Science.gov

Sample records for driving transgene expression

  1. The mouse muscle creatine kinase promoter faithfully drives reporter gene expression in transgenic Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wayland; Neff, Eric S; Furlow, J David

    2004-06-17

    Developing Xenopus laevis experience two periods of muscle differentiation, once during embryogenesis and again at metamorphosis. During metamorphosis, thyroid hormone induces both muscle growth in the limbs and muscle death in the tail. In mammals, the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene is activated during the differentiation from myoblasts to myocytes and has served as both a marker for muscle development and to drive transgene expression in transgenic mice. Transcriptional control elements are generally highly conserved throughout evolution, potentially allowing mouse promoter use in transgenic X. laevis. This paper compares endogenous X. laevis MCK gene expression and the mouse MCK (mMCK) promoter driving a green fluorescent protein reporter in transgenic X. laevis. The mMCK promoter demonstrated strong skeletal muscle-specific transgene expression in both the juvenile tadpole and adult frog. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrate the functional conservation of regulatory sequences in vertebrate muscle gene promoters and illustrate the utility of using X. laevis transgenesis for detailed comparative study of mammalian promoter activity in vivo.

  2. A promoter from sugarcane bacilliform badnavirus drives transgene expression in banana and other monocot and dicot plants.

    PubMed

    Schenk, P M; Sagi, L; Remans, T; Dietzgen, R G; Bernard, M J; Graham, M W; Manners, J M

    1999-04-01

    A 1369 bp DNA fragment (Sc) was isolated from a full-length clone of sugarcane bacilliform badnavirus (ScBV) and was shown to have promoter activity in transient expression assays using monocot (banana, maize, millet and sorghum) and dicot plant species (tobacco, sunflower, canola and Nicotiana benthamiana). This promoter was also tested for stable expression in transgenic banana and tobacco plants. These experiments showed that this promoter could drive high-level expression of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in most plant cells. The expression level was comparable to the maize ubiquitin promoter in standardised transient assays in maize. In transgenic banana plants the expression levels were variable for different transgenic lines but was generally comparable with the activities of both the maize ubiquitin promoter and the enhanced cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. The Sc promoter appears to express in a near-constitutive manner in transgenic banana and tobacco plants. The promoter from sugarcane bacilliform virus represents a useful tool for the high-level expression of foreign genes in both monocot and dicot transgenic plants that could be used similarly to the CaMV 35S or maize polyubiquitin promoter.

  3. Sugarcane Loading Stem Gene promoters drive transgene expression preferentially in the stem.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Richard L; Birch, Robert G

    2013-05-01

    Promoter regions of six sugarcane Loading Stem Gene (ScLSG) alleles were analyzed using bioinformatic and transgenic approaches. Stable transgene expression analyses, on multiple independent lines per construct, revealed differences between ScLSG promoters in absolute levels and in tissue-selectivity of luciferase reporter activity. Four promoters drove peak expression in the sucrose-loading zone and maintained substantial expression throughout mature stems. One drove a pattern of gradual increase along the stem maturation profile. In general, stem: root expression ratio increased with plant age. The ScLSG5 promoter had the fewest light-enhanced and root-expression motifs in bioinformatic analysis, and drove the highest level and specificity of transgene expression in stems. This indicates the potential to further improve the stem specificity of ScLSG promoter sequences by eliminating enhancers of expression in other tissues. An intron in the 5'UTR was important for expression strength. The ScLSG promoters will be useful for research and biotechnology in sugarcane, where the tailored expression of transgenes in stems is important for enhanced accumulation of sugar or value-added products, and for development as a bioenergy feedstock.

  4. Pineapple translation factor SUI1 and ribosomal protein L36 promoters drive constitutive transgene expression patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Koia, Jonni; Moyle, Richard; Hendry, Caroline; Lim, Lionel; Botella, José Ramón

    2013-03-01

    The availability of a variety of promoter sequences is necessary for the genetic engineering of plants, in basic research studies and for the development of transgenic crops. In this study, the promoter and 5' untranslated regions of the evolutionally conserved protein translation factor SUI1 gene and ribosomal protein L36 gene were isolated from pineapple and sequenced. Each promoter was translationally fused to the GUS reporter gene and transformed into the heterologous plant system Arabidopsis thaliana. Both the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters drove GUS expression in all tissues of Arabidopsis at levels comparable to the CaMV35S promoter. Transient assays determined that the pineapple SUI1 promoter also drove GUS expression in a variety of climacteric and non-climacteric fruit species. Thus the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters demonstrate the potential for using translation factor and ribosomal protein genes as a source of promoter sequences that can drive constitutive transgene expression patterns.

  5. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B.; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E.; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H. T.; Housley, Gary D.; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  6. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  7. Evaluation of viral and mammalian promoters for driving transgene expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Zhang Guisheng; Knapp, Joseph E.; Liu Dexi . E-mail: dliu@pitt.edu

    2006-01-13

    Fifteen luciferase plasmid constructs driven by various promoters including cytomegalovirus (CMV), Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), human serum albumin (SA), {alpha}-1 antitrypsin (AAT), cytochrome P450 CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, mouse CYP2b10, human amyloid precursor protein (APP), chicken {beta} actin (ACT), nuclear factor {kappa} B (NF{kappa}B), and heat shock protein 70 (HS) promoters were hydrodynamically introduced into mouse hepatocytes, and the level and persistence of luciferase gene expression were examined. Eight hours post-gene transfer, the CMV and AAT promoters showed the highest activity, followed by the CYP2D6, HS, and RSV promoters which were slightly less active. The human serum albumin promoter exhibited the lowest activity among the promoters examined. The time course of gene expression showed a two-phase decline in luciferase activity with a rapid phase within First 5-7 days and a slower decline thereafter. Results from Southern and Northern blot analyses revealed a good correlation between the decline of luciferase activity and the decrease in mRNA level, suggesting promoter silencing as the possible mechanism for the observed transient luciferase gene expression. Inclusion of EBN1 and oriP sequences of Epstein-Barr virus into the plasmid extended the period of active transcription for about one week. These results provide important information concerning the role of promoters in regulating transgene expression and for the proper design of plasmids for gene expression and gene therapy.

  8. The promoter of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1-associated protein 4 drives developmentally targeted transgene expression mainly in adult cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Young; Ahn, Kyu Youn; Lee, Seon Min; Koh, Jeong Tae; Chun, Byeong Jo; Bae, Choon Sang; Lee, Kee Sook; Kim, Kyung Keun

    2004-05-21

    Restricting transgene expression to specific cell types and maintaining long-term expression are major goals for gene therapy. Previously, we cloned brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1-associated protein 4 (BAI1-AP4), a novel brain-specific protein that interacts with BAI1, and found that it was developmentally upregulated in the adult brain. In this report, we isolated 5 kb of the 5' upstream sequence of the mouse BAI1-AP4 gene and analyzed its promoter activity. Functional analyses demonstrated that an Sp1 site was the enhancer, and the region containing the transcription initiation site and an AP2-binding site was the basal promoter. We examined the ability of the BAI1-AP4 promoter to drive adult brain-specific expression by using it to drive lacZ expression in transgenic (TG) mice. Northern blot analyses showed a unique pattern of beta-galactosidase expression in TG brain, peaking at 1 month after birth, like endogenous BAI1-AP4. Histological analyses demonstrated the same localization and developmental expression of beta-galactosidase and BAI1-AP4 in most neurons of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Our data indicate that TG mice carrying the BAI1-AP4 promoter could be a valuable model system for region-specific brain diseases.

  9. The β-actin gene promoter of rohu carp (Labeo rohita) drives reporter gene expressions in transgenic rohu and various cell lines, including spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barman, Hirak Kumar; Mohanta, Ramya; Patra, Swagat Kumar; Chakrapani, Vemulawada; Panda, Rudra Prasanna; Nayak, Swapnarani; Jena, Sasmita; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Nandanpawar, Priyanka

    2015-06-01

    We previously characterized the β-actin gene promoter of Indian domesticated rohu carp (Labeo rohita) and made a reporter construct via fusion to green fluorescence protein (GFP) cDNA. In this study, the same construct was used to breed transgenic rohu fish. About 20% of the transgenic offspring showed ubiquitous expression of the reporter GFP gene. In a few of the transgenic fish, we documented massive epithelial and/or muscular expression with visible green color under normal light. The expression of GFP mRNA was higher in the muscle tissue of transgenic fish than in that of non-transgenic fish. A highly efficient nucleofection protocol was optimized to transfect proliferating spermatogonial cells of rohu using this reporter construct. The β-actin promoter also drove expressions in HEK293 (derived from human embryonic kidney cells), K562 (human leukemic cells) and SF21 (insect ovarian cells) lines. These findings imply conserved regulatory mechanisms of β-actin gene expression across eukaryotes. Furthermore, the isolated β-actin promoter with consensus regulatory elements has the potential to be used in generating transgenic carp with genes of interest and in basic biology research.

  10. Relative transgene expression frequencies in homozygous versus hemizygous transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su-Ping; Opsahl, Margaret L; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Morley, Steven D; West, John D

    2013-12-01

    We have used a simple binomial model of stochastic transgene inactivation at the level of the chromosome or transgene, rather than the cellular level, for the analysis of two mouse transgenic lines that show variegated patterns of expression. This predicts the percentages of cells that express one, both or neither alleles of the transgene in homozygotes from the observed percentages of cells, which express the transgene in hemizygotes. It adequately explained the relationship between the numbers of cells expressing the transgene in hemizygous and homozygous mosaic 21OH/LacZ mouse adrenals and mosaic BLG/7 mouse mammary glands. The binomial model also predicted that a small proportion of cells in mosaic mammary glands of BLG/7 homozygotes would express both BLG/7 alleles but published data indicated that all cells expressing the transgene showed monoallelic expression. Although it didn't fit all of the BLG/7 data as precisely as a more complex model, which used several ad hoc assumptions to explain these results, the simple binomial model was able to explain the relationship in observed transgene expression frequencies between hemizygous and homozygous mosaic tissues for both 21OH/LacZ and BLG/7 mice. It may prove to be a useful general model for analysing other transgenic animals showing mosaic transgene expression.

  11. [Inheritance and expression stability of transgene in transgenic animals].

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing-Ran; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2011-05-01

    Transgenic technology is one of the most hotspots in biology. In the past decade, the progress in animal cloning has provided an alternative method to improve transgenic efficiency. Many kinds of transgenic animals have been successfully produced via the combination of transfection and nuclear transfer. However, the ultimate aim of transgenesis is not to produce several transgenic animals, but to service for the needs of human. In animal production, transgenic technology has been used to breed new livestock, which has received a lot of attention in China. It has been evidenced that inheritance and expression instability of transgene in transgenic animals is still the major limitation, which is attributed to position effect, epigenetic modification, and hereditary efficiency of transgene. In this review, we discussed the three points for promoting the industrialization of animal transgenic breeding.

  12. Expression specificity of GFAP transgenes.

    PubMed

    Su, Mu; Hu, Huimin; Lee, Youngjin; d'Azzo, Alessandra; Messing, Albee; Brenner, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate filament protein found predominantly in astrocytes. This specificity has recommended the GFAP gene promoter for targeting transgene expression to astrocytes. Although both we [Brenner et al. J. Neurosci. 14:1030-1037, (1994)] and others [Mucke et al. New Biol. 3:465-474, (1991)] have reported astrocyte specificity for GFAP promoters, we demonstrate here that these DNA sequences can also direct activity in neurons. The pattern of neuronal activity varied with both the nature of the expressed sequence and the transgene insertion site. Specifically, neuronal expression was very high for a protective protein/cathepsin A minigene, moderate for lacZ and undetectable for GFP. These findings, coupled with a survey of the literature, recommend that investigators using GFAP-driven transgenes verify specificity for each line studied, using a detection system whose sensitivity is sufficient to detect a compromising level of misexpression.

  13. Feline neural progenitor cells II: use of novel plasmid vector and hybrid promoter to drive expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor transgene.

    PubMed

    You, X Joann; Yang, Jing; Gu, Ping; Liew, Chee Gee; Klassen, Henry J

    2012-01-01

    Sustained transgene expression is required for the success of cell transplant-based gene therapy. Most widely used are lentiviral-based vectors which integrate into the host genome and thereby maintain sustained transgene expression. This requires integration into the nuclear genome, and potential risks include activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Plasmids have been used; however lack of sustained expression presents an additional challenge. Here we used the pCAG-PyF101-eGFP plasmid to deliver the human GDNF gene to cat neural progenitor cells (cNPCs). This vector consists of a CAGG composite promoter linked to the polyoma virus mutant enhancer PyF101. Expression of an episomal eGFP reporter and GDNF transgene were stably maintained by the cells, even following induction of differentiation. These genetically modified cells appear suitable for use in allogeneic models of cell-based delivery of GDNF in the cat and may find veterinary applications should such strategies prove clinically beneficial.

  14. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  15. Transgene expression systems in the Triticeae cereals.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Götz; Himmelbach, Axel; Chen, Wanxin; Douchkov, Dimitar K; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The control of transgene expression is vital both for the elucidation of gene function and for the engineering of transgenic crops. Given the dominance of the Triticeae cereals in the agricultural economy of the temperate world, the development of well-performing transgene expression systems of known functionality is of primary importance. Transgenes can be expressed either transiently or stably. Transient expression systems based on direct or virus-mediated gene transfer are particularly useful in situations where the need is to rapidly screen large numbers of genes. However, an unequivocal understanding of gene function generally requires that a transgene functions throughout the plant's life and is transmitted through the sexual cycle, since this alone allows its effect to be decoupled from the plant's response to the generally stressful gene transfer event. Temporal, spatial and quantitative control of a transgene's expression depends on its regulatory environment, which includes both its promoter and certain associated untranslated region sequences. While many transgenic approaches aim to manipulate plant phenotype via ectopic gene expression, a transgene sequence can be also configured to down-regulate the expression of its endogenous counterpart, a strategy which exploits the natural gene silencing machinery of plants. In this review, current technical opportunities for controlling transgene expression in the Triticeae species are described. Apart from protocols for transient and stable gene transfer, the choice of promoters and other untranslated regulatory elements, we also consider signal peptides, as they too govern the abundance and particularly the sub-cellular localization of transgene products.

  16. Transgene expression in the basidiomycete root pathogen Armillaria mellea.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toward development of a genetic transformation system for Armillaria mellea, we used particle bombardment to identify promoters for driving transgene expression. The plasmid tested was pYES-hph-004iGFP, on which the green fluorescence protein gene, gfp, is linked to the Agaricus bisporus gpdII promo...

  17. The effect of gene drive on containment of transgenic mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John M

    2009-05-21

    Mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever continue to be a major health problem through much of the world. Several new potential approaches to disease control utilize gene drive to spread anti-pathogen genes into the mosquito population. Prior to a release, these projects will require trials in outdoor cages from which transgenic mosquitoes may escape, albeit in small numbers. Most genes introduced in small numbers are very likely to be lost from the environment; however, gene drive mechanisms enhance the invasiveness of introduced genes. Consequently, introduced transgenes may be more likely to persist than ordinary genes following an accidental release. Here, we develop stochastic models to analyze the loss probabilities for several gene drive mechanisms, including homing endonuclease genes, transposable elements, Medea elements, the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia, engineered underdominance genes, and meiotic drive. We find that Medea and Wolbachia present the best compromise between invasiveness and containment for the six gene drive systems currently being considered for the control of mosquito-borne disease.

  18. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  19. Transgenic control of perforin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenheld, M.G.; Podack, E.R.; Levy, R.B.

    1995-03-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming effector molecule of CTL and NK cells. To characterize perforin gene expression and its transcriptional control mechanisms in vivo, expression of a cell surface tag, i.e., human CD4, was driven by 5.1 kb of the murin perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region in transgenic mice. Six out of seven transgenic lines expressed the perforin-tag hybrid gene at low to intermediate levels, depending on the integration site. Transgene expression occurred in all cells that physiologically are able to express perforin. At the whole organ level, significant amounts of transgenic mRNA and endogenous perforin mRNA were co-expressed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the lung, the ileum, the oviduct/uterus, and the bone marrow. At the single cell level, the perforin tag was present on NK cells and on CD8{sup +}, as well as on CD4{sup +} cells. Also targeted were Thy-1.2{sup +} {gamma}{delta} T cells, but not Thy-1.2{sup -} {gamma}{delta} T cells, B cells, nor monocytes. During thymic T cell development, transgene expression occurred in double negative (CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}) thymocytes and was detected at all subsequent stages, but exceeded the expression levels of the endogenous gene in the thymus. In conclusion, the analyzed perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region contains important cis-acting sequences that restrict perforin expression to T cells and NK cells, and therefore provides a unique tool for manipulating T cell and/or Nk cell-mediated immune responses in transgenic mice. On the other hand, the normal control of perforin gene expression involves at least one additional negative control mechanism that was not mediated by the transgenic promoter and upstream region. This control restricts perforin gene expression in thymically developing T cells and in most resting peripheral T cells, but can be released upon T cell activation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Variegated transgene expression in mouse mammary gland is determined by the transgene integration locus.

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, K W; Lee, M; Fantes, J A; Graham, E; Clark, A J; Springbett, A; Lathe, R; McClenaghan, M

    1996-01-01

    Mice carrying an ovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) transgene secrete BLG protein into their milk. To explore transgene expression stability, we studied expression levels in three BLG transgenic mouse lines. Unexpectedly, two lines exhibited variable levels of transgene expression. Copy number within lines appeared to be stable and there was no evidence of transgene rearrangement. In the most variable line, BLG production levels were stable within individual mice in two successive lactations. Backcrossing demonstrated that genetic background did not contribute significantly to variable expression. Tissue in situ hybridization revealed mosaicism of transgene expression within individual mammary glands from the two variable lines; in low expressors, discrete patches of cells expressing the transgene were observed. Transgene protein concentrations in milk reflected the proportion of epithelial cells expressing BLG mRNA. Furthermore, chromosomal in situ hybridization revealed that transgene arrays in both lines are situated close to the centromere. We propose that mosaicism of transgene expression is a consequence of the chromosomal location and/or the nature of the primary transgene integration event. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692874

  1. Differential regulation of laminin b1 transgene expression in the neonatal and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K A; Baker, H; Gudas, L J

    2004-01-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in basement membrane, a type of extracellular matrix. We showed that the LAMB1 gene, which encodes the laminin beta1 subunit, is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid in embryonic stem cells. However, little information is available concerning LAMB1 developmental regulation and spatial expression in the adult mouse brain. In this study we used transgenic mice expressing different lengths of LAMB1 promoter driving beta-galactosidase to investigate developmental and adult transcriptional regulation in the regions of the brain in which the laminin beta1 protein is expressed. CNS expression was not observed in transgenic mice carrying a 1.4LAMB1betagal construct. Mice carrying a 2.5LAMB1betagal construct expressed the LAMB1 transgene, as assayed by X-gal staining, only in the molecular layer of the neonatal cerebellum. In contrast, a 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene showed broad regional expression in the adult mouse brain, including the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, colliculi, striatum, and substantia nigra. Similar expression patterns were observed for the endogenous laminin beta1 protein and for the 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene, analyzed with an antibody against the beta-galactosidase protein. The 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene expression in the hippocampal tri-synaptic circuit suggests a role for the LAMB1 gene in learning and memory.

  2. Oviduct-specific expression of human neutrophil defensin 4 in lentivirally generated transgenic chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxin; Wu, Hanyu; Cao, Dainan; Li, Qingyuan; Zhang, Yaqiong; Li, Ning; Hu, Xiaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    The expression of oviduct-specific recombinant proteins in transgenic chickens is a promising technology for the production of therapeutic biologics in eggs. In this study, we constructed a lentiviral vector encoding an expression cassette for human neutrophil defensin 4 (HNP4), a compound that displays high activity against Escherichia coli, and produced transgenic chickens that expressed the recombinant HNP4 protein in egg whites. After the antimicrobial activity of the recombinant HNP4 protein was tested at the cellular level, a 2.8-kb ovalbumin promoter was used to drive HNP4 expression specifically in oviduct tissues. From 669 injected eggs, 218 chickens were successfully hatched. Ten G0 roosters, with semens identified as positive for the transgene, were mated with wild-type hens to generate G1 chickens. From 1,274 total offspring, fifteen G1 transgenic chickens were positive for the transgene, which was confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The results of the Southern blotting and genome walking indicated that a single copy of the HNP4 gene was integrated into chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 24 of the chickens. As expected, HNP4 expression was restricted to the oviduct tissues, and the levels of both transcriptional and translational HNP4 expression varied greatly in transgenic chickens with different transgene insertion sites. The amount of HNP4 protein expressed in the eggs of G1 and G2 heterozygous transgenic chickens ranged from 1.65 μg/ml to 10.18 μg/ml. These results indicated that the production of transgenic chickens that expressed HNP4 protein in egg whites was successful.

  3. Efficient Generation of Mice with Consistent Transgene Expression by FEEST

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Jiang, Yonghua; Mu, Libing; Liu, Yanbin; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Aiqun; Tang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Luo, Minmin; Yu, Lei; Gao, Shaorong; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mouse models are widely used in biomedical research; however, current techniques for producing transgenic mice are limited due to the unpredictable nature of transgene expression. Here, we report a novel, highly efficient technique for the generation of transgenic mice with single-copy integration of the transgene and guaranteed expression of the gene-of-interest (GOI). We refer to this technique as functionally enriched ES cell transgenics, or FEEST. ES cells harboring an inducible Cre gene enabled the efficient selection of transgenic ES cell clones using hygromycin before Cre-mediated recombination. Expression of the GOI was confirmed by assaying for the GFP after Cre recombination. As a proof-of-principle, we produced a transgenic mouse line containing Cre-activatable tTA (cl-tTA6). This tTA mouse model was able to induce tumor formation when crossed with a transgenic mouse line containing a doxycycline-inducible oncogene. We also showed that the cl-tTA6 mouse is a valuable tool for faithfully recapitulating the clinical course of tumor development. We showed that FEEST can be easily adapted for other genes by preparing a transgenic mouse model of conditionally activatable EGFR L858R. Thus, FEEST is a technique with the potential to generate transgenic mouse models at a genome-wide scale. PMID:26573149

  4. Transgenic nude mice ubiquitously expressing fluorescent proteins for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) nude mouse with ubiquitous GFP expression. The GFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the β-actin promoter drives GFP expression in essentially all tissues. In the adult mice, many organs brightly expressed GFP, including the spleen, heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum as well as the circulatory system. The liver expressed GFP at a lesser level. The red fluorescent protein (RFP) transgenic nude mouse was obtained by crossing non-transgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives RFP (DsRed2) expression in essentially all tissues. In the RFP nude mouse, the organs all brightly expressed RFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, liver, duodenum, the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart, and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed RFP. The bone marrow and spleen cells were also RFP positive. The cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) nude mouse was developed by crossing nontransgenic nude mice with the transgenic CK/ECFP mouse in which the β-actin promoter drives expression of CFP in almost all tissues. In the CFP nude mice, the pancreas and reproductive organs displayed the strongest fluorescence signals of all internal organs, which vary in intensity. The GFP, RFP, and CFP nude mice when transplanted with cancer cells of another color are powerful models for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment (TME) at the cellular level.

  5. Generation of stable Xenopus laevis transgenic lines expressing a transgene controlled by weak promoters.

    PubMed

    L'hostis-Guidet, Anne; Recher, Gaëlle; Guillet, Brigitte; Al-Mohammad, Abdulrahim; Coumailleau, Pascal; Tiaho, François; Boujard, Daniel; Madigou, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    Combining two existing protocols of trangenesis, namely the REMI and the I-SceI meganuclease methods, we generated Xenopus leavis expressing a transgene under the control of a promoter that presented a restricted pattern of activity and a low level of expression. This was realized by co-incubating sperm nuclei, the I-SceI enzyme and the transgene prior to transplantation into unfertilized eggs. The addition of the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element in our constructs further enhanced the expression of the transgene without affecting the tissue-specificity of the promoter activity. Using this combination of methods we produced high rates of fully transgenic animals that stably transmitted the transgene to the next generations with a transmission rate of 50% indicating a single integration event.

  6. qPCR for quantification of transgene expression and determination of transgene copy number.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is a mature technology that can be used to accurately quantify the number of copies of a target nucleic acid in a sample. Here, we describe a method for using this technology to determine the copy number of a transgene stably integrated into a plant's genome and to ascertain the level of transgene expression.

  7. Glucose metabolic gene expression in growth hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    Panserat, Stéphane; Kamalam, Biju Sam; Fournier, Jeanne; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Woodward, Krista; Devlin, Robert H

    2014-04-01

    Salmonids are generally known to be glucose intolerant. However, previous studies have shown that growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon display modified nutritional regulation of glycolysis and lipogenesis compared to non-transgenic fish, suggesting the potential for better use of glucose in GH transgenic fish. To examine this in detail, GH transgenic and non-transgenic coho salmon were subjected to glucose tolerance test and subsequent metabolic assessments. After intra-peritoneal injection of 250mg/kg glucose, we analysed post-injection kinetics of glycaemia and expression of several key target genes highly involved in glucose homeostasis in muscle and liver tissues. Our data show no significant differences in plasma glucose levels during peak hyperglycaemia (3-6h after injection), demonstrating a similar glucose tolerance between transgenic and non transgenic. However, and unrelated to the hyperglycaemic episode, GH transgenic fish return to a slightly lower basal glycaemia values 24h after injection. Correspondingly, GH transgenic fish exhibited higher mRNA levels of glucokinase (GK) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in liver, and glucose transporter (GLUT4) in muscle. These data suggest that these metabolic actors may be involved in different glucose use in GH transgenic fish, which would be expected to influence the glucose challenge response. Overall, our data demonstrate that GH transgenic coho salmon may be a pertinent animal model for further study of glucose metabolism in carnivorous fish.

  8. Expression systems and species used for transgenic animal bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Zhao, Sihai; Bai, Liang; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors can produce therapeutic proteins with high value for pharmaceutical use. In this paper, we compared different systems capable of producing therapeutic proteins (bacteria, mammalian cells, transgenic plants, and transgenic animals) and found that transgenic animals were potentially ideal bioreactors for the synthesis of pharmaceutical protein complexes. Compared with other transgenic animal expression systems (egg white, blood, urine, seminal plasma, and silkworm cocoon), the mammary glands of transgenic animals have enormous potential. Compared with other mammalian species (pig, goat, sheep, and cow) that are currently being studied as bioreactors, rabbits offer many advantages: high fertility, easy generation of transgenic founders and offspring, insensitivity to prion diseases, relatively high milk production, and no transmission of severe diseases to humans. Noticeably, for a small- or medium-sized facility, the rabbit system is ideal to produce up to 50 kg of protein per year, considering both economical and hygienic aspects; rabbits are attractive candidates for the mammary-gland-specific expression of recombinant proteins. We also reviewed recombinant proteins that have been produced by targeted expression in the mammary glands of rabbits and discussed the limitations of transgenic animal bioreactors.

  9. Generation of transgenic dogs that conditionally express green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Geon A; Hong, So Gun; Jang, Goo; Kwon, Mo Sun; Koo, Bon Chul; Kim, Teoan; Kang, Sung Keun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Ko, Chemyong; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2011-06-01

    We report the creation of a transgenic dog that conditionally expresses eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) under the regulation of doxycycline. Briefly, fetal fibroblasts infected with a Tet-on eGFP vector were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Subsequently reconstructed oocytes were transferred to recipients. Three clones having transgenes were born and one dog was alive. The dog showed all features of inducible expression of eGFP upon doxycycline administration, and successful breeding resulted in eGFP-positive puppies, confirming stable insertion of the transgene into the genome. This inducible dog model will be useful for a variety of medical research studies.

  10. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in transgenic banana plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G B Sunil; Ganapathi, T R; Revathi, C J; Srinivas, L; Bapat, V A

    2005-10-01

    Embryogenic cells of bananan cv. Rasthali (AAB) have been transformed with the 's' gene of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Four different expression cassettes (pHBS, pHER, pEFEHBS and pEFEHER) were utilized to optimize the expression of HBsAg in banana. The transgenic nature of the plants and expression of the antigen was confirmed by PCR, Southern hybridization and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The expression levels of the antigen in the plants grown under in vitro conditions as well as the green house hardened plants were estimated by ELISA for all the four constructs. Maximum expression level of 38 ng/g F.W. of leaves was noted in plants transformed with pEFEHBS grown under in vitro conditions, whereas pHER transformed plants grown in the green house showed the maximum expression level of 19.92 ng/g F.W. of leaves. Higher monoclonal antibody binding of 67.87% of the antigen was observed when it was expressed with a C-terminal ER retention signal. The buoyant density in CsCl of HBsAg derived from transgenic banana leaves was determined and found to be 1.146 g/ml. HBsAg obtained from transgenic banana plants is similar to human serum derived one in buoyant density properties. The transgenic plants were grown up to maturity in the green house and the expression of HBsAg in the fruits was confirmed by RT-PCR. These transgenic plants were multiplied under in vitro using floral apex cultures. Attempts were also made to enhance the expression of HBsAg in the leaves of transgenic banana plants by wounding and/or treatment with plant growth regulators. This is the first report on the expression of HBsAg in transgenic banana fruits.

  11. A conditional transgenic mouse line for targeted expression of the stem cell marker LGR5.

    PubMed

    Norum, Jens Henrik; Bergström, Åsa; Andersson, Agneta Birgitta; Kuiper, Raoul V; Hoelzl, Maria A; Sørlie, Therese; Toftgård, Rune

    2015-08-15

    LGR5 is a known marker of embryonic and adult stem cells in several tissues. In a mouse model, Lgr5+ cells have shown tumour-initiating properties, while in human cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma and colon cancer, LGR5 expression levels are increased: however, the effect of increased LGR5 expression is not fully understood. To study the effects of elevated LGR5 expression levels we generated a novel tetracycline-responsive, conditional transgenic mouse line expressing human LGR5, designated TRELGR5. In this transgenic line, LGR5 expression can be induced in any tissue depending on the expression pattern of the chosen transcriptional regulator. For the current study, we used transgenic mice with a tetracycline-regulated transcriptional transactivator linked to the bovine keratin 5 promoter (K5tTA) to drive expression of LGR5 in the epidermis. As expected, expression of human LGR5 was induced in the skin of double transgenic mice (K5tTA;TRELGR5). Inducing LGR5 expression during embryogenesis and early development resulted in macroscopically and microscopically detectable phenotypic changes, including kink tail, sparse fur coat and enlarged sebaceous glands. The fur and sebaceous gland phenotypes were reversible upon discontinued expression of transgenic LGR5, but this was not observed for the kink tail phenotype. There were no apparent phenotypic changes if LGR5 expression was induced at three weeks of age. The results demonstrate that increased expression of LGR5 during embryogenesis and the neonatal period alter skin development and homeostasis.

  12. Design rules for efficient transgene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Mark A; Sternes, Peter R; Mudge, Stephen R; Graham, Michael W; Birch, Robert G

    2014-09-01

    Sustained expression of transgenes in specified developmental patterns is commonly needed in plant biotechnology, but obstructed by transgene silencing. Here, we present a set of gene design rules, tested on the silencing-susceptible beetle luc and bacterial ims genes, expressed in sugarcane. Designs tested independently or in combination included removal of rare codons, removal of RNA instability sequences, blocking of likely endogenous sRNA binding sites and randomization of non-rare codons. Stable transgene expression analyses, on multiple independent lines per construct, showed greatest improvement from the removal of RNA instability sequences, accompanied by greatly reduced transcript degradation evident in northern blot analysis. We provide a set of motifs that readily can be eliminated concurrently with rare codons and undesired structural features such as repeat sequences, using Gene Designer 2.0 software. These design rules yielded 935- and 5-fold increased expression in transgenic callus, relative to the native luc and ims sequences; and gave sustained expression under the control of sugarcane and heterologous promoters over several years in greenhouse and field trials. The rules can be applied easily with codon usage tables from any plant species, providing a simple and effective means to achieve sustained expression of otherwise silencing-prone transgenes in plants.

  13. Improved production of genetically modified fetuses with homogeneous transgene expression after transgene integration site analysis and recloning in cattle.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Fabiana Fernandes; Dos Santos Miranda, Moyses; Perecin, Felipe; De Bem, Tiago Henrique; Pereira, Flavia Thomaz Verechia; Russo-Carbolante, Elisa Maria; Alves, Daiani; Strauss, Bryan; Bajgelman, Marcio; Krieger, José Eduardo; Binelli, Mario; Meirelles, Flavio Vieira

    2011-02-01

    Animal cloning by nuclear transfer (NT) has made the production of transgenic animals using genetically modified donor cells possible and ensures the presence of the gene construct in the offspring. The identification of transgene insertion sites in donor cells before cloning may avoid the production of animals that carry undesirable characteristics due to positional effects. This article compares blastocyst development and competence to establish pregnancies of bovine cloned embryos reconstructed with lentivirus-mediated transgenic fibroblasts containing either random integration of a transgene (random integration group) or nuclear transfer derived transgenic fibroblasts with known transgene insertion sites submitted to recloning (recloned group). In the random integration group, eGFP-expressing bovine fetal fibroblasts were selected by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and used as nuclei donor cells for NT. In the recloned group, a fibroblast cell line derived from a transgenic cloned fetus was characterized regarding transgene insertion and submitted to recloning. The recloned group had higher blastocyst production (25.38 vs. 14.42%) and higher percentage of 30-day pregnancies (14.29 vs. 2.56%) when compared to the random integration group. Relative eGFP expression analysis in fibroblasts derived from each cloned embryo revealed more homogeneous expression in the recloned group. In conclusion, the use of cell lines recovered from transgenic fetuses after identification of the transgene integration site allowed for the production of cells and fetuses with stable transgene expression, and recloning may improve transgenic animal yields.

  14. Polycythemia in transgenic mice expressing the human erythropoietin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Semenza, G.L.; Traystman, M.D.; Gearhart, J.D.; Antonarakis, S.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Erythropoietin is a glycoprotein hormone that regulates mammalian erythropoiesis. To study the expression of the human erythropoietin gene, EPO, 4 kilobases of DNA encompassing the gene with 0.4 kilobase of 5{prime} flanking sequence and 0.7 kilobase of 3{prime} flanking sequence was microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs. Transgenic mice were generated that are polycythemic, with increased erythrocytic indices in peripheral blood, increased numbers of erythroid precursors in hematopoietic tissue, and increased serum erythropoietin levels. Transgenic homozygotes show a greater degree of polycythemia than do heterozygotes as well as striking extramedullary erythropoiesis. Human erythropoietin RNA was found not only in fetal liver, adult liver, and kidney but also in all other transgenic tissues analyzed. Anemia induced increased human erythropoietin RNA levels in liver but not kidney. These transgenic mice represent a unique model of polycythemia due to increased erythropoietin levels.

  15. Primary demyelination in transgenic mice expressing interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Mcgavern, Dorian B.; Rodriguez, Moses; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2017-01-01

    Ever since the use of interferon-γ to treat patients with multiple sclerosis resulted in enhanced disease, the role of IFN-γ in demyelinatlon has been under question. To address this issue directly, transgenic mice were generated that expressed the cDNA of murlne IFN-γ in the central nervous system by using an oligodendrocyte-specific promoter. Expression of the transgene occurred after 8 weeks of age, at which time the murlne immune and central nervous systems are both fully developed. Directly associated with transgene expression, primary demyelination occurred and was accompanied by clinical abnormalities consistent with CNS disorders. Additionally, multiple hallmarks of immune-mediated CNS disease were observed including upregulation of MHC molecules, gliosis and lymphocytlc infiltration. These results demonstrate a direct role for IFN-γ as an Inducer of CNS demyellnatlon leading to disease and provide new opportunities for dissecting the mechanism of demyelinatlon. PMID:9288735

  16. Generation of Cre Transgenic Mice with Postnatal RPE-Specific Ocular Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iacovelli, Jared; Zhao, Chen; Wolkow, Natalie; Veldman, Peter; Gollomp, Kandace; Ojha, Pallavi; Lukinova, Nina; King, Ayala; Feiner, Leonard; Esumi, Noriko; Zack, Donald J.; Pierce, Eric A.; Vollrath, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To generate and characterize a constitutively active, RPE-specific, cre-expressing transgenic mouse line. This line can be used to create RPE-specific knockouts by crossing with mice harboring loxP-flanked (floxed) genes. Methods. A transgene construct was assembled with the BEST1 promoter driving cre expression. Transgenic mice were generated on a C57BL/6 background. Cre expression was assessed by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Cre enzymatic activity was tested by crossing to three lines with floxed DNA regions and detecting deletion of the intervening sequences or through histochemical detection of lacZ activity. Potential cre-mediated toxicity was assessed by retinal histology up to 24 months of age and by electroretinography. Results. The BEST1-cre line with expression in the highest percentage of RPE cells displayed a patchy mosaic expression pattern, with 50% to 90% of RPE cells expressing cre. In mice outcrossed to a mixed B6/129 background, expression was consistently found in 90% of RPE cells. Within the eye, only the RPE cells were immunoreactive with an anti-cre antibody. Maximum cre expression quantified by Western blot analysis occurred at P28. Crosses with three lines containing floxed sequences revealed RPE-specific cre activity in the eye and extraocular expression limited to the testes. Histology and electroretinography showed no cre-mediated RPE toxicity. Conclusions. This BEST1-cre transgenic line enables generation of RPE-specific knockout mice. The mosaic expression pattern provides an internal control; the non–cre-expressing RPE cells continue to express the floxed genes. These mice should facilitate study of the multifunctional RPE and the generation of mouse models of human retinal disease. PMID:21212186

  17. MAR elements and transposons for improved transgene integration and expression.

    PubMed

    Ley, Déborah; Harraghy, Niamh; Le Fourn, Valérie; Bire, Solenne; Girod, Pierre-Alain; Regamey, Alexandre; Rouleux-Bonnin, Florence; Bigot, Yves; Mermod, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Reliable and long-term expression of transgenes remain significant challenges for gene therapy and biotechnology applications, especially when antibiotic selection procedures are not applicable. In this context, transposons represent attractive gene transfer vectors because of their ability to promote efficient genomic integration in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, expression from genome-integrating vectors may be inhibited by variable gene transcription and/or silencing events. In this study, we assessed whether inclusion of two epigenetic control elements, the human Matrix Attachment Region (MAR) 1-68 and X-29, in a piggyBac transposon vector, may lead to more reliable and efficient expression in CHO cells. We found that addition of the MAR 1-68 at the center of the transposon did not interfere with transposition frequency, and transgene expressing cells could be readily detected from the total cell population without antibiotic selection. Inclusion of the MAR led to higher transgene expression per integrated copy, and reliable expression could be obtained from as few as 2-4 genomic copies of the MAR-containing transposon vector. The MAR X-29-containing transposons was found to mediate elevated expression of therapeutic proteins in polyclonal or monoclonal CHO cell populations using a transposable vector devoid of selection gene. Overall, we conclude that MAR and transposable vectors can be used to improve transgene expression from few genomic transposition events, which may be useful when expression from a low number of integrated transgene copies must be obtained and/or when antibiotic selection cannot be applied.

  18. Inheritance and expression of transgenes through anther culture of transgenic hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Soon; Kuk, Yong In; Kim, Kyung-Moon

    2007-01-01

    Anther cultures have been developed from transgenic donor peppers carrying HPT/J1-1. Eight out of sixteen plants produced from an anther culture set pepper fruits. Southern blot analysis of donors revealed two independent plants with a single copy of the integrated transgene. PCR and RT-PCR results showed the inheritance of HPT/J1-1 and expression of J1-1 in A1. All A1 progeny derived from transgenic anthers had resistance to hygromycin. They grew normally and showed similar phenotypes to the wild-type. Therefore, the use of an anther culture system coupled with genetic transformation in breeding programs will greatly facilitate the genetic improvement of pepper plants.

  19. Fitness of anopheline mosquitoes expressing transgenes that inhibit Plasmodium development.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luciano A; Wang, Jing; Collins, Frank H; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2004-03-01

    One potential strategy for the control of malaria and other vector-borne diseases is the introduction into wild vector populations of genetic constructs that reduce vectorial capacity. An important caveat of this approach is that the genetic construct should have minimal fitness cost to the transformed vector. Previously, we produced transgenic Anopheles stephensi expressing either of two effector genes, a tetramer of the SM1 dodecapeptide or the phospholipase A2 gene (PLA2) from honeybee venom. Mosquitoes carrying either of these transgenes were impaired for Plasmodium berghei transmission. We have investigated the role of two effector genes for malaria parasite blockage in terms of the fitness imposed to the mosquito vector that expresses either molecule. By measuring mosquito survival, fecundity, fertility, and by running population cage experiments, we found that mosquitoes transformed with the SM1 construct showed no significant reduction in these fitness parameters relative to nontransgenic controls. The PLA2 transgenics, however, had reduced fitness that seemed to be independent of the insertion site of the transgene. We conclude that the fitness load imposed by refractory gene(s)-expressing mosquitoes depends on the effect of the transgenic protein produced in that mosquito. These results have important implications for implementation of malaria control via genetic modification of mosquitoes.

  20. Expression of Recombinant Human Alpha-Lactalbumin in the Milk of Transgenic Goats Using a Hybrid Pomoter/Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; An, Liyou; Yu, Baoli; Song, Shaozheng; Zhou, Feng; Zhang, Liqing; Gu, Yinyin; Yu, Minghui; Cheng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    To improve nutrient content of goat milk, we describe the construction of a vector (pBLAC) containing a hybrid goat β-lactoglobulin (BLG) promoter/cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer. We also describe the generation of transgenic goats expressing rhLA by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Of 334 one-cell stage embryos derived from three transgenic cell lines and 99 embryos derived from non-transgenic (NT) cells surgically transferred to the oviducts of 37 recipients, two recipients delivered two kids (2%) from the non-transfected line and five recipients delivered six kids (1.8%) from transgenic cell lines, three of which died within 2 days. Compared to the NT donor cells, transfection of donor cells does not negatively affect the development of nuclear transfer embryos into viable transgenic offspring. However, the clone efficiency in cell line number 1 was lower than that in numbers 2 and 3, and in the NT lines (0.9% versus 1.9% 2.4% and 2%; P < 0.05). Two transgenic cloned goats expressed rhLA in the milk at 0.1–0.9 mg/mL. The mammary gland-specific expression vector pBLAC with hybrid BLG/CMV can drive the hLA gene to express in vitro and in vivo. These data establish the basis for use of a hybrid promoter/enhancer strategy to produce rhLA transgenic goats. PMID:24527256

  1. Expression of recombinant human alpha-lactalbumin in the milk of transgenic goats using a hybrid pomoter/enhancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu-Guo; An, Liyou; Yu, Baoli; Song, Shaozheng; Zhou, Feng; Zhang, Liqing; Gu, Yinyin; Yu, Minghui; Cheng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    To improve nutrient content of goat milk, we describe the construction of a vector (pBLAC) containing a hybrid goat β -lactoglobulin (BLG) promoter/cytomegalovirus (CMV) enhancer. We also describe the generation of transgenic goats expressing rhLA by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Of 334 one-cell stage embryos derived from three transgenic cell lines and 99 embryos derived from non-transgenic (NT) cells surgically transferred to the oviducts of 37 recipients, two recipients delivered two kids (2%) from the non-transfected line and five recipients delivered six kids (1.8%) from transgenic cell lines, three of which died within 2 days. Compared to the NT donor cells, transfection of donor cells does not negatively affect the development of nuclear transfer embryos into viable transgenic offspring. However, the clone efficiency in cell line number 1 was lower than that in numbers 2 and 3, and in the NT lines (0.9% versus 1.9% 2.4% and 2%; P < 0.05). Two transgenic cloned goats expressed rhLA in the milk at 0.1-0.9 mg/mL. The mammary gland-specific expression vector pBLAC with hybrid BLG/CMV can drive the hLA gene to express in vitro and in vivo. These data establish the basis for use of a hybrid promoter/enhancer strategy to produce rhLA transgenic goats.

  2. Tetracycline-inducible system for regulation of skeletal muscle-specific gene expression in transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, Mischala A.; Bales, Mark A.; Fought, Amber N.; Rosburg, Kristopher C.; Munger, Stephanie J.; Antin, Parker B.

