lattice mediated by the appearance of dislocations and disclinations and accompanied by an increase in the local vortex density fluctuations. Through a detailed analysis of correlation functions, we find that the transition is driven by the incommensurate 1D thickness modulation. We calculate the critical points and exponents and find that they are well above theoretical expectation for random disorder. Our results show that long range 1D correlations in random potentials enhance the stability range of the ordered phase in a 2D vortex lattice. Work supported by Spanish MINECO, CIG Marie Curie Grant, Axa Research Fund and FBBVA.

  6. Vortex Lattices in Rotating Atomic Bose Gases with Dipolar Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.R.; Rezayi, E.H.; Simon, S.H.

    2005-11-11

    We show that dipolar interactions have dramatic effects on the ground states of rotating atomic Bose gases in the weak-interaction limit. With increasing dipolar interaction (relative to the net contact interaction), the mean field, or high filling factor, ground state undergoes a series of transitions between vortex lattices of different symmetries: triangular, square, 'stripe', and 'bubble' phases. We also study the effects of dipolar interactions on the quantum fluids at low filling factors. We show that the incompressible Laughlin state at filling factor {nu}=1/2 is replaced by compressible stripe and bubble phases.

  7. Elastic Moduli of Vortex Lattices within Nonlocal London Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranović, P.; Kogan, V. G.

    2001-09-01

    Vortex lattice (VL) elastic response is analyzed within the nonlocal London model which holds for high- κ clean superconductors. The squash modulus vanishes at the field H□ where VL undergoes a square-to-rhombus transition. For H>H□, where the square VL is stable, the rotation modulus turns zero at H = Hr, indicating VL instability to rotations. The shear modulus depends on the shear direction; the dependence is strong in the vicinity of H□ where the square VL is soft with respect to the shear along [110]. The H dependences of the moduli are evaluated for LuNi2B2C.

  8. Thermally driven continuous-wave and pulsed optical vortex.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yitian; Xu, Miaomiao; Zhao, Yongguang; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang

    2014-04-15

    We demonstrated a continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed optical vortex with topological charges driven by heat generated during the lasing process without introducing the astigmatism effect and reducing lasing efficiency. During the lasing process, the topological charges were changeable by the thermal-induced lens and selected by the mode-matching between the pump and oscillating beams. With a graphene sample as the saturable absorber, a pulsed optical vortex was achieved at a wavelength of 1.36 μm, which identified that graphene could be used as a pulse modulator for the generation of a pulsed optical vortex. Thermally driven cw and pulsed optical vortexes should have various promising applications based on the compact structure, changeable topological charges, and specific wavelength. PMID:24978994

  9. Vortex formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating deep optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Akira; Nakano, Yuki; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2011-11-15

    We study the dynamics of vortex nucleation and lattice formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate in a rotating square optical lattice by numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Different dynamical regimes of vortex nucleation are found, depending on the depth and period of the optical lattice. We make an extensive comparison with the experiments by R. A. Williams et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 050404 (2010)], especially focusing on the issues of the critical rotation frequency for the first vortex nucleation and the vortex number as a function of rotation frequency.

  10. Vortex core-driven magnetization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Sug-Bong; Acremann, Yves; Scholl, Andreas; Bauer, Andreas; Doran, Andrew; Stohr, Joachim; Padmore, Howard A.

    2004-04-16

    Time-resolved x-ray imaging shows that the magnetization dynamics of a micron-size pattern containing a ferromagnetic vortex is determined by its handedness, or chirality. The out-of-plane magnetization in the nanometer-scale vortex core induces a 3-dimensional handedness in the planar magnetic structure, leading to a precessional motion of the core parallel to a sub-nanosecond field pulse. The core velocity is found to be an order of magnitude higher than expected from the static susceptibility. These results demonstrate that handedness, already well known to be important in biological systems, plays an important role in the dynamics of microscopic magnets.

  11. Transverse forces on a vortex in lattice models of superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    The paper derives the transverse forces (the Magnus and the Lorentz forces) in the lattice models of superfluids in the continuous approximation. The continuous approximation restores translational invariance absent in the original lattice model, but the theory is not Galilean invariant. As a result, calculation of the two transverse forces on the vortex, Magnus force and Lorentz force, requires the analysis of two balances, for the true momentum of particles in the lattice (Magnus force) and for the quasimomentum (Lorentz force) known from the Bloch theory of particles in the periodic potential. While the developed theory yields the same Lorentz force, which was well known before, a new general expression for the Magnus force was obtained. The theory demonstrates how a small Magnus force emerges in the Josephson-junction array if the particle-hole symmetry is broken. The continuous approximation for the Bose-Hubbard model close to the superfluid-insulator transition was developed, which was used for calculation of the Magnus force. The theory shows that there is an area in the phase diagram for the Bose-Hubbard model, where the Magnus force has an inverse sign with respect to that which is expected from the sign of velocity circulation.

  12. Anisotropic Peak Effect due to Structural Phase Transition in the Vortex Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, Baruch; Knigavko, Anton

    1999-07-01

    It is shown that the recently observed new peak effect in YBCO could be explained by the softening of the vortex lattice due to a structural phase transition in the vortex lattice. At this transition square lattice transforms into a distorted hexagonal one. While conventional peak effect is associated with the softening of shear modes (elastic modulus c66 vanishes) at melting, in this case the relevant mode is ``squash'' mode ( c11+c22-2c12 vanishes).

  13. Elastic Moduli of Vortex Lattices within Nonlocal London Model

    SciTech Connect

    Miranovic, P.; Kogan, V. G.

    2001-09-24

    Vortex lattice (VL) elastic response is analyzed within the nonlocal London model which holds for high-{kappa} clean superconductors. The squash modulus vanishes at the field H{sub (open square)} where VL undergoes a square-to-rhombus transition. For H>H{sub (open square)}, where the square VL is stable, the rotation modulus turns zero at H=H{sub r} , indicating VL instability to rotations. The shear modulus depends on the shear direction; the dependence is strong in the vicinity of H{sub (open square)} where the square VL is soft with respect to the shear along [110] . The H dependences of the moduli are evaluated for LuNi{sub 2}B {sub 2}C .

  14. Vortex lattices in strongly interacting Fermi gas with crossed-beam dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuping; Yao, Xingcan; Chen, Haoze; Liu, Xiangpei; Wang, Xiaoqiong

    2016-05-01

    We have built an experiment system to explore the dynamic and vortex in quantum degenerate Li6 gas. By using UV MOT and crossed-beam dipole trap, we obtained BEC of 2* 105 molecules. With a tightly focused 532nm laser beam as rotating bucket wall, We observed vortex formation in strongly interacting fermi superfluid. At suitable stirring frequency we produced the condensate of fermi pairs for which up to 10 vortices were simultaneously present. We produced vortex lattices in different magnetic fields (from BEC side to BCS side). Also we measured the lifetime of vortex lattices in different interaction region. This work was funded by CAS and USTC.

  15. Observation of Vortex Nucleation in a Rotating Two-Dimensional Lattice of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R. A.; Al-Assam, S.; Foot, C. J.

    2010-02-05

    We report the observation of vortex nucleation in a rotating optical lattice. A {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate was loaded into a static two-dimensional lattice and the rotation frequency of the lattice was then increased from zero. We studied how vortex nucleation depended on optical lattice depth and rotation frequency. For deep lattices above the chemical potential of the condensate we observed a linear dependence of the number of vortices created with the rotation frequency, even below the thermodynamic critical frequency required for vortex nucleation. At these lattice depths the system formed an array of Josephson-coupled condensates. The effective magnetic field produced by rotation introduced characteristic relative phases between neighboring condensates, such that vortices were observed upon ramping down the lattice depth and recombining the condensates.

  16. Tailored complex 3D vortex lattice structures by perturbed multiples of three-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Joseph, Joby

    2012-04-20

    As three-plane waves are the minimum number required for the formation of vortex-embedded lattice structures by plane wave interference, we present our experimental investigation on the formation of complex 3D photonic vortex lattice structures by a designed superposition of multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves. The unfolding of the generated complex photonic lattice structures with higher order helical phase is realized by perturbing the superposition of a relatively phase-encoded, axially equidistant multiple of three noncoplanar plane waves. Through a programmable spatial light modulator assisted single step fabrication approach, the unfolded 3D vortex lattice structures are experimentally realized, well matched to our computer simulations. The formation of higher order intertwined helices embedded in these 3D spiraling vortex lattice structures by the superposition of the multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves interference is also studied.

  17. Dynamic and Structural Studies of Metastable Vortex Lattice Domains in MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waard, E. R.; Kuhn, S. J.; Rastovski, C.; Eskildsen, M. R.; Leishman, A.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Debeer-Schmitt, L.; Littrell, K.; Karpinski, J.; Zhigadlo, N. D.

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in the type-II superconductor MgB2 have revealed an unprecedented degree of metastability that is demonstrably not due to vortex pinning, [C. Rastovski et al . , Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 107002 (2013)]. The VL can be driven to the GS through successive application of an AC magnetic field. Here we report on detailed studies of the transition kinetics and structure of the VL domains. Stroboscopic studies of the transition revealed a stretched exponential decrease of the metastable volume fraction as a function of the number of applied AC cycles, with subtle differences depending on whether the AC field is oriented parallel or perpendicular to the DC field used to create the VL. We speculate the slower transition kinetics for the transverse AC field may be due to vortex cutting. Spatial studies include scanning SANS measurements showing the VL domain distribution within the MgB2 single crystal as well as measurements of VL correlation lengths. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award DE-FG02-10ER46783.

  18. Observation of the vortex lattice melting by NMR spin-lattice relaxation in the mixed state

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, L.N.; Hammel, P.C.; Vinokur, V.M.

    1994-01-01

    For anisotropic layered superconductors the effect of moving vortices on the nuclear spin magnetization is calculated. Current is supposed to flow along layers, and applied magnetic field is tilted with respect to c-axis. In the solid phase the motion of the vortex lattice produces an alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the applied field which causes the decay of the spin-echo amplitude. This decay rate will display an array of peaks as a function of frequency. In the liquid phase this alternating field contribute to the longitudinal relaxation rate W{sub 1} which has a single peak.

  19. Vortex lattices generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, A.; Kashiwa, R.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2010-11-15

    Vortex streets are formed from sheared initial conditions in classical fluids even without viscosity, which is called the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. We demonstrate that similar vortex streets are generated from sheared initial conditions by the direct numerical simulation of the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation which describes the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensates. Furthermore, we show the vortex-lattice formation from sheared initial conditions analogous to the rigid-body rotation in the GP equation under a rotating harmonic potential. The vortex-lattice formation by the dynamical instability in the system without energy dissipation differs from the vortex-lattice formation process by the imaginary time evolution of the GP equation where the lowest energy state is obtained.

  20. UBIQUITOUS SOLAR ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIZED VORTEX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Lele, S. K.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2013-06-10

    The solar surface is covered by high-speed jets transporting mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. The most prominent of these jets have been known as spicules. However, the mechanism initiating these eruption events is still unknown. Using realistic numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes. The main new results are: (1) the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers; (2) the fluctuations in the vortex tubes penetrating into the chromosphere are quasi-periodic with a characteristic period of 2-5 minutes; and (3) the eruptions are highly non-uniform: the flows are predominantly downward in the vortex tube cores and upward in their surroundings; the plasma density and temperature vary significantly across the eruptions.

  1. Orientational coupling between the vortex lattice and the crystalline lattice in a weakly pinned Co0.0075NbSe2 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Somesh Chandra; Singh, Harkirat; Ganguly, Rini; Bagwe, Vivas; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2016-04-01

    We report experimental evidence of strong orientational coupling between the crystal lattice and the vortex lattice in a weakly pinned Co-doped NbSe2 single crystal through direct imaging using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. When the magnetic field is applied along the six-fold symmetric c-axis of the NbSe2 crystal, the basis vectors of the vortex lattice are preferentially aligned along the basis vectors of the crystal lattice. The orientational coupling between the vortex lattice and crystal lattice becomes more pronounced as the magnetic field is increased. This orientational coupling enhances the stability of the orientational order of the vortex lattice, which persists even in the disordered state at high fields where dislocations and disclinations have destroyed the topological order. Our results underpin the importance of crystal lattice symmetry on the vortex state phase diagram of weakly pinned type II superconductors.

  2. Vortex lattice disorder in YBa2Cu3O studied with β-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadaoui, H.; MacFarlane, W. A.; Morris, G. D.; Salman, Z.; Chow, K. H.; Fan, I.; Hossain, M. D.; Liang, R.; Mansour, A. I.; Parolin, T. J.; Smadella, M.; Song, Q.; Wang, D.; Kiefl, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we report Li+8β-NMR measurements in thin Ag films deposited on the surface of YBa2Cu3O (YBCO) in the vortex state. The resonance in the Ag overlayer broadens dramatically below the superconducting transition temperature Tc, as expected from the underlying vortex lattice in the YBCO. However, the lineshape is much broader and more symmetric than expected for an ideal vortex lattice. These results indicate the observed field distribution in the Ag overlayer is dominated by extrinsic, long length scale disorder.

  3. Arnold diffusion in a driven optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Boretz, Yingyue; Reichl, L E

    2016-03-01

    The effect of time-periodic forces on matter has been a topic of growing interest since the advent of lasers. It is known that dynamical systems with 2.5 or more degrees of freedom are intrinsically unstable. As a consequence, time-periodic driven systems can experience large excursions in energy. We analyze the classical and quantum dynamics of rubidium atoms confined to a time-periodic optical lattice with 2.5 degrees of freedom. When the laser polarizations are orthogonal, the system consists of two 1.5 uncoupled dynamical systems. When laser polarizations are turned away from orthogonal, an Arnold web forms and the dynamics undergoes a fundamental change. For parallel polarizations, we find huge random excursions in the rubidium atom energies and significant entanglement of energies in the quantum dynamics. PMID:27078351

  4. Solitons and Vortex Lattices in the Gross-Pitaevskii Equation with Spin-Orbit Coupling under Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Umeda, Kanji

    2016-06-01

    The Gross-Pitaevskii equation for two-component rotating Bose-Einstein condensates with the Rashba-type spin-orbit (SO) coupling is studied with numerical simulations and variational analyses. A multiquantum vortex state becomes a ground state in a harmonic potential when mutual interaction is absent. When the attractive interaction is strong, the multiquantum vortex state exhibits modulational instability in the azimuthal direction, and a soliton-like state appears. When the repulsive interaction is strong, a vortex lattice state with a multiquantum vortex at the center is created. We find that the vortex lattice state is approximated at a linear combination of multiquantum vortex states.

  5. Solitons and Vortex Lattices in the Gross–Pitaevskii Equation with Spin–Orbit Coupling under Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Umeda, Kanji

    2016-06-01

    The Gross-Pitaevskii equation for two-component rotating Bose-Einstein condensates with the Rashba-type spin-orbit (SO) coupling is studied with numerical simulations and variational analyses. A multiquantum vortex state becomes a ground state in a harmonic potential when mutual interaction is absent. When the attractive interaction is strong, the multiquantum vortex state exhibits modulational instability in the azimuthal direction, and a soliton-like state appears. When the repulsive interaction is strong, a vortex lattice state with a multiquantum vortex at the center is created. We find that the vortex lattice state is approximated at a linear combination of multiquantum vortex states.

  6. Electrodynamic duality and vortex unbinding in driven-dissipative condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtel, G.; Sieberer, L. M.; Diehl, S.; Altman, E.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the superfluid properties of two-dimensional driven Bose liquids, such as polariton condensates, using their long-wavelength description in terms of a compact Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation for the phase dynamics. We account for topological defects (vortices) in the phase field through a duality mapping between the compact KPZ equation and a theory of nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to charges. Using the dual theory, we derive renormalization group equations that describe vortex unbinding in these media. When the nonequilibirum drive is turned off, the KPZ nonlinearity λ vanishes and the RG flow gives the usual Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition. On the other hand, with nonlinearity λ >0 vortices always unbind, even if the same system with λ =0 is superfluid. We predict the finite-size scaling behavior of the superfluid stiffness in the crossover governed by vortex unbinding showing its clear distinction from the scaling associated with the KT transition.

  7. A vortex-lattice method for the mean camber shapes of trimmed noncoplanar planforms with minimum vortex drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A new subsonic method has been developed by which the mean camber surface can be determined for trimmed noncoplanar planforms with minimum vortex drag. This method uses a vortex lattice and overcomes previous difficulties with chord loading specification. A Trefftz plane analysis is utilized to determine the optimum span loading for minimum drag, then solved for the mean camber surface of the wing, which provides the required loading. Sensitivity studies, comparisons with other theories, and applications to configurations which include a tandem wing and a wing winglet combination have been made and are presented.

  8. A generalized vortex lattice method for subsonic and supersonic flow applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, L. R.; Elliot, R. D.; Baker, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    If the discrete vortex lattice is considered as an approximation to the surface-distributed vorticity, then the concept of the generalized principal part of an integral yields a residual term to the vorticity-induced velocity field. The proper incorporation of this term to the velocity field generated by the discrete vortex lines renders the present vortex lattice method valid for supersonic flow. Special techniques for simulating nonzero thickness lifting surfaces and fusiform bodies with vortex lattice elements are included. Thickness effects of wing-like components are simulated by a double (biplanar) vortex lattice layer, and fusiform bodies are represented by a vortex grid arranged on a series of concentrical cylindrical surfaces. The analysis of sideslip effects by the subject method is described. Numerical considerations peculiar to the application of these techniques are also discussed. The method has been implemented in a digital computer code. A users manual is included along with a complete FORTRAN compilation, an executed case, and conversion programs for transforming input for the NASA wave drag program.

  9. Azimuthal-spin-wave-mode-driven vortex-core reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-01-14

    We studied, by micromagnetic numerical calculations, asymmetric vortex-core reversals driven by the m = −1 and m = +1 azimuthal spin-wave modes' excitations in soft magnetic circular nano-disks. We addressed the similarities and differences between the asymmetric core reversals in terms of the temporal evolutions of the correlated core-motion speed, locally concentrated perpendicular gyrofield, and magnetization dip near the original vortex core. The criterion for the core reversals was found to be the magnetization dip that must reach the out-of-plane magnetization component, m{sub z} = −p, with the initial polarization p, where p = +1 (−1) for the upward (downward) core magnetization. The core-motion speed and the associated perpendicular gyrofield, variable and controllable with static perpendicular field, H{sub z}, applied perpendicularly to the disk plane, must reach their threshold values to meet the ultimate core-reversal criterion. Also, we determined the H{sub z} strength and direction dependence of the core-switching time and threshold exciting field strength required for the core reversals, whose parameters are essential in the application aspect. This work offers deeper insights into the azimuthal spin-wave-driven core-reversal dynamics as well as an efficient means of controlling the azimuthal-modes-driven core reversals.

  10. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  11. Formation of Vortex Lattices in Superfluid Bose Gases at Finite Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arahata, E.; Nikuni, T.

    2016-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a rotating trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) at finite temperatures. Using the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin formalism, based on a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate coupled to a semiclassical kinetic equation for a thermal cloud, we numerically simulate vortex lattice formation in the presence of a time-dependent rotating trap potential. At low rotation frequency, the thermal cloud undergoes rigid body rotation, while the condensate exhibits irrotational flow. Above a certain threshold rotation frequency, vortices penetrate into the condensate and form a vortex lattice. Our simulation result clearly indicates a crucial role for the thermal cloud, which triggers vortex lattice formation in the rotating BEC.

  12. Photonic Band Gap via Quantum Coherence in Vortex Lattices of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Muestecaplioglu, Oe.E.; Oktel, M.Oe.

    2005-06-10

    We investigate the optical response of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate with a vortex lattice. We find that it is possible for the vortex lattice to act as a photonic crystal and create photonic band gaps, by enhancing the refractive index of the condensate via a quantum coherent scheme. If high enough index contrast between the vortex core and the atomic sample is achieved, a photonic band gap arises depending on the healing length and the lattice spacing. A wide range of experimentally accessible parameters are examined and band gaps in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum are found. We also show how directional band gaps can be used to directly measure the rotation frequency of the condensate.

  13. Measuring the disorder of vortex lattices in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakonjac, A.; Marchant, A. L.; Billam, T. P.; Helm, J. L.; Yu, M. M. H.; Gardiner, S. A.; Cornish, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    We report observations of the formation and subsequent decay of a vortex lattice in a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a hybrid optical-magnetic trap. Vortices are induced by rotating the anharmonic magnetic potential that provides confinement in the horizontal plane. We present simple numerical techniques based on image analysis to detect vortices and analyze their distributions. We use these methods to quantify the amount of order present in the vortex distribution as it transitions from a disordered array to the energetically favorable ordered lattice.

  14. Model for nodal quasiparticle scattering in a disordered vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Marianna; Coleman, P.

    2009-10-01

    Recent scanning-tunneling experiments on Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2 by Hanaguri [Science 323, 923 (2009)] observe field-dependent quasiparticle interference effects which are sensitive to the sign of the d -wave order parameter. Their analysis of spatial fluctuations in the local density of states shows that there is a selective enhancement of quasiparticle scattering events that preserve the gap sign and a selective depression of the quasiparticle scattering events that reverse the gap sign. We introduce a model which accounts for this phenomenon as a consequence of vortex pinning to impurities. Each pinned vortex embeds several impurities in its core. The observations of recent experiments can be accounted for by assuming that the scattering potentials of the impurities inside the vortex cores acquire an additional resonant or Andreev scattering component, both of which induce gap sign preserving scattering events.

  15. Large-scale vortex lattice emerging from collectively moving microtubules.

    PubMed

    Sumino, Yutaka; Nagai, Ken H; Shitaka, Yuji; Tanaka, Dan; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Chaté, Hugues; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2012-03-21

    Spontaneous collective motion, as in some flocks of bird and schools of fish, is an example of an emergent phenomenon. Such phenomena are at present of great interest and physicists have put forward a number of theoretical results that so far lack experimental verification. In animal behaviour studies, large-scale data collection is now technologically possible, but data are still scarce and arise from observations rather than controlled experiments. Multicellular biological systems, such as bacterial colonies or tissues, allow more control, but may have many hidden variables and interactions, hindering proper tests of theoretical ideas. However, in systems on the subcellular scale such tests may be possible, particularly in in vitro experiments with only few purified components. Motility assays, in which protein filaments are driven by molecular motors grafted to a substrate in the presence of ATP, can show collective motion for high densities of motors and attached filaments. This was demonstrated recently for the actomyosin system, but a complete understanding of the mechanisms at work is still lacking. Here we report experiments in which microtubules are propelled by surface-bound dyneins. In this system it is possible to study the local interaction: we find that colliding microtubules align with each other with high probability. At high densities, this alignment results in self-organization of the microtubules, which are on average 15 µm long, into vortices with diameters of around 400 µm. Inside the vortices, the microtubules circulate both clockwise and anticlockwise. On longer timescales, the vortices form a lattice structure. The emergence of these structures, as verified by a mathematical model, is the result of the smooth, reptation-like motion of single microtubules in combination with local interactions (the nematic alignment due to collisions)--there is no need for long-range interactions. Apart from its potential relevance to cortical arrays in

  16. Anisotropic peak effect due to structural phase transition in the vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, Baruch; Knigavko, Anton

    2000-05-01

    The recently observed new peak effect in YBCO is explained by softening of the vortex lattice (VL) due to a structural phase transition in the VL. At this transition, square lattice transforms into a distorted hexagonal one. While conventional peak effect is associated with softening of shear modes at melting, in this case the relevant mode is the point. The squash mode is highly anisotropic and we point out some peculiar effects associated with this feature.

  17. Chaotic and ballistic dynamics in time-driven quasiperiodic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of classical particles in a driven quasiperiodic lattice based on the Fibonacci sequence. An intricate transient dynamics of extraordinarily long ballistic flights at distinct velocities is found. We argue how these transients are caused and can be understood by a hierarchy of block decompositions of the quasiperiodic lattice. A comparison to the cases of periodic and fully randomized lattices is performed.

  18. Chaotic and ballistic dynamics in time-driven quasiperiodic lattices.

    PubMed

    Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of classical particles in a driven quasiperiodic lattice based on the Fibonacci sequence. An intricate transient dynamics of extraordinarily long ballistic flights at distinct velocities is found. We argue how these transients are caused and can be understood by a hierarchy of block decompositions of the quasiperiodic lattice. A comparison to the cases of periodic and fully randomized lattices is performed. PMID:27176301

  19. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, T.; Mühlbauer, S.; Schulz, M.; Betz, B.; Kaestner, A.; Pipich, V.; Böni, P.; Grünzweig, C.

    2015-01-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice. PMID:26522610

  20. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor.

    PubMed

    Reimann, T; Mühlbauer, S; Schulz, M; Betz, B; Kaestner, A; Pipich, V; Böni, P; Grünzweig, C

    2015-01-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice. PMID:26522610

  1. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, T.; Mühlbauer, S.; Schulz, M.; Betz, B.; Kaestner, A.; Pipich, V.; Böni, P.; Grünzweig, C.

    2015-11-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice.

  2. Visualizing the morphology of vortex lattice domains in a bulk type-II superconductor.

    PubMed

    Reimann, T; Mühlbauer, S; Schulz, M; Betz, B; Kaestner, A; Pipich, V; Böni, P; Grünzweig, C

    2015-01-01

    Alike materials in the solid state, the phase diagram of type-II superconductors exhibit crystalline, amorphous, liquid and spatially inhomogeneous phases. The multitude of different phases of vortex matter has thence proven to act as almost ideal model system for the study of both the underlying properties of superconductivity but also of general phenomena such as domain nucleation and morphology. Here we show how neutron grating interferometry yields detailed information on the vortex lattice and its domain structure in the intermediate mixed state of a type-II niobium superconductor. In particular, we identify the nucleation regions, how the intermediate mixed state expands, and where it finally evolves into the Shubnikov phase. Moreover, we complement the results obtained from neutron grating interferometry by small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the spatially resolved morphology found in the intermediate mixed state, and very small-angle neutron scattering that confirm the domain structure of the vortex lattice.

  3. Validation of Vortex-Lattice Method for Loads on Wings in Lift-Generated Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1995-01-01

    A study is described that evaluates the accuracy of vortex-lattice methods when they are used to compute the loads induced on aircraft as they encounter lift-generated wakes. The evaluation is accomplished by the use of measurements made in the 80 by 120 ft Wind Tunnel of the lift, rolling moment, and downwash in the wake of three configurations of a model of a subsonic transport aircraft. The downwash measurements are used as input for a vortex-lattice code in order to compute the lift and rolling moment induced on wings that have a span of 0.186, 0.510, or 1.022 times the span of the wake-generating model. Comparison of the computed results with the measured lift and rolling-moment distributions the vortex-lattice method is very reliable as long as the span of the encountering or following wing is less than about 0.2 of the generator span. As the span of the following wing increases above 0.2, the vortex-lattice method continues to correctly predict the trends and nature of the induced loads, but it overpredicts the magnitude of the loads by increasing amounts.

  4. Some applications of the quasi vortex-lattice method in steady and unsteady aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    The quasi vortex-lattice method is reviewed and applied to the evaluation of backwash, with applications to ground effect analysis. It is also extended to unsteady aerodynamics, with particular interest in the calculation of unsteady leading-edge suction. Some applications in ornithopter aerodynamics are given.

  5. Manifestation of chirality in the vortex lattice in a two-dimensional topological superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan D. B.; Tanaka, K.; Nagai, Yuki

    2016-08-01

    We study the vortex lattice in a two-dimensional s -wave topological superconductor with Rashba spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman field by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations self-consistently for the superconducting order parameter. We find that when spin-orbit coupling is relatively weak, one of the two underlying chiralities in the topological superconducting state can be strongly manifest in the vortex core structure and govern the response of the system to vorticity and a nonmagnetic impurity where the vortex is pinned. The Majorana zero mode in the vortex core is found to be robust against the nonmagnetic impurity in that it remains effectively a zero-energy bound state regardless of the impurity potential strength and the major chirality. The spin polarization of the Majorana bound state depends on the major chirality for weak spin-orbit coupling, while it is determined simply by the vorticity when spin-orbit coupling is relatively strong.

  6. Topological triple-vortex lattice stabilized by mixed frustration in expanded honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoyan; Dong, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    The expanded classical Kitaev-Heisenberg model on a honeycomb lattice is investigated with the next-nearest-neighboring Heisenberg interaction considered. The simulation shows a rich phase diagram with periodic behavior in a wide parameter range. Beside the double 120° ordered phase, an inhomogeneous phase is uncovered to exhibit a topological triple-vortex lattice, corresponding to the hexagonal domain structure of vector chirality, which is stabilized by the mixed frustration of two sources: the geometrical frustration arising from the lattice structure as well as the frustration from the Kitaev couplings. PMID:27229486

  7. Topological triple-vortex lattice stabilized by mixed frustration in expanded honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaoyan; Dong, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    The expanded classical Kitaev-Heisenberg model on a honeycomb lattice is investigated with the next-nearest-neighboring Heisenberg interaction considered. The simulation shows a rich phase diagram with periodic behavior in a wide parameter range. Beside the double 120° ordered phase, an inhomogeneous phase is uncovered to exhibit a topological triple-vortex lattice, corresponding to the hexagonal domain structure of vector chirality, which is stabilized by the mixed frustration of two sources: the geometrical frustration arising from the lattice structure as well as the frustration from the Kitaev couplings. PMID:27229486

  8. Vortex Formation of Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates in Synthetic Magnetic Field with Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Motivated by recent experiments carried out by Spielman's group at NIST, we study the vortex formation in a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate in synthetic magnetic field confined in a harmonic potential combined with an optical lattice. We obtain numerical solutions of the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation and compare the vortex formation by synthetic magnetic field method with those by rotating frame method. We conclude that a large angular momentum indeed can be created in the presence of the optical lattice. However, it is still more difficult to rotate the condensate by the synthetic magnetic field than by the rotating frame even if the optical lattice is added, and the chemical potential and energy remain almost unchanged by increasing rotational frequency.

  9. Applications of the unsteady vortex-lattice method in aircraft aeroelasticity and flight dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murua, Joseba; Palacios, Rafael; Graham, J. Michael R.

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady vortex-lattice method provides a medium-fidelity tool for the prediction of non-stationary aerodynamic loads in low-speed, but high-Reynolds-number, attached flow conditions. Despite a proven track record in applications where free-wake modelling is critical, other less-computationally expensive potential-flow models, such as the doublet-lattice method and strip theory, have long been favoured in fixed-wing aircraft aeroelasticity and flight dynamics. This paper presents how the unsteady vortex-lattice method can be implemented as an enhanced alternative to those techniques for diverse situations that arise in flexible-aircraft dynamics. A historical review of the methodology is included, with latest developments and practical applications. Different formulations of the aerodynamic equations are outlined, and they are integrated with a nonlinear beam model for the full description of the dynamics of a free-flying flexible vehicle. Nonlinear time-marching solutions capture large wing excursions and wake roll-up, and the linearisation of the equations lends itself to a seamless, monolithic state-space assembly, particularly convenient for stability analysis and flight control system design. The numerical studies emphasise scenarios where the unsteady vortex-lattice method can provide an advantage over other state-of-the-art approaches. Examples of this include unsteady aerodynamics in vehicles with coupled aeroelasticity and flight dynamics, and in lifting surfaces undergoing complex kinematics, large deformations, or in-plane motions. Geometric nonlinearities are shown to play an instrumental, and often counter-intuitive, role in the aircraft dynamics. The unsteady vortex-lattice method is unveiled as a remarkable tool that can successfully incorporate all those effects in the unsteady aerodynamics modelling.

  10. Mobile impurities and orthogonality catastrophe in two-dimensional vortex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracanhas, M. A.; Pereira, R. G.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the properties of a neutral impurity atom coupled with the Tkachenko modes of a two-dimensional vortex lattice in a Bose-Einstein condensate. In contrast with polarons in homogeneous condensates, the marginal impurity-boson interaction in the vortex lattice leads to infrared singularities in perturbation theory and to the breakdown of the quasiparticle picture in the low-energy limit. These infrared singularities are interpreted in terms of a renormalization of the coupling constant, quasiparticle weight, and effective impurity mass. The divergence of the effective mass in the low-energy limit gives rise to a power-law singularity in the impurity spectral function and provides an example of an emergent orthogonality catastrophe in a bosonic system.

  11. Observation of Coupled Vortex Lattices in a Mass-Imbalance Bose and Fermi Superfluid Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xing-Can; Chen, Hao-Ze; Wu, Yu-Ping; Liu, Xiang-Pei; Wang, Xiao-Qiong; Jiang, Xiao; Deng, Youjin; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Quantized vortices play an essential role in diverse superfluid phenomena. In a Bose-Fermi superfluid mixture, especially of two mass-imbalance species, such macroscopic quantum phenomena are particularly rich due to the interplay between the Bose and Fermi superfluidity. However, generating a Bose-Fermi two-species superfluid, producing coupled vortex lattices within, and further probing interspecies interaction effects remain challenging. Here, we experimentally realize a two-species superfluid with dilute gases of lithium-6 and potassium-41, having a mass ratio of about seven. By rotating the superfluid mixture, we simultaneously produce coupled vortex lattices of the two species and thus present a definitive visual evidence for the double superfluidity. Moreover, we report several unconventional behaviors, due to the Bose-Fermi interaction, on the formation and decay of two-species vortices.

  12. How the vortex lattice of a superconductor becomes disordered: a study by scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zehetmayer, M

    2015-01-01

    Order-disorder transitions take place in many physical systems, but observing them in detail in real materials is difficult. In two- or quasi-two-dimensional systems, the transition has been studied by computer simulations and experimentally in electron sheets, dusty plasmas, colloidal and other systems. Here I show the different stages of defect formation in the vortex lattice of a superconductor while it undergoes an order-disorder transition by presenting real-space images of the lattice from scanning tunneling spectroscopy. When the system evolves from the ordered to the disordered state, the predominant kind of defect changes from dislocation pairs to single dislocations, and finally to defect clusters forming grain boundaries. Correlation functions indicate a hexatic-like state preceding the disordered state. The transition in the microscopic vortex distribution is mirrored by the well-known spectacular second peak effect observed in the macroscopic current density of the superconductor.

  13. Rotating superfluids in anharmonic traps: From vortex lattices to giant vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Correggi, Michele; Pinsker, Florian; Rougerie, Nicolas; Yngvason, Jakob

    2011-11-15

    We study a superfluid in a rotating anharmonic trap and explicate a rigorous proof of a transition from a vortex lattice to a giant vortex state as the rotation is increased beyond a limiting speed determined by the interaction strength. The transition is characterized by the disappearance of the vortices from the annulus where the bulk of the superfluid is concentrated due to centrifugal forces while a macroscopic phase circulation remains. The analysis is carried out within two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii theory at large coupling constant and reveals significant differences between ''soft'' anharmonic traps (like a quartic plus quadratic trapping potential) and traps with a fixed boundary: in the latter case the transition takes place in a parameter regime where the size of vortices is very small relative to the width of the annulus, whereas in soft traps the vortex lattice persists until the width of the annulus becomes comparable to the vortex cores. Moreover, the density profile in the annulus where the bulk is concentrated is, in the soft case, approximately Gaussian with long tails and not of the Thomas-Fermi type like in a trap with a fixed boundary.

  14. Ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order in bacterial vortex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wioland, Hugo; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2016-04-01

    Despite their inherently non-equilibrium nature, living systems can self-organize in highly ordered collective states that share striking similarities with the thermodynamic equilibrium phases of conventional condensed-matter and fluid systems. Examples range from the liquid-crystal-like arrangements of bacterial colonies, microbial suspensions and tissues to the coherent macro-scale dynamics in schools of fish and flocks of birds. Yet, the generic mathematical principles that govern the emergence of structure in such artificial and biological systems are elusive. It is not clear when, or even whether, well-established theoretical concepts describing universal thermostatistics of equilibrium systems can capture and classify ordered states of living matter. Here, we connect these two previously disparate regimes: through microfluidic experiments and mathematical modelling, we demonstrate that lattices of hydrodynamically coupled bacterial vortices can spontaneously organize into distinct patterns characterized by ferro- and antiferromagnetic order. The coupling between adjacent vortices can be controlled by tuning the inter-cavity gap widths. The emergence of opposing order regimes is tightly linked to the existence of geometry-induced edge currents, reminiscent of those in quantum systems. Our experimental observations can be rationalized in terms of a generic lattice field theory, suggesting that bacterial spin networks belong to the same universality class as a wide range of equilibrium systems.

  15. Skyrmionic vortex lattices in coherently coupled three-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Natalia V.; Kuopanportti, Pekko; Milošević, Milorad V.

    2016-08-01

    We show numerically that a harmonically trapped and coherently Rabi-coupled three-component Bose-Einstein condensate can host unconventional vortex lattices in its rotating ground state. The discovered lattices incorporate square and zig-zag patterns, vortex dimers and chains, and doubly quantized vortices, and they can be quantitatively classified in terms of a skyrmionic topological index, which takes into account the multicomponent nature of the system. The exotic ground-state lattices arise due to the intricate interplay of the repulsive density-density interactions and the Rabi couplings as well as the ubiquitous phase frustration between the components. In the frustrated state, domain walls in the relative phases can persist between some components even at strong Rabi coupling, while vanishing between others. Consequently, in this limit the three-component condensate effectively approaches a two-component condensate with only density-density interactions. At intermediate Rabi coupling strengths, however, we face unique vortex physics that occurs neither in the two-component counterpart nor in the purely density-density-coupled three-component system.

  16. Dissipation-Induced Symmetry Breaking in a Driven Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gommers, R.; Bergamini, S.; Renzoni, F.

    2005-08-12

    We analyze the atomic dynamics in an ac driven periodic optical potential which is symmetric in both time and space. We experimentally demonstrate that in the presence of dissipation the symmetry is broken, and a current of atoms through the optical lattice is generated as a result.

  17. Vortex Lattice Formation in High Magnetic Fields in an Underdoped Single Crystal of Hg1201 from 17O NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongseop; Xin, Yizhou; Halperin, W. P.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.

    The vortex lattice in HgBa2CuO4+δ forms at a vortex melting temperature, Tv, typically ~40K for underdoped crystals with a hole doping ~ 0.11. We present our results from 17O NMR for investigation of the vortex lattice as a function of external magnetic field up to 30 T and temperature as low as 5 K. The vortex contribution to the NMR linewidth can be separated from inhomogeneous broadening by deconvolution of the normal state spectra which was measured separately above, Tv. The vortex melting temperature was measured for two underdoped samples marked by the onset of extra linewidth broadening due to the inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution from the solid vortex lattice consistent with transverse relaxation measurements. We have found evidence for a change in the vortex lattice symmetry as a function of external fields. This work was supported by the DOE BES under Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER46248 and the NHMFL through the NSF and State of Florida.

  18. Magnetic vortex lattice in HgBa2CuO4+δ observed by small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Egetenmeyer, N.; Gavilano, J. L.; Barišić, N.; Greven, M.

    2011-02-01

    We report the direct observation of the magnetic vortex lattice in the model high-temperature superconductor HgBa2CuO4+δ. Using small-angle neutron scattering on high-quality crystals, we observe two equal domains of undistorted triangular vortex lattices well aligned with the tetragonal crystallographic axes. The signal decreases rapidly with increasing magnetic field and vanishes above 0.4 T, which we attribute to a crossover from a three-dimensional to a two-dimensional vortex system, similar to previous results for the more anisotropic compound Bi2.15Sr1.95CaCu2O8+δ. Our result indicates that a triangular vortex lattice (with or without distortion) at low magnetic fields is a generic property of cuprates with critical temperatures above 80 K.

  19. Vortex lattice structures in YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    SciTech Connect

    Yethiraj, M.; Paul, D.M.; Tomy, C.V.; Forgan, E.M.

    1997-12-01

    The authors observe a flux lattice with square symmetry in the superconductor YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C when the applied field is parallel to the c-axis of the crystal. A square lattice observed previously in the isostructural magnetic analog ErNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C was attributed to the interaction between magnetic order in that system and the flux lattice. Since the Y-based compound does not order magnetically, it is clear that the structure of the flux lattice is unrelated to magnetic order. In fact, they show that the flux lines have a square cross-section when the applied field is parallel to the c-axis of the crystal, since the measured penetration depth along the 100 crystal direction is larger than the penetration depth along the 110 by approximately 60%. This is the likely reason for the square symmetry of the lattice. Although they find considerable disorder in the arrangement of the flux lines at 2.5T, no melting of the vortex lattice was observed.

  20. Convergence characteristics of nonlinear vortex-lattice methods for configuration aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Rusak, Z.; Wasserstrom, E.

    1983-01-01

    Nonlinear panel methods have no proof for the existence and uniqueness of their solutions. The convergence characteristics of an iterative, nonlinear vortex-lattice method are, therefore, carefully investigated. The effects of several parameters, including (1) the surface-paneling method, (2) an integration method of the trajectories of the wake vortices, (3) vortex-grid refinement, and (4) the initial conditions for the first iteration on the computed aerodynamic coefficients and on the flow-field details are presented. The convergence of the iterative-solution procedure is usually rapid. The solution converges with grid refinement to a constant value, but the final value is not unique and varies with the wing surface-paneling and wake-discretization methods within some range in the vicinity of the experimental result.

  1. Lennard-Jones and lattice models of driven fluids.

    PubMed

    Díez-Minguito, M; Garrido, P L; Marro, J

    2005-08-01

    We introduce a nonequilibrium off-lattice model for anisotropic phenomena in fluids. This is a Lennard-Jones generalization of the driven lattice-gas model in which the particles' spatial coordinates vary continuously. A comparison between the two models allows us to discuss some exceptional, hardly realistic features of the original discrete system--which has been considered a prototype for nonequilibrium anisotropic phase transitions. We thus help to clarify open issues, and discuss on the implications of our observations for future investigation of anisotropic phase transitions.

  2. Interaction of vortex lattice with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B.; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R. |

    1995-03-27

    The interaction of sound with the vortex lattice is considered for high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. At low temperatures the Magnus force results in the acoustic Faraday effect; the velocity of sound propagating along the magnetic field depends on the polarization. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. In the thermally activated flux flow regime, the Faraday effect is caused by electric and magnetic fields induced by vortices and acting on ions.

  3. Cooperative ring exchange and quantum melting of vortex lattices in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tarun Kanti; Baskaran, G.

    2004-02-01

    Cooperative ring exchange is suggested as a mechanism of quantum melting of vortex lattices in a rapidly rotating quasi-two-dimensional atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Using an approach pioneered by Kivelson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 873 (1986)] for the fractional quantized Hall effect, we calculate the condition for quantum melting instability by considering large-correlated ring exchanges in a two-dimensional Wigner crystal of vortices in a strong 'pseudomagnetic field' generated by the background superfluid Bose particles. BEC may be profitably used to address issues of quantum melting of a pristine Wigner solid devoid of complications of real solids.

  4. Rossby vortex simulation on a paraboloidal coordinate system using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan; Zhao, Kaihua

    2001-11-01

    In this paper, we apply our compressible lattice Boltzmann model to a rotating parabolic coordinate system to simulate Rossby vortices emerging in a layer of shallow water flowing zonally in a rotating paraboloidal vessel. By introducing a scaling factor, nonuniform curvilinear mesh can be mapped to a flat uniform mesh and then normal lattice Boltzmann method works. Since the mass per unit area on the two-dimensional (2D) surface varies with the thickness of the water layer, the 2D flow seems to be ``compressible'' and our compressible model is applied. Simulation solutions meet with the experimental observations qualitatively. Based on this research, quantitative solutions and many natural phenomena simulations in planetary atmospheres, oceans, and magnetized plasma, such as the famous Jovian Giant Red Spot, the Galactic Spiral-vortex, the Gulf Stream, and the Kuroshio Current, etc., can be expected.

  5. Rossby vortex simulation on a paraboloidal coordinate system using the lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Zhao, K

    2001-11-01

    In this paper, we apply our compressible lattice Boltzmann model to a rotating parabolic coordinate system to simulate Rossby vortices emerging in a layer of shallow water flowing zonally in a rotating paraboloidal vessel. By introducing a scaling factor, nonuniform curvilinear mesh can be mapped to a flat uniform mesh and then normal lattice Boltzmann method works. Since the mass per unit area on the two-dimensional (2D) surface varies with the thickness of the water layer, the 2D flow seems to be "compressible" and our compressible model is applied. Simulation solutions meet with the experimental observations qualitatively. Based on this research, quantitative solutions and many natural phenomena simulations in planetary atmospheres, oceans, and magnetized plasma, such as the famous Jovian Giant Red Spot, the Galactic Spiral-vortex, the Gulf Stream, and the Kuroshio Current, etc., can be expected. PMID:11736137

  6. Production version of the extended NASA-Langley vortex lattice FORTRAN computer program. Volume 2: Source code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, H. E.; Lamar, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The source code for the latest production version, MARK IV, of the NASA-Langley Vortex Lattice Computer Program is presented. All viable subcritical aerodynamic features of previous versions were retained. This version extends the previously documented program capabilities to four planforms, 400 panels, and enables the user to obtain vortex-flow aerodynamics on cambered planforms, flowfield properties off the configuration in attached flow, and planform longitudinal load distributions.

  7. Production version of the extended NASA-Langley Vortex Lattice FORTRAN computer program. Volume 1: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Herbert, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    The latest production version, MARK IV, of the NASA-Langley vortex lattice computer program is summarized. All viable subcritical aerodynamic features of previous versions were retained. This version extends the previously documented program capabilities to four planforms, 400 panels, and enables the user to obtain vortex-flow aerodynamics on cambered planforms, flowfield properties off the configuration in attached flow, and planform longitudinal load distributions.

  8. Knotted Vortices: Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulation of Vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, Fabian; Chikatamarla, Shyam; Karlin, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    Knotted and interlinked vortex structures in real fluids are conjectured to play a major role in hydrodynamic flow dissipation. Much interest lies in determining their temporal stability and the mechanism through which knots dissolve. Kleckner and Irvine recently have shown the existence of such knotted vortices experimentally by accelerating hydrofoils in water. In the present work we employ the entropic lattice Boltzmann method (ELBM) to perform DNS simulations of the creation and dynamics of knotted vortex rings inspired by the experimental setup in. ELBM renders LBM scheme unconditionally stable by restoring the second law of thermodynamics (the Boltzmann H-theorem), and thus enables simulations of large domains and high Reynolds numbers with DNS quality. The results presented in this talk provide an in-depth study of the dynamics of knotted vortices and vortex reconnection events and confirm the existence of trefoil knots in silicio for the first time. This work was supported by a grant from the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) under project ID s347.

  9. Entanglement spectrum: Identification of the transition from vortex-liquid to vortex-lattice state in a weakly interacting rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhao; Guo Hongli; Fan Heng; Vedral, Vlatko

    2011-01-15

    We use entanglement to investigate the transition from vortex-liquid phase to vortex-lattice phase in a weakly interacting rotating Bose-Einstein condensate. For the torus geometry, the ground-state entanglement spectrum is analyzed to distinguish these two phases. The low-lying part of the ground-state entanglement spectrum, as well as the behavior of its lowest level, changes clearly when the transition occurs. For the sphere geometry, the entanglement gap in the conformal limit is also studied. We also show that the decrease in entanglement between particles can be regarded as a signal of the transition.

  10. A dilation-driven vortex flow in sheared granular materials explains a rheometric anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaraj, K. P.; Nott, Prabhu R.