    2003-01-01

    Tightly regulated control of over-expression is often necessary to study one aspect or time point of gene function and, in transgenesis, may help to avoid lethal effects and complications caused by ubiquitous over-expression. We have utilized the benefits of an optimized tet-on system and a modified muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter to generate a skeletal muscle-specific, doxycycline (Dox) controlled over-expression system in transgenic mice. A DNA construct was generated in which the codon optimized reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA) was placed under control of a skeletal muscle-specific version of the mouse MCK promoter. Transgenic mice containing this construct expressed rtTA almost exclusively in skeletal muscles. These mice were crossed to a second transgenic line containing a bi-directional promoter centered on a tet responder element driving both a luciferase reporter gene and a tagged gene of interest; in this case the calpain inhibitor calpastatin. Compound hemizygous mice showed high level, Dox dependent muscle-specific luciferase activity often exceeding 10,000-fold over non-muscle tissues of the same mouse. Western and immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated similar Dox dependent muscle-specific induction of the tagged calpastatin protein. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness and flexibility of the tet-on system to provide a tightly regulated over-expression system in adult skeletal muscle. The MCKrtTA transgenic lines can be combined with other transgenic responder lines for skeletal muscle-specific over-expression of any target gene of interest.

  3. Viral vectors: from virology to transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bouard, D; Alazard-Dany, N; Cosset, F-L

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1970s, it was predicted that gene therapy would be applied to humans within a decade. However, despite some success, gene therapy has still not become a routine practise in medicine. In this review, we will examine the problems, both experimental and clinical, associated with the use of viral material for transgenic insertion. We shall also discuss the development of viral vectors involving the most important vector types derived from retroviruses, adenoviruses, herpes simplex viruses and adeno-associated viruses. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:18776913

  4. Generation of transgenic marmosets expressing genetically encoded calcium indicators

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Zhang, Xian Feng; Choi, Sang-Ho; Okahara, Junko; Sasaki, Erika; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic monitoring of neuronal activity in the living brain with optical imaging techniques became feasible owing to the continued development of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). Here we report for the first time the successful generation of transgenic marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), an important nonhuman primate model in neurophysiological research, which were engineered to express the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based family of GECIs, GCaMP, under control of either the CMV or the hSyn promoter. High titer lentiviral vectors were produced, and injected into embryos collected from donor females. The infected embryos were then transferred to recipient females. Eight transgenic animals were born and shown to have stable and functional GCaMP expression in several different tissues. Germline transmission of the transgene was confirmed in embryos generated from two of the founder transgenic marmosets that reached sexual maturity. These embryos were implanted into six recipient females, three of which became pregnant and are in advanced stages of gestation. We believe these transgenic marmosets will be invaluable non-human primate models in neuroscience, allowing chronic in vivo monitoring of neural activity with functional confocal and multi-photon optical microscopy imaging of intracellular calcium dynamics. PMID:27725685

  5. Expression of Active Fluorophore Proteins in the Milk of Transgenic Pigs Bypassing the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ayan; Garrels, Wiebke; Talluri, Thirumala R.; Tiedemann, Daniela; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Kues, Wilfried A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the expression of recombinant fluorescent proteins in the milk of two lines of transgenic pigs generated by Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated genetic engineering. The Sleeping Beauty transposon consisted of an ubiquitously active CAGGS promoter driving a fluorophore cDNA, encoding either Venus or mCherry. Importantly, the fluorophore cDNAs did not encode for a signal peptide for the secretory pathway, and in previous studies of the transgenic animals a cytoplasmic localization of the fluorophore proteins was found. Unexpectedly, milk samples from lactating sows contained high levels of bioactive Venus or mCherry fluorophores. A detailed analysis suggested that exfoliated cells of the mammary epithelium carried the recombinant proteins passively into the milk. This is the first description of reporter fluorophore expression in the milk of livestock, and the findings may contribute to the development of an alternative concept for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins in the udder. PMID:27086548

  6. Leaf proteome analysis of transgenic plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Villani, Maria Elena; Renzone, Giovanni; Nardi, Luca; Pasquo, Alessandra; Franconi, Rosella; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2009-02-01

    The expression of exogenous antibodies in plant is an effective strategy to confer protection against viral infection or to produce molecules with pharmaceutical interest. However, the acceptance of the transgenic technology to obtain self-protecting plants depends on the assessment of their substantial equivalence compared to non-modified crops with an established history of safe use. In fact, the possibility exists that the introduction of transgenes in plants may alter expression of endogenous genes and/or normal production of metabolites. In this study, we investigated whether the expression in plant of recombinant antibodies directed against viral proteins may influence the host leaf proteome. Two transgenic plant models, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, were analyzed for this purpose, namely, Lycopersicon esculentum cv. MicroTom and Nicotiana benthamiana, expressing recombinant antibodies against cucumber mosaic virus and tomato spotted wilt virus, respectively. To obtain a significant representation of plant proteomes, optimized extraction procedures have been devised for each plant species. The proteome repertoire of antibody-expressing and control plants was compared by 2-DE associated to DIGE technology. Among the 2000 spots detected within the gels, about 10 resulted differentially expressed in each transgenic model and were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and muLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS procedures. Protein variations were restricted to a limited number of defined differences with an average ratio below 2.4. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were related to photosynthesis or defense function. The overall results suggest that the expression of recombinant antibodies in both systems does not significantly alter the leaf proteomic profile, contributing to assess the biosafety of resistant plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

  7. [Generation of sugar beet transgenic plants expressing bar gene].

    PubMed

    Mishutkina, Ia V; Kamionskaia, A M; Skriabin, K G

    2010-01-01

    The parameters of transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA 105 for 5 domestic sorts and lines of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. var. saccharifera (Alef) Krass) were optimized. The system of transgenic tissue selection based on resistance to phosphinothricin, allowing to avoid the appearing of chimeric shoots among initial transformants was developed. The transgenic plants of sugar beet sorts Ramonskaya single seed 47, L'govskaya single seed 52 and RMS 73, and LBO 17 and LBO 19 lines expressing the gene of phosphinothricin acetyl transferase bar have been obtained. The resistance of these sorts and lines to the effect of phosphinothricin in vitro has been shown.

  8. Isolation of yellow catfish β-actin promoter and generation of transgenic yellow catfish expressing enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jiachun; Dong, Zhangji; Li, Jingyun; Xu, Zhiqiang; Song, Wei; Bao, Jie; Liang, Dong; Li, Junbo; Li, Kui; Jia, Wenshuang; Zhao, Muzi; Cai, Yongxiang; Yang, Jiaxin; Pan, Jianlin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2012-10-01

    Yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco Richardson) is one of the most important freshwater farmed species in China. However, its small size and slow growth rate limit its commercial value. Because genetic engineering has been a powerful tool to develop and improve fish traits for aquaculture, we performed transgenic research on yellow catfish in order to increase its size and growth rate. Performing PCR with degenerate primers, we cloned a genomic fragment comprising 5'-flanking sequence upstream of the initiation codon of β-actin gene in yellow catfish. The sequence is 1,017 bp long, containing the core sequence of proximal promoter including CAAT box, CArG motif and TATA box. Microinjecting the transgene construct Tg(beta-actin:eYFP) of the proximal promoter fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) reporter gene into zebrafish and yellow catfish embryos, we found the promoter could drive the reporter to express transiently in both embryos at early development. Screening the offspring of five transgenic zebrafish founders developed from the embryos microinjected with Tg(ycbeta-actin:mCherry) or 19 yellow catfish founders developed from the embryos microinjected with Tg(beta-actin:eYFP), we obtained three lines of transgenic zebrafish and one transgenic yellow catfish, respectively. Analyzing the expression patterns of the reporter genes in transgenic zebrafish (Tg(ycbeta-actin:mCherry)nju8/+) and transgenic yellow catfish (Tg(beta-actin:eYFP)nju11/+), we found the reporters were broadly expressed in both animals. In summary, we have established a platform to make transgenic yellow catfish using the proximal promoter of its own β-actin gene. The results will help us to create transgenic yellow catfish using "all yellow catfish" transgene constructs.

  9. Pollen viability and transgene expression following storage in honey.

    PubMed

    Eady, C; Twell, D; Lindsey, K

    1995-07-01

    Transgenic plants of tobacco and Arabidopsis that produce genetically marked pollen, expressing the reporter gene uidA (gusA), were generated to determine whether pollen proteins can be expressed and stable in honey, a potential route by which foreign proteins might enter the wider environment. Hydrated tobacco pollen was found to lose viability rapidly in honey, while pollen in the natural dehydrated form remained viable for at least several days and in some cases several weeks, as determined by FDA staining activity and germinability. Dehydrated pollen was found to be capable of transient foreign gene expression, following microprojectile bombardment, after incubation in honey for at least 120 h. PCR amplification of transgene sequences in pollen of transgenic plants revealed that pollen DNA can remain relatively intact after 7 weeks in honey. GUS enzyme activity analysis and SDS-PAGE of pollen proteins revealed that foreign and native pollen proteins are stable in pollen incubated in honey for at least 6 weeks. We conclude that pollen may represent an ecologically important vector for transgenic protein products.

  10. Transgenic Expression of Dentin Phosphoprotein Inhibits Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.; Liu, P.; Wang, S.; Liu, C.; Jani, P.; Lu, Y.; Qin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is proteolytically processed into an NH2-terminal fragment called dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and a COOH-terminal fragment known as dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). These two fragments are believed to perform distinct roles in formation of bone and dentin. To investigate the functions of DPP in skeletal development, we generated transgenic mice to overexpress hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged DPP under the control of a 3.6 kb type I collagen (Col1a1) promoter (designated as Col1a1-HA-DPP). The Col1a1-HA-DPP transgenic mice were significantly smaller by weight, had smaller skeletons and shorter long bones than their wild type littermates, as demonstrated by X-ray radiography. They displayed reduced trabecular bone formation and narrower zones of proliferative and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plates of the long bones. Histological analyses showed that the transgenic mice had reduced cell proliferation in the proliferating zone, but lacked obvious defects in the chondrocyte differentiation. In addition, the transgenic mice with a high level of transgene expression developed spontaneous long bone fractures. In conclusion, overexpressing DPP inhibited skeletal development, suggesting that the balanced actions between the NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of DSPP may be required for normal skeletal development. PMID:26972716

  11. cis-acting DNA regulatory elements, including the retinoic acid response element, are required for tissue specific laminin B1 promoter/lacZ expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K A; Li, C; Gudas, L J

    2001-05-01

    The LAMB1 gene encodes the laminin beta1 subunit of laminin, an extracellular matrix protein. Using several transgenic mouse lines containing various lengths of the LAMB1 promoter driving lacZ reporter gene expression, regions of LAMB1 promoter that contain cis-acting DNA regulatory element(s) have been identified. The 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene is expressed in various tissues during development. LAMB1 transgene expression is observed in a selective set of nephrons of the neonatal and adult kidneys. The cis-acting DNA regulatory elements responsible for LAMB1 transgene expression in ovaries and in juvenile kidneys are present between -'1.4 and -0.7 kb relative to the transcription start site, while those of adult kidneys are located between -2.5 and -1.4 kb. The LAMB1 transgene is also expressed in the epididymis of 1 week old transgenic mice. Mutation of the retinoic acid response element (RARE) in the context of the 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene results in loss of LAMB1 transgene expression in all tissues. Thus, sequences between -2.5 and -0.7 kb plus the RARE are required for appropriate expression of the LAMB1 transgene in mice.

  12. Generation of cloned transgenic cats expressing red fluorescence protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xi Jun; Lee, Hyo Sang; Yu, Xian Feng; Choi, Eugene; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Mo Sun; Lee, Young S; Cho, Su Jin; Jin, Guang Zhen; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kim, Teoan; Kim, Nam Hyung; Kong, Il Keun

    2008-03-01

    A method for engineering and producing genetically modified cats is important for generating biomedical models of human diseases. Here we describe the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer to produce cloned transgenic cats that systemically express red fluorescent protein. Immature oocytes were collected from superovulating cat ovaries. Donor fibroblasts were obtained from an ear skin biopsy of a white male Turkish Angora cat, cultured for one to two passages, and subjected to transduction with a retrovirus vector designed to transfer and express the red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene. A total of 176 RFP cloned embryos were transferred into 11 surrogate mothers (mean = 16 +/- 7.5 per recipient). Three surrogate mothers were successfully impregnated (27.3%) and delivered two liveborn and one stillborn kitten at 65 to 66 days of gestation. Analysis of nine feline-specific microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned cats were genetically identical to the donor cat. Presence of the RFP gene in the transgenic cat genome was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Whole-body red fluorescence was detected 60 days after birth in the liveborn transgenic (TG) cat but not in the surrogate mother cat. Red fluorescence was detected in tissue samples, including hair, muscle, brain, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, bronchus, lung, stomach, intestine, tongue, and even excrement of the stillborn TG cat. These results suggest that this nuclear transfer procedure using genetically modified somatic cells could be useful for the efficient production of transgenic cats.

  13. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing cobra venom factor.

    PubMed

    Andrä, Jörg; Halter, Roman; Kock, Michael A; Niemann, Heiner; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Paul, Dieter

    2002-10-01

    Cobra venom factor (CVF), the anticomplementary protein in cobra venom, activates the alternative complement pathway, eventually leading to complement consumption. Here, we describe the development of a transgenic mouse model for CVF. We generated a DNA construct containing the full-length cDNA for single-chain pre-pro-CVF. Expression of CVF was controlled by the alpha(1)-antitrypsin promoter to achieve liver-specific expression. Linearized DNA was microinjected into murine ovary cells (strain CD(2)F(1) (BALB/cxDBA/2J)) and the newborn mice were analyzed for stable integration of CVF DNA. After establishing the transgene, mice were propagated in a BALB/c background. The CVF mRNA was detected in the liver and, in some animals, in the kidney. CVF protein was detected in small amounts in the serum. Serum complement hemolytic activity in CVF-transgenic mice was virtually absent. The concentration of plasma C3 was significantly reduced. The CVF-transgenic animals show no unusual phenotype. They provide an animal model to study the effect of long-term complement depletion by continued activation, as well as the role of complement in host immune response and pathogenesis of disease.

  14. Expression of RNA-Interference/Antisense Transgenes by the Cognate Promoters of Target Genes Is a Better Gene-Silencing Strategy to Study Gene Functions in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-01-01

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice. PMID:21408609

  15. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Dagang; Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-03-03

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  16. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Poidevin, Laetitia; Andreeva, Kalina; Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies.

  17. Transgenic rabbit that expresses a functional human lipoprotein (a)

    DOEpatents

    Rouy, Didier; Duverger, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Florence; Denefle, Patrice; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Viglietta, Celine; Rubin, Edward M.; Hughes, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    A transgenic rabbit which has in its genomic DNA sequences that encode apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein B polypeptides which are capable of combining to produce lipoprotein (a), a process for creating such a rabbit, and the use of the rabbit to identify compounds which are effective in the treatment of human diseases which are associated with, induced and/or exacerbated by Lp(a) expression.

  18. Enhanced hyperplasia in muscles of transgenic zebrafish expressing Follistatin1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Nie, Fen; Yin, Zhan; He, JiangYan

    2011-02-01

    Myostatin is a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) super-family and functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. Binding of the specific receptor, Activin receptor IIB (Act RIIB), with myostatin or other related TGF-β members, could be inhibited by the activin-binding protein follistatin (Fst) in mammals. Overexpressing Fst in mouse skeletal muscle leads to muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. To determine if Fst has similar roles in fish, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing high levels of zebrafish Fst1 using the promoter of the zebrafish skeletal muscle-specific gene, myosin, light polypeptide 2, skeletal muscle (Mylz2). Independent transgenic zebrafish lines exhibited elevated expression levels of myogenic regulatory genes MyoD and Pax7 in muscle cells. Adult Fst1 overexpressing transgenic zebrafish exhibited a slight body weight increase. The high level of Fst1 expression dramatically increased myofiber numbers in skeletal muscle, without significantly changing the fiber size. Our findings suggest that Fst1 overexpression can promote zebrafish muscle growth by enhancing myofiber hyperplasia.

  19. Strategies to facilitate transgene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Eichler-Stahlberg, Alke; Weisheit, Wolfram; Ruecker, Ovidiu; Heitzer, Markus

    2009-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been identified as a promising organism for the production of recombinant proteins. While during the last years important improvements have been developed for the production of proteins within the chloroplast, the expression levels of transgenes from the nuclear genome were too low to be of biotechnological importance. In this study, we integrated endogenous intronic sequences into the expression cassette to enhance the expression of transgenes in the nucleus. The insertion of one or more copies of intron sequences from the Chlamydomonas RBCS2 gene resulted in increased expression levels of a Renilla-luciferase gene used as a reporter. Although any of the three RBCS2 introns alone had a positive effect on expression, their integration in their physiological number and order created an over-proportional stimulating effect observed in all transformants. The secretion of the luciferase protein into the medium was achieved by using the export sequence of the Chlamydomonas ARS2 gene in a cell wall deficient strain and Renilla-luciferase could be successfully concentrated with the help of attached C-terminal protein tags. Similarly, a codon adapted gene variant for human erythropoietin (crEpo) was expressed as a protein of commercial relevance. Extracellular erythropoietin produced in Chlamydomonas showed a molecular mass of 33 kDa probably resulting from post-translational modifications. Both, the increased expression levels of transgenes by integration of introns and the isolation of recombinant proteins from the culture medium are important steps towards an extended biotechnological use of this alga.

  20. Fast-muscle-specific expression of human aldolase A transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, M; Maire, P; Concordet, J P; Moch, C; Porteu, A; Kahn, A; Daegelen, D

    1994-01-01

    The expression of the human aldolase A gene is controlled by three alternative promoters. In transgenic mice, pN and pH are active in all tissues whereas pM is activated specifically in adult muscles composed mainly of fast, glycolytic fibers. To detect potential regulatory regions involved in the fast-muscle-specific activation of pM, we analyzed DNase I hypersensitivity in a 4.3-kbp fragment from the 5' end of the human aldolase A gene. Five hypersensitive sites were located near the transcription initiation site of each promoter in those transgenic-mouse tissues in which the corresponding promoter was active. Only one muscle-specific hypersensitive site was detected, mapping near pM. To functionally delimit the elements required for muscle-specific activity of pM, we performed a deletion analysis of the aldolase A 5' region in transgenic mice. Our results show that a 280-bp fragment containing 235 bp of pM proximal upstream sequences together with the noncoding M exon is sufficient for tissue-specific expression of pM. When a putative MEF-2-binding site residing in this proximal pM region is mutated, pM is still active and no change in its tissue specificity is detected. Furthermore, we observed a modulation of pM activity by elements lying further upstream and downstream from pM. Interestingly, pM was expressed in a tissue-specific way in all transgenic mice in which the 280-bp region was present (32 lines and six founder animals). This observation led us to suggest that the proximal pM region contains elements that are able to override to some extent the effects of the surrounding chromatin. Images PMID:7935397

  1. Optical modulation of transgene expression in retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Lavinsky, D.; Chalberg, T.; Mandel, Y.; Huie, P.; Dalal, R.; Marmor, M.

    2013-03-01

    Over a million people in US alone are visually impaired due to the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The current treatment is monthly intravitreal injections of a protein which inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, thereby slowing progression of the disease. The immense financial and logistical burden of millions of intravitreal injections signifies an urgent need to develop more long-lasting and cost-effective treatments for this and other retinal diseases. Viral transfection of ocular cells allows creation of a "biofactory" that secretes therapeutic proteins. This technique has been proven successful in non-human primates, and is now being evaluated in clinical trials for wet AMD. However, there is a critical need to down-regulate gene expression in the case of total resolution of retinal condition, or if patient has adverse reaction to the trans-gene products. The site for genetic therapy of AMD and many other retinal diseases is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We developed and tested in pigmented rabbits, an optical method to down-regulate transgene expression in RPE following vector delivery, without retinal damage. Microsecond exposures produced by a rapidly scanning laser vaporize melanosomes and destroy a predetermined fraction of the RPE cells selectively. RPE continuity is restored within days by migration and proliferation of adjacent RPE, but since the transgene is not integrated into the nucleus it is not replicated. Thus, the decrease in transgene expression can be precisely determined by the laser pattern density and further reduced by repeated treatment without affecting retinal structure and function.

  2. Characterization of Growth and Reproduction Performance, Transgene Integration, Expression, and Transmission Patterns in Transgenic Pigs Produced by piggyBac Transposition-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Cai, Gengyuan; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2016-10-01

    Previously we successfully produced a group of EGFP-expressing founder transgenic pigs by a newly developed efficient and simple pig transgenesis method based on cytoplasmic injection of piggyBac plasmids. In this study, we investigated the growth and reproduction performance and characterized the transgene insertion, transmission, and expression patterns in transgenic pigs generated by piggyBac transposition. Results showed that transgene has no injurious effect on the growth and reproduction of transgenic pigs. Multiple copies of monogenic EGFP transgene were inserted at noncoding sequences of host genome, and passed from founder transgenic pigs to their transgenic offspring in segregation or linkage manner. The EGFP transgene was ubiquitously expressed in transgenic pigs, and its expression intensity was associated with transgene copy number but not related to its promoter DNA methylation level. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that fully described the growth and reproduction performance, transgene insertion, expression, and transmission profiles in transgenic pigs produced by piggyBac system. It not only demonstrates that piggyBac transposition-mediated gene transfer is an effective and favorable approach for pig transgenesis, but also provides scientific information for understanding the transgene insertion, expression and transmission patterns in transgenic animals produced by piggyBac transposition.

  3. Slow-growth phenotype of transgenic tomato expressing apoplastic invertase

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, C.D.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The growth of transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants that express in their apoplast yeast invertase under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter is severely inhibited. The higher the level of invertase, the greater the inhibition of growth. A second phenotypic characteristic of these transgenic plants is the development of yellow and necrotic spots on the leaves, and leaf curling. Again the severity of the symptoms is correlated with the level of invertase. These symptoms do not develop in shaded leaves indicating the need for photosynthesis. Keeping the plants in the dark for a prolonged period (24 hours) results in the disappearance of leaf starch from the control plants, but not from the plants with apoplastic invertase. These results are consistent with the interpretation that apoplastic invertase prevents photosynthate export from source leaves and that phloem loading includes an apoplastic step.

  4. Lupine leghemoglobin I: expression in transgenic Lotus and tobacco tissues.

    PubMed

    Strózycki, P M; Karłowski, W M; Dessaux, Y; Petit, A; Legocki, A B

    2000-03-01

    The proximal parts of the promoters of the genes for symbiotic-type hemoglobins are generally conserved, but the promoter of the lbI gene of lupine (LulbI) shows some unusual structural features. It lacks typical organ-specific elements characteristic of all the leghemoglobin gene promoters described thus far. We have analysed its functional activity in transgenic Lotus corniculatus. A fusion construct between the lbI promoter and the GUS reporter gene was expressed mainly in the central zone of the root nodule, but the product was also detected in the non-nodule root zone and in roots in tissue culture. In roots of transgenic tobacco, the activity of the promoter was only 24% lower than in Lotus nodules. LulbI promoter activity was also detected in tobacco leaves. Lupine hemoglobin I has a higher sequence identity to symbiotic-type hemoglobins and thus it groups within the "Class II" hemoglobins.

  5. Unstable expression of transgene is associated with the methylation of CAG promoter in the offspring from the same litter of homozygous transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Teng; Zhang, Qin-Kai; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Deng-Gao; Zhang, Min; Shen, Wei; Pan, Qing-Jie

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic animals have been established for studying gene function, improving animals' production traits, and providing organ models for the exploration of human diseases. However, the stability of inheritance and transgene expression in transgenic animals has gained extensive attention. The unstable expression of transgene through DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) targeting to the methylation of transgenic DNA such as CAG promoter and Egfp coding region in homozygous transgenic animals is still unknown. In the present study, the offspring from the same litter of homozygous transgenic mice carrying ubiquitously expressed enhanced green fluorescence protein driven by CMV early enhancer/chicken β-actin (CAG) promoter was observed to have unstable expression of transgene Egfp, quantitative PCR, western blot and bisulfite sequencing were conducted to quantify the expressional characteristics and methylation levels in various tissues. The correlation between transgene expression and methylation was analyzed. We have found that transgene expression is dependent on the methylation of CAG promoter, but not Egfp coding region. We have also characterized the correlation between the methylation of CAG promoter and DNMT, and found that only Dnmt3b expression is correlated with the methylation of CAG promoter. In conclusion, Dnmt3b-related methylation of CAG promoter can inhibit the transgene expression and may result in the unstable expression of transgene in the offspring from the same litter of homozygous transgenic mice.

  6. Expressing Anger Is More Dangerous than Feeling Angry when Driving

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Weina; Dai, Mengnuo; Zhao, Wenguo; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Anger is an emotion that drivers often feel and express while driving, and it is believed by researchers to be an important cause of dangerous driving behavior. In this study, the relationships between driving trait anger, driving anger expression, and dangerous driving behaviors were analyzed. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was used to measure driving trait anger, whereas the Driving Anger Expression (DAX) Inventory was used to measure expressions of driving anger. A sample of 38 drivers completed the DAS, DAX, and a driving simulation session on a simulator where their driving behaviors were recorded. Correlation analysis showed that the higher scores on the DAS were associated with longer durations of speeding in the simulator. The more participants expressed their anger in verbal and physical ways, the more likely they were to crash the virtual vehicle during the simulation. Regression analyses illustrated the same pattern. The findings suggest that, although trait anger is related to speeding, the passive expression of anger is the real factor underling traffic accidents. This study extends findings about the predictive effects of self-report scales of driving behaviors to behaviors recorded on a simulator. Thus, if in traffic safety propaganda, guiding drivers to use positive ways to cope with driving anger is recommended by our findings. PMID:27258144

  7. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P < 0.05). The expression of huPA protein in eggs increased from 7.82 IU/egg in the G0 generation to 17.02 IU/egg in the G1 generation. However, huPA-expressing embryos had reduced survival and hatchability at d 18 and 21 of incubation, respectively, and the blood clotting time was significantly higher in transgenic chickens than their nontransgenic counterparts (P < 0.05). Furthermore, adult transgenic rooster showed reduced (P < 0.05) fertility, as revealed by reduced volume of semen ejaculate, sperm concentration, and sperm viability. Taken together, our data suggest that huPA transgenic chickens could be successfully produced by the retroviral vector system. Transgenic chickens, expressing the huPA under the control of a ubiquitous promoter, may not only be used as a bioreactor for pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  8. AAVPG: A vigilant vector where transgene expression is induced by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bajgelman, Marcio C.; Medrano, Ruan F.V.; Carvalho, Anna Carolina P.V.; Strauss, Bryan E.

    2013-12-15

    Using p53 to drive transgene expression from viral vectors may provide on demand expression in response to physiologic stress, such as hypoxia or DNA damage. Here we introduce AAVPG, an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector where a p53-responsive promoter, termed PG, is used to control transgene expression. In vitro assays show that expression from the AAVPG-luc vector was induced specifically in the presence of functional p53 (1038±202 fold increase, p<0.001). The AAVPG-luc vector was an effective biosensor of p53 activation in response to hypoxia (4.48±0.6 fold increase in the presence of 250 µM CoCl{sub 2}, p<0.001) and biomechanical stress (2.53±0.4 fold increase with stretching, p<0.05). In vivo, the vigilant nature of the AAVPG-luc vector was revealed after treatment of tumor-bearing mice with doxorubicin (pre-treatment, 3.4×10{sup 5}±0.43×10{sup 5} photons/s; post-treatment, 6.6×10{sup 5}±2.1×10{sup 5} photons/s, p<0.05). These results indicate that the AAVPG vector is an interesting option for detecting p53 activity both in vitro and in vivo. - Highlights: • AAV vector where transgene expression is controlled by the tumor suppressor p53. • The new vector, AAVPG, shown to function as a biosensor of p53 activity, in vitro and in vivo. • The p53 activity monitored by the AAVPG vector is relevant to cancer and other diseases. • AAVPG reporter gene expression was activated upon DNA damage, hypoxia and mechanical stress.

  9. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    DOE PAGES

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; ...

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plantmore » height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.« less

  10. Using inositol as a biocompatible ligand for efficient transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Bellis, Susan L; Fan, Yiwen; Wu, Yunkun

    2015-01-01

    Transgene transfection techniques using cationic polymers such as polyethylenimines (PEIs) and PEI derivatives as gene vectors have shown efficacy, although they also have shortcomings. PEIs have decent DNA-binding capability and good cell internalization performance, but they cannot deliver gene payloads very efficiently to cell nuclei. In this study, three hyperbranched polyglycerol-polyethylenimine (PG6-PEI) polymers conjugated with myo-inositol (INO) molecules were developed. The three resulting PG6-PEI-INO polymers have an increased number of INO ligands per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 1 had only 14 carboxymethyl INO (CMINO) units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 2 had approximately 130 CMINO units per molecule. PG6-PEI-INO 3 had as high as 415 CMINO units approximately. Mixing PG6-PEI-INO polymers with DNA produced compact nanocomposites. We then performed localization studies using fluorescent microscopy. As the number of conjugated inositol ligands increased in PG6-PEI-INO polymers, there was a corresponding increase in accumulation of the polymers within 293T cell nuclei. Transfection performed with spherical 293T cells yielded 82% of EGFP-positive cells when using PG6-PEI-INO 3 as the vehicle. Studies further revealed that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) can inhibit the transgene efficiency of PG6-PEI-INO polymers, as compared with PEI and PG6-PEI that were not conjugated with inositol. Our work unveiled the possibility of using inositol as an effective ligand for transgene expression. PMID:25926732

  11. The arcelin-5 Gene of Phaseolus vulgaris Directs High Seed-Specific Expression in Transgenic Phaseolus acutifolius and Arabidopsis Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Alain; Dillen, Willy; De Clercq, Janniek; Van Montagu, Marc; Angenon, Geert

    1999-01-01

    The regulatory sequences of many genes encoding seed storage proteins have been used to drive seed-specific expression of a variety of proteins in transgenic plants. Because the levels at which these transgene-derived proteins accumulate are generally quite low, we investigated the utility of the arcelin-5 regulatory sequences in obtaining high seed-specific expression in transgenic plants. Arcelin-5 is an abundant seed protein found in some wild common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes. Seeds of Arabidopsis and Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) plants transformed with arcelin-5 gene constructs synthesized arcelin-5 to levels of 15% and 25% of the total protein content, respectively. To our knowledge, such high expression levels directed by a transgene have not been reported before. The transgenic plants also showed low plant-to-plant variation in arcelin expression. Complex transgene integration patterns, which often result in gene silencing effects, were not associated with reduced arcelin-5 expression. High transgene expression was the result of high mRNA steady-state levels and was restricted to seeds. This indicates that all requirements for high seed-specific expression are cis elements present in the cloned genomic arcelin-5 sequence and trans-acting factors that are available in Arabidopsis and Phaseolus spp., and thus probably in most dicotyledonous plants. PMID:10444093

  12. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  13. MicroRNA-150-regulated vectors allow lymphocyte-sparing transgene expression in hematopoietic gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, N; Jagielska, J; Heckl, D; Brennig, S; Pfaff, N; Maetzig, T; Modlich, U; Cantz, T; Gentner, B; Schambach, A; Moritz, T

    2012-09-01

    Endogenous microRNA (miRNA) expression can be exploited for cell type-specific transgene expression as the addition of miRNA target sequences to transgenic cDNA allows for transgene downregulation specifically in cells expressing the respective miRNAs. Here, we have investigated the potential of miRNA-150 target sequences to specifically suppress gene expression in lymphocytes and thereby prevent transgene-induced lymphotoxicity. Abundance of miRNA-150 expression specifically in differentiated B and T cells was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Mono- and bicistronic lentiviral vectors were used to investigate the effect of miRNA-150 target sequences on transgene expression in the lymphohematopoietic system. After in vitro studies demonstrated effective downregulation of transgene expression in murine B220(+) B and CD3(+) T cells, the concept was further verified in a murine transplant model. Again, marked suppression of transgene activity was observed in B220(+) B and CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells whereas expression in CD11b(+) myeloid cells, lin(-) and lin(-)/Sca1(+) progenitors, or lin(-)/Sca1(+)/c-kit(+) stem cells remained almost unaffected. No toxicity of miRNA-150 targeting in transduced lymphohematopoietic cells was noted. Thus, our results demonstrate the suitability of miRNA-150 targeting to specifically suppress transgene expression in lymphocytes and further support the concept of miRNA targeting for cell type-specific transgene expression in gene therapy approaches.

  14. Concordant activity of transgene expression cassettes inserted into E1, E3 and E4 cloning sites in the adenovirus genome

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Linh; Nakamura, Takafumi; Rosales, A. Gabriela; Carlson, Stephanie K.; Bailey, Kent R.; Peng, Kah-Whye; Russell, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Expression cassettes can be inserted at several positions into recombinant adenoviral genomes but the implications of this choice for transgene expression level have not been determined. Knowledge of the relative expression levels of transgenes inserted at different sites in the adenoviral genome is of particular significance for transgene expression monitoring approaches that rely on the concordant expression of a marker transgene inserted elsewhere in the viral genome. Methods Three expression cassettes, each comprising a cytomegalovirus promoter driving one of three marker peptides [serum carcinoembryonic antigen (sCEA), beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG) or human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS)], were inserted into E1, E3 or E4 cloning sites in a recombinant adenoviral vector backbone. High titer stocks of bicistronic adenoviral vectors coding for combinations of marker peptides were prepared. A panel of human cells of various lineages was infected with the vectors and expression ratios of the transgene-encoded proteins were analysed. Serum levels of the soluble proteins and hepatic uptake of radioactive iodine were also compared in vivo in nude rats after intravenous vector infusion. Results High concordance of expression between the inserted transgenes was observed in all of the bicistronic vectors irrespective of whether the expression cassettes were placed in the E1, E3 or E4 regions. Concordance was maintained across multiple cell lineages. In vivo, in athymic rats, blood and urine levels of βhCG were highly concordant with serum levels of sCEA at all timepoints after intravenous infusion of the bicistronic vectors encoding both of these soluble markers. Hepatic radioiodine uptake was concordant with serum CEA concentration in mice infused with a bicistronic vector expressing CEA and NIS. Conclusions The expression level of a given transgene in an adenoviral vector genome can be accurately and quantitatively inferred from the

  15. MAR-Mediated transgene integration into permissive chromatin and increased expression by recombination pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Neuenschwander, Samuel; Junier, Thomas; Regamey, Alexandre; Iseli, Christian; Schmid-Siegert, Emanuel; Bosshard, Sandra; Majocchi, Stefano; Le Fourn, Valérie; Girod, Pierre-Alain; Xenarios, Ioannis; Mermod, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Untargeted plasmid integration into mammalian cell genomes remains a poorly understood and inefficient process. The formation of plasmid concatemers and their genomic integration has been ascribed either to non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathways. However, a direct involvement of these pathways has remained unclear. Here, we show that the silencing of many HR factors enhanced plasmid concatemer formation and stable expression of the gene of interest in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, while the inhibition of NHEJ had no effect. However, genomic integration was decreased by the silencing of specific HR components, such as Rad51, and DNA synthesis-dependent microhomology-mediated end-joining (SD-MMEJ) activities. Genome-wide analysis of the integration loci and junction sequences validated the prevalent use of the SD-MMEJ pathway for transgene integration close to cellular genes, an effect shared with matrix attachment region (MAR) DNA elements that stimulate plasmid integration and expression. Overall, we conclude that SD-MMEJ is the main mechanism driving the illegitimate genomic integration of foreign DNA in CHO cells, and we provide a recombination engineering approach that increases transgene integration and recombinant protein expression in these cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 384-396. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    SciTech Connect

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; Ralph, John; Coleman, Heather D.

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plant height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.

  17. Field performance of transgenic sugarcane expressing isomaltulose synthase.

    PubMed

    Basnayake, Shiromani W V; Morgan, Terrance C; Wu, Luguang; Birch, Robert G

    2012-02-01

    Transgenic sugarcane plants expressing a vacuole-targeted isomaltulose (IM) synthase in seven recipient genotypes (elite cultivars) were evaluated over 3 years at a field site typical of commercial cane growing conditions in the Burdekin district of Australia. IM concentration typically increased with internode maturity and comprised up to 217 mm (33% of total sugars) in whole-cane juice. There was generally a comparable decrease in sucrose concentration, with no overall decrease in total sugars. Sugarcane is vegetatively propagated from stem cuttings known as setts. Culture-derived plants were slower to establish and generally gave shorter and thinner stalks at harvest than those grown from field-sourced setts in the initial field generations. However, after several cycles of field propagation, selections were obtained with cane yields similar to the recipient genotypes. There was no apparent adverse effect of IM accumulation on vigour assessed by stalk height and diameter or other visual indicators including germination of setts and establishment of stools. There was some inconsistency in IM levels in juice, between samplings of the vegetatively propagated transgenic lines. Until the causes are resolved, it is prudent to selectively propagate from stalks with higher IM levels in the initial vegetative field generations. Pol/Brix ratio allowed rapid identification of lines with high IM levels, using common sugar industry instruments. Sucrose isomerase activity was low in these transgenic lines, and the results indicate strong potential to develop sugarcane for commercial-scale production of IM if higher activity can be engineered in appropriate developmental patterns.

  18. A transgenic rat with ubiquitous expression of firefly luciferase gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamata, Yoji; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2006-02-01

    In vivo imaging strategies provide cellular and molecular events in real time that helps us to understand biological processes in living animals. The development of molecular tags such as green fluorescent proteins and luciferase from the firefly Photinus pyralis has lead to a revolution in the visualization of complex biochemical processes. We developed a novel inbred transgenic rat strain containing firefly luciferase based on the transgenic (Tg) technique in rats. This Tg rat expressed the luciferase gene ubiquitously under control of the ROSA26 promoter. Cellular immune responsiveness against the luciferase protein was evaluated using conventional skin grafting and resulted in the long-term acceptance of Tg rat skin on wild-type rats. Strikingly, organ transplant with heart and small bowel demonstrated organ viability and graft survival, suggesting that cells from luciferase-Tg are transplantable to track their fate. Taking advantage of the less immunogenic luciferase, we also tested the role of hepatocyte-infusion in a liver injury model, and bone marrow-derived cells in a skin defect model. Employed in conjunction with modern advances in optical imaging, this luciferase-Tg rat system provides an innovative animal tool and a new means of facilitating biomedical research such as in the case of regeneration medicine.

  19. How to make tetracycline-regulated transgene expression go on and off.

    PubMed

    Rennel, Emma; Gerwins, Pär

    2002-10-01

    Tetracycline-regulated gene expression systems are widely used to allow temporal and quantitative control of transgene expression in cultured cells and transgenic animals. While working with the Tet-Off system, where tetracycline or the analogue doxycycline suppresses expression, we noted a considerable variability in induced transgene expression after removal of doxycycline. Variable expression of the transgene could not be explained by clonal variation since it was noted when working with clonal cell lines. Instead we found that doxycycline bound nonspecifically to cells and extracellular matrix and was slowly released after it had been removed from tissue culture media. The released doxycycline reached sufficiently high levels to completely suppress transgene expression. The effect was not dependent on cell type or the nature of the transgene. However, robust and rapid transgene expression could be induced if released doxycycline were removed by washing cells 3h after the initial removal of doxycycline. The use of different vector systems, harboring the tetracycline-regulatable components, yielded similar results. These results not only help explain why tetracycline-regulatable transgene expression systems sometimes are variable but also provide simple ways to substantially improve the efficiency, utility, and reliability of these widely used expression systems.

  20. Transgenic expression of therapeutic proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana seed.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Cory L; Boothe, Joseph G

    2012-01-01

    The production of therapeutic proteins in plant seed augments alternative production platforms such as microbial fermentation, cell-based systems, transgenic animals, and other recombinant plant production systems to meet increasing demands for the existing biologics, drugs under evaluation, and undiscovered therapeutics in the future. We have developed upstream purification technologies for oilseeds which are designed to cost-effectively purify therapeutic proteins amenable to conventional downstream manufacture. A very useful tool in these endeavors is the plant model system Arabidopsis thaliana. The current chapter describes the rationale and methods used to over-express potential therapeutic products in A. thaliana seed for evaluation and definitive insight into whether our production platform, Safflower, can be utilized for large-scale manufacture.

  1. Expression of the Nicotiana protein kinase (NPK1) enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Shou, Huixia; Bordallo, Patricia; Wang, Kan

    2004-05-01

    Drought is one of the most important abiotic stresses affecting the productivity of maize. Previous studies have shown that expression of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) gene activated an oxidative signal cascade and led to the tolerance of freezing, heat, and salinity stress in transgenic tobacco. To analyse the role of activation of oxidative stress signalling in improving drought tolerance in major crops, a tobacco MAPKKK (NPK1) was expressed constitutively in maize. Results show that NPK1 expression enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic maize. Under drought conditions, transgenic maize plants maintained significantly higher photosynthesis rates than did the non-transgenic control, suggesting that NPK1 induced a mechanism that protected photosynthesis machinery from dehydration damage. In addition, drought-stressed transgenic plants produced kernels with weights similar to those under well-watered conditions, while kernel weights of drought-stressed non-transgenic control plants were significantly reduced when compared with their non-stressed counterparts.

  2. Expression of Trichoderma reesei exo-cellobiohydrolase I transgenic tobacco leaves and calli

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ziyu ); Hooker, Brian S. ); Quesenberry, Ryan D. ); Gao, Jianwei

    1998-12-01

    Expression of Trichoderma reesei exo-cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) gene in transgenic tobacco was under the control of CaMV 35S promoter. In transgenic leaf tissues, CBHI activity up to 66.1 mmol h{sup -1} g{sup -1} total protein was observed. In transgenic calli, the highest CBHI activity was 83.6 umol h{sup -1} g{sup -1} total protein. Protein immunoblot analysis confirms the presence of CBHI enzyme in both transgenic calli and leaf tissues. CBHI expression levels accounted for about 0.11% and 0.082% of total protein in transgenic leaf tissues and calli, respectively. Furthermore, expression of CBHI gene did not affect normal growth and development of transgenic plants.

  3. Effect of β‑globin MAR characteristic elements on transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Dong, Weihua; Wang, Tianyun; Liu, Zhonghe; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xiaoyin; Zhao, Chunpeng; Zhang, Junhe; Wang, Li

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the characteristic elements of matrix attachment region (MAR) on transgene expression. Human β‑globin MAR was obtained by PCR amplification. A splicing MAR fragment containing all the characteristic elements of β‑globin MAR was artificially synthesized and then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector. Following digestion and sequence identification, we transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with the two vectors, and then screened for the transformation of stable cells. The transgene expression level was analyzed by ELISA, and the copy numbers of the CAT gene were analyzed by real‑time fluorescent quantitative PCR. β‑globin MAR enhanced CAT reporter gene expression by 2.1489‑fold, whereas the β‑globin MAR characteristic elements did not enhance this expression. The real‑time fluorescent quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that the relative copy numbers of the CAT gene of the β‑globin MAR expression vector were 1.2‑fold higher compared with those of the non‑MAR expression vector. MAR was able to improve the transgene expression level to a certain extent. The MAR characteristic elements did not improve the transgene expression alone. The transgenic expression levels were not linear with the transgene copy number; however, the enhancement of transgenic expression was relative to the increase in the gene copy number.

  4. Generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that express green fluorescent protein throughout the whole body

    PubMed Central

    Seita, Yasunari; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Iwatani, Chizuru; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Matsushita, Jun; Azami, Takuya; Okahara, Junko; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hitoshi, Seiji; Itoh, Yasushi; Imamura, Takeshi; Nishimura, Masaki; Tooyama, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Mitinori; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Erika; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are valuable for human disease modelling, because rodents poorly recapitulate some human diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease amongst others. Here, we report for the first time, the generation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic cynomolgus monkeys by lentivirus infection. Our data show that the use of a human cytomegalovirus immediate-early enhancer and chicken beta actin promoter (CAG) directed the ubiquitous expression of the transgene in cynomolgus monkeys. We also found that injection into mature oocytes before fertilization achieved homogenous expression of GFP in each tissue, including the amnion, and fibroblasts, whereas injection into fertilized oocytes generated a transgenic cynomolgus monkey with mosaic GFP expression. Thus, the injection timing was important to create transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that expressed GFP homogenously in each of the various tissues. The strategy established in this work will be useful for the generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys for transplantation studies as well as biomedical research. PMID:27109065

  5. Transgenic silkworms expressing human insulin receptors for evaluation of therapeutically active insulin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Ishii, Kenichi; Miyaguchi, Wataru; Horie, Ryo; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Tatematsu, Ken-ichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Tamura, Toshiki; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-12-12

    We established a transgenic silkworm strain expressing the human insulin receptor (hIR) using the GAL4/UAS system. Administration of human insulin to transgenic silkworms expressing hIR decreased hemolymph sugar levels and facilitated Akt phosphorylation in the fat body. The decrease in hemolymph sugar levels induced by injection of human insulin in the transgenic silkworms expressing hIR was blocked by co-injection of wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor. Administration of bovine insulin, an hIR ligand, also effectively decreased sugar levels in the transgenic silkworms. These findings indicate that functional hIRs that respond to human insulin were successfully induced in the transgenic silkworms. We propose that the humanized silkworm expressing hIR is useful for in vivo evaluation of the therapeutic activities of insulin receptor agonists.

  6. Sequence-Modified Antibiotic Resistance Genes Provide Sustained Plasmid-Mediated Transgene Expression in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiamiao; Zhang, Feijie; Fire, Andrew Z; Kay, Mark A

    2017-03-30

    Conventional plasmid vectors are incapable of achieving sustained levels of transgene expression in vivo even in quiescent mammalian tissues because the transgene expression cassette is silenced. Transcriptional silencing results from the presence of the bacterial plasmid backbone or virtually any DNA sequence of >1 kb in length placed outside of the expression cassette. Here, we show that transcriptional silencing can be substantially forestalled by increasing the An/Tn sequence composition in the plasmid bacterial backbone. Increasing numbers of An/Tn sequences increased sustained transcription of both backbone sequences and adjacent expression cassettes. In order to recapitulate these expression profiles in compact and portable plasmid DNA backbones, we engineered the standard kanamycin or ampicillin antibiotic resistance genes, optimizing the number of An/Tn sequence without altering the encoded amino acids. The resulting vector backbones yield sustained transgene expression from mouse liver, providing generic DNA vectors capable of sustained transgene expression without additional genes or mammalian regulatory elements.

  7. Tal1 transgenic expression reveals absence of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, Alexey; Zanesi, Nicola; Aqeilan, Rami I; Efanov, Alexey; Maximov, Vadim; Santanam, Urmila; Hagan, John P; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2006-06-15

    TAL1 oncogene encodes a helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Tal1, which is required for blood cell development, and its activation is a frequent event in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Tal1 interacts and inhibits other helix-loop-helix factors such as E47 and HEB. To investigate the function of Tal1 in B cells, we generated Emu-TAL1 transgenic mouse line, expressing Tal1 in mouse B-cell lineage. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of lymphocytes isolated from spleens of five out of five founders reveals complete absence of IgM- or CD19-expressing cells. Only 2% to 3% of these cells were B220+ and 100% of B220+ cells were CD43+, indicating that these mice were able to make pro-B cells. Similarly, FACS analysis of bone marrow cells in Emu-TAL1 mice revealed complete absence of B220+IgM+ and B220+CD19+ cells. Analysis of the recombination status of IgH genes revealed the presence of D-J but absence or drastic reduction of V-D-J rearrangements. Our results suggest that Tal1 overexpression in B cells results in a phenotype similar to that of B cells of E47/E2A knockout animals. This represents first in vivo evidence that Tal1 can completely inhibit E47/E2A function.

  8. Transgenic expression of interferon-γ in mouse stomach leads to inflammation, metaplasia, and dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Syu, Li-Jyun; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Eaton, Kathryn A; Liu, Zhiping; Tetarbe, Manas; Keeley, Theresa M; Pero, Joanna; Ferris, Jennifer; Wilbert, Dawn; Kaatz, Ashley; Zheng, Xinlei; Qiao, Xiotan; Grachtchouk, Marina; Gumucio, Deborah L; Merchant, Juanita L; Samuelson, Linda C; Dlugosz, Andrzej A

    2012-12-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality worldwide. It arises through a stepwise process that includes prominent inflammation with expression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and multiple other pro-inflammatory cytokines. We engineered mice expressing IFN-γ under the control of the stomach-specific H(+)/K(+) ATPase β promoter to test the potential role of this cytokine in gastric tumorigenesis. Stomachs of H/K-IFN-γ transgenic mice exhibited inflammation, expansion of myofibroblasts, loss of parietal and chief cells, spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia, and dysplasia. Proliferation was elevated in undifferentiated and metaplastic epithelial cells in H/K-IFN-γ transgenic mice, and there was increased apoptosis. H/K-IFN-γ mice had elevated levels of mRNA for IFN-γ target genes and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Intracellular mediators of IFN-γ and IL-6 signaling, pSTAT1 and pSTAT3, respectively, were detected in multiple cell types within stomach. H/K-IFN-γ mice developed dysplasia as early as 3 months of age, and 4 of 39 mice over 1 year of age developed antral polyps or tumors, including one adenoma and one adenocarcinoma, which expressed high levels of nuclear β-catenin. Our data identified IFN-γ as a pivotal secreted factor that orchestrates complex changes in inflammatory, epithelial, and mesenchymal cell populations to drive pre-neoplastic progression in stomach; however, additional alterations appear to be required for malignant conversion.

  9. The Construction and Expression of Lysine-Rich Gene in the Mammary Gland of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Song, Guangqi; Chen, Yue; Wang, Zhongwei; Yin, Yupeng; Kong, Delong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Zhihui; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Lysine is the limiting amino acid in cereal grains, which represent a major source of human food and animal feed worldwide, and is considered the most important of the essential amino acids. In this study, β-casein, αS2-casein, and lactotransferrin cDNA clone fragments encoding lysine-rich peptides were fused together to generate a lysine-rich (LR) gene and the mammary gland-specific expression vector pBC1-LR-NEOr was constructed. Transgenic mice were generated by pronuclear microinjection of the linearized expression vectors harboring the LR transgene. The transgenic mice and their offspring were examined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting, reverse transcriptase–PCR, in situ hybridization, and Western blotting techniques. Our results showed that the LR gene was successfully integrated into the mouse genome and was transmitted stably. The specific LR gene expression was restricted to the mammary gland, active alveoli of the transgenic female mice during lactation. The lysine level of the two transgenic lines was significantly higher than that of nontransgenic controls (p<0.05). In addition, the growth performance of transgenic pups was enhanced by directly feeding them the LR protein-enriched transgenic milk. Our results demonstrated that lysine-rich gene was successfully constructed and expressed in mammary gland of transgenic mice. This study will provide a better understanding of how mammary gland expression systems that increase the lysine content of milk can be applied to other mammals, such as cows. PMID:22577831

  10. The construction and expression of lysine-rich gene in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Song, Guangqi; Chen, Yue; Wang, Zhongwei; Yin, Yupeng; Kong, Delong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Zhihui; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Tang, Bo; Li, Ziyi

    2012-08-01

    Lysine is the limiting amino acid in cereal grains, which represent a major source of human food and animal feed worldwide, and is considered the most important of the essential amino acids. In this study, β-casein, αS2-casein, and lactotransferrin cDNA clone fragments encoding lysine-rich peptides were fused together to generate a lysine-rich (LR) gene and the mammary gland-specific expression vector pBC1-LR-NEO(r) was constructed. Transgenic mice were generated by pronuclear microinjection of the linearized expression vectors harboring the LR transgene. The transgenic mice and their offspring were examined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting, reverse transcriptase-PCR, in situ hybridization, and Western blotting techniques. Our results showed that the LR gene was successfully integrated into the mouse genome and was transmitted stably. The specific LR gene expression was restricted to the mammary gland, active alveoli of the transgenic female mice during lactation. The lysine level of the two transgenic lines was significantly higher than that of nontransgenic controls (p<0.05). In addition, the growth performance of transgenic pups was enhanced by directly feeding them the LR protein-enriched transgenic milk. Our results demonstrated that lysine-rich gene was successfully constructed and expressed in mammary gland of transgenic mice. This study will provide a better understanding of how mammary gland expression systems that increase the lysine content of milk can be applied to other mammals, such as cows.

  11. Sex-linked behavioural differences in mice expressing a human insulin transgene in the medial habenula.

    PubMed

    Douhet, P; Bertaina, V; Durkin, T; Calas, A; Destrade, C

    1997-12-01

    We previously reported that a human insulin transgene was specifically expressed in the medial habenula of the adult mouse brain, and that this expression was ascribed to the delta-168 transgene. The present study analyses the possible behavioural consequences of this insulin transgene expression using measures of food intake, spontaneous activity, emotional reactivity, learning and extinction performance of an operant task. The delta-168 transgenic mice did not differ from the C57BL/6 control mice as concerns food intake, behaviour in the open field, or emotional response in an elevated plus maze. On the other hand, measures of locomotor activity in a circular corridor revealed a significantly faster decline of spontaneous locomotor activity in male as compared to female delta-168 transgenic mice. Moreover, as compared to female transgenic mice, male transgenic mice exhibited a deficit in the rate of acquisition and an acceleration of the rate of extinction of a bar press response in a Skinner box. In contrast, the behaviour of female transgenic mice did not differ from either male or female C57BL/6 control mice. The results of the present study demonstrate that the behavioural modifications observed in delta-168 transgenic mice are sex-linked and suggest that these behavioural differences result from changes in the interaction (interface) between motivational and motor mechanisms mediated via the striato-habenulo-mesencephalic system.

  12. Digital gene expression analysis of mature seeds of transgenic maize overexpressing Aspergillus niger phyA2 and its non-transgenic counterpart.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jun; Yang, Litao; Wang, Congmao; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The next generation sequencing technologies have been recently used for transcriptome analysis in many organisms because of the decreased sequencing cost and increased sequence output. In this study, we used digital gene expression (DGE) technique to compare the transcriptomic changes in mature seeds between transgenic maize overexpressing Aspergillus niger phyA2 and its non-transgenic counterpart. Deep sequencing of DGE libraries of the transgenic and its non-transgenic counterpart seeds generated 3,783,500 and 3,790,500 reads of 21-nucleotide, respectively, with frequencies spanning over four orders of magnitude. In transgenic maize, 53.97% of the unambiguous signature tags were mapped to the maize B73 reference genome, and 46.47% of genes were detected by at least two reads; in non-transgenic maize, the corresponding numbers were 51.38% and 47.39%. Compared with non-transgenic counterpart, about 12% of detected genes were differentially expressed in the transcriptome of transgenic maize seeds. Among these differentially expressed genes, there were 23 transcription factors in 14 families and no allergen genes. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that 21 pathways were significantly affected by the transgenic event, in which the pathway involved in protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum was the most significantly affected. Results from this study indicated that both intended and unintended transcriptomic changes occurred in the transgenic maize, thus emphasizing the importance of transcriptome profiling in risk assessment of transgenic events.

  13. Temporal and spatial patterning of transgene expression by near-infrared irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Leyre; Lopez, Daniel; Arruebo, Manuel; Wilson, Christopher G; Franceschi, Renny T.; Voellmy, Richard; Santamaria, Jesus; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether near-infrared (NIR) light could be employed for patterning transgene expression in plasmonic cell constructs. Hollow gold nanoparticles with a plasmon surface band absorption peaking at ~750 nm, a wavelength within the so called “tissue optical window”, were used as fillers in fibrin-based hydrogels. These composites, which efficiently transduce NIR photon energy into heat, were loaded with genetically-modified cells that harbor a heat-activated and ligand-dependent gene switch for regulating transgene expression. NIR laser irradiation in the presence of ligand triggered 3-dimensional patterns of transgene expression faithfully matching the illuminated areas of plasmonic cell constructs. This noninvasive technology was proven useful for remotely controlling in vivo the spatiotemporal bioavailability of transgenic vascular endothelial growth factor. The combination of spatial control by means of NIR irradiation along with safe and timed transgene induction presents a high application potential for engineering tissues in regenerative medicine scenarios. PMID:24957294

  14. A regulatory toolbox of MiniPromoters to drive selective expression in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Swanson, Douglas J.; Liu, Li; de Leeuw, Charles N.; Banks, Kathleen G.; Ho Sui, Shannan J.; Fulton, Debra L.; Ali, Johar; Amirabbasi, Mahsa; Arenillas, David J.; Babyak, Nazar; Black, Sonia F.; Bonaguro, Russell J.; Brauer, Erich; Candido, Tara R.; Castellarin, Mauro; Chen, Jing; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Jason C. Y.; Chopra, Vik; Docking, T. Roderick; Dreolini, Lisa; D'Souza, Cletus A.; Flynn, Erin K.; Glenn, Randy; Hatakka, Kristi; Hearty, Taryn G.; Imanian, Behzad; Jiang, Steven; Khorasan-zadeh, Shadi; Komljenovic, Ivana; Laprise, Stéphanie; Liao, Nancy Y.; Lim, Jonathan S.; Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Flora; Liu, Jun; Lu, Meifen; McConechy, Melissa; McLeod, Andrea J.; Milisavljevic, Marko; Mis, Jacek; O'Connor, Katie; Palma, Betty; Palmquist, Diana L.; Schmouth, Jean-François; Swanson, Magdalena I.; Tam, Bonny; Ticoll, Amy; Turner, Jenna L.; Varhol, Richard; Vermeulen, Jenny; Watkins, Russell F.; Wilson, Gary; Wong, Bibiana K. Y.; Wong, Siaw H.; Wong, Tony Y. T.; Yang, George S.; Ypsilanti, Athena R.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Holt, Robert A.; Goldowitz, Daniel; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Simpson, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The Pleiades Promoter Project integrates genomewide bioinformatics with large-scale knockin mouse production and histological examination of expression patterns to develop MiniPromoters and related tools designed to study and treat the brain by directed gene expression. Genes with brain expression patterns of interest are subjected to bioinformatic analysis to delineate candidate regulatory regions, which are then incorporated into a panel of compact human MiniPromoters to drive expression to brain regions and cell types of interest. Using single-copy, homologous-recombination “knockins” in embryonic stem cells, each MiniPromoter reporter is integrated immediately 5′ of the Hprt locus in the mouse genome. MiniPromoter expression profiles are characterized in differentiation assays of the transgenic cells or in mouse brains following transgenic mouse production. Histological examination of adult brains, eyes, and spinal cords for reporter gene activity is coupled to costaining with cell-type–specific markers to define expression. The publicly available Pleiades MiniPromoter Project is a key resource to facilitate research on brain development and therapies. PMID:20807748

  15. Transgenic plants expressing GLK1 and CCA1 having increased nitrogen assimilation capacity

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria [New York, NY; Gutierrez, Rodrigo A [Santiago, CL; Nero, Damion C [Woodside, NY

    2012-04-10

    Provided herein are compositions and methods for producing transgenic plants. In specific embodiments, transgenic plants comprise a construct comprising a polynucleotide encoding CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1, operably linked to a plant-specific promote, wherein the CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 is ectopically overexpressed in the transgenic plants, and wherein the promoter is optionally a constitutive or inducible promoter. In other embodiments, transgenic plants in which express a lower level of CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 are provided. Also provided herein are commercial products (e.g., pulp, paper, paper products, or lumber) derived from the transgenic plants (e.g., transgenic trees) produced using the methods provided herein.

  16. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies.

  17. Preservation and Faithful Expression of Transgene via Artificial Seeds in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenting; Liang, Zongsuo; Wang, Xinhua; Sibbald, Susan; Hunter, David; Tian, Lining

    2013-01-01

    Proper preservation of transgenes and transgenic materials is important for wider use of transgenic technology in plants. Here, we report stable preservation and faithful expression of a transgene via artificial seed technology in alfalfa. DNA constructs containing the uid reporter gene coding for β-glucuronidase (GUS) driven by a 35S promoter or a tCUP promoter were introduced into alfalfa via Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Somatic embryos were subsequently induced from transgenic alfalfa plants via in vitro technology. These embryos were treated with abscisic acid to induce desiccation tolerance and were subjected to a water loss process. After the desiccation procedure, the water content in dried embryos, or called artificial seeds, was about 12–15% which was equivalent to that in true seeds. Upon water rehydration, the dried somatic embryos showed high degrees of viability and exhibited normal germination. Full plants were subsequently developed and recovered in a greenhouse. The progeny plants developed from artificial seeds showed GUS enzyme activity and the GUS expression level was comparable to that of plants developed from somatic embryos without the desiccation process. Polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the transgene was well retained in the plants and Southern blot analysis showed that the transgene was stably integrated in plant genome. The research showed that the transgene and the new trait can be well preserved in artificial seeds and the progeny developed. The research provides a new method for transgenic germplasm preservation in different plant species. PMID:23690914

  18. Transgenic expression of human cytoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen4-immunoglobulin (hCTLA4Ig) by porcine skin for xenogeneic skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Hua-Qiang; Jiang, Wen; Fan, Na-Na; Zhao, Ben-Tian; Ou-Yang, Zhen; Liu, Zhao-Ming; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Dong-Shan; Zhou, Xiao-Yang; Shang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Lu-Lu; Xiang, Peng-Ying; Ge, Liang-Peng; Wei, Hong; Lai, Liang-Xue

    2015-04-01

    Porcine skin is frequently used as a substitute of human skin to cover large wounds in clinic practice of wound care. In our previous work, we found that transgenic expression of human cytoxicT-lymphocyte associated antigen4-immunoglobulin (hCTLA4Ig) in murine skin graft remarkably prolonged its survival in xenogeneic wounds without extensive immunosuppression in recipients, suggesting that transgenic hCTLA4Ig expression in skin graft may be an effective and safe method to prolong xenogeneic skin graft survival. In this work, using a transgene construct containing hCTLA4Ig coding sequence under the drive of human Keratine 14 (k14) promoter, hCTLA4Ig transgenic pigs were generated by somatic nuclear transfer. The derived transgenic pigs were healthy and exhibited no signs of susceptibility to infection. The hCTLA4Ig transgene was stably transmitted through germline over generations, and thereby a transgenic pig colony was established. In the derived transgenic pigs, hCTLA4Ig expression in skin was shown to be genetically stable over generations, and detected in heart, kidney and corneal as well as in skin. Transgenic hCTLA4Ig protein in pigs exhibited expected biological activity as it suppressed human lymphocyte proliferation in human mixed lymphocyte culture to extents comparable to those of commercially purchased purified hCTLA4Ig protein. In skin grafting from pigs to rats, transgenic porcine skin grafts exhibited remarkably prolonged survival compared to the wild-type skin grafts derived from the same pig strain (13.33 ± 3.64 vs. 6.25 ± 2.49 days, P < 0.01), further indicating that the transgenic hCTLA4Ig protein was biologically active and capable of extending porcine skin graft survival in xenogeneic wounds. The transgenic pigs generated in this work can be used as a reproducible resource to provide porcine skin grafts with extended survival for wound coverage, and also as donors to investigate the impacts of hCTLA4Ig on xenotransplantation of other organs

  19. Copper transport during lactation in transgenic mice expressing the human ATP7A protein

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Roxana M.; Michalczyk, Agnes A.; Freestone, David J.; Currie, Scott; Linder, Maria C.; Ackland, M. Leigh; Mercer, Julian F.B.

    2008-01-01

    Both copper transporting ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, are expressed in mammary epithelial cells but their role in copper delivery to milk has not been clarified. We investigated the role of ATP7A in delivery of copper to milk using transgenic mice that over-express human ATP7A. In mammary gland of transgenic mice, human ATP7A protein was 10- to 20-fold higher than in control mice, and was localized to the basolateral membrane of mammary epithelial cells in lactating mice. The copper concentration in the mammary gland of transgenic dams and stomach contents of transgenic pups was significantly reduced compared to non-transgenic mice. The mRNA levels of endogenous Atp7a, Atp7b, and Ctr1 copper transporters in the mammary gland were not altered by the expression of the ATP7A transgene, and the protein levels of Atp7b and ceruloplasmin were similar in transgenic and non-transgenic mice. These data suggest that ATP7A plays a role in removing excess copper from the mammary epithelial cells rather than supplying copper to milk. PMID:18515074

  20. Transgenic mice expressing high plasma concentrations of human apolipoprotein B100 and lipoprotein(a).

    PubMed Central

    Linton, M F; Farese, R V; Chiesa, G; Grass, D S; Chin, P; Hammer, R E; Hobbs, H H; Young, S G

    1993-01-01

    The B apolipoproteins, apo-B48 and apo-B100, are key structural proteins in those classes of lipoproteins considered to be atherogenic [e.g., chylomicron remnants, beta-VLDL, LDL, oxidized LDL, and Lp(a)]. Here we describe the development of transgenic mice expressing high levels of human apo-B48 and apo-B100. A 79.5-kb human genomic DNA fragment containing the entire human apo-B gene was isolated from a P1 bacteriophage library and microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs. 16 transgenic founders expressing human apo-B were generated, and the animals with the highest expression had plasma apo-B100 levels nearly as high as those of normolipidemic humans (approximately 50 mg/dl). The human apo-B100 in transgenic mouse plasma was present largely in lipoproteins of the LDL class as shown by agarose gel electrophoresis, chromatography on a Superose 6 column, and density gradient ultracentrifugation. When the human apo-B transgenic founders were crossed with transgenic mice expressing human apo(a), the offspring that expressed both transgenes had high plasma levels of human Lp(a). Both the human apo-B and Lp(a) transgenic mice will be valuable resources for studying apo-B metabolism and the role of apo-B and Lp(a) in atherosclerosis. Images PMID:8254057

  1. Transgene Expression in Microalgae—From Tools to Applications

    PubMed Central

    Doron, Lior; Segal, Na'ama; Shapira, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae comprise a biodiverse group of photosynthetic organisms that reside in water sources and sediments. The green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was adopted as a useful model organism for studying various physiological systems. Its ability to grow under both photosynthetic and heterotrophic conditions allows efficient growth of non-photosynthetic mutants, making Chlamydomonas a useful genetic tool to study photosynthesis. In addition, this green alga can grow as haploid or diploid cells, similar to yeast, providing a powerful genetic system. As a result, easy and efficient transformation systems have been developed for Chlamydomonas, targeting both the chloroplast and nuclear genomes. Since microalgae comprise a rich repertoire of species that offer variable advantages for biotech and biomed industries, gene transfer technologies were further developed for many microalgae to allow for the expression of foreign proteins of interest. Expressing foreign genes in the chloroplast enables the targeting of foreign DNA to specific sites by homologous recombination. Chloroplast transformation also allows for the introduction of genes encoding several enzymes from a complex pathway, possibly as an operon. Expressing foreign proteins in the chloroplast can also be achieved by introducing the target gene into the nuclear genome, with the protein product bearing a targeting signal that directs import of the transgene-product into the chloroplast, like other endogenous chloroplast proteins. Integration of foreign genes into the nuclear genome is mostly random, resulting in large variability between different clones, such that extensive screening is required. The use of different selection modalities is also described, with special emphasis on the use of herbicides and metabolic markers which are considered to be friendly to the environment, as compared to drug-resistance genes that are commonly used. Finally, despite the development of a wide range of transformation

  2. Recurrent selection for transgene expression levels in maize results in proxy selection for a native gene with the same promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High expression levels of a transgene can be very useful, making a transgene easier to evaluate for safety and efficacy. High expression levels can also increase the economic benefit of the production of high value proteins in transgenic plants. The goal of this research is to determine if recurre...

  3. Transgenic Anopheles gambiae expressing an antimalarial peptide suffer no significant fitness cost.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Clare C; Meredith, Janet M; Eggleston, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases present some of the greatest health challenges faced by the world today. In many cases, existing control measures are compromised by insecticide resistance, pathogen tolerance to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines. In light of these difficulties, new genetic tools for disease control programmes, based on the deployment of genetically modified mosquitoes, are seen as having great promise. Transgenic strains may be used to control disease transmission either by suppressing vector populations or by replacing susceptible with refractory genotypes. In practice, the fitness of the transgenic strain relative to natural mosquitoes will be a critical determinant of success. We previously described a transgenic strain of Anopheles gambiae expressing the Vida3 peptide into the female midgut following a blood-meal, which exhibited significant protection against malaria parasites. Here, we investigated the fitness of this strain relative to non-transgenic controls through comparisons of various life history traits. Experiments were designed, as far as possible, to equalize genetic backgrounds and heterogeneity such that fitness comparisons focussed on the presence and expression of the transgene cassette. We also employed reciprocal crosses to identify any fitness disturbance associated with inheritance of the transgene from either the male or female parent. We found no evidence that the presence or expression of the effector transgene or associated fluorescence markers caused any significant fitness cost in relation to larval mortality, pupal sex ratio, fecundity, hatch rate or longevity of blood-fed females. In fact, fecundity was increased in transgenic strains. We did, however, observe some fitness disturbances associated with the route of inheritance of the transgene. Maternal inheritance delayed male pupation whilst paternal inheritance increased adult longevity for both males and unfed females. Overall, in comparison to controls, there was

  4. Mushroom body miscellanea: transgenic Drosophila strains expressing anatomical and physiological sensor proteins in Kenyon cells

    PubMed Central

    Pech, Ulrike; Dipt, Shubham; Barth, Jonas; Singh, Priyanka; Jauch, Mandy; Thum, Andreas S.; Fiala, André; Riemensperger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster represents a key model organism for analyzing how neuronal circuits regulate behavior. The mushroom body in the central brain is a particularly prominent brain region that has been intensely studied in several insect species and been implicated in a variety of behaviors, e.g., associative learning, locomotor activity, and sleep. Drosophila melanogaster offers the advantage that transgenes can be easily expressed in neuronal subpopulations, e.g., in intrinsic mushroom body neurons (Kenyon cells). A number of transgenes has been described and engineered to visualize the anatomy of neurons, to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity, and to manipulate neuronal function artificially. To target the expression of these transgenes selectively to specific neurons several sophisticated bi- or even multipartite transcription systems have been invented. However, the number of transgenes that can be combined in the genome of an individual fly is limited in practice. To facilitate the analysis of the mushroom body we provide a compilation of transgenic fruit flies that express transgenes under direct control of the Kenyon-cell specific promoter, mb247. The transgenes expressed are fluorescence reporters to analyze neuroanatomical aspects of the mushroom body, proteins to restrict ectopic gene expression to mushroom bodies, or fluorescent sensors to monitor physiological parameters of neuronal activity of Kenyon cells. Some of the transgenic animals compiled here have been published already, whereas others are novel and characterized here for the first time. Overall, the collection of transgenic flies expressing sensor and reporter genes in Kenyon cells facilitates combinations with binary transcription systems and might, ultimately, advance the physiological analysis of mushroom body function. PMID:24065891

  5. Quaternization enhances the transgene expression efficacy of aminoglycoside-derived polymers.

    PubMed

    Miryala, Bhavani; Feng, Yunpeng; Omer, Ala; Potta, Thrimoorthy; Rege, Kaushal

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the present study was to synthesize and investigate the transgene expression efficacy of quaternized derivatives of aminoglycoside polymers in different cancer cell lines. A series of glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (GTMAC) derivatives of aminoglycoside polymers (GTMAC-AM polymers), containing varying degrees of quaternization (13-45%), were synthesized. The structures and properties of GTMAC-AM polymers were investigated using FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Physicochemical factors that influence transgene expression efficacy including DNA binding, hydrodynamic size, zeta potential and cytotoxicity, were determined. Formation of polymer-plasmid DNA complexes was also visualized using atomic force microscopy. GTMAC-AM polymers demonstrated higher transgene expression efficacies compared to their parent polymers, 25 kDa poly(ethyleneimine), as well as Lipofectamine-3000. Our results indicate that quaternization enhances the transgene expression efficacy and reduces the cytotoxicity of aminoglycoside-derived polymers, making it an attractive strategy for nucleic acid delivery with these new materials.

  6. Expression of human protamine P1 in sperm of transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Keith, C.; Stilwell, J.; Lowe, X.; Anderson, G.

    1994-12-31

    Transgenic mice were produced by pronuclear injection with DNA constructs containing human protamine P1 cDNA recombined with a murine protamine P1 promoter, and were identified by PCR. Expression of human P1 was investigated using huplm, a monoclonal antibody specific for human P1, applied to murine testicular cells, smears of epididymal sperm, and smears of detergent-isolated sperm nuclei. Various antibodies and nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. Two male founders (T3 and T7) sired more than five generations of transgenic offspring each with continued expression of human P1 in their sperm. Transgenic animals appear of normal fertility with sperm of typical nuclear morphology. The human P1 transgene was expressed postmeioticly in both lines, as expected. Nearly 100% of sperm of T3 and T7 hemizygotes labeled with huplm, consistent with complete diffusion of human P1 protein through the intercellular bridge of spermatogenic cells. Human P1 labeling of sperm nuclei was not visibly affected by sonication or by treatment with the detergent MATAB or the reducing agent DTT. A third founder female (T5) showed a transmission pattern consistent with insertion of the transgene into an X chromosome; her transgenic offspring expressed human P1 in only a small fraction of sperm. Human P1 transgenes may serve as efficient targets for germinal mutations and transgenicmice may provide promising models for investigating the DNA complexes.

  7. Generating a transgenic mouse line stably expressing human MHC surface antigen from a HAC carrying multiple genomic BACs.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Ishikura, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Suzuki, Junpei; Nakayama, Manabu; Okamura, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Tuneko; Koseki, Haruhiko; Ohara, Osamu; Ikeno, Masashi; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector is a promising tool to improve the problematic suppression and position effects of transgene expression frequently seen in transgenic cells and animals produced by conventional plasmid or viral vectors. We generated transgenic mice maintaining a single HAC vector carrying two genomic bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) from human HLA-DR loci (DRA and DRB1). Both transgenes on the HAC in transgenic mice exhibited tissue-specific expression in kidney, liver, lung, spleen, lymph node, bone marrow, and thymus cells in RT-PCR analysis. Stable functional expression of a cell surface HLA-DR marker from both transgenes, DRA and DRB1 on the HAC, was detected by flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes and maintained through at least eight filial generations. These results indicate that the de novo HAC system can allow us to manipulate multiple BAC transgenes with coordinated expression as a surface antigen through the generation of transgenic animals.

  8. Expression profiling of microRNAs in optineurin (E50K) mutant transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Jiang, B O; Lei, Dawei; Zhou, Xinrong; Yuan, Huiping

    2016-02-01

    An E50K substitution in the transcription factor optineurin (OPTN) induces primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). To explore the potential role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in E50K OPTN-induced POAG, miRNA expression profiling was performed on retinal samples from OPTN (E50K) transgenic and wild-type mice. The retinas were collected from 30 transgenic and 30 wild-type mice, and miRNA expression was evaluated using a genome-wide miRNA microarray. miRNAs that were differentially expressed in retinal samples from OPTN (E50K) transgenic mice were identified and validated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Additional gene ontology and signaling pathway analyses were performed using bioinformatics tools. A total of 48 miRNAs exhibited increased or decreased expression in the retinas from OPTN (E50K) transgenic mice when compared with the expression in the retinas from wild-type mice. A total of 5 miRNAs with increased expression in OPTN (E50K) transgenic mice could be grouped into one cluster as they belong to the miR-8 family and may act as regulators in the development of POAG in OPTN (E50K) transgenic mice. RT-qPCR results confirmed significantly increased expression of miR-141 in the retinas of OPTN (E50K) transgenic mice as compared to wild-type mice. In conclusion, these results show that certain miRNAs are differentially expressed in the retinas of OPTN (E50K) transgenic mice and may play roles in the pathogenesis of POAG induced by OPTN (E50K).

  9. Transgenic rice plants expressing cry1Ia5 gene are resistant to stem borer (Chilo agamemnon).

    PubMed

    Moghaieb, Reda E A

    2010-01-01

    The stem borer, Chilo agamemnon Bles., is the most serious insect pest in rice fields of the Egyptian Nile Delta. To induce rice plant resistance to Chilo agamemnon, the cry1Ia5 gene was introduced to rice plants (Oryza sativa L.). The integration of the cry1Ia5 gene into the plant genome was confirmed using PCR and Southern blot analyses. The obtained plantlets were transferred to the greenhouse until seeds were collected. Northern blot analysis of the T1 plants confirmed the expression of the cry1Ia5 gene. The insecticidal activity of the transgenic plants against the rice stem borer Chilo agamemnon were tested. The third larval instars were fed on stem cuts from three transgenic lines (L1, L2 and L3) as well as cuts from the control (gfp-transgenic) plants for one week and the mortality percentage was daily recorded. Transgenic line-3 showed the highest mortality percentage after one day (50%) followed by L2 (25%) then L1 (0%). Two days post treatment the mortality percentage increased to 70, 45 and 25% for transgenic lines 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Mortality of 100% was recorded four days post treatment, while those fed on the gfp-transgenic rice (control) showed 0% mortality. Thus, transgenic plants showed high resistance to stem borers and can serve as a novel genetic resource in breeding programs. Transgenic plants expressing BT protein were normal in phenotype with as good seed setting as the nontransgenic control plants.

  10. A transgenic approach to control hemipteran insects by expressing insecticidal genes under phloem-specific promoters

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Shaista; Amin, Imran; Jander, Georg; Mukhtar, Zahid; Saeed, Nasir A.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    The first generation transgenic crops used strong constitutive promoters for transgene expression. However, tissue-specific expression is desirable for more precise targeting of transgenes. Moreover, piercing/sucking insects, which are generally resistant to insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, have emerged as a major pests since the introduction of transgenic crops expressing these toxins. Phloem-specific promoters isolated from Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) were used for the expression of two insecticidal proteins, Hadronyche versuta (Blue Mountains funnel-web spider) neurotoxin (Hvt) and onion leaf lectin, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Here we demonstrate that transgenic plants expressing Hvt alone or in combination with onion leaf lectin are resistant to Phenacoccus solenopsis (cotton mealybug), Myzus persicae (green peach aphids) and Bemisia tabaci (silver leaf whitefly). The expression of both proteins under different phloem-specific promoters resulted in close to 100% mortality and provided more rapid protection than Hvt alone. Our results suggest the employment of the Hvt and onion leaf lectin transgenic constructs at the commercial level will reduce the use of chemical pesticides for control of hemipteran insect pests. PMID:27708374

  11. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene

    PubMed Central

    Kanobe, Milly N.; Rodermel, Steven R.; Bailey, Theodore; Scott, M. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and expressed in the maize seed endosperm. mRNA abundance of seven tested iron homeostasis genes and seed storage protein genes differed significantly between seed samples positive and negative for the transgene. The PCR negative samples had higher zein and total protein content compared to the positive samples. However, PCR positive samples had significantly higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and iron. We have shown that the soybean ferritin transgene affected the expression of native iron homeostasis genes in the maize plant. These results underscore the importance of taking a holistic approach to the evaluation of transgenic events in target plants, comparing the transgenic plant to the untransformed controls. PMID:23785377

  12. Transgenic expression of phytase in wheat endosperm increases bioavailability of iron and zinc in grains.

    PubMed

    Abid, Nabeela; Khatoon, Asia; Maqbool, Asma; Irfan, Muhammad; Bashir, Aftab; Asif, Irsa; Shahid, Muhammad; Saeed, Asma; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Malik, Kauser A

    2017-02-01

    Phytate is a major constituent of wheat seeds and chelates metal ions, thus reducing their bioavailability and so the nutritional value of grains. Transgenic plants expressing heterologous phytase are expected to enhance degradation of phytic acid stored in seeds and are proposed to increase the in vitro bioavailability of mineral nutrients. Wheat transgenic plants expressing Aspergillus japonicus phytase gene (phyA) in wheat endosperm were developed till T3 generation. The transgenic lines exhibited 18-99 % increase in phytase activity and 12-76 % reduction of phytic acid content in seeds. The minimum phytic acid content was observed in chapatti (Asian bread) as compared to flour and dough. The transcript profiling of phyA mRNA indicated twofold to ninefold higher expression as compared to non transgenic controls. There was no significant difference in grain nutrient composition of transgenic and non-transgenic seeds. In vitro bioavailability assay for iron and zinc in dough and chapatti of transgenic lines revealed a significant increase in iron and zinc contents. The development of nutritionally enhanced cereals is a step forward to combat nutrition deficiency for iron and zinc in malnourished human population, especially women and children.

  13. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene.

    PubMed

    Kanobe, Milly N; Rodermel, Steven R; Bailey, Theodore; Scott, M Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and expressed in the maize seed endosperm. mRNA abundance of seven tested iron homeostasis genes and seed storage protein genes differed significantly between seed samples positive and negative for the transgene. The PCR negative samples had higher zein and total protein content compared to the positive samples. However, PCR positive samples had significantly higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and iron. We have shown that the soybean ferritin transgene affected the expression of native iron homeostasis genes in the maize plant. These results underscore the importance of taking a holistic approach to the evaluation of transgenic events in target plants, comparing the transgenic plant to the untransformed controls.

  14. Reduced beta 2-microglobulin mRNA levels in transgenic mice expressing a designed hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, S; Hotchkiss, G; Andäng, M; Nyholm, T; Inzunza, J; Jansson, I; Ahrlund-Richter, L

    1994-01-01

    We have generated three artificial hammerhead ribozymes, denoted 'Rz-b', 'Rz-c' and 'Rz-d', with different specificities for exon II of the mouse beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2M) mRNA. In this study we tested for ribozyme mediated reduction of beta 2M mRNA in a cell line and in transgenic mice. Transfections of either of the Rz-b, Rz-c or Rz-d plasmids into a mouse cell-line (NIH/3T3) revealed reductions of beta 2M mRNA substrate in each case. Ribozyme expression in individual transfected clones was accompanied with an up to 80% reduction of beta 2M mRNA levels. Rz-c was selected for a transgenic study. Seven Rz-c transgenic founder animals were identified from which three ribozyme expressing families were established and analysed. Expression of the ribozyme transgene was tested for and detected in lung, kidney and spleen. Expression was accompanied with reduction of the beta 2M mRNA levels of heterozygous (Rz+/-) animals compared to non-transgenic litter mates. The effect was most pronounced in lung with more than 90% beta 2M mRNA reduction in individual mice. In summary, expression of our ribozymes in a cell free system, in a cell-line and in transgenic mice were all accompanied with reductions of beta 2M mRNA levels. Images PMID:8036151

  15. Expression of human apolipoprotein B and assembly of lipoprotein(a) in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Callow, M.J.; Stoltzfus, L.J.; Rubin, E.M.; Lawn, R.M.

    1994-03-15

    The atherogenic macromolecule lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] has resisted in vivo analyses partly because it is found in a limited number of experimental animals. Although transgenic mice expressing human apolipoprotein (a) [apo(a)] have previously been described, they failed to assemble Lp(a) particles because of the inability of human apo(a) to associate with mouse apolipoprotein B (apoB). The authors isolated a 90-kilobase P1 phagemid containing the human apoB gene and with this DNA generated 13 lines of transgenic mice of which 11 expressed human apoB. The human apoB transcript was expressed and edited in the liver of the transgenic mice. Plasma concentrations of human apoB, as well as low density lipoprotein (LDL), were related to transgene copy number; the transgenic line with the most copies of human apoB had a >4-fold increase in LDL cholesterol compared with nontransgenics and a lipoprotein profile similar to that of humans. When human apoB and apo(a) transgenic mice were bred together, plasma apo(a) in mice expressing both human proteins was tightly associated with lipoproteins in the LDL density region. These studies demonstrate the successful expression of human apoB and the efficient assembly of Lp(a) in mice.

  16. Criteria for high-level expression of a fungal laccase gene in transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Hood, Elizabeth E; Bailey, Michele R; Beifuss, Katherine; Magallanes-Lundback, Maria; Horn, Michael E; Callaway, Evelyn; Drees, Carol; Delaney, Donna E; Clough, Richard; Howard, John A

    2003-03-01

    Expression of industrial enzymes in transgenic plants offers an alternative system to fungal fermentation for large-scale production. Very high levels of expression are required to make the enzymes cost-effective. We tested several parameters to determine the best method for achieving high levels of expression for a fungal laccase gene. Transgenic maize plants were generated using an Agrobacterium-mediated system. The molecular parameters that induced the highest expression were the maize embryo-preferred globulin 1 promoter and targeting of the protein to the cell wall. Two independent transgenic events that yielded multiple clonal plants were characterized in detail. Independent transgenic events 01 and 03 contained two or one copies of T-DNA, respectively. Plants derived from a single transgenic event varied in expression level, and the variation in expression levels was heritable. Within the seed, expression in these plants was primarily within the embryo, and was associated with seed browning and limited germination. High oil germplasm was used to increase germination, as well as to assist in increasing expression 20-fold in five generations through breeding and selection.

  17. Lactase gene promoter fragments mediate differential spatial and temporal expression patterns in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2006-04-01

    Lactase gene expression is spatiotemporally regulated during mammalian gut development. We hypothesize that distinct DNA control regions specify appropriate spatial and temporal patterning of lactase gene expression. In order to define regions of the lactase promoter involved in mediating intestine-specific and spatiotemporal restricted expression, transgenic mice harboring 100 bp, 1.3- and 2.0- kb fragments of the 5' flanking region of the rat lactase gene cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter were characterized. The 100-bp lactase promoter-reporter transgenic mouse line expressed maximal luciferase activity in the intestine with a posterior shift in spatial restriction and ectopic expression in the stomach and lung. The temporal pattern of expression mediated by the 1.3-kb promoter?reporter transgene increases with postnatal maturation in contrast with the postnatal decline mediated by the 2.0-kb promoter-reporter transgene and the endogenous lactase gene. The differential transgene expression patterns mediated by the lactase promoter fragments suggests that intestine-specific spatial and temporal control elements reside in distinct regions of the DNA sequences upstream of the lactase gene transcription start-site.

  18. Negative regulation in correct tissue-specific expression of mouse mammary tumor virus in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, S R; Hsu, C L; Choi, Y; Mok, E; Dudley, J P

    1990-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is an endogenous murine retrovirus that is expressed in the epithelial cells of the mammary and salivary glands, lungs, kidneys, and seminal vesicles and in the lymphoid cells of the spleen and thymus. Several studies have shown that the long terminal repeat (LTR) of this virus can direct the expression of reporter genes to the same tissues in transgenic mice. To determine whether multiple regulatory elements within the LTR are involved in this tissue-specific expression, we have established lines of transgenic mice containing transgenes that have deletions in the MMTV LTR. Deletions of all LTR sequences upstream of -364 or of LTR sequences from -165 to -665 both result in the expression of linked reporter genes such as the simian virus 40 early region or the bacterial enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in novel sites, such as the heart, brain, and skeletal muscle; expression of endogenous MMTV and transgenes containing the full-length LTR is not detected in these organs. Negative regulation appears to involve more than one region, since deletion of sequences between either -201 and -471 or -201 and -344, as well as sequences upstream of -364, results in inappropriate expression in heart, brain, and skeletal muscle. Therefore, a negative regulatory element(s) in the MMTV LTR can suppress transcription from the viral promoter in several different organs. This represents the first example of generalized negative regulatory elements that act in many different tissues in transgenic mice to prevent inappropriate expression of a gene. Images PMID:1700274

  19. Effects of BCL-2 over-expression on B cells in transgenic rats and rat hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Iscache, Anne-Laure; Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Pedros, Christophe; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Buelow, Roland; Anegon, Ignacio

    2011-10-01

    The rat is an important biomedical experimental model that benefited from the recent development of new transgenic and knockout techniques. With the goal to optimize rat mAb production and to analyze the impact of Bcl-2 on B-cell development, we generated bcl-2 transgenic rats. Transgenic rats showed Bcl-2 over-expression in B cells, increased B cell numbers in lymphoid organs, elevated production of immunoglobulins (Igs) and prolonged B-cell survival in vitro. Transgenic rats remained healthy, reproduced normally and did not develop autoimmunity. Fusions with bcl-2 transgenic splenocytes did not result in increased hybridoma generation. A comparison of on- and off-rates of 39 mAbs generated with bcl-2 transgenic and wild-type animals revealed no significant differences. Over-expression of Bcl-2 in hybridomas did not change cell proliferation but resulted in increased Ig production. Bcl-2 transgenic rats will be a useful tool for the generation of rat mAbs, the analysis of B cells in different pathophysiological models, such as autoimmunity, cancer or organ transplantation, and the study of rat B-cell biology.