    2016-01-01

    Granular flows occur widely in nature and industry, yet a continuum description that captures their important features is yet not at hand. Recent experiments on granular materials sheared in a cylindrical Couette device revealed a puzzling anomaly, wherein all components of the stress rise nearly exponentially with depth. Here we show, using particle dynamics simulations and imaging experiments, that the stress anomaly arises from a remarkable vortex flow. For the entire range of fill heights explored, we observe a single toroidal vortex that spans the entire Couette cell and whose sense is opposite to the uppermost Taylor vortex in a fluid. We show that the vortex is driven by a combination of shear-induced dilation, a phenomenon that has no analogue in fluids, and gravity flow. Dilatancy is an important feature of granular mechanics, but not adequately incorporated in existing models. PMID:26864086

  11. Driven lattice gas of dimers coupled to a bulk reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierobon, Paolo; Frey, Erwin; Franosch, Thomas

    2006-09-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium steady state of a one-dimensional (1D) lattice gas of dimers. The dynamics is described by a totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) supplemented by attachment and detachment processes, mimicking chemical equilibrium of the 1D driven transport with the bulk reservoir. The steady-state phase diagram and current and density profiles are calculated using both a refined mean-field theory and extensive stochastic simulations. As a consequence of the on-off kinetics, a phase coexistence region arises intervening between low and high density phases such that the discontinuous transition line of the TASEP splits into two continuous ones. The results of the mean-field theory and simulations are found to coincide. We show that the physical picture obtained in the corresponding lattice gas model with monomers is robust, in the sense that the phase diagram changes quantitatively, but the topology remains unaltered. The mechanism for phase separation is identified as generic for a wide class of driven 1D lattice gases.

  12. Diffusion and transport in locally disordered driven lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Thomas; Okupnik, Alexander; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of disorder on the particle density evolution in a classical Hamiltonian driven lattice setup. If the disorder is localized within a finite sub-domain of the lattice, the emergence of strong tails in the density distribution which even increases towards larger positions is shown, thus yielding a highly non-Gaussian particle density evolution. As the key underlying mechanism, we identify the conversion between different components of the unperturbed systems mixed phase space which is induced by the disorder. Based on the introduction of individual conversion rates between chaotic and regular components, a theoretical model is developed which correctly predicts the scaling of the particle density. The effect of disorder on the transport properties is studied where a significant enhancement of the transport for cases of localized disorder is shown, thereby contrasting strongly the merely weak modification of the transport for global disorder.

  13. Slow relaxation and aging kinetics for the driven lattice gas.

    PubMed

    Daquila, George L; Täuber, Uwe C

    2011-05-01

    We numerically investigate the long-time behavior of the density-density autocorrelation function in driven lattice gases with particle exclusion and periodic boundary conditions in one, two, and three dimensions using precise Monte Carlo simulations. In the one-dimensional asymmetric exclusion process on a ring with half the lattice sites occupied, we find that correlations induce extremely slow relaxation to the asymptotic power law decay. We compare the crossover functions obtained from our simulations with various analytic results in the literature and analyze the characteristic oscillations that occur in finite systems away from half-filling. As expected, in three dimensions correlations are weak and consequently the mean-field description is adequate. We also investigate the relaxation toward the nonequilibrium steady state in the two-time density-density autocorrelations, starting from strongly correlated initial conditions. We obtain simple aging scaling behavior in one, two, and three dimensions, with the expected power laws.

  14. Current-driven vortex oscillations in metallic nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrkac, Gino

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we performed full micromagnetics simulations of metallic nano-contacts from the TUNAMOS consortium, by solving the Landau Lifshitz Gilbert Slonctewski equation simultaneously with quasi-static Maxwell equations. We take into account the spatially inhomogeneous current distribution flowing through the magnetic free layer and consequently use the Oersted field generated by this current for the magnetization dynamics. The system we simulated was a trilayer CoFe 3.5 nm/Cu 3nm/NiFe 4nm stack. The saturation magnetization of the free layer is taken to be the same as the experimental value Ms =1.1 T, and a GMR ratio of 1% is used. We account for the inhomogeneous current distribution flowing through the free layer by computing the local current density from the local angle between the free and fixed layer magnetizations. The Oersted field is computed with the Biot-Savart law from this current distribution [2], and an asymmetric Slonczewski term for the spin transfer is used [3]. We observe that the additional spin torque drives the vortex out of the contact area and towards a stable orbit around the contact. These simulations reveal that the oscillations observed are related to the large-amplitude translational motion of a magnetic vortex. In contrast to the nanopillar geometry in which the vortex core precesses within the confining part of the Oersted field [1], the dynamics here correspond to an orbital motion outside the contact region. This behavior can be likened to planetary orbital motion under the influence of a gravitational field; the spin-transfer torque leads to a centripetal motion of the vortex core, which is counterbalanced by the attractive potential provided by the Oersted field. Good quantitative agreement between the simulation and experimental frequencies is achieved [4]. [4pt] [1] V. S. Pribiag et al., Nat. Phys. 3, 498 (2007) [0pt] [2] O. Ertl et al., J. Appl. Phys. 99, 08S303 (2006). [0pt] [3] J. Xiao, A. Zangwill, and M. D. Stiles

  15. Floquet engineering with quasienergy bands of periodically driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthaus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A primer on the Floquet theory of periodically time-dependent quantum systems is provided, and it is shown how to apply this framework for computing the quasienergy band structure governing the dynamics of ultracold atoms in driven optical cosine lattices. Such systems are viewed here as spatially and temporally periodic structures living in an extended Hilbert space, giving rise to spatio-temporal Bloch waves whose dispersion relations can be manipulated at will by exploiting ac-Stark shifts and multiphoton resonances. The elements required for numerical calculations are introduced in a tutorial manner, and some example calculations are discussed in detail, thereby illustrating future prospects of Floquet engineering.

  16. In-plane gradient-magnetic-field-induced vortex lattices in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang-Fa; Zhou, Zheng-Wei; Wu, Congjun; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-03-01

    We consider the ground-state properties of the two-component spin-orbit-coupled ultracold bosons subject to a rotationally symmetric in-plane gradient magnetic field. In the noninteracting case, the ground state supports giant vortices carrying large angular momenta without rotating the trap. The vorticity is highly tunable by varying the amplitudes and orientations of the magnetic field. Interactions drive the system from a giant-vortex state to various configurations of vortex lattice states along a ring. Vortices exhibit ellipse-shaped envelopes with the major and minor axes determined by the spin-orbit coupling and healing lengths, respectively. Phase diagrams of vortex lattice configurations are constructed and their stabilities are analyzed.

  17. Shock dynamics of two-lane driven lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffmann, Christoph; Appert-Rolland, Cécile; Santen, Ludger

    2010-06-01

    Driven lattice gases such as those of the ASEP model are useful tools for the modelling of various stochastic transport processes carried out by self-driven particles, such as molecular motors or vehicles in road traffic. Often these processes take place in one-dimensional systems offering several tracks to the particles, and in many cases the particles are able to change track with a given rate. In this work we consider the case of strong coupling where the rate of hopping along the tracks and the exchange rates are of the same order, and show how a phenomenological approach based on a domain wall theory can be used to describe the dynamics of the system. In particular, the domain walls on the different tracks form pairs, whose dynamics dominate the behaviour of the system.

  18. Vortex Lattice Studies in CeCoIn₅ with H⊥c

    SciTech Connect

    Das, P.; White, J. S.; Holmes, A. T.; Gerber, S.; Forgan, E. M.; Bianchi, A. D.; Kenzelmann, M.; Zolliker, M.; Gavilano, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; Sarrao, J. L.; Petrovic, C.; Eskildsen, M. R.

    2012-02-23

    We present small angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in CeCoIn₅ with magnetic fields applied parallel (H) to the antinodal [100] and nodal [110] directions. For H II 100], a single VL orientation is observed, while a 90° reorientation transition is found for H II [110]. For both field orientations and VL configurations we find a distorted hexagonal VL with an anisotropy, Γ=2.0±0.05. The VL form factor shows strong Pauli paramagnetic effects similar to what have previously been reported for H II [001]. At high fields, above which the upper critical field (Hc2) becomes a first-order transition, an increased disordering of the VL is observed.

  19. Vortex Lattice Studies in CeCoIn₅ with H⊥c

    DOE PAGES

    Das, P.; White, J. S.; Holmes, A. T.; Gerber, S.; Forgan, E. M.; Bianchi, A. D.; Kenzelmann, M.; Zolliker, M.; Gavilano, J. L.; Bauer, E. D.; et al

    2012-02-23

    We present small angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in CeCoIn₅ with magnetic fields applied parallel (H) to the antinodal [100] and nodal [110] directions. For H II 100], a single VL orientation is observed, while a 90° reorientation transition is found for H II [110]. For both field orientations and VL configurations we find a distorted hexagonal VL with an anisotropy, Γ=2.0±0.05. The VL form factor shows strong Pauli paramagnetic effects similar to what have previously been reported for H II [001]. At high fields, above which the upper critical field (Hc2) becomes a first-order transition,more » an increased disordering of the VL is observed.« less

  20. Quantum melting of a two-dimensional vortex lattice at zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhkov, A.; Stroud, D.

    1996-11-01

    We consider the quantum melting of a two-dimensional flux lattice at temperature {ital T} = 0 in the {open_quote}{open_quote}superclean limit.{close_quote}{close_quote} In this regime, we find that vortex motion is dominated by the Magnus force. A Lindemann criterion predicts melting when {ital n}{sub {ital v}}/{ital n}{sub {ital p}}{ge}{beta}, where {ital n}{sub {ital v}} and {ital n}{sub {ital p}} are the areal number densities of vortex pancakes and Cooper pairs, and {beta}{approx_equal}0.1. A second criterion is derived by using Wigner-crystal and Laughlin wave functions for the solid and liquid phases respectively, and setting the two energies equal. This gives a melting value similar to the Lindemann result. We discuss the numerical value of the {ital T}=0 melting field for thin layers of a low-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductor, such as {ital a}-MoGe, and single layers of high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} materials. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Structural Studies of Metastable and Ground State Vortex Lattice Domains in MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waard, E. R.; Kuhn, S. J.; Rastovski, C.; Eskildsen, M. R.; Leishman, A.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Debeer-Schmitt, L.; Littrell, K.; Karpinski, J.; Zhigadlo, N. D.

    2015-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of the vortex lattice (VL) in the type-II superconductor MgB2 have revealed an unprecedented degree of metastability that is demonstrably not due to vortex pinning, [C. Rastovski et al . , Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 107002 (2013)]. Application of an AC magnetic field to drive the VL to the ground state revealed a two-step power law behavior, indicating a slow nucleation of ground state domains followed by a faster growth. The dependence on the number of applied AC cycles is reminiscent of jamming of soft, frictionless spheres. Here, we report on detailed structural studies of both metastable and ground state VL domains. These include measurements of VL correlation lengths as well as spatially resolved SANS measurements showing the VL domain distribution within the MgB2 single crystal. We discuss these results and how they may help to resolve the mechanism responsible for stabilizing the metastable VL phases. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award DE-FG02-10ER46783.

  2. Photonic currents in driven and dissipative resonator lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Thomas; Vasić, Ivana; Hartmann, Michael J.; Hofstetter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Arrays of coupled photonic cavities driven by external lasers represent a highly controllable setup to explore photonic transport. In this paper we address (quasi)-steady states of this system that exhibit photonic currents introduced by engineering driving and dissipation. We investigate two approaches: in the first one, photonic currents arise as a consequence of a phase difference of applied lasers and, in the second one, photons are injected locally and currents develop as they redistribute over the lattice. Effects of interactions are taken into account within a mean-field framework. In the first approach, we find that the current exhibits a resonant behavior with respect to the driving frequency. Weak interactions shift the resonant frequency toward higher values, while in the strongly interacting regime in our mean-field treatment the effect stems from multiphotonic resonances of a single driven cavity. For the second approach, we show that the overall lattice current can be controlled by incorporating few cavities with stronger dissipation rates into the system. These cavities serve as sinks for photonic currents and their effect is maximal at the onset of quantum Zeno dynamics.

  3. Lattice-Polarity-Driven Epitaxy of Hexagonal Semiconductor Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Yuan, Ying; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xinqiang; Zheng, Xiantong; Rong, Xin; Wang, Tao; Sheng, Bowen; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Yongqiang; Bian, Lifeng; Yang, Xuelin; Xu, Fujun; Qin, Zhixin; Li, Xinzheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Shen, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Lattice-polarity-driven epitaxy of hexagonal semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is demonstrated on InN NWs. In-polarity InN NWs form typical hexagonal structure with pyramidal growth front, whereas N-polarity InN NWs slowly turn to the shape of hexagonal pyramid and then convert to an inverted pyramid growth, forming diagonal pyramids with flat surfaces and finally coalescence with each other. This contrary growth behavior driven by lattice-polarity is most likely due to the relatively lower growth rate of the (0001̅) plane, which results from the fact that the diffusion barriers of In and N adatoms on the (0001) plane (0.18 and 1.0 eV, respectively) are about 2-fold larger in magnitude than those on the (0001̅) plane (0.07 and 0.52 eV), as calculated by first-principles density functional theory (DFT). The formation of diagonal pyramids for the N-polarity hexagonal NWs affords a novel way to locate quantum dot in the kink position, suggesting a new recipe for the fabrication of dot-based devices.

  4. Evolution of a superfluid vortex filament tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

    PubMed

    Villois, Alberto; Proment, Davide; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-06-01

    The development and decay of a turbulent vortex tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is studied. Using a recently developed accurate and robust tracking algorithm, all quantized vortices are extracted from the fields. The Vinen's decay law for the total vortex length with a coefficient that is in quantitative agreement with the values measured in helium II is observed. The topology of the tangle is then investigated showing that linked rings may appear during the evolution. The tracking also allows for determining the statistics of small-scale quantities of vortex lines, exhibiting large fluctuations of curvature and torsion. Finally, the temporal evolution of the Kelvin wave spectrum is obtained providing evidence of the development of a weak-wave turbulence cascade. PMID:27415198

  5. Evolution of a superfluid vortex filament tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villois, Alberto; Proment, Davide; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-06-01

    The development and decay of a turbulent vortex tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is studied. Using a recently developed accurate and robust tracking algorithm, all quantized vortices are extracted from the fields. The Vinen's decay law for the total vortex length with a coefficient that is in quantitative agreement with the values measured in helium II is observed. The topology of the tangle is then investigated showing that linked rings may appear during the evolution. The tracking also allows for determining the statistics of small-scale quantities of vortex lines, exhibiting large fluctuations of curvature and torsion. Finally, the temporal evolution of the Kelvin wave spectrum is obtained providing evidence of the development of a weak-wave turbulence cascade.

  6. Current driven vortex-antivortex pair breaking and vortex explosion in the Bi2Te3/FeTe interfacial superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, C. L.; Kunchur, M. N.; He, Q. L.; Liu, H.; Wang, J.; Lortz, R.; Sou, I. K.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the dissipative regime of the Bi2Te3/FeTe topological insulator-chalcogenide interface superconductor at temperatures well below the Berezinski-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. We observe a transition in the current-resistance and temperature-resistance curves that quantitatively agrees with the Likharev vortex-explosion phenomenon. In the limit of low temperatures and high current densities, we were able to demonstrate the regime of complete vortex-antivortex dissociation arising from current driven vortex-antivortex pair breaking.

  7. Effects of parallel dynamics on vortex structures in electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    2011-01-15

    Vortex structures and related heat transport properties in slab electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are comprehensively investigated by means of nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov simulations, with the aim of elucidating the underlying physical mechanisms of the transition from turbulent to coherent states. Numerical results show three different types of vortex structures, i.e., coherent vortex streets accompanied with the transport reduction, turbulent vortices with steady transport, and a zonal-flow-dominated state, depending on the relative magnitude of the parallel compression to the diamagnetic drift. In particular, the formation of coherent vortex streets is correlated with the strong generation of zonal flows for the cases with weak parallel compression, even though the maximum growth rate of linear ETG modes is relatively large. The zonal flow generation in the ETG turbulence is investigated by the modulational instability analysis with a truncated fluid model, where the parallel dynamics such as acoustic modes for electrons is incorporated. The modulational instability for zonal flows is found to be stabilized by the effect of the finite parallel compression. The theoretical analysis qualitatively agrees with secondary growth of zonal flows found in the slab ETG turbulence simulations, where the transition of vortex structures is observed.

  8. Chiral d -Wave Superfluid in Periodically Driven Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shao-Liang; Lang, Li-Jun; Zhou, Qi

    2015-11-01

    A chiral d -wave superfluid is a preliminary example of interacting topological matter. However, unlike s -wave superfluids prevalent in nature, its existence requires a strong d -wave interaction, a criterion that is difficult to access in ordinary systems. There is no experimental observation of such unconventional superfluid at the moment. Here, we present a new principle for creating a two-dimensional (2D) chiral d -wave superfluid using periodically driven lattices. Because of an imprinted 2D pseudospin-orbit coupling, where the sublattice index serves as the pseudospin, the s -wave interaction between two hyperfine spin states naturally creates a chiral d -wave superfluid. This scheme can be directly implemented in current experiments.

  9. Oscillatory behavior of vortex-lattice melting transition line in mesoscopic Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+y} superconductors.

    PubMed

    Ooi, S; Mochiku, T; Tachiki, M; Hirata, K

    2015-02-27

    The vortex-lattice melting transition of a limited number of vortices confined in mesoscopic square superconductors was studied by c-axis resistance measurements using stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions in Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+y}. In contrast to the melting transition in bulk crystals, we have first found a clear oscillatory behavior in the field dependence of the melting temperature in small samples of 5-10  μm square. The periods of the oscillations roughly obey the regularity of the matching conditions of square vortex lattices surrounded by a square boundary and the melting temperatures are enhanced around the vortex number of i^{2} (where i is an integer). The results suggest that a confinement effect by the square boundary stabilizes square lattice structures which are realized around i^{2} vortex number even in competition with the favorable Abrikosov triangular lattice in the bulk. PMID:25768774

  10. Superconducting gap and vortex lattice of the heavy-fermion compound CeCu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enayat, Mostafa; Sun, Zhixiang; Maldonado, Ana; Suderow, Hermann; Seiro, Silvia; Geibel, Christoph; Wirth, Steffen; Steglich, Frank; Wahl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The order parameter and pairing mechanism for superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds are still poorly understood. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at ultralow temperatures can yield important information about the superconducting order parameter and the gap structure. Here, we study the first heavy-fermion superconductor, CeCu2Si2 . Our data show the superconducting gap which is not fully formed and exhibits features that point to a multigap order parameter. Spatial mapping of the zero-bias conductance in magnetic field reveals the vortex lattice, which allows us to unequivocally link the observed conductance gap to superconductivity in CeCu2Si2 . The vortex lattice is found to be predominantly triangular with distortions at fields close to ˜0.7 Hc 2 .

  11. Unsteady vortex lattice techniques applied to wake formation and performance of the statically thrusting propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The application is considered of vortex lattice techniques to the problem of describing the aerodynamics and performance of statically thrusting propellers. A numerical lifting surface theory to predict the aerodynamic forces and power is performed. The chordwise and spanwise loading is modelled by bound vortices fixed to a twisted flat plate surface. In order to eliminate any apriori assumptions regarding the wake shape, it is assumed the propeller starts from rest. The wake is generated in time and allowed to deform under its own self-induced velocity field as the motion of the propeller progresses. The bound circulation distribution is then determined with time by applying the flow tangency boundary condition at certain selected control points on the blades. The aerodynamics of the infinite wing and finite wing are also considered. The details of wake formation and roll-up are investigated, particularly the localized induction effect. It is concluded that proper wake roll-up and roll-up rates can be established by considering the details of motion at the instant of start.

  12. Localization of a Bose-Einstein-condensate vortex in a bichromatic optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, S. K.

    2010-04-15

    By numerical simulation of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation we show that a weakly interacting or noninteracting Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) vortex can be localized in a three-dimensional bichromatic quasiperiodic optical-lattice (OL) potential generated by the superposition of two standing-wave polarized laser beams with incommensurate wavelengths. We also study the localization of a (nonrotating) BEC in two and three dimensions by bichromatic OL potentials along orthogonal directions. This is a generalization of the localization of a BEC in a one-dimensional bichromatic OL as studied in a recent experiment [Roati et al., Nature 453, 895 (2008)]. We demonstrate the stability of the localized state by considering its time evolution in the form of a stable breathing oscillation in a slightly altered potential for a large period of time. Finally, we consider the localization of a BEC in a random one-dimensional potential in the form of several identical repulsive spikes arbitrarily distributed in space.

  13. Aerodynamic Modeling of Transonic Aircraft Using Vortex Lattice Coupled with Transonic Small Disturbance for Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaparro, Daniel; Fujiwara, Gustavo E. C.; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan

    2016-01-01

    The need to rapidly scan large design spaces during conceptual design calls for computationally inexpensive tools such as the vortex lattice method (VLM). Although some VLM tools, such as Vorview have been extended to model fully-supersonic flow, VLM solutions are typically limited to inviscid, subcritical flow regimes. Many transport aircraft operate at transonic speeds, which limits the applicability of VLM for such applications. This paper presents a novel approach to correct three-dimensional VLM through coupling of two-dimensional transonic small disturbance (TSD) solutions along the span of an aircraft wing in order to accurately predict transonic aerodynamic loading and wave drag for transport aircraft. The approach is extended to predict flow separation and capture the attenuation of aerodynamic forces due to boundary layer viscosity by coupling the TSD solver with an integral boundary layer (IBL) model. The modeling framework is applied to the NASA General Transport Model (GTM) integrated with a novel control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF).

  14. Description, Usage, and Validation of the MVL-15 Modified Vortex Lattice Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    MVL-15 is the most recent version of the Modified Vortex-Lattice (MVL) code developed within the Aerodynamics Systems Analysis Branch (ASAB) at NASA LaRC. The term "modified" refers to the primary modification of the core vortex-lattice methodology: inclusion of viscous aerodynamics tables that are linked to the linear solution via iterative processes. The inclusion of the viscous aerodynamics inherently converts the MVL-15 from a purely analytic linearized method to a semi-empirical blend which retains the rapid execution speed of the linearized method while empirically characterizing the section aerodynamics at all spanwise lattice points. The modification provides a means to assess non-linear effects on lift that occur at angles of attack near stall, and provides a means to determine the drag associated with the application of design strategies for lift augmentation such as the use of flaps or blowing. The MVL-15 code is applicable to the analyses of aircraft aerodynamics during cruise, but it is most advantageously applied to the analysis of aircraft operating in various high-lift configurations. The MVL methodology has been previously conceived and implemented; the initial concept version was delivered to the ASAB in 2001 (van Dam, C.), subsequently revised (Gelhausen, P. and Ozoroski, T. 2002 / AVID Inc., Gelhausen, P., and Roberts, M. 2004), and then overhauled (Ozoroski, T., Hahn, A. 2008). The latest version, MVL-15 has been refined to provide analysis transparency and enhanced to meet the analysis requirements of the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. Each revision has been implemented with reasonable success. Separate applications of the methodology are in use, including a similar in-house capability, developed by Olson, E. that is tailored for structural and acoustics analyses. A central premise of the methodology is that viscous aerodynamic data can be associated with analytic inviscid aerodynamic results at each spanwise wing section

  15. Peak effect and square-to-rhombic vortex lattice transition in La2-xSrxCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, B.; Shapiro, B. Ya.; Shapiro, I.; Bruckental, Y.; Shaulov, A.; Yeshurun, Y.

    2005-10-01

    A theory of structural phase transition of the vortex lattice in tetragonal superconductors is constructed based on the self consistent harmonic approximation for lattice anharmonicities, within the fourfold-symmetric generalization of the London model. Thermal fluctuations on the mesoscopic scale are strong enough to affect the location of the square to rhomb transition line in the T-H plane. We find that the slope of the transition line is generally negative: thermal fluctuations favor the more symmetric square lattice. The calculated transition line is concave, and fits the experimental line deduced in LaSCO crystals from the onset of the second magnetization peak. Near the transition line the “squash” modulus Csq=2(C11+C12)-C66 is softened leading to enhancement of the critical current, born out in the experiment as a second magnetization peak.

  16. Effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction on the magnetic vortex oscillator driven by spin-polarized current

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shujun; Zhang, Senfu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Liu, Xianyin; Jin, Chendong; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2015-05-07

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the dynamic of magnetic vortex driven by spin-polarized current in Permalloy nanodisks in the presence of interfacial/superficial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI). It is found that spin-polarized current can drive the vortex precession. In the presence of DMI, the oscillation frequency of the vortex is about 3 times higher than that of without DMI for the same nanodisk. Moreover, the linewidth is more narrow than that of without DMI when the radius of nanodisk is 50 nm. In addition, the vortex can support a higher current density than that of without DMI. Introduction of DMI in this system can provide a new way to design magnetic vortex oscillator.

  17. Dynamic visualization of nanoscale vortex orbits.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Matias; Samuely, Tomas; Raes, Bart; Van de Vondel, Joris; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2014-03-25

    Due to the atomic-scale resolution, scanning tunneling microscopy is an ideal technique to observe the smallest objects. Nevertheless, it suffers from very long capturing times in order to investigate dynamic processes at the nanoscale. We address this issue, for vortex matter in NbSe2, by driving the vortices using an ac magnetic field and probing the induced periodic tunnel current modulations. Our results reveal different dynamical modes of the driven vortex lattices. In addition, by recording and synchronizing the time evolution of the tunneling current at each pixel, we visualize the overall dynamics of the vortex lattice with submillisecond time resolution and subnanometer spatial resolution.

  18. Active suppression of vortex-driven combustion instability using controlled liquid-fuel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Bin

    Combustion instabilities remain one of the most challenging problems encountered in developing propulsion and power systems. Large amplitude pressure oscillations, driven by unsteady heat release, can produce numerous detrimental effects. Most previous active control studies utilized gaseous fuels to suppress combustion instabilities. However, using liquid fuel to suppress combustion instabilities is more realistic for propulsion applications. Active instability suppression in vortex-driven combustors using a direct liquid fuel injection strategy was theoretically established and experimentally demonstrated in this dissertation work. Droplet size measurements revealed that with pulsed fuel injection management, fuel droplet size could be modulated periodically. Consequently, desired heat release fluctuation could be created. If this oscillatory heat release is coupled with the natural pressure oscillation in an out of phase manner, combustion instabilities can be suppressed. To identify proper locations of supplying additional liquid fuel for the purpose of achieving control, the natural heat release pattern in a vortex-driven combustor was characterized in this study. It was found that at high Damkohler number oscillatory heat release pattern closely followed the evolving vortex front. However, when Damkohler number became close to unity, heat release fluctuation wave no longer coincided with the coherent structures. A heat release deficit area was found near the dump plane when combustor was operated in lean premixed conditions. Active combustion instability suppression experiments were performed in a dump combustor using a controlled liquid fuel injection strategy. High-speed Schlieren results illustrated that vortex shedding plays an important role in maintaining self-sustained combustion instabilities. Complete combustion instability control requires total suppression of these large-scale coherent structures. The sound pressure level at the excited dominant

  19. Hubbard Model for Atomic Impurities Bound by the Vortex Lattice of a Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T H; Yuan, Y; Bao, W; Clark, S R; Foot, C; Jaksch, D

    2016-06-17

    We investigate cold bosonic impurity atoms trapped in a vortex lattice formed by condensed bosons of another species. We describe the dynamics of the impurities by a bosonic Hubbard model containing occupation-dependent parameters to capture the effects of strong impurity-impurity interactions. These include both a repulsive direct interaction and an attractive effective interaction mediated by the Bose-Einstein condensate. The occupation dependence of these two competing interactions drastically affects the Hubbard model phase diagram, including causing the disappearance of some Mott lobes. PMID:27367366

  20. Quantum melting of the quasi-two-dimensional vortex lattice in kappa- (ET)2Cu(NCS)(2).

    PubMed

    Mola, M M; Hill, S; Brooks, J S; Qualls, J S

    2001-03-01

    We report torque magnetization measurements in regions of the mixed state phase diagram ( B approximately mu(o)H(c2) and T(c)/10(3)) of the organic superconductor kappa-(ET)2Cu(NCS)(2), where quantum fluctuations are expected to dominate thermal effects. Over most of the field range below the irreversibility line ( B(irr)), magnetothermal instabilities are observed in the form of flux jumps. The abrupt cessation of these instabilities just below B(irr) indicates a quantum melting transition from a quasi-two-dimensional vortex lattice phase to a quantum liquid phase.

  1. Hubbard Model for Atomic Impurities Bound by the Vortex Lattice of a Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T H; Yuan, Y; Bao, W; Clark, S R; Foot, C; Jaksch, D

    2016-06-17

    We investigate cold bosonic impurity atoms trapped in a vortex lattice formed by condensed bosons of another species. We describe the dynamics of the impurities by a bosonic Hubbard model containing occupation-dependent parameters to capture the effects of strong impurity-impurity interactions. These include both a repulsive direct interaction and an attractive effective interaction mediated by the Bose-Einstein condensate. The occupation dependence of these two competing interactions drastically affects the Hubbard model phase diagram, including causing the disappearance of some Mott lobes.

  2. Aerodynamic Analysis of the Truss-Braced Wing Aircraft Using Vortex-Lattice Superposition Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric Bi-Wen; Reynolds, Kevin Wayne; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Totah, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The SUGAR Truss-BracedWing (TBW) aircraft concept is a Boeing-developed N+3 aircraft configuration funded by NASA ARMD FixedWing Project. This future generation transport aircraft concept is designed to be aerodynamically efficient by employing a high aspect ratio wing design. The aspect ratio of the TBW is on the order of 14 which is significantly greater than those of current generation transport aircraft. This paper presents a recent aerodynamic analysis of the TBW aircraft using a conceptual vortex-lattice aerodynamic tool VORLAX and an aerodynamic superposition approach. Based on the underlying linear potential flow theory, the principle of aerodynamic superposition is leveraged to deal with the complex aerodynamic configuration of the TBW. By decomposing the full configuration of the TBW into individual aerodynamic lifting components, the total aerodynamic characteristics of the full configuration can be estimated from the contributions of the individual components. The aerodynamic superposition approach shows excellent agreement with CFD results computed by FUN3D, USM3D, and STAR-CCM+. XXXXX Demand for green aviation is expected to increase with the need for reduced environmental impact. Most large transports today operate within the best cruise L/D range of 18-20 using the conventional tube-and-wing design. This configuration has led to marginal improvements in aerodynamic efficiency over this past century, as aerodynamic improvements tend to be incremental. A big opportunity has been shown in recent years to significantly reduce structural weight or trim drag, hence improved energy efficiency, with the use of lightweight materials such as composites. The Boeing 787 transport is an example of a modern airframe design that employs lightweight structures. High aspect ratio wing design can provide another opportunity for further improvements in energy efficiency. Historically, the study of high aspect ratio wings has been intimately tied to the study of

  3. Exotic vortex lattices in a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Wen, Lin; Dai, Cai-Qing; Dong, Rui-Fang; Jiang, Hai-Feng; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of dipolar quantum gases. Previous theoretical investigations of a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate, where only one component possesses dipole moment, were mainly focused on two special orientations of the dipoles: perpendicular or parallel to the plane of motion. Here we study the ground-state and rotational properties of such a system for an arbitrary orientation of the dipoles. We demonstrate the ground-state vortex structures depend strongly on the relative strength between dipolar and contact interactions and the rotation frequency, as well as on the orientation of the dipoles. In the absence of rotation, the tunable dipolar interaction can be used to induce the squeezing or expansion of the cloud, and to derive the phase transition between phase coexistence and separation. Under finite rotation, the system is found to exhibit exotic ground-state vortex configurations, such as kernel-shell, vortex necklace, and compensating stripe vortex structures. We also check the validity of the Feynman relation, and find no significant deviations from it. The obtained results open up alternate ways for the quantum control of dipolar quantum gases. PMID:26778736

  4. Exotic vortex lattices in a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Wen, Lin; Dai, Cai-Qing; Dong, Rui-Fang; Jiang, Hai-Feng; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of dipolar quantum gases. Previous theoretical investigations of a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate, where only one component possesses dipole moment, were mainly focused on two special orientations of the dipoles: perpendicular or parallel to the plane of motion. Here we study the ground-state and rotational properties of such a system for an arbitrary orientation of the dipoles. We demonstrate the ground-state vortex structures depend strongly on the relative strength between dipolar and contact interactions and the rotation frequency, as well as on the orientation of the dipoles. In the absence of rotation, the tunable dipolar interaction can be used to induce the squeezing or expansion of the cloud, and to derive the phase transition between phase coexistence and separation. Under finite rotation, the system is found to exhibit exotic ground-state vortex configurations, such as kernel-shell, vortex necklace, and compensating stripe vortex structures. We also check the validity of the Feynman relation, and find no significant deviations from it. The obtained results open up alternate ways for the quantum control of dipolar quantum gases. PMID:26778736

  5. Exotic vortex lattices in a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Wen, Lin; Dai, Cai-Qing; Dong, Rui-Fang; Jiang, Hai-Feng; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of dipolar quantum gases. Previous theoretical investigations of a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate, where only one component possesses dipole moment, were mainly focused on two special orientations of the dipoles: perpendicular or parallel to the plane of motion. Here we study the ground-state and rotational properties of such a system for an arbitrary orientation of the dipoles. We demonstrate the ground-state vortex structures depend strongly on the relative strength between dipolar and contact interactions and the rotation frequency, as well as on the orientation of the dipoles. In the absence of rotation, the tunable dipolar interaction can be used to induce the squeezing or expansion of the cloud, and to derive the phase transition between phase coexistence and separation. Under finite rotation, the system is found to exhibit exotic ground-state vortex configurations, such as kernel-shell, vortex necklace, and compensating stripe vortex structures. We also check the validity of the Feynman relation, and find no significant deviations from it. The obtained results open up alternate ways for the quantum control of dipolar quantum gases.

  6. Exotic vortex lattices in a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Wen, Lin; Dai, Cai-Qing; Dong, Rui-Fang; Jiang, Hai-Feng; Chang, Hong; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2016-01-18

    In the last decade, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of dipolar quantum gases. Previous theoretical investigations of a rotating binary dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate, where only one component possesses dipole moment, were mainly focused on two special orientations of the dipoles: perpendicular or parallel to the plane of motion. Here we study the ground-state and rotational properties of such a system for an arbitrary orientation of the dipoles. We demonstrate the ground-state vortex structures depend strongly on the relative strength between dipolar and contact interactions and the rotation frequency, as well as on the orientation of the dipoles. In the absence of rotation, the tunable dipolar interaction can be used to induce the squeezing or expansion of the cloud, and to derive the phase transition between phase coexistence and separation. Under finite rotation, the system is found to exhibit exotic ground-state vortex configurations, such as kernel-shell, vortex necklace, and compensating stripe vortex structures. We also check the validity of the Feynman relation, and find no significant deviations from it. The obtained results open up alternate ways for the quantum control of dipolar quantum gases.

  7. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of coalescence-driven island coarsening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basagaoglu, H.; Green, C.T.; Meakin, P.; McCoy, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    The first-order phase separation in a thin fluid film was simulated using a two-dimensional lattice-Boltzman model (LBM) with fluid-fluid interactions. The effects of the domain size on the intermediate asymptotic island size distribution were also discussed. It was observed that the overall process is dominated by coalescence which is independent of island mass. The results show that the combined effects of growth, coalescence, and Ostwald ripening control the phase transition process in the LBM simulations.

  8. Simultaneous evidence for Pauli paramagnetic effects and multiband superconductivity in KFe2As2 by small-angle neutron scattering studies of the vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, S. J.; Kawano-Furukawa, H.; Jellyman, E.; Riyat, R.; Forgan, E. M.; Ono, M.; Kihou, K.; Lee, C. H.; Hardy, F.; Adelmann, P.; Wolf, Th.; Meingast, C.; Gavilano, J.; Eskildsen, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    We study the intrinsic anisotropy of the superconducting state in KFe2As2 by using small-angle neutron scattering to image the vortex lattice as the applied magnetic field is rotated towards the FeAs crystalline planes. The anisotropy is found to be strongly field dependent, indicating multiband superconductivity. Furthermore, the high-field anisotropy significantly exceeds that of the upper critical field, providing further support for Pauli limiting in KFe2As2 for fields applied in the basal plane. The effect of Pauli paramagnetism on the unpaired quasiparticles in the vortex cores is directly evident from the ratio of scattered intensities due to the longitudinal and transverse vortex lattice field modulation.

  9. Disordering of the vortex lattice through successive destruction of positional and orientational order in a weakly pinned Co0.0075NbSe2 single crystal

    PubMed Central

    Chandra Ganguli, Somesh; Singh, Harkirat; Saraswat, Garima; Ganguly, Rini; Bagwe, Vivas; Shirage, Parasharam; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The vortex lattice in a Type II superconductor provides a versatile model system to investigate the order-disorder transition in a periodic medium in the presence of random pinning. Here, using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy in a weakly pinned Co0.0075NbSe2 single crystal, we show that the vortex lattice in a 3-dimensional superconductor disorders through successive destruction of positional and orientational order, as the magnetic field is increased across the peak effect. At the onset of the peak effect, the equilibrium quasi-long range ordered state transforms into an orientational glass through the proliferation of dislocations. At a higher field, the dislocations dissociate into isolated disclination giving rise to an amorphous vortex glass. We also show the existence of a variety of additional non-equilibrium metastable states, which can be accessed through different thermomagnetic cycling. PMID:26039699

  10. Producing directed migration with correlated atoms in a tilted ac-driven lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Yang, Shi-Jie

    2016-06-01

    The correlated atoms in a tilted optical lattice driven by an ac field are studied within the Hubbard model. By making use of both photon-assisted tunneling and coherent destructive tunneling effects, we can move a pair of strongly correlated atoms in the lattice via manipulating the global amplitude of the driving field. We propose a scheme for creating entanglement between the particle pair and a single particle through interacting oscillations. Our model may provide a new building block for investigating quantum computing and quantum information processing with ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  11. Freezing, accelerating, and slowing directed currents in real time with superimposed driven lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aritra K.; Liebchen, Benno; Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We provide a generic scheme offering real-time control of directed particle transport using superimposed driven lattices. This scheme allows one to accelerate, slow, and freeze the transport on demand by switching one of the lattices subsequently on and off. The underlying physical mechanism hinges on a systematic opening and closing of channels between transporting and nontransporting phase space structures upon switching and exploits cantori structures which generate memory effects in the population of these structures. Our results should allow for real-time control of cold thermal atomic ensembles in optical lattices but might also be useful as a design principle for targeted delivery of molecules or colloids in optical devices.

  12. Observation of well-ordered metastable vortex lattice phases in superconducting MgB2 using small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Das, P; Rastovski, C; O'Brien, T R; Schlesinger, K J; Dewhurst, C D; DeBeer-Schmitt, L; Zhigadlo, N D; Karpinski, J; Eskildsen, M R

    2012-04-20

    The vortex lattice (VL) symmetry and orientation in clean type-II superconductors depends sensitively on the host material anisotropy, vortex density and temperature, frequently leading to rich phase diagrams. Typically, a well-ordered VL is taken to imply a ground-state configuration for the vortex-vortex interaction. Using neutron scattering we studied the VL in MgB(2) for a number of field-temperature histories, discovering an unprecedented degree of metastability in connection with a known, second-order rotation transition. This allows, for the first time, structural studies of a well-ordered, nonequilibrium VL. While the mechanism responsible for the longevity of the metastable states is not resolved, we speculate it is due to a jamming of VL domains, preventing a rotation to the ground-state orientation.

  13. Observation of Well-ordered Metastable Vortex Lattice Phases in Superconducting MgB2 Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Pinaki; Rastovski, Catherine; O'Brien, Timothy; Schlesinger, Kimberly; Dewhurst, Charles; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M; Zhigadlo, Nikolai; Karpinski, Janusz; Eskildsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The vortex lattice (VL) symmetry and orientation in clean type-II superconductors depends sensitively on the host material anisotropy, vortex density and temperature, frequently leading to rich phase diagrams. Typically, a well-ordered VL is taken to imply a ground-state configuration for the vortex-vortex interaction. Using neutron scattering we studied the VL in MgB2 for a number of field-temperature histories, discovering an unprecedented degree of metastability in connection with a known, second-order rotation transition. This allows, for the first time, structural studies of a well-ordered, nonequilibrium VL. While the mechanism responsible for the longevity of the metastable states is not resolved, we speculate it is due to a jamming of VL domains, preventing a rotation to the ground-state orientation.

  14. Lattice gas dynamics: application to driven vortices in two dimensional superconductors.

    PubMed

    Gotcheva, Violeta; Wang, Albert T J; Teitel, S

    2004-06-18

    A continuous time Monte Carlo lattice gas dynamics is developed to model driven steady states of vortices in two dimensional superconducting networks. Dramatic differences are found when compared to a simpler Metropolis dynamics. Subtle finite size effects are found at low temperature, with a moving smectic that becomes unstable to an anisotropic liquid on sufficiently large length scales.

  15. SUNRISE/IMaX OBSERVATIONS OF CONVECTIVELY DRIVEN VORTEX FLOWS IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Bonet, J. A.; Marquez, I.; Almeida, J. Sanchez; Pillet, V. MartInez; Palacios, J.; Domingo, V.; Solanki, S. K.; Gandorfer, A.; Barthol, P.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Knoelker, M.

    2010-11-10

    We characterize the observational properties of the convectively driven vortex flows recently discovered on the quiet Sun, using magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and images obtained with the 1 m balloon-borne SUNRISE telescope. By visual inspection of time series, we find some 3.1 x 10{sup -3} vortices Mm{sup -2} minute{sup -1}, which is a factor of {approx}1.7 larger than previous estimates. The mean duration of the individual events turns out to be 7.9 minutes, with a standard deviation of 3.2 minutes. In addition, we find several events appearing at the same locations along the duration of the time series (31.6 minutes). Such recurrent vortices show up in the proper motion flow field map averaged over the time series. The typical vertical vorticities are {approx_lt}6 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}, which corresponds to a period of rotation of some 35 minutes. The vortices show a preferred counterclockwise sense of rotation, which we conjecture may have to do with the preferred vorticity impinged by the solar differential rotation.

  16. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  17. Equilibrium vortex lattices of a binary rotating atomic Bose-Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Biao; Wang, Lin-Xue; Chen, Guang-Ping; Han, Wei; Zhang, Shou-Gang; Zhang, Xiao-Fei

    2016-10-01

    We perform a detailed numerical study of the equilibrium ground-state structures of a binary rotating Bose-Einstein condensate with unequal atomic masses. Our results show that the ground-state distribution and its related vortex configurations are complex events that differ markedly depending strongly on the strength of rotation frequency, as well as on the ratio of atomic masses. We also discuss the structures and radii of the clouds, the number and the size of the core region of the vortices, as a function of the rotation frequency, and of the ratio of atomic masses, and the analytical results agree well with our numerical simulations. This work may open an alternate way in the quantum control of the binary rotating quantum gases with unequal atomic masses.

  18. Vortex-lattice pinning and critical current density in anisotropic high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingxu; Li, Xiangyu; Kang, Guozheng; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-10-01

    The anisotropy of critical current density is an impressive manifestation in the physics of high-temperature superconductors. We develop an analytical characterization of anisotropic flux-lattice pinning and critical current density in a system of random point defects. The effect of superconducting anisotropy on the pinning force and critical current density is formulated. The in-plane/out-of-plane anisotropy and microscopic characteristic lengths are incorporated in the field and angular dependence of the critical current density. This is helpful in understanding the physical essence of the scaling behavior in the experiments for critical current anisotropy. We discuss the role of strong and weak point defects in the anisotropic flux-lattice pinning. Relevance of the theory to the critical-state model is dictated as well.

  19. Cascaded spin motive force driven by the dynamics of the skyrmion lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ohe, Jun-ichiro; Shimada, Yuhki

    2013-12-09

    We numerically investigate the spin motive force (SMF) driven by the dynamics of a Skyrmion lattice. The rotating mode of the Skyrmion core excited by the AC magnetic field induces the large spin-dependent electric field near the core. Due to the collective dynamics of Skyrmion lattice, the measurable voltage is enhanced by the cascade effect of the SMF. The amplitude of the AC voltage is estimated to 30 μV in a macroscopic sample, where 100 Skyrmions exist between two probes. We also investigate the SMF due to the dynamics of the helical magnetic state, where the enhancement of the SMF does not occur.

  20. Electronic structure of topological superconductors in the presence of a vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Franz, M.

    2015-10-01

    Certain types of topological superconductors and superfluids are known to host protected Majorana zero modes in cores of Abrikosov vortices. When such vortices are arranged in a dense periodic lattice one expects zero modes from neighboring vortices to hybridize and form dispersing bands. Understanding the structure of these bands is essential for the schemes that aim to employ the zero modes in quantum computation applications and in studies of their strongly interacting phases. We investigate here the band formation phenomenon in two concrete models, describing a two-dimensional px+i py superconductor and a superconducting surface of a three-dimensional strong topological insulator (Fu-Kane model), using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. We find that the physics of the Majorana bands is well described by tight-binding models of Majorana fermions coupled to a static Z2 gauge field with a nontrivial gauge flux through each plaquette, in accord with expectations based on very general arguments. In the case of the Fu-Kane model we also find that, irrespective of the lattice geometry, the Majorana band becomes completely flat at the so-called neutrality point (chemical potential coincident with the Dirac point) where the model exhibits an extra chiral symmetry. In this limit the low-energy physics will be dominated by four-fermion interaction terms which are permitted by symmetries and may arise from the Coulomb interaction between the constituent electron degrees of freedom.

  1. Existence and non-existence of breather solutions in damped and driven nonlinear lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, D.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the existence of spatially localised solutions, in the form of discrete breathers, in general damped and driven nonlinear lattice systems of coupled oscillators. Conditions for the exponential decay of the difference between the maximal and minimal amplitudes of the oscillators are provided which proves that initial non-uniform spatial patterns representing breathers attain exponentially fast a spatially uniform state preventing the formation and/or preservation of any breather solution at all. Strikingly our results are generic in the sense that they hold for arbitrary dimension of the system, any attractive interaction, coupling strength and on-site potential and general driving fields. Furthermore, our rigorous quantitative results establish conditions under which discrete breathers in general damped and driven nonlinear lattices can exist at all and open the way for further research on the emergent dynamical scenarios, in particular features of pattern formation, localisation and synchronisation, in coupled cell networks.

  2. Coupled Vortex-Lattice Flight Dynamic Model with Aeroelastic Finite-Element Model of Flexible Wing Transport Aircraft with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Daniel; Dao, Tung; Trinh, Khanh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled vortex-lattice flight dynamic model with an aeroelastic finite-element model to predict dynamic characteristics of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The aircraft model is based on NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with representative mass and stiffness properties to achieve a wing tip deflection about twice that of a conventional transport aircraft (10% versus 5%). This flexible wing transport aircraft is referred to as an Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC) which is equipped with a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system for active wing shaping control for drag reduction. A vortex-lattice aerodynamic model of the ESAC is developed and is coupled with an aeroelastic finite-element model via an automated geometry modeler. This coupled model is used to compute static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions. The deflection information from the finite-element model and the vortex-lattice model is used to compute unsteady contributions to the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients. A coupled aeroelastic-longitudinal flight dynamic model is developed by coupling the finite-element model with the rigid-body flight dynamic model of the GTM.