  20. Expression of a fungal glucoamylase in transgenic rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Huang, Jinming; Fang, Jun; Lin, Chaoyang; Cheng, Jiaan; Shen, Zhicheng

    2008-10-01

    Glucoamylase, which catalyses the hydrolysis of the alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds of starch, is an important industrial enzyme used in starch enzymatic saccharification. In this study, a glucoamylase gene from Aspergillus awamori, under the control of the promoter of seed storage protein Gt1, was introduced into rice by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Significant glucoamylase activity was detected specifically in the seeds but not other tissues of the transgenic rice lines. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the transgenic line Bg17-2, which was estimated to have about 500 units per gram of seeds (one unit is defined as the amount of enzyme that produces 1 micromol of reducing sugar in 1 min at 60 degrees C using soluble starch as substrate). The optimum pH for the activity of the rice produced enzyme is 5.0-5.5, and the optimum temperature is around 60 degrees C. One part of this transgenic glucoamylase rice seed flour fully converted 25 parts of corn starch pre-liquefied by an alpha-amylase also produced by a transgenic rice into glucose in 16 h incubation. This study suggests that this hydrolysis enzyme may substitute commercial fermentation enzymes for industrial starch conversion.

  1. Generation of a transgenic mouse line for conditional expression of human IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Taiki; Murasawa, Yusuke; Ikai, Rina; Hayakawa, Tomoko; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Ogiso, Noboru; Niida, Shumpei; Watanabe, Ken

    2016-01-01

    IL-6 is a cytokine that is involved in various physiological and pathological conditions, and approaches using gain-of-function transgenic animals have contributed in elucidating IL-6 function. However, studies of the multiple functions of IL-6 in vivo are very time consuming because they require the generation of transgenic mice that harbor the gene encoding IL-6 under the control of specific promoters to mimic different pathologies. Here, we report the establishment of a conditional human IL-6 transgenic mouse, LGL-IL6, which conditionally expresses human IL-6 by taking advantage of the well-characterized Cre recombinase drivers. PMID:27349442

  2. BCL-B (BCL2L10) is overexpressed in patients suffering from multiple myeloma (MM) and drives an MM-like disease in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Puissant, Alexandre; Richez, Valentine; Cassel, Romeo; Fenouille, Nina; Gilleron, Jerome; Bailly-Maitre, Beatrice; Mallavialle, Aude; Marchetti, Sandrine; Amiot, Martine; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Hofman, Paul; Karsenti, Jean-Michel; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) evolves from a premalignant condition known as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, the factors underlying the malignant transformation of plasmocytes in MM are not fully characterized. We report here that Eµ-directed expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-B protein in mice drives an MM phenotype that reproduces accurately the human disease. Indeed, with age, Eµ-bcl-b transgenic mice develop the characteristic features of human MM, including bone malignant plasma cell infiltration, a monoclonal immunoglobulin peak, immunoglobulin deposit in renal tubules, and highly characteristic bone lytic lesions. In addition, the tumors are serially transplantable in irradiated wild-type mice, underlying the tumoral origin of the disease. Eµ-bcl-b plasmocytes show increased expression of a panel of genes known to be dysregulated in human MM pathogenesis. Treatment of Eµ-bcl-b mice with drugs currently used to treat patients such as melphalan and VELCADE efficiently kills malignant plasmocytes in vivo. Finally, we find that Bcl-B is overexpressed in plasmocytes from MM patients but neither in MGUS patients nor in healthy individuals, suggesting that Bcl-B may drive MM. These findings suggest that Bcl-B could be an important factor in MM disease and pinpoint Eµ-bcl-b mice as a pertinent model to validate new therapies in MM. PMID:27455953

  3. BCL-B (BCL2L10) is overexpressed in patients suffering from multiple myeloma (MM) and drives an MM-like disease in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Mohamed-Amine; Jacquel, Arnaud; Robert, Guillaume; Puissant, Alexandre; Richez, Valentine; Cassel, Romeo; Fenouille, Nina; Roulland, Sandrine; Gilleron, Jerome; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Dubois, Alix; Bailly-Maitre, Beatrice; Goncalves, Diogo; Mallavialle, Aude; Colosetti, Pascal; Marchetti, Sandrine; Amiot, Martine; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Rochet, Nathalie; Deckert, Marcel; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Hofman, Paul; Karsenti, Jean-Michel; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine; Nadel, Bertrand; Cluzeau, Thomas; Anderson, Kenneth C; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Luciano, Frederic

    2016-08-22

    Multiple myeloma (MM) evolves from a premalignant condition known as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, the factors underlying the malignant transformation of plasmocytes in MM are not fully characterized. We report here that Eµ-directed expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-B protein in mice drives an MM phenotype that reproduces accurately the human disease. Indeed, with age, Eµ-bcl-b transgenic mice develop the characteristic features of human MM, including bone malignant plasma cell infiltration, a monoclonal immunoglobulin peak, immunoglobulin deposit in renal tubules, and highly characteristic bone lytic lesions. In addition, the tumors are serially transplantable in irradiated wild-type mice, underlying the tumoral origin of the disease. Eµ-bcl-b plasmocytes show increased expression of a panel of genes known to be dysregulated in human MM pathogenesis. Treatment of Eµ-bcl-b mice with drugs currently used to treat patients such as melphalan and VELCADE efficiently kills malignant plasmocytes in vivo. Finally, we find that Bcl-B is overexpressed in plasmocytes from MM patients but neither in MGUS patients nor in healthy individuals, suggesting that Bcl-B may drive MM. These findings suggest that Bcl-B could be an important factor in MM disease and pinpoint Eµ-bcl-b mice as a pertinent model to validate new therapies in MM.

  4. Transgenic mice expressing a human mutant beta1 thyroid receptor are hyperactive, impulsive, and inattentive.

    PubMed

    Siesser, W B; Zhao, J; Miller, L R; Cheng, S-Y; McDonald, M P

    2006-04-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed childhood psychiatric disorder. We have found that a transgenic mouse bearing a human mutant thyroid receptor (TRbeta1) expresses all of the defining symptoms of ADHD--inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity--as well as a 'paradoxical' response to methylphenidate (MPH). As with ADHD, the behavioral phenotypes expressed by the TRbeta transgenic mice are dynamic and sensitive to changes in environmental conditions, stress, and reinforcement. TRbeta transgenic mice are euthyroid except for a brief period during postnatal development, but the behavioral phenotypes, elevated dopamine turnover, and paradoxical response to MPH persist into adulthood. Thus, like the vast majority of children with ADHD, the TRbeta transgenic mice exhibit the symptoms of ADHD in the complete absence of thyroid abnormalities. This suggests that even transient perturbations in developmental thyroid homeostasis can have long-lasting behavioral and cognitive consequences, including producing the full spectrum of symptoms of ADHD.

  5. Insulitis in transgenic mice expressing tumor necrosis factor beta (lymphotoxin) in the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Picarella, D E; Kratz, A; Li, C B; Ruddle, N H; Flavell, R A

    1992-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor beta (TNF-beta) (lymphotoxin) may play an important role in the immune response and pathologic inflammatory diseases. Insulitis is an important early step in the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. To understand better the role of TNF-beta in the regulation of inflammation and type 1 diabetes, we produced transgenic mice in which the murine TNF-beta gene was regulated by the rat insulin II promoter. The transgene was expressed in the pancreas, kidney, and skin of transgenic mice. The expression of TNF-beta in the pancreas of transgenic mice resulted in a leukocytic inflammatory infiltrate consisting primarily of B220+ IgM+ B cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The insulitis is reminiscent of the early stages of diabetes, though the mice did not progress to diabetes. Images PMID:1279667

  6. Minicircle DNA Provides Enhanced and Prolonged Transgene Expression Following Airway Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Munye, Mustafa M.; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Barnes, Josephine L.; Brown, Rachel E.; McAnulty, Robin J.; Howe, Steven J.; Hart, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis using non-viral, plasmid-based formulations has been the subject of intensive research for over two decades but a clinically viable product has yet to materialise in large part due to inefficient transgene expression. Minicircle DNA give enhanced and more persistent transgene expression compared to plasmid DNA in a number of organ systems but has not been assessed in the lung. In this study we compared minicircle DNA with plasmid DNA in transfections of airway epithelial cells. In vitro, luciferase gene expression from minicircles was 5–10-fold higher than with plasmid DNA. In eGFP transfections in vitro both the mean fluorescence intensity and percentage of cells transfected was 2–4-fold higher with minicircle DNA. Administration of equimolar amounts of DNA to mouse lungs resulted in a reduced inflammatory response and more persistent transgene expression, with luciferase activity persisting for 2 weeks from minicircle DNA compared to plasmid formulations. Transfection of equal mass amounts of DNA in mouse lungs resulted in a 6-fold increase in transgene expression in addition to more persistent transgene expression. Our findings have clear implications for gene therapy of airway disorders where plasmid DNA transfections have so far proven inefficient in clinical trials. PMID:26975732

  7. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-08-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  8. Lox-dependent gene expression in transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, N; Kishchenko, O; Sakhno, L; Komarnytsky, I; Kuchuk, M

    2013-01-01

    Lox sites of the Cre/lox recombination system from bacteriophage P1 were analyzed for their ability to affect on transgene expression when inserted upstream from a gene coding sequence adjacent to the right border (RB) of T-DNA. Wild and mutated types of lox sites were tested for their effect upon bar gene expression in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated and biolistic transformation methods. Lox-mediated expression of bar gene, recognized by resistance of transgenic plants to PPT, occurred only in plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. RT-PCR analysis confirms that PPT-resistant phenotype of transgenic plants obtained via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was caused by activation of bar gene. The plasmid with promoterless gus gene together with the lox site adjacent to the RB was constructed and transferred to Nicotiana tabacum as well. Transgenic plants exhibited GUS activity and expression of gus gene was detected in plant leaves. Expression of bar gene from the vectors containing lox site near RB allowed recovery of numerous PPT-resistant transformants of such important crops as Beta vulgaris, Brassica napus, Lactuca sativa and Solanum tuberosum. Our results demonstrate that the lox site sequence adjacent to the RB can be used to control bar gene expression in transgenic plants.

  9. Robust heat-inducible gene expression by two endogenous hsp70-derived promoters in transgenic Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Carpenetti, Tiffany L. G.; Aryan, Azadeh; Myles, Kevin M.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2011-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is an important vector of the viruses that cause dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and yellow fever. Reverse genetic approaches to the study of gene function in this mosquito have been limited by the lack of a robust inducible promoter to allow precise temporal control over a protein-encoding or hairpin RNA transgene. Likewise, investigations into the molecular and biochemical basis of vector competence would benefit from the ability to activate an anti-pathogen molecule at specific times during infection. We have characterized the ability of genomic sequences derived from two Ae. aegypti hsp70 genes to drive heat-inducible expression of a reporter in both transient and germline transformation contexts. AaHsp70-luciferase transcripts accumulated specifically after heat shock, and displayed a pattern of rapid induction and decay similar to endogenous AaHsp70 genes. Luciferase expression in transgenic Ae. aegypti increased by ∼25-50 fold in whole adults by four hours after heat-shock, with significant activity (∼20 fold) remaining at 24 hr. Heat-induced expression was even more dramatic in midgut tissues, with one strain showing a ∼2500-fold increase in luciferase activity. The AaHsp70 promoters described could be valuable for gene function studies as well as for the precise timing of the expression of anti-pathogen molecules. PMID:22142225

  10. Identification of the MUC2 Promoter as a Strong Promoter for Intestinal Gene Expression through Generation of Transgenic Quail Expressing GFP in Gut Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Woodfint, Rachel M.; Chen, Paula R.; Ahn, Jinsoo; Suh, Yeunsu; Hwang, Seongsoo; Lee, Sang Suk; Lee, Kichoon

    2017-01-01

    Identification of tissue- and stage-specific gene promoters is valuable for delineating the functional roles of specific genes in genetically engineered animals. Here, through the comparison of gene expression in different tissues by analysis of a microarray database, the intestinal specificity of mucin 2 (MUC2) expression was identified in mice and humans, and further confirmed in chickens by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analysis. An analysis of cis-acting elements in avian MUC2 gene promoters revealed conservation of binding sites, within a 2.9 kb proximal promoter region, for transcription factors such as caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4A), and transcription factor 4 (TCF4) that are important for maintaining intestinal homeostasis and functional integrity. By generating transgenic quail, we demonstrated that the 2.9 kb chicken MUC2 promoter could drive green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter expression exclusively in the small intestine, large intestine, and ceca. Fluorescence image analysis further revealed GFP expression in intestine epithelial cells. The GFP expression was barely detectable in the embryonic intestine, but increased during post-hatch development. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of the reporter gene confirmed that the 2.9 kb MUC2 promoter could retain the regulatory element to drive expression of target genes in intestinal tissues after hatching. This new transgene expression system, using the MUC2 promoter, will provide a new method of overexpressing target genes to study gene function in the avian intestine. PMID:28106824

  11. Production of germline transgenic pigs co-expressing double fluorescent proteins by lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Yu; Zhu, Zhi-Wei; Yu, Fu-Xian; Huang, Jing; Hu, Xiao-Rui; Pan, Jian-Zhi

    2016-11-01

    Genomic integration of transgene by lentiviral vector has been proved an efficient method to produce single-transgenic animals. But it failed to create multi-gene transgenic offspring. Here, we have exploited lentivirus to generate the double-transgenic piglets through the female germline. The recombinant lentivirus containing fluorescent proteins genes (DsRed1 and Venus) were injected into the perivitelline space of 2-cell stage in vitro porcine embryos. Compared to control group, there was no significantly decreased in the proportion of blastocysts, and the two fluorescent protein genes were co-expressed in almost all the injected embryos. Total of 32 injected in vitro embryos were transferred to 2 recipients. One recipient gave birth of three live offspring, and one female piglet was identified as genomic transgene integration by PCR analysis. Subsequently, the female transgenic founder was mated naturally with a wild-type boar and gave birth of two litters of total 23 F(1) generation piglets, among which Venus and DsRed1 genes were detected in 11 piglets and 10 kinds of organs by PCR and RT-PCR respectively. The co-expression of two fluorescent proteins was visible in four different frozen tissue sections from the RT-PCR positive piglets, and 3 to 5 copies of the transgenes were detected to be integrated into the second generation genome by southern blotting analysis. The transgenes were heritable and stably integrated in the F(1) generation. The results indicated for the first time that lentiviral vector combined with natural mating has the potential to become a simple and practical technology to create germline double-transgenic livestock or biomedical animals.

  12. Transgenic Expression of the Anti-parasitic Factor TEP1 in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Saenger, Mélanie; Soichot, Julien; Scholze, Heidi; Boch, Jens; Blandin, Stéphanie A.; Marois, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes genetically engineered to be resistant to Plasmodium parasites represent a promising novel approach in the fight against malaria. The insect immune system itself is a source of anti-parasitic genes potentially exploitable for transgenic designs. The Anopheles gambiae thioester containing protein 1 (TEP1) is a potent anti-parasitic protein. TEP1 is secreted and circulates in the mosquito hemolymph, where its activated cleaved form binds and eliminates malaria parasites. Here we investigated whether TEP1 can be used to create malaria resistant mosquitoes. Using a GFP reporter transgene, we determined that the fat body is the main site of TEP1 expression. We generated transgenic mosquitoes that express TEP1r, a potent refractory allele of TEP1, in the fat body and examined the activity of the transgenic protein in wild-type or TEP1 mutant genetic backgrounds. Transgenic TEP1r rescued loss-of-function mutations, but did not increase parasite resistance in the presence of a wild-type susceptible allele. Consistent with previous reports, TEP1 protein expressed from the transgene in the fat body was taken up by hemocytes upon a challenge with injected bacteria. Furthermore, although maturation of transgenic TEP1 into the cleaved form was impaired in one of the TEP1 mutant lines, it was still sufficient to reduce parasite numbers and induce parasite melanization. We also report here the first use of Transcription Activator Like Effectors (TALEs) in Anopheles gambiae to stimulate expression of endogenous TEP1. We found that artificial elevation of TEP1 expression remains moderate in vivo and that enhancement of endogenous TEP1 expression did not result in increased resistance to Plasmodium. Taken together, our results reveal the difficulty of artificially influencing TEP1-mediated Plasmodium resistance, and contribute to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying mosquito resistance to Plasmodium parasites. PMID:28095489

  13. Reduction of malaria transmission by transgenic mosquitoes expressing an antisporozoite antibody in their salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Sumitani, M; Kasashima, K; Yamamoto, D S; Yagi, K; Yuda, M; Matsuoka, H; Yoshida, S

    2013-02-01

    We have previously developed a robust salivary gland-specific expression system in transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. To establish transgenic mosquito lines refractory to Plasmodium falciparum using this system, we generated a transgenic mosquito harbouring the gene encoding an anti-P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) single-chain antibody (scFv) fused to DsRed in a secretory form (mDsRed-2A10 scFv). Fluorescence microscopy showed that the mDsRed-2A10 scFv was localized in the secretory cavities and ducts of the salivary glands in a secreted form. To evaluate P. falciparum transmission-blocking in a rodent malaria model, a transgenic Plasmodium berghei line expressing PfCSP in place of PbCSP (PfCSP/Pb) was constructed. The PfCSP/Pb parasites were able to bind to the mDsRed-2A10 scFv in the salivary glands of the transgenic mosquitoes. Importantly, the infectivity of the transgenic mosquitoes to mice was strongly impaired, indicating that the parasites had been inactivated. These results suggest that salivary gland-specific expression of antisporozoite molecules could be a promising strategy for blocking malaria transmission to humans.

  14. The formation of brown adipose tissue induced by transgenic over-expression of PPARγ2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Yang, Jinzeng; Huang, Jinliang; Li, Ting; Xu, Dequan; Zuo, Bo; Hou, Liming; Wu, Wangjun; Zhang, Lin; Xia, Xiaoliang; Ma, Zhiyuan; Ren, Zhuqing; Xiong, Yuanzhu

    2014-04-18

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized to dissipate energy as heat, therefore reducing fat deposition and counteracting obesity. Brown adipocytes arise from myoblastic progenitors during embryonic development by the action of transcription regulator PRDM16 binding to PPARγ, which promotes BAT-like phenotype in white adipose tissue. To investigate the capability of converting white adipose tissue to BAT or browning by PPARγ in vivo, we generated transgenic mice with over-expressed PPARγ2. The transgenic mice showed strong brown fat features in subcutaneous fat in morphology and histology. To provide molecular evidences on browning characteristics of the adipose tissue, we employed quantitative real-time PCR to determine BAT-specific gene expressions. The transgenic mice had remarkably elevated mRNA level of UCP1, Elovl3, PGC1α and Cebpα in subcutaneous fat. Compared with wild-type mice, UCP1 protein levels were increased significantly in transgenic mice. ATP concentration was slightly decreased in the subcutaneous fat of transgenic mice. Western blotting analysis also confirmed that phosphorylated AMPK and ACC proteins were significantly (P<0.01) increased in the transgenic mice. Therefore, this study demonstrated that over-expression of PPARγ2 in skeletal muscle can promote conversion of subcutaneous fat to brown fat formation, which can have beneficial effects on increasing energy metabolisms and combating obesity.

  15. Development of S/MAR minicircles for enhanced and persistent transgene expression in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Argyros, Orestis; Wong, Suet Ping; Fedonidis, Constantinos; Tolmachov, Oleg; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, Steven J; Niceta, Marcello; Coutelle, Charles; Harbottle, Richard P

    2011-05-01

    We have previously described the development of a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) episomal vector system for in vivo application and demonstrated its utility to sustain transgene expression in the mouse liver for at least 6 months following a single administration. Subsequently, we observed that transgene expression is sustained for the lifetime of the animal. The level of expression, however, does drop appreciably over time. We hypothesised that by eliminating the bacterial components in our vectors, we could improve their performance since bacterial sequences have been shown to be responsible for the immunotoxicity of the vector and the silencing of its expression when applied in vivo. We describe here the development of a minimally sized S/MAR vector, which is devoid of extraneous bacterial sequences. This minicircle vector comprises an expression cassette and an S/MAR moiety, providing higher and more sustained transgene expression for several months in the absence of selection, both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to the expression of our original S/MAR plasmid vector, the novel S/MAR minicircle vectors mediate increased transgene expression, which becomes sustained at about twice the levels observed immediately after administration. These promising results demonstrate the utility of minimally sized S/MAR vectors for persistent, atoxic gene expression.

  16. Transgenic labeling of parvalbumin-expressing neurons with tdTomato.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, T; Ting, J T; Monteiro, P; Feng, G

    2016-05-03

    Parvalbumin (PVALB)-expressing fast-spiking interneurons subserve important roles in many brain regions by modulating circuit function and dysfunction of these neurons is strongly implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and autism. To facilitate the study of PVALB neuron function we need to be able to identify PVALB neurons in vivo. We have generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorophore tdTomato under the control of endogenous regulatory elements of the Pvalb gene locus (JAX # 027395). We show that the tdTomato transgene is faithfully expressed relative to endogenous PVALB expression throughout the brain. Furthermore, targeted patch clamp recordings confirm that the labeled populations in neocortex, striatum, and hippocampus are fast-spiking interneurons based on intrinsic properties. This new transgenic mouse line provides a useful tool to study PVALB neuron function in the normal brain as well as in mouse models of psychiatric disease.

  17. A 5' Noncoding Exon Containing Engineered Intron Enhances Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV Vectors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiamiao; Williams, James A; Luke, Jeremy; Zhang, Feijie; Chu, Kirk; Kay, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) expression system in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within a universal 5' UTR noncoding exon. Like minicircle DNA plasmids (devoid of bacterial backbone sequences), MIP plasmids overcome transcriptional silencing of the transgene. However, in addition MIP plasmids increase transgene expression by 2 and often >10 times higher than minicircle vectors in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of the MIP intronic sequences in a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector system. Recombinant AAV vectors containing an intron with a bacterial replication origin and bacterial selectable marker increased transgene expression by 40 to 100 times in vivo when compared with conventional AAV vectors. Therefore, inclusion of this noncoding exon/intron sequence upstream of the coding region can substantially enhance AAV-mediated gene expression in vivo.

  18. Hydrodynamic Tail Vein Injection as a Simple Tool for Yielding Extended Transgene Expression in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Takuma; Ukawa, Masami; Kanazawa, Yuki; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodynamic tail vein injection was considered an in vivo transfection method that yields a higher level of gene expression mainly in the liver. This method has been applied to cancer gene therapy targeting both hepatic and non-hepatic cancers. However, intratumor transgene expression in non-hepatic tumors has not been well studied. In this study, we showed an extended transgene expression of β-galactosidase (LacZ), a nonsecretory protein, in a subcutaneously implanted murine solid tumor following the hydrodynamic injection of plasmid DNA (LacZ pDNA). Our result may indicate that the hydrodynamic injection method is a powerful tool that can be used to gain transgene expression not only in the liver but also in solid tumors.

  19. Expression and Chloroplast Targeting of Cholesterol Oxidase in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, David R.; Grebenok, Robert J.; Ohnmeiss, Thomas E.; Greenplate, John T.; Purcell, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase represents a novel type of insecticidal protein with potent activity against the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman). We transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with the cholesterol oxidase choM gene and expressed cytosolic and chloroplast-targeted versions of the ChoM protein. Transgenic leaf tissues expressing cholesterol oxidase exerted insecticidal activity against boll weevil larvae. Our results indicate that cholesterol oxidase can metabolize phytosterols in vivo when produced cytosolically or when targeted to chloroplasts. The transgenic plants exhibiting cytosolic expression accumulated low levels of saturated sterols known as stanols, and displayed severe developmental aberrations. In contrast, the transgenic plants expressing chloroplast-targeted cholesterol oxidase maintained a greater accumulation of stanols, and appeared phenotypically and developmentally normal. These results are discussed within the context of plant sterol distribution and metabolism. PMID:11457962

  20. Expressing the sweet potato orange gene in transgenic potato improves drought tolerance and marketable tuber production.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Soo; Han, Eun-Heui; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Cho, Ji-Hong; Im, Ju-Seong; Hong, Su-Young; Sohn, Hwang-Bae; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is generally considered to be sensitive to drought stress. Even short periods of water shortage can result in reduced tuber production and quality. We previously reported that transgenic potato plants expressing the sweet potato orange gene (IbOr) under the control of the stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SOR plants) showed increased tolerance to methyl viologen-mediated oxidative stress and high salinity, along with increased carotenoid contents. In this study, in an effort to improve the productivity and environmental stress tolerance of potato, we subjected transgenic potato plants expressing IbOr to water-deficient conditions in the greenhouse. The SOR plants exhibited increased tolerance to drought stress under greenhouse conditions. IbOr expression was associated with slightly negative phenotypes, including reduced tuber production. Controlling IbOr expression imparted the same degree of drought tolerance while ameliorating these negative phenotypic effects, leading to levels of tuber production similar to or better than those of wild-type plants under drought stress conditions. In particular, under drought stress, drought tolerance and the production of marketable tubers (over 80g) were improved in transgenic plants compared with non-transgenic plants. These results suggest that expressing the IbOr transgene can lead to significant gains in drought tolerance and tuber production in potato, thereby improving these agronomically important traits.

  1. Generation of transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Cui, Cheng-du; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Red fluorescent protein and its variants enable researchers to study gene expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions in vitro in real-time. Fluorophores with higher wavelengths are usually preferred since they efficiently penetrate tissues and produce less toxic emissions. A recently developed fluorescent protein marker, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), is particularly useful because of its rapid maturation and minimal interference with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-derived markers. We generated a pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR construct and evaluated the ability of mRFP1 to function as a fluorescent marker in transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs. Transgenic embryos were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of nuclei isolated from ear fibroblasts expressing mRFP1. Embryos generated by SCNT developed into blastocysts in vitro (11.65%; 31/266). Thereafter, a total of 685 transgenic embryos were transferred into the oviducts of three recipients, two of which became pregnant. Of these, one recipient had six aborted fetuses, whereas the other recipient gave birth to four offspring. All offspring expressed the pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR gene as shown by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The transgenic pigs expressed mRFP1 in all organs and tissues at high levels. These results demonstrate that Wuzhishan miniature pigs can express mRFP1. To conclude, this transgenic animal represents an excellent model with widespread applications in medicine and agriculture.

  2. Transgenic potato plants expressing cry3A gene confer resistance to Colorado potato beetle.

    PubMed

    Mi, Xiaoxiao; Ji, Xiangzhuo; Yang, Jiangwei; Liang, Lina; Si, Huaijun; Wu, Jiahe; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Di

    2015-07-01

    The Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, CPB) is a fatal pest, which is a quarantine pest in China. The CPB has now invaded the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region and is constantly spreading eastward in China. In this study, we developed transgenic potato plants expressing cry3A gene. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the cry3A gene expressed in leaves, stems and roots of the transgenic plants under the control of CaMV 35S promoter, while they expressed only in leaves and stems under the control of potato leaf and stem-specific promoter ST-LS1. The mortality of the larvae was higher (28% and 36%) on the transgenic plant line 35S1 on the 3rd and 4th days, and on ST3 (48%) on the 5th day after inoculation with instar larvae. Insect biomass accumulation on the foliage of the transgenic plant lines 35S1, 35S2 and ST3 was significantly lower (0.42%, 0.43% and 0.42%). Foliage consumption was lowest on transgenic lines 35S8 and ST2 among all plant foliage (7.47 mg/larvae/day and 12.46 mg/larvae/day). The different transgenic plant foliages had varied inhibition to larval growth. The survivors on the transgenic lines obviously were smaller than their original size and extremely weak. The transgenic potato plants with CPB resistance could be used to develop germplasms or varieties for controlling CPB damage and halting its spread in China.

  3. Regulatory region in choline acetyltransferase gene directs developmental and tissue-specific expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnerberg, P; Lendahl, U; Funakoshi, H; Arhlund-Richter, L; Persson, H; Ibáñez, C F

    1995-01-01

    Acetylcholine, one of the main neurotransmitters in the nervous system, is synthesized by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT; acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). The molecular mechanisms controlling the establishment, maintenance, and plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in vivo are largely unknown. A previous report showed that a 3800-bp, but not a 1450-bp, 5' flanking segment from the rat ChAT gene promoter directed cell type-specific expression of a reporter gene in cholinergic cells in vitro. Now we have characterized a distal regulatory region of the ChAT gene that confers cholinergic specificity on a heterologous downstream promoter in a cholinergic cell line and in transgenic mice. A 2342-bp segment from the 5' flanking region of the ChAT gene behaved as an enhancer in cholinergic cells but as a repressor in noncholinergic cells in an orientation-independent manner. Combined with a heterologous basal promoter, this fragment targeted transgene expression to several cholinergic regions of the central nervous system of transgenic mice, including basal forebrain, cortex, pons, and spinal cord. In eight independent transgenic lines, the pattern of transgene expression paralleled qualitatively and quantitatively that displayed by endogenous ChAT mRNA in various regions of the rat central nervous system. In the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord, 85-90% of the transgene expression was targeted to the ventral part of the cord, where cholinergic alpha-motor neurons are located. Transgene expression in the spinal cord was developmentally regulated and responded to nerve injury in a similar way as the endogenous ChAT gene, indicating that the 2342-bp regulatory sequence contains elements controlling the plasticity of the cholinergic phenotype in developing and injured neurons. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7732028

  4. Relationship between expression levels and atherogenesis in scavenger receptor Class B, Type I Transgenics

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yukihiko; Gong, Elaine; Royer, Lori; Cooper, Philip N.; Francone, Omar L; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-03-15

    Both in vitro and in vivo studies of SR-BI have implicated it as a likely participant in the metabolism of HDL cholesterol. To investigate SR-BI's effect on atherogenesis we examined two lines of SR-BI transgenic mice with high (10-fold increases) and low (2-fold increases) in SR-BI expression in an inbred mouse background hemizygous for a human apo B transgene. Unlike non-HDL cholesterol levels which minimally differed in the various groups of animals, HDL cholesterol levels were inversely related to SR-BI expression. Mice with the low expression SR-BI transgene had a 50% reduction in HDL cholesterol while the high expression SR-BI transgene was associated with two-fold decreases in HDL as well as dramatic alterations in HDL composition and size including the near absence of a-migrating particles as determined by 2-dimensional electrophoresis. The low expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had more than a two-fold decrease in the development of diet induced fatty streak lesions compared t o the apo B transgenics (4448{+-}1908 {mu}m2/aorta to 10133 {+-} 4035 {mu}m2/aorta; p<0.001), while the high expression SR-BI/apo B transgenics had an atherogenic response similar to that of the apo B transgenics (14692{+-}7238 {mu}m2/aorta) but three-fold greater than the low SR-BI/apo B mice (p<0.001). The prominent anti-atherogenic effect of moderate SR-BI expression provides in vivo support for the hypothesis that HDL functions to inhibit atherogenesis through its interactions with SR-BI in facilitating reverse cholesterol transport. The failure of the high SR-BI/apo B transgenics to have similar or even greater reductions in atherogenesis suggests that the changes resulting from extremely high SR-BI expression including dramatic changes in lipoproteins may have both pro- and anti-atherogenic consequences illustrating the complexity of the relationship between SR-BI and atherogenesis.

  5. Transgenic plant virus resistance mediated by untranslatable sense RNAs: expression, regulation, and fate of nonessential RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H A; Swaney, S L; Parks, T D; Wernsman, E A; Dougherty, W G

    1994-01-01

    Haploid leaf tissue of tobacco cultivars K326 and K149 was transformed with several transgenes containing cDNA of the potato virus Y (PVY) coat protein (CP) open reading frame (ORF). The various transgenes containing the PVY CP ORF sequence produced (1) the expected mRNA and CP product, (2) an mRNA rendered untranslatable by introduction of a stop codon immediately after the initiation codon, or (3) an antisense RNA that was untranslatable as a result of the incorrect orientation of the PVY CP ORF behind the transcriptional promoter. Homozygous doubled haploid (DH) (diploid) plants were generated, and selfed progeny from these plants were examined. Resistance was virus specific, functioning only against PVY. An inverse correlation between transgene-derived PVY transcript steady state levels and resistance was generally noted with lines expressing the untranslatable sense version of the PVY CP ORF. A collection of DH lines, derived from a single transformation event of a common haploid plant and isogenic for the PVY transgenes expressing untranslatable sense RNA, displayed different levels of PVY resistance. Lines with actively transcribed, methylated transgene sequences had low steady state levels of transgene transcript and a virus-resistant phenotype. These results are discussed within the context of sense suppression in plants. PMID:7994177

  6. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  7. Impaired growth of pancreatic exocrine cells in transgenic mice expressing human activin {beta}E subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu . E-mail: ohashim@vmas.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Ushiro, Yuuki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Yoshioka, Kazuki; Mutoh, Ken-Ichiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa

    2006-03-10

    Activins, TGF-{beta} superfamily members, have multiple functions in a variety of cells and tissues. Recently, additional activin {beta} subunit genes, {beta}C and {beta}E, have been identified. To explore the role of activin E, we created transgenic mice overexpressing human activin {beta}E subunit. There were pronounced differences in the pancreata of the transgenic animals as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Pancreatic weight, expressed relative to total body weight, was significantly reduced. Histologically, adipose replacement of acini in the exocrine pancreas was observed. There was a significant decrease in the number of PCNA-positive cells in the acinar cells, indicating reduced proliferation in the exocrine pancreas of the transgenic mice. However, quantitative pancreatic morphometry showed that the total number and mass of the islets of the transgenic mice were comparable with those of the nontransgenic control mice. Our findings suggest a role for activin E in regulating the proliferation of pancreatic exocrine cells.

  8. The TGV transgenic vectors for single-copy gene expression from the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gumbiner-Russo, L M; Lombardo, M J; Ponder, R G; Rosenberg, S M

    2001-07-25

    Plasmid-based cloning and expression of genes in Escherichia coli can have several problems: plasmid destabilization; toxicity of gene products; inability to achieve complete repression of gene expression; non-physiological overexpression of the cloned gene; titration of regulatory proteins; and the requirement for antibiotic selection. We describe a simple system for cloning and expression of genes in single copy in the E. coli chromosome, using a non-antibiotic selection for transgene insertion. The transgene is inserted into a vector containing homology to the chromosomal region flanking the attachment site for phage lambda. This vector is then linearized and introduced into a recombination-proficient E. coli strain carrying a temperature-sensitive lambda prophage. Selection for replacement of the prophage with the transgene is performed at high temperature. Once in the chromosome, transgenes can be moved into other lysogenic E. coli strains using standard phage-mediated transduction techniques, selecting against a resident prophage. Additional vector constructs provide an arabinose-inducible promoter (P(BAD)), P(BAD) plus a translation-initiation sequence, and optional chloramphenicol-, tetracycline-, or kanamycin-resistance cassettes. These Transgenic E. coli Vectors (TGV) allow drug-free, single-copy expression of genes from the E. coli chromosome, and are useful for genetic studies of gene function.

  9. LiPS-A3S, a human genomic site for robust expression of inserted transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Kotini, Andriana G; Sadelain, Michel; Papapetrou, Eirini P

    2016-01-01

    Transgenesis of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can enable and empower a variety of studies in stem cell research, including lineage tracing and functional genetics studies. While in recent years much progress has been made in the development of tools for gene targeting, little attention has been given to the identification of sites in the human genome where transgenes can be inserted and reliably expressed. In order to find human genomic sites capable of supporting long-term and high-level transgene expression in hPSCs, we performed a lentiviral screen in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We isolated 40 iPSC clones each harboring a single vector copy and characterized the level of transgene expression afforded by each unique integration site. We selected one clone, LiPS-A3 with an integration site in chromosome 15 maintaining robust expression without silencing and demonstrate that different transgenes can be inserted therein rapidly and efficiently through recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). The LiPS-A3 line can greatly facilitate the insertion of reporter and other genes in hPSCs. Targeting transgenes in the LiPS-A3S genomic locus can find broad applications in stem cell research and possibly cell and gene therapy. PMID:27898090

  10. Iron Biofortification and Homeostasis in Transgenic Cassava Roots Expressing the Algal Iron Assimilatory Gene, FEA1.

    PubMed

    Ihemere, Uzoma E; Narayanan, Narayanan N; Sayre, Richard T

    2012-01-01

    We have engineered the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) to express the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii iron assimilatory gene, FEA1, in its storage roots with the objective of enhancing the root nutritional qualities. Iron levels in mature cassava storage roots were increased from 10 to 36 ppm in the highest iron accumulating transgenic lines. These iron levels are sufficient to meet the minimum daily requirement for iron in a 500 g meal. Significantly, the expression of the FEA1 gene in storage roots did not alter iron levels in leaves. Transgenic plants also had normal levels of zinc in leaves and roots consistent with the specific uptake of ferrous iron mediated by the FEA1 protein. Relative to wild-type plants, fibrous roots of FEA1 expressing plants had reduced Fe (III) chelate reductase activity consistent with the more efficient uptake of iron in the transgenic plants. We also show that multiple cassava genes involved in iron homeostasis have altered tissue-specific patterns of expression in leaves, stems, and roots of transgenic plants consistent with increased iron sink strength in transgenic roots. These results are discussed in terms of strategies for the iron biofortification of plants.

  11. [Selection of microRNA for providing tumor specificity of transgene expression in cancer gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Shepelev, M V; Kalinichenko, S V; Vikhreva, P N; Korobko, I V

    2016-01-01

    The use of tumor-specific microRNA loss to inhibit transgene expression in normal cells is considered as a way to increase the specificity of gene-therapeutic antitumor drugs. This method assumes the introduction of recognition sites of suppressed in tumor cells microRNAs into transgene transcipt. In the presented work, the efficiency of the strategy for providing the tumor specificity of transgene expression depending on parameters of microRNA expression in normal and tumor cells was studied. It was established that microRNA suppression in tumor cells and the determination of absolute microRNA levels in tumor and normal cells are not sufficient for the adequate estimation of the possibility of specific microRNA usage in the scheme of cancer gene therapy, and particularly do not allow to exclude a significant decrease in the efficiency of the gene-therapeutic drug upon the introduction of microRNA recognition sites. These parameters are only suitable for the preliminary selection of microRNA. The effect of introduction of microRNA recognition sites on transgene expression level in target tumor cells should be validated experimentally. It is suggested that this should be done directly in the cancer gene therapy scheme with monitoring of the therapeutic transgene activity.

  12. Factors that influence transgene expression and cell viability on DNA-PEI-seeded collagen films.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jordan M; Roth, Charles M; Dunn, Michael G

    2005-01-01

    Gene delivery from tissue-engineering devices has the potential to improve healing, but better regulation of the level and duration of gene expression is needed. We hypothesized that transgene expression could be controlled by varying the fabrication and soaking parameters used in making collagen- based gene delivery scaffolds. Collagen films were made from acid-insoluble type I bovine dermal collagen and seeded with plasmid DNA encoding firefly luciferase, complexed with polyethylenimine. By varying the thickness of the films, the volume of the DNA soak solution, and the pH of the DNA soak solution, and by cross-linking the films, we identified variable combinations that produce significantly different levels of cell number and transgene expression in L-929 cells in vitro. Increasing film thickness or soak volume increased overall reporter gene expression. Decreasing film thickness or soak volume decreased cell number but did not significantly change reporter gene expression per cell. Cross-linking by ultraviolet irradiation (before adding the DNA) significantly decreased transgene expression, probably because of decreased swelling of the collagen film. These results suggest that collagen-based biomaterials may be designed and fabricated to induce, in a controlled fashion, various levels of cellularity and transgene expression.

  13. Mifepristone-inducible transgene expression in neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hjelm, BE; Grunseich, C; Gowing, G; Avalos, P; Tian, J; Shelley, BC; Mooney, M; Narwani, K; Shi, Y; Svendsen, CN; Wolfe, JH; Fischbeck, KH; Pierson, TM

    2016-01-01

    Numerous gene and cell therapy strategies are being developed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Many of these strategies use constitutive expression of therapeutic transgenic proteins, and although functional in animal models of disease, this method is less likely to provide adequate flexibility for delivering therapy to humans. Ligand-inducible gene expression systems may be more appropriate for these conditions, especially within the central nervous system (CNS). Mifepristone’s ability to cross the blood–brain barrier makes it an especially attractive ligand for this purpose. We describe the production of a mifepristone-inducible vector system for regulated expression of transgenes within the CNS. Our inducible system used a lentivirus-based vector platform for the ex vivo production of mifepristone-inducible murine neural progenitor cells that express our transgenes of interest. These cells were processed through a series of selection steps to ensure that the cells exhibited appropriate transgene expression in a dose-dependent and temporally controlled manner with minimal background activity. Inducible cells were then transplanted into the brains of rodents, where they exhibited appropriate mifepristone-inducible expression. These studies detail a strategy for regulated expression in the CNS for use in the development of safe and efficient gene therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:26863047

  14. Mifepristone-inducible transgene expression in neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, B E; Grunseich, C; Gowing, G; Avalos, P; Tian, J; Shelley, B C; Mooney, M; Narwani, K; Shi, Y; Svendsen, C N; Wolfe, J H; Fischbeck, K H; Pierson, T M

    2016-05-01

    Numerous gene and cell therapy strategies are being developed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Many of these strategies use constitutive expression of therapeutic transgenic proteins, and although functional in animal models of disease, this method is less likely to provide adequate flexibility for delivering therapy to humans. Ligand-inducible gene expression systems may be more appropriate for these conditions, especially within the central nervous system (CNS). Mifepristone's ability to cross the blood-brain barrier makes it an especially attractive ligand for this purpose. We describe the production of a mifepristone-inducible vector system for regulated expression of transgenes within the CNS. Our inducible system used a lentivirus-based vector platform for the ex vivo production of mifepristone-inducible murine neural progenitor cells that express our transgenes of interest. These cells were processed through a series of selection steps to ensure that the cells exhibited appropriate transgene expression in a dose-dependent and temporally controlled manner with minimal background activity. Inducible cells were then transplanted into the brains of rodents, where they exhibited appropriate mifepristone-inducible expression. These studies detail a strategy for regulated expression in the CNS for use in the development of safe and efficient gene therapy for neurological disorders.

  15. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP) in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed without a fusion partner. Immunoblot analysis showed that ubiquitin was processed from the final protein product, and ubiquitination was up-regulated in all transgenic plants analyzed. Driven by CaMV 35S promoter and phaseolin signal peptide, hG-CSF was observed to be secreted into apoplast in leaves but deposited in protein storage vacuole (PSV) in seeds, indicating that targeting of the hG-CSF was tissue-dependent in transgenic tobacco. Bioactivity assay showed that hG-CSF expressed in both seeds and leaves was bioactive to support the proliferation of NFS-60 cells. Conclusions In this study, the expression of bioactive hG-CSF in transgenic plants was improved through ubiquitin fusion strategy, demonstrating that protein expression can be enhanced in both plant leaves and seeds through fusion with ubiquitin and providing a typical case of tissue-dependent expression of recombinant protein in transgenic plants. PMID:21985646

  16. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing yeast cytosine deaminase: relationship between viral replication, transgene expression, prodrug bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Kuroda, T; Fuchs, B C; He, X; Supko, J G; Schmitt, A; McGinn, C M; Lanuti, M; Tanabe, K K

    2012-03-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) is a well-characterized prodrug/enzyme system that converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and has been combined with oncolytic viruses. However, in vivo studies of the interactions between 5-FC bioactivation and viral replication have not been previously reported, nor have the kinetics of transgene expression and the pharmacokinetics of 5-FC and 5-FU. We constructed a replication-conditional Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) expressing yCD and examined cytotoxicity when 5-FC was initiated at different times after viral infection, and observed that earlier 5-FC administration led to greater cytotoxicity than later 5-FC administration in vitro and in vivo. In animal models, 12 days of 5-FC administration was superior to 6 days, but dosing beyond 12 days did not further enhance efficacy. Consistent with the dosing-schedule results, both viral genomic DNA copy number and viral titers were observed to peak on Day 3 after viral injection and gradually decrease thereafter. The virus is replication-conditional and was detected in tumors for as long as 2 weeks after viral injection. The maximum relative extent of yCD conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in tumors was observed on Day 6 after viral injection and it decreased progressively thereafter. The observation that 5-FU generation within tumors did not lead to appreciable levels of systemic 5-FU (<10 ng ml⁻¹) is important and has not been previously reported. The approaches used in these studies of the relationship between the viral replication kinetics, transgene expression, prodrug administration and anti-tumor efficacy are useful in the design of clinical trials of armed, oncolytic viruses.