  3. Static Aeroelastic and Longitudinal Trim Model of Flexible Wing Aircraft Using Finite-Element Vortex-Lattice Coupled Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a static aeroelastic model and longitudinal trim model for the analysis of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The static aeroelastic model is built using a structural model based on finite-element modeling and coupled to an aerodynamic model that uses vortex-lattice solution. An automatic geometry generation tool is used to close the loop between the structural and aerodynamic models. The aeroelastic model is extended for the development of a three degree-of-freedom longitudinal trim model for an aircraft with flexible wings. The resulting flexible aircraft longitudinal trim model is used to simultaneously compute the static aeroelastic shape for the aircraft model and the longitudinal state inputs to maintain an aircraft trim state. The framework is applied to an aircraft model based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with wing structures allowed to flexibly deformed referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The ESAC wing mass and stiffness properties are based on a baseline "stiff" values representative of current generation transport aircraft.

  4. SANS study of vortex lattice structural transition in optimally doped (Ba1-x K x )Fe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirdiş, S.; van der Beek, C. J.; Mühlbauer, S.; Su, Y.; Wolf, Th

    2016-10-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering on high quality single crystalline Ba1-x K x Fe2As2 reveals the transition from a low-field vortex solid phase with orientational order to a vortex polycrystal at high magnetic field. The vortex order-disorder transition is correlated with the second-peak feature in isothermal hysteresis loops, and is interpreted in terms of the generation of supplementary vortex solid dislocations. The sharp drop of the structure factor above the second peak field is explained by the dynamics of freezing of the vortex ensemble in the high field phase.

  5. SANS study of vortex lattice structural transition in optimally doped (Ba1-x K x )Fe2As2.

    PubMed

    Demirdiş, S; van der Beek, C J; Mühlbauer, S; Su, Y; Wolf, Th

    2016-10-26

    Small-angle neutron scattering on high quality single crystalline Ba1-x K x Fe2As2 reveals the transition from a low-field vortex solid phase with orientational order to a vortex polycrystal at high magnetic field. The vortex order-disorder transition is correlated with the second-peak feature in isothermal hysteresis loops, and is interpreted in terms of the generation of supplementary vortex solid dislocations. The sharp drop of the structure factor above the second peak field is explained by the dynamics of freezing of the vortex ensemble in the high field phase. PMID:27541966

  6. Interaction-Driven Spontaneous Quantum Hall Effect on a Kagome Lattice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Gong, Shou-Shu; Zeng, Tian-Sheng; Fu, Liang; Sheng, D N

    2016-08-26

    Topological states of matter have been widely studied as being driven by an external magnetic field, intrinsic spin-orbital coupling, or magnetic doping. Here, we unveil an interaction-driven spontaneous quantum Hall effect (a Chern insulator) emerging in an extended fermion-Hubbard model on a kagome lattice, based on a state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group on cylinder geometry and an exact diagonalization in torus geometry. We first demonstrate that the proposed model exhibits an incompressible liquid phase with doublet degenerate ground states as time-reversal partners. The explicit spontaneous time-reversal symmetry breaking is determined by emergent uniform circulating loop currents between nearest neighbors. Importantly, the fingerprint topological nature of the ground state is characterized by quantized Hall conductance. Thus, we identify the liquid phase as a quantum Hall phase, which provides a "proof-of-principle" demonstration of the interaction-driven topological phase in a topologically trivial noninteracting band. PMID:27610866

  7. Interaction-Driven Spontaneous Quantum Hall Effect on a Kagome Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gong, Shou-Shu; Zeng, Tian-Sheng; Fu, Liang; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    Topological states of matter have been widely studied as being driven by an external magnetic field, intrinsic spin-orbital coupling, or magnetic doping. Here, we unveil an interaction-driven spontaneous quantum Hall effect (a Chern insulator) emerging in an extended fermion-Hubbard model on a kagome lattice, based on a state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group on cylinder geometry and an exact diagonalization in torus geometry. We first demonstrate that the proposed model exhibits an incompressible liquid phase with doublet degenerate ground states as time-reversal partners. The explicit spontaneous time-reversal symmetry breaking is determined by emergent uniform circulating loop currents between nearest neighbors. Importantly, the fingerprint topological nature of the ground state is characterized by quantized Hall conductance. Thus, we identify the liquid phase as a quantum Hall phase, which provides a "proof-of-principle" demonstration of the interaction-driven topological phase in a topologically trivial noninteracting band.

  8. An unsteady vortex lattice method model of a horizontal axis wind turbine operating in an upstream rotor wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, D.; Graham, J. M. R.

    2014-12-01

    An unsteady formulation of the vortex lattice method, VLM, is presented that uses a force- free representation of the wake behind a horizontal axis wind turbine, HAWT, to calculate the aerodynamic loading on a turbine operating in the wake of an upstream rotor. A Cartesian velocity grid is superimposed over the computational domain to facilitate the representation of the atmospheric turbulence surrounding the turbine and wind shear. The wake of an upstream rotor is modelled using two methods: a mean velocity deficit with superimposed turbulence, based on experimental observations, and a purely numeric periodic boundary condition. Both methods are treated as frozen and propagated with the velocity grid. Measurements of the mean thrust and blade root bending moment on a three bladed horizontal axis rotor modelling a 5 MW HAWT at 1:250 scale were carried out in a wind tunnel. Comparisons are made between operation in uniform flow and in the wake of a similarly loaded rotor approximately 6.5 diameters upstream. The measurements were used to validate the output from the VLM simulations, assuming a completely rigid rotor. The trends in the simulation thrust predictions are found to compare well with the uniform flow case, except at low tip speed ratios where there are losses due to stall which are yet to be included in the model. The simple wake model predicts the mean deficit, whilst the periodic boundary condition captures more of the frequency content of the loading in an upstream wake. However, all the thrust loads are over-predicted. The simulation results severely overestimate the bending moment, which needs addressing. However, the reduction in bending due to the simple wake model is found to reflect the experimental data reasonably well.

  9. Fluctuation-driven topological transition of binary condensates in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthar, K.; Roy, Arko; Angom, D.

    2015-04-01

    We show the emergence of a third Goldstone mode in binary condensates at phase separation in quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) optical lattices. We develop the coupled discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equations using Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory with the Popov approximation in the Bose-Hubbard model to investigate the mode evolution at zero temperature, in particular, as the system is driven from the miscible to the immiscible phase. We demonstrate that the position exchange of the species in the 87Rb-85Rb system is accompanied by a discontinuity in the excitation spectrum. Our results show that, in quasi-1D optical lattices, the presence of the fluctuations dramatically changes the geometry of the ground-state density profile of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates.

  10. Stabilization of buoyancy-driven unstable vortex flow in mixed convection of air in a rectangular duct by tapering its top plate

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, W.S.; Lin, W.L.; Yin, C.P.; Lin, C.L.; Lin, T.F.

    2000-02-01

    At high buoyancy-to-inertia ratio frequently encountered in various heat transfer equipment, the buoyancy-driven secondary vortex flow in a forced laminar flow through a bottom heated rectangular duct is rather unstable. Heat transfer augmentation associated with the buoyancy-driven vortex flow is desirable and welcome in many technological applications in which the efficient energy transport is of major concern. Here, stabilization of the buoyancy-driven unstable mixed convective vortex air flow in a bottom heated rectangular duct by tapering its top plate is investigated experimentally. Specifically, the duct is tapered so that its aspect ratio at the duct inlet is 4 and gradually raised to 12 at the exit of the duct. In the study the secondary flow in the duct is visualized and the steady and transient thermal characteristics of the flow are examined by measuring the spanwise distributions of the time-average temperature. The effects of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers on the vortex flow structure are studied in detail. Moreover, the spanwise-averaged Nusselt numbers for the horizontal rectangular and tapering ducts are also measured and compared. Furthermore, the time records of the air temperature are obtained to further detect the temporal stability of the flow. Over the ranges of the Re and Gr investigated for 5 {le} Re {le} 102 and 1.0 x 10{sup 4} {le} Gr {le} 1.7 x 10{sup 5}, the vortex flow induced in the rectangular duct exhibits temporal transition from a steady laminar to time periodic and then to chaotic state at increasing buoyancy-to-inertia ratio. Substantial change in the spatial structure of the vortex flow is also noted to accompany this temporal transition. The results for the tapering duct indicate that more vortex rolls can be induced due to the increase in the aspect ratio of the duct with the axial distance. But the vortex rolls are weaker and are completely stabilized by the tapering of the top plate.

  11. Correlation-driven d -wave superconductivity in Anderson lattice model: Two gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysokiński, Marcin M.; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Spałek, Józef

    2016-07-01

    Superconductivity in heavy-fermion systems has an unconventional nature and is considered to originate from the universal features of the electronic structure. Here, the Anderson lattice model is studied by means of the full variational Gutzwiller wave function incorporating nonlocal effects of the on-site interaction. We show that the d -wave superconducting ground state can be driven solely by interelectronic correlations. The proposed microscopic mechanism leads to a multigap superconductivity with the dominant contribution due to f electrons and in the dx2-y2-wave channel. Our results rationalize several important observations for CeCoIn5.

  12. Exposing local symmetries in distorted driven lattices via time-averaged invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, T.; Morfonios, C. V.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2016-05-01

    Time-averaged two-point currents are derived and shown to be spatially invariant within domains of local translation or inversion symmetry for arbitrary time-periodic quantum systems in one dimension. These currents are shown to provide a valuable tool for detecting deformations of a spatial symmetry in static and driven lattices. In the static case the invariance of the two-point currents is related to the presence of time-reversal invariance and/or probability current conservation. The obtained insights into the wave functions are further exploited for a symmetry-based convergence check which is applicable for globally broken but locally retained potential symmetries.

  13. Current driven transition from Abrikosov-Josephson to Josephson-like vortex in mesoscopic lateral S/S’/S superconducting weak links

    PubMed Central

    Carapella, G.; Sabatino, P.; Barone, C.; Pagano, S.; Gombos, M.

    2016-01-01

    Vortices are topological defects accounting for many important effects in superconductivity, superfluidity, and magnetism. Here we address the stability of a small number of such excitations driven by strong external forces. We focus on Abrikosov-Josephson vortex that appears in lateral superconducting S/S’/S weak links with suppressed superconductivity in S’. In such a system the vortex is nucleated and confined in the narrow S’ region by means of a small magnetic field and moves under the effect of a force proportional to an applied electrical current with a velocity proportional to the measured voltage. Our numerical simulations show that when a slow moving Abrikosov-Josephson vortex is driven by a strong constant current it becomes unstable with respect to a faster moving excitation: the Josephon-like vortex. Such a current-driven transition explains the structured dissipative branches that we observe in the voltage-current curve of the weak link. When vortex matter is strongly confined phenomena as magnetoresistance oscillations and reentrance of superconductivity can possibly occur. We experimentally observe these phenomena in our weak links. PMID:27752137

  14. Driven dynamic mode-splitting of the magnetic vortex translational resonance.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, K. S.; Grimsditch, M.; Fradin, F. Y.; Bader, S. D.; Novosad, V.

    2007-12-31

    A magnetic vortex in a restricted geometry possesses a nondegenerate translational excitation that corresponds to circular motion of its core at a characteristic frequency. For 40-nm thick, micron-sized permalloy elements, we find that the translational-mode microwave absorption peak splits into two peaks that differ in frequency by up to 25% as the driving field is increased. An analysis of micromagnetic equations shows that for large driving fields two stable solutions emerge.

  15. Phase transition in the vortex liquid and the critical endpoint in YBa2Cu3Oy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kenji; Nishizaki, Terukazu; Sasaki, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Norio

    2002-12-01

    The vortex phase diagram of optimally doped untwinned YBa2Cu3Oy is studied. We find a first-order transition TL(H) in the vortex liquid above the terminal point Hmcp (≃7 T) of both the vortex glass line Tg(H) and the field-driven disordering transition line H*(T). The obtained small entropy change (˜0.02 kB/vortex/layer) and the critical endpoint Hcep (≃11 T) of the TL(H) line indicate that the vortex liquid undergoes the vortex slush regime before the solidification into the vortex glass phase. Below Hmcp, the vortex liquid phase shows the first-order melting transition into the Bragg glass phase. We also study the oxygen content y dependence of the vortex phase diagram and find that the vortex slush regime is located in the borderline (i.e., 6.90⩽y⩽6.92) below which the vortex lattice melting transition disappears. The result indicates that the point disorder with the intermediate strength plays an important role in the vortex slush regime.

  16. Competition of coarsening and shredding of clusters in a driven diffusive lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Ambarish; Chowdhury, Debashish; Schadschneider, Andreas; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2006-06-01

    We investigate a driven diffusive lattice gas model with two oppositely moving species of particle. The model is motivated by bidirectional traffic of ants on a pre-existing trail. A third species, corresponding to pheromones used by the ants for communication, is not conserved and mediates interactions between the particles. Here we study the spatio-temporal organization of the particles. In the unidirectional variant of this model it is known to be determined by the formation and coarsening of 'loose clusters'. For our bidirectional model, we show that the interaction of oppositely moving clusters is essential. In the late stages of evolution the cluster size oscillates because of a competition between their 'shredding' during encounters with oppositely moving counterparts and subsequent 'coarsening' during collision-free evolution. We also establish a nontrivial dependence of the spatio-temporal organization on the system size.

  17. Vortex Phase Diagram as a Function of Oxygen Deficiency in Untwinned YBa_2Cu_3O_y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizaki, Terukazu

    2000-03-01

    This talk will present recent results of the vortex phase diagram of untwinned YBa2Cu3Oy (YBCO) single crystals with a different oxygen content under high magnetic fields up to 30T. We show that the first-order vortex lattice melting line T_m(H) and the second-order vortex glass transition line T_g(H) terminate at the critical point H_cp and the field-driven disordering transition line separates the vortex solid phase into the Bragg glass and the vortex glass phases(T. Nishizaki et al., Phys. Rev. B 58, 11169 (1998).). The value of H_cp strongly depends on the oxygen content and the vortex lattice melting transition is observed up to 30 T for fully oxidized YBCO (y~=7, T_c~=87.5 K). For optimally doped YBCO (T_c~= 93 K), on the other hand, T_g(H) decreases with increasing temperature and approaches to the vortex lattice melting line well below the critical point of T_m(H), indicating the existence of the new vortex state such as a vortex slush regime between T_g(H) and T_m(H). Thermodynamic properties are also examined above and below the terminal point of T_g(H). We find that the entropy change at the first-order melting transition becomes considerably small above the terminal field of T_g(H). The novel vortex phase diagram is discussed.

  18. Dynamic instabilities in the vortex lattice of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, W.K.; Crabtree, G.W.; Fendrich, J.A.; Paulius, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    A dynamic instability in the ac response of the vortex solid phase just below the melting/freezing line is reported. The instability takes the form of a voltage oscillation whose frequency is much lower than the driving frequency. The dependence of the voltage oscillation on experimental parameters is described.

  19. Does vortex lattice of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.94} in H{perpendicular}c melt below intrinsic-pinning irreversibility line?

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Takekazu; Okuda, Kiichi; Asaoka, Hidehito

    1999-12-01

    Vortex lattice melting in the H{perpendicular}c configuration of an YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.94} single crystal has been investigated by means of the ac susceptibility {chi}{prime}-i{chi}{double{underscore}prime} and the magnetic torque {tau}. The melting transition of vortex lattice occurs in H{perpendicular}c, too. Since the torque curve shows a sharp peak in the irreversible torque at {theta}{sub c} {approx{underscore}equal} 90{degree} due to intrinsic pinning at lower temperatures, the authors can determine the irreversibility line for the intrinsic pinning. The melting transition in the H{perpendicular}c configuration appears at temperatures where the intrinsic-pinning peak is absent. They consider that the intrinsic pinning does not affect the nature of the vortex melting transition in the H{perpendicular}c configuration.

  20. Large-eddy simulations of 3D Taylor-Green vortex: comparison of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajzer, A.; Pozorski, J.; Szewc, K.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper we present Large-eddy simulation (LES) results of 3D Taylor- Green vortex obtained by the three different computational approaches: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM). The Smagorinsky model was chosen as a subgrid-scale closure in LES for all considered methods and a selection of spatial resolutions have been investigated. The SPH and LBM computations have been carried out with the use of the in-house codes executed on GPU and compared, for validation purposes, with the FVM results obtained using the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. A comparative study in terms of one-point statistics and turbulent energy spectra shows a good agreement of LES results for all methods. An analysis of the GPU code efficiency and implementation difficulties has been made. It is shown that both SPH and LBM may offer a significant advantage over mesh-based CFD methods.

  1. Magnetic Radial Vortex Stabilization and Efficient Manipulation Driven by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction and Spin-Transfer Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siracusano, G.; Tomasello, R.; Giordano, A.; Puliafito, V.; Azzerboni, B.; Ozatay, O.; Carpentieri, M.; Finocchio, G.

    2016-08-01

    Solitons are very promising for the design of the next generation of ultralow power devices for storage and computation. The key ingredient to achieving this goal is the fundamental understanding of their stabilization and manipulation. Here, we show how the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction (IDMI) is able to lift the energy degeneracy of a magnetic vortex state by stabilizing a topological soliton with radial chirality, hereafter called radial vortex. It has a noninteger Skyrmion number S (0.5 <|S |<1 ) due to both the vortex core polarity and the magnetization tilting induced by the IDMI boundary conditions. Micromagnetic simulations predict that a magnetoresistive memory based on the radial vortex state in both free and polarizer layers can be efficiently switched by a threshold current density smaller than 106 A /cm2 . The switching processes occur via the nucleation of topologically connected vortices and vortex-antivortex pairs, followed by spin-wave emissions due to vortex-antivortex annihilations.

  2. Characterization of oscillatory instability in lid driven cavity flows using lattice Boltzmann method

    PubMed Central

    Anupindi, Kameswararao; Lai, Weichen; Frankel, Steven

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied for simulating flow in a three-dimensional lid driven cubic and deep cavities. The developed code is first validated by simulating flow in a cubic lid driven cavity at 1000 and 12000 Reynolds numbers following which we study the effect of cavity depth on the steady-oscillatory transition Reynolds number in cavities with depth aspect ratio equal to 1, 2 and 3. Turbulence modeling is performed through large eddy simulation (LES) using the classical Smagorinsky sub-grid scale model to arrive at an optimum mesh size for all the simulations. The simulation results indicate that the first Hopf bifurcation Reynolds number correlates negatively with the cavity depth which is consistent with the observations from two-dimensional deep cavity flow data available in the literature. Cubic cavity displays a steady flow field up to a Reynolds number of 2100, a delayed anti-symmetry breaking oscillatory field at a Reynolds number of 2300, which further gets restored to a symmetry preserving oscillatory flow field at 2350. Deep cavities on the other hand only attain an anti-symmetry breaking flow field from a steady flow field upon increase of the Reynolds number in the range explored. As the present work involved performing a set of time-dependent calculations for several Reynolds numbers and cavity depths, the parallel performance of the code is evaluated a priori by running the code on up to 4096 cores. The computational time required for these runs shows a close to linear speed up over a wide range of processor counts depending on the problem size, which establishes the feasibility of performing a thorough search process such as the one presently undertaken. PMID:24587561

  3. Patterns beyond Faraday waves: observation of parametric crossover from Faraday instabilities to the formation of vortex lattices in open dual fluid strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlin, Kjell; Berggren, Karl Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Faraday first characterised the behaviour of a fluid in a container subjected to vertical periodic oscillations. His study pertaining to hydrodynamic instability, the ‘Faraday instability’, has catalysed a myriad of experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for the transition of a system at rest to a new state of well-ordered vibrational patterns at fixed frequencies. Here we study dual strata in a shallow vessel containing distilled water and high-viscosity lubrication oil on top of it. At elevated driving power, beyond the Faraday instability, the top stratum is found to ‘freeze’ into a rigid pattern with maxima and minima. At the same time there is a dynamic crossover into a new state in the form of a lattice of recirculating vortices in the lower layer containing the water. Instrumentation and the physics behind are analysed in a phenomenological way together with a basic heuristic modelling of the wave field. The study, which is based on relatively low-budget equipment, stems from related art projects that have evolved over the years. The study is of value within basic research as well as in education, especially as more advanced collective project work in e.g. engineering physics, where it invites further studies of pattern formation, the emergence of vortex lattices and complexity.

  4. THz-Driven Ultrafast Spin-Lattice Scattering in Amorphous Metallic Ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, S; Hoffmann, M C; Sher, M-J; Chen, Z; Yang, S-H; Samant, M G; Parkin, S S P; Dürr, H A

    2016-08-19

    We use single-cycle THz fields and the femtosecond magneto-optical Kerr effect to, respectively, excite and probe the magnetization dynamics in two thin-film ferromagnets with different lattice structures: crystalline Fe and amorphous CoFeB. We observe Landau-Lifshitz-torque magnetization dynamics of comparable magnitude in both systems, but only the amorphous sample shows ultrafast demagnetization caused by the spin-lattice depolarization of the THz-induced ultrafast spin current. Quantitative modeling shows that such spin-lattice scattering events occur on similar time scales than the conventional spin conserving electronic scattering (∼30  fs). This is significantly faster than optical laser-induced demagnetization. THz conductivity measurements point towards the influence of lattice disorder in amorphous CoFeB as the driving force for enhanced spin-lattice scattering. PMID:27588880

  5. THz-Driven Ultrafast Spin-Lattice Scattering in Amorphous Metallic Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, S.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Sher, M.-J.; Chen, Z.; Yang, S.-H.; Samant, M. G.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Dürr, H. A.

    2016-08-01

    We use single-cycle THz fields and the femtosecond magneto-optical Kerr effect to, respectively, excite and probe the magnetization dynamics in two thin-film ferromagnets with different lattice structures: crystalline Fe and amorphous CoFeB. We observe Landau-Lifshitz-torque magnetization dynamics of comparable magnitude in both systems, but only the amorphous sample shows ultrafast demagnetization caused by the spin-lattice depolarization of the THz-induced ultrafast spin current. Quantitative modeling shows that such spin-lattice scattering events occur on similar time scales than the conventional spin conserving electronic scattering (˜30 fs ). This is significantly faster than optical laser-induced demagnetization. THz conductivity measurements point towards the influence of lattice disorder in amorphous CoFeB as the driving force for enhanced spin-lattice scattering.

  6. Magnetic Radial Vortex Stabilization and Efficient Manipulation Driven by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction and Spin-Transfer Torque.

    PubMed

    Siracusano, G; Tomasello, R; Giordano, A; Puliafito, V; Azzerboni, B; Ozatay, O; Carpentieri, M; Finocchio, G

    2016-08-19

    Solitons are very promising for the design of the next generation of ultralow power devices for storage and computation. The key ingredient to achieving this goal is the fundamental understanding of their stabilization and manipulation. Here, we show how the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction (IDMI) is able to lift the energy degeneracy of a magnetic vortex state by stabilizing a topological soliton with radial chirality, hereafter called radial vortex. It has a noninteger Skyrmion number S (0.5<|S|<1) due to both the vortex core polarity and the magnetization tilting induced by the IDMI boundary conditions. Micromagnetic simulations predict that a magnetoresistive memory based on the radial vortex state in both free and polarizer layers can be efficiently switched by a threshold current density smaller than 10^{6}  A/cm^{2}. The switching processes occur via the nucleation of topologically connected vortices and vortex-antivortex pairs, followed by spin-wave emissions due to vortex-antivortex annihilations. PMID:27588879

  7. Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Lin, Jiayi; Darby, Ellis; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2009-07-01

    Mechanical equilibrium at zero temperature does not necessarily imply thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature for a particle confined by a static but nonconservative force field. Instead, the diffusing particle can enter into a steady state characterized by toroidal circulation in the probability flux, which we call a Brownian vortex. The circulatory bias in the particle's thermally driven trajectory is not simply a deterministic response to the solenoidal component of the force but rather reflects interplay between advection and diffusion in which thermal fluctuations extract work from the nonconservative force field. As an example of this previously unrecognized class of stochastic heat engines, we consider a colloidal sphere diffusing in a conventional optical tweezer. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that nonconservative optical forces bias the particle's fluctuations into toroidal vortexes whose circulation can reverse direction with temperature or laser power. PMID:19658638

  8. Phase transitions and connectivity in three-dimensional vortex equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Akao, J.H.

    1994-05-01

    The statistical mechanics of collections of closed self avoiding vortex loops on a lattice are studied. The system is related to the vortex form of the three dimensional XY model and to lattice vortex equilibrium models of turbulence. The system exhibits vortex connectivity and screening effects, and models in vorticity variables the superfluid transition. The equilibrium states of the system are simulated by a grand canonical Monte Carlo method. A set of geometric transformations for self-avoiding loops is developed. The numerical method employs histogram sampling techniques and utilizes a modification to the Metropolis flow which enhances efficiency. Results are given for a region in the temperature-chemical potential plane, where the chemical potential is related to the vortex fugacity. A line of second order transitions is identified at low temperature. The transition is shown to be a percolation threshold at which connected vortex loops of infinite size appear in the system. The nature of the transition supports the assumption that the lambda transition in bulk superfluid helium is driven by vortices. An asymptotic analysis is performed for the energy and entropy scaling of the system as functions of the system size and the lattice spacing. These estimates indicate that the infinite temperature line is a phase boundary between small scale fractal vortices and large scale smooth vortices. A suggestion is made that quantum vortices have uniform structure on the scale of the lattice spacing and lie in the positive temperature regime, while classical vortices have uniform structure on the scale of the domain and lie in the negative temperature regime.

  9. Switching dynamics and linear response spectra of a driven one-dimensional nonlinear lattice containing an intrinsic localized mode.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Imai, S; Fujita, N; Shi, W; Takao, Y; Sada, Y; Hubbard, B E; Ilic, B; Sievers, A J

    2013-01-01

    An intrinsic localized mode (ILM) represents a localized vibrational excitation in a nonlinear lattice. Such a mode will stay in resonance as the driver frequency is changed adiabatically until a bifurcation point is reached, at which point the ILM switches and disappears. The dynamics behind switching in such a many body system is examined here through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Linear response spectra of a driven micromechanical array containing an ILM were measured in the frequency region between two fundamentally different kinds of bifurcation points that separate the large amplitude ILM state from the two low amplitude vibrational states. Just as a natural frequency can be associated with a driven harmonic oscillator, a similar natural frequency has been found for a driven ILM via the beat frequency between it and a weak, tunable probe. This finding has been confirmed using numerical simulations. The behavior of this nonlinear natural frequency plays important but different roles as the two bifurcation points are approached. At the upper transition its frequency coalesces with the driver and the resulting bifurcation is very similar to the saddle-node bifurcation of a single driven Duffing oscillator, which is treated in an Appendix. The lower transition occurs when the four-wave mixing partner of the natural frequency of the ILM intersects the topmost extended band mode of the same symmetry. The properties of linear local modes associated with the driven ILM are also identified experimentally for the first time and numerically but play no role in these transitions. PMID:23410417

  10. Avalanche-like vortex penetration driven by pulsed microwave fields in an epitaxial LaSrCuO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadra-Solís, P.-de-J.; Hernandez, J. M.; García-Santiago, A.; Tejada, J.; Vanacken, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2013-12-01

    Different vortex penetration regimes have been registered in the output voltage signal of a magnetometer when single microwave pulses are applied to an epitaxial overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 thin film in a perpendicular dc magnetic field. The onset of a significant variation in the sample magnetization which exists below threshold values of temperature, dc magnetic field, and pulse duration is interpreted as an avalanche-type flux penetration. The microwave contribution to the background electric field suggests that the nucleation of this fast vortex motion is of electric origin, which also guarantees the occurrence of vortex instabilities under adiabatic conditions via the enhancement of the flux flow resistivity. Flux creep phenomena and heat transfer effects act as stabilizing factors against the microwave-pulse-induced fast flux diffusion.

  11. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  12. The topological quantum phase transitions in Lieb lattice driven by the Rashba SOC and exchange field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Qiao, Qian; Wang, Bin; Ding, Xiu-Huan; Zhang, Yi-Fu

    2016-09-01

    The quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect and the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in Lieb lattice are investigated in the presence of both Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and uniform exchange field. The Lieb lattice has a simple cubic symmetry, which is characterized by the single Dirac-cone per Brillouin zone and the middle flat band in the band structure. The intrinsic SOC is essentially needed to open the full energy gap in the bulk. The QSH effect could survive even in the presence of the exchange field. In terms of the first Chern number and the spin Chern number, we study the topological nature and the topological phase transition from the time-reversal symmetry broken QSH effect to the QAH effect. For Lieb lattice ribbons, the energy spectrum and the wave-function distributions are obtained numerically, where the helical edge states and the chiral edge states reveal the non-trivial topological QSH and QAH properties, respectively.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann model for Coulomb-driven flows in dielectric liquids.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kang; Wu, Jian; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we developed a unified lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) to simulate electroconvection in a dielectric liquid induced by unipolar charge injection. Instead of solving the complex set of coupled Navier-Stokes equations, the charge conservation equation, and the Poisson equation of electric potential, three consistent lattice Boltzmann equations are formulated. Numerical results are presented for both strong and weak injection regimes, and different scenarios for the onset and evolution of instability, bifurcation, and chaos are tracked. All LBM results are found to be highly consistent with the analytical solutions and other numerical work.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann model for Coulomb-driven flows in dielectric liquids.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kang; Wu, Jian; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we developed a unified lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) to simulate electroconvection in a dielectric liquid induced by unipolar charge injection. Instead of solving the complex set of coupled Navier-Stokes equations, the charge conservation equation, and the Poisson equation of electric potential, three consistent lattice Boltzmann equations are formulated. Numerical results are presented for both strong and weak injection regimes, and different scenarios for the onset and evolution of instability, bifurcation, and chaos are tracked. All LBM results are found to be highly consistent with the analytical solutions and other numerical work. PMID:26986441

  15. Boundary-field-driven control of discontinuous phase transitions on hyperbolic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yoju; Verstraete, Frank; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-08-01

    The multistate Potts models on two-dimensional hyperbolic lattices are studied with respect to various boundary effects. The free energy is numerically calculated using the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. We analyze phase transitions of the Potts models in the thermodynamic limit with respect to contracted boundary layers. A false phase transition is present even if a couple of the boundary layers are contracted. Its significance weakens, as the number of the contracted boundary layers increases, until the correct phase transition (deep inside the bulk) prevails over the false one. For this purpose, we derive a thermodynamic quantity, the so-called bulk excess free energy, which depends on the contracted boundary layers and memorizes additional boundary effects. In particular, the magnetic field is imposed on the outermost boundary layer. While the boundary magnetic field does not affect the second-order phase transition in the bulk if suppressing all the boundary effects on the hyperbolic lattices, the first-order (discontinuous) phase transition is significantly sensitive to the boundary magnetic field. Contrary to the phase transition on the Euclidean lattices, the discontinuous phase transition on the hyperbolic lattices can be continuously controlled (within a certain temperature coexistence region) by varying the boundary magnetic field.

  16. Boundary-field-driven control of discontinuous phase transitions on hyperbolic lattices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoju; Verstraete, Frank; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-08-01

    The multistate Potts models on two-dimensional hyperbolic lattices are studied with respect to various boundary effects. The free energy is numerically calculated using the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. We analyze phase transitions of the Potts models in the thermodynamic limit with respect to contracted boundary layers. A false phase transition is present even if a couple of the boundary layers are contracted. Its significance weakens, as the number of the contracted boundary layers increases, until the correct phase transition (deep inside the bulk) prevails over the false one. For this purpose, we derive a thermodynamic quantity, the so-called bulk excess free energy, which depends on the contracted boundary layers and memorizes additional boundary effects. In particular, the magnetic field is imposed on the outermost boundary layer. While the boundary magnetic field does not affect the second-order phase transition in the bulk if suppressing all the boundary effects on the hyperbolic lattices, the first-order (discontinuous) phase transition is significantly sensitive to the boundary magnetic field. Contrary to the phase transition on the Euclidean lattices, the discontinuous phase transition on the hyperbolic lattices can be continuously controlled (within a certain temperature coexistence region) by varying the boundary magnetic field. PMID:27627272

  17. Spin-Chirality-Driven Ferroelectricity on a Perfect Triangular Lattice Antiferromagnet

    DOE PAGES

    Mitamura, H.; Watanuki, R.; Kaneko, Koji; Onozaki, N.; Amou, Y.; Kittaka, S.; Kobayashi, Riki; Shimura, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Suzuki, K.; et al

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic field (B) variation of the electrical polarization Pc ( ∥c) of the perfect triangular lattice antiferromagnet RbFe(MoO4)2 is examined up to the saturation point of the magnetization for B⊥c. Pc is observed only in phases for which chirality is predicted in the in-plane magnetic structures. No strong anomaly is observed in Pc at the field at which the spin modulation along the c axis, and hence the spin helicity, exhibits a discontinuity to the commensurate state. These results indicate that the ferroelectricity in this compound originates predominantly from the spin chirality, the explanation of which would require a newmore » mechanism for magnetoferroelectricity. Lastly, the obtained field-temperature phase diagrams of ferroelectricity well agree with those theoretically predicted for the spin chirality of a Heisenberg spin triangular lattice antiferromagnet.« less

  18. Spin-Chirality-Driven Ferroelectricity on a Perfect Triangular Lattice Antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mitamura, H.; Watanuki, R.; Kaneko, Koji; Onozaki, N.; Amou, Y.; Kittaka, S.; Kobayashi, Riki; Shimura, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Suzuki, K.; Chi, Songxue; Sakakibara, T.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic field (B) variation of the electrical polarization Pc ( ∥c) of the perfect triangular lattice antiferromagnet RbFe(MoO4)2 is examined up to the saturation point of the magnetization for B⊥c. Pc is observed only in phases for which chirality is predicted in the in-plane magnetic structures. No strong anomaly is observed in Pc at the field at which the spin modulation along the c axis, and hence the spin helicity, exhibits a discontinuity to the commensurate state. These results indicate that the ferroelectricity in this compound originates predominantly from the spin chirality, the explanation of which would require a new mechanism for magnetoferroelectricity. Lastly, the obtained field-temperature phase diagrams of ferroelectricity well agree with those theoretically predicted for the spin chirality of a Heisenberg spin triangular lattice antiferromagnet.

  19. User's manual for interfacing a leading edge, vortex rollup program with two linear panel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, B. M. E.; Medan, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Sufficient instructions are provided for interfacing the Mangler-Smith, leading edge vortex rollup program with a vortex lattice (POTFAN) method and an advanced higher order, singularity linear analysis for computing the vortex effects for simple canard wing combinations.

  20. Ferroelectric phase transitions in multiferroic Ge1 -xMnxTe driven by local lattice distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegner, Dominik; Furthmüller, Jürgen; Kirchschlager, Raimund; Endres, Jan; Horak, Lukas; Cejpek, Petr; Reichlova, Helena; Marti, Xavier; Primetzhofer, Daniel; Ney, Andreas; Bauer, Günther; Bechstedt, Friedhelm; Holy, Vaclav; Springholz, Gunther

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of local ferroelectric lattice distortions in multiferroic Ge1 -xMnxTe is studied by x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory. We show that the anion/cation displacements smoothly decrease with increasing Mn content, thereby reducing the ferroelectric transition from 700 to 100 K at x =0.5 , where the ferromagnetic Curie temperature reaches its maximum. First principles calculations explain this quenching by different local bond contributions of the Mn 3 d shell compared to the Ge 4 s shell in excellent quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  1. Beyond mean-field bistability in driven-dissipative lattices: Bunching-antibunching transition and quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Arenas, J. J.; Clark, S. R.; Felicetti, S.; Romero, G.; Solano, E.; Angelakis, D. G.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work we investigate the existence of multiple nonequilibrium steady states in a coherently driven X Y lattice of dissipative two-level systems. A commonly used mean-field ansatz, in which spatial correlations are neglected, predicts a bistable behavior with a sharp shift between low- and high-density states. In contrast one-dimensional matrix product methods reveal these effects to be artifacts of the mean-field approach, with both disappearing once correlations are taken fully into account. Instead, a bunching-antibunching transition emerges. This indicates that alternative approaches should be considered for higher spatial dimensions, where classical simulations are currently infeasible. Thus we propose a circuit QED quantum simulator implementable with current technology to enable an experimental investigation of the model considered.

  2. Influence of adaptive control on vortex-driven instabilities in a scaled model of solid propellant motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthoine, J.; Mettenleiter, M.; Repellin, O.; Buchlin, J.-M.; Candel, S.

    2003-05-01

    Aeroacoustic instabilities occur in many applications of technological interest and have undesirable effects on the steady operation of the system. Passive and active means are sought to reduce the level of oscillation and eliminate the instability. In the case of segmented solid rocket motors, observations indicate that low-frequency oscillations are generated by a coupling between vortex shedding in shear regions established in the flow and the acoustic eigenmodes of the system. This process is investigated in this article on a model-scale configuration representing the geometry of the motor. An active control loop is exploited to obtain resonant and non-resonant conditions for the same operating point. Adaptive techniques are used to stabilize the flow and the experiment serves as a testbed for active control. It is shown that an adaptive system may be applied to essentially suppress the pressure oscillations. The instability mechanism is then studied by analyzing the flow field with particle image velocimetry. It is found that control noticeably modifies the mean flow structure. Detailed studies of the vortex pattern in the shedding region indicate that the concentrated vorticity and the corresponding circulation values remain in the same range but that vorticity is shed more randomly when the resonance is eliminated by the controller. This indicates that control is achieved by reducing the level of organization in the vortex pattern. Under resonant conditions the level of pressure fluctuations results from coherent interactions between vortices and the downstream nozzle. This process feeds energy in one of the acoustic modes of the system enhancing the pressure level. It is made less effective by the control loop.

  3. Monte Carlo studies of a driven lattice gas. I. Growth and asymmetry during phase segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, F.J.; Laberge, C.A.; Lebowitz, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    We investigate the effects of an external field on the kinetics of phase segregation in systems with conservative diffusive dynamics. We find that, in contrast to the situation without a field, there are now qualitative differences between the results of microscopic simulations of a 2D lattice model with biased Kawasaki exchanges and those obtained from various modifications of the macroscopic Cahn-Hilliard equation (mCH). While both microscopic simulations and numerical solutions of MCH yield triangular domains, we find that in the former the triangles mainly point opposite to the field, while in the latter and in new calculations with the mCH they point along the field. On the other hand, the rate of growth of the clusters and their final state, bands parallel to the field, are similar. This issue and the question of the mesoscopic behavior of cell dynamical systems is discussed but not resolved.

  4. Interaction-driven Lifshitz transition with dipolar fermions in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, E. G. C. P.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Chomaz, L.; Lemeshko, M.

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions between ultracold dipolar fermions break the symmetry of the Fermi surface and thereby deform it. Here we demonstrate that such a Fermi surface deformation induces a topological phase transition—the so-called Lifshitz transition—in the regime accessible to present-day experiments. We describe the impact of the Lifshitz transition on observable quantities such as the Fermi surface topology, the density-density correlation function, and the excitation spectrum of the system. The Lifshitz transition in ultracold atoms can be controlled by tuning the dipole orientation and, in contrast to the transition studied in crystalline solids, is completely interaction driven.

  5. Hierarchy of Floquet gaps and edge states for driven honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Piskunow, P. M.; Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Usaj, Gonzalo

    2015-04-01

    Electromagnetic driving in a honeycomb lattice can induce gaps and topological edge states with a structure of increasing complexity as the frequency of the driving lowers. While the high-frequency case is the most simple to analyze we focus on the multiple photon processes allowed in the low-frequency regime to unveil the hierarchy of Floquet edge states. In the case of low intensities an analytical approach allows us to derive effective Hamiltonians and address the topological character of each gap in a constructive manner. At high intensities we obtain the net number of edge states, given by the winding number, with a numerical calculation of the Chern numbers of each Floquet band. Using these methods, we find a hierarchy that resembles that of a Russian nesting doll. This hierarchy classifies the gaps and the associated edge states in different orders according to the electron-photon coupling strength. For large driving intensities, we rely on the numerical calculation of the winding number, illustrated in a map of topological phase transitions. The hierarchy unveiled with the low-energy effective Hamiltonians, along with the map of topological phase transitions, discloses the complexity of the Floquet band structure in the low-frequency regime. The proposed method for obtaining the effective Hamiltonian can be easily adapted to other Dirac Hamiltonians of two-dimensional materials and even the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator.

  6. Superconducting vortex avalanches, voltage bursts, and vortex plastic flow: Effect of the microscopic pinning landscape on the macroscopic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.J.; Reichhardt, C.; Nori, F.

    1997-09-01

    Using large-scale simulations on parallel processors, we analyze in detail the dynamical behavior of superconducting vortices undergoing avalanches. In particular, we quantify the effect of the pinning landscape on the macroscopic properties of vortex avalanches and vortex plastic flow. These dynamical instabilities are triggered when the external magnetic field is increased slightly, and are thus driven by a flux gradient rather than by thermal effects. The flux profiles, composed of rigid flux lines that interact with 100 or more vortices, are maintained in the Bean critical state and do not decay away from it. By directly determining vortex positions during avalanches in the plastically moving lattice, we find that experimentally observable voltage bursts correspond to the pulsing movement of vortices along branched channels or winding chains in a manner reminiscent of lightning strikes. This kind of motion cannot be described by elastic theories. We relate the velocity field and cumulative patterns of vortex flow channels with statistical quantities, such as distributions of avalanche sizes. Samples with a high density of strong pinning sites produce very broad avalanche distributions. Easy-flow vortex channels appear in samples with a low pinning density, and typical avalanche sizes emerge in an otherwise broad distribution of sizes. We observe a crossover from interstitial motion in narrow channels to pin-to-pin motion in broad channels as pin density is increased. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Ultracold fermions in a one-dimensional bipartite optical lattice: Metal-insulator transitions driven by shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Liberto, M.; Malpetti, D.; Japaridze, G. I.; Morais Smith, C.

    2014-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the behavior of a system of fermionic atoms loaded in a bipartite one-dimensional optical lattice that is under the action of an external time-periodic driving force. By using Floquet theory, an effective model is derived. The bare hopping coefficients are renormalized by zeroth-order Bessel functions of the first kind with different arguments for the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor hopping. The insulating behavior characterizing the system at half filling in the absence of driving is dynamically suppressed, and for particular values of the driving parameter the system becomes either a standard metal or an unconventional metal with four Fermi points. The existence of the four-Fermi-point metal relies on the fact that, as a consequence of the shaking procedure, the next-nearest-neighbor hopping coefficients become significant compared to the nearest-neighbor ones. We use the bosonization technique to investigate the effect of on-site Hubbard interactions on the four-Fermi-point metal-insulator phase transition. Attractive interactions are expected to enlarge the regime of parameters where the unconventional metallic phase arises, whereas repulsive interactions reduce it. This metallic phase is known to be a Luther-Emery liquid (spin-gapped metal) for both repulsive and attractive interactions, contrary to the usual Hubbard model, which exhibits a Mott-insulator phase for repulsive interactions. Ultracold fermions in driven one-dimensional bipartite optical lattices provide an interesting platform for the realization of this long-studied four-Fermi-point unconventional metal.

  8. Interaction-Driven Topological Insulator in Fermionic Cold Atoms on an Optical Lattice: A Design with a Density Functional Formalism.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Sota; Tsuji, Naoto; Aoki, Hideo

    2015-07-24

    We design an interaction-driven topological insulator for fermionic cold atoms in an optical lattice; that is, we pose the question of whether we can realize in a continuous space a spontaneous symmetry breaking induced by the interatom interaction into a topological Chern insulator. Such a state, sometimes called a "topological Mott insulator," has yet to be realized in solid-state systems, since this requires, in the tight-binding model, large off-site interactions on top of a small on-site interaction. Here, we overcome the difficulty by introducing a spin-dependent potential, where a spin-selective occupation of fermions in A and B sublattices makes the on-site interaction Pauli forbidden, while a sizeable intersite interaction is achieved by a shallow optical potential with a large overlap between neighboring Wannier orbitals. This puts the system away from the tight-binding model, so that we adopt density functional theory for cold atoms, here extended to accommodate noncollinear spin structures emerging in the topological regime, to quantitatively demonstrate the phase transition to the topological Mott insulator.

  9. Interaction-driven fractional quantum Hall state of hard-core bosons on kagome lattice at one-third filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, D. N.; Gong, S. S.; Zhu, W.

    There has been a growing interest in realizing topologically nontrivial states of matter in band insulators, where a quantum Hall effect can appear as an intrinsic property of the band structure. While the on-going progress is under way with a number of directions, the possibility of realizing novel interaction-generated topological phases, without the requirement of a nontrivial invariant encoded in single-particle wavefunction or band structure, can significantly extend the class of topological materials and is thus of great importance. Here, we show an interaction-driven topological phase emerging in an extended Bose-Hubbard model on kagome lattice, where the non-interacting band structure is topological trivial with zero Berry curvature in the Brillouin zone. By means of an unbiased state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group technique, we identify that the groundstate in a broad parameter region is equivalent to a bosonic fractional quantum Hall Laughlin state, based on the characterization of unverisal properties including groundstate degeneracy, edge excitations and anyonic quasiparticle statistics. Our work paves a way of finding interaction induced topological phase at the phase boundary of conventionally ordered solid phases. This research is supported by the DOE Grants No. DE-FG02-06ER46305, and the NSF Grant No. DMR-1408560.

  10. Interaction-driven fractional quantum Hall state of hard-core bosons on kagome lattice at one-third filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gong, S. S.; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-07-01

    There has been a growing interest in realizing topologically nontrivial states of matter in band insulators, where a quantum Hall effect can appear as an intrinsic property of the band structure. While ongoing progress is under way with a number of directions, the possibility of realizing novel interaction-generated topological phases, without the requirement of a nontrivial invariant encoded in single-particle wave function or band structure, can significantly extend the class of topological materials and is thus of great importance. Here, we show an interaction-driven topological phase emerging in an extended Bose-Hubbard model on a kagome lattice, where the noninteracting band structure is topological trivial with zero Berry curvature in the Brillouin zone. By means of an unbiased state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group technique, we identify that the ground state in a broad parameter region is equivalent to a bosonic fractional quantum Hall Laughlin state, based on the characterization of universal properties including ground-state degeneracy, edge excitations, and anyonic quasiparticle statistics. Our work paves a way to finding an interaction-induced topological phase at the phase boundary of conventionally ordered solid phases.

  11. First-Order Vortex-Lattice Melting Transition in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{ital {minus}{delta}}} near the Critical Temperature Detected by Magnetic Torque

    SciTech Connect

    Willemin, M.; Schilling, A.; Keller, H.; Hofer, J.; Rossel, C.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W.K.; Olsson, R.J.; Crabtree, G.W.

    1998-11-01

    High-resolution magnetic-torque studies on an untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu {sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} single crystal near its critical temperature T{sub c} reveal that the first-order vortex-lattice melting transition (VLMT) persists at least up to 0.5thinspthinspK below T{sub c} . The associated sharp discontinuity in magnetization is detectable even at temperatures where the torque signal deviates from mean-field behavior due to fluctuations. The magnetic irreversibility at the VLMT can be suppressed by applying a weak transverse ac magnetic field. This offers the possibility of separating the irreversibility line from the melting line near T{sub c} . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  12. Vortex dynamics and scalar transport in the wake of a bluff body driven through a steady recirculating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poussou, Stephane B.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-09-01

    The air ventilation system in wide-body aircraft cabins provides passengers with a healthy breathing environment. In recent years, the increase in global air traffic has amplified contamination risks by airborne flu-like diseases and terrorist threats involving the onboard release of noxious materials. In particular, passengers moving through a ventilated cabin may transport infectious pathogens in their wake. This paper presents an experimental investigation of the wake produced by a bluff body driven through a steady recirculating flow. Data were obtained in a water facility using particle image velocimetry and planar laser induced fluorescence. Ventilation attenuated the downward convection of counter-rotating vortices produced near the free-end corners of the body and decoupled the downwash mechanism from forward entrainment, creating stagnant contaminant regions.