  17. Constitutive and salt-inducible expression of SlBADH gene in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Micro-Tom) enhances salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-yu; Lai, Lu-di; Tong, Shao-ming; Li, Qiu-li

    2013-03-08

    To improve the stress tolerance of crops, many genes, including transcription factors, have been expressed in transgenic plants using either constitutive or stress-inducible promoters. However, transgenic plants that show strong constitutive expression of transcription factors often suffer from many undesirable phenotypes, such as stunted growth and reduced yield. In the present study, the betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) gene, cloned from Suaeda liaotungensis and, controlled by the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter or stress-inducible promoter of BADH (P5: -300 to +62 bp), was transformed into tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The transformants with single copy of SlBADH were determined by real time PCR. Expression of SlBADH in the P5:BADH transgenic plants exhibited salt induced and was higher than that in CaMV35S:BADH under salt stress. The SlBADH enhanced salt tolerance of P5:BADH and CaMV35S:BADH transformants. And SlBADH in P5:BADH plants did not affect the growth of transformants. Consequently, we conclude that the P5 promoter can drive increased expression of SlBADH in transgenic tomato under salt stress and increase salt tolerance without affecting plant growth.

  18. Analysis of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) harboring a maize (Zea mays L.) gene for plastid EF-Tu: segregation pattern, expression and effects of the transgene.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianming; Ristic, Zoran

    2010-06-01

    We previously reported that transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) carrying a maize (Zea mays L.) gene (Zmeftu1) for chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, displays reduced thermal aggregation of leaf proteins, reduced injury to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoids), and enhanced rate of CO(2) fixation following exposure to heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C) [Fu et al. in Plant Mol Biol 68:277-288, 2008]. In the current study, we investigated the segregation pattern and expression of the transgene Zmeftu1 and determined the grain yield of transgenic plants after exposure to a brief heat stress (18 h at 45 degrees C). We also assessed thermal aggregation of soluble leaf proteins in transgenic plants, testing the hypothesis that increased levels of EF-Tu will lead to a non-specific protection of leaf proteins against thermal aggregation. The transgenic wheat displayed a single-gene pattern of segregation of Zmeftu1. Zmeftu1 was expressed, and the transgenic plants synthesized and accumulated three anti-EF-Tu cross-reacting polypeptides of similar molecular mass but different pI, suggesting the possibility of posttranslational modification of this protein. The transgenic plants also showed better grain yield after exposure to heat stress compared with their non-transgenic counterparts. Soluble leaf proteins of various molecular masses displayed lower thermal aggregation in transgenic than in non-transgenic wheat. The results suggest that overexpression of chloroplast EF-Tu can be beneficial to wheat tolerance to heat stress. Moreover, the results also support the hypothesis that EF-Tu contributes to heat tolerance by acting as a molecular chaperone and protecting heat-labile proteins from thermal aggregation in a non-specific manner.

  19. Neuroendocrine function in adult female transgenic mice expressing the human growth hormone gene.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, V; Bartke, A; Wagner, T E

    1992-04-01

    Adult female transgenic mice expressing the human GH (hGH) gene with mouse metallothionein-I promoter are sterile. To evaluate the hypothalamic-pituitary function in these animals, adult female transgenic mice and nontransgenic normal littermates were ovariectomized. On days 7 and 8 after ovariectomy, mice were injected with either oil or primed with 0.5 micrograms estradiol benzoate (EB) in oil, 24 h later treated with 10 micrograms EB/100 g body wt and a day later bled for measurements of FSH, LH, and PRL levels. Plasma gonadotropin and PRL levels were also measured in ovary-intact transgenic and normal siblings at estrus. Additional ovariectomized EB-treated transgenic mice and normal siblings were injected with either saline or GnRH in saline (1 ng/g body wt) and were bled 15 min later for determination of circulating hormone levels. At estrus, in transgenic mice, circulating FSH and PRL levels were significantly lower (FSH:P less than 0.001; PRL:P less than 0.025), but plasma LH concentrations were higher (P less than 0.001) than those in nontransgenic mice. As expected, ovariectomy significantly increased (P less than 0.001) circulating FSH and LH levels in both groups of mice relative to ovary-intact animals, but the increase in plasma LH levels was attenuated in transgenic mice. The suppressive effect of estrogen on circulating FSH and LH levels were similar in transgenic and nontransgenic mice. Treatment with GnRH significantly increased plasma FSH and LH levels in both transgenic and normal mice. However, the plasma FSH and LH responses to GnRH administration were significantly reduced (P less than 0.001) in transgenic mice. The results of these studies indicate that adult female transgenic mice expressing the hGH gene are hypoprolactinemic. Yet due to PRL-like activity of hGH, the gonadotropin secretion is altered. Thus, endogenously secreted hGH modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary function of adult female transgenic mice bearing the hGH gene.

  20. Golden bananas in the field: elevated fruit pro-vitamin A from the expression of a single banana transgene.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jean-Yves; Khanna, Harjeet; Kleidon, Jennifer; Hoang, Phuong; Geijskes, Jason; Daniells, Jeff; Zaplin, Ella; Rosenberg, Yvonne; James, Anthony; Mlalazi, Bulukani; Deo, Pradeep; Arinaitwe, Geofrey; Namanya, Priver; Becker, Douglas; Tindamanyire, James; Tushemereirwe, Wilberforce; Harding, Robert; Dale, James

    2017-04-01

    Vitamin A deficiency remains one of the world's major public health problems despite food fortification and supplements strategies. Biofortification of staple crops with enhanced levels of pro-vitamin A (PVA) offers a sustainable alternative strategy to both food fortification and supplementation. As a proof of concept, PVA-biofortified transgenic Cavendish bananas were generated and field trialed in Australia with the aim of achieving a target level of 20 μg/g of dry weight (dw) β-carotene equivalent (β-CE) in the fruit. Expression of a Fe'i banana-derived phytoene synthase 2a (MtPsy2a) gene resulted in the generation of lines with PVA levels exceeding the target level with one line reaching 55 μg/g dw β-CE. Expression of the maize phytoene synthase 1 (ZmPsy1) gene, used to develop 'Golden Rice 2', also resulted in increased fruit PVA levels although many lines displayed undesirable phenotypes. Constitutive expression of either transgene with the maize polyubiquitin promoter increased PVA accumulation from the earliest stage of fruit development. In contrast, PVA accumulation was restricted to the late stages of fruit development when either the banana 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase or the expansin 1 promoters were used to drive the same transgenes. Wild-type plants with the longest fruit development time had also the highest fruit PVA concentrations. The results from this study suggest that early activation of the rate-limiting enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway and extended fruit maturation time are essential factors to achieve optimal PVA concentrations in banana fruit.

  1. A fast-evolving human NPAS3 enhancer gained reporter expression in the developing forebrain of transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamm, Gretel B.; López-Leal, Rodrigo; Lorenzo, Juan R.; Franchini, Lucía F.

    2013-01-01

    The developmental brain gene NPAS3 stands out as a hot spot in human evolution because it contains the largest number of human-specific, fast-evolving, conserved, non-coding elements. In this paper we studied 2xHAR142, one of these elements that is located in the fifth intron of NPAS3. Using transgenic mice, we show that the mouse and chimp 2xHAR142 orthologues behave as transcriptional enhancers driving expression of the reporter gene lacZ to a similar NPAS3 expression subdomain in the mouse central nervous system. Interestingly, the human 2xHAR142 orthologue drives lacZ expression to an extended expression pattern in the nervous system. Thus, molecular evolution of 2xHAR142 provides the first documented example of human-specific heterotopy in the forebrain promoted by a transcriptional enhancer and suggests that it may have contributed to assemble the unique properties of the human brain. PMID:24218632

  2. Over-expression of AGPase genes enhances seed weight and starch content in transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Shujuan; Zhao, Yajie; Li, Bei; Zhang, Juren

    2011-02-01

    Cereal crops accumulate starch in the seed endosperm as an energy reserve. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) plays a key role in regulating starch biosynthesis in cereal seeds. The AGPase in the maize endosperm is a heterotetramer of two small subunits, encoded by Brittle2 (Bt2) gene, and two large subunits, encoded by the Shrunken2 (Sh2) gene. The two genes (Bt2, Sh2) from maize were introduced into two elite maize inbred lines, solely and in tandem, and under the control of endosperm-specific promoters for over-expression. PCR, Southern blotting, and real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that the transgenes were integrated into the genome of transgenic plants and were over-expressed in their progeny. The over-expression of either gene enhanced AGPase activity, seed weight and starch content compared with the WT, but the amounts were lower than plants with over-expression of both Bt2 and Sh2. Developing seeds from co-expression transgenic maize plants had higher cytoplasmic AGPase activity: the 100-grain weight increased 15% over the wild type (WT), and the starch content increased to over 74% compared with the WT of 65%. These results indicate that over-expression of the genes in transgenic maize plants could improve kernel traits. This report provides a feasible approach for increasing starch content and seed weight in maize.

  3. Diversity of Reporter Expression Patterns in Transgenic Mouse Lines Targeting Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Molet, Jenny; Gunn, Benjamin G.; Ressler, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic mice, including lines targeting corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF or CRH), have been extensively employed to study stress neurobiology. These powerful tools are poised to revolutionize our understanding of the localization and connectivity of CRH-expressing neurons, and the crucial roles of CRH in normal and pathological conditions. Accurate interpretation of studies using cell type-specific transgenic mice vitally depends on congruence between expression of the endogenous peptide and reporter. If reporter expression does not faithfully reproduce native gene expression, then effects of manipulating unintentionally targeted cells may be misattributed. Here, we studied CRH and reporter expression patterns in 3 adult transgenic mice: Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 (tdTomato mouse), Crfp3.0CreGFP, and Crh-GFP BAC. We employed the CRH antiserum generated by Vale after validating its specificity using CRH-null mice. We focused the analyses on stress-salient regions, including hypothalamus, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and hippocampus. Expression patterns of endogenous CRH were consistent among wild-type and transgenic mice. In tdTomato mice, most CRH-expressing neurons coexpressed the reporter, yet the reporter identified a few non-CRH-expressing pyramidal-like cells in hippocampal CA1 and CA3. In Crfp3.0CreGFP mice, coexpression of CRH and the reporter was found in central amygdala and, less commonly, in other evaluated regions. In Crh-GFP BAC mice, the large majority of neurons expressed either CRH or reporter, with little overlap. These data highlight significant diversity in concordant expression of reporter and endogenous CRH among 3 available transgenic mice. These findings should be instrumental in interpreting important scientific findings emerging from the use of these potent neurobiological tools. PMID:26402844

  4. Production of Transgenic Calves Expressing an shRNA Targeting Myostatin

    PubMed Central

    Tessanne, K; Golding, MC; Long, CR; Peoples, MD; Hannon, G; Westhusin, ME

    2012-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a well-known negative regulator of muscle growth. Animals that possess mutations within this gene display an enhanced muscling phenotype, a desirable agricultural trait. Increased neonatal morbidity is common, however, resulting from complications arising from the birth of offspring with increased fetal muscle mass. The objective of the current research was to generate an attenuated MSTN-null phenotype in a large-animal model using RNA interference to enhance muscle development without the detrimental consequences of an inactivating mutation. To this end, we identified a series of short interfering RNAs that demonstrated effective suppression of MSTN mRNA and protein levels. To produce transgenic offspring capable of stable MSTN suppression in vivo, a recombinant lentiviral vector expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting MSTN for silencing was introduced into bovine fetal fibroblasts. These cells were used as nucleus donors for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Twenty blastocysts were transferred into seven recipient cows resulting in five pregnancies. One transgenic calf developed to term, but died following delivery by Caesarean-section. As an alternative strategy, microinjection of recombinant lentiviral particles into the perivitelline space of in vitro-produced bovine zygotes was utilized to produce 40 transgenic blastocysts that were transferred into 14 recipient cows, resulting in 7 pregnancies. Five transgenic calves were produced, of which three expressed the transgene. This is the first report of transgenic livestock produced by direct injection of a recombinant lentivirus, and expressing transgenes encoding shRNAs targeting an endogenous gene (myostatin) for silencing. PMID:22139943

  5. Herbicide resistance of transgenic rice plants expressing human CYP1A1.

    PubMed

    Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Sakiko; Ohkawa, Hideo; Ohkawa, Yasunobu

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) metabolize herbicides to produce mainly non-phytotoxic metabolites. Although rice plants endogenously express multiple P450 enzymes, transgenic plants expressing other P450 isoforms might show improved herbicide resistance or reduce herbicide residues. Mammalian P450s metabolizing xenobiotics are reported to show a broad and overlapping substrate specificity towards lipophilic foreign chemicals, including herbicides. These P450s are ideal for enhancing xenobiotic metabolism in plants. A human P450, CYP1A1, metabolizes various herbicides with different structures and modes of herbicide action. We introduced human CYP1A1 into rice plants, and the transgenic rice plants showed broad cross-resistance towards various herbicides and metabolized them. The introduced CYP1A1 enhanced the metabolism of chlorotoluron and norflurazon. The herbicides were metabolized more rapidly in the transgenic rice plants than in non-transgenic controls. Transgenic rice plants expressing P450 might be useful for reducing concentrations of various chemicals in the environment.

  6. Microarray Analysis of the Gene Expression Profile and Lipid Metabolism in Fat-1 Transgenic Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Chunling; Ding, Xiangbin; Wei, Zhuying; Guo, Hong; Li, Guangpeng

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) are beneficial for human health. However, humans and mammals are unable to synthesize n-3 PUFAs because they lack the n-3 desaturase gene fat-1 and must therefore obtain this type of fatty acid through their diet. Through the production of fat-1 transgenic animals, it is possible to obtain animal products that are rich in n-3 PUFAs, such as meat and milk. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression profile and the mechanism of lipid metabolism in fat-1 transgenic cattle and to accumulate important basic data that are required to obtain more efficient fat-1 transgenic cattle. Transcriptome profiling of fat-1 transgenic and wild-type cattle identified differentially expressed genes that are involved in 90 biological pathways, eight pathways of which were related to lipid metabolism processes 36 genes of which were related to lipid metabolism. This analysis also identified 11 significantly enriched genes that were involved in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway. These findings were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The information obtained in this study indicated that the introduction of an exogenous fat-1 gene into cattle affects the gene expression profile and the process of lipid metabolism in these animals. These results may provide important insights into how an exogenous fat-1 gene synthesizes n-3 PUFAs in transgenic cattle and other mammals. PMID:26426396

  7. Microarray Analysis of the Gene Expression Profile and Lipid Metabolism in Fat-1 Transgenic Cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinfeng; Bai, Chunling; Ding, Xiangbin; Wei, Zhuying; Guo, Hong; Li, Guangpeng

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) are beneficial for human health. However, humans and mammals are unable to synthesize n-3 PUFAs because they lack the n-3 desaturase gene fat-1 and must therefore obtain this type of fatty acid through their diet. Through the production of fat-1 transgenic animals, it is possible to obtain animal products that are rich in n-3 PUFAs, such as meat and milk. The aim of this study was to analyze the gene expression profile and the mechanism of lipid metabolism in fat-1 transgenic cattle and to accumulate important basic data that are required to obtain more efficient fat-1 transgenic cattle. Transcriptome profiling of fat-1 transgenic and wild-type cattle identified differentially expressed genes that are involved in 90 biological pathways, eight pathways of which were related to lipid metabolism processes 36 genes of which were related to lipid metabolism. This analysis also identified 11 significantly enriched genes that were involved in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway. These findings were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The information obtained in this study indicated that the introduction of an exogenous fat-1 gene into cattle affects the gene expression profile and the process of lipid metabolism in these animals. These results may provide important insights into how an exogenous fat-1 gene synthesizes n-3 PUFAs in transgenic cattle and other mammals.

  8. Transgenic Mice Expressing Yeast CUP1 Exhibit Increased Copper Utilization from Feeds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenliang; Liao, Rongrong; Zhang, Xiangzhe; Wang, Qishan; Pan, Yuchun

    2014-01-01

    Copper is required for structural and catalytic properties of a variety of enzymes participating in many vital biological processes for growth and development. Feeds provide most of the copper as an essential micronutrient consumed by animals, but inorganic copper could not be utilized effectively. In the present study, we aimed to develop transgenic mouse models to test if copper utilization will be increased by providing the animals with an exogenous gene for generation of copper chelatin in saliva. Considering that the S. cerevisiae CUP1 gene encodes a Cys-rich protein that can bind copper as specifically as copper chelatin in yeast, we therefore constructed a transgene plasmid containing the CUP1 gene regulated for specific expression in the salivary glands by a promoter of gene coding pig parotid secretory protein. Transgenic CUP1 was highly expressed in the parotid and submandibular salivary glands and secreted in saliva as a 9-kDa copper-chelating protein. Expression of salivary copper-chelating proteins reduced fecal copper contents by 21.61% and increased body-weight by 12.97%, suggesting that chelating proteins improve the utilization and absorbed efficacy of copper. No negative effects on the health of the transgenic mice were found by blood biochemistry and histology analysis. These results demonstrate that the introduction of the salivary CUP1 transgene into animals offers a possible approach to increase the utilization efficiency of copper and decrease the fecal copper contents. PMID:25265503

  9. Characterization of Bioactive Recombinant Human Lysozyme Expressed in Milk of Cloned Transgenic Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Jianwu; Tang, Bo; Liu, Yufang; Guo, Chengdong; Yang, Penghua; Yu, Tian; Li, Rong; Zhao, Jianmin; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Background There is great potential for using transgenic technology to improve the quality of cow milk and to produce biopharmaceuticals within the mammary gland. Lysozyme, a bactericidal protein that protects human infants from microbial infections, is highly expressed in human milk but is found in only trace amounts in cow milk. Methodology/Principal Findings We have produced 17 healthy cloned cattle expressing recombinant human lysozyme using somatic cell nuclear transfer. In this study, we just focus on four transgenic cattle which were natural lactation. The expression level of the recombinant lysozyme was up to 25.96 mg/L, as measured by radioimmunoassay. Purified recombinant human lysozyme showed the same physicochemical properties, such as molecular mass and bacterial lysis, as its natural counterpart. Moreover, both recombinant and natural lysozyme had similar conditions for reactivity as well as for pH and temperature stability during in vitro simulations. The gross composition of transgenic and non-transgenic milk, including levels of lactose, total protein, total fat, and total solids were not found significant differences. Conclusions/Significance Thus, our study not only describes transgenic cattle whose milk offers the similar nutritional benefits as human milk but also reports techniques that could be further refined for production of active human lysozyme on a large scale. PMID:21436886

  10. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls.

  11. Analysis of imprinted messenger RNA expression in deceased transgenic cloned goats.

    PubMed

    Jia, R X; Zhou, Z R; Zhang, G M; Wang, L Z; Fan, Y X; Wan, Y J; Zhang, Y L; Wang, Z Y; Wang, F

    2016-01-29

    Genomic imprinting is an important epigenetic mechanism that has vital effects on fetal growth and development. We observed the differences in four tissues (heart, spleen, liver, and kidney) from dead transgenic cloned goats using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Eight imprinted genes in the tissues of dead transgenic cloned and normal goats were analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. H&E staining results from the abortion group indicated the lack of obvious morphological changes in heart and spleen tissues, while inflammatory cell infiltration and glomerular nephritis characteristics were observed in liver and kidney tissues, respectively. Compared to the control group, CDKN1C, H19, IGF2R, and SNRPN were significantly (P < 0.05) overexpressed in the heart tissue of the abortion group, while XIST was significantly reduced. In the liver tissues, CDKN1C and DLK1 expression decreased, while GNAS, H19, IGF2R, PEG3, and XIST expression increased significantly. In the spleen tissues, DLK1 expression increased, while GNAS, H19, IGF2R, PEG3, SNRPN, and XIST expression decreased. In the kidney tissues, CDKN1C, DLK1, GNAS, IGF2R, and PEG3 expression increased, while H19 and XIST expression decreased. The overall expression of imprinted genes was abnormal in different tissues of transgenic cloned goats, and the degree of abnormal genomic imprinting was more severe in the abortion group compared to the death and control groups. These results suggest that abnormal expression of imprinted genes may cause developmental defects in transgenic cloned goats. Moreover, abnormal epigenetic modifications may affect the reprogramming of transgenic donor cells.

  12. Elevated production of melatonin in transgenic rice seeds expressing rice tryptophan decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Kim, Young-Soon; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-04-01

    A major goal of plant biotechnology is to improve the nutritional qualities of crop plants through metabolic engineering. Melatonin is a well-known bioactive molecule with an array of health-promoting properties, including potent antioxidant capability. To generate melatonin-rich rice plants, we first independently overexpressed three tryptophan decarboxylase isogenes in the rice genome. Melatonin levels were altered in the transgenic lines through overexpression of TDC1, TDC2, and TDC3; TDC3 transgenic seed (TDC3-1) had melatonin concentrations 31-fold higher than those of wild-type seeds. In TDC3 transgenic seedlings, however, only a doubling of melatonin content occurred over wild-type levels. Thus, a seed-specific accumulation of melatonin appears to occur in TDC3 transgenic lines. In addition to increased melatonin content, TDC3 transgenic lines also had enhanced levels of melatonin intermediates including 5-hydroxytryptophan, tryptamine, serotonin, and N-acetylserotonin. In contrast, expression levels of melatonin biosynthetic mRNA did not increase in TDC3 transgenic lines, indicating that increases in melatonin and its intermediates in these lines are attributable exclusively to overexpression of the TDC3 gene.

  13. Intracerebral transplants of primary muscle cells: a potential 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, S.; Schultz, E.; Wolff, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    After the transplantation of rat primary muscle cells into the caudate or cortex of recipient rats, the muscle cells were able to persist for at least 6 months. Muscle cells transfected with expression plasmids prior to transplantation were able to express reporter genes in the brains for at least 2 months. These results suggest that muscle cells might be a useful 'platform' for transgene expression in the brain.

  14. Genetically stable expression of functional miraculin, a new type of alternative sweetener, in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2007-11-01

    Miraculin is a taste-modifying protein isolated from the red berries of Richadella dulcifica, a shrub native to West Africa. Miraculin by itself is not sweet, but it is able to turn a sour taste into a sweet taste. This unique property has led to increasing interest in this protein. In this article, we report the high-yield production of miraculin in transgenic tomato plants. High and genetically stable expression of miraculin was confirmed by Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant miraculin accumulated to high levels in leaves and fruits, up to 102.5 and 90.7 microg/g fresh weight, respectively. Purified recombinant miraculin expressed in transgenic tomato plants showed strong sweetness-inducing activity, similar to that of native miraculin. These results demonstrate that recombinant miraculin was correctly processed in transgenic tomato plants, and that this production system could be a good alternative to production from the native plant.

  15. Expression of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) gene in transgenic potato plants confers resistance to aphids.

    PubMed

    Mi, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xue; Yan, Haolu; Liang, Lina; Zhou, Xiangyan; Yang, Jiangwei; Si, Huaijun; Zhang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Aphids, the largest group of sap-sucking pests, cause significant yield losses in agricultural crops worldwide every year. The massive use of pesticides to combat this pest causes severe damage to the environment, putting in risk the human health. In this study, transgenic potato plants expressing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) gene were developed using CaMV 35S and ST-LS1 promoters generating six transgenic lines (35S1-35S3 and ST1-ST3 corresponding to the first and second promoter, respectively). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the GNA gene was expressed in leaves, stems and roots of transgenic plants under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, while it was only expressed in leaves and stems under the control of the ST-LS1 promoter. The levels of aphid mortality after 5 days of the inoculation in the assessed transgenic lines ranged from 20 to 53.3%. The range of the aphid population in transgenic plants 15 days after inoculation was between 17.0±1.43 (ST2) and 36.6±0.99 (35S3) aphids per plant, which corresponds to 24.9-53.5% of the aphid population in non-transformed plants. The results of our study suggest that GNA expressed in transgenic potato plants confers a potential tolerance to aphid attack, which appears to be an alternative against the use of pesticides in the future.

  16. Production of transgenic dairy goat expressing human α-lactalbumin by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiujing; Cao, Shaoxian; Wang, Huili; Meng, Chunhua; Li, Jingxin; Jiang, Jin; Qian, Yong; Su, Lei; He, Qiang; Zhang, Qingxiao

    2015-02-01

    Production of human α-lactalbumin (hα-LA) transgenic cloned dairy goats has great potential in improving the nutritional value and perhaps increasing the yield of dairy goat milk. Here, a mammary-specific expression vector 5A, harboring goat β-lactoglobulin (βLG) promoter, the hα-LA gene, neo(r) and EGFP dual markers, was constructed. Then, it was effectively transfected into goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) and the expression of hα-LA was investigated. Both the hα-LA transcript and protein were detected in the transfected GMECs after the induction of hormonal signals. In addition, the 5A vector was introduced into dairy goat fetal fibroblasts (transfection efficiency ≈60-70%) to prepare competent transgenic donor cells. A total of 121 transgenic fibroblast clones were isolated by 96-well cell culture plates and screened with nested-PCR amplification and EGFP fluorescence. After being frozen for 8 months, the transgenic cells still showed high viabilities, verifying their ability as donor cells. Dairy goat cloned embryos were produced from these hα-LA transgenic donor cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and the rates of fusion, cleavage, and the development to blastocyst stages were 81.8, 84.4, and 20.0%, respectively. A total of 726 reconstructed embryos derived from the transgenic cells were transferred to 74 recipients and pregnancy was confirmed at 90 days in 12 goats. Of six female kids born, two carried hα-LA and the hα-LA protein was detected in their milk. This study provides an effective system to prepare SCNT donor cells and transgenic animals for human recombinant proteins.

  17. Expression of jasmonic ethylene responsive factor gene in transgenic poplar tree leads to increased salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiliang; Su, Xiaohua; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Zhang, Xianghua; Huang, Rongfeng

    2009-02-01

    The stress resistance of plants can be enhanced by regulating the expression of multiple downstream genes associated with stress resistance. We used the Agrobacterium method to transfer the tomato jasmonic ethylene responsive factors (JERFs) gene that encodes the ethylene response factor (ERF) like transcription factor to the genome of a hybrid poplar (Populus alba x Populus berolinensis). Eighteen resistant plants were obtained, of which 13 were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse transcriptase PCR and Southern blot analyses as having incorporated the JERFs gene and able to express it at the transcriptional level. Salinity tests were conducted in a greenhouse with 0, 100, 200 and 300 mM NaCl. In the absence of NaCl, the transgenic plants were significantly taller than the control plants, but no statistically significant differences in the concentrations of proline and chlorophyll were observed. With increasing salinity, the extent of damage was significantly less in transgenic plants than that in control plants, and the reductions in height, basal diameter and biomass were less in transgenic plants than those in control plants. At 200 and 300 mM NaCl concentrations, transgenic plants were 128.9% and 98.8% taller, respectively, and had 199.8% and 113.0% more dry biomass, respectively, than control plants. The saline-induced reduction in leaf water content and increase in root/crown ratio were less in transgenic plants than in control plants. Foliar proline concentration increased more in response to salt treatment in transgenic plants than in control plants. Foliar Na(+) concentration was higher in transgenic plants than in control plants. In the coastal area in Panjin of Liaoning where the total soil salt concentration is 0.3%, a salt tolerance trial of transgenic plants indicated that 3-year-old transgenic plants were 14.5% and 33.6% taller than the control plants at two field sites. The transgenic plants at the two field sites were growing

  18. Epidermal Expression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 is Not a Primary Inducer of Cutaneous Inflammation in Transgenic Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ifor R.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    1994-10-01

    Keratinocytes at sites of cutaneous inflammation have increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), a cytokine-inducible adhesion molecule which binds the leukocyte integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. Transgenic mice were prepared in which the expression of mouse ICAM-1 was targeted to basal keratinocytes by using the human K14 keratin promoter. The level of constitutive expression attained in the transgenic mice exceeded the peak level of ICAM-1 expression induced on nontransgenic mouse keratinocytes in vitro by optimal combinations of interferon γ and tumor necrosis factor α or in vivo by proinflammatory stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. In vitro adhesion assays demonstrated that cultured transgenic keratinocytes were superior to normal keratinocytes as a substrate for the LFA-1-dependent binding of mouse T cells, confirming that the transgene-encoded ICAM-1 was expressed in a functional form. However, the high level of constitutive ICAM-1 expression achieved on keratinocytes in vivo in these transgenic mice did not result in additional recruitment of CD45^+ leukocytes into transgenic epidermis, nor did it elicit dermal inflammation. Keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression also did not potentiate contact-hypersensitivity reactions to epicutaneous application of haptens. The absence of a spontaneous phenotype in these transgenic mice was not the result of increased levels of soluble ICAM-1, since serum levels of soluble ICAM-1 were equal in transgenic mice and controls. We conclude that elevated ICAM-1 expression on keratinocytes cannot act independently to influence leukocyte trafficking and elicit cutaneous inflammation.

  19. Fitness aspects of transgenic Aedes fluviatilis mosquitoes expressing a Plasmodium-blocking molecule.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maíra N; Nogueira, Paula M; Dias, Fernando B S; Valle, Denise; Moreira, Luciano A

    2010-12-01

    Vector-born diseases cause millions of deaths every year globally. Alternatives for the control of diseases such as malaria and dengue fever are urgently needed and the use of transgenic mosquitoes that block parasite/virus is a sound strategy to be used within control programs. However, prior to use transgenic mosquitoes as control tools, it is important to study their fitness since different biological aspects might influence their ability to disseminate and compete with wild populations. We previously reported the construction of four transgenic Aedes fluviatilis mosquito lines expressing a Plasmodium- blocking molecule (mutated bee venom phospholipase A(2)-mPLA(2)). Presently we studied two aspects of their fitness: body size, that has been used as a fitness-related status, and the expression of major enzymes classes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, including insecticides. Body size analysis (recorded by geometric wing morphometrics) indicated that both male and female mosquitoes were larger than the non-transgenic counterparts, suggesting that this characteristic might have an impact on their overall fitness. By contrast, no significant difference in the activity of enzymes related to metabolic insecticide resistance was detected in transgenic mosquitoes. The implication on fitness advantage of these features, towards the implementation of this strategy, is further discussed.

  20. A Histone2BCerulean BAC transgene identifies differential expression of Phox2b in migrating enteric neural crest derivatives and enteric glia

    PubMed Central

    Corpening, Jennifer C.; Cantrell, V. Ashley; Deal, Karen K.; Southard-Smith, E. Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian enteric nervous system (ENS) derives from migratory enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCC) that express the transcription factor Phox2b. Studies of these enteric progenitors have typically relied on immunohistochemical (IHC) detection. To circumvent complicating factors of IHC, we have generated a mouse BAC transgenic line that drives a Histone2BCerulean (H2BCFP) reporter from Phox2b regulatory regions. This construct does not alter the endogenous Phox2b locus and enables studies of normal neural crest (NC) derivatives. The Phox2b-H2BCFP transgene expresses the H2BCFP reporter in patterns that recapitulate expression of endogenous Phox2b. Our studies reveal Phox2b expression in mature enteric glia at levels below that of enteric neurons. Moreover, we also observe differential expression of the transgene reporter within the leading ENCC that traverse the gut. Our findings indicate that the wavefront of migrating enteric progenitors is not homogeneous, and suggest these cells may be fate-specified before expression of mature lineage markers appears. PMID:18351668

  1. Enhanced Myogenesis in adult skeletal muscle by transgenic expression of Myostatin Propeptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle growth and maintenance are essential for human health. One of the muscle regulatory genes, namely myostatin, a member of transforming growth factor-ß, plays a dominant role in the genetic control of muscle mass. Transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide in skeletal muscle showed ...

  2. Technical advance: stringent control of transgene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana using the Top10 promoter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, J.; Scott, A. C.; Thompson, W. F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We show that the tightly regulated tetracycline-sensitive Top10 promoter system (Weinmann et al. Plant J. 1994, 5, 559-569) is functional in Arabidopsis thaliana. A pure breeding A. thaliana line (JL-tTA/8) was generated which expressed a chimeric fusion of the tetracycline repressor and the activation domain of Herpes simplex virus (tTA), from a single transgenic locus. Plants from this line were crossed with transgenics carrying the ER-targeted green fluorescent protein coding sequence (mGFP5) under control of the Top10 promoter sequence. Progeny from this cross displayed ER-targeted GFP fluorescence throughout the plant, indicating that the tTA-Top10 promoter interaction was functional in A. thaliana. GFP expression was repressed by 100 ng ml-1 tetracycline, an order of magnitude lower than the concentration used previously to repress expression in Nicotiana tabacum. Moreover, the level of GFP expression was controlled by varying the concentration of tetracycline in the medium, allowing a titred regulation of transgenic activity that was previously unavailable in A. thaliana. The kinetics of GFP activity were determined following de-repression of the Top10:mGFP5 transgene, with a visible ER-targeted GFP signal appearing from 24 to 48 h after de-repression.

  3. Transgenic Expression of ZBP1 in Neurons Suppresses Cocaine-Associated Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapidus, Kyle A. B.; Nwokafor, Chiso; Scott, Daniel; Baroni, Timothy E.; Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Hiroi, Noboru; Singer, Robert H.; Czaplinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    To directly address whether regulating mRNA localization can influence animal behavior, we created transgenic mice that conditionally express Zipcode Binding Protein 1 (ZBP1) in a subset of neurons in the brain. ZBP1 is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the localization, as well as translation and stability of target mRNAs in the cytoplasm. We…

  4. Increased liver pathology in hepatitis C virus transgenic mice expressing the hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, Victor V.; Lerat, Herve; Madden, Charles R.; Finegold, Milton J.; McGarvey, Michael J.; Mohammed, Essam M.A.; Forbes, Stuart J.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Hadsell, Darryl L.; Grona, Shala J.; Hollinger, F. Blaine; Slagle, Betty L. . E-mail: bslagle@bcm.edu

    2006-04-10

    Transgenic mice expressing the full-length HCV coding sequence were crossed with mice that express the HBV X gene-encoded regulatory protein HBx (ATX mice) to test the hypothesis that HBx expression accelerates HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. At 16 months (mo) of age, hepatocellular carcinoma was identified in 21% of HCV/ATX mice, but in none of the single transgenic animals. Analysis of 8-mo animals revealed that, relative to HCV/WT mice, HCV/ATX mice had more severe steatosis, greater liver-to-body weight ratios, and a significant increase in the percentage of hepatocytes staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Furthermore, primary hepatocytes from HCV, ATX, and HCV/ATX transgenic mice were more resistant to fas-mediated apoptosis than hepatocytes from nontransgenic littermates. These results indicate that HBx expression contributes to increased liver pathogenesis in HCV transgenic mice by a mechanism that involves an imbalance in hepatocyte death and regeneration within the context of severe steatosis.

  5. Remodeling of mouse milk glycoconjugates by transgenic expression of a human glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Prieto, P A; Mukerji, P; Kelder, B; Erney, R; Gonzalez, D; Yun, J S; Smith, D F; Moremen, K W; Nardelli, C; Pierce, M

    1995-12-08

    The mammary gland is a unique biosynthetic tissue that produces a variety of species-specific glycoconjugates, but the factors regulating the production of specific glycoconjugates are not well understood. To explore the underlying regulation, a fusion gene containing a cDNA encoding the human alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferase (alpha 1,2FT), which generates the H-blood group antigen, flanked by the murine whey acidic protein promoter and a polyadenylation signal, was introduced into mice. Milk samples from transgenic animals contained soluble forms of the alpha 1,2FT, as revealed by Western blots of milk samples using an anti-alpha 1,2FT antiserum and by the demonstration of alpha 1,2FT enzyme activity. Milk from transgenic animals also contained large quantities of 2'-fucosyllactose (Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta 1-4Glc) and modified glycoproteins containing the H-antigen, whereas milk from control animals lacked these glycoconjugates. Expression levels of 2'-fucosyllactose were high in most animals and represented 1/3 to nearly 1/2 of the total milk oligosaccharides. These results demonstrate that heterologous transgenic expression of a glycosyltransferase can result in the expression of both the transgene and its secondary gene products and that the structures of milk oligosaccharides can be remodeled depending on expression of the appropriate enzyme. Furthermore, these results suggest that the lactating mammary gland may be a unique biosynthetic reactor for the production of biologically active oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates.

  6. Expression of spearmint limonene synthase in transgenic spike lavender results in an altered monoterpene composition in developing leaves.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2008-01-01

    We generated transgenic spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) plants constitutively expressing the limonene synthase (LS) gene from spearmint (Mentha spicata), encoding the LS enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of limonene from geranyl diphosphate. Overexpression of the LS transgene did not consistently affect monoterpene profile in pooled leaves or flowers from transgenic T(0) plants. Analyses from cohorts of leaves sampled at different developmental stages showed that essential oil accumulation in transgenic and control plants was higher in developing than in mature leaves. Furthermore, developing leaves of transgenic plants contained increased limonene contents (more than 450% increase compared to controls) that correlated with the highest transcript accumulation of the LS gene. The levels of other monoterpene pathway components were also significantly altered. T(0) transgenic plants were grown for 2 years, self-pollinated, and the T(1) seeds obtained. The increased limonene phenotype was maintained in the progenies that inherited the LS transgene.

  7. Relationship between expression of epidermal growth factor and simian virus 40 T antigen in a line of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lafond, R E; Giammalvo, J T; Norkin, L C

    1995-09-01

    The pattern of expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen gene and resultant dysplasia were re-examined in a line of transgenic mice in which the T antigen gene was under the control of the SV40 early promoter. We found that T antigen expression in the kidney, and resulting dysplastic lesions, occurred exclusively in the distal convoluted tubules and the ascending limbs of Henle. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression in the kidney of normal mice was similarly immunolocalized. The correlation between high EGF immunoreactivity in normal mouse tissues and T antigen expression in the transgenic counterpart was also seen in the choroid plexus epithelium and in the submandibular glands of male mice. T antigen was not found in the submandibular gland of transgenic females. Similarly, EGF was only rarely detected in the normal female submandibular gland. In contrast to the correlation between T antigen expression in the transgenic mice and EGF expression in the corresponding tissues of the normal mice, within the dysplastic lesions of the transgenic mice EGF expression was severely diminished. Adenocarcinomas of the male submandibular gland from another line of transgenic mice that expresses the Int-1 transgene, showed similarly reduced levels of immunostaining for EGF. Thus, reduced expression of EGF might be a general feature of dysplasia and tumorigenesis in those tissues that normally express EGF.

  8. Repression of retrovirus-mediated transgene expression by interferons: implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh, S; Carroll, J M; Taichman, L B

    1997-01-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer is commonly used in gene therapy protocols and has the potential to provide long-term expression of the transgene. Although expression of a retrovirus-delivered transgene is satisfactory in cultured cells, it has been difficult to achieve consistent and high-level expression in vivo. In this investigation, we explored the possibility of modulating transgene expression by host-derived cytokines. Normal human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts were transduced with recombinant retroviruses expressing a reporter gene (lacZ). Treatment of transduced cells with a proinflammatory cytokine, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), significantly reduced lacZ expression to less than 25% of that of nontreated cells. The inhibition was concentration dependent (peak at 5 ng/ml) and time dependent (maximal at 16 h for transcript and 24 h for protein); expression remained repressed in the continued presence of IFN-gamma but returned to normal levels 24 h after IFN-gamma withdrawal. The decrease in beta-galactosidase activity appeared to result from decrease in steady-state lacZ mRNA levels. Inhibitors of transcription and translation blocked IFN-gamma-induced repression, suggesting involvement of newly synthesized protein intermediates. Similar results were obtained by treatment of transduced cells with IFN-alpha but not with other proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-2 (IL-1), IL-4, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Although the level of lacZ mRNA was reduced by >70% following IFN treatment, the rate of lacZ transcription was not significantly different from that for nontreated cells. These results suggest that IFN-mediated regulation of transgene expression is at a posttranscriptional level. Interestingly, IFN-gamma also suppressed transgene expression driven by a cellular promoter (involucrin) inserted in an internal position in the retroviral vector. The presence of the overlapping 3' untranslated

  9. GAL4-NF-kappaB fusion protein augments transgene expression from neuronal promoters in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, B H; Yang, Y; Paton, J F R; Li, F; Boulaire, J; Kasparov, S; Wang, S

    2006-12-01

    Targeted gene expression mediated by a mammalian cellular promoter is desirable for gene therapy in the brain, where there are a variety of different neuronal phenotypes, several types of supportive cells, and blood vessels. However, this approach can be hampered by weak activity of some cellular promoters. In view of the potency of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in regulating neuronal gene expression, we have assessed whether it can be used to enhance the strength of neuron-specific promoters. Our approach was to use a neuronal promoter to drive expression of a chimeric transactivator, which consisted of a part of the transcriptional activation domain of the NF-kappaB p65 protein fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4 protein from yeast. The second copy of the neuronal promoter was modified by introducing the unique GAL4 binding sequences at its 5' end and used to drive the expression of a transgene. Binding of the chimeric transcriptional activator upstream of the second promoter was expected to potentiate its transcriptional activity. In this study, the approach was applied to the platelet-derived growth factor beta chain and synapsin-1 neuron-specific promoters and tested in vitro and in vivo using plasmid, lentiviral, and baculoviral vectors. We observed up to a 100-fold improvement in reporter gene expression in cultured neurons and 20-fold improvement in the rat brain in vivo. Moreover, the cell-type specificity of the two tested promoters was well preserved and restricted to neurons. Finally, the expression driven by the new lentiviral vectors with the p65-potentiated synapsin-1 promoter showed no signs of decline or cell damage 4 weeks after injection. This approach should be suitable for constructing powerful and stable gene expression systems based on weak cell-specific promoters in neuronal phenotypes.

  10. Matrix attachment region combinations increase transgene expression in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Peng; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Si-Jia; Li, Chang-Zheng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Jun-He; Chen, Shao-Nan; Jia, Yan-Long; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2017-02-20

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are cis-acting DNA elements that can increase transgene expression levels in a CHO cell expression system. To investigate the effects of MAR combinations on transgene expression and the underlying regulatory mechanisms, we generated constructs in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene flanked by different combinations of human β-interferon and β-globin MAR (iMAR and gMAR, respectively), which was driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus (SV) 40 promoter. These were transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which were screened with geneticin; eGFP expression was detected by flow cytometry. The presence of MAR elements increased transfection efficiency and transient and stably expression of eGFP expression under both promoters; the level was higher when the two MARs differed (i.e., iMAR and gMAR) under the CMV but not the SV40 promoter. For the latter, two gMARs showed the highest activity. We also found that MARs increased the ratio of stably transfected positive colonies. These results indicate that combining the CMV promoter with two different MAR elements or the SV40 promoter with two gMARs is effective for inducing high expression level and stability of transgenes.

  11. Matrix attachment region combinations increase transgene expression in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun-Peng; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Si-Jia; Li, Chang-Zheng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Jun-He; Chen, Shao-Nan; Jia, Yan-Long; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are cis-acting DNA elements that can increase transgene expression levels in a CHO cell expression system. To investigate the effects of MAR combinations on transgene expression and the underlying regulatory mechanisms, we generated constructs in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene flanked by different combinations of human β-interferon and β-globin MAR (iMAR and gMAR, respectively), which was driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus (SV) 40 promoter. These were transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which were screened with geneticin; eGFP expression was detected by flow cytometry. The presence of MAR elements increased transfection efficiency and transient and stably expression of eGFP expression under both promoters; the level was higher when the two MARs differed (i.e., iMAR and gMAR) under the CMV but not the SV40 promoter. For the latter, two gMARs showed the highest activity. We also found that MARs increased the ratio of stably transfected positive colonies. These results indicate that combining the CMV promoter with two different MAR elements or the SV40 promoter with two gMARs is effective for inducing high expression level and stability of transgenes. PMID:28216629

  12. Transgenic expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) causes premature aging phenotypes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mingxiao; Field, Kevin; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Shim, Minsub

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostanoids, lipid signaling molecules that regulate various physiological processes. COX2, one of the isoforms of COX, is highly inducible in response to a wide variety of cellular and environmental stresses. Increased COX2 expression is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. COX2 expression is also reported to be increased in the tissues of aged humans and mice, which suggests the involvement of COX2 in the aging process. However, it is not clear whether the increased COX2 expression is causal to or a result of aging. We have now addressed this question by creating an inducible COX2 transgenic mouse model. Here we show that post-natal expression of COX2 led to a panel of aging-related phenotypes. The expression of p16, p53, and phospho-H2AX was increased in the tissues of COX2 transgenic mice. Additionally, adult mouse lung fibroblasts from COX2 transgenic mice exhibited increased expression of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase. Our study reveals that the increased COX2 expression has an impact on the aging process and suggests that modulation of COX2 and its downstream signaling may be an approach for intervention of age-related disorders. PMID:27750221

  13. Expression of a complete soybean leghemoglobin gene in root nodules of transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Stougaard, J; Petersen, T E; Marcker, K A

    1987-08-01

    The complete soybean leghemoglobin lbc(3) gene was transferred into the legume Lotus corniculatus using an Agrobacterium rhizogenes vector system. Organ-specific expression of the soybean gene was observed in root nodules formed on regenerated transgenic plants after infection with Rhizobium loti. The primary transcript was processed in the same way as in soybean nodules and the resulting mRNA was translated into Lbc(3) protein. Quantitative determination of the Lbc(3) protein in nodules of transgenic plants indicated that the steady-state level of the soybean protein is comparable to that of endogenous Lotus leghemoglobin.

  14. Effect of CRC::etr1-1 transgene expression on ethylene production, sex expression, fruit set and fruit ripening in transgenic melon (Cucumis melo L.).

    PubMed

    Switzenberg, Jessica A; Beaudry, Randy M; Grumet, Rebecca

    2015-06-01

    Ethylene is a key factor regulating sex expression in cucurbits. Commercial melons (Cucumis melo L.) are typically andromonoecious, producing male and bisexual flowers. Our prior greenhouse studies of transgenic melon plants expressing the dominant negative ethylene perception mutant gene, etr1-1, under control of the carpel- and nectary-primordia targeted CRAB'S CLAW (CRC) promoter showed increased number and earlier appearance of carpel-bearing flowers. To further investigate this phenomenon which could be potentially useful for earlier fruit production, we observed CRC::etr1-1 plants in the field for sex expression, fruit set, fruit development, and ripening. CRC::etr1-1 melon plants showed increased number of carpel-bearing open flowers on the main stem and earlier onset by 7-10 nodes. Additional phenotypes observed in the greenhouse and field were conversion of approximately 50% of bisexual buds to female, and elongated ovaries and fruits. Earlier and greater fruit set occurred on the transgenic plants. However, CRC::etr1-1 plants had greater abscission of young fruit, and smaller fruit, so that final yield (kg/plot) was equivalent to wild type. Earlier fruit set in line M5 was accompanied by earlier appearance of ripe fruit. Fruit from line M15 frequently did not exhibit external ripening processes of rind color change and abscission, but when cut open, the majority showed a ripe or overripe interior accompanied by elevated internal ethylene. The non-ripening external phenotype in M15 fruit corresponded with elevated etr1-1 transgene expression in the exocarp. These results provide insight into the role of ethylene perception in carpel-bearing flower production, fruit set, and ripening.

  15. Prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons shape neuronal activity to drive fear expression.

    PubMed

    Courtin, Julien; Chaudun, Fabrice; Rozeske, Robert R; Karalis, Nikolaos; Gonzalez-Campo, Cecilia; Wurtz, Hélène; Abdi, Azzedine; Baufreton, Jerome; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2014-01-02

    Synchronization of spiking activity in neuronal networks is a fundamental process that enables the precise transmission of information to drive behavioural responses. In cortical areas, synchronization of principal-neuron spiking activity is an effective mechanism for information coding that is regulated by GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons through the generation of neuronal oscillations. Although neuronal synchrony has been demonstrated to be crucial for sensory, motor and cognitive processing, it has not been investigated at the level of defined circuits involved in the control of emotional behaviour. Converging evidence indicates that fear behaviour is regulated by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). This control over fear behaviour relies on the activation of specific prefrontal projections to the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), a structure that encodes associative fear memories. However, it remains to be established how the precise temporal control of fear behaviour is achieved at the level of prefrontal circuits. Here we use single-unit recordings and optogenetic manipulations in behaving mice to show that fear expression is causally related to the phasic inhibition of prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons (PVINs). Inhibition of PVIN activity disinhibits prefrontal projection neurons and synchronizes their firing by resetting local theta oscillations, leading to fear expression. Our results identify two complementary neuronal mechanisms mediated by PVINs that precisely coordinate and enhance the neuronal activity of prefrontal projection neurons to drive fear expression.

  16. Expression of a calmodulin methylation mutant affects the growth and development of transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D M; Besl, L; Oh, S H; Masterson, R V; Schell, J; Stacey, G

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic plants were constructed that express two foreign calmodulins (VU-1 and VU-3 calmodulins) derived from a cloned synthetic calmodulin gene. VU-1 calmodulin, similar to endogenous plant calmodulin, possesses a lysine residue at position 115 and undergoes posttranslational methylation. VU-3 calmodulin is a site-directed mutant of VU-1 calmodulin that is identical in sequence except for the substitution of an arginine at position 115 and thus is incapable of methylation. Both calmodulin genes, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, were expressed in transgenic tobacco. Foreign calmodulin protein accumulated in plant tissues to levels equivalent to that of the endogenous calmodulin. All transformed lines of VU-1 plants were indistinguishable from untransformed controls with respect to growth and development. However, all transformed lines of VU-3 plants were characterized by decreased stem internode growth, reduced seed production, and reduced seed and pollen viability. The data suggest that these phenotypes are the result of the expression of the calmodulin mutant rather than the position of transferred DNA insertion or the overall alteration of calmodulin levels. Analyses of the activity of the purified transgenic calmodulins suggest that calmodulin-dependent NAD kinase is among the potential targets that may have altered regulation in VU-3 transgenic plants. Images PMID:1325656

  17. [Comparison between transgenic insect-resistant cotton expressing Cry1Ac protein and its parental variety in rhizospheric fungal diversity].

    PubMed

    Pan, Jian-Gang; Jiao, Hai-Hua; Bai, Zhi-Hui; Qi, Hong-Yan; Ma, An-Zhou; Zhuang, Guo-qiang; Zhang, Hong-xun

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of rhizospheric fungal diversity and biomass at different sampling stages associated with two transgenic insectresistant cottons expressing Cry1Ac protein and their control varieties were studied under greenhouse conditions, followed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR), in order to evaluate the ecological security of planting transgenic cotton expressing Cry1Ac protein. The results indicated that the fungal superior bands in rhizosphere of transgenic Bt cotton were similar with that of control cotton at four sampling stages, the more obvious difference in the blurred bands among transgenic Bt cotton, JM20 and SHIYUAN321 was detected. The rhizospheric fungal biomass of transgenic Bt cotton SGK321 was significantly lower than that of its parental control cotton at seedling stage, while the slight decrease in fungal biomass of transgenic Bt cotton XP188 was detected at boll forming stage, the ill-defined decrease, even growing tendency in two transgenic Bt cottons was detected at other stages. However, the difference of rhizospheric fungal community compositions and biomass was not only existed between transgenic cotton and its control, but also between SHIYUAN321 and JM20, and the same phenomenon was also detected between transgenic Bt cotton SGK321 and XP188. Hence, Bt protein is not the only incentive resulting in the difference in fungal community composition and diversity, the decrease in biomass between transgenic cotton and untransgenic cotton, different cotton varieties has an effect on them.

  18. Increasing morphinan alkaloid production by over-expressing codeinone reductase in transgenic Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Philip J; Miller, James A C; Allen, Robert S; Chitty, Julie A; Gerlach, Wayne L; Frick, Susanne; Kutchan, Toni M; Fist, Anthony J

    2007-01-01

    Only plants of the Papaver genus (poppies) are able to synthesize morphinan alkaloids, and cultivation of P. somniferum, opium poppy, remains critical for the production and supply of morphine, codeine and various semi-synthetic analgesics. Opium poppy was transformed with constitutively expressed cDNA of codeinone reductase (PsCor1.1), the penultimate step in morphine synthesis. Most transgenic lines showed significant increases in capsule alkaloid content in replicated glasshouse and field trials over 4 years. The morphinan alkaloid contents on a dry weight basis were between 15% and 30% greater than those in control high-yielding genotypes and control non-transgenic segregants. Transgenic leaves had approximately 10-fold greater levels of Cor transcript compared with non-transgenic controls. Two cycles of crossing of the best transgenic line into an elite high-morphine genotype resulted in significant increases in morphine and total alkaloids relative to the elite recurrent parent. No significant changes in alkaloid profiles or quantities were observed in leaf, roots, pollen and seed.

  19. Impact of age and vector construct on striatal and nigral transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Polinski, Nicole K; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Benskey, Matthew J; Fischer, D Luke; Kemp, Christopher J; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Sandoval, Ivette M; Paumier, Katrina L; Sortwell, Caryl E

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic protein delivery using viral vectors has shown promise in preclinical models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) but clinical trial success remains elusive. This may partially be due to a failure to include advanced age as a covariate despite aging being the primary risk factor for PD. We investigated transgene expression following intracerebral injections of recombinant adeno-associated virus pseudotypes 2/2 (rAAV2/2), 2/5 (rAAV2/5), 2/9 (rAAV2/9), and lentivirus (LV) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in aged versus young adult rats. Both rAAV2/2 and rAAV2/5 yielded lower GFP expression following injection to either the aged substantia nigra or striatum. rAAV2/9-mediated GFP expression was deficient in the aged striatonigral system but displayed identical transgene expression between ages in the nigrostriatal system. Young and aged rats displayed equivalent GFP levels following LV injection to the striatonigral system but LV-delivered GFP was deficient in delivering GFP to the aged nigrostriatal system. Notably, age-related transgene expression deficiencies revealed by protein quantitation were poorly predicted by GFP-immunoreactive cell counts. Further, in situ hybridization for the viral CβA promoter revealed surprisingly limited tropism for astrocytes compared to neurons. Our results demonstrate that aging is a critical covariate to consider when designing gene therapy approaches for PD. PMID:27933309

  20. Expression of human coagulation Factor IX in transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Lingxia; Chen, Yuhui; Cui, Lijie; Ren, Weiwei; Tang, Kexuan

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, a plant binary expression vector PG-pRD12-hFIX (where PG is polygalacturonase) harbouring the hFIX (human coagulation Factor IX) gene was constructed and introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. After kanamycin selection, 32 putative independent transgenic tomato plants were regenerated. PCR and Southern-blot analyses confirmed the transgenic status of some plants. RT (reverse transcription)-PCR analysis for the expression of the introduced gene (hFIX) demonstrated that the hFIX gene was expressed specifically in fruits of the tomato. Western-blot analysis confirmed the presence of a 56 kDa band specific to hFIX in the transformed tomatoes. ELISA results showed that the expression of hFIX protein reached a maximum of 15.84 ng/g fresh weight in mature fruit. A blood-clotting assay demonstrated the clotting activity of the expressed hFIX protein in transgenic tomato fruits. This is the first report on the expression of hFIX in plants, and our research provides potentially valuable knowledge for further development of the plant-derived therapeutic proteins.

  1. A comparison of constitutive promoters for expression of transgenes in alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed

    Samac, Deborah A; Tesfaye, Mesfin; Dornbusch, Melinda; Saruul, Purev; Temple, Stephen J

    2004-08-01

    The activity of constitutive promoters was compared in transgenic alfalfa plants using two marker genes. Three promoters, the 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), the cassava vein mosaic virus (CsVMV) promoter, and the sugarcane bacilliform badnavirus (ScBV) promoter were each fused to the beta-glucuronidase (gusA) gene. The highest GUS enzyme activity was obtained using the CsVMV promoter and all alfalfa cells assayed by in situ staining had high levels of enzyme activity. The 35S promoter was expressed in leaves, roots, and stems at moderate levels, but the promoter was not active in stem pith cells, root cortical cells, or in the symbiotic zones of nodules. The ScBV promoter was active primarily in vascular tissues throughout the plant. In leaves, GUS activity driven by the CsVMV promoter was approximately 24-fold greater than the activity from the 35S promoter and 38-fold greater than the activity from the ScBV promoter. Five promoters, the double 35S promoter, figwort mosaic virus (FMV) promoter, CsVMV promoter, ScBV promoter, and alfalfa small subunit Rubisco (RbcS) promoter were used to control expression of a cDNA from Trichoderma atroviride encoding an endochitinase (ech42). Highest chitinase activity in leaves, roots, and root nodules was obtained in plants containing the CsVMV:ech42 transgene. Plants expressing the endochitinase were challenged with Phoma medicaginis var. medicaginis, the causal agent of spring black stem and leaf spot of alfalfa. Although endochitinase activity in leaves of transgenic plants was 50- to 2650-fold greater than activity in control plants, none of the transgenic plants showed a consistent increase in disease resistance compared to controls. The high constitutive levels of both GUS and endochitinase activity obtained demonstrate that the CsVMV promoter is useful for high-level transgene expression in alfalfa.

  2. Expression and Cellular Immunogenicity of a Transgenic Antigen Driven by Endogenous Poxviral Early Promoters at Their Authentic Loci in MVA

    PubMed Central

    Orubu, Toritse; Alharbi, Naif Khalaf; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Cottingham, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ T cell responses to vaccinia virus are directed almost exclusively against early gene products. The attenuated strain modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is under evaluation in clinical trials of new vaccines designed to elicit cellular immune responses against pathogens including Plasmodium spp., M. tuberculosis and HIV-1. All of these recombinant MVAs (rMVA) utilize the well-established method of linking the gene of interest to a cloned poxviral promoter prior to insertion into the viral genome at a suitable locus by homologous recombination in infected cells. Using BAC recombineering, we show that potent early promoters that drive expression of non-functional or non-essential MVA open reading frames (ORFs) can be harnessed for immunogenic expression of recombinant antigen. Precise replacement of the MVA orthologs of C11R, F11L, A44L and B8R with a model antigen positioned to use the same translation initiation codon allowed early transgene expression similar to or slightly greater than that achieved by the commonly-used p7.5 or short synthetic promoters. The frequency of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced in mice by single shot or adenovirus-prime, rMVA-boost vaccination were similarly equal or marginally enhanced using endogenous promoters at their authentic genomic loci compared to the traditional constructs. The enhancement in immunogenicity observed using the C11R or F11L promoters compared with p7.5 was similar to that obtained with the mH5 promoter compared with p7.5. Furthermore, the growth rates of the viruses were unimpaired and the insertions were genetically stable. Insertion of a transgenic ORF in place of a viral ORF by BAC recombineering can thus provide not only a potent promoter, but also, concomitantly, a suitable insertion site, potentially facilitating development of MVA vaccines expressing multiple recombinant antigens. PMID:22761956

  3. Astrocyte heterogeneity revealed by expression of a GFAP-LacZ transgene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjin; Su, Mu; Messing, Albee; Brenner, Michael

    2006-05-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate filament protein present primarily in astrocytes. The gene is first expressed as astrocytes mature, and in the adult is strongly upregulated in response to CNS damage. Thus, in addition to its astrocyte specificity, transcriptional regulation of the GFAP gene is of interest as a reporter of CNS signaling during development and injury. Several laboratories have shown that approximately 2 kb of 5'-flanking DNA of the human or mouse GFAP gene is sufficient to direct transgene expression to astrocytes and to confer developmental and injury-induced regulation. Enhancer regions have been identified adjacent to the basal promoter and about 1500 bp upstream of the RNA start site. Juxtaposition of these two segments yielded a 447 bp promoter, gfa28, which strongly drove reporter activity in transfected glioma cells. We report here that in mice a gfa28-lacZ transgene expresses in only certain brain regions, revealing an unexpected heterogeneity among astrocytes. The restricted pattern of expression is present early in development, is not altered by injury, and is preserved in cultured astrocytes. However, astrocytes cultured from an inactive region strongly express a transiently transfected gfa28-lacZ construct, and activity of the embedded gfa28-lacZ transgene is partially restored by treatment with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. These results indicate that the absence of gfa28-lacZ expression in specific brain regions results from a developmental failure to remodel GFAP chromatin to an open structure. Thus, expression of the gfa28-lacZ transgene appears to serendipitously mark a distinct set of astrocyte precursors.

  4. Growth regulation, imprinting, and epigenetic transcription-related gene expression differs in lung of deceased transgenic cloned and normal goats.

    PubMed

    Meng, Li; Jia, Ruo-Xin; Sun, Yan-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Wan, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Li; Zhong, Bu-Shuai; Wang, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a promising technique to produce mammalian transgenic clones. Only a small proportion of manipulated embryos, however, can develop into viable offspring. The abnormal growth and development of cloned animals, furthermore, are accompanied by aberrant lung development. Our objective was to investigate molecular background of lung developmental problems in transgenic (random insertion of exogenous DNA) cloned goats. We examined expression of 15 genes involved in growth regulation, imprinting, and epigenetic transcription in lung tissue of deceased transgenic cloned and normal goats of various ages. Compared with normal goats of the same age from conventional reproduction, expression of 13 genes (BMP4, FGF10, GHR, HGFR, PDGFR, RABP, VEGF, H19, CDKNIC, PCAF, MeCP2, HDAC1, and Dnmt3b) decreased in transgenic cloned goats that died at or shortly after birth; Expression of eight genes (FGF10, PDGFR, RABP, VEGF, PCAF, HDAC1, MeCP2, and Dnmt3b) decreased in fetal death of transgenic cloned goats. Expression of two epigenetic transcription genes (PCAF and Dnmt3b) decreased in disease death of transgenic cloned goats (1-4 months old). Disruptions in gene expression might be associated with the high neonatal mortality in transgenic cloned animals. These findings have implications in understanding the low efficiency of transgenic cloning.

  5. Expression of a calpastatin transgene slows muscle wasting and obviates changes in myosin isoform expression during murine muscle disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidball, James G.; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    Muscle wasting is a prominent feature of several systemic diseases, neurological damage and muscle disuse. The contribution of calpain proteases to muscle wasting in any instance of muscle injury or disease has remained unknown because of the inability to specifically perturb calpain activity in vivo. We have generated a transgenic mouse with muscle-specific overexpression of calpastatin, which is the endogenous inhibitor of calpains, and induced muscle atrophy by unloading hindlimb musculature for 10 days. Expression of the transgene resulted in increases in calpastatin concentration in muscle by 30- to 50-fold, and eliminated all calpain activity that was detectable on zymograms. Muscle fibres in ambulatory, transgenic mice were smaller in diameter, but more numerous, so that muscle mass did not differ between transgenic and non-transgenic mice. This is consistent with the role of the calpain-calpastatin system in muscle cell fusion that has been observed in vitro. Overexpression of calpastatin reduced muscle atrophy by 30 % during the 10 day unloading period. In addition, calpastatin overexpression completely prevented the shift in myofibrillar myosin content from slow to fast isoforms, which normally occurs in muscle unloading. These findings indicate that therapeutics directed toward regulating the calpain-calpastatin system may be beneficial in preventing muscle mass loss in muscle injury and disease.

  6. Prevention of scrapie pathogenesis by transgenic expression of anti-prion protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Heppner, F L; Musahl, C; Arrighi, I; Klein, M A; Rülicke, T; Oesch, B; Zinkernagel, R M; Kalinke, U; Aguzzi, A

    2001-10-05

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy are initiated by extracerebral exposure to prions. Although prion transmission from extracerebral sites to the brain represents a potential target for prophylaxis, attempts at vaccination have been limited by the poor immunogenicity of prion proteins. To circumvent this, we expressed an anti-prion protein (anti-PrP) mu chain in Prnp(o/o) mice. Transgenic mice developed sustained anti-PrP titers, which were not suppressed by introduction of Prnp+ alleles. Transgene expression prevented pathogenesis of prions introduced by intraperitoneal injection in the spleen and brain. Expression of endogenous PrP (PrP(C)) in the spleen and brain was unaffected, suggesting that immunity was responsible for protection. This indicates the feasibility of immunological inhibition of prion disease in vivo.

  7. Functional expression of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin, in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Cui, Min-Long; Ma, Biao; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-23

    Taste-modifying proteins are a natural alternative to artificial sweeteners and flavor enhancers and have been used in some cultures for centuries. The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of being able to modify a sour taste into a sweet taste. Here, we report the use of a plant expression system for the production of miraculin. A synthetic gene encoding miraculin was placed under the control of constitutive promoters and transferred to lettuce. Expression of this gene in transgenic lettuce resulted in the accumulation of significant amounts of miraculin protein in the leaves. The miraculin expressed in transgenic lettuce possessed sweetness-inducing activity. These results demonstrate that the production of miraculin in edible plants can be a good alternative strategy to enhance the availability of this protein.

  8. Ecdysone-inducible gene expression in mammalian cells and transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    No, D; Yao, T P; Evans, R M

    1996-01-01

    During metamorphosis of Drosophila melanogaster, a cascade of morphological changes is triggered by the steroid hormone 20-OH ecdysone via the ecdysone receptor, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. In this report, we have transferred insect hormone responsiveness to mammalian cells by the stable expression of a modified ecdysone receptor that regulates an optimized ecdysone responsive promoter. Inductions reaching 4 orders of magnitude have been achieved upon treatment with hormone. Transgenic mice expressing the modified ecdysone receptor can activate an integrated ecdysone responsive promoter upon administration of hormone. A comparison of tetracycline-based and ecdysone-based inducible systems reveals the ecdysone regulatory system exhibits lower basal activity and higher inducibility. Since ecdysone administration has no apparent effect on mammals, its use for regulating genes should be excellent for transient inducible expression of any gene in transgenic mice and for gene therapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8622939

  9. Predation drives interpopulation differences in parental care expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-San; Lin, Si-Min; Dubey, Sylvain; Pike, David A

    2013-03-01

    Expressing parental care after oviposition or parturition is usually an obligate (evolved) trait within a species, despite evolutionary theory predicting that widespread species should vary in whether or not they express parental care according to local selection pressures. The lizard Eutropis longicaudata expresses maternal care only in a single population throughout its large geographical range, but why this pattern occurs is unknown. We used reciprocal translocation and predator exclusion experiments to test whether this intraspecific variation is a fixed trait within populations and whether predator abundance explains this perplexing pattern. Wild-caught female lizards that were reciprocally translocated consistently guarded or abandoned eggs in line with their population of origin. By contrast, most lizards raised in a common garden environment and subsequently released as adults adopted the maternal care strategy of the recipient population, even when the parents originated from a population lacking maternal care. Egg predation represents a significant fitness cost in the populations where females display egg-guarding behaviour, but guarding eggs outweighs this potential cost by increasing hatching success. These results imply that predators can be a driving force in the expression of parental care in instances where it is normally absent and that local selection pressure is sufficient to cause behavioural divergence in whether or not parental care is expressed.

  10. Susceptibility to hepatotoxicity in transgenic mice that express a dominant-negative human keratin 18 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Ku, N O; Michie, S A; Soetikno, R M; Resurreccion, E Z; Broome, R L; Oshima, R G; Omary, M B

    1996-01-01

    Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/18) are intermediate filament phosphoglycoproteins that are expressed preferentially in simple-type epithelia. We recently described transgenic mice that express point-mutant human K18 (Ku, N.-O., S. Michie, R.G. Oshima, and M.B. Omary. 1995. J. Cell Biol. 131:1303-1314) and develop chronic hepatitis and hepatocyte fragility in association with hepatocyte keratin filament disruption. Here we show that mutant K18 expressing transgenic mice are highly susceptible to hepatotoxicity after acute administration of acetaminophen (400 mg/Kg) or chronic ingestion of griseofulvin (1.25% wt/wt of diet). The predisposition to hepatotoxicity results directly from the keratin mutation since nontransgenic or transgenic mice that express normal human K18 are more resistant. Hepatotoxicity was manifested by a significant difference in lethality, liver histopathology, and biochemical serum testing. Keratin glycosylation decreased in all griseofulvin-fed mice, whereas keratin phosphorylation increased dramatically preferentially in mice expressing normal K18. The phosphorylation increase in normal K18 after griseofulvin feeding appears to involve sites that are different to those that increase after partial hepatectomy. Our results indicate that hepatocyte intermediate filament disruption renders mice highly susceptible to hepatotoxicity, and raises the possibility that K18 mutations may predispose to drug hepatotoxicity. The dramatic phosphorylation increase in nonmutant keratins could provide survival advantage to hepatocytes. PMID:8770877

  11. Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Vail, Andrew W; Wang, Ping; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Samac, Deborah A; Vance, Carroll P; Wackett, Lawrence P; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and groundwater in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, which is initiated by atzA, encoding atrazine chlorohydrolase. Here we explored the use of enhanced expression of a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase, p-AtzA, in transgenic grasses (tall fescue, perennial ryegrass, and switchgrass) and the legume alfalfa for the biodegradation of atrazine. Enhanced expression of p-AtzA was obtained by using combinations of the badnavirus promoter, the maize alcohol dehydrogenase first intron, and the maize ubiquitin promoter. For alfalfa, we used the first intron of the 5'-untranslated region tobacco alcohol dehydrogenase gene and the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. Resistance of plants to atrazine in agar-based and hydroponic growth assays was correlated with in vivo levels of gene expression and atrazine degradation. The in planta expression of p-atzA enabled transgenic tall fescue to transform atrazine into hydroxyatrazine and other metabolites. Results of our studies highlight the potential use of transgenic plants for bioremediating atrazine in the environment.

  12. Variability of Inducible Expression across the Hematopoietic System of Tetracycline Transactivator Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takiguchi, Megumi; Dow, Lukas E.; Prier, Julia E.; Carmichael, Catherine L.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Turner, Stephen J.; Lowe, Scott W.; Huang, David C. S.; Dickins, Ross A.

    2013-01-01

    The tetracycline (tet)-regulated expression system allows for the inducible overexpression of protein-coding genes, or inducible gene knockdown based on expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). The system is widely used in mice, however it requires robust expression of a tet transactivator protein (tTA or rtTA) in the cell type of interest. Here we used an in vivo tet-regulated fluorescent reporter approach to characterise inducible gene/shRNA expression across a range of hematopoietic cell types of several commonly used transgenic tet transactivator mouse strains. We find that even in strains where the tet transactivator is expressed from a nominally ubiquitous promoter, the efficiency of tet-regulated expression can be highly variable between hematopoietic lineages and between differentiation stages within a lineage. In some cases tet-regulated reporter expression differs markedly between cells within a discrete, immunophenotypically defined population, suggesting mosaic transactivator expression. A recently developed CAG-rtTA3 transgenic mouse displays intense and efficient reporter expression in most blood cell types, establishing this strain as a highly effective tool for probing hematopoietic development and disease. These findings have important implications for interpreting tet-regulated hematopoietic phenotypes in mice, and identify mouse strains that provide optimal tet-regulated expression in particular hematopoietic progenitor cell types and mature blood lineages. PMID:23326559

  13. Transgenic mice expressing the human heat shock protein 70 have improved post-ischemic myocardial recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Plumier, J C; Ross, B M; Currie, R W; Angelidis, C E; Kazlaris, H; Kollias, G; Pagoulatos, G N

    1995-01-01

    Heat shock treatment induces expression of several heat shock proteins and subsequent post-ischemic myocardial protection. Correlations exist between the degree of stress used to induce the heat shock proteins, the amount of the inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the level of myocardial protection. The inducible HSP70 has also been shown to be protective in transfected myogenic cells. Here we examined the role of human inducible HSP70 in transgenic mouse hearts. Overexpression of the human HSP70 does not appear to affect normal protein synthesis or the stress response in transgenic mice compared with nontransgenic mice. After 30 min of ischemia, upon reperfusion, transgenic hearts versus nontransgenic hearts showed significantly improved recovery of contractile force (0.35 +/- 0.08 versus 0.16 +/- 0.05 g, respectively, P < 0.05), rate of contraction, and rate of relaxation. Creatine kinase, an indicator of cellular injury, was released at a high level (67.7 +/- 23.0 U/ml) upon reperfusion from nontransgenic hearts, but not transgenic hearts (1.6 +/- 0.8 U/ml). We conclude that high level constitutive expression of the human inducible HSP70 plays a direct role in the protection of the myocardium from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Images PMID:7706492

  14. Expression of soybean lectin in transgenic tobacco results in enhanced resistance to pathogens and pests.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peipei; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Xiaohui; Xie, Yongli; Wu, Huijun; Gao, Xuewen

    2013-10-01

    Lectins are proteins of non-immune origin that specifically interact with carbohydrates, known to play important roles in the defense system of plants. In this study, in order to study the function of a new soybean lectin (SBL), the corresponding encoding gene lec-s was introduced into tobacco plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Southern blot analyses had revealed that the lec-s gene was stable integrated into the chromosome of the tobacco. The results of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) also indicated that the lec-s gene in the transgenic tobacco plants could be expressed under the control of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter. Evaluation agronomic of the performance had showed that the transgenic plants could resist to the infection of Phytophthora nicotianae. Insect bioassays using detached leaves from transgenic tobacco plants demonstrated that the ectopically expressed SBL significantly (P.0.05) reduced the weight gain of larvae of the beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua). Further on, the lectins retarded the development of the larvae and their metamorphosis. These findings suggest that soybean lectins have potential as a protective agent against pathogens and insect pests through a transgenic approach.

  15. PVY-resistant transgenic potato plants expressing an anti-NIa protein scFv antibody.

    PubMed

    Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia; Jaoua, Leïla; Rouis, Souad; Saïdi, Mohamed Najib; Bouaziz, Donia; Ellouz, Radhouane

    2006-06-01

    A synthetic gene encoding a single chain Fv fragment of an antibody directed against the nuclear inclusion a (NIa) protein of potato virus Y (PVY) was used to transform two commercial potato cultivars (Claustar and BF15). The NIa protease forms the nuclear inclusion body A and acts as the major protease in the cleavage of the viral polyprotein into functional proteins. Immunoblot analysis showed that most of the resulting transgenic plants accumulate high levels of the transgenic protein. Furthermore, a majority of the selected transgenic lines showed an efficient and complete protection against the challenge virus after mechanical inoculation with PVYO strain. Two transgenic lines showed an incomplete resistance with delayed appearance of symptoms accompanied by low virus titers, whereas one line developed symptoms during the first days after inoculation but recovered rapidly, leading to a low virus accumulation rate. These results confirm that expression of scFv antibody is able to inhibit a crucial step in the virus multiplication, such as polyprotein cleavage is a powerful strategy for engineered virus resistance. It can lead to a complete resistance that was not obtained previously by expression of scFv directed against the viral coat protein.

  16. Enhanced drought tolerance of transgenic rice plants expressing a pea manganese superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Zheng; Wang, Qing-Bin; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Su, Wei-Ai

    2005-04-01

    We investigated the role that manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), an important antioxidant enzyme, may play in the drought tolerance of rice. MnSOD from pea (Pisum sativum) under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter was introduced into chloroplasts of rice (Oryza sativa) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to develop drought-tolerant rice plants. Functional expression of the pea MnSOD in transgenic rice plants (T1) was revealed under drought stress induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. After PEG treatment the transgenic leaf slices showed reduced electrolyte leakage compared to wild type (WT) leaf slices, whether they were exposed to methyl viologen (MV) or not, suggesting that transgenic plants were more resistant to MV- or PEG-induced oxidative stress. Transgenic plants also exhibited less injury, measured by net photosynthetic rate, when treated with PEG. Our data suggest that SOD is a critical component of the ROS scavenging system in plant chloroplasts and that the expression of MnSOD can improve drought tolerance in rice.

  17. Does pea lectin expressed transgenically in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) influence honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae?

    PubMed

    Lehrman, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is important both for pollination and for honey production. Pollen is the major protein source for bees, which exposes them directly to changes in pollen quality e.g. through genetic engineering. In order to create a worst case scenario regarding pea lectin (PSL) expressed transgenically in oilseed rape anthers and pollen, the maximum amount of dried pollen that could be mixed in an artificial diet without negatively affecting larval performance (1.5% w/w) was fed to bee larvae. Pollen from two transgenic plant lines expressing PSL up to 1.2% of total soluble protein and pollen from one non-transgenic line was added to the same diet and used as a pollen control. When these three pollen diets and the control diet (without added pollen) were compared, no negative effect from the pollen of the transgenic plants could be detected on larval mortality, weight, or development time. An increased weight and a reduced developmental time were recorded for larvae on all diets containing pollen when compared to the diet without pollen.

  18. Horticultural characteristics of transgenic tobacco expressing the rolC gene from Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, R.; Zimmerman, T.W.; Cordts, J.M.; Footen, K.J. ); Ravelonandro, M. . Station de Pathologie Vegetale)

    1994-09-01

    Wisconsin 38 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf discs were transformed with the disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 101 carrying the rolC gene from A. rhizogenes and NPT II and GUS genes. Shoots that regenerated on kanamycin-containing medium were confirmed as transgenic through GUS assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analyses, and transmission of the foreign genes through the sexual cycle. Transgenic plants were as short as half the height of control plants; were earlier flowering by up to 35 days; and had smaller leaves, shorter internodes, smaller seed capsules, fewer seeds, smaller flowers, and reduced pollen viability. The number of seed capsules, leaf number, and specific root length were similar between transgenic and control plants. Transgenic clones varied in the expression of the rolC-induced growth alterations as did the first generation of seedlings from these clones. Such differences suggested the potential for selecting for different levels of expression. Transformation with the rolC gene presents a potentially useful method of genetically modifying horticultural crops, particularly for flowering date, height, and leaf and flower size. Chemical names used: neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS).

  19. Expression of a Cystatin Transgene in Eggplant Provides Resistance to Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Papolu, Pradeep K.; Dutta, Tushar K.; Tyagi, Nidhi; Urwin, Peter E.; Lilley, Catherine J.; Rao, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) cause substantial yield decline in eggplant and sustainable management options to minimize crop damage due to nematodes are still limited. A number of genetic engineering strategies have been developed to disrupt the successful plant–nematode interactions. Among them, delivery of proteinase inhibitors from the plant to perturb nematode development and reproduction is arguably the most effective strategy. In the present study, transgenic eggplant expressing a modified rice cystatin (OC-IΔD86) gene under the control of the root-specific promoter, TUB-1, was generated to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. Five putative transformants were selected through PCR and genomic Southern blot analysis. Expression of the cystatin transgene was confirmed in all the events using western blotting, ELISA and qPCR assay. Upon challenge inoculation, all the transgenic events exhibited a detrimental effect on RKN development and reproduction. The best transgenic line (a single copy event) showed 78.3% inhibition in reproductive success of RKN. Our results suggest that cystatins can play an important role for improving nematode resistance in eggplant and their deployment in gene pyramiding strategies with other proteinase inhibitors could ultimately enhance crop yield. PMID:27516765

  20. High-toughness silk produced by a transgenic silkworm expressing spider (Araneus ventricosus) dragline silk protein.

    PubMed

    Kuwana, Yoshihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Tamada, Yasushi; Kojima, Katsura

    2014-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is a natural fiber that has excellent tensile properties; however, it is difficult to produce artificially as a long, strong fiber. Here, the spider (Araneus ventricosus) dragline protein gene was cloned and a transgenic silkworm was generated, that expressed the fusion protein of the fibroin heavy chain and spider dragline protein in cocoon silk. The spider silk protein content ranged from 0.37 to 0.61% w/w (1.4-2.4 mol%) native silkworm fibroin. Using a good silk-producing strain, C515, as the transgenic silkworm can make the raw silk from its cocoons for the first time. The tensile characteristics (toughness) of the raw silk improved by 53% after the introduction of spider dragline silk protein; the improvement depended on the quantity of the expressed spider dragline protein. To demonstrate the commercial feasibility for machine reeling, weaving, and sewing, we used the transgenic spider silk to weave a vest and scarf; this was the first application of spider silk fibers from transgenic silkworms.

  1. RNA Interference Is Responsible for Reduction of Transgene Expression after Sleeping Beauty Transposase Mediated Somatic Integration

    PubMed Central

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrating non-viral vectors based on transposable elements are widely used for genetically engineering mammalian cells in functional genomics and therapeutic gene transfer. For the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase system it was demonstrated that convergent transcription driven by the SB transposase inverted repeats (IRs) in eukaryotic cells occurs after somatic integration. This could lead to formation of double-stranded RNAs potentially presenting targets for the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery and subsequently resulting into silencing of the transgene. Therefore, we aimed at investigating transgene expression upon transposition under RNA interference knockdown conditions. Principal Findings To establish RNAi knockdown cell lines we took advantage of the P19 protein, which is derived from the tomato bushy stunt virus. P19 binds and inhibits 21 nucleotides long, small-interfering RNAs and was shown to sufficiently suppress RNAi. We found that transgene expression upon SB mediated transposition was enhanced, resulting into a 3.2-fold increased amount of colony forming units (CFU) after transposition. In contrast, if the transgene cassette is insulated from the influence of chromosomal position effects by the chicken-derived cHS4 insulating sequences or when applying the Forg Prince transposon system, that displays only negligible transcriptional activity, similar numbers of CFUs were obtained. Conclusion In summary, we provide evidence for the first time that after somatic integration transposon derived transgene expression is regulated by the endogenous RNAi machinery. In the future this finding will help to further improve the molecular design of the SB transposase vector system. PMID:22570690

  2. Comparison of factor VIII transgenes bioengineered for improved expression in gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Dooriss, Kerry L; Denning, Gabriela; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Javazon, Elisabeth H; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2009-05-01

    Successful gene therapy of hemophilia A depends on the sustained expression of therapeutic levels of factor VIII (fVIII). Because of mRNA instability, interactions with resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones, and the requirement for carbohydrate-facilitated transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, fVIII is expressed at much lower levels from mammalian cells than other proteins of similar size and complexity. A number of bioengineered forms of B domain-deleted (BDD) human fVIII have been generated and shown to have enhanced expression. Previously, we demonstrated that recombinant BDD porcine fVIII exhibits high-level expression due to specific sequence elements that increase biosynthesis via enhanced posttranslational transit through the secretory pathway. In the current study, high-expression recombinant fVIII constructs were compared directly in order to determine the relative expression of the various bioengineered fVIII transgenes. The data demonstrate that BDD porcine fVIII expression is superior to that of any of the human fVIII variant constructs tested. Mean fVIII expression of 18 units/10(6) cells/24 hr was observed from HEK-293 cells expressing a single copy of the porcine fVIII transgene, which was 36- to 225-fold greater than that of any human fVIII transgene tested. Furthermore, greater than 10-fold higher expression was observed in human cells transduced with BDD porcine fVIII versus BDD human fVIII-encoding lentiviral vectors, even at low proviral copy numbers, supporting its use over other human fVIII variants in future hemophilia A gene therapy clinical trials.

  3. Virus-derived transgenes expressing hairpin RNA give immunity to Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An effective method for obtaining resistant transgenic plants is to induce RNA silencing by expressing virus-derived dsRNA in plants and this method has been successfully implemented for the generation of different plant lines resistant to many plant viruses. Results Inverted repeats of the partial Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) gene and the partial Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) replication protein (Rep) gene were introduced into the plant expression vector and the recombinant plasmids were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was carried out and three transgenic tobacco lines (MP16-17-3, MP16-17-29 and MP16-17-58) immune to TMV infection and three transgenic tobacco lines (Rep15-1-1, Rep15-1-7 and Rep15-1-32) immune to CMV infection were obtained. Virus inoculation assays showed that the resistance of these transgenic plants could inherit and keep stable in T4 progeny. The low temperature (15℃) did not influence the resistance of transgenic plants. There was no significant correlation between the resistance and the copy number of the transgene. CMV infection could not break the resistance to TMV in the transgenic tobacco plants expressing TMV hairpin MP RNA. Conclusions We have demonstrated that transgenic tobacco plants expressed partial TMV movement gene and partial CMV replicase gene in the form of an intermolecular intron-hairpin RNA exhibited complete resistance to TMV or CMV infection. PMID:21269519

  4. Generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse model with hepatic expression of human CYP2A6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Gu, Jun; Su, Ting; Cui, Huadong; Zhang, Xiuling; D'Agostino, Jaime; Zhuo, Xiaoliang; Yang, Weizhu; Swiatek, Pamela J; Ding, Xinxin

    2005-12-09

    The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize a transgenic mouse model in which CYP2A6, a human P450 enzyme, is expressed specifically in the liver. CYP2A6, which is mainly expressed in human liver, is active toward many xenobiotics. Our transgene construct contained the mouse transthyretin promoter/enhancer, a full-length CYP2A6 cDNA, and a downstream neomycin-resistance gene for positive selection in embryonic stem cells. Hepatic expression of the CYP2A6 transgene was demonstrated by immunoblotting, whereas tissue specificity of CYP2A6 expression was confirmed by RNA-PCR. The transgenic mouse was further characterized after being backcrossed to the B6 strain for six generations. Hepatic microsomes from homozygous transgenic mice had activities significantly higher than those of B6 mice toward coumarin. The in vivo activity of transgenic CYP2A6 was also determined. Systemic clearance of coumarin was significantly higher in the transgenic mice than in B6 controls, consistent with the predicted role of CYP2A6 as the major coumarin hydroxylase in human liver. The CYP2A6-transgenic mouse model should be valuable for studying the in vivo function of this polymorphic human enzyme in drug metabolism and chemical toxicity.

  5. Development of a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the precise quantification of transgene expression levels in rice plants.

    PubMed

    James, Victoria A.; Worland, Barbara; Snape, John W.; Vain, Philippe

    2004-04-01

    Variation in transgene expression levels can result from uncontrolled differences in experimental protocols. It is important to quantify and eliminate this unwanted variation as much as possible in order to attain precision in transgenic studies. Large-scale transgenic studies could, by their design, generate additional variation. The influence of different plant growth, sampling and analysis strategies in generating spurious variation in transgene expression level quantification in rice plant populations was assessed. The use of multiple independent plant phenotypic analyses (enzymatic assays in this study) was identified as the major source of spurious variation (doubling or tripling the variation). The quantification of transgene expression levels was also found to be significantly influenced by plant age, the choice of leaf sampled and leaf size. All of these factors reduced the precision of molecular genetic studies and generated artefactual results in transgenic studies. Identification of the sources of extraneous variation allowed the development of a new standard operating procedure (SOP) for rice, designed to control spurious variation. SOP allowed the influence of differences in growth period and independent phenotypic analyses to be minimized. The coefficient of variation in transgene expression levels, between and within genetically identical rice plants, was reduced to approximately 10 to 15% using SOP. Adoption of quality assurance (QA) criteria such as SOP is key to improving the reproducibility of transgenic studies.

  6. Promoter methylation and histone modifications affect the expression of the exogenous DsRed gene in transgenic goats.

    PubMed

    Nuo, M T; Yuan, J L; Yang, W L; Gao, X Y; He, N; Liang, H; Cang, M; Liu, D J

    2016-08-29

    Transgene silencing, which is common in transgenic plants and animals, limits the generation and application of genetically modified organisms, and is associated with the exogenous gene copy number, the methylation status of its promoters, and histone modification abnormalities. Here, we analyzed the expression of the exogenous gene DsRed and the methylation status of its cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter in six healthy transgenic cashmere goats and transgenic nuclear donor cells. The CMV promoter exhibited high methylation levels (74.4-88.2%) in four of the goats, a moderate methylation level (58.7%) in one, and a low methylation level (21.2%) in one, while the methylation level of the transgenic nuclear donor cells was comparatively low (14.3%). DsRed expression was negatively correlated with promoter methylation status. Transgenic cashmere goats carried one to three copies of the CMV promoter fragment and one to six copies of the DsRed fragment, but copy number showed no obvious correlation with DsRed expression. After treatment with the methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, DsRed expression in transgenic goat cells significantly increased and CMV promoter methylation significantly decreased; this indicated an inverse correlation between promoter methylation status and DsRed expression. After treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, DsRed expression increased, indicating that an abnormal histone modification in transgenic goats is also involved in exogenous gene silencing. These findings indicate the potential of trichostatin A and 5-azacytidine to rescue the biological activity of silenced exogenous transgenes in adult-derived transgenic cells under culture conditions.