  13. Vulcanized vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Inyong; Lee, Youngone

    2009-01-15

    We investigate vortex configurations with the 'vulcanization' term inspired by the renormalization of {phi}{sub *}{sup 4} theory in the canonical {theta}-deformed noncommutativity. We focus on the classical limit of the theory described by a single parameter which is the ratio of the vulcanization and the noncommutativity parameters. We perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  14. Vulcanized vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Inyong; Lee, Youngone

    2009-01-01

    We investigate vortex configurations with the “vulcanization” term inspired by the renormalization of ϕ⋆4 theory in the canonical θ-deformed noncommutativity. We focus on the classical limit of the theory described by a single parameter which is the ratio of the vulcanization and the noncommutativity parameters. We perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  15. Static property and current-driven precession of 2π-vortex in nano-disk with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xianyin; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zhang, Senfu; Liu, Qingfang E-mail: wangjb@lzu.edu.cn; Wang, Jianbo E-mail: wangjb@lzu.edu.cn

    2015-08-15

    An interesting type of skyrmion-like spin texture, 2π-vortex, is obtained in a thin nano-disk with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. We have simulated the existence of 2π-vortex by micromagnetic method. Furthermore, the spin polarized current is introduced in order to drive the motion of 2π-vortex in a nano-disk with diameter 2 R = 140 nm. When the current density matches with the current injection area, 2π-vortex soon reaches a stable precession (3∼4 ns). The relationship between the precession frequency of 2π-vortex and the current density is almost linear. It may have potential use in spin torque nano-oscillators.

  16. Experimental Study of Vortex Dynamics during Blade-Vortex Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Di; Gregory, James

    2013-11-01

    Vortices incident upon bodies, such as cylinders, airfoils, and rotor blades, can give rise to substantial unsteady loading, sound generation, and vibration in a variety of engineering applications. A comprehensive study on vortex dynamics during blade-vortex interaction (BVI) is performed in this work. Evidence has been found in previous studies that the vortex behavior during BVI varies with Reynolds number, but the effects are not clear. In the current study, the experiments are performed in a 3' × 5' low speed wind tunnel where the Reynolds number can be varied from 6 × 104 to 8 × 105 by adjusting freestream speed and airfoil size. The vortex is generated by the pitching motion of a wing, which is driven by an air cylinder. Another wing is placed downstream to initiate parallel interactions with the generated vortices. Smoke visualization is used originally to characterize the vortex. Then the BVI problem is studied in detail using time-resolved PIV and unsteady pressure measurements on the downstream target airfoil. The vortex behaviors at selected Reynolds numbers are investigated. The influence of other factors on vortex behavior, such as vortex strength and core size, is also discussed.

  17. Minimal model for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Grier, David G; Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2010-08-01

    A Brownian vortex is a noise-driven machine that uses thermal fluctuations to extract a steady-state flow of work from a static force field. Its operation is characterized by loops in a probability current whose topology and direction can change with changes in temperature. We present discrete three- and four-state minimal models for Brownian vortexes that can be solved exactly with a master-equation formalism. These models elucidate conditions required for flux reversal in Brownian vortexes and provide insights into their thermodynamic efficiency through the rate of entropy production. PMID:20866791

  18. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Mixed Convection Heat Transfer in a Driven Cavity with Non-uniform Heating of the Bottom Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soufiene, Bettaibi; Ezeddine, Sediki; Frédéric, Kuznik; Sauro, Succi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to study numerically the mixed convection in a differentially heated lid-driven cavity with non-uniform heating of the bottom wall. The velocity field is solved by a hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time Lattice Boltzmann (MRT-LBM) model, while the temperature field is obtained by resolution of the energy balance equation using the finite difference method (FDM). First, the model is checked and validated using data from the literature. Validation of the present results with those available in the literature shows a good agreement. A good efficiency in time simulation is confirmed. Thereafter, the model has been applied to mixed convection in a driven cavity with non-uniform heating wall at the fixed Grashof number Gr = 106. It is found that, the heat transfer is weakened as the Richardson number is augmented. For Gr = 106, we note the appearance of secondary vortices at different positions of the cavity corners.

  19. Vortex dynamics during blade-vortex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Di; Gregory, James W.

    2015-05-01

    Vortex dynamics during parallel blade-vortex interactions (BVIs) were investigated in a subsonic wind tunnel using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Vortices were generated by applying a rapid pitch-up motion to an airfoil through a pneumatic system, and the subsequent interactions with a downstream, unloaded target airfoil were studied. The blade-vortex interactions may be classified into three categories in terms of vortex behavior: close interaction, very close interaction, and collision. For each type of interaction, the vortex trajectory and strength variation were obtained from phase-averaged PIV data. The PIV results revealed the mechanisms of vortex decay and the effects of several key parameters on vortex dynamics, including separation distance (h/c), Reynolds number, and vortex sense. Generally, BVI has two main stages: interaction between vortex and leading edge (vortex-LE interaction) and interaction between vortex and boundary layer (vortex-BL interaction). Vortex-LE interaction, with its small separation distance, is dominated by inviscid decay of vortex strength due to pressure gradients near the leading edge. Therefore, the decay rate is determined by separation distance and vortex strength, but it is relatively insensitive to Reynolds number. Vortex-LE interaction will become a viscous-type interaction if there is enough separation distance. Vortex-BL interaction is inherently dominated by viscous effects, so the decay rate is dependent on Reynolds number. Vortex sense also has great impact on vortex-BL interaction because it changes the velocity field and shear stress near the surface.

  20. Vortex structure and dynamics in kagome and triangular pinning potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, M. F.; Balseiro, C. A.; Dominguez, D.; Nori, Franco

    2001-09-01

    We study the dynamics of thermally driven superconducting vortices in two types of periodic pinning potentials: kagome and triangular. For the first, second, and third matching fields, we obtain the corresponding ground-state vortex configurations and their phase diagrams. We analyze the system properties by looking at the vortex trajectories and the structure factor, as well as the linear and angular diffusion. The temperature versus pinning force phase diagram is analyzed in detail for each matching field. When the temperature is varied, we observe several stages of lattice pinning and melting. In most of the cases we find, for decreasing temperature, first a pinning of vortices and afterwards a freezing transition of the interstitial vortices. The intermediate regime corresponds to interstitial vortices in a confined liquidlike state and pinned vortices. The kagome pinning potential shows interesting behavior at low temperatures: there is a phase with rotating vortex triangles caged by kagome hexagons (''cooperative ring elementary excitations''), and there is geometric frustration for T{yields}0 with a nearly degenerate ground state.

  1. Vortex methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chorin, A.J. |

    1993-06-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible inviscid flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus, if the vorticity is known at time t=0, one can find the flow at a later time by simply following the vorticity. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that follows vorticity. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (blobs) and those whose analysis contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Blob methods started in the 1930`s.

  2. Spectroscopy of magnetic excitations in magnetic superconductors using vortex motion.

    PubMed

    Bulaevskii, L N; Hruska, M; Maley, M P

    2005-11-11

    In magnetic superconductors a moving vortex lattice is accompanied by an ac magnetic field which leads to the generation of spin waves. At resonance conditions the dynamics of vortices in magnetic superconductors changes drastically, resulting in strong peaks in the dc I-V characteristics at voltages at which the washboard frequency of the vortex lattice matches the spin wave frequency omegaS(g), where g are the reciprocal vortex lattice vectors. We show that if the washboard frequency lies above the magnetic gap, measurement of the I-V characteristics provides a new method to obtain information on the spectrum of magnetic excitations in borocarbides and cuprate layered magnetic superconductors.

  3. Speed limit to the Abrikosov lattice in mesoscopic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, G.; Leo, A.; Sabatino, P.; Carapella, G.; Nigro, A.; Pace, S.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Silhanek, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    We study the instability of the superconducting state in a mesoscopic geometry for the low pinning material Mo3Ge characterized by a large Ginzburg-Landau parameter. We observe that in the current-driven switching to the normal state from a nonlinear region of the Abrikosov flux flow, the mean critical vortex velocity reaches a limiting maximum velocity as a function of the applied magnetic field. Based on time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations, we argue that the observed behavior is due to the high-velocity vortex dynamics confined on a mesoscopic scale. We build up a general phase diagram which includes all possible dynamic configurations of the Abrikosov lattice in a mesoscopic superconductor.

  4. Leapfrogging of multiple coaxial viscous vortex rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M. Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2015-03-15

    A recent theoretical study [Borisov, Kilin, and Mamaev, “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging, choreographies and the stability problem,” Regular Chaotic Dyn. 18, 33 (2013); Borisov et al., “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging in an ideal and viscous fluid,” Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 031415 (2014)] shows that when three coaxial vortex rings travel in the same direction in an incompressible ideal fluid, each of the vortex rings alternately slips through (or leapfrogs) the other two ahead. Here, we use a lattice Boltzmann method to simulate viscous vortex rings with an identical initial circulation, radius, and separation distance with the aim of studying how viscous effect influences the outcomes of the leapfrogging process. For the case of two identical vortex rings, our computation shows that leapfrogging can be achieved only under certain favorable conditions, which depend on Reynolds number, vortex core size, and initial separation distance between the two rings. For the case of three coaxial vortex rings, the result differs from the inviscid model and shows that the second vortex ring always slips through the leading ring first, followed by the third ring slipping through the other two ahead. A simple physical model is proposed to explain the observed behavior.

  5. Experimental observation of the bifurcation dynamics of an intrinsic localized mode in a driven 1D nonlinear lattice.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Imai, S; Fujita, N; Nishimura, S; Takao, Y; Sada, Y; Hubbard, B E; Ilic, B; Sievers, A J

    2011-12-01

    Linear response spectra of a driven intrinsic localized mode in a micromechanical array are measured as it approaches two fundamentally different kinds of bifurcation points. A linear phase mode associated with this autoresonant state softens in frequency and its amplitude grows as the upper frequency bifurcation point is approached, similar to the soft-mode kinetic transition for a single driven Duffing resonator. A lower frequency bifurcation point occurs when the four-wave-mixing partner of this same phase mode intercepts the top of the extended wave branch, initiating a second kinetic transition process. PMID:22182091

  6. Arctic Vortex

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-06-26

    ... within the cloud layer downwind of the obstacle. These turbulence patterns are known as von Karman vortex streets. In these images ... was the first to derive the conditions under which these turbulence patterns occur. von Karman was a professor of aeronautics at the ...

  7. Effective Hamiltonians for Rapidly Driven Many-Body Lattice Systems: Induced Exchange Interactions and Density-Dependent Hoppings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, A. P.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2015-08-01

    We consider 1D lattices described by Hubbard or Bose-Hubbard models, in the presence of periodic high-frequency perturbations, such as uniform ac force or modulation of hopping coefficients. Effective Hamiltonians for interacting particles are derived using an averaging method resembling classical canonical perturbation theory. As is known, a high-frequency force may renormalize hopping coefficients, causing interesting phenomena such as coherent destruction of tunneling and creation of artificial gauge fields. We find explicitly additional corrections to the effective Hamiltonians due to interactions, corresponding to nontrivial processes such as single-particle density-dependent tunneling, correlated pair hoppings, nearest neighbor interactions, etc. Some of these processes arise also in multiband lattice models, and are capable of giving rise to a rich variety of quantum phases. The apparent contradiction with other methods, e.g., Floquet-Magnus expansion, is explained. The results may be useful for designing effective Hamiltonian models in experiments with ultracold atoms, as well as in the field of ultrafast nonequilibrium magnetism. An example of manipulating exchange interaction in a Mott-Hubbard insulator is considered, where our corrections play an essential role.

  8. Optimum lattice arrangement developed from a rigorous analytical basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1976-01-01

    The spanwise vortex-lattice arrangement is mathematically established by lattice solutions of the slender wing which are shown to be analogous to the chordwise vortex-lattice thin wing solution. Solutions for any number N of panels wing theory lift and induced drag and thin wing theory lift and moment are predicted exactly. As N approaches infinity, the slender wing elliptic spanwise loading and thin wing cotangent chordwise loading are predicted, which proves there is mathematical convergence of the vortex-lattice method to the exact answer. Based on this planform spanwise lattice arrangement, an A-vortex-lattice spanwise system is developed for an arbitrary aspect ratio A. This A-lattice has the optimum characteristic of predicting lift accurately for any value of N.

  9. Flucutation driven selection at crticality: the case of multi-k partial order on the pyrochlore lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhihao; Javanparast, Behnam; Enjalran, Matthew; Gingras, Michel

    2014-03-01

    We study the problem of partially ordered phases with periodically arranged disordered sites on the pyrochlore lattice. The periodicity of the phases is characterized by one or more wave vectors k = {1/21/21/2 } . Starting from a general microscopic Hamiltonian including anisotropic nearest-neighbor exchange, long-range dipolar interactions and second- and third-nearest neighbor exchange, we identify using standard mean-field theory (s-MFT) an extended range of interaction parameters that support partially ordered phases. We demonstrate that thermal fluctuations beyond s-MFT are responsible for the selection of one particular partially ordered phase, e.g. the ``4- k'' phase over the ``1- k'' phase. We suggest that the transition into the 4- k phase is continuous with its critical properties controlled by the cubic fixed point of a Ginzburg-Landau theory with a 4-component vector order-parameter. By combining an extension of the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer method originally used to study fluctuations in spin glasses with parallel-tempering Monte-Carlo simulations, we establish the phase diagram for different types of partially ordered phases. Our result reveals the origin of 4- k phase observed bellow 1K in Gd2Ti2O7. Funded by NSERC of Canada. M. G. acknowledge funding from Canadian Research Chair program (Tier 1).

  10. Lattice Boltzmann method and channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensholt, Sigvat; Mongstad Hope, Sigmund

    2016-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann methods are presented at an introductory level with a focus on fairly simple simulations that can be used to test and illustrate the model’s capabilities. Two scenarios are presented. The first is a simple laminar flow in a straight channel driven by a pressure gradient (Poiseuille flow). The second is a more complex, including a wedge where Moffatt vortices may be induced if the wedge is deep enough. Simulations of the Poiseuille flow scenario accurately capture the theoretical velocity profile. The experiment shows the location of the fluid-wall boundary and the effects viscosity has on the velocity and convergence time. The numerical capabilities of the lattice Boltzmann model are tested further by simulating the more complex Moffatt vortex scenario. The method reproduces with high accuracy the theoretical predction that Moffat vortices will not form in a wedge if the vertex angle exceeds 146°. Practical issues limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method are discussed. In particular the accuracy of the bounce-back boundary condition is first order dependent on the grid resolution.

  11. Experimental studies on coaxial vortex loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, R.; Kontis, K.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on the formation and propagation of coaxial vortex loops using a shock tube facility. The study aimed at evaluating the flow characteristics of pairs of corotating vortex rings that generate the leapfrogging phenomenon. The driver and driven gas of the shock tube were air. Three driver pressures were used (4, 8, and 12 bars) with the driven gas being at ambient conditions. The Mach numbers of the shock wave generated inside the shock tube were 1.34, 1.54, and 1.66, respectively. The sudden expansion present at the diaphragm location effectively decreased the Mach number value of the traveling shock wave. Results showed that a pair of vortex rings staggered with respect to time and with the same direction rotation lead to leapfrogging. Results also indicated that the number of leapfrogging occurrences is related to the Reynolds number of the vortex ring pairs with a decrease in leapfrogs at higher Reynolds numbers.

  12. Mean flow development of a longitudinal vortex embedded in an attached, three-dimensional, turbulent boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shizawa, T.; Eaton, J.K.

    1990-12-31

    The interaction of a longitudinal vortex with a pressure-driven, three dimensional turbulent boundary layer was investigated experimentally. The vortex was attenuated much more rapidly in the three dimensional layer than in a two-dimensional boundary layer. The persistence for the vortex-induced perturbation was strongly dependent on the sign of the vortex.

  13. Vortex dynamics in cubic-quintic Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithun, T.; Porsezian, K.; Dey, Bishwajyoti

    2013-07-01

    We study vortex dynamics in a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate with tunable two- and three-body interactions. The dynamics is governed by two-dimensional cubic-quintic Gross-Pitaevskii equation. A time-dependent variational method has been used to obtain critical rotational frequency and surface mode frequency analytically and are compared with numerical simulation results. An imaginary time propagation method and Crank-Nicolson scheme for discretization have been used for numerical simulation. The numerically calculated average value of the angular momentum per particle shows very clearly its dynamical relation with the time development of the vortex formation. The rotational frequency dependence of the variation of average value of the angular momentum per particle with time shows that vortices form much faster in time for higher rotational frequency. Similarly, the vortex forms much faster in time with an increase of the strength of the repulsive three-body interaction. The simulation of the vortex lattice formation in the condensate shows that the presence of the three-body interactions does not alter the vortex lattice pattern but it helps in the shape deformations of the condensate thereby leading to vortex lattice formation. Likewise, the three-body interactions enable the vortex lattice formation in Bose-Einstein condensates even with attractive two-body interactions and in purely quintic BEC.

  14. Density-dependent synthetic magnetism for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greschner, Sebastian; Huerga, Daniel; Sun, Gaoyong; Poletti, Dario; Santos, Luis

    2015-09-01

    Raman-assisted hopping can allow for the creation of density-dependent synthetic magnetism for cold neutral gases in optical lattices. We show that the density-dependent fields lead to a nontrivial interplay between density modulations and chirality. This interplay results in a rich physics for atoms in two-leg ladders, characterized by a density-driven Meissner-superfluid to vortex-superfluid transition, and a nontrivial dependence of the density imbalance between the legs. Density-dependent fields also lead to intriguing physics in square lattices. In particular, it leads to a density-driven transition between a nonchiral and a chiral superfluid, both characterized by nontrivial charge density-wave amplitude. We finally show how the physics due to the density-dependent fields may be easily probed in experiments by monitoring the expansion of doublons and holes in a Mott insulator, which presents a remarkable dependence on quantum fluctuations.

  15. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F. (Editor); Osborn, R. F. (Editor); Foughner, J. T., Jr. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  16. Finite vortex numbers and symmetric vortex structures in a rotating trapped Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, T. L.; Ma, Y. L.

    2011-08-01

    The ground state of a three-dimensional (3D) rotating trapped superfluid Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover is mapped to finite N v -body vortex states by a simple ansatz. The total vortex energy is measured from the ground-state energy of the system in the absence of the vortices. The vortex state is stable since the vortex potential and rotation energies are attractive while the vortex kinetic energy and interaction between vortices are repulsive. By combining the analytical and numerical works for the minimal vortex energy, the 2D configurations of N v vortices are studied by taking into account of the finite size effects both on xy-plane and on z-direction. The calculated vortex numbers as a function of the interaction strength are appropriate to the renew experimental results by Zwierlein in [ High-temperature superfluidity in a ultracold Fermi gas, Ph.D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2006]. The numerical results show that there exist two types of vortex structures: the trap center is occupied and unoccupied by a vortex, even in the case of N v < 10 with regular polygon and in the case of N v ≥ 10 with finite triangle lattice. The rotation frequency dependent vortex numbers with different interaction strengths are also discussed.

  17. Lattice duality for the compact Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieberer, L. M.; Wachtel, G.; Altman, E.; Diehl, S.

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive theory of the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in two-dimensional superfluids in thermal equilibrium can be developed within a dual representation which maps vortices in the superfluid to charges in a Coulomb gas. In this framework, the dissociation of vortex-antivortex pairs at the critical temperature corresponds to the formation of a plasma of free charges. The physics of vortex unbinding in driven-dissipative systems such as fluids of light, on the other hand, is much less understood. Here, we make a crucial step to fill this gap by deriving a transformation that maps the compact Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation, which describes the dynamics of the phase of a driven-dissipative condensate, to a dual electrodynamic theory. The latter is formulated in terms of modified Maxwell equations for the electromagnetic fields and a diffusion equation for the charges representing vortices in the KPZ equation. This mapping utilizes an adaption of the Villain approximation to a generalized Martin-Siggia-Rose functional integral representation of the compact KPZ equation on a lattice.

  18. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    A Sadovskii vortex is a patch of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. Using a boundary element type method, we investigate the steady states of this flow in an incompressible, inviscid straining flow. Outside the vortex, the fluid is irrotational. In the limiting case where the entire circulation is due to the vortex patch, this is a patch vortex (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971). In the other limiting case, where all the circulation is due to the vortex sheet, this is a hollow vortex (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691, 2012). This flow has two governing nondimensional parameters, relating the strengths of the straining field, vortex sheet, and patch vorticity. We study the relationship between these two parameters, and examine the shape of the resulting vortices. We also work towards a bifurcation diagram of the steady states of the Sadovskii vortex in an attempt to understand the connection between vortex sheet and vortex patch desingularizations of the point vortex. Support from NSF-CMMI-0970113.

  19. Quantum vortex dynamics in two-dimensional neutral superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-C. Joseph; Duine, R. A.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2010-01-15

    We derive an effective action for the vortex-position degree of freedom in a superfluid by integrating out condensate phase- and density-fluctuation environmental modes. When the quantum dynamics of environmental fluctuations is neglected, we confirm the occurrence of the vortex Magnus force and obtain an expression for the vortex mass. We find that this adiabatic approximation is valid only when the superfluid droplet radius R, or the typical distance between vortices, is very much larger than the coherence length xi. We go beyond the adiabatic approximation numerically, accounting for the quantum dynamics of environmental modes and capturing their dissipative coupling to condensate dynamics. For the case of an optical-lattice superfluid, we demonstrate that vortex motion damping can be adjusted by tuning the ratio between the tunneling energy J and the on-site interaction energy U. We comment on the possibility of realizing vortex-Landau-level physics.

  20. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificial magnetic nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Velez, M.; Martin, J. I.; Villegas, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Vicent, J. L.; Schuller, I. K.; Univ. de Oviedo-CINN; Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS Univ. Paris-Sud; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Univ. California at San Diego

    2008-11-01

    This review is dedicated to summarizing the recent research on vortex dynamics and pinning effects in superconducting films with artificial magnetic structures. The fabrication of hybrid superconducting/magnetic systems is presented together with the wide variety of properties that arise from the interaction between the superconducting vortex lattice and the artificial magnetic nanostructures. Specifically, we review the role that the most important parameters in the vortex dynamics of films with regular array of dots play. In particular, we discuss the phenomena that appear when the symmetry of a regular dot array is distorted from regularity towards complete disorder including rectangular, asymmetric, and aperiodic arrays. The interesting phenomena that appear include vortex-lattice reconfigurations, anisotropic dynamics, channeling, and guided motion as well as ratchet effects. The different regimes are summarized in a phase diagram indicating the transitions that take place as the characteristic distances of the array are modified respect to the superconducting coherence length. Future directions are sketched out indicating the vast open area of research in this field.

  1. Three-dimensional vortex structures in a rotating dipolar Bose–Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishor Kumar, Ramavarmaraja; Sriraman, Thangarasu; Fabrelli, Henrique; Muruganandam, Paulsamy; Gammal, Arnaldo

    2016-08-01

    We study three-dimensional vortex lattice structures in purely dipolar Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC). By using the mean-field approximation, we obtain a stability diagram for the vortex states in purely dipolar BECs as a function of harmonic trap aspect ratio (λ) and dipole–dipole interaction strength (D) under rotation. Rotating the condensate within the unstable region leads to collapse while in the stable region furnishes stable vortex lattices of dipolar BECs. We analyse stable vortex lattice structures by solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Gross–Pitaevskii equation in imaginary time. Further, the stability of vortex states is examined by evolution in real-time. We also investigate the distribution of vortices in a fully anisotropic trap by increasing eccentricity of the external trapping potential. We observe the breaking up of the condensate in two parts with an equal number of vortices on each when the trap is sufficiently weak, and the rotation frequency is high.

  2. Some observations on vortex-ring collisions upon inclined surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New, T. H.; Shi, Shengxian; Zang, B.

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports upon a laser-induced fluorescence visualization and time-resolved particle image velocimetry study to resolve the detailed dynamics associated with Re = 2000 and 4000 circular vortex rings colliding with 30°-75° inclined surfaces. Two-dimensional visualization results show that larger inclination angles lead to increasingly rapid size reduction in the primary vortex-ring core closer to the surface, faster formation of the secondary vortex-ring core, and subsequent ingestion by the former. In contrast, primary vortex-ring core further away from the surface becomes physically larger and incoherent more rapidly, with slower formation and entrainment of the secondary vortex-ring core. Interestingly, a vortex dipole and small vortex-ring-like structure are produced for the largest inclination angle of 75°, possibly due to vortex disconnection and reconnection processes. Results taken along the non-inclined plane show significant bulging of the primary vortex-ring cores when the inclination angle increases from 30° onwards. More importantly, additional vortex cores are observed to entwine with the primary vortex-ring core and provide strong direct evidence for the bi-helical vortex line flow mechanism put forward by Lim (Exp Fluids 7:453-463, 1989). Lastly, the behaviour of the primary and secondary vortex-ring cores further away from the surface is highly sensitive towards the state of the bi-helical lines compressed at that region. Strong compression driven by circumferential flows due to large inclination angles may explain the unique flow structures and behaviour observed for 75° inclination angle here.

  3. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Sadovskii vortices are patches of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. They were first constructed as models for wakes behind bluff objects. We investigate the Sadovskii vortex in a straining field and examine limiting cases to validate our computational method. One limit is the patch vortex in strain (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971), where there is no vortex sheet. We solve this as a free-boundary problem, and show that a simple method using the Biot-Savart law quickly gives solutions for stable shapes. When used for the more elongated (stronger straining field) situations, the method also leads to new vortex shapes. In the hollow vortex case, where there is no vortex patch and the circulation is entirely due to the vortex sheet (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691 2012), we use the Birkhoff-Rott equation to calculate the velocity of the fluid on the vortex boundary. The combination of these two methods can then be used to calculate the shape and velocity field of the Sadovksii vortex in strain.

  4. Transfer and storage of vortex states in light and matter waves.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Zachary; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2004-11-01

    We theoretically explore the transfer of vortex states between atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and optical pulses using ultraslow and stopped light techniques. We find shining a coupling laser on a rotating two-component ground state condensate with a vortex lattice generates a probe laser field with optical vortices. We also find that optical vortex states can be robustly stored in the atomic superfluids for times, in Rb-87 condensates, limited only by the ground state coherence time.

  5. Vortex gyroscope imaging of planar superfluids.

    PubMed

    Powis, A T; Sammut, S J; Simula, T P

    2014-10-17

    We propose a robust imaging technique that makes it possible to distinguish vortices from antivortices in quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates from a single image of the density of the atoms. Tilting the planar condensate prior to standard absorption imaging excites a generalized gyroscopic mode of the condensate, revealing the sign and location of each vortex. This technique is anticipated to enable experimental measurement of the incompressible kinetic energy spectrum of the condensate and the observation of a negative-temperature phase transition of the vortex gas, driven by two-dimensional superfluid turbulence.

  6. Physical Realization of von Neumann Lattices in Rotating Bose Gases with Dipole Interatomic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Jheng, Shih-Da

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a novel type of vortex lattice, referred to as a bubble crystal, which was discovered in rapidly rotating Bose gases with long-range interactions. Bubble crystals differ from vortex lattices which possess a single quantum flux per unit cell, while atoms in bubble crystals are clustered periodically and surrounded by vortices. No existing model is able to describe the vortex structure of bubble crystals; however, we identified a mathematical lattice, which is a subset of coherent states and exists periodically in the physical space. This lattice is called a von Neumann lattice, and when it possesses a single vortex per unit cell, it presents the same geometrical structure as an Abrikosov lattice. In this report, we extend the von Neumann lattice to one with an integral number of flux quanta per unit cell and demonstrate that von Neumann lattices well reproduce the translational properties of bubble crystals. Numerical simulations confirm that, as a generalized vortex, a von Neumann lattice can be physically realized using vortex lattices in rapidly rotating Bose gases with dipole interatomic interactions.

  7. Physical Realization of von Neumann Lattices in Rotating Bose Gases with Dipole Interatomic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Jheng, Shih-Da

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a novel type of vortex lattice, referred to as a bubble crystal, which was discovered in rapidly rotating Bose gases with long-range interactions. Bubble crystals differ from vortex lattices which possess a single quantum flux per unit cell, while atoms in bubble crystals are clustered periodically and surrounded by vortices. No existing model is able to describe the vortex structure of bubble crystals; however, we identified a mathematical lattice, which is a subset of coherent states and exists periodically in the physical space. This lattice is called a von Neumann lattice, and when it possesses a single vortex per unit cell, it presents the same geometrical structure as an Abrikosov lattice. In this report, we extend the von Neumann lattice to one with an integral number of flux quanta per unit cell and demonstrate that von Neumann lattices well reproduce the translational properties of bubble crystals. Numerical simulations confirm that, as a generalized vortex, a von Neumann lattice can be physically realized using vortex lattices in rapidly rotating Bose gases with dipole interatomic interactions. PMID:27545446

  8. Physical Realization of von Neumann Lattices in Rotating Bose Gases with Dipole Interatomic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Jheng, Shih-Da

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a novel type of vortex lattice, referred to as a bubble crystal, which was discovered in rapidly rotating Bose gases with long-range interactions. Bubble crystals differ from vortex lattices which possess a single quantum flux per unit cell, while atoms in bubble crystals are clustered periodically and surrounded by vortices. No existing model is able to describe the vortex structure of bubble crystals; however, we identified a mathematical lattice, which is a subset of coherent states and exists periodically in the physical space. This lattice is called a von Neumann lattice, and when it possesses a single vortex per unit cell, it presents the same geometrical structure as an Abrikosov lattice. In this report, we extend the von Neumann lattice to one with an integral number of flux quanta per unit cell and demonstrate that von Neumann lattices well reproduce the translational properties of bubble crystals. Numerical simulations confirm that, as a generalized vortex, a von Neumann lattice can be physically realized using vortex lattices in rapidly rotating Bose gases with dipole interatomic interactions. PMID:27545446

  9. Superfluid-Mott transitions and vortices in the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard lattices with time-reversal-symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, A. L. C.; Martin, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the ground-state behavior of Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard lattices in the presence of a synthetic magnetic field, via a Gutzwiller ansatz. Specifically, we study the superfluid-Mott transition and the formation of vortex lattices in the superfluid regime. We find a suppression of the superfluid fraction due to the frustration induced by the incommensurate magnetic and spacial lattice lengths. We also predict the formation of triangular vortex lattices inside the superfluid regime.

  10. Vortex structures of rotating spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiangfa; Zhou Jing; Wu Congjun

    2011-12-15

    We consider the quasi-two-dimensional two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling in a rotating trap. The rotation angular velocity couples to the mechanical angular momentum, which contains a noncanonical part arising from SO coupling. The effects of an external Zeeman term favoring spin polarization along the radial direction is also considered, which has the same form as the noncanonical part of the mechanical angular momentum. The rotating condensate exhibits a variety of rich structures by varying the strengths of the trapping potential and interaction. With a strong trapping potential, the condensate exhibits a half-quantum vortex-lattice configuration. Such a configuration is driven to the normal one by introducing the external radial Zeeman field. In the case of a weak trap potential, the condensate exhibits a multidomain pattern of plane-wave states under the external radial Zeeman field.

  11. Vortex generation in oscillatory canopy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisalberti, Marco; Schlosser, Tamara

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time the generation of coherent vortices at the top of a canopy in oscillatory (i.e., wave-dominated) flow. Through a series of flow visualization experiments, vortex formation is shown to occur when two conditions described by the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) and Reynolds (Re) numbers are met. First, the wave period must be sufficiently long to allow the generation of the shear-driven instability at the top of the canopy; this occurs when KC ≳ 5. Second, the vortex instability must be able to overcome the stabilizing effects of viscosity; this occurs when Re ≳ 1000. The vortices greatly increase the rate of vertical mixing within the canopy, such that any prediction of residence time in a coastal canopy requires an understanding of whether vortex generation is occurring.

  12. Deflection of a Reflected Intense Vortex Laser Beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Huang, Shan; Shi, Yin; Liu, Chen; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Pei, Zhikun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    An interesting deflection effect deviating the optical reflection law is revealed in the relativistic regime of intense vortex laser plasma interaction. When an intense vortex laser obliquely impinges onto an overdense plasma target, the reflected beam deflects out of the plane of incidence with an experimentally observable deflection angle. The mechanism is demonstrated by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation as well as analytical modeling using the Maxwell stress tensor. The deflection results from the rotational symmetry breaking of the foil driven by the unsymmetrical shear stress of the vortex beam. The l-dependent shear stress, where l is the topological charge, as an intrinsic characteristic to the vortex beam, plays an important role as the ponderomotive force in relativistic vortex laser matter interaction. PMID:27661689

  13. Vortex dynamics and Hall conductivity of hard-core bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Netanel; Auerbach, Assa; Arovas, Daniel P.

    2010-10-01

    Magnetotransport of hard-core bosons is studied using an XXZ quantum spin model representation, appropriately gauged on the torus to allow for an external magnetic field. We find strong lattice effects near half filling. An effective quantum mechanical description of the vortex degrees of freedom is derived. Using semiclassical and numerical analysis we compute the vortex-hopping energy t{sub V}, which at half filling is close to magnitude of the boson hopping energy. The critical quantum melting density of the vortex lattice is estimated at 6.5x10{sup -3} vortices per unit cell. The Hall conductance is computed from the Chern numbers of the low-energy eigenstates. At zero temperature, it reverses sign abruptly at half filling. At precisely half filling, all eigenstates are doubly degenerate for any odd number of flux quanta. We prove the exact degeneracies on the torus by constructing an SU(2) algebra of point-group symmetries, associated with the center of vorticity. This result is interpreted as if each vortex carries an internal spin-half degree of freedom, which can manifest itself as a charge density modulation in its core. Our findings suggest interesting experimental implications for vortex motion of cold atoms in optical lattices and magnet transport of short coherence length superconductors.

  14. Quantum phases, supersolids and quantum phase transitions of interacting bosons in frustrated lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jinwu; Chen, Yan

    2013-04-01

    By using the dual vortex method (DVM), we develop systematically a simple and effective scheme to use the vortex degree of freedoms on dual lattices to characterize the symmetry breaking patterns of the boson insulating states in the direct lattices. Then we apply our scheme to study quantum phases and phase transitions in an extended boson Hubbard model slightly away from 1/3 (2/3) filling on frustrated lattices such as triangular and Kagome lattice. In a triangular lattice at 1/3, we find a X-CDW, a stripe CDW phase which was found previously by a density operator formalism (DOF). Most importantly, we also find a new CDW-VB phase which has both local CDW and local VB orders, in sharp contrast to a bubble CDW phase found previously by the DOF. In the Kagome lattice at 1/3, we find a VBS phase and a 6-fold CDW phase. Most importantly, we also identify a CDW-VB phase which has both local CDW and local VB orders which was found in previous QMC simulations. We also study several other phases which are not found by the DVM. By analyzing carefully the saddle point structures of the dual gauge fields in the translational symmetry breaking sides and pushing the effective actions slightly away from the commensurate filling f=1/3(2/3), we classified all the possible types of supersolids and analyze their stability conditions. In a triangular lattice, there are X-CDW supersolid, stripe CDW supersolid, but absence of any valence bond supersolid (VB-SS). There are also a new kind of supersolid: CDW-VB supersolid. In a Kagome lattice, there are 6-fold CDW supersolid, stripe CDW supersolid, but absence of any valence bond supersolid (VB-SS). There are also a new kind of supersolid: CDW-VB supersolid. We show that independent of the types of the SS, the quantum phase transitions from solids to supersolids driven by a chemical potential are in the same universality class as that from a Mott insulator to a superfluid, therefore have exact exponents z=2, ν=1/2, η=0 (with

  15. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  16. Scientist Examines Tornado Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this Quick Time movie, a scientist examines what appears to be a tornado vortex (blue) coming out of a thunderstorm. The scientist uses 3D glasses to be able to see in 3 dimensions the different flows going out into the vortex. Earth science and weather studies are an important ongoing function of NASA and its affiliates.

  17. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Scahill, John W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  18. Vortex shedding by matched asymptotic vortex method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinjun; Mandre, Shreyas

    2014-11-01

    An extension of the Kutta condition, using matched asymptotic expansion applied to the Navier-Stokes equations, is presented for flow past a smooth body at high Reynolds number. The goal is to study the influence of unsteady fluid dynamical effects like leading edge vortex, unsteady boundary layer separation, etc. In order to capture accurately the location and strength of vortex shedding, the simplified Navier-Stokes equations in the form of boundary layer approximation are solved in the thin inner region close to the solid body. In the outer region far from the structure, the vortex methods are applied, which significantly reduces the computational cost compared to CFD in the whole domain. With this method, the flow past an airfoil with two degrees of freedom, pitching and heaving, is investigated.

  19. Formation of Small-Scale Vortex Rings from Vortex Pairs Close to the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, Charles

    2013-11-01

    In this research, we examine the effect of a solid boundary on the dynamics and instabilities of a pair of counter-rotating vortices. An isolated vortex pair is subject to a short-wave elliptic instability and a long-wave Crow (1970) instability. Near a wall, the boundary layer between the primary vortices and the wall can separate, leading to the generation of secondary vorticity. These secondary vortices can be subject to small-scale instabilities (Harris & Williamson, 2012) as they come under the influence of the primary vortices. In contrast, in the present study we are interested in the long-wave Crow instability interrupted by interaction with a wall. This can cause significant axial flow, resulting in a periodic concentration of fluid containing vorticity at the peaks of each wavy vortex tube and a corresponding evacuation of fluid containing vorticity from the troughs. It appears that this axial flow is driven at least in part by the formation of vortex ring-like structures in the secondary vortex as it is deformed by the primary vortex. Furthermore, additional small scale-vortex rings evolve from the secondary vorticity and from the concentrated vortical regions in the primary vorticity. In both cases, these rings cause vorticity to rebound away from the ground.

  20. Disordered vortex phases in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Olsson, R. J.; Karapetrov, G.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A.; Tobos, V.; Moulton, W. G.

    2000-05-22

    The disordered vortex phases induced by line and point pinning in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are explored. At high defect densities there is a single disordered solid separated from the liquid phase by a melting line. At low defect densities the topology of the phase diagram changes dramatically, with a vortex lattice phase adjoining disordered phases at high or low field. Critical points at the termination of first order melting separate the lattice and disordered phases. The line defect disordered phases follow the expected Bose glass behavior, while the point defect disordered phases do not exhibit the expected vortex glass behavior.

  1. Pinning-modulated non-collective Josephson-vortex motion in stacked Josephson junctions.

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Y.-D.; Lee, G.-H.; Lee, H.-J.; Bae, M.-H.; Koshelev, A. E.; Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology; Univ. of Illinois

    2009-01-01

    Josephson vortices in naturally stacked Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} tunneling junctions display rich dynamic behavior that derives from the coexistence of three basic states: static Josephson vortex lattice, coherently moving lattice, and incoherent quasiparticle tunneling state. The rich structure of hysteretic branches observed in the current-voltage characteristics can be understood as combinatorial combinations of these three states which are realized in different junctions and evolve separately with magnetic field and bias current. In particular, the multiple Josephson vortex flow branches at low-bias currents arise from the individual depinning of Josephson vortex rows in each junction.

  2. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  3. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  4. Method and apparatus for enhancing vortex pinning by conformal crystal arrays

    DOEpatents

    Janko, Boldizsar; Reichhardt, Cynthia; Reichhardt, Charles; Ray, Dipanjan

    2015-07-14

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for strongly enhancing vortex pinning by conformal crystal arrays. The conformal crystal array is constructed by a conformal transformation of a hexagonal lattice, producing a non-uniform structure with a gradient where the local six-fold coordination of the pinning sites is preserved, and with an arching effect. The conformal pinning arrays produce significantly enhanced vortex pinning over a much wider range of field than that found for other vortex pinning geometries with an equivalent number of vortex pinning sites, such as random, square, and triangular.

  5. VORSTAB: A computer program for calculating lateral-directional stability derivatives with vortex flow effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward

    1985-01-01

    A computer program based on the Quasi-Vortex-Lattice Method of Lan is presented for calculating longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of nonplanar wing-body combination. The method is based on the assumption of inviscid subsonic flow. Both attached and vortex-separated flows are treated. For the vortex-separated flow, the calculation is based on the method of suction analogy. The effect of vortex breakdown is accounted for by an empirical method. A summary of the theoretical method, program capabilities, input format, output variables and program job control set-up are described. Three test cases are presented as guides for potential users of the code.

  6. Composite vortex beams by coaxial superposition of Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sujuan; Miao, Zhuang; He, Chao; Pang, Fufei; Li, Yingchun; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-03-01

    We propose the generation of novel composite vortex beams by coaxial superposition of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams with common waist position and waist parameter. Computer-generated holography by conjugate-symmetric extension is applied to produce the holograms of several composite vortex beams. Utilizing the holograms, fantastic light modes including optical ring lattice, double dark-ring and double bright-ring composite vortex beams etc. are numerically reconstructed. The generated composite vortex beams show diffraction broadening with some of them showing dynamic rotation around beam centers while propagating. Optical experiments based on a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) verify the numerical results. These novel composite vortex beams possess more complicated distribution and more controllable parameters for their potential application in comparison to conventional optical ring lattice.

  7. Vortex Rings in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamri, Sultan Z.; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2008-11-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of large-scale vortex rings in superfluid helium. These large-scale vortex rings consists of many discrete (quantized) vortex filaments which interact with each other moving according to the Biot-Savart law. Lifetime, structural stability and speed of large-scale vortex rings will be discussed and compared to experimental results.

  8. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  9. Driving an individual vortex in the presence of a periodic pinning array

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated experimentally that it is possible to manipulate an individual vortex in a type-II superconductor using a magnetic force microscope tip. Using numerical simulations, we investigate the dynamics of a single driven individual vortex in the presence of a periodic pinning array and other vortices. Remarkably, we find that the effective drag on the driven vortex is reduced at the matching fields, which is opposite from the behavior of the critical current when all the vortices are driven. We discuss this effect in the context of the type of dynamics that occur at matching and nonmatching fields.

  10. Influence of Initial Vorticity Distribution on Axisymmetric Vortex Breakdown and Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    An analytical treatment has been developed to study some of the axisymmetric vortex breakdown and reconnection fluid dynamic processes underlying body-vortex interactions that are frequently manifested in rotorcraft and propeller-driven fixed-wing aircraft wakes. In particular, the presence of negative vorticity in the inner core of a vortex filament (one example of which is examined in this paper) subsequent to "cutting" by a solid body has a profound influence on the vortex reconnection, leading to analog flow behavior similar to vortex breakdown phenomena described in the literature. Initial vorticity distributions (three specific examples which are examined) without an inner core of negative vorticity do not exhibit vortex breakdown and instead manifest diffusion-like properties while undergoing vortex reconnection. Though this work focuses on laminar vortical flow, this work is anticipated to provide valuable insight into rotary-wing aerodynamics as well as other types of vortical flow phenomena.

  11. Universal statistics of vortex lines.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Adam; Chalker, J T

    2012-03-01

    We study the vortex lines that are a feature of many random or disordered three-dimensional systems. These show universal statistical properties on long length scales, and geometrical phase transitions analogous to percolation transitions but in distinct universality classes. The field theories for these problems have not previously been identified, so that while many numerical studies have been performed, a framework for interpreting the results has been lacking. We provide such a framework with mappings to simple supersymmetric models. Our main focus is on vortices in short-range-correlated complex fields, which show a geometrical phase transition that we argue is described by the CP(k|k) model (essentially the CP(n-1) model in the replica limit n→1). This can be seen by mapping a lattice version of the problem to a lattice gauge theory. A related field theory with a noncompact gauge field, the 'NCCP(k|k) model', is a supersymmetric extension of the standard dual theory for the XY transition, and we show that XY duality gives another way to understand the appearance of field theories of this type. The supersymmetric descriptions yield results relevant, for example, to vortices in the XY model and in superfluids, to optical vortices, and to certain models of cosmic strings. A distinct but related field theory, the RP(2l|2l) model (or the RP(n-1) model in the limit n→1) describes the unoriented vortices that occur, for instance, in nematic liquid crystals. Finally, we show that in two dimensions, a lattice gauge theory analogous to that discussed in three dimensions gives a simple way to see the known relation between two-dimensional percolation and the CP(k|k) σ model with a θ term.

  12. Universal statistics of vortex lines.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Adam; Chalker, J T

    2012-03-01

    We study the vortex lines that are a feature of many random or disordered three-dimensional systems. These show universal statistical properties on long length scales, and geometrical phase transitions analogous to percolation transitions but in distinct universality classes. The field theories for these problems have not previously been identified, so that while many numerical studies have been performed, a framework for interpreting the results has been lacking. We provide such a framework with mappings to simple supersymmetric models. Our main focus is on vortices in short-range-correlated complex fields, which show a geometrical phase transition that we argue is described by the CP(k|k) model (essentially the CP(n-1) model in the replica limit n→1). This can be seen by mapping a lattice version of the problem to a lattice gauge theory. A related field theory with a noncompact gauge field, the 'NCCP(k|k) model', is a supersymmetric extension of the standard dual theory for the XY transition, and we show that XY duality gives another way to understand the appearance of field theories of this type. The supersymmetric descriptions yield results relevant, for example, to vortices in the XY model and in superfluids, to optical vortices, and to certain models of cosmic strings. A distinct but related field theory, the RP(2l|2l) model (or the RP(n-1) model in the limit n→1) describes the unoriented vortices that occur, for instance, in nematic liquid crystals. Finally, we show that in two dimensions, a lattice gauge theory analogous to that discussed in three dimensions gives a simple way to see the known relation between two-dimensional percolation and the CP(k|k) σ model with a θ term. PMID:22587072

  13. NASA wake vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Greene, George C.; Stewart, Eric C.; Stuever, Robert A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Rivers, Robert A.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA is conducting research that will enable safe improvements in the capacity of the nation's air transportation system. The wake-vortex hazard is a factor in establishing the minimum safe spacing between aircraft during landing and takeoff operations and, thus, impacts airport capacity. The ability to accurately model the wake hazard and determine safe separation distances for a wide range of aircraft and operational scenarios may provide the basis for significant increases in airport capacity. Current and planned NASA research is described which is focused on increasing airport capacity by safely reducing wake-hazard-imposed aircraft separations through advances in a number of technologies including vortex motion and decay prediction, vortex encounter modeling, wake-vortex hazard characterization, and in situ flow sensing.

  14. Vortex/surface interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodstein, G. C. R.; George, A. R.; Hui, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a vortex generated upstream in a flow field with a downstream aerodynamic surface that possesses a large chord. The flow is assumed to be steady, incompressible, inviscid and irrotational, and the surface to be semiinfinite. The vortex is considered to be a straight vortex filament. To lowest order the problem is modeled using potential theory, where the 3D Laplace's equation for the velocity potential on the surface is solved exactly. The closed-form equation for pressure distribution obtained from this theory is found to have a square root singularity at the leading-edge. It also converges, as x goes to infinity, to the solution of the 2D point-vortex/infinite plane problem. The pressure coefficient presents an anti-symmetric behavior, near the leading-edge and a symmetric behavior as x goes to infinity.

  15. Vortex flow hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the hysteresis associated with various vortex flow transition points and to determine the effect of planform geometry. The transition points observed consisted of the appearance (or disappearance) of trailing edge vortex burst and the transition to (or from) flat plate or totally separated flows. Flow visualization with smoke injected into the vortices was used to identify the transitions on a series of semi-span models tested in a low speed tunnel. The planforms tested included simple deltas (55 deg to 80 deg sweep), cranked wings with varying tip panel sweep and dihedral, and a straked wing. High speed movies at 1000 frames per second were made of the vortex flow visualization in order to better understand the dynamics of vortex flow, burst and transition.

  16. The singing vortex

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, R.; Pennings, P.; Bosschers, J.; van Terwisga, T.

    2015-01-01

    Marine propellers display several forms of cavitation. Of these, propeller-tip vortex cavitation is one of the important factors in propeller design. The dynamic behaviour of the tip vortex is responsible for hull vibration and noise. Thus, cavitation in the vortices trailing from tips of propeller blades has been studied extensively. Under certain circumstances cavitating vortices have been observed to have wave-like disturbances on the surfaces of vapour cores. Intense sound at discrete frequencies can result from a coupling between tip vortex disturbances and oscillating sheet cavitation on the surfaces of the propeller blades. This research article focuses on the dynamics of vortex cavitation and more in particular on the energy and frequency content of the radiated pressures. PMID:26442147

  17. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  18. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  19. Glory, Vortex Street off Baja California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On June 19, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured both a vortex street and a glory visible amid the lattice of clouds over the Pacific Ocean off Baja California. In this image, the swirling clouds known as vortex streets appear along the left edge of the image, stretching southward from Isla Guadalupe. Another NASA satellite captured an earlier example of vortex streets in June 2000. These atmospheric vortices, known as Von Karman vortex streets, often occur in the wake of an obstacle to air flow, such as an island. Stratocumulus clouds--low-lying, sheets of puffy clouds-- over the ocean show the impact of the island on air flow visible though their alternating pattern of clockwise and counter-clockwise swirls. Southeast of the vortex street, a glory, which resembles a rainbow, hovers above the cloud cover. The glory is faint but large, 200 to 300 kilometers long, along a north-south orientation. This phenomenon can occur when the satellite passes directly between the Sun and a bank of clouds below. (People also observe them while looking down on clouds from airplanes.) Not just any kind of cloud can produce a glory; only clouds composed entirely of water droplets (as opposed to ice crystals) can make them. The droplets that form glories generally have diameters of less than 50 micrometers (a micrometers is a millionth of a meter). The water droplets bend the light, showing its different wavelengths, or colors. In this glory, reds and oranges are most visible. NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center.

  20. Superradiance Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Ren-Bao; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the timed Dicke states of a collection of three-level atoms can form a tight-binding lattice in momentum space. This lattice, coined the superradiance lattice (SL), can be constructed based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). For a one-dimensional SL, we need the coupling field of the EIT system to be a standing wave. The detuning between the two components of the standing wave introduces an effective uniform force in momentum space. The quantum lattice dynamics, such as Bloch oscillations, Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch band collapsing, and dynamic localization can be observed in the SL. The two-dimensional SL provides a flexible platform for Dirac physics in graphene. The SL can be extended to three and higher dimensions where no analogous real space lattices exist with new physics waiting to be explored.

  1. Theory of lattice response to external magnetic field in SrCu2(BO3)2: magnetostriction driven by panthograph effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saul, Andres; Radtke, Guillaume; Jaime, Marcelo; Salamon, Myron; Dabkowska, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Recent magnetostriction experiments have shown that the macroscopic physical dimensions of the Shastry-Sutherland compound SrCu2(BO3)2 change with the applied magnetic field mimicking the same complex behavior observed in the magnetization. Using Density Functional based methods we find that the driving force behind the magnetoelastic coupling is the Cu-O-Cu superexchange angle which, thanks to the orthogonal Cu2+ dimers acting as pantographs, can shrink significantly (0.44%) with minute (0.01%) variations in the lattice parameters. The consequence is a reduction of the order of ~10% in the antiferromagnetic intra-dimer exchange integral J, sufficient to compensate the elastic energy loss in the deformation.

  2. Defect pair in the elastic lattice of pancake vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Slutzky, M.; Mints, R.G.; Brandt, E.H.

    1997-07-01

    An additional pancake-antipancake vortex pair is considered in the vortex lattice of layered superconductors. Within linear elastic continuum theory, the relaxation of the background lattice screens the long-range logarithmic interaction of the defect pair, reducing the factor ln(r{sub 0}/{xi}) to ln(a/{xi}) where r{sub 0} is the pair spacing, {xi} the in-plane coherence length, and a the vortex spacing. The finite tilt modulus does not destroy this ideal two-dimensional screening, yielding a small correction {approximately}(a{sup 2}/8{pi}{lambda}{sup 2})ln(r{sub 0}/a), which in principle is of long range, but has a very small prefactor when the vortex spacing a is smaller than the in-plane penetration depth {lambda}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Magnetic Vortex Induced by Nonmagnetic Impurity in Frustrated Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Batista, Cristian D.

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity inserted in a two-dimensional frustrated ferromagnet above its saturation magnetic field Hsat for arbitrary spin S . We demonstrate that the ground state includes a magnetic vortex that is nucleated around the impurity over a finite range of magnetic field Hsat≤H ≤HsatI. Upon approaching the quantum critical point at H =Hsat, the radius of the magnetic vortex diverges as the magnetic correlation length: ξ ∝1 /√{H -Hsat }. These results are derived both for the lattice and in the continuum limit.

  4. Magnetic Vortex Induced by Nonmagnetic Impurity in Frustrated Magnets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Batista, Cristian D

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity inserted in a two-dimensional frustrated ferromagnet above its saturation magnetic field H_{sat} for arbitrary spin S. We demonstrate that the ground state includes a magnetic vortex that is nucleated around the impurity over a finite range of magnetic field H_{sat}≤H≤H_{sat}^{I}. Upon approaching the quantum critical point at H=H_{sat}, the radius of the magnetic vortex diverges as the magnetic correlation length: ξ∝1/sqrt[H-H_{sat}]. These results are derived both for the lattice and in the continuum limit. PMID:27203342

  5. Vortex Solutions of the Defocusing Discrete Nonlinear Schroedinger Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Cuevas, J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Law, K. J. H.

    2009-09-09

    We consider the existence, stability and dynamical evolution of dark vortex states in the two-dimensional defocusing DNLS equation, a model of interest both to atomic physics and to nonlinear optics. Our considerations are chiefly based on initializing such vortex configurations at the anti-continuum limit of zero coupling between adjacent sites, and continuing them to finite values of the coupling. Discrete defocusing vortices become unstable past a critical coupling strength and, subsequently feature a cascade of alternating stabilization-destabilization windows for any finite lattice.

  6. Dual vortex theory of doped Mott insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Balents, Leon; Sachdev, Subir

    2007-11-15

    We present a general framework for describing the quantum phases obtained by doping paramagnetic Mott insulators on the square lattice. The undoped insulators are efficiently characterized by the projective transformations of various fields under the square lattice space group (the PSG). We show that the PSG also imposes powerful constraints on the doped system, and on the effective action for the vortex and Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of superconducting states. This action can also be extended across transitions to supersolid or insulating states at non-zero doping. For the case of a valence bond solid (VBS) insulator, we show that the doped system has the same PSG as that of elementary bosons with density equal to the density of electron Cooper pairs. We also discuss aspects of the action for a d-wave superconductor obtained by doping a 'staggered-flux' spin liquid state.

  7. Point-vortex approach in two-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, B. N.; Schep, T. J.

    2016-05-01

    The properties of two-dimensional turbulence in a circular domain are investigated within the framework of the punctuated point-vortex model. Vortex dynamics is governed by Hamiltonian equations, and it is interrupted by instantaneous events resulting in vortex merging. Motion of about 100 point vortices is simulated using an accurate, symplectic integration method. Ensembles of like-sign vortices relax to a quasi-lattice state. Vortices with zero total vorticity tend to be randomized. Their motion still does not become fully chaotic. We observe emergence of long lived large dipoles (co-propagating pairs of vortices with opposite signs), which affect the evolution of the whole vortex ensemble. The presence of such dipoles accelerate the vortex decay rate. The decay exponent has been estimated as ξ ≃ 1.7, which is much larger than ξ ≃ 0.7, reported in previous studies of decaying turbulence. Since dipole dynamics depends on specific properties of the point vortex system, our findings suggest that a universal decay exponent in such systems does not exist.

  8. Vortex Apparatus and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerin, Said

    2010-05-01

    Vortex flow, from millimeter to kilometer in scale, is important in many scientific and technological areas. Examples are seen in water strider locomotion, from industrial pipe flow (wastewater treatment) to air traffic control (safe distance between aircrafts on a runway ready for takeoff) to atmospheric studies.2-5 In this paper, we focus on a particular vortex known as bathtub vortex (BTV). It occurs when water is drained from a hole at the bottom of a container such as a bathtub or a sink under the action of gravity. The vortex has a funnel shape with a central air core, resembling a tornado. We have designed a portable apparatus to demonstrate bathtub vortex on a continual basis. The apparatus consists of a clear cylinder supported by a frame over a water reservoir and a submersible pump. Young and old have been equally amazed by watching the demonstrations at various public presentations held at the University of the Pacific recently. With material cost of less than 100, the apparatus can be easily fabricated and used at other universities. With a short set-up time, it is an ideal device for promoting science to the general public, and it can be used to enhance lectures in physics courses as well.

  9. The giant dipole vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoldus, Henk F.; Li, Xin; Xu, Zhangjin

    2016-06-01

    The field lines of energy flow of radiation emitted by an oscillating electric dipole in free space are either straight lines (linear dipole) or they form a vortex (rotating dipole). When the dipole is embedded in a material, the properties of the medium affect the direction of energy flow. Damping due to the imaginary part of the relative permittivity ? makes the field lines curve for the case of a linear dipole, and for a rotating dipole, the shape of the vortex is altered. In addition, a negative value of the real part of ? has the effect that the rotation direction of the vortex reverses for the case of a rotating dipole. The value of the relative permeability ? has in general not much effect on the redistribution of the direction of energy propagation. We show that a dramatic effect occurs when the embedding material is near-single-negative (both ? and ? approximately real, and the real parts of opposite sign). The curving of field lines is in general a sub-wavelength phenomenon. For near-single-negative materials, however, this curving extends over large distances from the dipole. In particular, the small free-space vortex of a rotating dipole becomes a vortex of enormous dimensions when the radiation is emitted into a near-single-negative material.

  10. Fluctuation-Driven Selection at Criticality in a Frustrated Magnetic System: The Case of Multiple-k Partial Order on the Pyrochlore Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanparast, Behnam; Hao, Zhihao; Enjalran, Matthew; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2015-04-01

    We study the problem of partially ordered phases with periodically arranged disordered (paramagnetic) sites on the pyrochlore lattice, a network of corner-sharing tetrahedra. The periodicity of these phases is characterized by one or more wave vectors k ={1/2 1/2 1/2 } . Starting from a general microscopic Hamiltonian including anisotropic nearest-neighbor exchange, long-range dipolar interactions, and second- and third-nearest neighbor exchange, we use standard mean-field theory (SMFT) to identify an extended range of interaction parameters that support partially ordered phases. We demonstrate that thermal fluctuations ignored in SMFT are responsible for the selection of one particular partially ordered phase, e.g., the "4 -k " phase over the "1 -k " phase. We suggest that the transition into the 4 -k phase is continuous with its critical properties controlled by the cubic fixed point of a Ginzburg-Landau theory with a four-component vector order parameter. By combining an extension of the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer method originally used to study fluctuations in spin glasses with parallel-tempering Monte Carlo simulations, we establish the phase diagram for different types of partially ordered phases. Our results elucidate the long-standing puzzle concerning the origin of the 4 -k partially ordered phase observed in the Gd2Ti2O7 dipolar pyrochlore antiferromagnet below its paramagnetic phase transition temperature.

  11. Fluctuation-driven selection at criticality in a frustrated magnetic system: the case of multiple-k partial order on the pyrochlore lattice.

    PubMed

    Javanparast, Behnam; Hao, Zhihao; Enjalran, Matthew; Gingras, Michel J P

    2015-04-01

    We study the problem of partially ordered phases with periodically arranged disordered (paramagnetic) sites on the pyrochlore lattice, a network of corner-sharing tetrahedra. The periodicity of these phases is characterized by one or more wave vectors k={1/21/21/2}. Starting from a general microscopic Hamiltonian including anisotropic nearest-neighbor exchange, long-range dipolar interactions, and second- and third-nearest neighbor exchange, we use standard mean-field theory (SMFT) to identify an extended range of interaction parameters that support partially ordered phases. We demonstrate that thermal fluctuations ignored in SMFT are responsible for the selection of one particular partially ordered phase, e.g., the "4-k" phase over the "1-k" phase. We suggest that the transition into the 4-k phase is continuous with its critical properties controlled by the cubic fixed point of a Ginzburg-Landau theory with a four-component vector order parameter. By combining an extension of the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer method originally used to study fluctuations in spin glasses with parallel-tempering Monte Carlo simulations, we establish the phase diagram for different types of partially ordered phases. Our results elucidate the long-standing puzzle concerning the origin of the 4-k partially ordered phase observed in the Gd2Ti2O7 dipolar pyrochlore antiferromagnet below its paramagnetic phase transition temperature.

  12. Critical behavior at a dynamic vortex insulator-to-metal transition.

    PubMed

    Poccia, Nicola; Baturina, Tatyana I; Coneri, Francesco; Molenaar, Cor G; Wang, X Renshaw; Bianconi, Ginestra; Brinkman, Alexander; Hilgenkamp, Hans; Golubov, Alexander A; Vinokur, Valerii M

    2015-09-11

    An array of superconducting islands placed on a normal metal film offers a tunable realization of nanopatterned superconductivity. This system enables investigation of the nature of competing vortex states and phase transitions between them. A square array creates the eggcrate potential in which magnetic field-induced vortices are frozen into a vortex insulator. We observed a vortex insulator-vortex metal transition driven by the applied electric current and determined critical exponents that coincided with those for thermodynamic liquid-gas transition. Our findings offer a comprehensive description of dynamic critical behavior and establish a deep connection between equilibrium and nonequilibrium phase transitions. PMID:26359398

  13. Force Evaluation in the Lattice Boltzmann Method Involving Curved Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Yu, Dazhi; Shyy, Wei; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The present work investigates two approaches for force evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann equation: the momentum- exchange method and the stress-integration method on the surface of a body. The boundary condition for the particle distribution functions on curved geometries is handled with second order accuracy based on our recent works. The stress-integration method is computationally laborious for two-dimensional flows and in general difficult to implement for three-dimensional flows, while the momentum-exchange method is reliable, accurate, and easy to implement for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows. Several test cases are selected to evaluate the present methods, including: (i) two-dimensional pressure-driven channel flow; (ii) two-dimensional uniform flow past a column of cylinders; (iii) two-dimensional flow past a cylinder asymmetrically placed in a channel (with vortex shedding); (iv) three-dimensional pressure-driven flow in a circular pipe; and (v) three-dimensional flow past a sphere. The drag evaluated by using the momentum-exchange method agrees well with the exact or other published results.

  14. Force evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann method involving curved geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Renwei; Yu, Dazhi; Shyy, Wei; Luo, Li-Shi

    2002-04-01

    The present work investigates two approaches for force evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann equation: the momentum-exchange method and the stress-integration method on the surface of a body. The boundary condition for the particle distribution functions on curved geometries is handled with second-order accuracy based on our recent works [Mei et al., J. Comput. Phys. 155, 307 (1999); ibid. 161, 680 (2000)]. The stress-integration method is computationally laborious for two-dimensional flows and in general difficult to implement for three-dimensional flows, while the momentum-exchange method is reliable, accurate, and easy to implement for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows. Several test cases are selected to evaluate the present methods, including: (i) two-dimensional pressure-driven channel flow; (ii) two-dimensional uniform flow past a column of cylinders; (iii) two-dimensional flow past a cylinder asymmetrically placed in a channel (with vortex shedding); (iv) three-dimensional pressure-driven flow in a circular pipe; and (v) three-dimensional flow past a sphere. The drag evaluated by using the momentum-exchange method agrees well with the exact or other published results.

  15. Vortex attenuation flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, M. R.; Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Champine, R. A.; Tymczyszyn, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flight tests evaluating the effects of altered span loading, turbulence ingestion, combinations of mass and turbulence ingestion, and combinations of altered span loading turbulance ingestion on trailed wake vortex attenuation were conducted. Span loadings were altered in flight by varying the deflections of the inboard and outboard flaps on a B-747 aircraft. Turbulence ingestion was achieved in flight by mounting splines on a C-54G aircraft. Mass and turbulence ingestion was achieved in flight by varying the thrust on the B-747 aircraft. Combinations of altered span loading and turbulence ingestion were achieved in flight by installing a spoiler on a CV-990 aircraft and by deflecting the existing spoilers on a B-747 aircraft. The characteristics of the attenuated and unattenuated vortexes were determined by probing them with smaller aircraft. Acceptable separation distances for encounters with the attenuated and unattenuated vortexes are presented.

  16. Aircraft vortex marking program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pompa, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    A simple, reliable device for identifying atmospheric vortices, principally as generated by in-flight aircraft and with emphasis on the use of nonpolluting aerosols for marking by injection into such vortex (-ices) is presented. The refractive index and droplet size were determined from an analysis of aerosol optical and transport properties as the most significant parameters in effecting vortex optimum light scattering (for visual sighting) and visual persistency of at least 300 sec. The analysis also showed that a steam-ejected tetraethylene glycol aerosol with droplet size near 1 micron and refractive index of approximately 1.45 could be a promising candidate for vortex marking. A marking aerosol was successfully generated with the steam-tetraethylene glycol mixture from breadboard system hardware. A compact 25 lb/f thrust (nominal) H2O2 rocket chamber was the key component of the system which produced the required steam by catalytic decomposition of the supplied H2O2.

  17. Quantum vortex reconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccher, S.; Caliari, M.; Baggaley, A. W.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2012-12-01

    We study reconnections of quantum vortices by numerically solving the governing Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We find that the minimum distance between vortices scales differently with time before and after the vortex reconnection. We also compute vortex reconnections using the Biot-Savart law for vortex filaments of infinitesimal thickness, and find that, in this model, reconnections are time symmetric. We argue that the likely cause of the difference between the Gross-Pitaevskii model and the Biot-Savart model is the intense rarefaction wave which is radiated away from a Gross-Pitaeveskii reconnection. Finally we compare our results to experimental observations in superfluid helium and discuss the different length scales probed by the two models and by experiments.

  18. Vortex Characterization for Engineering Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jankun-Kelly, M; Thompson, D S; Jiang, M; Shannahan, B; Machiraju, R

    2008-01-30

    Realistic engineering simulation data often have features that are not optimally resolved due to practical limitations on mesh resolution. To be useful to application engineers, vortex characterization techniques must be sufficiently robust to handle realistic data with complex vortex topologies. In this paper, we present enhancements to the vortex topology identification component of an existing vortex characterization algorithm. The modified techniques are demonstrated by application to three realistic data sets that illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of our approach.

  19. Evolution of an elliptic vortex ring in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of a viscous elliptic vortex ring in an initially quiescent fluid or a linear shear flow is numerically simulated using a lattice Boltzmann method. A wide range of parameters are considered, namely, aspect ratios (AR) (1 ≤ AR ≤ 8), core radius to ring radius ratios (σ0) (0.1 ≤ σ0 ≤ 0.3), Reynolds number (Re) (500 ≤ Re ≤ 3000), and shear rate (K) (0 ≤ K ≤ 0.12). The study aims to fill the gap in the current knowledge of the dynamics of an elliptic vortex ring in a viscous fluid and also to address the issue of whether an elliptic ring undergoes vortex stretching and compression during axis-switching. In a quiescent fluid, results show that for fixed Re and σ0, there exists a critical aspect ratio (ARc), below which an elliptic ring undergoes oscillatory deformation with the period that increases with increasing AR. Above ARc, the vortex ring breaks up into two or three sub-rings after the first half-cycle of oscillation. While higher Reynolds number enhances vortex ring breakup, larger core size has the opposite effect. Contrary to an inviscid theory, an elliptic ring does undergo vortex stretching and compression during oscillatory deformation. In the presence of a linear shear flow, the vortex ring undergoes not only oscillatory deformation and stretching but also tilting as it propagates downstream. The tilting angle increases with the shear rate K and is responsible for inducing a "tail" that consists of a counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP) near the upstream end of the initial major axis after the first half-cycle of oscillation. For a high shear rate, the CVP wraps around the ring and transforms its topological structure from a simple elliptic geometry to a complicated structure that eventually leads to the generation of turbulence.

  20. Vortex pairs on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koiller, Jair

    2009-05-06

    A pair of infinitesimally close opposite vortices moving on a curved surface moves along a geodesic, according to a conjecture by Kimura. We outline a proof. Numerical simulations are presented for a pair of opposite vortices at a close but nonzero distance on a surface of revolution, the catenoid. We conjecture that the vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid is a KAM perturbation of Jacobi's geodesic problem. We outline some preliminary calculations required for this study. Finding the surfaces for which the vortex pair system is integrable is in order.

  1. Consider vortex shedding flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbeck, K.

    1988-08-01

    Precise flow control is becoming a critical concern in the hydrocarbon processing industry. The old practice of ''one flowmeter fits all services'' is no longer possible with the different service conditions and measurement requirements of refineries and petrochemical plants in the late 1980s. Proper selection of a flowmeter for a given service requires consideration of all flowmeter types and a detailed examination of the application's measurement requirements. This article discusses the vortex shedding flowmeter, an instrument that can be used in a wide variety of applications in the hydrocarbon processing industry. This article will discuss the theory of operation and offer guidelines for the application, installation and maintenance of vortex meters.

  2. Lattice Kinetic Theory in a Comoving Galilean Reference Frame.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-07-01

    We prove that the fully discrete lattice Boltzmann method is invariant with respect to Galilean transformation. Based on this finding, a novel class of shifted lattices is proposed which dramatically increases the operating range of lattice Boltzmann simulations, in particular, for gas dynamics applications. A simulation of vortex-shock interaction is used to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed lattices. With one single algorithm it is now possible to simulate a broad range of applications, from low Mach number flows to transonic and supersonic flow regimes. PMID:27419555

  3. Lattice Kinetic Theory in a Comoving Galilean Reference Frame.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-07-01

    We prove that the fully discrete lattice Boltzmann method is invariant with respect to Galilean transformation. Based on this finding, a novel class of shifted lattices is proposed which dramatically increases the operating range of lattice Boltzmann simulations, in particular, for gas dynamics applications. A simulation of vortex-shock interaction is used to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed lattices. With one single algorithm it is now possible to simulate a broad range of applications, from low Mach number flows to transonic and supersonic flow regimes.

  4. Lattice Kinetic Theory in a Comoving Galilean Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frapolli, N.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2016-07-01

    We prove that the fully discrete lattice Boltzmann method is invariant with respect to Galilean transformation. Based on this finding, a novel class of shifted lattices is proposed which dramatically increases the operating range of lattice Boltzmann simulations, in particular, for gas dynamics applications. A simulation of vortex-shock interaction is used to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed lattices. With one single algorithm it is now possible to simulate a broad range of applications, from low Mach number flows to transonic and supersonic flow regimes.

  5. Vortex Confinement in Superconducting/Ferromagnet Hybrid Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iavarone, M.; Scarfato, A.; Bobba, F.; Longobardi, M.; Giubileo, F.; Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Yefremenko, V. G.; Cucolo, A.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetically coupled superconductor-ferromagnet hybrids offer advanced routes for nanoscale control of superconductivity. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning magnetic force microscopy (MFM) coupled to magneto-transport measurements reveal rich vortex phase diagram. The magnetic stripe domain of the ferromagnet induces periodic local magnetic induction in the superconductor, creating a series of pinning and anti-pinning channels for vortices observed with low temperature STM and MFM. Such laterally confined Abrikosov vortices form chains. We also found general equilibrium condition for which vortex-antivortex pairs are spontaneously formed during zero-field cooling. In the non-equilibrium state the strong magnetic pinning of the vortex lattice results in avalanches of antivortices when changing the polarity of the applied magnetic field.

  6. Picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination forms a monocrystalline silicon needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Fuyuto; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Hidai, Hirofumi; Yamane, Keisaku; Morita, Ryuji; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-02-01

    The formation of a monocrystalline silicon needle by picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination was demonstrated for the first time in this study. The dynamics of this silicon needle formation was further revealed by employing an ultrahigh-speed camera. The melted silicon was collected through picosecond pulse deposition to the dark core of the optical vortex, forming the silicon needle on a submicrosecond time scale. The needle was composed of monocrystalline silicon with the same lattice index (100) as that of the silicon substrate, and had a height of approximately 14 μm and a thickness of approximately 3 μm. Overlaid vortex pulses allowed the needle to be shaped with a height of approximately 40 μm without any changes to the crystalline properties. Such a monocrystalline silicon needle can be applied to devices in many fields, such as core-shell structures for silicon photonics and photovoltaic devices as well as nano- or microelectromechanical systems.

  7. Unsteady Free-Wake Vortex Particle Model for HAWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogateanu, R.; Frunzulicǎ, F.; Cardos, V.

    2010-09-01

    In the design of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) one problem is to determine the aeroelastic behaviour of the rotor blades for the various wind inflow conditions. A step in this process is to predict with accuracy the aerodynamic loads on the blades. The Vortex Lattice Method (VLM) provides a transparent investigation concerning the role of various physical parameters which influence the aerodynamic problem. In this paper we present a method for the calculation of the non-uniform induced downwash of a HAWT rotor using the vortex ring model for the lifting surface coupled with an unsteady free-wake vortex particle model. Comparative studies between results obtained with different models of wake for a generic HAWT are presented.

  8. Calculation of wing response to gusts and blast waves with vortex lift effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, D. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical study of the response of aircraft wings to atmospheric gusts and to nuclear explosions when flying at subsonic speeds is presented. The method is based upon unsteady quasi-vortex-lattice method, unsteady suction analogy, and Pade approximate. The calculated results, showing vortex lag effect, yield reasonable agreement with experimental data for incremental lift on wings in gust penetration and due to nuclear blast waves.

  9. Calculation of wing response to gusts and blast waves with vortex lift effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, D. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical study of the response of aircraft wings to atmospheric gusts and to nuclear explosions when flying at subsonic speeds is presented. The method is based upon unsteady quasi-vortex lattice method, unsteady suction analogy and Pade approximant. The calculated results, showing vortex lag effect, yield reasonable agreement with experimental data for incremental lift on wings in gust penetration and due to nuclear blast waves.

  10. Calculation of wing response to gusts and blast waves with vortex lift effect

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, D.C.; Lan, C.E.

    1983-04-01

    A numerical study of the response of aircraft wings to atmospheric gusts and to nuclear explosions when flying at subsonic speeds is presented. The method is based upon unsteady quasi-vortex lattice method, unsteady suction analogy and Pade approximant. The calculated results, showing vortex lag effect, yield reasonable agreement with experimental data for incremental lift on wings in gust penetration and due to nuclear blast waves.

  11. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  12. Vortex Apparatus and Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2010-01-01

    Vortex flow, from millimeter to kilometer in scale, is important in many scientific and technological areas. Examples are seen in water strider locomotion, from industrial pipe flow (wastewater treatment) to air traffic control (safe distance between aircrafts on a runway ready for takeoff) to atmospheric studies. In this paper, we focus on a…

  13. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  14. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging.'' This active concept

  15. Control of submersible vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Donaldson, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    Vortex flows produced by submersibles typically unfavorably influence key figures of merit such as acoustic and nonacoustic stealth, control effectiveness/maneuverability, and propulsor efficiency/body drag. Sources of such organized, primarily longitudinal, vorticity include the basic body (nose and sides) and appendages (both base/intersection and tip regions) such as the fairwater, dive planes, rear control surfaces, and propulsor stators/tips. Two fundamentally different vortex control approaches are available: (1) deintensification of the amplitude and/or organization of the vortex during its initiation process; and (2) downstream vortex disablement. Vortex control techniques applicable to the initiation region (deintensification approach) include transverse pressure gradient minimization via altered body cross section, appendage dillets, fillets, and sweep, and various appendage tip and spanload treatment along with the use of active controls to minimize control surface size and motions. Vortex disablement can be accomplished either via use of control vortices (which can also be used to steer the vortices off-board), direct unwinding, inducement of vortex bursting, or segmentation/tailoring for enhanced dissipation. Submersible-applicable vortex control technology is also included derived from various aeronautical applications such as mitigation of the wing wake vortex hazard and flight aircraft maneuverability at high angle of attack as well as the status of vortex effects upon, and mitigation of, nonlinear control forces on submersibles. Specific suggestions for submersible-applicable vortex control techniques are presented.

  16. Lattices of quantized vortices in polariton superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulier, Thomas; Cancellieri, Emiliano; Sangouard, Nicolas D.; Hivet, Romain; Glorieux, Quentin; Giacobino, Élisabeth; Bramati, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    In this review, we will focus on the description of the recent studies conducted in the quest for the observation of lattices of quantized vortices in resonantly injected polariton superfluids. In particular, we will show how the implementation of optical traps for polaritons allows for the realization of vortex-antivortex lattices in confined geometries and how the development of a flexible method to inject a controlled orbital angular momentum (OAM) in such systems results in the observation of patterns of same-sign vortices.

  17. Rotor-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was conducted to develop a validated first principles analysis for predicting noise generated by helicopter main-rotor shed vortices interacting with the tail rotor. The generalized prediction procedure requires a knowledge of the incident vortex velocity field, rotor geometry, and rotor operating conditions. The analysis includes compressibility effects, chordwise and spanwise noncompactness, and treats oblique intersections with the blade planform. Assessment of the theory involved conducting a model rotor experiment which isolated the blade-vortex interaction noise from other rotor noise mechanisms. An isolated tip vortex, generated by an upstream semispan airfoil, was convected into the model tail rotor. Acoustic spectra, pressure signatures, and directivity were measured. Since assessment of the acoustic prediction required a knowledge of the vortex properties, blade-vortes intersection angle, intersection station, vortex stength, and vortex core radius were documented. Ingestion of the vortex by the rotor was experimentally observed to generate harmonic noise and impulsive waveforms.

  18. Thermally assisted vortex motion in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, A.; Oya, G.

    2008-02-01

    The vortex dynamics in intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) at finite temperatures has been investigated numerically by taking into account the thermal fluctuations. Our simulations based on the perturbed, coupled sine-Gordon model successfully reproduce the experimental results associated with the Josephson-vortex flow resistance (JVFR) at low bias currents. Depending on the junction length, bias current, and temperature, the JVFR oscillation is changed from the period of half flux quantum per junction to the period of one flux quantum per junction. It is shown that the oscillation is essentially due to the field dependence of the critical current. At currents slightly exceeding the critical current the stationary vortex lattice structure becomes unstable and an irregular vortex flow can be induced by thermal fluctuations in different junctions. Our simulation results strongly suggest that the triangular lattice of vorticies in the dynamical state is more stable rather than the rectangular one even in a submicrometer IJJ stack when IJJs are biased at a low current.

  19. Magnetic translation group on Abrikosov lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Akira

    1996-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic translational symmetry of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation describing quasiparticles in the vortex lattice state. Magnetic translation group is formulated for the quasiparticles and the generalized Bloch theorem is established. Projection operators are obtained and used to construct the symmetry adopted basis functions. Careful treatment of the phase of the pair potential and its quasiperiodicity enable us to get the magnetic Wannier functions, which are utilized to justify a part of Canel's assertion about the effective Hamiltonian theory.

  20. Vortex Crystals with Chiral Stripes in Itinerant Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Ryo; Hayami, Satoru; Barros, Kipton; Chern, Gia-Wei; Motome, Yukitoshi; Batista, Cristian D.

    2016-10-01

    We study noncoplanar magnetic ordering in frustrated itinerant magnets. For a family of Kondo square lattice models with classical local moments, we find that a double-Q noncoplanar vortex crystal has lower energy than the single-Q helical order expected from the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction when the lattice symmetry dictates four global maxima in the bare magnetic susceptibility. By expanding in the small Kondo exchange and the degree of noncoplanarity, we demonstrate that this noncoplanar state arises from a Fermi surface instability occurring in independent sections connected by two ordering wave vectors.

  1. A subvortex technique for the close approach to a discretized vortex sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.

    1976-01-01

    The close-approach problem associated with vortex-lattice methods was examined numerically with the objective of calculating velocities at arbitrary points, not just at midpoints, between the vortices. The objective was achieved using a subvortex technique in which a vortex splits into an increasing number of subvortices as it is approached. The technique, incorporated in a two-dimensional potential flow method using "submerged" vortices and sources, was evaluated for a cambered Joukowski airfoil. The method could be extended to three dimensions, and should improve non-linear methods, which calculate interference effects between multiple wings and vortex wakes, and which include procedures for force-free wakes.

  2. Generic Weyl phase in the vortex state of quasi-two-dimensional chiral superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tomohiro; Udagawa, Masafumi

    2016-08-01

    We study the collective behavior of Majorana modes in the vortex state of chiral p -wave superconductors. Away from the isolated vortex limit, the zero-energy Majorana states communicate with each other on a vortex lattice, and form a coherent band structure with a nontrivial topological character. We reveal that the topological nature of Majorana bands changes sensitively via quantum phase transitions in two-dimensional (2D) systems, by sweeping magnetic field or Fermi energy. Through the idea of dimensional reduction, we show the existence of a generic superconducting Weyl phase in a low magnetic field region of quasi-2D chiral superconductors.

  3. Electrical switching of the vortex core in a magnetic disk.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Keisuke; Kasai, Shinya; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kohno, Hiroshi; Thiaville, André; Ono, Teruo

    2007-04-01

    A magnetic vortex is a curling magnetic structure realized in a ferromagnetic disk, which is a promising candidate for a memory cell for future non-volatile data-storage devices. Thus, an understanding of the stability and dynamical behaviour of the magnetic vortex is a major requirement for developing magnetic data-storage technology. Since the publication of experimental proof for the existence of a nanometre-scale core with out-of-plane magnetization in a magnetic vortex, the dynamics of vortices have been investigated intensively. However, a way to electrically control the core magnetization, which is a key for constructing a vortex-core memory, has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate the electrical switching of the core magnetization by using the current-driven resonant dynamics of the vortex; the core switching is triggered by a strong dynamic field that is produced locally by a rotational core motion at a high speed of several hundred metres per second. Efficient switching of the vortex core without magnetic-field application is achieved owing to resonance. This opens up the potentiality of a simple magnetic disk as a building block for spintronic devices such as a memory cell where the bit data is stored as the direction of the nanometre-scale core magnetization.

  4. Consider vortex flowmeters for gas custody transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ostling, H.

    1995-07-01

    Much natural gas measurement falls under the category of custody transfer, where inaccurate metering could mean financial disaster (or windfall) for one of the parties. Modern vortex flowmeters eliminate the inaccuracies of DP/orifice plate installations and provide the added security of reduced fugitive emissions. What follows are seven reasons why you should consider vortex flow measurement technology for custody transfer or any other measurement of natural gas. Vortex flowmeters offer higher accuracy; vortex flowmeters have no density/viscosity distortion; vortex flowmeters feature low installation costs; vortex flowmeters mean low cost of ownership; vortex flowmeters reduce pressure drop; vortex flowmeters allow accurate billing; nd vortex flowmeters have fewer fugitive emission sources.

  5. Vortex equations: Singularities, numerical solution, and axisymmetric vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossel, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    A method of weighted residuals for the computation of rotationally symmetric quasi-cylindrical viscous incompressible vortex flow is presented and used to compute a wide variety of vortex flows. The method approximates the axial velocity and circulation profiles by series of exponentials having (N + 1) and N free parameters, respectively. Formal integration results in a set of (2N + 1) ordinary differential equations for the free parameters. The governing equations are shown to have an infinite number of discrete singularities corresponding to critical values of the swirl parameters. The computations point to the controlling influence of the inner core flow on vortex behavior. They also confirm the existence of two particular critical swirl parameter values: one separates vortex flow which decays smoothly from vortex flow which eventually breaks down, and the second is the first singularity of the quasi-cylindrical system, at which point physical vortex breakdown is thought to occur.

  6. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  7. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  8. Delta Wing Vortex Breakdown Suppression by Vortex Core Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Charles

    2000-11-01

    The flow over a delta wing is characterized by two counter-rotating vortices that can undergo a sudden radial expansion at high angles of attack known as vortex breakdown. Downstream of this breakdown is a region of organized unsteady flow that can cause tail buffeting and structural fatigue, especially on twin-tailed aircraft. The recent self-induction theory of vortex breakdown points to the "pile-up" of vorticity due to the linear addition of vorticity in the spiraling shear layer that surrounds the vortex core as a principal cause of vortex breakdown (Kurosaka 1998). Based on that theory, this research attempts to relieve vorticity pile-up by altering the straight-line path of the vortex core and preventing the linear addition of vorticity. This is accomplished by applying a combination of periodic blowing and suction with low mass and momentum flux. The blowing and suction are directed normal to the low-pressure surface and supplied from ports under the vortex core which are near the forward tip of the delta wing. This oscillating input causes the vortex core to transition into a spiral formation downstream of the input ports. Initial results indicate that this change in the vortex core path may prevent vortex breakdown over the surface of the delta wing.

  9. Confined vortex scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards using a cleanup technology appropriate to small scale coal combustors. This to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber (CVS), which consists of a cylindrical vortex chamber with tangential flue gas inlets. The clean gas exit is via vortex finder outlets, one at either end of the tube. Liquid is introduced into the chamber and is confined within the vortex chamber by the centrifugal force generated by the gas flow itself. This confined liquid forms a layer through which the flue gas is then forced to bubble, producing a strong gas/liquid interaction, high inertial separation forces and efficient particulate cleanup. During this quarter a comprehensive series of cleanup experiments have been made for three CVS configurations. The first CVS configuration tested gave very efficient fine particulate removal at the design air mass flow rate (1 MM BUT/hr combustor exhaust flow), but had over 20{double prime}WC pressure drop. The first CVS configuration was then re-designed to produce the same very efficient particulate collection performance at a lower pressure drop. The current CVS configuration produces 99.4 percent cleanup of ultra-fine fly ash at the design air mass flow at a pressure drop of 12 {double prime}WC with a liquid/air flow ratio of 0.31/m{sup 3}. Unlike venturi scrubbers, the collection performance of the CVS is insensitive to dust loading and to liquid/air flow ratio.

  10. Vortex states and quantum magnetic oscillations in conventional type-II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniv, Tsofar; Zhuravlev, Vladimir; Vagner, Israel; Wyder, Peter

    2001-10-01

    The theory of pure type-II superconductors at high magnetic fields and low temperatures has recently attracted much attention due to the discovery of de Haas-van Alphen oscillations deep in the vortex state. In this article the authors review the state of the art in this rapidly growing new field of research. The very existence of quantum magnetic oscillations deep in the vortex state poses challenging questions to the theorists working in this field. For a conventional extreme type-II superconductor in magnetic fields just below the upper critical field Hc2, the quasiparticle spectrum is gapless and the de Haas-van Alphen effect is suppressed with respect to the corresponding normal-state signal due to superconducting induced currents near the vortex cores, which are of paramagnetic nature. Numerical simulations of the quasiparticle band structure in the Abrikosov vortex lattice show the existence of well-separated Landau bands below Hc2. An analytical perturbative approach, which emphasizes the importance of phase coherence in quasiparticle scattering by the pair potential in the Abrikosov lattice, predicts a relatively weak magnetic breakdown of the corresponding cyclotron orbits. In contrast to the situation in the Abrikosov lattice state, a theory based on a random vortex lattice model yields large exponential decay of the de Haas-van Alphen oscillations with the superconducting order parameter below Hc2. The disordered nature of the vortex state near Hc2 in real superconductors, where long-range phase coherence in the superconducting order parameter is destroyed, could explain the success of this model in interpreting experimental data below Hc2. In the Abrikosov vortex lattice state, which usually stabilizes well below Hc2, the residual damping of the de Haas-van Alphen amplitude is significantly reduced. In quasi-two-dimensional superconductors, phase fluctuations associated with sliding Bragg chains along principal axes in the vortex lattice lead to a weak

  11. Accumulation of heavy particles around a helical vortex filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IJzermans, Rutger H. A.; Hagmeijer, Rob; van Langen, Pieter J.

    2007-10-01

    The motion of small heavy particles near a helical vortex filament in incompressible flow is investigated. Both the configurations of a helical vortex filament in free space and a helical vortex filament in a concentric pipe are considered, and the corresponding helically symmetric velocity fields are expressed in terms of a stream function. Particle motion is assumed to be driven by Stokes drag, and the flow fields are assumed to be independent from the motion of particles. Numerical results show that heavy particles may be attracted to helical trajectories. The stability of these attraction trajectories is demonstrated by linear stability analysis. In addition, the correlation between the attraction trajectories and the streamline topologies is investigated.

  12. Design and evaluation of a Dean vortex-based micromixer.

    PubMed

    Howell, Peter B; Mott, David R; Golden, Joel P; Ligler, Frances S

    2004-12-01

    A mixer, based on the Dean vortex, is fabricated and tested in an on-chip format. When fluid is directed around a curve under pressure driven flow, the high velocity streams in the center of the channel experience a greater centripetal force and so are deflected outward. This creates a pair of counter-rotating vortices moving fluid toward the inner wall at the top and bottom of the channel and toward the outer wall in the center. For the geometries studied, the vortices were first seen at Reynolds numbers between 1 and 10 and became stronger as the flow velocity is increased. Vortex formation was monitored in channels with depth/width ratios of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. The lowest aspect ratio strongly suppressed vortex formation. Increasing the aspect ratio above 1 appeared to provide improved mixing. This design has the advantages of easy fabrication and low surface area. PMID:15570382

  13. Experimental vortex transitional nondestructive read-out Josephson memory cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tahara, S.; Ishida, I.; Ajisawa, Y.; Wada, Y.

    1989-01-15

    A proposal vortex transitional nondestructive read-out Josephson memory cell is successfully fabricated and tested. The memory cell consists of two superconducting loops in which a single flux quantum is stored and a two-junction interferometer gate as a sense gate. The memory cell employs vortex transitions in the superconducting loops for writing and reading data. The vortex transitional memory operation of the cell contributes to improving its sense discrimination and operating margin. The memory cell is activated by two control signals without timing control signals. Memory cell chips have been fabricated using a niobium planarization process. A +- 21% address signal current margin and a +- 33% sense gate current margin have been obtained experimentally. Successful memory operations of a cell driven by two-junction interferometer gates has been demonstrated. The single flux quantum operations of this memory cell makes it an attractive basic element for a high-speed cache memory.

  14. Edge-soliton-mediated vortex-core reversal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Suk; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Choi, Youn-Seok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-04-01

    We report an additional reversal mechanism of magnetic vortex cores in nanodot elements driven by currents flowing perpendicular to the sample plane, occurring via dynamic transformations between two coupled edge solitons and bulk vortex solitons. This mechanism differs completely from the well-known switching process mediated by the creation and annihilation of vortex-antivortex pairs in terms of the associated topological solitons, energies, and spin-wave emissions. Strongly localized out-of-plane gyrotropic fields induced by the fast motion of the coupled edge solitons enable a magnetization dip that plays a crucial role in the formation of the reversed core magnetization. This work provides a deeper physical insight into the dynamic transformations of magnetic topological solitons in nanoelements.

  15. Control of diffusion of nanoparticles in an optical vortex lattice.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Ivar; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Sáenz, Juan José

    2016-06-01

    A two-dimensional periodic optical force field, which combines conservative dipolar forces with vortices from radiation pressure, is proposed in order to influence the diffusion properties of optically susceptible nanoparticles. The different deterministic flow patterns are identified. In the low-noise limit, the diffusion coefficient is computed from a mean first passage time and the most probable escape paths are identified for those flow patterns which possess a stable stationary point. Numerical simulations of the associated Langevin equations show remarkable agreement with the analytically deduced expressions. Modifications of the force field are proposed so that a wider range of phenomena could be tested. PMID:27415231

  16. Vortex nozzle for segmenting and transporting metal chips from turning operations

    SciTech Connect

    Bieg, L.F.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus for collecting, segmenting and conveying metal chips from machining operations which utilizes a compressed gas driven vortex nozzle for receiving the chip and twisting it to cause the chip to segment through the application of torsional forces to the chip. The vortex nozzle is open ended and generally tubular in shape with a converging inlet end, a constant diameter throat section and a diverging exhaust end. Compressed gas is discharged through angled vortex ports in the nozzle throat section to create vortex flow in the nozzle and through an annular inlet at the entrance to the converging inlet end to create suction at the nozzle inlet and cause ambient air to enter the nozzle. The vortex flow in the nozzle causes the metal chip to segment and the segments thus formed to pass out of the discharge end of the nozzle where they are collected, cleaned and compacted as needed.

  17. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-06-14

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancymore » spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Lastly, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ~ 100 ns timescales.« less

  18. Vortex nozzle for segmenting and transporting metal chips from turning operations

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, L.F.

    1993-04-20

    Apparatus for collecting, segmenting and conveying metal chips from machining operations utilizes a compressed gas driven vortex nozzle for receiving the chip and twisting it to cause the chip to segment through the application of torsional forces to the chip. The vortex nozzle is open ended and generally tubular in shape with a converging inlet end, a constant diameter throat section and a diverging exhaust end. Compressed gas is discharged through angled vortex ports in the nozzle throat section to create vortex flow in the nozzle and through an annular inlet at the entrance to the converging inlet end to create suction at the nozzle inlet and cause ambient air to enter the nozzle. The vortex flow in the nozzle causes the metal chip to segment and the segments thus formed to pass out of the discharge end of the nozzle where they are collected, cleaned and compacted as needed.

  19. Effects Of Ignition on Premixed Vortex Rings: A Simultaneous PLIF and PIV Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, T. R.; Gord, J. R.; Katta, V. R.; Gogineni, S. P.

    2001-11-01

    Preliminary studies of reacting, premixed vortex rings have shown that flame propagation is highly sensitive to ignition timing, equivalence ratio, and vortex strength. A variety of divergent phenomena have been observed, such as interior/exterior flame propagation, vortex-induced flame bridging across the jet column, and the formation of unburned pockets. In the current work, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone and OH is performed to study the non-reacting and reacting regions, respectively, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the effects of reaction on the flow field. The flow field consists of well-characterized vortex rings of premixed methane and air generated at the exit of an axisymmetric nozzle using a solenoid-driven piston. Ignition is initiated at various phases of vortex development and propagation. Results are compared with corresponding numerical simulations from a time-dependent computational fluid dynamics code with chemistry.

  20. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-01-01

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancy spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Finally, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ∼100 ns timescales. PMID:27296550

  1. Discrete breathers in hexagonal dusty plasma lattices.

    PubMed

    Koukouloyannis, V; Kourakis, I

    2009-08-01

    The occurrence of single-site or multisite localized vibrational modes, also called discrete breathers, in two-dimensional hexagonal dusty plasma lattices is investigated. The system is described by a Klein-Gordon hexagonal lattice characterized by a negative coupling parameter epsilon in account of its inverse dispersive behavior. A theoretical analysis is performed in order to establish the possibility of existence of single as well as three-site discrete breathers in such systems. The study is complemented by a numerical investigation based on experimentally provided potential forms. This investigation shows that a dusty plasma lattice can support single-site discrete breathers, while three-site in phase breathers could exist if specific conditions, about the intergrain interaction strength, would hold. On the other hand, out of phase and vortex three-site breathers cannot be supported since they are highly unstable.

  2. Discrete breathers in hexagonal dusty plasma lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Koukouloyannis, V.; Kourakis, I.