  7. Generation of Transgenic Rodent Malaria Parasites Expressing Human Malaria Parasite Proteins.

    PubMed

    Salman, Ahmed M; Mogollon, Catherin Marin; Lin, Jing-Wen; van Pul, Fiona J A; Janse, Chris J; Khan, Shahid M

    2015-01-01

    We describe methods for the rapid generation of transgenic rodent Plasmodium berghei (Pb) parasites that express human malaria parasite (HMP) proteins, using the recently developed GIMO-based transfection methodology. Three different genetic modifications are described resulting in three types of transgenic parasites. (1) Additional Gene (AG) mutants. In these mutants the HMP gene is introduced as an "additional gene" into a silent/neutral locus of the Pb genome under the control of either a constitutive or stage-specific Pb promoter. This method uses the GIMO-transfection protocol and AG mutants are generated by replacing the positive-negative selection marker (SM) hdhfr::yfcu cassette in a neutral locus of a standard GIMO mother line with the HMP gene expression cassette, resulting in SM free transgenic parasites. (2) Double-step Replacement (DsR) mutants. In these mutants the coding sequence (CDS) of the Pb gene is replaced with the CDS of the HMP ortholog in a two-step GIMO-transfection procedure. This process involves first the replacement of the Pb CDS with the hdhfr::yfcu SM, followed by insertion of the HMP ortholog at the same locus thereby replacing hdhfr::yfcu with the HMP CDS. These steps use the GIMO-transfection protocol, which exploits both positive selection for Pb orthologous gene-deletion and negative selection for HMP gene-insertion, resulting in SM free transgenic parasites. (3) Double-step Insertion (DsI) mutants. When a Pb gene is essential for blood stage development the DsR strategy is not possible. In these mutants the HMP expression cassette is first introduced into the neutral locus in a standard GIMO mother line as described for AG mutants but under the control elements of the Pb orthologous gene; subsequently, the Pb ortholog CDS is targeted for deletion through replacement of the Pb CDS with the hdhfr::yfcu SM, resulting in transgenic parasites with a new GIMO locus permissive for additional gene-insertion modifications.The different

  8. A new transgenic mouse line for tetracycline inducible transgene expression in mature melanocytes and the melanocyte stem cells using the Dopachrome tautomerase promoter.

    PubMed

    Woods, Susan L; Bishop, J Michael

    2011-04-01

    We have generated a novel transgenic mouse to direct inducible and reversible transgene expression in the melanocytic compartment. The Dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) control sequences we used are active early in the development of melanocytes and so this system was designed to enable the manipulation of transgene expression during development in utero and in the melanocyte stem cells as well as mature melanocytes. We observed inducible lacZ and GFP reporter transgene activity specifically in melanocytes and melanocyte stem cells in mouse skin. This mouse model will be a useful tool for the pigment cell community to investigate the contribution of candidate genes to normal melanocyte and/or melanoma development in vivo. Deregulated expression of the proto-oncogene MYC has been observed in melanoma, however whether MYC is involved in tumorigenesis in pigment cells has yet to be directly investigated in vivo. We have used our system to over-express MYC in the melanocytic compartment and show for the first time that increased MYC expression can indeed promote melanocytic tumor formation.

  9. Transgenic Expression of a Viral Cystatin Gene CpBV-CST1 in Tobacco Confers Insect Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Kim, Y; Yeam, I; Kim, Y

    2016-10-01

    A viral gene, CpBV-CST1, was identified from a polydnavirus Cotesia plutellae bracovirus (CpBV). Its protein product was significantly toxic to lepidopteran insects. This study generated a transgenic tobacco plant expressing CpBV-CST1 Expression of transgene CpBV-CST1 was confirmed in T1 generation (second generation after transgenesis) in both mRNA and protein levels. Young larvae of Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) suffered high mortalities after feeding on transgenic tobacco. All 10 T1 transgenic tobacco plants had no significant variation in speed-to-kill. In order to further explore insect resistance of these transgenic tobaccos, bioassays were performed by assessing antixenosis and antibiosis. S. exigua larvae significantly avoided T1 plants in a choice test. Larvae fed with T1 plant exhibited significant decrease in protease activity in the midgut due to consuming CpBV-CST1 protein produced by the transgenic plant. Furthermore, the transgenic tobacco exhibited similar insect resistance to other tobacco-infesting insects, including a leaf-feeding insect, Helicoverpa assulta, and a sap-feeding insect, Myzus persicae These results demonstrate that a viral cystatin gene can be used to develop insect-resistant transgenic plant, suggesting a prospective possibility of expanding the current transgenic approach to high-valued crops.

  10. A Mini-intronic Plasmid (MIP): A Novel Robust Transgene Expression Vector In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiamiao; Zhang, Feijie; Kay, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial backbone (BB) sequences contained within a canonical plasmid DNA dampen exogenous transgene expression by tenfold to 1,000-fold over a period of a few weeks following transfection into quiescent tissues such as the liver. Minicircle DNA vectors devoid of bacterial plasmid backbone sequences overcome transgene silencing providing persistent transgene expression. Because, we recently established that the length rather than sequence of the DNA flanking the transgene expression cassette is the major parameter affecting transgene silencing, we developed an alternative plasmid propagation process in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within the eukaryotic expression cassette. As with the minicircle vector, the mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) vector system overcomes transgene silencing observed with plasmids but in addition provides between 2 and often 10 times or higher levels of transgene expression compared with minicircle vectors containing the same expression cassette in vivo and in vitro. These improved plasmids will benefit all studies involving gene transfer/therapy approaches. PMID:23459514

  11. Differentially expressed microRNAs and affected signaling pathways in placentae of transgenic cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Jun; Jin, Li-Jun; Ma, Xue-Gang; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Zhai, Xiao-Wei; Chen, Jun-Jie; Yang, Xue-Yi

    2014-07-15

    Placental deficiencies are related to the developmental abnormalities of transgenic cattle produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer, but the concrete molecular mechanism is not very clear. Studies have shown that placental development can be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs) in normal pregnancy. Thus, this study screened differentially expressed miRNAs by the next-generation sequencing technology to reveal the relationship between miRNAs expression and aberrant development of placentae produced by the transgenic-clone technology. Expressions of miRNAs and mRNAs in different placentae were compared, the placentae derived from one natural pregnancy counterpart (PNC), one natural pregnancy of a cloned offspring as a mother (PCM), and two transgenic (human beta-defensin-3) cloned pregnancy: one offspring was alive after birth (POL) and the other offspring was dead in 2 days after birth (POD). Further, signaling pathway analysis was conducted. The results indicated that 694 miRNAs were differentially expressed in four placental samples, such as miR-210, miR-155, miR-21, miR-128, miR-183, and miR-145. Signaling pathway analysis revealed that compared with PNC, significantly upregulated pathways in POL, POD, and PCM mainly included focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, pathways in cancer, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, endosytosis, and adherens junction, and significantly downregulated pathways mainly included malaria, nucleotide binding oligomerization domain-like receptor signaling, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, Jak-STAT signaling pathway. In conclusion, this study confirmed alterations of the expression profile of miRNAs and signaling pathways in placentae from transgenic (hBD-3) cloned cattle (PTCC), which could lead to the morphologic and histologic deficiencies of PTCC. This information would be useful for the relative research in future.

  12. A transgenic zebrafish model expressing KIT-D816V recapitulates features of aggressive systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Balci, Tugce B; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Teh, Evelyn M; Da'as, Sahar I; McBride, Eileen; Liwski, Robert; Chute, Ian C; Leger, Daniel; Lewis, Stephen M; Berman, Jason N

    2014-10-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a rare myeloproliferative disease without curative therapy. Despite clinical variability, the majority of patients harbour a KIT-D816V mutation, but efforts to inhibit mutant KIT with tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been unsatisfactory, indicating a need for new preclinical approaches to identify alternative targets and novel therapies in this disease. Murine models to date have been limited and do not fully recapitulate the most aggressive forms of SM. We describe the generation of a transgenic zebrafish model expressing the human KIT-D816V mutation. Adult fish demonstrate a myeloproliferative disease phenotype, including features of aggressive SM in haematopoeitic tissues and high expression levels of endopeptidases, consistent with SM patients. Transgenic embryos demonstrate a cell-cycle phenotype with corresponding expression changes in genes associated with DNA maintenance and repair, such as reduced dnmt1. In addition, epcam was consistently downregulated in both transgenic adults and embryos. Decreased embryonic epcam expression was associated with reduced neuromast numbers, providing a robust in vivo phenotypic readout for chemical screening in KIT-D816V-induced disease. This study represents the first zebrafish model of a mast cell disease with an aggressive adult phenotype and embryonic markers that could be exploited to screen for novel agents in SM.

  13. A genetic strategy to treat sickle cell anemia by coregulating globin transgene expression and RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Samakoglu, Selda; Lisowski, Leszek; Budak-Alpdogan, Tulin; Usachenko, Yelena; Acuto, Santina; Di Marzo, Rosalba; Maggio, Aurelio; Zhu, Ping; Tisdale, John F; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The application of RNA interference (RNAi) to stem cell-based therapies will require highly specific and lineage-restricted gene silencing. Here we show the feasibility and therapeutic potential of coregulating transgene expression and RNAi in hematopoietic stem cells. We encoded promoterless small-hairpin RNA (shRNA) within the intron of a recombinant gamma-globin gene. Expression of both gamma-globin and the lariat-embedded small interfering RNA (siRNA) was induced upon erythroid differentiation, specifically downregulating the targeted gene in tissue- and differentiation stage-specific fashion. The position of the shRNA within the intron was critical to concurrently achieve high-level transgene expression, effective siRNA generation and minimal interferon induction. Lentiviral transduction of CD34(+) cells from patients with sickle cell anemia led to erythroid-specific expression of the gamma-globin transgene and concomitant reduction of endogenous beta(S) transcripts, thus providing proof of principle for therapeutic strategies that require synergistic gene addition and gene silencing in stem cell progeny.

  14. Transgene expression in Penaeus monodon cells: evaluation of recombinant baculoviral vectors with shrimp specific hybrid promoters.

    PubMed

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Philip, Rosamma; Bright Singh, I S

    2016-08-01

    It has been realized that shrimp cell immortalization may not be accomplished without in vitro transformation by expressing immortalizing gene in cells. In this process, efficiency of transgene expression is confined to the ability of vectors to transmit gene of interests to the genome. Over the years, unavailability of such vectors has been hampering application of such a strategy in shrimp cells. We report the use of recombinant baculovirus mediated transduction using hybrid promoter system for transgene expression in lymphoid cells of Penaeus monodon. Two recombinant baculovirus vectors with shrimp viral promoters (WSSV-Ie1 and IHHNV-P2) were constructed (BacIe1-GFP and BacP2-GFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) used as the transgene. The GFP expression in cells under the control of hybrid promoters, PH-Ie1 or PH-P2, were analyzed and confirmed in shrimp cells. The results indicate that the recombinant baculovirus with shrimp specific viral promoters (hybrid) can be employed for delivery of foreign genes to shrimp cells for in vitro transformation.

  15. bcl-2 transgene expression can protect neurons against developmental and induced cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Farlie, P G; Dringen, R; Rees, S M; Kannourakis, G; Bernard, O

    1995-01-01

    The bcl-2 protooncogene, which protects various cell types from apoptotic cell death, is expressed in the developing and adult nervous system. To explore its role in regulation of neuronal cell death, we generated transgenic mice expressing Bcl-2 under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter, which forced expression uniquely in neurons. Sensory neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia of newborn mice normally require nerve growth factor for their survival in culture, but those from the bcl-2 transgenic mice showed enhanced survival in its absence. Furthermore, apoptotic death of motor neurons after axotomy of the sciatic nerve was inhibited in these mice. The number of neurons in two neuronal populations from the central and peripheral nervous system was increased by 30%, indicating that Bcl-2 expression can protect neurons from cell death during development. The generation of these transgenic mice suggests that Bcl-2 may play an important role in survival of neurons both during development and throughout adult life. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7753817

  16. Transposon-mediated transgenesis, transgenic rescue, and tissue-specific gene expression in rodents and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Katter, Katharina; Geurts, Aron M.; Hoffmann, Orsolya; Mátés, Lajos; Landa, Vladimir; Hiripi, László; Moreno, Carol; Lazar, Jozef; Bashir, Sanum; Zidek, Vaclav; Popova, Elena; Jerchow, Boris; Becker, Katja; Devaraj, Anantharam; Walter, Ingrid; Grzybowksi, Michael; Corbett, Molly; Filho, Artur Rangel; Hodges, Matthew R.; Bader, Michael; Ivics, Zoltán; Jacob, Howard J.; Pravenec, Michal; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Rülicke, Thomas; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Germline transgenesis is an important procedure for functional investigation of biological pathways, as well as for animal biotechnology. We have established a simple, nonviral protocol in three important biomedical model organisms frequently used in physiological studies. The protocol is based on the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposon system, SB100X, which reproducibly promoted generation of transgenic founders at frequencies of 50–64, 14–72, and 15% in mice, rats, and rabbits, respectively. The SB100X-mediated transgene integrations are less prone to genetic mosaicism and gene silencing as compared to either the classical pronuclear injection or to lentivirus-mediated transgenesis. The method was successfully applied to a variety of transgenes and animal models, and can be used to generate founders with single-copy integrations. The transposon vector also allows the generation of transgenic lines with tissue-specific expression patterns specified by promoter elements of choice, exemplified by a rat reporter strain useful for tracking serotonergic neurons. As a proof of principle, we rescued an inborn genetic defect in the fawn-hooded hypertensive rat by SB100X transgenesis. A side-by-side comparison of the SB100X- and piggyBac-based protocols revealed that the two systems are complementary, offering new opportunities in genome manipulation.—Katter, K., Geurts, A. M., Hoffmann, O., Mátés, L., Landa,V., Hiripi, L., Moreno, C., Lazar, J., Bashir, S., Zidek, V., Popova, E., Jerchow, B., Becker, K., Devaraj, A., Walter, I., Grzybowksi, M., Corbett, M., Rangel Filho, A., Hodges, M. R., Bader, M., Ivics, Z., Jacob, H. J., Pravenec, M., Bősze, Z., Rülicke, T., Izsvák, Z. Transposon-mediated transgenesis, transgenic rescue, and tissue-specific gene expression in rodents and rabbits. PMID:23195032

  17. Bioremediation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by bacterial nitroreductase expressing transgenic aspen.

    PubMed

    Van Dillewijn, Pieter; Couselo, José L; Corredoira, Elena; Delgado, Antonio; Wittich, Rolf-Michael; Ballester, Antonio; Ramos, Juan L

    2008-10-01

    Trees belonging to the genus Populus are often used for phytoremediation due to their deep root formation, fast growth and high transpiration rates. Here, we study the capacity of transgenic hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides var. Etropole) which expresses the bacterial nitroreductase gene, pnrA, to tolerate and take-up greater amounts of the toxic and recalcitrant explosive, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) from contaminated waters and soil. Transgenic aspen tolerate up to 57 mg TNT/L in hydroponic media and more than 1000 mg TNT/ kg soil, whereas the parental aspen could not endure in hydroponic culture with more than 11 mg TNT/L or soil with more than 500 mg TNT/kg. Likewise, the phytotoxicological limit for transgenic plants to a constant concentration of TNT was 20 mg TNT/L while wild-type plants only tolerated 10 mg TNT/L. Transgenic plants also showed improved uptake of TNT over wild-type plants when the original TNT concentration was above 35 mg TNT/L in liquid media or 750 mg TNT/kg in soil. Assays with 13C-labeled TNT show rapid adsorption of TNT to the root surface followed by a slower entrance rate into the plant. Most of the 13C-carbon from the labeled TNT taken up bythe plant (> 95%) remains in the root with little translocation to the stem. Altogether, transgenic aspen expressing pnrA are highly interesting for phytoremediation applications on contaminated soil and underground aquifers.

  18. Delay of Disease Development in Transgenic Plants that Express the Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell Abel, Patricia; Nelson, Richard S.; de, Barun; Hoffmann, Nancy; Rogers, Stephen G.; Fraley, Robert T.; Beachy, Roger N.

    1986-05-01

    A chimeric gene containing a cloned cDNA of the coat protein (CP) gene of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was introduced into tobacco cells on a Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens from which tumor inducing genes had been removed. Plants regenerated from transformed cells expressed TMV mRNA and CP as a nuclear trait. Seedlings from self-fertilized transgenic plants were inoculated with TMV and observed for development of disease symptoms. The seedlings that expressed the CP gene were delayed in symptom development and 10 to 60 percent of the transgenic plants failed to develop symptoms for the duration of the experiments. Increasing the concentration of TMV in the inoculum shortened the delay in appearance of symptoms. The results of these experiments indicate that plants can be genetically transformed for resistance to virus disease development.

  19. Polyethylenimine-mediated expression of transgenes in the acinar cells of rats salivary glands in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sramkova, Monika; Parente, Laura; Wigand, Timothy; Aye, Myo-Pale'; Shitara, Akiko; Weigert, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Non viral-mediated transfection of plasmid DNA provides a fast and reliable way to express various transgenes in selected cell populations in live animals. Here, we show an improvement of a previously published method that is based on injecting plasmid DNA into the ductal system of the salivary glands in live rats. Specifically, using complexes between plasmid DNA and polyethyleneimine (PEI) we show that the expression of the transgenes is directed selectively to the salivary acinar cells. PEI does not affect the ability of cells to undergo regulated exocytosis, which was one of the main drawbacks of the previous methods. Moreover PEI does not affect the proper localization and targeting of transfected proteins, as shown for the apical plasma membrane water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5). Overall, this approach, coupled with the use of intravital microscopy, permits to conduct localization and functional studies under physiological conditions, in a rapid, reliable, and affordable fashion. PMID:25621283

  20. Modulation of Mammary Gland Development and Milk Production by Growth Hormone Expression in GH Transgenic Goats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zekun; Lin, Jian; Ye, Lulu; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Jianquan; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Mammary gland development during puberty and reconstruction during pregnancy and lactation is under the control of circulating endocrine hormones, such as growth hormone, which are released from the pituitary. In this study, we explored the influence of overexpression of growth hormone in the mammary gland on breast development and milk production in goats. Using transcriptome sequencing, we found that the number of highly expressed genes was greater in GH transgenic goats than non-transgenic goats. Furthermore, KEGG pathway analysis showed that the majority of the genes belonged to the MAPK signaling pathway and the ECM-receptor interaction pathway. The expression of genes related to breast development was further confirmed using qRT-PCR. Interestingly, both milk production and milk quality were increased. The results of these experiments imply that overexpression of growth hormone in the breast may stimulate breast development and enhances milk production by modulating alveolar cell proliferation or branching through the MAPK signaling pathway.

  1. Expression of Cry1Ac in transgenic tobacco plants under the control of a wound-inducible promoter (AoPR1) isolated from Asparagus officinalis to control Heliothis virescens and Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Gulbitti-Onarici, Selma; Zaidi, Mohsin Abbas; Taga, Ibrahim; Ozcan, Sebahattin; Altosaar, Illimar

    2009-07-01

    Expression of cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was evaluated under the control of a wound-inducible AoPR1 promoter from Asparagus officinalis in transgenic tobacco plants. The leaves of transgenic plants were mechanically wounded to evaluate the activity of the AoPR1 promoter in driving the expression of Cry1Ac protein at the wound site. Our results indicate that mechanical wounding of transgenic plants was effective in inducing the expression of Cry1Ac protein. As a result of this induction, the accumulated levels of Cry1Ac protein increased during 6-72 h post-wounding period. The leaves of transgenic tobacco plants were evaluated for resistance against Heliothis virescens and Manduca sexta in insect bioassays in two different ways. The detached tobacco leaves were either fed directly to the insect larvae or they were first mechanically wounded followed by a 72 h post-wounding feeding period. Complete protection of mechanically wounded leaves of transgenic plants was observed within 24 h of the bioassay. The leaves of transgenic plants fed directly (without pre-wounding) to the larvae achieved the same level of protection between 24 and 72 h of the bioassay.

  2. Transgenic rice plants expressing synthetic cry2AX1 gene exhibits resistance to rice leaffolder (Cnaphalocrosis medinalis).

    PubMed

    Manikandan, R; Balakrishnan, N; Sudhakar, D; Udayasuriyan, V

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a major source of insecticidal genes imparting insect resistance in transgenic plants. Level of expression of transgenes in transgenic plants is important to achieve desirable level of resistance against target insects. In order to achieve desirable level of expression, rice chloroplast transit peptide sequence was fused with synthetic cry2AX1 gene to target its protein in chloroplasts. Sixteen PCR positive lines of rice were generated by Agrobacterium mediated transformation using immature embryos. Southern blot hybridization analysis of T0 transgenic plants confirmed the integration of cry2AX1 gene in two to five locations of rice genome and ELISA demonstrated its expression. Concentration of Cry2AX1 in transgenic rice events ranged 5.0-120 ng/g of fresh leaf tissue. Insect bioassay of T0 transgenic rice plants against neonate larvae of rice leaffolder showed larval mortality ranging between 20 and 80 % in comparison to control plant. Stable inheritance and expression of cry2AX1 gene was demonstrated in T1 progenies through Southern and ELISA. In T1 progenies, the highest concentration of Cry2AX1 and mortality of rice leaffolder larvae were recorded as 150 ng/g of fresh leaf tissue and 80 %, respectively. The Cry2AX1 expression even at a very low concentration (120-150 ng/g) in transgenic rice plants was found effective against rice leaffolder larvae.

  3. Characterization of phenotype resistance to plum pox of transgenic plums expressing plum pox virus capsid gene.

    PubMed

    Ravelonandro, M; Scorza, R; Dunez, J

    1998-09-01

    Resistance to plum pox virus (PPV) infection can be obtained in transgenic plants that express the virus capsid gene. An Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was used to introduce the PPV capsid gene into Prunus domestica plants. Over 11 regenerated plants (clones) were observed for the development of the disease symptoms and analysed for the presence of PPV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) through 4 dormancy cycles. The level of protection against PPV was determined in the transformed plants, non-transformed plants, and a control transgenic plant "transformed" with the plasmid vector alone. One clone, C-5, appeared fully protected, while PT-6 and C-4 clones accumulated a low concentration of virus and the rest of the clones was entirely susceptible. Little is known about the mechanisms of resistance to virus infection in transgenic woody plants. To investigate this aspect, comparative studies based on the characteristics of resistant and susceptible clones have been started. A question, whether the phenotype resistance of clone C-5 is similar to that observed in transgenic herbaceous plants or not, has been addressed. Recent progress in this investigation is presented.

  4. Expression of bkt and bch genes from Haematococcus pluvialis in transgenic Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, KaiJing; Wang, ChaoGang; Xiao, Ming; Chen, Jun; Li, JianCheng; Hu, ZhangLi

    2014-10-01

    β-carotene ketolase and β-carotene hydroxylase encoded by bkt and bch, respectively, are key enzymes required for astaxanthin biosynthesis in Haematococcu pluvialis 34-1n. Two expression vectors containing cDNA sequences of bkt and bch were constructed and co-transformed into cell-wall-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-849. Transgenic algae were screened on TAP agar plates containing 10 μg mL(-1) Zeomycin. PCR-Southern analysis showed that bkt and bch were integrated into the genomes of C. reinhardtii. Transcripts of bkt and bch were further confirmed by RT-PCR-Southern analysis. Compared with the wild type, transgenic algae produced 29.04% and 30.27% more carotenoids and xanthophylls, respectively. Moreover, the transgenic algae could accumulate 34% more astaxanthin than wild type. These results indicate that foreign bkt and bch genes were successfully translated into β-carotene ketolase and β-carotene hydroxylase, which were responsible for catalyzing the biosynthesis of astaxanthin in transgenic algae.

  5. Oral immunization of mice using transgenic tomato fruit expressing VP1 protein from enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuan-Fu; Chang, Meng-Huei; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Jeng, Shih-Tong

    2006-04-05

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes seasonal epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease associated with fatal neurological complications in young children, and several major outbreaks have occurred recently. This study developed an effective antiviral agent by transforming the gene for VP1 protein, a previously defined epitope and also a coat protein of EV71, into tomato plant. VP1 protein was first fused with sorting signals to enable it to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum of tomato plant, and its expression level increased to 27 microg/g of fresh tomato fruit. Transgenic tomato fruit expressing VP1 protein was then used as an oral vaccine, and the development of VP1-specific fecal IgA and serum IgG were observed in BALB/c mice. Additionally, serum from mice fed transgenic tomato could neutralize the infection of EV71 to rhabdomyosarcoma cells, indicating that tomato fruit expressing VP1 was successful in orally immunizing mice. Moreover, the proliferation of spleen cells from orally immunized mice was stimulated by VP1 protein, and provided further evidence of both humoral and cellular immunity. Results of this study not only demonstrate the feasibility of using transgenic tomato as an oral vaccine to generate protective immunity in mice against EV71, but also suggest the probability of enterovirus vaccine development.

  6. New Wistar Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat transgenic models with ubiquitous expression of green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Diaz, Ana Isabel; Moyon, Ben; Coan, Philip M.; Alfazema, Neza; Venda, Lara; Woollard, Kevin; Aitman, Tim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat and the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rat inbred strains are well-established models for human crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) and metabolic syndrome, respectively. Novel transgenic (Tg) strains add research opportunities and increase scientific value to well-established rat models. We have created two novel Tg strains using Sleeping Beauty transposon germline transgenesis, ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the rat elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1a) promoter on the WKY and SHR genetic backgrounds. The Sleeping Beauty system functioned with high transgenesis efficiency; 75% of new rats born after embryo microinjections were transgene positive. By ligation-mediated PCR, we located the genome integration sites, confirming no exonic disruption and defining a single or low copy number of the transgenes in the new WKY-GFP and SHR-GFP Tg lines. We report GFP-bright expression in embryos, tissues and organs in both lines and show preliminary in vitro and in vivo imaging data that demonstrate the utility of the new GFP-expressing lines for adoptive transfer, transplantation and fate mapping studies of CRGN, metabolic syndrome and other traits for which these strains have been extensively studied over the past four decades. PMID:26769799

  7. Cosmetics-triggered percutaneous remote control of transgene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ye, Haifeng; Xie, Mingqi; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-08-18

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the rational design of trigger-inducible gene switches that program cellular behavior in a reliable and predictable manner. Capitalizing on genetic componentry, including the repressor PmeR and its cognate operator OPmeR, that has evolved in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 to sense and resist plant-defence metabolites of the paraben class, we have designed a set of inducible and repressible mammalian transcription-control devices that could dose-dependently fine-tune transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice in response to paraben derivatives. With an over 60-years track record as licensed preservatives in the cosmetics industry, paraben derivatives have become a commonplace ingredient of most skin-care products including shower gels, cleansing toners and hand creams. As parabens can rapidly reach the bloodstream of mice following topical application, we used this feature to percutaneously program transgene expression of subcutaneous designer cell implants using off-the-shelf commercial paraben-containing skin-care cosmetics. The combination of non-invasive, transdermal and orthogonal trigger-inducible remote control of transgene expression may provide novel opportunities for dynamic interventions in future gene and cell-based therapies.

  8. Cosmetics-triggered percutaneous remote control of transgene expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ye, Haifeng; Xie, Mingqi; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the rational design of trigger-inducible gene switches that program cellular behavior in a reliable and predictable manner. Capitalizing on genetic componentry, including the repressor PmeR and its cognate operator OPmeR, that has evolved in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 to sense and resist plant-defence metabolites of the paraben class, we have designed a set of inducible and repressible mammalian transcription-control devices that could dose-dependently fine-tune transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice in response to paraben derivatives. With an over 60-years track record as licensed preservatives in the cosmetics industry, paraben derivatives have become a commonplace ingredient of most skin-care products including shower gels, cleansing toners and hand creams. As parabens can rapidly reach the bloodstream of mice following topical application, we used this feature to percutaneously program transgene expression of subcutaneous designer cell implants using off-the-shelf commercial paraben-containing skin-care cosmetics. The combination of non-invasive, transdermal and orthogonal trigger-inducible remote control of transgene expression may provide novel opportunities for dynamic interventions in future gene and cell-based therapies. PMID:25943548

  9. Overview of expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng-jun; Guo, Bin; Huo, Yan-lin; Guan, Zheng-ping; Wei, Ya-hui

    2010-10-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), a pathogen for chronic liver infection, afflicts more than 350 million people world-wide. The effective way to control the virus is to take HBV vaccine. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is an effective protective antigen suitable for vaccine development. At present, "edible" vaccine based on transgenic plants is one of the most promising directions in novel types of vaccines. HBsAg production from transgenic plants has been carried out, and the transgenic plant expression systems have developed from model plants (such as tobacco, potato and tomato) to other various plant platforms. Crude or purified extracts of transformed plants have been found to conduct immunological responses and clinical trials for hepatitis B, which gave the researches of plant-based HBsAg production a big boost. The aim of this review was to summarize the recent data about plant-based HBsAg development including molecular biology of HBsAg gene, selection of expression vector, the expression of HBsAg gene in plants, as well as corresponding immunological responses in animal models or human.

  10. Increased maintenance and persistence of transgenes by excision of expression cassettes from plasmid sequences in vivo.

    PubMed

    Riu, Efren; Grimm, Dirk; Huang, Zan; Kay, Mark A

    2005-05-01

    Persistence of transgene expression is a major limitation for nonvirus-mediated gene therapy approaches. We have suggested that covalent linkage of bacterial DNA to the expression cassette plays a critical role in transcriptional silencing of transgenes in vivo. To gain insight into the role of the covalent linkage of plasmid DNA to the expression cassette and transcriptional repression, and whether this silencing effect could be alleviated by altering the molecular structure of vector DNAs in vivo, we generated a scheme for converting routine plasmids into a purified expression cassette, free of bacterial DNA after gene transfer in vivo. To do this, the human alpha-1-antitrypsin (hAAT) and human clotting factor IX (hfIX) reporter genes were flanked by two ISceI endonuclease recognition sites, and coinjected together with a plasmid encoding the I-SceI cDNA or a control plasmid into mouse liver. Two weeks after DNA administration, mice injected with the reporter gene alone or with the irrelevant control plasmid showed low serum levels of hAAT or hFIX, which remained low throughout the length of the experiment. However, animals that expressed I-SceI had a 5- to 10-fold increase in serum hAAT or hFIX that persisted for at least 8 months (length of study). Expression of I-SceI resulted in cleavage and excision of the expression cassettes from the plasmid backbone, forming mostly circles devoid of bacterial DNA sequences, as established by a battery of different Southern blot and polymerase chain reaction analyses in both C57BL/6 and scid treated mice. In contrast, only the input parental circular plasmid DNA band was detected in mice injected with the reporter gene alone, or an I-SceI plasmid together with the hAAT reporter plasmid lacking the I-SceI sites. Similar results were obtained when the Flp recombinase system was used to make mini-plasmids in mouse liver in vivo. This study presents further independent evidence that removing the covalent linkage between

  11. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  12. Growth, fecundity and competitive ability of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum subsp. subterraneum cv. Leura expressing a sunflower seed albumin gene.

    PubMed

    Godfree, Robert C; Woods, Matthew J; Young, Andrew G; Burdon, Jeremy J; Higgins, T J V

    2004-01-01

    Ecological risk assessment is an important step in the production and commercialisation of transgenic plants. To date, however, most risk assessment studies have been performed on crop plants, and few have considered the ecological consequences associated with genetic modification of pasture species. In this study we compared the growth, yield, population dynamics and competitive ability of transgenic Trifolium subterraneum subsp. subterraneum cv. Leura (subclover) expressing a nutritive sunflower seed albumin (ssa) gene with the equivalent non-transgenic commercial line in a glasshouse competition trial. Plants were grown in low-fertility soil typical of unimproved native southeastern Australian grasslands. We measured survivorship, seed production rate, seed germination rate, seed weight, dry weight yield and the intrinsic rate of population increase (lambda) of plants grown in mixtures and monocultures over a range of densities (250 to 2000 plants m(-2)), and also determined intragenotypic and intergenotypic competition coefficients for each line. There were no significant differences between transgenic and non-transgenic plants in any of the measured variables except survivorship; transgenic plants had a significantly lower survival rate than non-transgenic plants when grown at high densities (p<0.01). However, density-dependent effects were observed for all measured variables, and in all models plant density affected the response variables more than the presence of the transgene. Based on these results, we conclude that the ssa gene construct appears to confer no advantage to transgenic T. s. subterraneum cv. Leura growing in mixed or pure swards under the fertility and density regimes examined in the trial. Our data also suggest that transgenic subterranean clover expressing the ssa gene is unlikely to exhibit a competitive advantage over associated non-transgenic commercial cultivars when grown in dense swards in low-fertility pastures.

  13. Comparative Transcriptomic Analyses of Differentially Expressed Genes in Transgenic Melatonin Biosynthesis Ovine HIOMT Gene in Switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shan; Guan, Cong; Liu, Sijia; Huang, Yanhua; Tian, Danyang; Cui, Xin; Zhang, Yunwei; Yang, Fuyu

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin serves pleiotropic functions in prompting plant growth and resistance to various stresses. The accurate biosynthetic pathway of melatonin remains elusive in plant species, while the N-acetyltransferase and O-methyltransferase were considered to be the last two key enzymes during its biosynthesis. To investigate the biosynthesis and metabolic pathway of melatonin in plants, the RNA-seq profile of overexpression of the ovine HIOMT was analyzed and compared with the previous transcriptome of transgenic oAANAT gene in switchgrass, a model plant for cellulosic ethanol production. A total of 946, 405, and 807 differentially expressed unigenes were observed in AANAT vs. control, HIOMT vs. control, and AANAT vs. HIOMT, respectively. Two hundred and seventy-five upregulated and 130 downregulated unigenes were detected in transgenic oHIOMT line comparing with control, including the significantly upregulated (F-box/kelch-repeat protein, zinc finger BED domain-containing protein-3) genes, which were potentially correlated with enhanced phenotypes of shoot, stem and root growth in transgenic oHIOMT switchgrass. Several stress resistant related genes (SPX domain-containing membrane protein, copper transporter 1, late blight resistance protein homolog R1A-6 OS etc.) were specifically and significantly upregulated in transgenic oHIOMT only, while metabolism-related genes (phenylalanine-4-hydroxylase, tyrosine decarboxylase 1, protein disulfide-isomerase and galactinol synthase 2 etc.) were significantly upregulated in transgenic oAANAT only. These results provide new sights into the biosynthetic and physiological functional networks of melatonin in plants. PMID:27877177

  14. Constitutive expression of SMAR1 confers susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Malonia, Sunil K.; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Gupta, Pushpa; Wadhwa, Neerja; Badhwar, Archana; Gupta, Umesh D.; Katoch, Vishwa M.; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies involving animal models of experimental tuberculosis have elucidated the predominant role of cytokines secreted by T cells and macrophages to be an essential component of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The immune activities of CD4+ T cells are mediated in part by Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is produced primarily by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and critical for initiating the immune response against intracellular pathogen such as M. tuberculosis. Nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 plays an important role in V(D)J recombination, T helper cell differentiation and inflammatory diseases. In this study a transgenic mouse model was used to study the role of SMAR1 in M. tuberculosis infection. Methods: Wild type BALB/c, C57BL/6, BALB/c-EGFP-SMAR1 and C57BL/6-SMAR1 transgenic mice were infected with M. tuberculosis (H37Rv). A dose of 100 bacilli was used for infection via respiratory route. Bacterial load in lung and spleen of infected mice was determined at 2, 4, 6 and 8 wk post-infection. Gene expression analysis for Th1 cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed in infected lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Results: SMAR1 transgenic mice from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 genetic background displayed higher bacillary load and susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild type mice. This susceptibility was attributed due to compromised of Th1 response exhibited by transgenic mice. Interpretation & conclusions: SMAR1 transgenic mice exhibited susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo irrespective of genetic background. This susceptibility was attributed to downregulation of Th1 response and its hallmark cytokine IFN-γ. Hence, SMAR1 plays an important role in modulating host immune response after M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26831422

  15. Direct visualization of membrane architecture of myelinating cells in transgenic mice expressing membrane-anchored EGFP.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaqi; Kim, BongWoo; He, Xuelian; Kim, Sunja; Lu, Changqing; Wang, Haibo; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Hou, Yiping; Li, Jianrong; Zhao, Xianghui; Lu, Q Richard

    2014-04-01

    Myelinogenesis is a complex process that involves substantial and dynamic changes in plasma membrane architecture and myelin interaction with axons. Highly ramified processes of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) make axonal contact and then extrapolate to wrap around axons and form multilayer compact myelin sheathes. Currently, the mechanisms governing myelin sheath assembly and axon selection by myelinating cells are not fully understood. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse line expressing the membrane-anchored green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) in myelinating cells, which allow live imaging of details of myelinogenesis and cellular behaviors in the nervous systems. mEGFP expression is driven by the promoter of 2'-3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) that is expressed in the myelinating cell lineage. Robust mEGFP signals appear in the membrane processes of oligodendrocytes in the CNS and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), wherein mEGFP expression defines the inner layers of myelin sheaths and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures in adult sciatic nerves. In addition, mEGFP expression can be used to track the extent of remyelination after demyelinating injury in a toxin-induced demyelination animal model. Taken together, the membrane-anchored mEGFP expression in the new transgenic line would facilitate direct visualization of dynamic myelin membrane formation and assembly during development and process remodeling during remyelination after various demyelinating injuries.

  16. Assessment of long-term transgene expression in barley: Ds-mediated delivery of bar results in robust, stable, and heritable expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utility of transgenic plants for both experimental and practical agronomic purposes is highly dependent on stable, predictable, and heritable expression of the introduced genes. This requirement is frequently unfulfilled, and transgenes are frequently subject to silencing. Studies of the charact...

  17. Combinatorial Screening for Transgenic Yeasts with High Cellulase Activities in Combination with a Tunable Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Ikeuchi, Akinori; Imamura, Chie; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Combinatorial screening used together with a broad library of gene expression cassettes is expected to produce a powerful tool for the optimization of the simultaneous expression of multiple enzymes. Recently, we proposed a highly tunable protein expression system that utilized multiple genome-integrated target genes to fine-tune enzyme expression in yeast cells. This tunable system included a library of expression cassettes each composed of three gene-expression control elements that in different combinations produced a wide range of protein expression levels. In this study, four gene expression cassettes with graded protein expression levels were applied to the expression of three cellulases: cellobiohydrolase 1, cellobiohydrolase 2, and endoglucanase 2. After combinatorial screening for transgenic yeasts simultaneously secreting these three cellulases, we obtained strains with higher cellulase expressions than a strain harboring three cellulase-expression constructs within one high-performance gene expression cassette. These results show that our method will be of broad use throughout the field of metabolic engineering. PMID:26692026

  18. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353

  19. Expression of recombinant antibody (single chain antibody fragment) in transgenic plant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi.

    PubMed

    Dobhal, S; Chaudhary, V K; Singh, A; Pandey, D; Kumar, A; Agrawal, S

    2013-12-01

    Plants offer an alternative inexpensive and convenient technology for large scale production of recombinant proteins especially recombinant antibodies (plantibodies). In this paper, we describe the expression of a model single chain antibody fragment (B6scFv) in transgenic tobacco. Four different gene constructs of B6scFv with different target signals for expression in different compartments of a tobacco plant cell with and without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal were used. Agrobacterium mediated plant transformation of B6scFv gene was performed with tobacco leaf explants and the gene in regenerated plants was detected using histochemical GUS assay and PCR. The expression of B6scFv gene was detected by western blotting and the recombinant protein was purified from putative transgenic tobacco plants using metal affinity chromatography. The expression level of recombinant protein was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highest accumulation of protein was found up to 3.28 % of the total soluble protein (TSP) in plants expressing B6scFv 1003 targeted to the ER, and subsequently expression of 2.9 % of TSP in plants expressing B6scFv 1004 (with target to apoplast with ER retention signal). In contrast, lower expression of 0.78 and 0.58 % of TSP was found in plants expressing antibody fragment in cytosol and apoplast, without ER retention signal. The described method/system could be used in the future for diverse applications including expression of other recombinant molecules in plants for immunomodulation, obtaining pathogen resistance against plant pathogens, altering metabolic pathways and also for the expression of different antibodies of therapeutic and diagnostic uses.

  20. Transgenic expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 results in epidermal hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and severe dermal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, P L; Gimenez-Conti, I B; LaCava, M; Martinez, L A; Conti, C J; Rodriguez-Puebla, M L

    2001-07-01

    In a previous report we have described the effects of expression of D-type cyclins in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of the D-type cyclin partner cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in epithelial growth and differentiation, transgenic mice were generated carrying the CDK4 gene under the control of a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, transgenic mice showed expression of CDK4 in the epidermal basal-cell layer. Epidermal proliferation increased dramatically and basal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy were observed. The hyperproliferative phenotype of these transgenic mice was independent of D-type cyclin expression because no overexpression of these proteins was detected. CDK4 and CDK2 kinase activities increased in transgenic animals and were associated with elevated binding of p27(Kip1) to CDK4. Expression of CDK4 in the epidermis results in an increased spinous layer compared with normal epidermis, and a mild hyperkeratosis in the cornified layer. In addition to epidermal changes, severe dermal fibrosis was observed and part of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was replaced by connective tissue. Also, abnormal expression of keratin 6 associated with the hyperproliferative phenotype was observed in transgenic epidermis. This model provides in vivo evidence for the role of CDK4 as a mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells independent of D-type cyclin expression.

  1. Expression of Finger Millet EcDehydrin7 in Transgenic Tobacco Confers Tolerance to Drought Stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv Kumar; Singh, Vivek Kumar; Raghavendrarao, Sanagala; Phanindra, Mullapudi Lakshmi Venkata; Venkat Raman, K; Solanke, Amolkumar U; Kumar, Polumetla Ananda; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2015-09-01

    One of the critical alarming constraints for agriculture is water scarcity. In the current scenario, global warming due to climate change and unpredictable rainfall, drought is going to be a master player and possess a big threat to stagnating gene pool of staple food crops. So it is necessary to understand the mechanisms that enable the plants to cope with drought stress. In this study, effort was made to prospect the role of EcDehydrin7 protein from normalized cDNA library of drought tolerance finger millet in transgenic tobacco. Biochemical and molecular analyses of T0 transgenic plants were done for stress tolerance. Leaf disc assay, seed germination test, dehydration assay, and chlorophyll estimation showed EcDehydrin7 protein directly link to drought tolerance. Northern and qRT PCR analyses shows relatively high expression of EcDehydrin7 protein compare to wild type. T0 transgenic lines EcDehydrin7(11) and EcDehydrin7(15) shows superior expression among all lines under study. In summary, all results suggest that EcDehydrin7 protein has a remarkable role in drought tolerance and may be used for sustainable crop breeding program in other food crops.

  2. Non-invasive imaging of transgenic GFP expression in neonatal mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhuo, Lang

    2007-02-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a traditional biomarker for astrocytes of the central nervous system. In this study, non-invasive in vivo imaging of GFAP-GFP (green fluorescent protein) expression in the brain of neonatal transgenic mice is used as a novel method to investigate the relationship between the expression of the transgene at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hr post-treatment in mice subjected to a single administration of 12 mg/kg of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4(2'-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (2'-CH 3-MPTP). The GFP elevation was found to peak at 6 hr and lasted to at least 8 hr after the toxin treatment. Histological examination of fixed brain sections using immunohistochemistry (IHC) shows an increase in GFP and GFAP signal from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the hippocampus. The results have provided quantitative fluorescence and qualitative histological evidence for the activation of the GFAP-GFP transgene in astrocytes following neurotoxin 2'-CH 3-MPTP administration, suggesting that the model described here could be used to study neuronal degeneration such as Parkinson's disease and in general, developmental neurotoxicity in live animals.

  3. Heterologous expression of Arabidopsis phytochrome B in transgenic potato influences photosynthetic performance and tuber development

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, A.; Herold, M.; Lenk, I.; Gatz, C. . Albrecht von Haller Inst. fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften); Quail, P.H. )

    1999-05-01

    Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants expressing Arabidopsis phytochrome B were characterized morphologically and physiologically under white light in a greenhouse to explore their potential for improved photosynthesis and higher tuber yields. As expected, overexpression of functional phytochrome B caused pleiotropic effects such as semidwarfism, decreased apical dominance, a higher number of smaller but thicker leaves, and increased pigmentation. Because of increased numbers of chloroplasts in elongated palisade cells, photosynthesis per leaf area and in each individual plant increased. In addition, photosynthesis was less sensitive to photoinactivation under prolonged light stress. The beginning of senescence was not delayed, but deceleration of chlorophyll degradation extended the lifetime of photosynthetically active plants. Both the higher photosynthetic performance and the longer lifespan of the transgenic plants allowed greater biomass production, resulting in extended underground organs with increased tuber yields.