    2009-08-15

    The occurrence of single-site or multisite localized vibrational modes, also called discrete breathers, in two-dimensional hexagonal dusty plasma lattices is investigated. The system is described by a Klein-Gordon hexagonal lattice characterized by a negative coupling parameter epsilon in account of its inverse dispersive behavior. A theoretical analysis is performed in order to establish the possibility of existence of single as well as three-site discrete breathers in such systems. The study is complemented by a numerical investigation based on experimentally provided potential forms. This investigation shows that a dusty plasma lattice can support single-site discrete breathers, while three-site in phase breathers could exist if specific conditions, about the intergrain interaction strength, would hold. On the other hand, out of phase and vortex three-site breathers cannot be supported since they are highly unstable.

  3. Vortex Flipping in Superconductor-Ferromagnet Spin Valve Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patino, Edgar J.; Aprili, Marco; Blamire, Mark; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2014-03-01

    We report in plane magnetization measurements on Ni/Nb/Ni/CoO and Co/Nb/Co/CoO spin valve structures with one of the ferromagnetic layers pinned by an antiferromagnetic layer. In samples with Ni, below the superconducting transition Tc, our results show strong evidence of vortex flipping driven by the ferromagnets magnetization. This is a direct consequence of proximity effect that leads to vortex supercurrents leakage into the ferromagnets. Here the polarized electron spins are subject to vortices magnetic field occasioning vortex flipping. Such novel mechanism has been made possible for the first time by fabrication of the F/S/F/AF multilayered spin valves with a thin-enough S layer to barely confine vortices inside as well as thin-enough F layers to align and control the magnetization within the plane. When Co is used there is no observation of vortex flipping effect. This is attributed to Co shorter coherence length. Interestingly instead a reduction in pinning field of about 400 Oe is observed when the Nb layer is in superconducting state. This effect cannot be explained in terms of vortex fields. In view of these facts any explanation must be directly related to proximity effect and thus a remarkable phenomenon that deserves further investigation. Programa Nacional de Ciencias Basicas COLCIENCIAS (No. 120452128168).

  4. Research of the high performance low temperature vortex street flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Zhen-peng; Geng, Wei-guo

    2007-07-01

    Flow measurement is the key method for R&D and operation monitoring of liquid rocket engine. Therefore, it is important to measure flux of low temperature liquid propellants for the liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen or the liquid oxygen/kerosene rocket engine. Presently in China, the level meter and the turbine flowmeter are usually used in the experimentation of the liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen rocket engine. The level meter can only scale average flux and the precision of the turbine flowmeter (the measuring wild point is 1.5%) can not be ensured due to the reason which there is not devices of low temperature real-time demarcation in China. Therefore, it is required to research the high performance low temperature flow measurement equipment and the vortex street flowmeter is selected because of its advantages. In the paper, some key techniques of low temperature vortex street flowmeter are researched from the design aspect. Firstly, the basic theoretical research of vortex street flowmeter includes signal detection method, shape of vortex producer and effects of dimension of vertex producer to vortex quality. Secondly, low temperature vortex street flowmeter adopts the method of piezoelectric components stress mode. As for the weakness of phase-change, lattice change and fragility for many piezoelectric materials in low temperature, it can not be fulfilled piezoelectric signal and mechanism performance under this condition. Some piezoelectric materials which can be used in low temperature are illustrated in the paper by lots of research in order for the farther research. The article places emphasis upon low temperature trait of piezoelectric materials, and the structure designs of signal detector and calculation of stress, electric charge quantity and heat transfer.

  5. Wingtip vortex dissipator for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A means for attenuating the vortex created at aircraft wingtips which consists of a retractable planar surface transverse to the airstream and attached downstream of the wingtip which creates a positive pressure gradient just downstream from the wing is presented. The positive pressure forces a break up of the rotational air flow of the vortex.

  6. Robustness of a coherence vortex.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cleberson R; Jesus-Silva, Alcenisio J; Fonseca, Eduardo J S

    2016-09-20

    We study, experimentally and theoretically, the behavior of a coherence vortex after its transmission through obstacles. Notably, we find that such a vortex survives and preserves its effective topological charge. Despite suffering changes on the modulus of the coherence function, these changes disappear during propagation.

  7. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  8. Vortex structures of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate for large anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Ran; Mueller, Erich

    2011-12-15

    We calculate the vortex structures of an elongated two-component Bose-Einstein condensate. We study how these structures depend on the intracomponent and intercomponent interaction strengths. We present analytical and numerical results respectively at weak and strong interactions; finding lattices with different interlocking geometries: triangular, square, rectangular, and double core.

  9. Optical vortex generation with wavelength tunability based on an acoustically-induced fiber grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wending; Wei, Keyan; Huang, Ligang; Mao, Dong; Jiang, Biqiang; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Guoquan; Mei, Ting; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-08-22

    We presented a method to actualize the optical vortex generation with wavelength tunability via an acoustically-induced fiber grating (AIFG) driven by a radio frequency source. The circular polarization fundamental mode could be converted to the first-order optical vortex through the AIFG, and its topological charges were verified by the spiral pattern of coaxial interference between the first-order optical vortex and a Gaussian-reference beam. A spectral tuning range from 1540 nm to 1560 nm was demonstrated with a wavelength tunability slope of 4.65 nm/kHz. The mode conversion efficiency was 95% within the whole tuning spectral range. PMID:27557207

  10. Superfluid Vortex Cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaeva, I. A.; Lindemann, U.; Jiang, N.; de Waele, A. T. A. M.; Thummes, G.

    2004-06-01

    A superfluid vortex cooler (SVC) is a combination of a fountain pump and a vortex cooler. The working fluid in the SVC is 4He at a temperature below the lambda line. The cooler has no moving parts, is gravity independent, and hardly requires any additional infrastructure. At saturated vapour pressure the SVC is capable of reaching a temperature as low as 0.75 K. At pressures close to the melting pressure the temperature can be brought down to 0.65 K. As the SVC operates only below the lambda line, it has to be precooled e.g. by a liquid-helium bath or a cryocooler. As a first step of our research we have carried out a number of experiments, using a liquid-helium bath as a precooler for the SVC. In this arrangement we have reached temperatures below 1 K with 3.5 mW heating power supplied to the fountain part of the SVC at 1.4 K. The next step was combining the SVC with a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR), developed at the University of Giessen. It is a two-stage G-M type refrigerator with 3He as a working fluid that reached a lowest temperature of 1.27 K. In this contribution we report on the results of the SVC tests in liquid helium and the progress in the integration of the SVC with the PTR.

  11. The VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment (VORTEX) GAS project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Langenderfer, Lynn S.; Jardon, Rebecca D.; Cutlip, Hansford H.; Kazerooni, Alexander C.; Thweatt, Amber L.; Lester, Joseph L.; Bernal, Luis P.

    1995-01-01

    Get Away Special (GAS) payload G-093, also called VORTEX (VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment), is an investigation of the propagation of a vortex ring through a liquid-gas interface in microgravity. This process results in the formation of one or more liquid droplets similar to earth based liquid atomization systems. In the absence of gravity, surface tension effects dominate the drop formation process. The Shuttle's microgravity environment allows the study of the same fluid atomization processes as using a larger drop size than is possible on Earth. This enables detailed experimental studies of the complex flow processes encountered in liquid atomization systems. With VORTEX, deformations in both the vortex ring and the fluid surface will be measured closely for the first time in a parameters range that accurately resembles liquid atomization. The experimental apparatus will record images of the interactions for analysis after the payload has been returned to earth. The current design of the VORTEX payload consists of a fluid test cell with a vortex ring generator, digital imaging system, laser illumination system, computer based controller, batteries for payload power, and an array of housekeeping and payload monitoring sensors. It is a self-contained experiment and will be flown on board the Space Shuttle in a 5 cubic feet GAS canister. The VORTEX Project is entirely run by students at the University of Michigan but is overseen by a faculty advisor acting as the payload customer and the contact person with NASA. This paper summarizes both the technical and programmatic aspects of the VORTEX Project.

  12. A New Vortex-Breakdown Device: Use of Magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslen, Eric H.; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    1996-11-01

    To complement our theoretical and computational work regarding the nature of interaction of vortex lines during the process of vortex breakdown, a new experimental device is developed. The geometry under consideration is an eccentric spherical gap. In previous studies using this device an inner sphere was driven by a shaft which penetrated the outer spherical cavity axisymmetrically. We desire a completely non-intrusive device, coupled with non-intrusive visualization, as well as the ability to shift the spin axis (breaking axisymmetry) to test our hypotheses. All these requirements suggest a magnetically suspended and driven inner sphere. The controls algorithms and expertise developed for magnetic bearings were extended to address the difficult problem of large fluid gaps (inches as opposed to mils). We will report on the design and construction of the device, and argue for the feasibility of magnetics when absolute non-intrusion is necessary.

  13. Leading-edge vortex burst on a low-aspect-ratio rotating flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert; Jones, Anya R.

    2016-08-01

    This study experimentally investigates the phenomenon of leading-edge-vortex burst on rotating flat plate wings. An aspect-ratio-2 wing was driven in pure rotation at a Reynolds number of Re=2500 . Of primary interest is the evolution of the leading-edge vortex along the wing span over a single-revolution wing stroke. Direct force measurements of the lift produced by the wing revealed a single global lift maximum relatively early in the wing stroke. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was applied to several chordwise planes to quantify the structure and strength of the leading-edge vortex and its effect on lift production. This analysis revealed opposite-sign vorticity entrainment into the core of the leading-edge vortex, originating from a layer of secondary vorticity along the wing surface. Coincident with the lift peak, there emerged both a concentration of opposite vorticity in the leading-edge-vortex core, as well as axial flow stagnation within the leading-edge-vortex core. Planar control volume analysis was performed at the midspan to quantify the contributions of vorticity transport mechanisms to the leading-edge-vortex circulation. The rate of circulation annihilation by opposite-signed vorticity entrainment was found to be minimal during peak lift production, where convection balanced the flux of vorticity resulting in stagnation and eventually reversal of axial flow. Finally, vortex burst was found to be correlated with swirl number, where bursting occurs at a swirl threshold of Sw<0.6 .

  14. Evolution and Control of the Leading Edge Vortex on an Unsteady Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkala, James; Buchholz, James

    2015-11-01

    The development of the leading-edge vortex is investigated on a periodically plunging plate within a uniform free stream. Vortex circulation is governed primarily by the strength of the leading edge shear layer, which provides the primary source of circulation, and a substantial opposite-sign contribution due to the pressure-gradient-driven diffusive flux of vorticity from the suction surface of the plate. The latter has been shown to produce a substantial reduction in leading-edge vortex strength, and leads to the development of a secondary vortex whose evolution influences the interaction between the leading edge vortex and the surface, and thus alters the surface pressure gradients. Suction is applied in the vicinity of the secondary vortex in an attempt to regulate the aerodynamic loads in the presence of the leading-edge vortex. The effect on vorticity transport, leading-edge vortex dynamics, and the resulting aerodynamic loads is discussed. This work was supported, in part, by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant number FA9550-11-1-0019 and the National Science Foundation under EPSCoR grant EPS1101284.

  15. Direct visualization of vortex pattern transition in ZrB12 with Ginzburg-Landau parameter close to the dual point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jun-Yi; Gutierrez, Joffre; Lyashchenko, A.; Filipov, V.; Li, Jun; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2014-11-01

    In nature, many systems exhibit modulated phases with periodic macroscopic patterns and textures mainly due to the competitive interactions of different phases. Vortex systems in superconductors, which are easy to access, offer the possibility of tuning the ratio between the competitive interactions, providing a unique tool to study the evolution and equilibrium of similar patterns. The κ -T phase diagram of clean superconductors shows the transition from type-I to type-II superconductivity via a narrow κ range near the dual point κ =1 /√{2 } where the vortices attract each other at long distances and repel each other at short distances. This κ range, which is termed the type-II/1 phase, becomes larger with decreasing temperature. The direct imaging at the scale of individual vortices of the vortex pattern transition would provide valuable information. Therefore, by using scanning Hall probe microscopy, we have performed direct visualization of the vortex pattern transition in a ZrB12 single crystal across the type-II and type-II/1 phases. By gradually lowering the temperature, and thereby tuning vortex interactions, a transition is observed from the ordered Abrikosov vortex lattice to a disordered vortex pattern with large areas of Meissner phase, vortex chains, and vortex clusters. The formation of vortex chains and clusters has been found to arise from the combined effect of quenched disorder and the attractive vortex-vortex interaction in the type-II/1 phase. The clusters and chains serve as the vortex reservoir to enable the formation of a triangular vortex lattice of the type-II phase at high temperatures.

  16. Moving vortex phases, dynamical symmetry breaking, and jamming for vortices in honeycomb pinning arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    We show using numerical simulations that vortices in honeycomb pinning arrays can exhibit a remarkable variety of dynamical phases that are distinct from those found for triangular and square pinning arrays. In the honeycomb arrays, it is possible for the interstitial vortices to form dimer or higher n-mer states which have an additional orientational degree of freedom that can lead to the formation of vortex molecular crystals. For filling fractions where dimer states appear, a dynamical symmetry breaking can occur when the dimers flow in one of two possible alignment directions. This leads to transport in the direction transverse to the applied drive. We show that dimerization produces distinct types of moving phases which depend on the direction of the driving force with respect to the pinning lattice symmetry. When the dimers are driven along certain directions, a reorientation of the dimers can produce a jamming phenomenon which results in a strong enhancement in the critical depinning force. The jamming can also cause unusual effects such as an increase in the critical depinning force when the size of the pinning sites is reduced.

  17. Wingtip-Vortex Turbine Lowers Aircraft Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. C. J.

    1982-01-01

    Turbine captures some of energy lost in aircraft wingtip vortexes. Wing-tip vortex turbine operates in crossflow of the lift-induced vortex; i.e., flow not parallel to the flightpath. Each turbine blade generates a force as a result of angle of attack between blade and nonstreamwise local flow. Turbine converts lost vortex energy to rotational energy and reduces induced drag.

  18. Vortex Matter in Highly Strained Nb_{75} Zr_{25} : Analogy with Viscous Flow of Disordered Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Jagdish; Manekar, Meghmalhar; Sharma, V. K.; Mondal, Puspen; Tiwari, Pragya; Roy, S. B.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of magnetization and magneto-transport measurements in the superconducting state of an as-cast Nb_{75} Zr_{25} alloy. We also report the microstructure of our sample at various length scales by using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies. The information of microstructure is used to understand the flux pinning properties in the superconducting state within the framework of collective pinning. The magneto-transport measurements show a non-Arrhenius behaviour of the temperature- and field-dependent resistivity across the resistive transition and is understood in terms of a model for viscous flow of disordered solids which is popularly known as the `shoving model'. The activation energy for flux flow is assumed to be mainly the elastic energy stored in the flux-line lattice. The scaling of pinning force density indicates the presence of two pinning mechanisms of different origins. The elastic constants of the flux-line lattice are used to estimate the length scale of vortex lattice movement, or the volume displaced by the flux-line lattice. It appears that the vortex lattice displacement estimated from elastic energy considerations is of the same order of magnitude as that of the flux bundle hopping length during flux flow. Our results could provide possible directions for establishing a framework where vortex matter and glass-forming liquids or amorphous solids can be treated in a similar manner for understanding the phenomenon of viscous flow in disordered solids or more generally the pinning and depinning properties of elastic manifolds in random media. It is likely that the vortex molasses scenario is more suited to explain the vortex dynamics in conventional low-T_C superconductors.

  19. New vortex-matter size effect observed in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y M; Fuhrer, M S; Zettl, A; Ooi, S; Tamegai, T

    2001-04-16

    The vortex-matter 3D to 2D phase transition is studied in micron-sized Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + delta) single crystals using local Hall magnetization measurements. At a given temperature, the second magnetization peak, the signature of a possible 3D--2D vortex phase transition, disappears for samples smaller than a critical length. We suggest that this critical length should be equated with the 2D vortex lattice ab-plane correlation length R(2D)(c). The magnitude and temperature dependence of R(2D)(c) agree well with Larkin-Ovchinnikov collective pinning theory.

  20. Vortex operator and BKT transition in Abelian duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Tong

    2016-04-01

    We give a new simple derivation for the sine-Gordon description of Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition. Our derivation is simpler than traditional derivations. Besides, our derivation is a continuous field theoretic derivation by using path integration, different from the traditional derivations which are based on lattice theory or based on Coulomb gas model. Our new derivation relies on Abelian duality of two dimensional quantum field theory. By utilizing this duality in path integration, we find that the vortex configurations are naturally mapped to exponential operators in dual description. Since these operators are the vortex operators that can create vortices, the sine-Gordon description then naturally follows. Our method may be useful for the investigation to the BKT physics of superconductors.

  1. Vortex creep in TFA-YBCO nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouco, V.; Bartolomé, E.; Maiorov, B.; Palau, A.; Civale, L.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T.

    2014-11-01

    Vortex creep in YBa2Cu3O7 - x (YBCO) films grown from the trifluoracetate (TFA) chemical route with BaZrO3 and Ba2YTaO6 second-phase nanoparticles (NPs) has been investigated by magnetic relaxation measurements. We observe that in YBCO nanocomposites the phenomenological crossover line from the elastic to the plastic creep regime is shifted to higher magnetic fields and temperatures. The origin of this shift lies on the new isotropic-strong vortex pinning contribution appearing in these nanocomposites, induced by local lattice distortions. As a consequence, we demonstrate that the addition of non-coherent NPs produces a decrease in the creep rate S in most of the phase diagram, particularly, in the range of fields and temperatures (T\\gt 60 K, {{μ }0}H\\gt 0.5 T) relevant for large scale applications.

  2. Josephson-vortex Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Snapiro, I.B.

    1995-10-01

    We predict the Josephson-vortex Cherenkov radiation of an electromagnetic wave. We treat a long one-dimensional Josephson junction. We consider the wavelength of the radiated electromagnetic wave to be much less than the Josephson penetration depth. We use for calculations the nonlocal Josephson electrodynamics. We find the expression for the radiated power and for the radiation friction force acting on a Josephson vortex and arising due to the Cherenkov radiation. We calculate the relation between the density of the bias current and the Josephson vortex velocity.

  3. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  4. Finite number of vortices and bending of finite vortex lines in a confined rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Z.; Ma, Y. L.

    2007-01-01

    The minimal energy configurations of finite Nv-body vortices in a rotating trapped Bose-Einstein condensate is studied analytically by extending the previous work [Y. Castin, R. Dum, Eur. Phys. J. D 7, 399 (1999)], and taking into account the finite size effects on z-direction and the bending of finite vortex lines. The calculation of the energy of the vortices as a function of the rotation frequency of the trap gives number, curvature, configuration of vortices and width of vortex cores self-consistently. The numerical results show that (1) the simplest regular polynomial of the several vortex configurations is energetically favored; while the hexagonal vortex lattice is more stable than square lattice; (2) bending is more stable then straight vortex line along the z-axis for λ<1; (3) the boundary effect is obvious: compared with the estimation made under infinite boundary, the finite size effect leads to a lower vortex density, while the adding vortex bending results in a less higher density because of the expansion. The results are in well agreement with the other authors' ones.

  5. Structure of leading-edge vortex flows including vortex breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structure of leading-edge vortex flows on thin sharp-edged delta wings was carried out at low Reynolds numbers. Flow-visualization techniques were used to study the topology of the vortex and the phenomenon of vortex breakdown. Seven-hole probe-wake surveys and laser-doppler-anemometer measurements were obtained and compared. Delta wings with sweep angles of 70, 75, 80, and 85/sup 0/ were tested at angles of attack of 10, 20, 30, and 40/sup 0/. The test were conducted in a Reynolds number range of 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ to 6.4 x 10/sup 5/. Smoke-flow visualization revealed the presence of small Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortical structures in the shear layer of a leading-edge vortex. These shear-layer vortices follow a helical path and grow in the streamwise direction as they wind into the vortex core where the individual shear layers merge. The phenomenon of vortex breakdown was studied using high-speed cinema photography. The bubble and spiral types of breakdown were observed and appear to represent the extremes in a continuum of breakdown forms.

  6. Numerical simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, X.

    1985-01-01

    The breakdown of an isolated axisymmetric vortex embedded in an unbounded uniform flow is examined by numerical integration of the complete Navier-Stokes equations for unsteady axisymmetric flow. Results show that if the vortex strength is small, the solution approaches a steady flow and the vortex is stable. If the strength is large enough, the solution remains unsteady and a recirculating zone will appear near the axis, its form and internal structure resembling those of the axisymmetric breakdown bubbles with multi-cells observed by Faler and Leibovich (1978). For apppropriate combinations of flow parameters, the flow reveals quasi-periodicity. Parallel calculations with the quasi-cylindrical approximation indicate that so far as predicting of breakdown is concerned, its results coincide quite well with the results mentioned above. Both show that the vortex breakdown has little concern with the Reynolds number or with the critical classification of the upstream flow, at least for the lower range of Reynolds numbers.

  7. Vortex state in ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betto, Davide; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of the magnetic state of a soft ferromagnetic nanoparticle with its size is usually thought to be from superparamagnetic single domain to blocked single domain to a blocked multidomain structure. Néel pointed out that a vortex configuration produces practically no stray field at the cost of an increase in the exchange energy, of the order of RJS2lnR /c, where JS2 is the bond energy, R is the particle radius, and c is of the order of the exchange length. A vortex structure is energetically cheaper than single domain when the radius is greater than a certain value. The correct sequence should include a vortex configuration between the single domain and the multidomain states. The critical size is calculated for spherical particles of four important materials (nickel, magnetite, permalloy, and iron) both numerically and analytically. A vortex state is favored in materials with high magnetisation.

  8. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-12-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small Hw, the AMF effect dominates. As Hw increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  9. New omega vortex identification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, ChaoQun; Wang, YiQian; Yang, Yong; Duan, ZhiWei

    2016-08-01

    A new vortex identification criterion called Ω-method is proposed based on the ideas that vorticity overtakes deformation in vortex. The comparison with other vortex identification methods like Q-criterion and λ 2-method is conducted and the advantages of the new method can be summarized as follows: (1) the method is able to capture vortex well and very easy to perform; (2) the physical meaning of Ω is clear while the interpretations of iso-surface values of Q and λ 2 chosen to visualize vortices are obscure; (3) being different from Q and λ 2 iso-surface visualization which requires wildly various thresholds to capture the vortex structure properly, Ω is pretty universal and does not need much adjustment in different cases and the iso-surfaces of Ω=0.52 can always capture the vortices properly in all the cases at different time steps, which we investigated; (4) both strong and weak vortices can be captured well simultaneously while improper Q and λ 2 threshold may lead to strong vortex capture while weak vortices are lost or weak vortices are captured but strong vortices are smeared; (5) Ω=0.52 is a quantity to approximately define the vortex boundary. Note that, to calculate Ω, the length and velocity must be used in the non-dimensional form. From our direct numerical simulation, it is found that the vorticity direction is very different from the vortex rotation direction in general 3-D vortical flow, the Helmholtz velocity decomposition is reviewed and vorticity is proposed to be further decomposed to vortical vorticity and non-vortical vorticity.

  10. Inverse Problem of Vortex Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protas, Bartosz; Danaila, Ionut

    2014-11-01

    This study addresses the following question: given incomplete measurements of the velocity field induced by a vortex, can one determine the structure of the vortex? Assuming that the flow is incompressible, inviscid and stationary in the frame of reference moving with the vortex, the ``structure'' of the vortex is uniquely characterized by the functional relation between the streamfunction and vorticity. To focus attention, 3D axisymmetric vortex rings are considered. We show how this inverse problem can be framed as an optimization problem which can then be efficiently solved using variational techniques. More precisely, we use measurements of the tangential velocity on some contour to reconstruct the function defining the streamfunction-vorticity relation in a continuous setting. Two test cases are presented, involving Hill's and Norbury vortices, in which very good reconstructions are obtained. A key result of this study is the application of our approach to obtain an optimal inviscid vortex model in an actual viscous flow problem based on DNS data which leads to a number of nonintuitive findings.

  11. Forebody vortex control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, Gerald N.

    Because conventional fighter aircraft control surfaces (e.g. rudder) become ineffective at high angles of attack, alternate means of providing aerodynamic control are being explored. A prime potential source for improved control power is the vortex flowfield existing on typical fighter aircraft forebodies. Several techniques to manipulate the forebody vortices to produce controlled forces and moments at high angles of attack have been investigated by a number of researchers in the past few years. This paper reviews some of the reported research results and discusses the merits of several methods applied directly to the forebody, including: (1) movable strakes, (2) blowing surface jets, (3) blowing and suction through surface slots, (4) suction through surface holes, and (5) miniaturized rotatable tip strakes. All of these were found to be effective over a varying range of angles of attack and sideslip. Most of the methods work on the basis of boundary layer separation control. The presence of closely spaced forebody vortices enhances the effectiveness since controlling the separation controls the vortices which, in turn, creates large changes in the forebody forces. Regardless of which method is employed, the maximum effectiveness is realized if it is applied near the forebody tip. The advantage of one method over another will depend on the configuration and specific performance requirements.

  12. VORTEX CREEP AGAINST TOROIDAL FLUX LINES, CRUSTAL ENTRAINMENT, AND PULSAR GLITCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Gügercinoğlu, Erbil; Alpar, M. Ali E-mail: alpar@sabanciuniv.edu

    2014-06-10

    A region of toroidally oriented quantized flux lines must exist in the proton superconductor in the core of the neutron star. This region will be a site of vortex pinning and creep. Entrainment of the neutron superfluid with the crustal lattice leads to a requirement of superfluid moment of inertia associated with vortex creep in excess of the available crustal moment of inertia. This will bring about constraints on the equation of state. The toroidal flux region provides the moment of inertia necessary to complement the crust superfluid with postglitch relaxation behavior fitting the observations.

  13. Arrays of Gaussian vortex, Bessel and Airy beams by computer-generated hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yang; Jiang, Bo; Lü, Shuchao; Liu, Yongqi; Li, Shasha; Cao, Zheng; Qi, Xinyuan

    2016-03-01

    We generate various kinds of arrays of Gaussian vortex, Bessel and Airy beams, respectively, with digital phase holograms (DPH) based on the fractional-Talbot effect by using the phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM). The linear and nonlinear transmissions of these beam arrays in strontium barium niobate (SBN) crystal are investigated numerically and experimentally. Compared with Gaussian vortex arrays, Bessel and Airy beam arrays can keep their patterns unchanged in over 20 mm, realizing non-diffracting transmission. The Fourier spectra (far-field diffraction patterns) of the lattices are also studied. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  14. Multiple-Relaxation-Time Lattice Boltzmann Models in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    dHumieres, Dominique; Ginzburg, Irina; Krafczyk, Manfred; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a concise exposition of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation, with examples of fifteen-velocity and nineteen-velocity models in three dimensions. Simulation of a diagonally lid-driven cavity flow in three dimensions at Re=500 and 2000 is performed. The results clearly demonstrate the superior numerical stability of the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation over the popular lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation.

  15. Dynamical critical behavior in a cellular model of superconducting vortex avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadakkan, Tegy John

    Bak, Tang, and Wiesenfeld showed that certain driven dissipative systems with many degrees of freedom organize into a critical state characterized by avalanche dynamics and power law distribution of avalanche sizes and durations. They called this phenomenon self-organized criticality and sandpile became the prototype of such dynamical systems. Universality in these systems is not yet well established. Forty years ago, de Gennes noted that the Bean state in a type-II superconductor is similar to a sandpile. Motivated by strong experimental evidences, Bassler and Paczuski (BP) proposed a 2D sandpile model to study self-organization in the dynamics of vortices in superconductors. In this dissertation, the effect of anisotropy in the vortex-vortex interaction, stochasticity in the vortex toppling rule, and the configuration of the pinning centers on the scaling properties of the avalanches in the BP model is studied. Also, universality in the cellular model of vortex dynamics is investigated.

  16. Probing commensurate ground states of Josephson vortex in layered superconductors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Luo, M-B; Nishizaki, T; Kobayashi, N; Hu, X

    2014-04-01

    Because of the commensurability condition between the vortex lattice constant determined by external magnetic field and the nano-scale layered structure, interlayer Josephson vortices (JVs) in high-Tc cuprate superconductors can take various configurations. We have simulated with Langevin scheme the in-plane flux-flow dynamics of JVs subject to point-like pinning centers. Oscillation in resistivity is found with the applied magnetic field, where the resistivity peaks occur around commensurate JV configurations. We have also measured the resistivity experimentally using single crystals of underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy with the anisotropy parameter gamma approximately equal to 50. A unique JV lattice has been detected for the first time.

  17. Non-conservative optical forces and Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo

    Optical manipulation using optical tweezers has been widely adopted in physics, chemical engineering and biology. While most applications and fundamental studies of optical trapping have focused on optical forces resulting from intensity gradients, we have also explored the role of radiation pressure, which is directed by phase gradients in beams of light. Interestingly, radiation pressure turns out to be a non-conservative force and drives trapped objects out of thermodynamic equilibrium with their surrounding media. We have demonstrated the resulting nonequilibrium effects experimentally by tracking the thermally driven motions of optically trapped colloidal spheres using holographic video microscopy. Rather than undergoing equilibrium thermal fluctuations, as has been assumed for more than a quarter century, a sphere in an optical tweezer enters into a stochastic steady-state characterized by closed loops in its probability current density. These toroidal vortexes constitute a bias in the particle's otherwise random thermal fluctuations arising at least indirectly from a solenoidal component in the optical force. This surprising effect is a particular manifestation of a more general class of noise-driven machines that we call Brownian vortexes. This previously unrecognized class of stochastic heat engines operates on qualitatively different principles from such extensively studied nonequilibrium systems as thermal ratchets and Brownian motors. Among its interesting properties, a Brownian vortex can reverse its direction with changes in temperature or equivalent control parameters.

  18. The vortex interaction in a propeller/stator flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    The vortex interaction encounered in the flow field of a propeller and a stator has been investigated using smoke flow visualization. A stator at angle of attack was used to generate a line vortex which interacted with the helical vortex filaments generated by a propeller. Changes in the relative vortex strengths and vortex rotational directions yielded several distinct vortex structures. Axial flow in the vortex cores is determined to influence the development of the vortex interaction.

  19. Entrainment in interacting vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shami, Rammah; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2014-11-01

    The efficiency of entrainment in single vortex rings has been examined by various studies in the literature. These studies have shown that this efficiency is greatly increased for smaller stroke-time to nozzle-diameter ratios, L/D. However, no clear consensus exists regarding the effect on the entrainment process for the sectioned delivery of the vortex forming impulse. In the present work the entrainment mechanism associated with the interaction between two co-axially separated vortex rings is explored. Planar, time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements are taken of a interacting vortex flow field. Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) extracted from the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields are employed to determine the vortex boundaries of the interacting rings and is then used to measure entrainment. Preliminary results indicate that whilst the most efficient entrainment of ambient fluid by the ring pairs occurs at larger separations, the rate and overall mass transport increase can be controlled by altering the spatial/temporal separation between successive rings and is higher at smaller ring spacing. Variation in mass transport behaviour for different ring strengths (L/D) and Reynolds numbers will also be discussed.

  20. The Onset of Vortex Turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg

    The onset of turbulence in two-dimensional, excitable media close to a global Hopf bifurcation is investigated. There one finds that the turbulence is associated with the appearance of topological point defects (vortices). A discrete form of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is used to explore this dynamics. Linear stability analysis of the complex Ginzburg -Landau equation indicates in what regions of parameter space the global, homogeneous solution is stable. However, in general the system does not asymptotically settle into this homogeneous state, rather it finds a many-vortex state. This can be either a 'frozen' state of stationary vortices, or a highly turbulent state with vortex-antivortex creation and annihilation. These states are related to the dynamics of the vortex statistics, as computed numerically. A phase diagram, based on the numerical simulations, is presented. Transient turbulence, near the transition line that separates the frozen states and the turbulent states, is discovered. These transients are identified as metastable states having a well-defined vortex density. Just below the transition to turbulence, the metastable states break down through the nucleation and growth of single-vortex droplets, leading to a finite-density frozen state. The lifetime of the metastable state is found to depend on the distance to the transition line. A relation between the nucleation time and droplet radius is derived, and their dependence on the distance to the turbulence transition is found.

  1. The onset of vortex turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, G.

    1993-01-01

    The onset of turbulence in two-dimensional, excitable media close to a global Hopf bifurcation is investigated. There one finds that the turbulence is associated with the appearance of topological point defects (vortices). A discrete form of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is used to explore this dynamics. Linear stability analysis of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation indicates in what regions of parameter space the global, homogeneous solution is stable. However, in general the system does not asymptotically settle into this homogeneous state, rather it finds a many-vortex state. This can be either a [open quotes]frozen[close quotes] state of stationary vortices, or a highly turbulent state with vortex-antivortex creation and annihilation. These states are related to the dynamics of the vortex statistics, as computed numerically. A phase diagram, based on the numerical simulations, is presented. Transient turbulence, near the transition line that separates the frozen states and the turbulent states, is discovered. These transients are identified a metastable states having a well-defined vortex density. Just below the transition to turbulence, the metastable states break down through the nucleation and growth of single-vortex droplets, leading to a finite-density frozen state. The lifetime of the metastable state is found to depend on the distance to the transition line. A relation between the nucleation time and droplet radius is derived, and their dependence on the distance to the turbulence transition is found.

  2. The structure of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.

    1978-01-01

    The term 'vortex breakdown', as used in the reported investigation, refers to a disturbance characterized by the formation of an internal stagnation point on the vortex axis, followed by reversed flow in a region of limited axial extent. Two forms of vortex breakdown, which predominate, are shown in photographs. One form is called 'near-axisymmetric' (sometimes 'axisymmetric'), and the other is called 'spiral'. A survey is presented of work published since the 1972 review by Hall. Most experimental data taken since Hall's review have been in tubes, and the survey deals primarily with such cases. It is found that the assumption of axial-symmetry has produced useful results. The classification of flows as supercritical or subcritical, a step that assumes symmetry, has proved universally useful. Experiments show that vortex breakdown is always preceded by an upstream supercritical flow and followed by a subcritical wake. However, a comparison between experiments and attempts at prediction is less than encouraging. For a satisfactory understanding of the structure of vortex breakdown it is apparently necessary to take into account also aspects of asymmetry.

  3. Geometries of Karman Vortex Street

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roushan, Pedram; Wu, X. L.

    2004-03-01

    The Bénard-von Kármán vortex street is studied in a flowing soap film channel. The two-dimensional fluid flow in the film allows stable vortex streets to be generated and investigated over a broad range of Reynolds numbers, 10vortex street is analyzed for different diameter rods, which span more than two orders of magnitude in their diameters. The parameters that characterize the envelop of the vortex street, such as the growth rate and the saturation amplitude, are measured for different Reynolds numbers. It is found that all of the curves representing the envelope can be collapsed onto a single master curve, suggesting that the shape of Karman vortex streets is universal, independent of Re. We construct a simple model that takes into account the energy transfer into vortices by periodic oscillations of transverse velocity fluctuations beneath the rod. This simple model not only explains the near wake shape of the street, but also allows other useful information such as the kinetic energy injected into the fluid and the drag coefficient CD to be extracted.

  4. Vortex Formation in Shallow Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Vortical structures having a scale much larger than the depth of the flow, which arise in bluff body wakes, jets, and mixing layers generated in shallow layers, show distinctive features due to the influence of bed friction. Cinema techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed to characterize quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional aspects of the vortex development in terms of: patterns of vorticity; flow topology involving definition of critical points; and global spectral and cross-spectral analyses, based on simultaneous time records at thousands of grid points of the cinema imaging. Taken together, these representations lead to an understanding of the relationship between coherent vortex development and unsteadiness along the bed and, furthermore, provide a basis for exploration of concepts generic to separated shear layers in shallow flows. These concepts include: suppression of a primary mode of vortex formation due to bed friction and emergence of another mode; resonant coupling between a gravity wave of the shallow layer and vortex formation, leading to large-scale vortices; and passive and active (open loop) control, which can either retard or enhance the onset of vortex formation. These studies suggest opportunities for further investigation on both experimental and numerical fronts. Collaboration with Haojun Fu, Alis Ekmekci, Jung-Chang Lin, and Muammer Ozgoren is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Vortex Flows at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data are for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft with Mach numbers of 1.5 to 4.6. Data are presented to show the types of vortex structures that occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures on vehicle performance and control. The data show the presence of both small- and large-scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices. Data are shown that highlight the effect of leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. Finally, a discussion of a design approach for wings that use vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speeds is presented.

  6. Vortex waves in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ariste, A.; Centeno, R.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Waves in the magnetized solar atmosphere are one of the favourite means of transferring and depositing energy into the solar corona. The study of waves brings information not just on the dynamics of the magnetized plasma, but also on the possible ways in which the corona is heated. Aims: The identification and analysis of the phase singularities or dislocations provide us with a complementary approach to the magnetoacoustic and Aflvén waves propagating in the solar atmosphere. They allow us to identify individual wave modes, shedding light on the probability of excitation or the nature of the triggering mechanism. Methods: We use a time series of Doppler shifts measured in two spectral lines, filtered around the three-minute period region. The data show a propagating magnetoacoustic slow mode with several dislocations and, in particular, a vortex line. We study under what conditions the different wave modes propagating in the umbra can generate the observed dislocations. Results: The observed dislocations can be fully interpreted as a sequence of sausage and kink modes excited sequentially on average during 15 min. Kink and sausage modes appear to be excited independently and sequentially. The transition from one to the other lasts less than three minutes. During the transition we observe and model the appearance of superoscillations inducing large phase gradients and phase mixing. Conclusions: The analysis of the observed wave dislocations leads us to the identification of the propagating wave modes in umbrae. The identification in the data of superoscillatory regions during the transition from one mode to the other may be an important indicator of the location of wave dissipation.

  7. The Solar Vortex: Electric Power Generation using Anchored, Buoyancy-Induced Columnar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glezer, Ari

    2015-04-01

    Naturally-occurring, buoyancy-driven columnar vortices (``dust devils'') that are driven by the instability of thermally stratified air layers and sustained by the entrainment of ground- heated air, occur spontaneously in the natural environment with core diameters of 1-50 m and heights up to 1 km. These vortices convert low-grade waste heat in the air layer overlying the warm surface into a solar-induced wind with significant kinetic energy. Unlike dust devil vortices that are typically free to wander laterally, the Solar Vortex (SoV) is deliberately triggered and anchored within a cylindrical domain bounded by an azimuthal array of stationary ground-mounted vertical vanes and sustained by continuous entrainment of the ground-heated air through these vanes. The mechanical energy of the anchored vortex is exploited for power generation by coupling the vortex to a vertical-axis turbine. This simple, low-cost electric power generating unit is competitive in cost, intermittency, and capacity factor with traditional solar power technologies. The considerable kinetic energy of the vortex column cannot be explained by buoyancy alone, and the fundamental mechanisms associated with the formation, evolution, and dynamics of an anchored, buoyancy-driven columnar vortex were investigated experimentally and numerically with specific emphasis on flow manipulation for increasing the available kinetic energy and therefore the generated power. These investigations have also considered the dependence of the vortex scaling and strength on the thermal resources and on the flow enclosure in the laboratory and in the natural environment. Preliminary outdoor tests of a two-meter scale prototype successfully demonstrated the ability to engender and anchor a columnar vortex using only solar radiation and couple the flow to a vertical axis wind turbine. A kilowatt-scale outer door prototype will be tested during the summer of 2015.

  8. Analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flows and supersonic vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1991-01-01

    Topics relative to the analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flow and supersonic vortex breakdown are discussed. Specific topics include the computation of compressible, quasi-axisymmetric slender vortex flow and breakdown; supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown; and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes asymmetric solutions for cones and cone-cylinder configurations.

  9. Picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination forms a monocrystalline silicon needle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fuyuto; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Hidai, Hirofumi; Yamane, Keisaku; Morita, Ryuji; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a monocrystalline silicon needle by picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination was demonstrated for the first time in this study. The dynamics of this silicon needle formation was further revealed by employing an ultrahigh-speed camera. The melted silicon was collected through picosecond pulse deposition to the dark core of the optical vortex, forming the silicon needle on a submicrosecond time scale. The needle was composed of monocrystalline silicon with the same lattice index (100) as that of the silicon substrate, and had a height of approximately 14 μm and a thickness of approximately 3 μm. Overlaid vortex pulses allowed the needle to be shaped with a height of approximately 40 μm without any changes to the crystalline properties. Such a monocrystalline silicon needle can be applied to devices in many fields, such as core-shell structures for silicon photonics and photovoltaic devices as well as nano- or microelectromechanical systems. PMID:26907639

  10. Picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination forms a monocrystalline silicon needle

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Fuyuto; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Hidai, Hirofumi; Yamane, Keisaku; Morita, Ryuji; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a monocrystalline silicon needle by picosecond optical vortex pulse illumination was demonstrated for the first time in this study. The dynamics of this silicon needle formation was further revealed by employing an ultrahigh-speed camera. The melted silicon was collected through picosecond pulse deposition to the dark core of the optical vortex, forming the silicon needle on a submicrosecond time scale. The needle was composed of monocrystalline silicon with the same lattice index (100) as that of the silicon substrate, and had a height of approximately 14 μm and a thickness of approximately 3 μm. Overlaid vortex pulses allowed the needle to be shaped with a height of approximately 40 μm without any changes to the crystalline properties. Such a monocrystalline silicon needle can be applied to devices in many fields, such as core–shell structures for silicon photonics and photovoltaic devices as well as nano- or microelectromechanical systems. PMID:26907639

  11. Vortex trails in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pao, H.-P.; Lai, R. Y.; Schemm, C. E.

    1982-03-01

    A framework is proposed which accounts for the properties of atmospheric vortex trails used by wind flow. Similarities between atmospheric vortex patterns and those in stratified fluids are observed noting that the generation of vortex trails is primarily due to density stratification. Horizontal vortices form for values of Froude numbers between 2-505, and for Reynolds numbers between 600-100,000. The cause of late-wake vortices and the reason for their great regularity is the presence of a large-scale coherent structure in the early wake. A critical Froude number exists above which no horizontal vortices form and its value for a bluff body is about 160. Finally, it is also noted that ambient shear can prevent or destroy late-wake horizontal vortices.

  12. Magnetic Vortex Based Transistor Operations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, D.; Barman, S.; Barman, A.

    2014-01-01

    Transistors constitute the backbone of modern day electronics. Since their advent, researchers have been seeking ways to make smaller and more efficient transistors. Here, we demonstrate a sustained amplification of magnetic vortex core gyration in coupled two and three vortices by controlling their relative core polarities. This amplification is mediated by a cascade of antivortex solitons travelling through the dynamic stray field. We further demonstrated that the amplification can be controlled by switching the polarity of the middle vortex in a three vortex sequence and the gain can be controlled by the input signal amplitude. An attempt to show fan–out operation yielded gain for one of the symmetrically placed branches which can be reversed by switching the core polarity of all the vortices in the network. The above observations promote the magnetic vortices as suitable candidates to work as stable bipolar junction transistors (BJT). PMID:24531235

  13. Vortex methods for separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations by Lagrangian vortex methods is discussed. The mathematical background is presented and includes the relationship with traditional point-vortex studies, convergence to smooth solutions of the Euler equations, and the essential differences between two and three-dimensional cases. The difficulties in extending the method to viscous or compressible flows are explained. Two-dimensional flows around bluff bodies are emphasized. Robustness of the method and the assessment of accuracy, vortex-core profiles, time-marching schemes, numerical dissipation, and efficient programming are treated. Operation counts for unbounded and periodic flows are given, and two algorithms designed to speed up the calculations are described.

  14. Unsuccessful Concepts for Aircraft Wake Vortex Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, R. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Exploratory concepts are described which were investigated to achieve a reduction in the vortex induced rolling upsets produced by heavy aircraft trailing vortexes. The initial tests included the use of mass injection, oscillating devices, wingtip shape design, interacting multiple vortexes, and end plates. Although later refinements of some of these concepts were successful, initial test results did not indicate a capability of these concepts to significantly alter the vortex induced rolling upset on a following aircraft.

  15. Cutting of bent vortex lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenleithner, P.

    1982-07-01

    One of the major problems in the application of type II superconductors is the appearance of resistivity in case where a current-carrying specimen is in a longitudinal magnetic field. This is explained by the onset of flux-line cutting events, followed by cross-joining of the line parts. The calculation given here shows the amount of repulsive force and energy between two curved vortex lines and examines the general stability of the vortex-vortex system. First, the actual interaction potential between curved vortices is computed. It includes all electromagnetic and core overlap terms of interactions and self-interaction, and allows computation of the system energy under all curved vortex-line configurations. A computer program is used to find the form of lowest free energy. To do this, special trial functions are established to describe the three-dimensional form of the vortex-vortex system. In these functions parameters determine the qualitative and quantitative form. The asymptotic boundary conditions are built into the nature of the trial functions. The computer program now minimizes the free energy with respect to these parameters. The resulting repulsive energy and force are more than ten times less than the known results for straight flux lines, especially for small asymptotic cutting angles. There is no sharp maximum in the plot of repulsive force versus flux-line separation. A remarkable results is the loss of general stability below a separation distance of several London penetration depths, depending on the cutting angle and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter. The explanation lies in the local attraction of central sections of the vortices as a result of configurational adaption. This explains the onset of resistance at small currents and small magnetic fields.

  16. Vortex states in a non-Abelian magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Predrag

    2016-08-01

    A type-II superconductor survives in an external magnetic field by admitting an Abrikosov lattice of quantized vortices. This is an imprint of the Aharonov-Bohm effect created by the Abelian U(1) gauge field. The simplest non-Abelian analog of such a gauge field, which belongs to the SU(2) symmetry group, can be found in topological insulators. Here we discover a superconducting ground state with a lattice of SU(2) vortices in a simple two-dimensional model that presents an SU(2) "magnetic" field (invariant under time reversal) to attractively interacting fermions. The model directly captures the correlated topological insulator quantum well, and approximates one channel for instabilities on the Kondo topological insulator surface. Due to its simplicity, the model might become amenable to cold atom simulations in the foreseeable future. The vitality of low-energy vortex states born out of SU(2) magnetic fields is promising for the creation of incompressible vortex liquids with non-Abelian fractional excitations.

  17. Coulombic contribution and fat center vortex model

    SciTech Connect

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Deldar, Sedigheh

    2007-02-27

    The fat (thick) center vortex model is one of the phenomenological models which is fairly successful to interpret the linear potential between static sources. However, the Coulombic part of the potential has not been investigated by the model yet. In an attempt to get the Coulombic contribution and to remove the concavity of the potentials, we are studying different vortex profiles and vortex sizes.

  18. A Experimental Study of Viscous Vortex Rings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziedzic, Mauricio

    Motivated by the role played by vortex rings in the process of turbulent mixing, the work is focused on the problem of stability and viscous decay of a single vortex ring. A new classification is proposed for vortex rings which is based on extensive hot-wire measurements of velocity in the ring core and wake and flow visualization. Vortex rings can be classified as laminar, wavy, turbulence-producing, and turbulent. Prediction of vortex ring type is shown to be possible based on the vortex ring Reynolds number. Linear growth rates of ring diameter with time are observed for all types of vortex rings, with different growth rates occurring for laminar and turbulent vortex rings. Data on the viscous decay of vortex rings are used to provide experimental confirmation of the accuracy of Saffman's equation for the velocity of propagation of a vortex ring. Experimental data indicate that instability of the vortex ring strongly depends on the mode of generation and can be delayed by properly adjusting the generation parameters. A systematic review of the literature on vortex-ring interactions is presented in the form of an appendix, which helps identify areas in which further research may be fruitful.

  19. Generation of Nonlinear Vortex Precursors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Feng, Xun-Li; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex harmonics are generated in the transmitted field due to carrier effects associated with ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provides a straightforward way to measure precursors. By virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical information and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity, and high speed communication are required.

  20. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, Andras J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  1. Generation of Nonlinear Vortex Precursors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Feng, Xun-Li; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex harmonics are generated in the transmitted field due to carrier effects associated with ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provides a straightforward way to measure precursors. By virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical information and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity, and high speed communication are required. PMID:27447507

  2. Realization of Ground State Artificial Skyrmion Lattices at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Maranville, Brian B.; Balk, Andrew J.; Kirby, Brian J.; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Borchers, Julie A.; Fischer, Peter; Liu, Kai

    Artificial skyrmion lattices stable at ambient conditions offer a convenient and powerful platform to explore skyrmion physics and topological phenomena and motivates their inclusion in next-generation data and logic devices. In this work we present direct experimental evidence of artificial skyrmion lattices with a stable ground state at room temperature. Our approach is to pattern vortex-state Co nanodots (560 nm diameter) in hexagonal arrays on top of a Co/Pd multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy; the skyrmion state is prepared using a specific magnetic field sequence. Ion irradiation has been employed to suppress PMA in the underlayer and allow imprinting of the vortex structure from the nanodots to form skyrmion lattices, as revealed by polarized neutron reflectometry. Circularity control is realized through Co dot shape asymmetry, and confirmed by microscopy and FORC magnetometry. The vortex polarity is set during the field sequence and confirmed by magnetometry. Spin-transport studies further demonstrate a sensitivity to the skyrmion spin texture.Work supported by NSF (DMR-1008791, ECCS-1232275 and DMR-1543582)

  3. Magnetic coupling of vortices in a two dimensional lattice.

    PubMed

    Nissen, D; Mitin, D; Klein, O; Arekapudi, S S P K; Thomas, S; Im, M-Y; Fischer, P; Albrecht, M

    2015-11-20

    We investigated the magnetization reversal of magnetic vortex structures in a two-dimensional lattice. The structures were formed by permalloy (Py) film deposition onto large arrays of self assembled spherical SiO(2)-particles with a diameter of 330 nm. We present the dependence of the nucleation and annihilation field of the vortex structures as a function of the Py layer thickness(aspect ratio) and temperature. By increasing the Py thickness up to 90 nm or alternatively by lowering the temperature the vortex structure becomes more stable as expected. However, the increase of the Py thickness results in the onset of strong exchange coupling between neighboring Py caps due to the emergence of Py bridges connecting them. In particular, we studied the influence of magnetic coupling locally by in-field scanning magne to-resistive microscopy and full-field magnetic soft x-ray microscopy, revealing a domain-like nucleation process of vortex states, which arises via domain wall propagation due to exchange coupling of the closely packed structures. By analyzing the rotation sense of the reversed areas, large connected domains are present with the same circulation sense. Furthermore, the lateral core displacements when an in-plane field is applied were investigated, revealing spatially enlarged vortex cores and a broader distribution with increasing Py layer thickness. In addition, the presence of some mixed states, vortices and c-states, is indicated for the array with the thickest Py layer. PMID:26511585

  4. Vortex pair production and decay of a two-dimensional supercurrent by a quantum-field-theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Iengo, R. |; Jug, G. |

    1995-09-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of the decay of a supercurrent through homogeneous nucleation of vortex-antivortex pairs in a two-dimensional (2D) like superconductor or superfluid by means of a quantum electrodynamic formulation for the decay of the 2D vacuum. The case in which both externally driven current and Magnus force are present is treated exactly, taking the vortex activation energy and its inertial mass as independent parameters. Quantum dissipation is included through the formulation introduced by Caldeira and Leggett. The most relevant consequence of quantum dissipation is the elimination of the threshold for vortex production due to the Magnus force. In the dissipation-dominated case, corresponding formally to the limit of zero intertial mass, an exact formula for the pair production rate is given. If however the inertial mass is strictly zero we find that vortex production is inhibited by a quantum effect related to the Magnus force. The possibility of including vortex pinning is investigated by means of an effective harmonic potential. While an additional term in the vortex activation energy can account for the effect of a finite barrier in the direction perpendicular to the current, pinning along the current depresses the role of the Magnus force in the dissipation-dominated dynamics, except for the above-mentioned quantum effect. A possible description of vortex nucleation due to the combined effects of temperature and externally driven currents is also presented along with an evaluation of the resulting voltage drop.

  5. Quenching of vortex breakdown oscillations via harmonic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. M.; Cui, Y. D.; Marques, F.; Lim, T. T.

    Vortex breakdown is a phenomenon inherent to many practical problems, such as leading-edge vortices on aircraft, atmospheric tornadoes, and flame-holders in combustion devices. The breakdown of these vortices is associated with the stagnation of the axial velocity on the vortex axis and the development of a near-axis recirculation zone. For large enough Reynolds number, the breakdown can be time-dependent. The unsteadiness can have serious consequences in some applications, such as tail-buffeting in aircraft flying at high angles of attack. There has been much interest in controlling the vortex breakdown phenomenon, but most efforts have focused on either shifting the threshold for the onset of steady breakdown or altering the spatial location of the recirculation zone. There has been much less attention paid to the problem of controlling unsteady vortex breakdown. Here we present results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of vortex breakdown in an enclosed cylinder in which low-amplitude modulations of the rotating endwall that sets up the vortex are used as an open-loop control. As expected, for very low amplitudes of the modulation, variation of the modulation frequency reveals typical resonance tongues and frequency locking, so that the open-loop control allows us to drive the unsteady vortex breakdown to a prescribed periodicity within the resonance regions. For modulation amplitudes above a critical level that depends on the modulation frequency (but still very low), the result is a periodic state synchronous with the forcing frequency over an extensive range of forcing frequencies. Of particular interest is the spatial form of this forced periodic state: for modulation frequencies less than about twice the natural frequency of the unsteady breakdown, the oscillations of the near-axis recirculation zone are amplified, whereas for modulation frequencies larger than about twice the natural frequency the oscillations of the recirculation

  6. Quantum Phase Transitions of Hard-Core Bosons on the Kagome Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakov, S. V.; Melko, R. G.; Sengupta, K.; Wessel, S.; Kim, Yong Baek

    2006-03-01

    We study hard-core bosons with nearest-neighbor repulsion on the kagome lattice at different filling factors using quantum Monte Carlo simulations and a dual vortex theory. At half-filling, the ground state of the system is always a uniform superfluid in contrast to the case of the triangular lattice. There exists a quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a valence bond solid phase away from half-filling. The possibility of unusual quantum criticality is investigated.

  7. Vortex structures of rotating Bose-Einstein condensates in an anisotropic harmonic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Matveenko, S. I.

    2010-09-15

    We found an analytical solution for the vortex structure in a rapidly rotating trapped Bose-Einstein condensate in the lowest Landau level approximation. This solution is exact in the limit of a large number of vortices and is obtained for the case of a condensate in a anisotropic harmonic potential. The solution describes as limiting cases both a triangle vortex lattice in the symmetric potential trap and a quasi-one-dimensional structure of vortex rows in an asymmetric case, when the rotation frequency is very close to the lower trapping potential frequency. The shape of the density profile is found to be close to the Thomas-Fermi inverted paraboloid form, except in the vicinity of edges of a condensate cloud.

  8. Vortex fluctuation in HgBa 2Ca 3Cu 4O 10+δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mun-Seog; Kim, Wan-Seon; Lee, Sung-Ik; Yu, Seong-Cho; Itskevich, E. S.; Kuzemskaya, I.

    1997-08-01

    Reversible magnetization with the external magnetic fields of 1 T ≤ H ≤ 5 T parallel to the c-axis has been measured for the grain aligned HgBa2Ca3Cu4O10+δ. A strong vortex fluctuation effect was clearly observed and the magnetization is well described by the vortex fluctuation model. From this analysis, the penetration depth λab(0) = 1583 Å and the effective interlayer spacing s = 44.6 Å were estimated. However, the value of s is significantly larger than the lattice parameter c = 19 Å, which is different from the prediction of the vortex fluctuation model. From the model on superconducting fluctuations proposed by Koshelev, in which not only the critical fluctuations at the lowest Landau level but also the Gaussian fluctuations at higher Landau levels were considered, the different value of s = 15.4 Å was obtained.

  9. Quantized Vortex State in hcp Solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Minoru

    2012-11-01

    The quantized vortex state appearing in the recently discovered new states in hcp 4He since their discovery (Kim and Chan, Nature, 427:225-227, 2004; Science, 305:1941, 2004) is discussed. Special attention is given to evidence for the vortex state as the vortex fluid (VF) state (Anderson, Nat. Phys., 3:160-162, 2007; Phys. Rev. Lett., 100:215301, 2008; Penzev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 101:065301, 2008; Nemirovskii et al., arXiv:0907.0330, 2009) and its transition into the supersolid (SS) state (Shimizu et al., arXiv:0903.1326, 2009; Kubota et al., J. Low Temp. Phys., 158:572-577, 2010; J. Low Temp. Phys., 162:483-491, 2011). Its features are described. The historical explanations (Reatto and Chester, Phys. Rev., 155(1):88-100, 1967; Chester, Phys. Rev. A, 2(1):256-258, 1970; Andreev and Lifshitz, JETP Lett., 29:1107-1113, 1969; Leggett, Phys. Rev. Lett., 25(22), 1543-1546, 1970; Matsuda and Tsuneto, Prog. Theor. Phys., 46:411-436, 1970) for the SS state in quantum solids such as solid 4He were based on the idea of Bose Einstein Condensation (BEC) of the imperfections such as vacancies, interstitials and other possible excitations in the quantum solids which are expected because of the large zero-point motions. The SS state was proposed as a new state of matter in which real space ordering of the lattice structure of the solid coexists with the momentum space ordering of superfluidity. A new type of superconductors, since the discovery of the cuprate high T c superconductors, HTSCs (Bednorz and Mueller, Z. Phys., 64:189, 1986), has been shown to share a feature with the vortex state, involving the VF and vortex solid states. The high T c s of these materials are being discussed in connection to the large fluctuations associated with some other phase transitions like the antiferromagnetic transition in addition to that of the low dimensionality. The supersolidity in the hcp solid 4He, in contrast to the new superconductors which have multiple degrees of freedom of

  10. Calorimetric study of the transitions between the different vortex states in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}.

    SciTech Connect

    Bouquet, F.; Calemczuk, R.; Crabtree, G. W.; Erb, A.; Fisher, R. A.; Junod, A.; Kwok, W. K.; Marcenat, C.; Phillips, N. E.; Roulin, M.; Schilling, A.; Welp, U.

    1999-08-17

    We have studied the vortex phase diagram of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) in very strong magnetic field (0-26 Tesla) by a.c. calorimetry. We describe the anomalies associated with the transitions between the different vortex states (solid, liquid, and glass), with special emphasis on the first order flux lattice melting.

  11. Evolution of a plasma vortex in air.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a vortex-shaped plasma in air by using a capacitively coupled dielectric barrier discharge system. We show that a vortex-shaped plasma can be produced inside a helium gas vortex and is capable of propagating for 3 cm. The fluctuation of the plasma ring shows a scaling relation with the Reynolds number of the vortex. The transient discharge reveals the property of corona discharge, where the conducting channel within the gas vortex and the blur plasma emission are observed at each half voltage cycle. PMID:26871181

  12. Evolution of a plasma vortex in air.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a vortex-shaped plasma in air by using a capacitively coupled dielectric barrier discharge system. We show that a vortex-shaped plasma can be produced inside a helium gas vortex and is capable of propagating for 3 cm. The fluctuation of the plasma ring shows a scaling relation with the Reynolds number of the vortex. The transient discharge reveals the property of corona discharge, where the conducting channel within the gas vortex and the blur plasma emission are observed at each half voltage cycle.

  13. Vortex telegraph noise in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shung, E.; Rosenbaum, T.F.; Coppersmith, S.N.; Crabtree, G.W.; Kwok, W.

    1997-11-01

    We cool untwinned single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} with columnar defects down to liquid-He temperatures and study the development of pinning in the strongly interacting Bose glass with local Hall-probe magnetometry. We are able to resolve discrete fluctuations in the local vortex density resulting from reconfigurations of the vortex assembly between metastable states nearby in energy. By varying the applied magnetic field, and therefore the mean vortex density, we gain microscopic information about vortex-vortex interactions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Perspectives in Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramashi, Yoshinobu

    2007-12-01

    Preface -- Fixed point actions, symmetries and symmetry transformations on the lattice / P. Hasenfratz -- Algorithms for dynamical fennions / A. D. Kennedy -- Applications of chiral perturbation theory to lattice QCD / Stephen R. Sharpe -- Lattice QCD with a chiral twist / S. Sint -- Non-perturbative QCD: renormalization, O(A) - Improvement and matching to Heavy Quark effective theory / Rainer Sommer.

  15. Disorder-induced two-step melting of vortex matter in Co-intercalated NbS e2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Somesh Chandra; Singh, Harkirat; Roy, Indranil; Bagwe, Vivas; Bala, Dibyendu; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2016-04-01

    Disorder-induced melting where the increase in positional entropy created by random pinning sites drives the order-disorder transition in a periodic solid provides an alternate route to the more conventional thermal melting. Here, using real-space imaging of the vortex lattice through scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we show that, in the presence of weak pinning, the vortex lattice in a type-II superconductor disorders through two distinct topological transitions. Across each transition, we separately identify metastable states formed through superheating of the low-temperature state or supercooling of the high-temperature state. Comparing crystals with different levels of pinning we conclude that the two-step melting is fundamentally associated with the presence of random pinning which generates topological defects in the ordered vortex lattice.

  16. Spin-1 Ising model on tetrahedron recursive lattices: Exact results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the ferromagnetic spin-1 Ising model on the tetrahedron recursive lattices. An exact solution of the model is found in the framework of which it is shown that the critical temperatures of the second order phase transitions of the model are driven by a single equation simultaneously on all such lattices. It is also shown that this general equation for the critical temperatures is equivalent to the corresponding polynomial equation for the model on the tetrahedron recursive lattice with arbitrary given value of the coordination number. The explicit form of these polynomial equations is shown for the lattices with the coordination numbers z = 6, 9, and 12. In addition, it is shown that the thermodynamic properties of all possible physical phases of the model are also completely driven by the corresponding single equations simultaneously on all tetrahedron recursive lattices. In this respect, the spontaneous magnetization, the free energy, the entropy, and the specific heat of the model are studied in detail.

  17. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Henrique W; Bauer, Ross O; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers. PMID:26172698

  18. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique W.; Bauer, Ross O.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  19. Vortex lines in layered superconductors. I. From 3D to 2D behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, D.

    1994-02-01

    The fundamental aspects of vortices in layered superconductors (natural or artificial multilayered materials) are reviewed, focusing on the role of anisotropy and very short coherence lengths. These materials divide into three classes, with increasing T_c's : chalcogenides, organic superconductors and high-T_c copper oxides. The first part of the paper summarizes the quantitative features of the vortex lattice, due to the incorporation of anisotropy in the 3D Ginzburg-Landau or London descriptions : anisotropy of critical fields and vortex lattice, elastic coefficients and melting. This kind of model describes most of the properties of moderately anisotropic compounds as Y : 123. The second part concerns the Josephson-coupled layered systems and identifies in which regimes vortices exhibit a quasi-2D character. Qualitatively new features as Josephson vortices, 2D vortices, Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and lock-in of vortices are reviewed. This analysis is adapted to compounds as Bi : 2212 or multilayers, but also to Y : 123 for some aspects. On passe en revue les aspects fondamentaux des vortex dans les supraconducteurs lamellaires (naturels ou superréseaux artificiels), en mettant l'accent sur le rôle de l'anisotropie et des très courtes longueurs de cohérence. Ces composés se divisent en trois classes, de T_c croissants : chalcogénures, supraconducteurs organiques et oxydes de cuivre à haut T_c. La première partie de l'article résume les aspects quantitatifs dus à l'incorporation de l'anisotropie dans les descriptions 3D Ginzburg-Landau ou London du réseau de vortex.: anisotropie des champs critiques et du réseau de vortex, coefficients élastiques et fusion. Ce type de modèle décrit une grande partie des propriétés des composés modérément anisotropes tels que Y : 123. La seconde partie concerne les systèmes lamellaires à couplage Josephson et identifie dans quels régimes les vortex présentent un caractère quasi-2D. Des effets

  20. Simulation of swimming of a flexible filament using the generalized lattice-spring lattice-Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tai-Hsien; Guo, Rurng-Sheng; He, Guo-Wei; Liu, Ying-Ming; Qi, Dewei

    2014-05-21

    A generalized lattice-spring lattice-Boltzmann model (GLLM) is introduced by adding a three-body force in the traditional lattice-spring model. This method is able to deal with bending deformation of flexible biological bodies in fluids. The interactions between elastic solids and fluid are treated with the immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. GLLM is validated by comparing the present results with the existing theoretical and simulation results. As an application of GLLM, swimming of flagellum in fluid is simulated and propulsive force as a function of driven frequency and fluid structures at various Reynolds numbers 0.15-5.1 are presented in this paper.

  1. Burning invariant manifolds in time-periodic and time-aperiodic vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowen, Savannah; Solomon, Tom

    2014-11-01

    We present experiments that study reaction fronts in a flow composed of a single, translating vortex. The fronts are produced by the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) chemical reaction, and the vortex flow is driven magnetohydrodynamically by a radial current in a thin fluid layer above a Nd-Fe-Bo magnet. The magnet is mounted on a pair of perpendicular translation stages, allowing for controlled, two-dimensional movement of the magnet and the resulting vortex. We study reaction fronts that pin to the vortex for time-independent flows (produced by moving the vortex with a constant velocity) and for time-periodic and time-aperiodic flows produced by oscillating the vortex laterally. The steady-state front shape is analyzed in terms of burning invariant manifolds (BIMs) that act as one-way barriers against any propagating reaction fronts. For time independent and time-periodic flows, the location of the BIMs are calculated numerically and are compared with experimental images of the pinned reaction fronts. We investigate extensions of this BIM approach for analyzing fronts in time-aperiodic flows. Supported by NSF Grants DMR-1004744, DMR-1361881 and PHY-1156964.

  2. Vortex pinning vs. superconducting wire network in nanostructured superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicent, Jose L.

    2014-03-01

    Superconducting films with array of ordered defects allow studying effects which are governed by the interplay between lengths of the nanostructured sample and lengths related to physical parameters, as for example coherence length. When the coherence length and the separation between the defects are similar, the sample can mimic a superconducting wire network. In this situation, applied magnetic fields induce Little-Parks oscillations due to fluxoid quantization constraint. These L-P oscillations vanish when the coherence length is smaller than the ``stripe'' superconducting region between the defects. In superconducting films with array of nanodefects periodic oscillations can also be detected in resistance R(H), critical current Ic(H), magnetization M(H) and ac-susceptibility χac(H) in a broader temperature range than the temperature interval where L-P oscillations are present. Vortex pinning mechanisms are the origin of these oscillations. These oscillations emerge due to matching effects between two lattices: the vortex lattice and the lattice of defects. These oscillations are detected in a broader temperature interval than the temperature interval where L-P oscillations are present. Worth to note that, due to the coherence length divergence at Tc, a crossover to wire network behavior is experimentally found always. Interestingly, both mechanisms coexist close to superconducting critical temperatures; i. e. in the temperature region where the sample mimics superconducting wire network. These overlapping effects can be experimentally separated and both origins can be discriminated. We have analyzed and single out, with magnetotransport measurements, both mechanisms: pinning and fluxoid quantization constraint in superconducting films with arrays of non-magnetic and magnetic dots. Work supported by Spanish MINECO and CAM.

  3. Evolution from BCS to Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless Superfluidity in One-Dimensional Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskin, M.; de Melo, C. A. R. Sá

    2009-10-01

    We analyze the finite temperature phase diagram of fermion mixtures in one-dimensional optical lattices as a function of interaction strength. At low temperatures, the system evolves from an anisotropic three-dimensional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluid to an effectively two-dimensional Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) superfluid as the interaction strength increases. We calculate the critical temperature as a function of interaction strength, and identify the region where the dimensional crossover occurs for a specified optical lattice potential. Finally, we show that the dominant vortex excitations near the critical temperature evolve from multiplane elliptical vortex loops in the three-dimensional regime to planar vortex-antivortex pairs in the two-dimensional regime, and we propose a detection scheme for these excitations.

  4. Preliminary study of the three-dimensional deformation of the vortex in Karman vortex street

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Guocan; Guo, Liang; Wu, Zuobin; Ma, Huiyang

    1992-03-01

    The mechanism for 3D evolution of the isolated Karman vortex and the thin-vortex filament in a circular cylinder wake is studied numerically using the LIA method. The results show that the vortex motion is unstable for small 3D disturbances in the separated wake of a circular cylinder. Karman vortex in the time-averaged wake flowfield wolves into a horseshoe-spoon-like 3D structure. The thin vortex filament deforms three-dimensionally in the braid and generates streamwise vortex structures which incline to the region maximum-deformation direction of the flowfield.

  5. A lattice-Boltzmann scheme of the Navier-Stokes equations on a 3D cuboid lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Haoda; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    The standard lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow simulation is based on a square (in 2D) or cubic (in 3D) lattice grids. Recently, two new lattice Boltzmann schemes have been developed on a 2D rectangular grid using the MRT (multiple-relaxation-time) collision model, by adding a free parameter in the definition of moments or by extending the equilibrium moments. Here we developed a lattice Boltzmann model on 3D cuboid lattice, namely, a lattice grid with different grid lengths in different spatial directions. We designed our MRT-LBM model by matching the moment equations from the Chapman-Enskog expansion with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model guarantees correct hydrodynamics. A second-order term is added to the equilibrium moments in order to restore the isotropy of viscosity on a cuboid lattice. The form and the coefficients of the extended equilibrium moments are determined through an inverse design process. An additional benefit of the model is that the viscosity can be adjusted independent of the stress-moment relaxation parameter, thus improving the numerical stability of the model. The resulting cuboid MRT-LBM model is then validated through benchmark simulations using laminar channel flow, turbulent channel flow, and the 3D Taylor-Green vortex flow.

  6. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  7. Vortex phase transitions in monolayer FeSe film on SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Chang, Cui-Zu; Xi, Xiaoxiang; Mak, Kin Fai; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2016-06-01

    The voltage–current (V–I) characteristics in superconducting monolayer FeSe film on SrTiO3 (100) under different magnetic fields are investigated. The zero-field V–I result exhibits signatures of a Berezinski–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition, a characteristic of two-dimensional (2D) superconductors. Under an applied magnetic field, with current density lower than the critical current density, the sheet resistance versus current density (R sq–J) dependence changes from ohmic (R sq independent of J) to non-ohmic (a nonlinear dependence of R sq on J) as the temperature decreases, indicative of a vortex phase transition/crossover. We interpret the high-temperature phase as the vortex liquid phase and the low-temperature phase as the vortex slush phase, which has short-ranged vortex lattice correlation, while long-range correlation (i.e. true superconductivity) is absent. No transition into a vortex glass phase is seen, illustrating the importance of thermal fluctuations in a perfect 2D superconductor under a magnetic field.

  8. Vortex-Core Reversal Dynamics: Towards Vortex Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-03-01

    An energy-efficient, ultrahigh-density, ultrafast, and nonvolatile solid-state universal memory is a long-held dream in the field of information-storage technology. The magnetic random access memory (MRAM) along with a spin-transfer-torque switching mechanism is a strong candidate-means of realizing that dream, given its nonvolatility, infinite endurance, and fast random access. Magnetic vortices in patterned soft magnetic dots promise ground-breaking applications in information-storage devices, owing to the very stable twofold ground states of either their upward or downward core magnetization orientation and plausible core switching by in-plane alternating magnetic fields or spin-polarized currents. However, two technologically most important but very challenging issues --- low-power recording and reliable selection of each memory cell with already existing cross-point architectures --- have not yet been resolved for the basic operations in information storage, that is, writing (recording) and readout. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a magnetic vortex random access memory (VRAM) in the basic cross-point architecture. This unique VRAM offers reliable cell selection and low-power-consumption control of switching of out-of-plane core magnetizations using specially designed rotating magnetic fields generated by two orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents along with optimized pulse width and time delay. Our achievement of a new device based on a new material, that is, a medium composed of patterned vortex-state disks, together with the new physics on ultrafast vortex-core switching dynamics, can stimulate further fruitful research on MRAMs that are based on vortex-state dot arrays.

  9. One-dimensional sawtooth and zigzag lattices for ultracold atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2015-01-01

    We describe tunable optical sawtooth and zigzag lattices for ultracold atoms. Making use of the superlattice generated by commensurate wavelengths of light beams, tunable geometries including zigzag and sawtooth configurations can be realised. We provide an experimentally feasible method to fully control inter- (t) and intra- (t′) unit-cell tunnelling in zigzag and sawtooth lattices. We analyse the conversion of the lattice geometry from zigzag to sawtooth, and show that a nearly flat band is attainable in the sawtooth configuration by means of tuning the lattice parameters. The bandwidth of the first excited band can be reduced up to 2% of the ground bandwidth for a wide range of lattice setting. A nearly flat band available in a tunable sawtooth lattice would offer a versatile platform for the study of interaction-driven quantum many-body states with ultracold atoms. PMID:26530007

  10. Interaction of Vortex Ring with Cutting Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musta, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a vortex ring impinging on a thin cutting plate was made experimentally using Volumetric 3-component Velocitmetry (v3v) technique. The vortex rings were generated with piston-cylinder vortex ring generator using piston stroke-to-diameter ratios and Re at 2-3 and 1500 - 3000, respectively. The cutting of vortex rings below center line leads to the formation of secondary vortices on each side of the plate which is look like two vortex rings, and a third vortex ring propagates further downstream in the direction of the initial vortex ring, which is previously showed by flow visualization study of Weigand (1993) and called ``trifurcation''. Trifurcation is very sensitive to the initial Reynolds number and the position of the plate with respect to the vortex ring generator pipe. The present work seeks more detailed investigation on the trifurcation using V3V technique. Conditions for the formation of trifurcation is analyzed and compared with Weigand (1993). The formed secondary vortex rings and the propagation of initial vortex ring in the downstream of the plate are analyzed by calculating their circulation, energy and trajectories.

  11. Reversal of nonlocal vortex motion in the regime of strong nonequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Otto, Florian; Bilusić, Ante; Babić, Dinko; Vodolazov, Denis Yu; Sürgers, Christoph; Strunk, Christoph

    2010-01-15

    We investigate nonlocal vortex motion in weakly pinning a-NbGe nanostructures, which is driven by a transport current I and remotely detected as a nonlocal voltage V{nl}. At a high I of a given polarity, V{nl} changes sign dramatically. This is followed by V{nl} becoming even in I, with the opposite sign at low and high temperatures T. These findings can be explained by a Nernst-like effect resulting from local electron overheating (low T), and a magnetization enhancement due to a nonequilibrium quasiparticle distribution that leads to a gap enhancement near the vortex core (high T).

  12. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method with a block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement technique.

    PubMed

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2014-03-01

    An adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) algorithm for the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) is presented in this study. The idea behind the proposed AMR is to remove the need for a tree-type data structure. Instead, pointer attributes are used to determine the neighbors of a certain block via appropriate adjustment of its children identifications. As a result, the memory and time required for tree traversal are completely eliminated, leaving us with an efficient algorithm that is easier to implement and use on parallel machines. To allow different mesh sizes at separate parts of the computational domain, the Eulerian formulation of the streaming process is invoked. As a result, there is no need for rescaling the distribution functions or using a temporal interpolation at the fine-coarse grid boundaries. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed FDLBM AMR are extensively assessed by investigating a variety of vorticity-dominated flow fields, including Taylor-Green vortex flow, lid-driven cavity flow, thin shear layer flow, and the flow past a square cylinder.

  13. A spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Min, M.; Lee, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science; City Univ. of New York

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin lattice Boltzmann method for solving nearly incompressible flows. Decoupling the collision step from the streaming step offers numerical stability at high Reynolds numbers. In the streaming step, we employ high-order spectral-element discontinuous Galerkin discretizations using a tensor product basis of one-dimensional Lagrange interpolation polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre grids. Our scheme is cost-effective with a fully diagonal mass matrix, advancing time integration with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We present a consistent treatment for imposing boundary conditions with a numerical flux in the discontinuous Galerkin approach. We show convergence studies for Couette flows and demonstrate two benchmark cases with lid-driven cavity flows for Re = 400-5000 and flows around an impulsively started cylinder for Re = 550-9500. Computational results are compared with those of other theoretical and computational work that used a multigrid method, a vortex method, and a spectral element model.

  14. A hydrodynamically-consistent MRT lattice Boltzmann model on a 2D rectangular grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Min, Haoda; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2016-12-01

    A multiple-relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) model on a D2Q9 rectangular grid is designed theoretically and validated numerically in the present work. By introducing stress components into the equilibrium moments, this MRT-LB model restores the isotropy of diffusive momentum transport at the macroscopic level (or in the continuum limit), leading to moment equations that are fully consistent with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model is derived by an inverse design process which is described in detail. Except one moment associated with the energy square, all other eight equilibrium moments can be theoretically and uniquely determined. The model is then carefully validated using both the two-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green vortex flow and lid-driven cavity flow, with different grid aspect ratios. The corresponding results from an earlier model (Bouzidi et al. (2001) [28]) are also presented for comparison. The results of Bouzidi et al.'s model show problems associated with anisotropy of viscosity coefficients, while the present model exhibits full isotropy and is accurate and stable.

  15. Wake Vortex Algorithm Scoring Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, R. E.; Delisi, D. P.; Hinton, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report compares the performance of two models of trailing vortex evolution for which interaction with the ground is not a significant factor. One model uses eddy dissipation rate (EDR) and the other uses the kinetic energy of turbulence fluctuations (TKE) to represent the effect of turbulence. In other respects, the models are nearly identical. The models are evaluated by comparing their predictions of circulation decay, vertical descent, and lateral transport to observations for over four hundred cases from Memphis and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airports. These observations were obtained during deployments in support of NASA's Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The results of the comparisons show that the EDR model usually performs slightly better than the TKE model.

  16. Vortex boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1986-01-01

    Parametric studies to identify a vortex generator were completed. Data acquisition in the first chosen configuration, in which a longitudinal vortex pair generated by an isolated delta wing starts to merge with a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate fairly close to the leading edge is nearly completed. Work on a delta-wing/flat-plate combination, consisting of a flow visualization and hot wire measurements taken with a computer controlled traverse gear and data logging system were completed. Data taking and analysis have continued, and sample results for another cross stream plane are presented. Available data include all mean velocity components, second order mean products of turbulent fluctuations, and third order mean products. Implementation of a faster data logging system was accomplished.

  17. Drag of buoyant vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S.-K.; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.126], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  18. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Horn, Bart; Parikh, Sarthak

    2016-02-01

    We study pairs of coaxial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  19. Drag of buoyant vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S-K; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015)], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann Equation On a 2D Rectangular Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouzidi, MHamed; DHumieres, Dominique; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We construct a multi-relaxation lattice Boltzmann model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The model is partly inspired by a previous work of Koelman to construct a lattice BGK model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The linearized dispersion equation is analyzed to obtain the constraints on the isotropy of the transport coefficients and Galilean invariance for various wave propagations in the model. The linear stability of the model is also studied. The model is numerically tested for three cases: (a) a vortex moving with a constant velocity on a mesh periodic boundary conditions; (b) Poiseuille flow with an arbitrasy inclined angle with respect to the lattice orientation: and (c) a cylinder &symmetrically placed in a channel. The numerical results of these tests are compared with either analytic solutions or the results obtained by other methods. Satisfactory results are obtained for the numerical simulations.

  1. Vortex methods for separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations by Lagrangian vortex methods is discussed. The mathematical background is presented in an elementary fashion and includes the relationship with traditional point-vortex studies, the convergence to smooth solutions of the Euler equations, and the essential differences between two- and three-dimensional cases. The difficulties in extending the method to viscous or compressible flows are explained. The overlap with the excellent review articles available is kept to a minimum and more emphasis is placed on the area of expertise, namely two-dimensional flows around bluff bodies. When solid walls are present, complete mathematical models are not available and a more heuristic attitude must be adopted. The imposition of inviscid and viscous boundary conditions without conformal mappings or image vortices and the creation of vorticity along solid walls are examined in detail. Methods for boundary-layer treatment and the question of the Kutta condition are discussed. Practical aspects and tips helpful in creating a method that really works are explained. The topics include the robustness of the method and the assessment of accuracy, vortex-core profiles, timemarching schemes, numerical dissipation, and efficient programming. Calculations of flows past streamlined or bluff bodies are used as examples when appropriate.

  2. Review of Idealized Aircraft Wake Vortex Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Duparcmeur, Fanny M. Limon; Jacob, Don

    2014-01-01

    Properties of three aircraft wake vortex models, Lamb-Oseen, Burnham-Hallock, and Proctor are reviewed. These idealized models are often used to initialize the aircraft wake vortex pair in large eddy simulations and in wake encounter hazard models, as well as to define matched filters for processing lidar observations of aircraft wake vortices. Basic parameters for each vortex model, such as peak tangential velocity and circulation strength as a function of vortex core radius size, are examined. The models are also compared using different vortex characterizations, such as the vorticity magnitude. Results of Euler and large eddy simulations are presented. The application of vortex models in the postprocessing of lidar observations is discussed.

  3. Birth and evolution of an optical vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Sponselli, Anna; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    When a phase singularity is suddenly imprinted on the axis of an ordinary Gaussian beam, an optical vortex appears and starts to grow radially, by effect of diffraction. This radial growth and the subsequent evolution of the optical vortex under focusing or imaging can be well described in general within the recently introduced theory of circular beams, which generalize the hypergeometric-Gaussian beams and which obey novel kinds of ABCD rules. Here, we investigate experimentally these vortex propagation phenomena and test the validity of circular-beam theory. Moreover, we analyze the difference in radial structure between the newly generated optical vortex and the vortex obtained in the image plane, where perfect imaging would lead to complete closure of the vortex core.

  4. Vortex Breakdown-Aircraft Tail Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younjong; Rockwell, Donald

    2003-11-01

    The interaction of vortex breakdown with the tail of an aircraft can lead to severe unsteady loading and vibration. A technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry is employed to characterize the instantaneous and averaged structure of a broken-down vortex with a generic tail configuration. Interaction of the primary (incident) vortex with the tail results in formation of a relatively large-scale cluster of secondary vorticity. The coexistence of these primary and secondary vortical structures is intimately associated with the unsteadiness of the vortex system, and thereby the near-surface fluctuations associated with buffet loading. Instantaneous and averaged representations of the vortex-tail interaction provide insight into the complex physics. Furthermore, a low order POD model is employed to characterize the most energetic modes of the vortex-tail interaction.

  5. Melting of charge stripes in vibrationally driven La(1.875)Ba(0.125)CuO4: assessing the respective roles of electronic and lattice order in frustrated superconductors.

    PubMed

    Först, M; Tobey, R I; Bromberger, H; Wilkins, S B; Khanna, V; Caviglia, A D; Chuang, Y-D; Lee, W S; Schlotter, W F; Turner, J J; Minitti, M P; Krupin, O; Xu, Z J; Wen, J S; Gu, G D; Dhesi, S S; Cavalleri, A; Hill, J P

    2014-04-18

    We report femtosecond resonant soft x-ray diffraction measurements of the dynamics of the charge order and of the crystal lattice in nonsuperconducting, stripe-ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4. Excitation of the in-plane Cu-O stretching phonon with a midinfrared pulse has been previously shown to induce a transient superconducting state in the closely related compound La1.675Eu0.2Sr0.125CuO4. In La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, we find that the charge stripe order melts promptly on a subpicosecond time scale. Surprisingly, the low temperature tetragonal (LTT) distortion is only weakly reduced, reacting on significantly longer time scales that do not correlate with light-induced superconductivity. This experiment suggests that charge modulations alone, and not the LTT distortion, prevent superconductivity in equilibrium.

  6. On Traveling Waves in Lattices: The Case of Riccati Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka

    2012-09-01

    The method of simplest equation is applied for analysis of a class of lattices described by differential-difference equations that admit traveling-wave solutions constructed on the basis of the solution of the Riccati equation. We denote such lattices as Riccati lattices. We search for Riccati lattices within two classes of lattices: generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices and generalized Holling lattices. We show that from the class of generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices only the Wadati lattice belongs to the class of Riccati lattices. Opposite to this many lattices from the Holling class are Riccati lattices. We construct exact traveling wave solutions on the basis of the solution of Riccati equation for three members of the class of generalized Holling lattices.

  7. Interface and vortex motion in the two-component complex dissipative Ginzburg-Landau equation in two-dimensional space.

    PubMed

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke

    2014-10-01

    We study interface and vortex motion in the two-component dissipative Ginzburg-Landau equation in two-dimensional space. We consider cases where the whole system is divided into several domains, and we assume that these domains are separated by interfaces and each domain contains quantized vortices. The equations for interface and vortex motion will be derived by means of a variational approach by Kawasaki. These equations indicate that, along an interface, the phase gradient fields of the complex order parameters is parallel to the interface. They also indicate that the interface motion is driven by the curvature and the phase gradient fields along the interface, and vortex motion is driven by the phase gradient field around the vortex. With respect to the static interactions between defects, we find an analogy between quantized vortices in a domain and electric charges in a vacuum domain surrounded by a metallic object in electrostatic. This analogy indicates that there is an attractive interaction between an interface and a quantized vortex with any charge. We also discuss several examples of interface and vortex motion.

  8. Contributions to theory of vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, B. K.; Uberoi, M. S.

    A study is made of vortex breakdown in stratified flows, and it is found that a positive stratification in the vortex where the density is increasing away from the axis, postpones the vortex breakdown and vice versa. This is apparent due to the density increasing in a direction opposite to that of an effective gravity which would correspond to a topheavy arrangement under gravity. It is also shown that a wavemotion promotes the possibility of axisymmetric flow downstream of the transaction.

  9. An investigation of counterrotating tip vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Uenishi, K.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    A tip vortex interaction model originally developed for compressors has been extended and adapted for use with counterrotating open rotors. Comparison of available acoustic data with predictions (made with and without the tip vortex model included) illustrate the importance of this interaction effect. This report documents the analytical modeling, a limited experimental verification, and certain key parametric studies pertaining to the tip vortex as a noise source mechanism for the unsteady loading noise of counterrotating properllers.

  10. Vortex knot cascade in polynomial skein relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricca, Renzo L.

    2016-06-01

    The process of vortex cascade through continuous reduction of topological complexity by stepwise unlinking, that has been observed experimentally in the production of vortex knots (Kleckner & Irvine, 2013), is shown to be reproduced in the branching of the skein relations of knot polynomials (Liu & Ricca, 2015) used to identify topological complexity of vortex systems. This observation can be usefully exploited for predictions of energy-complexity estimates for fluid flows.

  11. On the structure of the turbulent vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1985-01-01

    The trailing vortex generated by a lifting surface, the structure of its turbulent core and the influence of axial flow within the vortex on its initial persistence and on its subsequent decay are described. Similarity solutions of the turbulent diffusion equation are given in closed form and results are expressed in sufficiently simple terms that the influence of the lifting surface parameters on the length of persistence and the rate of decay of the vortex can be evaluated.

  12. Facts and fallacies of vortex flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, E.A.

    1982-08-01

    Vortex flowmeters have been popular since the late 1960s. They have been sold as everything from a panacea for severe service flow applications to a direct replacement for orifice meters. In many ways, vortex flowmeters have not lived up to industry expectations and therefore, have obtained a bad reputation. However, vortex flowmeters can be good flow measurement devices if applied properly, and they do have a place in the processing industries for certain flow applications.

  13. Engineering novel optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    Optical lattices have developed into a widely used and highly recognized tool to study many-body quantum physics with special relevance for solid state type systems. One of the most prominent reasons for this success is the high degree of tunability in the experimental setups. While at the beginning quasi-static, cubic geometries were mainly explored, the focus of the field has now shifted toward new lattice topologies and the dynamical control of lattice structures. In this review we intend to give an overview of the progress recently achieved in this field on the experimental side. In addition, we discuss theoretical proposals exploiting specifically these novel lattice geometries. PMID:23828639

  14. Mechanics of viscous vortex reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Fazle; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2011-02-01

    This work is motivated by our long-standing claim that reconnection of coherent structures is the dominant mechanism of jet noise generation and plays a key role in both energy cascade and fine-scale mixing in fluid turbulence [F. Hussain, Phys. Fluids 26, 2816 (1983); J. Fluid Mech. 173, 303 (1986)]. To shed further light on the mechanism involved and quantify its features, the reconnection of two antiparallel vortex tubes is studied by direct numerical simulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range (250-9000) of the vortex Reynolds number, Re (=circulation/viscosity) at much higher resolutions than have been attempted. Unlike magnetic or superfluid reconnections, viscous reconnection is never complete, leaving behind a part of the initial tubes as threads, which then undergo successive reconnections (our cascade and mixing scenarios) as the newly formed bridges recoil from each other by self-advection. We find that the time tR for orthogonal transfer of circulation scales as tR≈Re-3/4. The shortest distance d between the tube centroids scales as d ≈a[Re(t0-t)]3/4 before reconnection (collision) and as d ≈b[Re(t -t0)]2 after reconnection (repulsion), where t0 is the instant of smallest separation between vortex centroids. We find that b is a constant, thus suggesting self-similarity, but a is dependent on Re. Bridge repulsion is faster than collision and is more autonomous as local induction predominates, and, given the associated acceleration of vorticity, is potentially a source of intense sound generation. At the higher Re studied, the tails of the colliding threads are compressed into a planar jet with multiple vortex pairs. For Re>6000, there is an avalanche of smaller scales during the reconnection, the rate of small scale generation and the spectral content (in vorticity, transfer function and dissipation spectra) being quite consistent with the structures visualized by the λ2 criterion. The maximum rate of vortex

  15. Phases of d-orbital bosons in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Fernanda; Matrikainen, Jani-Petri; Larson, Jonas

    2015-05-01

    We explore the properties of bosonic atoms loaded into the d bands of an isotropic square optical lattice. Following the recent experimental success reported in Zhai et al (2013 Phys. Rev. A 87 063638), in which populating d bands with a 99 % fidelity was demonstrated, we present a theoretical study of the possible phases that can appear in this system. Using the Gutzwiller ansatz for the three d band orbitals we map the boundaries of the Mott insulating phases. For not too large occupation, two of the orbitals are predominantly occupied, while the third, of a slightly higher energy, remains almost unpopulated. In this regime, in the superfluid phase we find the formation of a vortex lattice, where the vortices come in vortex/anti-vortex pairs with two pairs locked to every site. Due to the orientation of the vortices time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken. This state also breaks a discrete {{{Z}}2}-symmetry. We further derive an effective spin-1/2 model that describe the relevant physics of the lowest Mott-phase with unit filling. We argue that the corresponding two dimensional phase diagram should be rich with several different phases. We also explain how to generate anti-symmetric spin interactions that can give rise to novel effects like spin canting.

  16. Point vortex modelling of the wake dynamics behind asymmetric vortex generator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchino, D.; Ferreira, C.; Ragni, D.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a simple inviscid point vortex model to study the dynamics of asymmetric vortex rows, as might appear behind misaligned vortex generator vanes. Starting from the existing solution of the infinite vortex cascade, a numerical model of four base-vortices is chosen to represent two primary counter-rotating vortex pairs and their mirror plane images, introducing the vortex strength ratio as a free parameter. The resulting system of equations is also defined in terms of the vortex row separation and the qualitative features of the ensuing motion are mapped. A translating and orbiting regime are identified for different cascade separations. The latter occurs for all unequal strength vortex pairs. Thus, the motion is further classified by studying the cyclic behaviour of the orbiting regime and it is shown that for small mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting length and time scales are sufficiently large as to appear, in the near wake, as translational (non-orbiting). However, for larger mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting motion approaches the order of the starting height of the vortex. Comparisons between experimental data and the potential flow model show qualitative agreement whilst viscous effects account for the major discrepancies. Despite this, the model captures the orbital mode observed in the measurements and provides an impetus for considering the impact of these complex interactions on vortex generator designs.

  17. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter configuration.

  18. ASRS Reports on Wake Vortex Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.; Taube, Elisa Ann; Drew, Charles Robert; Barclay, Tommy Earl

    2010-01-01

    ASRS is conducting a structured callback research project of wake vortex incidents reported to the ASRS at all US airports, as well as wake encounters in the enroute environment. This study has three objectives: (1) Utilize the established ASRS supplemental data collection methodology and provide ongoing analysis of wake vortex encounter reports; (2) Document event dynamics and contributing factors underlying wake vortex encounter events; and (3) Support ongoing FAA efforts to address pre-emptive wake vortex risk reduction by utilizing ASRS reporting contributions.

  19. The permeability of the Antarctic vortex edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping

    1994-01-01

    Mixing and cross-vortex mass transport along isentropic surfaces in the lower stratosphere are investigated with a 'contour advection' technique and a semi-Lagrangian transport model for the Antarctic winter of 1993 using analyzed winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office data assimilation system. Results from the 'contour advection' technique show that at the vortex edge there exists a potential vorticity (PV) contour that has the smallest lengthening rate. This PV contour is referred to as the 'line of separation' because it essentially separates the inner and outer vortex. The average e-folding time for the lengthening of the 'line of separation' increases monotonically with altitude, ranging from about 7 days on the 350 K isentropic surface to about 105 days on the 500 K isentropic surface. The results also suggest the existence of a transition layer around the 400 K isentropic surface, above which the vortex is nearly completely isolated from the midlatitudes and below which the vortex is less isolated. Results from a semi-Lagrangian transport model with an idealized tracer initially inside the inner vortex show that at 425 K and above virtually no tracer is transported out of the vortex during a 40-day integration starting from July 21, 1993. At 400 K and below a small amount of the tracer is transported out of the vortex while the bulk of the tracer remains confined within the inner vortex.

  20. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2014-12-10

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter configuration.

  1. Tree Method for Quantum Vortex Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggaley, A. W.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical method to compute the evolution of vortex filaments in superfluid helium. The method is based on a tree algorithm which considerably speeds up the calculation of Biot-Savart integrals. We show that the computational cost scales as Nlog( N) rather than N 2, where N is the number of discretization points. We test the method and its properties for a variety of vortex configurations, ranging from simple vortex rings to a counterflow vortex tangle, and compare results against the Local Induction Approximation and the exact Biot-Savart law.

  2. Vortex Line Density Fluctuations of Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiyama, Shoji; Tsubota, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    We investigate vortex line density fluctuations of quantum turbulence generated by an oscillating grid in superfluid 3He- B. The scenario of quantum turbulence experimentally suggested by the Lancaster group is confirmed in the numerical simulation. The spectrum of the vortex line density fluctuations with respect to frequency obeyed a -5/3 power law, which is consistent with the experiment of the Lancaster group. Based on the argument of time scales experienced by vortex rings with different sizes and on the power spectrum, the connection between the self-similar structure of the vortex tangle and the power spectrum is discussed.

  3. Measurements of a supersonic turbulent vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metwally, O. M.; Settles, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    Mean-flow measurements of a supersonic turbulent streamwise vortex are presented. This vortex was produced by the injection of a swirling flow along the centerline of a supersonic airstream at Mach 3. Directional Mach number distributions, obtained via a five-hole flow-angularity probe, reveal vortex characteristics similar to those of the incompressible case, even though rotational Mach numbers up to 0.8 were obtained. This work is the first step of a study of the supersonic vortex breakdown phenomenon.

  4. Flow visualizations of perpendicular blade vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rife, Michael C.; Davenport, William J.

    1992-01-01

    Helium bubble flow visualizations have been performed to study perpendicular interaction of a turbulent trailing vortex and a rectangular wing in the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. Many combinations of vortex strength, vortex-blade separation (Z(sub s)) and blade angle of attack were studied. Photographs of representative cases are presented. A range of phenomena were observed. For Z(sub s) greater than a few percent chord the vortex is deflected as it passes the blade under the influence of the local streamline curvature and its image in the blade. Initially the interaction appears to have no influence on the core. Downstream, however, the vortex core begins to diffuse and grow, presumably as a consequence of its interaction with the blade wake. The magnitude of these effects increases with reduction in Z(sub s). For Z(sub s) near zero the form of the interaction changes and becomes dependent on the vortex strength. For lower strengths the vortex appears to split into two filaments on the leading edge of the blade, one passing on the pressure and one passing on the suction side. At higher strengths the vortex bursts in the vicinity of the leading edge. In either case the core of its remnants then rapidly diffuse with distance downstream. Increase in Reynolds number did not qualitatively affect the flow apart from decreasing the amplitude of the small low-frequency wandering motions of the vortex. Changes in wing tip geometry and boundary layer trip had very little effect.

  5. Dynamics of non Newtonian vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Morales, C. A.; Barbosa, C.; Zenit, R.

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of formation and evolution of non-Newtonian vortex rings generated in a piston-cylinder arrangement are studied. The ratio of the piston displacement Lm to the internal cylinder diameter D0, the piston velocity Up and fluid properties determine the vortex properties and evolution. Measurements of the 2D velocity field were obtained with a PIV technique. The vortex circulation Γ was computed considering a vortex identification scheme (Q criterion). Experiments with fluids with different rheological properties (shear thinning and viscoelastic) are presented. Our Newtonian experiments agree with previous investigations. For shear-thinning liquids, we observed that the final vortex circulation decreases with the fluid power index, n. We show that the total circulation ejected from the cylinder is reduced when the thinning property of the liquid increases; thus, the circulation confined inside the vortex ring, is reduced too. For vortex rings in a viscoelastic liquid, the formation of a `negative wake' (returning flow) and a second vortex ring with opposite whirl are observed. We show that the negative wake results from the high extension rates produced during the vortex formation.

  6. On boundary conditions in lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Martinez, D. |; Mei, R.

    1996-09-01

    A lattice Boltzmann boundary condition for simulation of fluid flow using simple extrapolation is proposed. Numerical simulations, including two-dimensional Poiseuille flow, unsteady Couette flow, lid-driven square cavity flow, and flow over a column of cylinders for a range of Reynolds numbers, are carried out, showing that this scheme is of second order accuracy in space discretization. Applications of the method to other boundary conditions, including pressure condition and flux condition are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. A Family of Vortices to Study Axisymmetric Vortex Breakdown and Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    A new analytic model describing a family of vortices has been developed to study some of the axisymmetric vortex breakdown and reconnection fluid dynamic processes underlying body-vortex interactions that are frequently manifested in rotorcraft and propeller-driven fixed-wing aircraft wakes. The family of vortices incorporates a wide range of prescribed initial vorticity distributions -- including single or dual-core vorticity distributions. The result is analytical solutions for the vorticity and velocities for each member of the family of vortices. This model is of sufficient generality to further illustrate the dependence of vortex reconnection and breakdown on initial vorticity distribution as was suggested by earlier analytical work. This family of vortices, though laminar in nature, is anticipated to provide valuable insight into the vortical evolution of large-scale rotor and propeller wakes.

  8. Anomalous vortex motion in the quantum-liquid phase of amorphous MoxSi1-x films.

    PubMed

    Okuma, S; Kobayashi, M; Kamada, M

    2005-02-01

    We measure, in real time (t), the fluctuating component of the flux-flow voltage V(t), deltaV(t) identical withV(t)-V0, about the average V0 in the vortex-liquid phase of amorphous MoxSi1-x films. For the thick film, deltaV(t) originating from the vortex motion is clearly visible in the quantum-liquid phase, where the distribution of deltaV(t) is asymmetric, indicative of large velocity and/or number fluctuations of driven vortices. For the thin film the similar anomalous vortex motion is observed in nearly the same (reduced-)temperature regime. These results suggest that vortex dynamics in the low-temperature liquid phase of thick and thin films is dominated by common physical mechanisms, presumably related to quantum effects.

  9. Vortex Crystals with Chiral Stripes in Itinerant Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Ryo; Hayami, Satoru; Barros, Kipton; Chern, Gia-Wei; Motome, Yukitoshi; Batista, Cristian D.

    Noncoplanar spin textures in itinerant magnets are generating increasing interest because of the associated spin Berry phase, which induces a tremendous effective magnetic field on the itinerant electrons. Such noncoplanar spin textures appear frequently in itinerant magnets, even with vanishingly small spin-orbit coupling. We explore a generic condition for noncoplanar spin ordering, with a focus on ``frustration'' in itinerant magnets, that is characterized by multiple global maxima in the magnetic susceptibility. In a simple square Kondo lattice model, we find that a noncoplanar vortex-antivortex crystal with a one-dimensional modulation of spin scalar chirality becomes stable in a wide range of electron filling fraction. The unexpected result is obtained by careful analyses of higher-order terms in the perturbative expansion in terms of the Kondo exchange coupling and the degree of noncoplanarity, as well as numerical simulation based on the Langevin and stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics with the kernel polynomial method.

  10. Supersymmetry on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Georg; Catterall, Simon

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the motivations, difficulties and progress in the study of supersymmetric lattice gauge theories focusing in particular on 𝒩 = 1 and 𝒩 = 4 super-Yang-Mills in four dimensions. Brief reviews of the corresponding lattice formalisms are given and current results are presented and discussed. We conclude with a summary of the main aspects of current work and prospects for the future.

  11. Laterally closed lattice homomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, Mohamed Ali; Toumi, Nedra

    2006-12-01

    Let A and B be two Archimedean vector lattices and let be a lattice homomorphism. We call that T is laterally closed if T(D) is a maximal orthogonal system in the band generated by T(A) in B, for each maximal orthogonal system D of A. In this paper we prove that any laterally closed lattice homomorphism T of an Archimedean vector lattice A with universal completion Au into a universally complete vector lattice B can be extended to a lattice homomorphism of Au into B, which is an improvement of a result of M. Duhoux and M. Meyer [M. Duhoux and M. Meyer, Extended orthomorphisms and lateral completion of Archimedean Riesz spaces, Ann. Soc. Sci. Bruxelles 98 (1984) 3-18], who established it for the order continuous lattice homomorphism case. Moreover, if in addition Au and B are with point separating order duals (Au)' and B' respectively, then the laterally closedness property becomes a necessary and sufficient condition for any lattice homomorphism to have a similar extension to the whole Au. As an application, we give a new representation theorem for laterally closed d-algebras from which we infer the existence of d-algebra multiplications on the universal completions of d-algebras.

  12. Investigation of the Vortex Tab. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffler, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was made into the drag reduction capability of vortex tabs on delta wing vortex flaps. The vortex tab is an up-deflected leading edge portion of the vortex flap. Tab deflection augments vortex suction on the flap, thus improving its thrust, but the tab itself is drag producing. Whether a net improvement in the drag reduction can be obtained with vortex tabs, in comparison with plane vortex flaps of the same total area, was the objective of this investigation. Wind tunnel tests were conducted on two models, and analytical studies were performed on one of them using a free vortex sheet theory.

  13. Recent Laboratory and Numerical Trailing Vortex Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delisi, Donald P.; Greene, George C.; Robins, Robert E.; Singh, Raminder

    1996-01-01

    Results from two laboratory studies and two numerical studies are presented. In the first laboratory study, measurements of the strength of vortices from a three-dimensional (3-D) model wing are presented. The measurements follow the vortices as they evolve in time from a two-dimensional (2-D) line vortex pair to the development and migration of 3-D vortex rings. It is shown that the resulting vortex rings can contain up to 40 percent of the initial vortex circulation. Thus, the formation of vortex rings may not necessarily signal the end of the wake hazard to following aircraft. In the second laboratory study, we present the results of an experiment which shows how the spanwise drag distribution affects wake-vortex evolution. In this experiment, we modified the spanwise drag distribution on a model wing while keeping the total lift and drag constant. The results show that adding drag on or near the centerline of the wing has a larger effect than adding drag at or near the wingtips. These measurements complement the results of NASA studies in the 1970s. In the first numerical study, results of 3-D numerical calculations are presented which show that the vortex Reynolds number has a significant influence on the evolution and migration of wake vortices. When the Reynolds number is large, 3-D vortex rings evolve from the initially 2-D line vortex pairs. These vortex rings then migrate vertically. When the Reynolds number is lower, the transition of vorticity from 2-D to 3-D is delayed. When the Reynolds number is very low, the vortices never transition to 3-D, and the vertical migration is significantly reduced. It is suggested that this effect may have been important in previous laboratory wake-evolution studies. A second numerical study shows the influence that vertical wind shear can have on trailing vortex evolution.

  14. Rotating hot-wire investigation of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontana, Richard Remo

    1988-01-01

    This distribution of the circumferential velocity of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise was measured using a rotating hot-wire rake synchronously meshed with a model helicopter rotor at the blade passage frequency. Simultaneous far-field acoustic data and blade differential pressure measurements were obtained. Results show that the shape of the measured far-field acoustic blade-vortex interaction signature depends on the blade-vortex interaction geometry. The experimental results are compared with the Widnall-Wolf model for blade-vortex interaction noise.

  15. THE EMMA LATTICE DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.; RUGGIERO, A.; MACHIDA, S.; KOSCIELNIAK, S.

    2007-06-25

    EMMA is a 10 to 20 MeV electron ring designed to test our understanding of beam dynamics in a relativistic linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG). This paper describes the design of the EMMA lattice. We begin with a summary of the experimental goals that impact the lattice design, and then outline what motivated the choice for the basic lattice parameters, such as the type of cells, the number of cells, and the RF frequency. We next list the different configurations that we wish to operate the machine in so as to accomplish our experimental goals. Finally, we enumerate the detailed lattice parameters, showing how these parameters result from the various lattice configurations.

  16. Measurement-based quantum lattice gas model of fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions.

    PubMed

    Micci, Michael M; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Presented are quantum simulation results using a measurement-based quantum lattice gas algorithm for Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics in 2+1 dimensions. Numerical prediction of the kinematic viscosity was measured by the decay rate of an initial sinusoidal flow profile. Due to local quantum entanglement in the quantum lattice gas, the minimum kinematic viscosity in the measurement-based quantum lattice gas is lower than achievable in a classical lattice gas. The numerically predicted viscosities precisely match the theoretical predictions obtained with a mean field approximation. Uniform flow profile with double shear layers, on a 16K×8K lattice, leads to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, breaking up the shear layer into pairs of counter-rotating vortices that eventually merge via vortex fusion and dissipate because of the nonzero shear viscosity.

  17. Vortex Dynamics in a Spin-Orbit-Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetter, Alexander L.

    2015-07-01

    Vortices in a one-component dilute atomic ultracold Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) usually arise as a response to externally driven rotation. Apart from a few special situations, these vortices are singly quantized with unit circulation (Fetter, Rev Mod Phys 81, 647-691, 2009). Recently, the NIST group has constructed a two-component BEC with a spin-orbit-coupled Hamiltonian involving Pauli matrices (Spielman, Phys Rev A 79, 063613, 2009; Y.-J. Lin et al., Nature 462, 628-632, 2009; Y.-J. Lin et al., Nature 471, 83-87, 2011), and I here study the dynamics of a two-component vortex in such a spin-orbit-coupled condensate. These spin-orbit-coupled BECs use an applied magnetic field to split the hyperfine levels. Hence, they rely on a focused laser beam to trap the atoms. In addition, two Raman laser beams create an effective (or synthetic) gauge potential. The resulting spin-orbit Hamiltonian is discussed in some detail. The various laser beams are fixed in the laboratory, so that it is not feasible to nucleate a vortex by an applied rotation that would need to rotate all the laser beams and the magnetic field. In a one-component BEC, a vortex can also be created by a thermal quench, starting from the normal state and suddenly cooling deep into the condensed state (Freilich et al., Science 329, 1182-1185, 2010). I propose that a similar method would work for a vortex in a spin-orbit-coupled BEC. Such a vortex has two components, and each has its own circulation quantum number (typically ). If both components have the same circulation, I find that the composite vortex should execute uniform precession, like that observed in a single-component BEC (Freilich et al., Science 329, 1182-1185, 2010). In contrast, if one component has unit circulation and the other has zero circulation, then some fraction of the dynamical vortex trajectories should eventually leave the condensate, providing clear experimental evidence for this unusual vortex structure. In the context of

  18. Vortex metrology using Fourier analysis techniques: vortex networks correlation fringes.

    PubMed

    Angel-Toro, Luciano; Sierra-Sosa, Daniel; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Néstor

    2012-10-20

    In this work, we introduce an alternative method of analysis in vortex metrology based on the application of the Fourier optics techniques. The first part of the procedure is conducted as is usual in vortex metrology for uniform in-plane displacement determination. On the basis of two recorded intensity speckled distributions, corresponding to two states of a diffuser coherently illuminated, we numerically generate an analytical signal from each recorded intensity pattern by using a version of the Riesz integral transform. Then, from each analytical signal, a two-dimensional pseudophase map is generated in which the vortices are located and characterized in terms of their topological charges and their core's structural properties. The second part of the procedure allows obtaining Young's interference fringes when Fourier transforming the light passing through a diffracting mask with multiple apertures at the locations of the homologous vortices. In fact, we use the Fourier transform as a mathematical operation to compute the far-field diffraction intensity pattern corresponding to the multiaperture set. Each aperture from the set is associated with a rectangular hole that coincides both in shape and size with a pixel from recorded images. We show that the fringe analysis can be conducted as in speckle photography in an extended range of displacement measurements. Effects related with speckled decorrelation are also considered. Our experimental results agree with those of speckle photography in the range in which both techniques are applicable.

  19. The effect of tip vortex structure on helicopter noise due to blade/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, T. L.; Widnall, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    A potential cause of helicopter impulsive noise, commonly called blade slap, is the unsteady lift fluctuation on a rotor blade due to interaction with the vortex trailed from another blade. The relationship between vortex structure and the intensity of the acoustic signal is investigated. The analysis is based on a theoretical model for blade/vortex interaction. Unsteady lift on the blades due to blade/vortex interaction is calculated using linear unsteady aerodynamic theory, and expressions are derived for the directivity, frequency spectrum, and transient signal of the radiated noise. An inviscid rollup model is used to calculate the velocity profile in the trailing vortex from the spanwise distribution of blade tip loading. A few cases of tip loading are investigated, and numerical results are presented for the unsteady lift and acoustic signal due to blade/vortex interaction. The intensity of the acoustic signal is shown to be quite sensitive to changes in tip vortex structure.

  20. Rolling up of Large-scale Laminar Vortex Ring from Synthetic Jet Impinging onto a Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yang; Pan, Chong; Wang, Jinjun; Flow Control Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Vortex ring impinging onto a wall exhibits a wide range of interesting behaviors. The present work devotes to an experimental investigation of a series of small-scale vortex rings impinging onto a wall. These laminar vortex rings were generated by a piston-cylinder driven synthetic jet in a water tank. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) were used for flow visualization/quantification. A special scenario of vortical dynamic was found for the first time: a large-scale laminar vortex ring is formed above the wall, on the outboard side of the jet. This large-scale structure is stable in topology pattern, and continuously grows in strength and size along time, thus dominating dynamics of near wall flow. To quantify its spatial/temporal characteristics, Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) fields were calculated from PIV velocity fields. It is shown that the flow pattern revealed by FTLE fields is similar to the visualization. The size of this large-scale vortex ring can be up to one-order larger than the jet vortices, and its rolling-up speed and entrainment strength was correlated to constant vorticity flux issued from the jet. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No.11202015 and 11327202).

  1. The effect of particles and electromagnetic waves on vortex structures in the atmosphere and the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhovkina, N. I.

    2015-05-01

    The formation of vortex structures in an inhomogeneous gyrotropic atmosphere was stochastically determined. Atmospheric gyrotropy is induced by the Coriolis force acting as the Earth rotates and the motion of charged particles in the geomagnetic field. Vortices of a plasma nature are observed in the atmosphere. The electric field of such plasma vortices originates within the fields of pressure gradients of a mosaic cell topology upon the ionization of particles. It is shown that waves in a neutral atmosphere, electric fields, and electromagnetic waves affect the stability of vortex structures. Wave signals from anthropogenic sources and smog may stimulate local precipitation upon the passage of a cloud front and weaken or strengthen vortex structures. The plasma vortex may capture charged particles of different masses. The charge separation in plasma vortex structures is driven by the polarization drift at the decay of electric fields. The self-focusing of plasma vortices upon the condensation of moisture in the atmospheric cloud cover leads to an increase in the energy of vortices.

  2. Delaying vortex breakdown by waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, M. F.; Jiang, L. B.; Wu, J. Z.; Ma, H. Y.; Pan, J. Y.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of spiral waves on delaying vortex breakdown in a tube is studied experimentally and theoretically. When a harmonic oscillation was imposed on one of guiding vanes in the tube, the breakdown was observed to be postponed appreciately. According to the generalized Lagrangian mean theory, proper forcing spiral waves may produce an additional streaming momentum, of which the effect is favorable and similar to an axial suction at downstream end. The delayed breakdown position is further predicted by using nonlinear wave theory. Qualitative agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, and experimental comparison of the effects due to forcing spiral wave and axial suction is made.

  3. Ergoregion instability: The hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Leandro A.; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2014-06-01

    Four-dimensional, asymptotically flat spacetimes with an ergoregion but no horizon have been shown to be linearly unstable against a superradiant-triggered mechanism. This result has wide implications in the search for astrophysically viable alternatives to black holes, but also in the understanding of black holes and Hawking evaporation. Here we investigate this instability in detail for a particular setup that can be realized in the laboratory: the hydrodynamic vortex, an effective geometry for sound waves, with ergoregion and without an event horizon.

  4. Spectral stability of Taylor's vortex array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Tobak, M.

    1986-01-01

    In a global sense it is shown that the two-dimensional Taylor vortex array, an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, is absolutely and monotonically stable with respect to infinitesimal disturbances of all discrete frequencies as long as the viscosity is positive. It is suggested that the Taylor vortex array may also be stable with respect to finite amplitude disturbances.

  5. Shadowgraphs Of Helicopter-Rotor-Tip Vortexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Shakkottai P.; Cho, Young I.; Back, Lloyd H.

    1988-01-01

    Optical apparatus produces full-scale or larger shadowgraph of tip vortexes of helicopter rotor. Stroboscope projects shadow image of helicopter rotor on large, square screen. Commercial, highly reflecting projection screen used; simply projecting image on white wall does not yield enough light for photographing vortexes with standard 35-mm camera. Apparatus adapts to use in large wind tunnels.

  6. The modelling of symmetric airfoil vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Wendt, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted to determine the dependence of vortex generator geometry and impinging flow conditions on shed vortex circulation and crossplane peak vorticity for one type of vortex generator. The vortex generator is a symmetric airfoil having a NACA 0012 cross-sectional profile. The geometry and flow parameters varied include angle-of-attack alfa, chordlength c, span h, and Mach number M. The vortex generators are mounted either in isolation or in a symmetric counter-rotating array configuration on the inside surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio is delta/R = 0. 17. Circulation and peak vorticity data are derived from crossplane velocity measurements conducted at or about 1 chord downstream of the vortex generator trailing edge. Shed vortex circulation is observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. With these parameters held constant, circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio AR. Shed vortex peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. Unlike circulation, however, peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at AR approx. 2.0 before falling off.

  7. Obstacle-induced spiral vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasche, Simon; Gallaire, François; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    An experimental investigation on vortex breakdown dynamics is performed. An adverse pressure gradient is created along the axis of a wing-tip vortex by introducing a sphere downstream of an elliptical hydrofoil. The instrumentation involves high-speed visualizations with air bubbles used as tracers and 2D Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). Two key parameters are identified and varied to control the onset of vortex breakdown: the swirl number, defined as the maximum azimuthal velocity divided by the free-stream velocity, and the adverse pressure gradient. They were controlled through the incidence angle of the elliptical hydrofoil, the free-stream velocity and the sphere diameter. A single helical breakdown of the vortex was systematically observed over a wide range of experimental parameters. The helical breakdown coiled around the sphere in the direction opposite to the vortex but rotated along the vortex direction. We have observed that the location of vortex breakdown moved upstream as the swirl number or the sphere diameter was increased. LDV measurements were corrected using a reconstruction procedure taking into account the so-called vortex wandering and the size of the LDV measurement volume. This allows us to investigate the spatio-temporal linear stability properties of the flow and demonstrate that the flow transition from columnar to single helical shape is due to a transition from convective to absolute instability.

  8. Vortex dynamics in thin elliptic ferromagnetic nanodisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysin, G. M.

    2015-10-01

    Vortex gyrotropic motion in thin ferromagnetic nanodisks of elliptical shape is described here for a pure vortex state and for a situation with thermal fluctuations. The system is analyzed using numerical simulations of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations, including the demagnetization field calculated with a Green's function approach for thin film problems. At finite temperature the thermalized dynamics is found using a second order Heun algorithm for a magnetic Langevin equation based on the LLG equations. The vortex state is stable only within a limited range of ellipticity, outside of which a quasi-single-domain becomes the preferred minimum energy state. A vortex is found to move in an elliptical potential, whose force constants along the principal axes are determined numerically. The eccentricity of vortex motion is directly related to the force constants. Elliptical vortex motion is produced spontaneously by thermal fluctuations. The vortex position and velocity distributions in thermal equilibrium are Boltzmann distributions. The results show that vortex motion in elliptical disks can be described by a Thiele equation.

  9. Flight tests of vortex-attenuating splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Visual data on formation and motion of lift-induced wingtip vortex were obtained by stationary, airflow visualization method. Visual data indicated that vortex cannot be eliminated by merely reshaping wingtip. Configuration change will likely have only small effect on far-field flow.

  10. Vortex avalanches in a type II superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Behnia, K.; Capan, C.; Mailly, D.; Etienne, B.

    1999-12-01

    The authors report on a study of the spatiotemporal variation of magnetic induction in a superconducting niobium sample during a slow sweep of external magnetic field. A sizable fraction of the increase in the local vortex population occurs in abrupt jumps. They compare the size distribution of these avalanches with the predictions of self-organized-criticality models for vortex dynamics.

  11. An investigation of the vortex method

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, D.W. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    The vortex method is a numerical scheme for solving the vorticity transport equation. Chorin introduced modern vortex methods. The vortex method is a Lagrangian, grid free method which has less intrinsic diffusion than many grid schemes. It is adaptive in the sense that elements are needed only where the vorticity is non-zero. Our description of vortex methods begins with the point vortex method of Rosenhead for two dimensional inviscid flow, and builds upon it to eventually cover the case of three dimensional slightly viscous flow with boundaries. This section gives an introduction to the fundamentals of the vortex method. This is done in order to give a basic impression of the previous work and its line of development, as well as develop some notation and concepts which will be used later. The purpose here is not to give a full review of vortex methods or the contributions made by all the researchers in the field. Please refer to the excellent review papers in Sethian and Gustafson, chapters 1 Sethian, 2 Hald, 3 Sethian, 8 Chorin provide a solid introduction to vortex methods, including convergence theory, application in two dimensions and connection to statistical mechanics and polymers. Much of the information in this review is taken from those chapters, Chorin and Marsden and Batchelor, the chapters are also useful for their extensive bibliographies.

  12. Vortex motion on surfaces of small curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigoni, Daniele Dunajski, Maciej Manton, Nicholas S.

    2013-12-15

    We consider a single Abelian Higgs vortex on a surface Σ whose Gaussian curvature K is small relative to the size of the vortex, and analyse vortex motion by using geodesics on the moduli space of static solutions. The moduli space is Σ with a modified metric, and we propose that this metric has a universal expansion, in terms of K and its derivatives, around the initial metric on Σ. Using an integral expression for the Kähler potential on the moduli space, we calculate the leading coefficients of this expansion numerically, and find some evidence for their universality. The expansion agrees to first order with the metric resulting from the Ricci flow starting from the initial metric on Σ, but differs at higher order. We compare the vortex motion with the motion of a point particle along geodesics of Σ. Relative to a particle geodesic, the vortex experiences an additional force, which to leading order is proportional to the gradient of K. This force is analogous to the self-force on bodies of finite size that occurs in gravitational motion. -- Highlights: •We study an Abelian Higgs vortex on a surface with small curvature. •A universal expansion for the moduli space metric is proposed. •We numerically check the universality at low orders. •Vortex motion differs from point particle motion because a vortex has a finite size. •Moduli space geometry has similarities with the geometry arising from Ricci flow.

  13. Supersonic shock wave/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, G. S.; Cattafesta, L.

    1993-01-01

    Although shock wave/vortex interaction is a basic and important fluid dynamics problem, very little research has been conducted on this topic. Therefore, a detailed experimental study of the interaction between a supersonic streamwise turbulent vortex and a shock wave was carried out at the Penn State Gas Dynamics Laboratory. A vortex is produced by replaceable swirl vanes located upstream of the throat of various converging-diverging nozzles. The supersonic vortex is then injected into either a coflowing supersonic stream or ambient air. The structure of the isolated vortex is investigated in a supersonic wind tunnel using miniature, fast-response, five-hole and total temperature probes and in a free jet using laser Doppler velocimetry. The cases tested have unit Reynolds numbers in excess of 25 million per meter, axial Mach numbers ranging from 2.5 to 4.0, and peak tangential Mach numbers from 0 (i.e., a pure jet) to about 0.7. The results show that the typical supersonic wake-like vortex consists of a non-isentropic, rotational core, where the reduced circulation distribution is self similar, and an outer isentropic, irrotational region. The vortex core is also a region of significant turbulent fluctuations. Radial profiles of turbulent kinetic energy and axial-tangential Reynolds stress are presented. The interactions between the vortex and both oblique and normal shock waves are investigated using nonintrusive optical diagnostics (i.e. schlieren, planar laser scattering, and laser Doppler velocimetry). Of the various types, two Mach 2.5 overexpanded-nozzle Mach disc interactions are examined in detail. Below a certain vortex strength, a 'weak' interaction exists in which the normal shock is perturbed locally into an unsteady 'bubble' shock near the vortex axis, but vortex breakdown (i.e., a stagnation point) does not occur. For stronger vortices, a random unsteady 'strong' interaction results that causes vortex breakdown. The vortex core reforms downstream of

  14. Origin of reversed vortex ratchet motion.

    PubMed

    Gillijns, W; Silhanek, A V; Moshchalkov, V V; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2007-12-14

    We experimentally demonstrate that the origin of multiply reversed rectified vortex motion in an asymmetric pinning landscape not only is a consequence of the vortex-vortex interactions but also essentially depends on the ratio between the characteristic interaction distance and the period of the asymmetric pinning potential. We study four samples with different periods d of the asymmetric potential. For large d the dc voltage V(dc) recorded under a ac excitation indicates that the average vortex drift is from bigger to smaller dots for all explored positive fields. As d is reduced, a series of sign reversals in the dc response are observed as a function of field. We show that the number of sign reversals increases as d decreases. These findings are in agreement with recent computer simulations and illustrate the relevance of the different characteristic lengths for the vortex rectification effects.

  15. Calculation of vortex flows on complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.; Rao, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    The calculation of aerodynamic characteristics of complex configurations having strongly coupled vortex flows is a non-linear problem requiring iterative solution techniques. This paper discusses the use of a low-order panel method as a means of obtaining practical solutions to such problems. The panel method is based on piecewise constant source and doublet quadrilateral panels and uses the internal Dirichlet boundary condition of zero perturbation potential. The problems of predicting vortex/surface interaction and vortex separation are discussed. Some example calculations are included but further test cases have yet to be carried out, in particular for comparisons with experimental data. The problem of convergence on the iterative calculation for the shape of the free vortex sheet is addressed and a preprocessor routine, based on an unsteady, two-dimensional version of the panel method, is put forward as a cost-effective way of generating an initial vortex structure for use as a starting solution for general configurations.

  16. Phase structure, magnetic monopoles, and vortices in the lattice Abelian Higgs model

    SciTech Connect

    Ranft, J.; Kripfganz, J.; Ranft, G.

    1983-07-15

    We present Monte Carlo calculations of lattice Abelian Higgs models in four dimensions and with charges of the Higgs particles equal to q = 1, 2, and 6. The phase transitions are studied in the plane of the two coupling constants considering separately average plaquette and average link expectation values. The density of topological excitations is studied. In the confinement phase we find finite densities of magnetic-monopole currents, electric currents, and vortex currents. The magnetic-monopole currents vanish exponentially in the Coulomb phase. The density of electric currents and vortex currents is finite in the Coulomb phase and vanishes exponentially in the Higgs phase.

  17. Effect of point-like disorder on the vortex phase diagram in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-δ in oblique field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konczykowski, M.; van der Beek, C. J.; Mosser, V.; Koshelev, A. E.; Li, M.; Kes, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    The phase diagram of vortex matter in the layered superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-δ exposed to a magnetic field oblique to the crystalline c-axis contains two first order transition (FOT) lines [1]. The first, HFOTm, separates the vortex solid from the vortex liquid, the second, HFOTct, separates the combined lattice state in the vortex solid from a tilted lattice state. The angular dependence of HFOTm in the tilted lattice region follows the anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau model [2], allowing for the determination of the anisotropy factor γeff and the contribution of magnetic coupling to the mutual interaction of “pancake” vortices in the crossed lattice limit. The later parameter is directly related to the in-plane penetration depth λab. We investigate the evolution of the phase diagram of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-δ in oblique fields with point-like disorder, introduced by irradiation with 2.3 MeV electrons. Apart from the depression of Tc, point-like disorder induces an increase of γeff and a depression of the superfluid density.

  18. A realistic lattice example

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    A realistic, distributed interaction region (IR) lattice has been designed that includes new components discussed in the June 1985 lattice workshop. Unlike the test lattices, the lattice presented here includes utility straights and the mechanism for crossing the beams in the experimental straights. Moreover, both the phase trombones and the dispersion suppressors contain the same bending as the normal cells. Vertically separated beams and 6 Tesla, 1-in-1 magnets are assumed. Since the cells are 200 meters long, and have 60 degree phase advance, this lattice has been named RLD1, in analogy with the corresponding test lattice, TLD1. The quadrupole gradient is 136 tesla/meter in the cells, and has similar values in other quadrupoles except in those in the IR`s, where the maximum gradient is 245 tesla/meter. RLD1 has distributed IR`s; however, clustered realistic lattices can easily be assembled from the same components, as was recently done in a version that utilizes the same type of experimental and utility straights as those of RLD1.

  19. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  20. Closer look at the low-frequency dynamics of vortex matter using scanning susceptibility microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raes, B.; de Souza Silva, C. C.; Silhanek, A. V.; Cabral, L. R. E.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Van de Vondel, J.

    2014-10-01

    Using scanning susceptibility microscopy, we shed light on the dynamics of individual superconducting vortices and examine the hypotheses of the phenomenological models traditionally used to explain the macroscopic ac electromagnetic properties of superconductors. The measurements, carried out on a 2H-NbSe2 single crystal at relatively high temperature (T =6.8 K), show a linear amplitude dependence of the global ac susceptibility for excitation amplitudes between 0.3 and 2.6 Oe. We observe that the low amplitude response, typically attributed to the oscillation of vortices in a potential well defined by a single, relaxing, Labusch constant, actually corresponds to strongly nonuniform vortex shaking. This is particularly pronounced in the field-cooled disordered phase, which undergoes a dynamic reorganization above 0.8 Oe as evidenced by the healing of lattice defects and a more uniform oscillation of vortices. These observations are corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations when choosing the microscopic input parameters from the experiments. The theoretical simulations allow us to reconstruct the vortex trajectories, providing deeper insight into the thermally induced hopping dynamics and the vortex lattice reordering.

  1. Thermal depinning and transverse-field tilting transitions in a planar vortex array pinned by a columnar defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo

    2006-03-01

    I will discuss results on a thermal and a transverse magnetic field response of a vortex line array confined to a plane with a dilute concentration of columnar pins. As a function of temperature, for a magnetic field aligned with defects this system exhibits a one-dimensional analog of a roughening transition, with a low-temperature ``smooth'' phase corresponding to a vortex array pinned by the defects, and a high-temperature ``rough'' phase in which at long scales thermal fluctuations effectively average away pinning by the defects. In the low-T pinned phase, the vortex lattice tilt response to a transverse magnetic field proceeds via a soliton proliferation ``transition'', governed by an integrable sine-Hilbert equation. Combining the aforementioned roughenning transitition with this commensurate-incommensurate transition, I map out the transverse-field---temperature phase diagram for this system.

  2. PREFACE: Special section on vortex rings Special section on vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2009-10-01

    This special section of Fluid Dynamics Research includes five articles on vortex rings in both classical and quantum fluids. The leading scientists of the field describe the trends in and the state-of-the-art development of experiments, theories and numerical simulations of vortex rings. The year 2008 was the 150th anniversary of 'vortex motion' since Hermann von Helmholtz opened up this field. In 1858, Helmholtz published a paper in Crelle's Journal which put forward the concept of 'vorticity' and made the first analysis of vortex motion. Fluid mechanics before that was limited to irrotational motion. In the absence of vorticity, the motion of an incompressible homogeneous fluid is virtually equivalent to a rigid-body motion in the sense that the fluid motion is determined once the boundary configuration is specified. Helmholtz proved, among other things, that, without viscosity, a vortex line is frozen into the fluid. This Helmholtz's law immediately implies the preservation of knots and links of vortex lines and its implication is enormous. One of the major trends of fluid mechanics since the latter half of the 20th century is to clarify the topological meaning of Helmholtz's law and to exploit it to develop theoretical and numerical methods to find the solutions of the Euler equations and to develop experimental techniques to gain an insight into fluid motion. Vortex rings are prominent coherent structures in a variety of fluid motions from the microscopic scale, through human and mesoscale to astrophysical scales, and have attracted people's interest. The late professor Philip G Saffman (1981) emphasized the significance of studies on vortex rings. One particular motion exemplifies the whole range of problems of vortex motion and is also a commonly known phenomenon, namely the vortex ring or smoke ring. Vortex rings are easily produced by dropping drops of one liquid into another, or by puffing fluid out of a hole, or by exhaling smoke if one has the skill

  3. The lateral-directional characteristics of a 74-degree Delta wing employing gothic planform vortex flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantz, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    The low speed lateral/directional characteristics of a generic 74 degree delta wing body configuration employing the latest generation, gothic planform vortex flaps was determined. Longitudinal effects are also presented. The data are compared with theoretical estimates from VORSTAB, an extension of the Quasi vortex lattice Method of Lan which empirically accounts for vortex breakdown effects in the calculation of longitudinal and lateral/directional aerodynamic characteristics. It is indicated that leading edge deflections of 30 and 40 degrees reduce the magnitude of the wing effective dihedral relative to the baseline for a specified angle of attack or lift coefficient. For angles of attack greater than 15 degrees, these flap deflections reduce the configuration directional stability despite improved vertical tail effectiveness. It is shown that asymmetric leading edge deflections are inferior to conventional ailerons in generating rolling moments. VORSTAB calculations provide coarse lateral/directional estimates at low to moderate angles of attack. The theory does not account for vortex flow induced, vertical tail effects.

  4. Modeling of Wake-vortex Aircraft Encounters. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sonya T.

    1999-01-01

    There are more people passing through the world's airports today than at any other time in history. With this increase in civil transport, airports are becoming capacity limited. In order to increase capacity and thus meet the demands of the flying public, the number of runways and number of flights per runway must be increased. In response to the demand, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), airport operators, and the airline industry are taking steps to increase airport capacity without jeopardizing safety. Increasing the production per runway increases the likelihood that an aircraft will encounter the trailing wake-vortex of another aircraft. The hazard of a wake-vortex encounter is that heavy load aircraft can produce high intensity wake turbulence, through the development of its wing-tip vortices. A smaller aircraft following in the wake of the heavy load aircraft will experience redistribution of its aerodynamic load. This creates a safety hazard for the smaller aircraft. Understanding this load redistribution is of great importance, particularly during landing and take-off. In this research wake-vortex effects on an encountering 10% scale model of the B737-100 aircraft are modeled using both strip theory and vortex-lattice modeling methods. The models are then compared to wind tunnel data that was taken in the 30ft x 60ft wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Comparisons are made to determine if the models will have acceptable accuracy when parts of the geometry are removed, such as the horizontal stabilizer and the vertical tail. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to observe how accurately the models could match the experimental data if there was a 10% error in the circulation strength. It was determined that both models show accurate results when the wing, horizontal stabilizer, and vertical tail were a part of the geometry. When the horizontal

  5. Vortex bursting and tracer transport of a counter-rotating vortex pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misaka, T.; Holzäpfel, F.; Hennemann, I.; Gerz, T.; Manhart, M.; Schwertfirm, F.

    2012-02-01

    Large-eddy simulations of a coherent counter-rotating vortex pair in different environments are performed. The environmental background is characterized by varying turbulence intensities and stable temperature stratifications. Turbulent exchange processes between the vortices, the vortex oval, and the environment, as well as the material redistribution processes along the vortex tubes are investigated employing passive tracers that are superimposed to the initial vortex flow field. It is revealed that the vortex bursting phenomenon, known from photos of aircraft contrails or smoke visualization, is caused by collisions of secondary vortical structures traveling along the vortex tube which expel material from the vortex but do not result in a sudden decay of circulation or an abrupt change of vortex core structure. In neutrally stratified and weakly turbulent conditions, vortex reconnection triggers traveling helical vorticity structures which is followed by their collision. A long-lived vortex ring links once again establishing stable double rings. Key phenomena observed in the simulations are supported by photographs of contrails. The vertical and lateral extents of the detrained passive tracer strongly depend on environmental conditions where the sensitivity of detrainment rates on initial tracer distributions appears to be low.

  6. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition Using 3C-PIV Measurements: Corrected for Vortex Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughues Richard; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2003-01-01

    Three-component (3-C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within the wake across a rotor disk plane, are used to determine wake vortex definitions important for BVI (Blade Vortex Interaction) and broadband noise prediction. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted using a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). In this paper, measurements are presented of the wake vortex field over the advancing side of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition. The orientations of the vortex (tube) axes are found to have non-zero tilt angles with respect to the chosen PIV measurement cut planes, often on the order of 45 degrees. Methods for determining the orientation of the vortex axis and reorienting the measured PIV velocity maps (by rotation/projection) are presented. One method utilizes the vortex core axial velocity component, the other utilizes the swirl velocity components. Key vortex parameters such as vortex core size, strength, and core velocity distribution characteristics are determined from the reoriented PIV velocity maps. The results are compared with those determined from velocity maps that are not corrected for orientation. Knowledge of magnitudes and directions of the vortex axial and swirl velocity components as a function of streamwise location provide a basis for insight into the vortex evolution.

  7. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  8. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  9. SPIN ON THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    ORGINOS,K.

    2003-01-07

    I review the current status of hadronic structure computations on the lattice. I describe the basic lattice techniques and difficulties and present some of the latest lattice results; in particular recent results of the RBC group using domain wall fermions are also discussed. In conclusion, lattice computations can play an important role in understanding the hadronic structure and the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although some difficulties still exist, several significant steps have been made. Advances in computer technology are expected to play a significant role in pushing these computations closer to the chiral limit and in including dynamical fermions. RBC has already begun preliminary dynamical domain wall fermion computations [49] which we expect to be pushed forward with the arrival of QCD0C. In the near future, we also expect to complete the non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant derivative operators in quenched QCD.

  10. Asymptotic energy of lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weigen; Zhang, Zuhe

    2009-04-01

    The energy of a simple graph G arising in chemical physics, denoted by E(G), is defined as the sum of the absolute values of eigenvalues of G. As the dimer problem and spanning trees problem in statistical physics, in this paper we propose the energy per vertex problem for lattice systems. In general for a type of lattice in statistical physics, to compute the entropy constant with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are different tasks with different hardness and may have different solutions. We show that the energy per vertex of plane lattices is independent of the toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions. In particular, the asymptotic formulae of energies of the triangular, 33.42, and hexagonal lattices with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are obtained explicitly.

  11. Composite Fermion Theory for Bosonic Quantum Hall States on Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, G.; Cooper, N. R.

    2009-09-01

    We study the ground states of the Bose-Hubbard model in a uniform magnetic field, motivated by the physics of cold atomic gases on lattices at high vortex density. Mapping the bosons to composite fermions (CF) leads to the prediction of quantum Hall fluids that have no counterpart in the continuum. We construct trial states for these phases and test numerically the predictions of the CF model. We establish the existence of strongly correlated phases beyond those in the continuum limit and provide evidence for a wider scope of the composite fermion approach beyond its application to the lowest Landau level.

  12. Active and driven hydrodynamic crystals.

    PubMed

    Desreumaux, N; Florent, N; Lauga, E; Bartolo, D

    2012-08-01

    Motivated by the experimental ability to produce monodisperse particles in microfluidic devices, we study theoretically the hydrodynamic stability of driven and active crystals. We first recall the theoretical tools allowing to quantify the dynamics of elongated particles in a confined fluid. In this regime hydrodynamic interactions between particles arise from a superposition of potential dipolar singularities. We exploit this feature to derive the equations of motion for the particle positions and orientations. After showing that all five planar Bravais lattices are stationary solutions of the equations of motion, we consider separately the case where the particles are passively driven by an external force, and the situation where they are self-propelling. We first demonstrate that phonon modes propagate in driven crystals, which are always marginally stable. The spatial structures of the eigenmodes depend solely on the symmetries of the lattices, and on the orientation of the driving force. For active crystals, the stability of the particle positions and orientations depends not only on the symmetry of the crystals but also on the perturbation wavelengths and on the crystal density. Unlike unconfined fluids, the stability of active crystals is independent of the nature of the propulsion mechanism at the single-particle level. The square and rectangular lattices are found to be linearly unstable at short wavelengths provided the volume fraction of the crystals is high enough. Differently, hexagonal, oblique, and face-centered crystals are always unstable. Our work provides a theoretical basis for future experimental work on flowing microfluidic crystals. PMID:22864543

  13. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  14. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  15. Phenomena, dynamics and instabilities of vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, C. H. K.; Leweke, T.; Asselin, D. J.; Harris, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Our motivation for studying the dynamics of vortex pairs stems initially from an interest in the trailing wake vortices from aircraft and the dynamics of longitudinal vortices close to a vehicle surface. However, our motivation also comes from the fact that vortex-vortex interactions and vortex-wall interactions are fundamental to many turbulent flows. The intent of the paper is to present an overview of some of our recent work concerning the formation and structure of counter-rotating vortex pairs. We are interested in the long-wave and short-wave three-dimensional instabilities that evolve for an isolated vortex pair, but also we would like to know how vortex pairs interact with a wall, including both two-dimensional interactions, and also the influence of the surface on the three-dimensional instabilities. The emphasis of this presentation is on physical mechanisms by which vortices interact with each other and with surfaces, principally from an experimental approach, but also coupled with analytical studies.

  16. Dynamics of Isolated Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennings, Pepijn; Bosschers, Johan; van Terwisga, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Performance of ship propellers and comfort levels in the surroundings are limited by various forms of cavitation. Amongst these forms tip vortex cavitation is one of the first appearing forms and is expected to be mainly responsible for the emission of broadband pressure fluctuations typically occurring between the 4th to the 7th blade passing frequency (approx. 40--70 Hz). These radiated pressure pulses are likely to excite parts of the hull structure resulting in a design compromise between efficiency and comfort. Insight is needed in the mechanism of acoustic emission from the oscillations by a tip vortex cavity. In the current experimental study the tip vortex cavity from a blade with an elliptic planform and sections based on NACA 662 - 415 with meanline a = 0 . 8 is observed using high speed shadowgraphy in combination with blade force and acoustic measurements. An analytic model describing three main cavity deformation modes is verified and used to explain the origin of a cavity eigenfrequency or ``vortex singing'' phenomenon observed by Maines and Arndt (1997) on the tip vortex cavity originating from the same blade. As no hydrodynamic sound originating from the tip vortex cavity was observed it is posed that a tip flow instability is essential for ``vortex singing.'' This research was funded by the Lloyd's Register Foundation as part of the International Institute for Cavitation Research.

  17. Topology of vortex-wing interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, C.; Rockwell, D.

    2016-10-01

    A trailing vortex incident upon a wing can generate different modes of vortex-wing interaction. These modes, which may involve either enhancement or suppression of the vortex generated at the tip of the wing, are classified on the basis of the present experiments together with computations at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Occurrence of a given mode of interaction is predominantly determined by the dimensionless location of the incident vortex relative to the tip of the wing and is relatively insensitive to the Reynolds number and dimensionless circulation of the incident vortex. The genesis of the basic interaction modes is clarified using streamline topology with associated critical points that show compatibility between complex streamline patterns in the vicinity of the tip of the wing. Whereas formation of an enhanced tip vortex involves a region of large upwash in conjunction with localized flow separation, complete suppression of the tip vortex is associated with a small-scale separation-reattachment bubble bounded by downwash at the wing tip.

  18. Vortex Ring Interaction with a Heated Screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason; Krueger, Paul S.

    2008-11-01

    Previous examinations of vortex rings impinging on porous screens has shown the reformation of the vortex ring with a lower velocity after passing through the screen, the creation of secondary vortices, and mixing. A heated screen could, in principle, alter the vortex-screen interaction by changing the local liquid viscosity and density. In the present investigation, a mechanical piston-cylinder vortex ring generator was used to create vortex rings in an aqueous sucrose solution. The rings impinged on a screen of horizontal wires that were heated using electrical current. The flow was visualized with food color and video imaging. Tests with and without heat were conducted at a piston stroke-to-jet diameter ratio of 4 and a jet Reynolds number (Re) of 1000. The vortex rings slowed after passing through the screen, but in tests with heat, they maintained a higher fraction of their before-screen velocity due to reduction in fluid viscosity near the wires. In addition, small ``fingers'' that developed on the front of the vortex rings as they passed through the screen exhibited positive buoyancy effects in the heated case.

  19. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  20. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Gong, Chaohui; Serrano, Miguel M.; Mendelson, Joseph R., III; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    By propagating waves from head to tail, limbless organisms like snakes can traverse terrain composed of rocks, foliage, soil and sand. Previous research elucidated how rigid obstacles influence snake locomotion by studying a model terrain-symmetric lattices of pegs placed in hard ground. We want to understand how different substrate-body interaction modes affect performance in desert-adapted snakes during transit of substrates composed of both rigid obstacles and granular media (GM). We tested Chionactis occipitalis, the Mojave shovel-nosed snake, in two laboratory treatments: lattices of 0 . 64 cm diameter obstacles arrayed on both a hard, slick substrate and in a GM of ~ 0 . 3 mm diameter glass particles. For all lattice spacings, d, speed through the hard ground lattices was less than that in GM lattices. However, maximal undulation efficiencies ηu (number of body lengths advanced per undulation cycle) in both treatments were comparable when d was intermediate. For other d, ηu was lower than this maximum in hard ground lattices, while on GM, ηu was insensitive to d. To systematically explore such locomotion, we tested a physical robot model of the snake; performance depended sensitively on base substrate, d and body wave parameters.