  4. Enhanced calcium cycling and contractile function in transgenic hearts expressing constitutively active G alpha o* protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ming; Gach, Agnieszka A; Liu, GongXin; Xu, Xiaomei; Lim, Chee Chew; Zhang, Julie X; Mao, Lan; Chuprun, Kurt; Koch, Walter J; Liao, Ronglih; Koren, Gideon; Blaxall, Burns C; Mende, Ulrike

    2008-03-01

    In contrast to the other heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) Gs and Gi, the functional role of G o is still poorly defined. To investigate the role of G alpha o in the heart, we generated transgenic mice with cardiac-specific expression of a constitutively active form of G alpha o1* (G alpha o*), the predominant G alpha o isoform in the heart. G alpha o expression was increased 3- to 15-fold in mice from 5 independent lines, all of which had a normal life span and no gross cardiac morphological abnormalities. We demonstrate enhanced contractile function in G alpha o* transgenic mice in vivo, along with increased L-type Ca2+ channel current density, calcium transients, and cell shortening in ventricular G alpha o*-expressing myocytes compared with wild-type controls. These changes were evident at baseline and maintained after isoproterenol stimulation. Expression levels of all major Ca2+ handling proteins were largely unchanged, except for a modest reduction in Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in transgenic ventricles. In contrast, phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor and phospholamban at known PKA sites was increased 1.6- and 1.9-fold, respectively, in G alpha o* ventricles. Density and affinity of beta-adrenoceptors, cAMP levels, and PKA activity were comparable in G alpha o* and wild-type myocytes, but protein phosphatase 1 activity was reduced upon G alpha o* expression, particularly in the vicinity of the ryanodine receptor. We conclude that G alpha o* exerts a positive effect on Ca2+ cycling and contractile function. Alterations in protein phosphatase 1 activity rather than PKA-mediated phosphorylation might be involved in hyperphosphorylation of key Ca2+ handling proteins in hearts with constitutive G alpha o activation.

  5. Transgenic expression of BRCA1 disturbs hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells quiescence and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Lin; Shi, Guiying; Zhang, Xu; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2013-10-15

    The balance between quiescence and proliferation of HSCs is an important regulator of hematopoiesis. Loss of quiescence frequently results in HSCs exhaustion, which underscores the importance of tight regulation of proliferation in these cells. Studies have indicated that cyclin-dependent kinases are involved in the regulation of quiescence in HSCs. BRCA1 plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks, cell cycle, apoptosis and transcription. BRCA1 is expressed in the bone marrow. However, the function of BRCA1 in HSCs is unknown. In our study, we generated BRCA1 transgenic mice to investigate the effects of BRCA1 on the mechanisms of quiescence and differentiation in HSCs. The results demonstrate that over-expression of BRCA1 in the bone marrow impairs the development of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, BRCA1 induced an increase in the number of LSKs, LT-HSCs, ST-HSCs and MPPs. A competitive transplantation assay found that BRCA1 transgenic mice failed to reconstitute hematopoiesis. Moreover, BRCA1 regulates the expression of p21{sup waf1}/cip1 and p57{sup kip2}, which results in a loss of quiescence in LSKs. Together, over-expression of BRCA1 in bone marrow disrupted the quiescent of LSKs, induced excessive accumulation of LSKs, and disrupted differentiation of the HSCs, which acts through the down-regulated of p21{sup waf1}/cip1 and p57{sup kip2}. - Highlights: • Over-expression of BRCA1 results in impaired B lymphocyte development. • BRCA1 transgenic mice disrupted the quiescent of LSKs, induced excessive accumulation of LSKs. • BRCA1 impairs the function of HSCs through the down-regulated of p21{sup waf1/cip1} and p57{sup kip2}.

  6. A multiplexed miRNA and transgene expression platform for simultaneous repression and expression of protein coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Attila A

    2016-01-01

    Knockdown of single or multiple gene targets by RNA interference (RNAi) is necessary to overcome escape mutants or isoform redundancy. It is also necessary to use multiple RNAi reagents to knockdown multiple targets. It is also desirable to express a transgene or positive regulatory elements and inhibit a target gene in a coordinated fashion. This study reports a flexible multiplexed RNAi and transgene platform using endogenous intronic primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) as a scaffold located in the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model for any functional transgene. The multiplexed intronic miRNA - GFP transgene platform was designed to co-express multiple small RNAs within the polycistronic cluster from a Pol II promoter at more moderate levels to reduce potential vector toxicity. The native intronic miRNAs are co-transcribed with a precursor GFP mRNA as a single transcript and presumably cleaved out of the precursor-(pre) mRNA by the RNA splicing machinery, spliceosome. The spliced intron with miRNA hairpins will be further processed into mature miRNAs or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) capable of triggering RNAi effects, while the ligated exons become a mature messenger RNA for the translation of the functional GFP protein. Data show that this approach led to robust RNAi-mediated silencing of multiple Renilla Luciferase (R-Luc)-tagged target genes and coordinated expression of functional GFP from a single transcript in transiently transfected HeLa cells. The results demonstrated that this design facilitates the coordinated expression of all mature miRNAs either as individual miRNAs or as multiple miRNAs and the associated protein. The data suggest that, it is possible to simultaneously deliver multiple negative (miRNA or shRNA) and positive (transgene) regulatory elements. Because many cellular processes require simultaneous repression and activation of downstream pathways, this approach offers a platform technology to achieve that dual manipulation efficiently

  7. Gene expression analysis of embryonic photoreceptor precursor cells using BAC-Crx-EGFP transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Muranishi, Yuki; Sato, Shigeru; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ueno, Shinji; Koyasu, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Mineo; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2010-02-12

    Crx is a transcription factor which is predominantly expressed in developing and mature photoreceptor cells in the retina, and plays a crucial role in the terminal differentiation of both rods and cones. Crx is one of the earliest-expressed genes specifically in photoreceptor precursors, allowing us to trace photoreceptor precursor cells from embryonic stages to adult stage by visualizing Crx-expressing cells. In the current study, we generated a transgenic mouse line which expresses enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) in the retina driven by the Crx promoter using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. EGFP-positive cells were observed in the presumptive photoreceptor layer in the retina at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5), and continued to be expressed in developing and mature photoreceptor cells up to adult stage. We sorted EGFP-positive photoreceptor precursors at E17.5 using fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), and subsequently performed microarray analysis of the FACS-sorted cells. We observed various photoreceptor genes, especially cone genes, are enriched in the EGFP-positive cells, indicating that embryonic cone photoreceptor precursors are enriched. In addition, we found that most of the EGFP-positive cells were post-mitotic cells. Thus, the transgenic line we established can serve as a useful tool to study both developing and mature photoreceptor cells, including embryonic cone precursors whose analysis has been difficult.

  8. Transfection efficiency and transgene expression kinetics of mRNA delivered in naked and nanoparticle format.

    PubMed

    Phua, Kyle K L; Leong, Kam W; Nair, Smita K

    2013-03-28

    Transfection efficiencies and transgene expression kinetics of messenger RNA (mRNA), an emerging class of nucleic acid-based therapeutics, have been poorly characterized. In this study, we evaluated transfection efficiencies of mRNA delivered in naked and nanoparticle format in vitro and in vivo using GFP and luciferase as reporters. While mRNA nanoparticles transfect primary human and mouse dendritic cells (DCs) efficiently in vitro, naked mRNA could not produce any detectable gene product. The protein expression of nanoparticle-mediated transfection in vitro peaks rapidly within 5-7h and decays in a biphasic manner. In vivo, naked mRNA is more efficient than mRNA nanoparticles when administered subcutaneously. In contrast, mRNA nanoparticle performs better when administered intranasally and intravenously. Gene expression is most transient when delivered intravenously in nanoparticle format with an apparent half-life of 1.4h and lasts less than 24h, and most sustained when delivered in the naked format subcutaneously at the base of tail with an apparent half-life of 18h and persists for at least 6days. Notably, exponential decreases in protein expression are consistently observed post-delivery of mRNA in vivo regardless of the mode of delivery (naked or nanoparticle) or the site of administration. This study elucidates the performance of mRNA transfection and suggests a niche for mRNA therapeutics when predictable in vivo transgene expression kinetics is imperative.

  9. Transgenic cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds expressing a bean alpha-amylase inhibitor 1 confer resistance to storage pests, bruchid beetles.

    PubMed

    Solleti, Siva Kumar; Bakshi, Souvika; Purkayastha, Jubilee; Panda, Sanjib Kumar; Sahoo, Lingaraj

    2008-12-01

    Cowpea is one of the important grain legumes. Storage pests, Callosobruchus maculatus and C. chinensis cause severe damage to the cowpea seeds during storage. We employ a highly efficient Agrobacterium-mediated cowpea transformation method for introduction of the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (alphaAI-1) gene into a commercially important Indian cowpea cultivar, Pusa Komal and generated fertile transgenic plants. The use of constitutive expression of additional vir genes in resident pSB1 vector in Agrobacterium strain LBA4404, thiol compounds during cocultivation and a geneticin based selection system resulted in twofold increase in stable transformation frequency. Expression of alphaAI-1 gene under bean phytohemagglutinin promoter results in accumulation of alphaAI-1 in transgenic seeds. The transgenic protein was active as an inhibitor of porcine alpha-amylase in vitro. Transgenic cowpeas expressing alphaAI-1 strongly inhibited the development of C. maculatus and C. chinensis in insect bioassays.

  10. Caffeine biosynthesis and adenine metabolism in transgenic Coffea canephora plants with reduced expression of N-methyltransferase genes.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Katahira, Riko; Morimoto, Masayuki; Ogita, Shinjiro; Sano, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    In anti-sense and RNA interference transgenic plants of Coffea canephora in which the expression of CaMXMT1 was suppressed, caffeine biosynthesis from [8-(14)C]adenine was investigated, together with the overall metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine. Compared with wild type control plants, total purine alkaloid biosynthesis from adenine and conversion of theobromine to caffeine were both reduced in the transgenic plants. As found previously, [8-(14)C]adenine was metabolised to salvage products (nucleotides and RNA), to degradation products (ureides and CO(2)) and to purine alkaloids (theobromine and caffeine). In the transgenic plants, metabolism of [8-(14)C]adenine shifted from purine alkaloid synthesis to purine catabolism or salvage for nucleotides. HPLC analysis revealed a significantly reduced caffeine content in the transgenic plants. A small quantity (less than 20 nmol g(-1) fresh weight) of xanthosine had accumulated in at least one of the transgenic plants.

  11. Improvement of anti-nutritional effect resulting from β-glucanase specific expression in the parotid gland of transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Guan, Li-Zeng; Cai, Jin-Shun; Zhao, Shuai; Sun, Yu-Ping; Wang, Jing-Lan; Jiang, Yong; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qing-Yan; Wu, Zhen-Fang; Xi, Qian-Yun; Zhang, Yong-Liang

    2017-02-01

    β-Glucan is the predominant anti-nutritional factors in monogastric animal feed. Although β-glucanase supplementation in diet can help to eliminate the adverse effects, enzyme stability is substantially modified during the feed manufacturing process. To determine whether the expression of endogenous β-glucanase gene (GLU) in vivo can improve digestibility of dietary β-glucan and absorption of nutrients, we successfully produced transgenic pigs via nuclear transfer which express the GLU from Paenibacillus polymyxa CP7 in the parotid gland. In three live transgenic founders, β-glucanase activities in the saliva were 3.2, 0.07 and 0.03 U/mL, respectively, and interestingly the enzyme activities increased in the pigs from 178 days old to 789 days old. From the feed the amount of gross energy, crude protein and crude fat absorbed by the transgenic pigs was significantly higher than the non-transgenic pigs. Meanwhile the moisture content of the feces was significantly reduced in transgenic pigs compared with the non-transgenic pigs. Furthermore, in all positive G1 pigs, β-glucanase activity was detectable and the highest enzyme activity reached 3.5 U/mL in saliva. Also, crude protein digestion was significantly higher in G1 transgenic pigs than in control pigs. Taken together, our data showed that the transgenic β-glucanase exerted its biological catalytic function in vivo in the saliva, and the improved performance of the transgenic pigs could be accurately passed on to the offspring, indicating a promising alternative approach to improving nutrient availability was established to improve utilization of livestock feed through transgenic animals.

  12. Stability of transgene expression in reduced allergen peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) across multiple generations and at different soil sulfur levels.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Manju; Chu, Ye; Maleki, Soheila J; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2015-02-18

    Transgenic peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) containing a gene designed for RNA interference (RNAi) showed stable complete silencing of Ara h 2 and partial silencing of Ara h 6, two potent peanut allergens/proteins, along with minimal collateral changes to other allergens, Ara h 1 and Ara h 3, across three generations (T3, T4, and T5) under field conditions. Different soil sulfur levels (0.012, 0.3, and 3.0 mM) differentially impacted sulfur-rich (Ara h 2, Ara h 3, and Ara h 6) versus sulfur-poor (Ara h 1) proteins in non-transgenic versus transgenic peanut. The sulfur level had no effect on Ara h 1, whereas low sulfur led to a significant reduction of Ara h 3 in transgenic and non-transgenic seeds and Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 in non-transgenic but not in transgenic peanuts because these proteins already were reduced by gene silencing. These results demonstrate stability of transgene expression and the potential utility of RNAi in allergen manipulation.

  13. Induction of a Highly Specific Antiviral State in Transgenic Plants: Implications for Regulation of Gene Expression and Virus Resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Lindbo, JA; Silva-Rosales, L; Proebsting, WM; Dougherty, WG

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing either a full-length form of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) coat protein or a form truncated at the N terminus of the TEV coat protein were initially susceptible to TEV infection, and typical systemic symptoms developed. However, 3 to 5 weeks after a TEV infection was established, transgenic plants "recovered" from the TEV infection, and new stem and leaf tissue emerged symptom and virus free. A TEV-resistant state was induced in the recovered tissue. The resistance was virus specific. Recovered plant tissue could not be infected with TEV, but was susceptible to the closely related virus, potato virus Y. The resistance phenotype was functional at the single-cell level because protoplasts from recovered transgenic tissue did not support TEV replication. Surprisingly, steady state transgene mRNA levels in recovered tissue were 12-to 22-fold less than transgene mRNA levels in uninoculated transgenic tissue of the same developmental stage. However, nuclear run-off studies suggested that transgene transcription rates in recovered and uninoculated plants were similar. We propose that the resistant state and reduced steady state levels of transgene transcript accumulation are mediated at the cellular level by a cytoplasmic activity that targets specific RNA sequences for inactivation. PMID:12271055

  14. Heterologous expression of the adenosine A1 receptor in transgenic mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Salom, David; Zhang, Li; Harris, Tim; Ballesteros, Juan A; Golczak, Marcin; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kurahara, Carole; Juan, Todd; Jordan, Steven; Salon, John A

    2007-07-17

    Traditional cell-based systems used to express integral membrane receptors have yet to produce protein samples of sufficient quality for structural study. Herein we report an in vivo method that harnesses the photoreceptor system of the retina to heterologously express G protein-coupled receptors in a biochemically homogeneous and pharmacologically functional conformation. As an example we show that the adenosine A1 receptor, when placed under the influence of the mouse opsin promoter and rhodopsin rod outer segment targeting sequence, localized to the photoreceptor cells of transgenic retina. The resulting receptor protein was uniformly glycosylated and pharmacologically well behaved. By comparison, we demonstrated in a control experiment that opsin, when expressed in the liver, had a complex pattern of glycosylation. Upon solubilization, the retinal adenosine A1 receptor retained binding characteristics similar to its starting material. This expression method may prove generally useful for generating high-quality G protein-coupled receptors for structural studies.

  15. The Lgr5 transgene is expressed specifically in glycinergic amacrine cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Sukhdeo, Kumar; Koch, Catherine E; Miller, Tyler E; Zhou, Hannah; Rivera, Maricruz; Yan, Kenneth; Cepko, Constance L; Lathia, Justin D; Rich, Jeremy N

    2014-02-01

    Retinal amacrine cells are a diverse set of interneurons within the inner nuclear layer. The canonical Wnt pathway is highly active within mature amacrine cells, but its role remains unclear. Leucine-rich repeat containing G-protein receptor 5 (Lgr5) is a newly identified component of the Wnt receptor complex that potentiates beta-catenin signaling. In multiple epithelial organs Lgr5 marks adult tissue stem cells. We investigated the expression of this gene using Lgr5-eGFP-IRES-CreER transgenic reporter mice. In the eye, Lgr5 was exclusively expressed in glycinergic amacrine cells in adult mice. Amacrine cells are post-mitotic and represent the first neuronal and non-stem cell lineage to express Lgr5. We further interrogated the spatiotemporal labeling of individual amacrine cells with controlled fluorophore expression. This "fluorofilling" technique provides a tool to study amacrine morphology and dissect neural networks.

  16. Production of heterozygous alpha 1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) knock-out transgenic miniature pigs expressing human CD39.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kimyung; Shim, Joohyun; Ko, Nayoung; Eom, Heejong; Kim, Jiho; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Jin, Dong-Il; Kim, Hyunil

    2017-04-01

    Production of transgenic pigs for use as xenotransplant donors is a solution to the severe shortage of human organs for transplantation. The first barrier to successful xenotransplantation is hyperacute rejection, a rapid, massive humoral immune response directed against the pig carbohydrate GGTA1 epitope. Platelet activation, adherence, and clumping, all major features of thrombotic microangiopathy, are inevitable results of immune-mediated transplant rejection. Human CD39 rapidly hydrolyzes ATP and ADP to AMP; AMP is hydrolyzed by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) to adenosine, an anti-thrombotic and cardiovascular protective mediator. In this study, we developed a vector-based strategy for ablation of GGTA1 function and concurrent expression of human CD39 (hCD39). An hCD39 expression cassette was constructed to target exon 4 of GGTA1. We established heterozygous GGTA1 knock-out cell lines expressing hCD39 from pig ear fibroblasts for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We also described production of heterozygous GGTA1 knock-out piglets expressing hCD39 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human CD39 was expressed in heart, kidney and aorta. Human CD39 knock-in heterozygous ear fibroblast from transgenic cloned pigs, but not in non-transgenic pig's cells. Expression of GGTA1 gene was lower in the knock-in heterozygous ear fibroblast from transgenic pigs compared to the non-transgenic pig's cell. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the transgenic pigs were more resistant to lysis by pooled complement-preserved normal human serum than that from wild type (WT) pig. Accordingly, GGTA1 mutated piglets expressing hCD39 will provide a new organ source for xenotransplantation research.

  17. Transgenic Citrus Expressing an Arabidopsis NPR1 Gene Exhibit Enhanced Resistance against Huanglongbing (HLB; Citrus Greening)

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Manjul; Barthe, Gary; Irey, Michael; Grosser, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Commercial sweet orange cultivars lack resistance to Huanglongbing (HLB), a serious phloem limited bacterial disease that is usually fatal. In order to develop sustained disease resistance to HLB, transgenic sweet orange cultivars ‘Hamlin’ and ‘Valencia’ expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene under the control of a constitutive CaMV 35S promoter or a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2) promoter were produced. Overexpression of AtNPR1 resulted in trees with normal phenotypes that exhibited enhanced resistance to HLB. Phloem specific expression of NPR1 was equally effective for enhancing disease resistance. Transgenic trees exhibited reduced diseased severity and a few lines remained disease-free even after 36 months of planting in a high-disease pressure field site. Expression of the NPR1 gene induced expression of several native genes involved in the plant defense signaling pathways. The AtNPR1 gene being plant derived can serve as a component for the development of an all plant T-DNA derived consumer friendly GM tree. PMID:26398891

  18. Expression and Characterization of Acidothermus celluloyticus E1 Endoglucanase in Transgenic Duckweed Lemna minor 8627

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Cheng, J. J.; Himmel, M. E.; Skory, C. D.; Adney, W. S.; Thomas, S. R.; Tisserat, B.; Nishimura, Y.; Yamamoto, Y. T.

    2007-01-01

    Endoglucanase E1 from Acidothermus cellulolyticus was expressed cytosolically under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in transgenic duckweed, Lemna minor 8627 without any obvious observable phenotypic effects on morphology or rate of growth. The recombinant enzyme co-migrated with the purified catalytic domain fraction of the native E1 protein on western blot analysis, revealing that the cellulose-binding domain was cleaved near or in the linker region. The duckweed-expressed enzyme was biologically active and the expression level was up to 0.24% of total soluble protein. The endoglucanase activity with carboxymethylcellulose averaged 0.2 units mg protein{sup -1} extracted from fresh duckweed. The optimal temperature and pH for E1 enzyme activity were about 80 C and pH 5, respectively. While extraction with HEPES (N-[2-hydroxyethyl]piperazine-N{prime}-[2-ethanesulfonic acid]) buffer (pH 8) resulted in the highest recovery of total soluble proteins and E1 enzyme, extraction with citrate buffer (pH 4.8) at 65 C enriched relative amounts of E1 enzyme in the extract. This study demonstrates that duckweed may offer new options for the expression of cellulolytic enzymes in transgenic plants.

  19. Pathogen-induced expression of a cecropin A-melittin antimicrobial peptide gene confers antifungal resistance in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yevtushenko, Dmytro P; Romero, Rafael; Forward, Benjamin S; Hancock, Robert E; Kay, William W; Misra, Santosh

    2005-06-01

    Expression of defensive genes from a promoter that is specifically activated in response to pathogen invasion is highly desirable for engineering disease-resistant plants. A plant transformation vector was constructed with transcriptional fusion between the pathogen-responsive win3.12T promoter from poplar and the gene encoding the novel cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptide (CEMA) with strong antimicrobial activity. This promoter-transgene combination was evaluated in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) for enhanced plant resistance against a highly virulent pathogenic fungus Fusarium solani. Transgene expression in leaves was strongly increased after fungal infection or mechanical wounding, and the accumulation of CEMA transcripts was found to be systemic and positively correlated with the number of transgene insertions. A simple and efficient in vitro regeneration bioassay for preliminary screening of transgenic lines against pathogenic fungi was developed. CEMA had strong antifungal activity in vitro, inhibiting conidia germination at concentrations that were non-toxic to tobacco protoplasts. Most importantly, the expression level of the CEMA peptide in vivo, regulated by the win3.12T promoter, was sufficient to confer resistance against F. solani in transgenic tobacco. The antifungal resistance of plants with high CEMA expression was strong and reproducible. In addition, leaf tissue extracts from transgenic plants significantly reduced the number of fungal colonies arising from germinated conidia. Accumulation of CEMA peptide in transgenic tobacco had no deleterious effect on plant growth and development. This is the first report showing the application of a heterologous pathogen-inducible promoter to direct the expression of an antimicrobial peptide in plants, and the feasibility of this approach to provide disease resistance in tobacco and, possibly, other crops.

  20. Enhanced Whitefly Resistance in Transgenic Tobacco Plants Expressing Double Stranded RNA of v-ATPase A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Nidhi; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verma, Praveen C.; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa; Tuli, Rakesh; Singh, Pradhyumna K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA) designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi), thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA) coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. Conclusions/Significance Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops. PMID:24595215

  1. Transgenic expression of tilapia hepcidin 1-5 and shrimp chelonianin in zebrafish and their resistance to bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Peng, Kuan-Chieh; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2011-08-01

    Recently, tilapia hepcidin (TH)1-5 was characterized, and its antimicrobial functions against several pathogens were reported. The antimicrobial functions of another shrimp antimicrobial peptide (AMP), chelonianin, were also characterized using a recombinant chelonianin protein (rcf) that was expressed by a stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line against pathogen infections in fish. The function of the overexpression of both AMPs in zebrafish muscles was not examined in previous studies. Herein, we investigated the antimicrobial functions of TH1-5 and chelonianin against Vibrio vulnificus (204) and Streptococcus agalactiae (SA48) in transgenic TH1-5 zebrafish and transgenic chelonianin zebrafish. The presence of TH1-5 and chelonianin enhanced the inhibitory ability in transgenic AMP zebrafish against the two different bacterial infections. The bacterial number of either V. vulnificus (204) or S. agalactiae (SA48) had decreased at 96 h after injection into transgenic AMP zebrafish muscle compared to non-transgenic zebrafish muscle. Additionally, immune-related gene expressions analyzed by real-time PCR studies showed the modulation of several genes including interleukin (IL)-10, IL-22, IL-26, MyD88, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-1, TLR-3, TLR-4, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and lysozyme, and significant differences were found between transgenic AMP zebrafish and wild-type zebrafish injected with PBS at 1-24 h. These results suggest that several immune-related gene expressions were induced in transgenic TH1-5 and chelonianin zebrafish which effectively inhibited bacterial growth. The survival rate dropped to 86.6% in transgenic chelonianin zebrafish after 28 days of infection compared of the 50% survival rate in transgenic TH1-5 zebrafish after 28 days of infection. Overall, these results indicate that TH1-5 and chelonianin possess the potential to be novel candidate genes for aquaculture applications to treat fish diseases.

  2. New Resistance Mechanism in Helicoverpa armigera Threatens Transgenic Crops Expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Robin V.; Dang, Ho T.; Kemp, Fred C.; Nicholson, Ian C.; Moores, Graham D.

    2005-01-01

    In Australia, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, has a long history of resistance to conventional insecticides. Transgenic cotton (expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac) has been grown for H. armigera control since 1996. It is demonstrated here that a population of Australian H. armigera has developed resistance to Cry1Ac toxin (275-fold). Some 70% of resistant H. armigera larvae were able to survive on Cry1Ac transgenic cotton (Ingard) The resistance phenotype is inherited as an autosomal semidominant trait. Resistance was associated with elevated esterase levels, which cosegregated with resistance. In vitro studies employing surface plasmon resonance technology and other biochemical techniques demonstrated that resistant strain esterase could bind to Cry1Ac protoxin and activated toxin. In vivo studies showed that Cry1Ac-resistant larvae fed Cy1Ac transgenic cotton or Cry1Ac-treated artificial diet had lower esterase activity than non-Cry1Ac-fed larvae. A resistance mechanism in which esterase sequesters Cry1Ac is proposed. PMID:15870346

  3. New resistance mechanism in Helicoverpa armigera threatens transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Robin V; Dang, Ho T; Kemp, Fred C; Nicholson, Ian C; Moores, Graham D

    2005-05-01

    In Australia, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, has a long history of resistance to conventional insecticides. Transgenic cotton (expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac) has been grown for H. armigera control since 1996. It is demonstrated here that a population of Australian H. armigera has developed resistance to Cry1Ac toxin (275-fold). Some 70% of resistant H. armigera larvae were able to survive on Cry1Ac transgenic cotton (Ingard) The resistance phenotype is inherited as an autosomal semidominant trait. Resistance was associated with elevated esterase levels, which cosegregated with resistance. In vitro studies employing surface plasmon resonance technology and other biochemical techniques demonstrated that resistant strain esterase could bind to Cry1Ac protoxin and activated toxin. In vivo studies showed that Cry1Ac-resistant larvae fed Cy1Ac transgenic cotton or Cry1Ac-treated artificial diet had lower esterase activity than non-Cry1Ac-fed larvae. A resistance mechanism in which esterase sequesters Cry1Ac is proposed.

  4. Oral immunogenicity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus antigen expressed in transgenic banana.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hui-Ting; Chia, Min-Yuan; Pang, Victor Fei; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2013-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a persistent threat of economically significant influence to the swine industry worldwide. Recombinant DNA technology coupled with tissue culture technology is a viable alternative for the inexpensive production of heterologous proteins in planta. Embryogenic cells of banana cv. 'Pei chiao' (AAA) have been transformed with the ORF5 gene of PRRSV envelope glycoprotein (GP5) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and have been confirmed. Recombinant GP5 protein levels in the transgenic banana leaves were detected and ranged from 0.021%-0.037% of total soluble protein. Pigs were immunized with recombinant GP5 protein by orally feeding transgenic banana leaves for three consecutive doses at a 2-week interval and challenged with PRRSV at 7 weeks postinitial immunization. A vaccination-dependent gradational increase in the elicitation of serum and saliva anti-PRRSV IgG and IgA was observed. Furthermore, significantly lower viraemia and tissue viral load were recorded when compared with the pigs fed with untransformed banana leaves. The results suggest that transgenic banana leaves expressing recombinant GP5 protein can be an effective strategy for oral delivery of recombinant subunit vaccines in pigs and can open new avenues for the production of vaccines against PRRSV.

  5. High-level expression of biologically active human alpha 1-antitrypsin in the milk of transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, A L; McClenaghan, M; Hornsey, V; Simons, J P; Clark, A J

    1990-01-01

    Reduced circulating levels of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1 AT) are associated with certain alpha 1 AT genotypes and increased susceptibility to emphysema. Unfortunately, the amounts of alpha 1 AT that would be required for replacement therapy are beyond the capacity of plasma fractionation and mammalian cell culture systems. Thus, we have examined the potential of transgenic animals as an alternative means of producing human alpha 1 AT. A hybrid gene constructed by using sequences from the ovine milk protein gene beta-lactoglobulin fused to an alpha 1 AT "minigene" was used to generate transgenic mice. Of 13 independent transgenic mice and mouse lines, 5 expressed the hybrid gene in the mammary gland, 5 in the salivary glands, and 2 in both these tissues. Human alpha 1 AT was secreted into the milk of each of the 7 mice and mouse lines that expressed the hybrid gene in the mammary gland. Four of these mammary-expressing transgenic mice and mouse lines produced concentrations of at least 0.5 mg of alpha 1 AT per ml in their milk; one line (AATB 35) produced 7 mg of this protein per ml. alpha 1 AT from transgenic mouse milk was similar in size to human plasma-derived alpha 1 AT and showed a similar capacity to inhibit trypsin. Expression at equivalent levels in transgenic sheep or cattle would yield sufficient alpha 1 AT for therapeutic purposes. Images PMID:1695012

  6. Transgenic banana plants expressing Xanthomonas wilt resistance genes revealed a stable non-target bacterial colonization structure.

    PubMed

    Nimusiima, Jean; Köberl, Martina; Tumuhairwe, John Baptist; Kubiriba, Jerome; Staver, Charles; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-12-10

    Africa is among the continents where the battle over genetically modified crops is currently being played out. The impact of GM in Africa could potentially be very positive. In Uganda, researchers have developed transgenic banana lines resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt. The transgenic lines expressing hrap and pflp can provide a timely solution to the pandemic. However, the impact of the transgenes expression on non-target microorganisms has not yet been investigated. To study this effect, transgenic and control lines were grown under field conditions and their associated microbiome was investigated by 16S rRNA gene profiling combining amplicon sequencing and molecular fingerprinting. Three years after sucker planting, no statistically significant differences between transgenic lines and their non-modified predecessors were detected for their associated bacterial communities. The overall gammaproteobacterial rhizosphere microbiome was highly dominated by Xanthomonadales, while Pseudomonadales and Enterobacteriales were accumulated in the pseudostem. Shannon indices revealed much higher diversity in the rhizosphere than in the pseudostem endosphere. However, the expression of the transgenes did not result in changes in the diversity of Gammaproteobacteria, the closest relatives of the target pathogen. In this field experiment, the expression of the resistance genes appears to have no consequences for non-target rhizobacteria and endophytes.

  7. Transgenic banana plants expressing Xanthomonas wilt resistance genes revealed a stable non-target bacterial colonization structure

    PubMed Central

    Nimusiima, Jean; Köberl, Martina; Tumuhairwe, John Baptist; Kubiriba, Jerome; Staver, Charles; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Africa is among the continents where the battle over genetically modified crops is currently being played out. The impact of GM in Africa could potentially be very positive. In Uganda, researchers have developed transgenic banana lines resistant to banana Xanthomonas wilt. The transgenic lines expressing hrap and pflp can provide a timely solution to the pandemic. However, the impact of the transgenes expression on non-target microorganisms has not yet been investigated. To study this effect, transgenic and control lines were grown under field conditions and their associated microbiome was investigated by 16S rRNA gene profiling combining amplicon sequencing and molecular fingerprinting. Three years after sucker planting, no statistically significant differences between transgenic lines and their non-modified predecessors were detected for their associated bacterial communities. The overall gammaproteobacterial rhizosphere microbiome was highly dominated by Xanthomonadales, while Pseudomonadales and Enterobacteriales were accumulated in the pseudostem. Shannon indices revealed much higher diversity in the rhizosphere than in the pseudostem endosphere. However, the expression of the transgenes did not result in changes in the diversity of Gammaproteobacteria, the closest relatives of the target pathogen. In this field experiment, the expression of the resistance genes appears to have no consequences for non-target rhizobacteria and endophytes. PMID:26657016

  8. Transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing MsrA1, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, exhibit resistance to fungal phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Anjana; Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Shashi; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Misra, Santosh; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2014-06-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) have shown potential against broad spectrum of phytopathogens. Synthetic versions with desirable properties have been modeled on these natural peptides. MsrA1 is a synthetic chimera of cecropin A and melittin CAPs with antimicrobial properties. We generated transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing the msrA1 gene aimed at conferring fungal resistance. Five independent transgenic lines were evaluated for resistance to Alternaria brassicae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, two of the most devastating pathogens of B. juncea crops. In vitro assays showed inhibition by MsrA1 of Alternaria hyphae growth by 44-62 %. As assessed by the number and size of lesions and time taken for complete leaf necrosis, the Alternaria infection was delayed and restricted in the transgenic plants with the protection varying from 69 to 85 % in different transgenic lines. In case of S. sclerotiorum infection, the lesions were more severe and spread profusely in untransformed control compared with transgenic plants. The sclerotia formed in the stem of untransformed control plants were significantly more in number and larger in size than those present in the transgenic plants where disease protection of 56-71.5 % was obtained. We discuss the potential of engineering broad spectrum biotic stress tolerance by transgenic expression of CAPs in crop plants.

  9. Expression of EGFP and NPTII protein is not associated with organ abnormalities in deceased transgenic cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Qian; Cui, Huiting; Li, Qinghe; Zhao, Yiqiang; Luo, Juan; Liu, Qiuyue; Sun, Xiuzhu; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2008-12-01

    Both enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase type II enzyme (NPTII) are widely used in transgenic studies, but their side effects have not been extensively investigated. In this study, we evaluated the expression profiles of the two marker genes and the relationship between their expression and organ abnormalities. Eight transgenic cloned cattle were studied, four harboring both EGFP and NPTII, and four harboring only the NPTII gene. Four age-matched cloned cattle were used as controls. EGFP and NPTII expression were measured and detected by Q-PCR, Western blot, ELISA, and RIA in heart, liver, and lungs, and the values ranged from 0.3 to 5 microg/g. The expression profiles exhibited differential or mosaic pattern between the organs, the pathologic symptoms of which were identified, but were similar to those of age-matched cloned cattle. All data indicated that the expression of EGFP and NPTII is not associated with organ abnormalities in transgenic cloned cattle.

  10. The transgenic expression of human follistatin-344 increases skeletal muscle mass in pigs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fei; Fang, Rui; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Xin; Chang, Wen; Zhang, Zaihu; Li, Ning; Meng, Qingyong

    2017-02-01

    Follistatin (FST), which was first found in the follicles of cattle and pigs, has been shown to be an essential regulator for muscle development. Mice that were genetically engineered to overexpress Fst specifically in muscle had at least twice the amount of skeletal muscle mass as controls; these findings are similar to earlier results obtained in myostatin-knockout mice. However, the role of follistatin in skeletal muscle development has yet to be clarified in livestock. Here, we describe transgenic Duroc pigs that exogenously express Fst specifically in muscle tissue. The transgenic pigs exhibited an increased proportion of skeletal muscle and a reduced proportion of body fat that were similar to those reported in myostatin-null cattle. The lean percentage of lean meat was significantly higher in the F1 generation of TG pigs (72.95 ± 1.0 %) than in WT pigs (69.18 ± 0.97 %) (N = 16, P < 0.05). Myofiber hypertrophy was also observed in the longissimus dorsi of transgenic pigs, possibly contributing to the increased skeletal muscle mass. Western blot analysis showed a significantly reduced level of Smad2 phosphorylation and an increased level of Akt(S473) phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle tissue of the transgenic pigs. Moreover, no cardiac muscle hypertrophy or reproductive abnormality was observed. These findings indicate that muscle-specific Fst overexpression in pigs enhances skeletal muscle growth, at least partly due to myofiber hypertrophy and providing a promising approach to increase muscle mass in pigs and other livestock.

  11. [Effect of constitutive expression of ARGOS-LIKE gene on dimensions of cells and organs of transgenic tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Khiazev, A V; Safiullina, M G; Cemeris, A V

    2013-05-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress the ARGOS-LIKE (ARL) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana have been developed. The transgenic plants possessed increased dimensions of leaves and stem, whereas the magnitude of flowers was modified to a lesser degree. The increase in the organ dimensions was a result of stimulation of cell expansion; the cell quantity in the organ was even decreased. Ectopic expression of the ARL gene was promoted in order to increase in the level of mRNA of tobacco expansine NtEXPA5. It has been shown that the ARL gene of A. thaliana can be used to obtain transgenic plants with increased sizes of the leaves and stem.

  12. Position independent expression and developmental regulation is directed by the beta myosin heavy chain gene's 5' upstream region in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1995-08-25

    Transgenic mice generated with constructs containing 5.6 kb of the beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene's 5' flanking region linked to the cat reporter gene express the transgene at high levels. In all 47 lines analyzed, tissue-specific accumulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was found at levels proportional to the number of integrated transgene copies. Deletion constructs containing only 0.6 kb of 5' upstream region showed position effects in transgenic mice and did not demonstrate copy number dependence although transgene expression remained muscle-specific. The 5.6 kb 5' upstream region conferred appropriate developmental control of the transgene to the cardiac compartment and directs copy number dependent and position independent expression. Lines generated with a construct in which three proximal cis-acting elements were mutated showed reduced levels of transgene expression, but all maintained their position independence and copy number dependence, suggesting the presence of distinct regulatory mechanisms.

  13. Position independent expression and developmental regulation is directed by the beta myosin heavy chain gene's 5' upstream region in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice generated with constructs containing 5.6 kb of the beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene's 5' flanking region linked to the cat reporter gene express the transgene at high levels. In all 47 lines analyzed, tissue-specific accumulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was found at levels proportional to the number of integrated transgene copies. Deletion constructs containing only 0.6 kb of 5' upstream region showed position effects in transgenic mice and did not demonstrate copy number dependence although transgene expression remained muscle-specific. The 5.6 kb 5' upstream region conferred appropriate developmental control of the transgene to the cardiac compartment and directs copy number dependent and position independent expression. Lines generated with a construct in which three proximal cis-acting elements were mutated showed reduced levels of transgene expression, but all maintained their position independence and copy number dependence, suggesting the presence of distinct regulatory mechanisms. Images PMID:7667107

  14. Widespread neuron-specific transgene expression in brain and spinal cord following synapsin promoter-driven AAV9 neonatal intracerebroventricular injection.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jesse R; Smith, Gaynor A; Rocha, Emily M; Hayes, Melissa A; Beagan, Jonathan A; Hallett, Penelope J; Isacson, Ole

    2014-07-25

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer holds great promise for treating a wide-range of neurodegenerative disorders. The AAV9 serotype crosses the blood-brain barrier and shows enhanced transduction efficiency compared to other serotypes, thus offering advantageous targeting when global transgene expression is required. Neonatal intravenous or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) delivery of recombinant AAV9 (rAAV9) have recently proven effective for modeling and treating several rodent models of neurodegenerative disease, however, the technique is associated with variable cellular tropism, making tailored gene transfer a challenge. In the current study, we employ the human synapsin 1 (hSYN1) gene promoter to drive neuron-specific expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) after neonatal i.c.v. injection of rAAV9 in mice. We observed widespread GFP expression in neurons throughout the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves and ganglia at 6 weeks-of-age. Region-specific quantification of GFP expression showed high neuronal transduction rates in substantia nigra pars reticulata (43.9±5.4%), motor cortex (43.5±3.3%), hippocampus (43.1±2.7%), cerebellum (29.6±2.3%), cervical spinal cord (24.9±3.9%), and ventromedial striatum (16.9±4.3%), among others. We found that 14.6±2.2% of neuromuscular junctions innervating the gastrocnemius muscle displayed GFP immunoreactivity. GFP expression was identified in several neuronal sub-types, including nigral tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic cells, striatal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein (DARPP-32)-positive neurons, and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive motor neurons. These results build on contemporary gene transfer techniques, demonstrating that the hSYN1 promoter can be used with rAAV9 to drive robust neuron-specific transgene expression throughout the nervous system.

  15. Improved transgene expression fine-tuning in mammalian cells using a novel transcription-translation network.

    PubMed

    Malphettes, Laetitia; Fussenegger, Martin

    2006-08-05

    Following the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and related phenomena, novel regulatory processes, attributable to small non-protein-coding RNAs, continue to emerge. Capitalizing on the ability of artificial short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to trigger degradation of specific target transcripts, and thereby silence desired gene expression, we designed and characterized a generic transcription-translation network in which it is possible to fine-tune heterologous protein production by coordinated transcription and translation interventions using macrolide and tetracycline antibiotics. Integration of siRNA-specific target sequences (TAGs) into the 5' or 3' untranslated regions (5'UTR, 3'UTR) of a desired constitutive transcription unit rendered transgene-encoded protein (erythropoietin, EPO; human placental alkaline phosphatase, SEAP; human vascular endothelial growth factor 121, VEGF(121)) production in mammalian cells responsive to siRNA levels that can be fine-tuned by macrolide-adjustable RNA polymerase II- or III-dependent promoters. Coupling of such macrolide-responsive siRNA-triggered translation control with tetracycline-responsive transcription of tagged transgene mRNAs created an antibiotic-adjustable two-input transcription-translation network characterized by elimination of detectable leaky expression with no reduction in maximum protein production levels. This transcription-translation network revealed transgene mRNA depletion to be dependent on siRNA and mRNA levels and that translation control was able to eliminate basal expression inherent to current transcription control modalities. Coupled transcription-translation circuitries have the potential to lead the way towards composite artificial regulatory networks, to enable complex therapeutic interventions in future biopharmaceutical manufacturing, gene therapy and tissue engineering initiatives.

  16. Ammonia-regulated expression of a soybean gene encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase in transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Miao, G H; Hirel, B; Marsolier, M C; Ridge, R W; Verma, D P

    1991-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS), expressed in roots and root nodules of soybean, was isolated by direct complementation of an Escherichia coli gln A- mutant. This sequence is induced in roots by the availability of ammonia. A 3.5-kilobase promoter fragment of a genomic clone (lambda GS15) corresponding to this cDNA was isolated and fused with a reporter [beta-glucuronidase (GUS)] gene. The GS-GUS fusion was introduced into a legume (Lotus corniculatus) and a nonlegume (tobacco) plant by way of Agrobacterium-mediated transformations. This chimeric gene was found to be expressed in a root-specific manner in both tobacco and L. corniculatus, the expression being restricted to the growing root apices and the vascular bundles of the mature root. Treatment with ammonia increased the expression of this chimeric gene in the legume background (i.e., L. corniculatus); however, no induction was observed in tobacco roots. Histochemical localization of GUS activity in ammonia-treated transgenic L. corniculatus roots showed a uniform distribution across all cell types. These data suggest that the tissue specificity of the soybean cytosolic GS gene is conserved in both tobacco and L. corniculatus; however, in the latter case, this gene is ammonia inducible. Furthermore, the ammonia-enhanced GS gene expression in L. corniculatus is due to an increase in transcription. That this gene is directly regulated by externally supplied or symbiotically fixed nitrogen is also evident from the expression of GS-GUS in the infection zone, including the uninfected cells, and the inner cortex of transgenic L. corniculatus nodules, where a flux of ammonia is encountered by this tissue. The lack of expression of GS-GUS in the outer cortex of the nodules suggests that ammonia may not be able to diffuse outside the endodermis.

  17. Evaluation of lateral spread of transgene expression following subretinal AAV-mediated gene delivery in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bruewer, Ashlee R; Mowat, Freya M; Bartoe, Joshua T; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    Dog models with spontaneously occurring mutations in retinal dystrophy genes are an invaluable resource for preclinical development of retinal gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been most successful; to target the outer retina and RPE they are delivered by subretinal injection, causing a temporary retinal detachment with some potential for retinal morbidity. A recent reporter gene study using an AAV2/8 vector in dogs reported transgene expression beyond the boundary of the subretinal bleb. This could be a desirable feature which increases the area of retina treated while minimizing the retinal detachment and any associated morbidity. We performed a detailed study of the lateral spread of transgene expression beyond the subretinal injection site following subretinally delivered AAV vectors in normal dogs. Vectors expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) using a small chicken beta-actin promoter. AAV2/2 (quadruple tyrosine to phenylalanine (Y-F) capsid mutant), self-complementary (sc) AAV2/8 (single Y-F capsid mutant) and a scAAV2/5 were used. We found that in all eyes GFP expression involved retina beyond the initial post-injection subretinal bleb boundary. In all eyes there was post-injection spread of the retinal detachment within the first 3 days post procedure and prior to retinal reattachment. In 11/16 eyes this accounted for the entire "lateral spread" of GFP expression while in 5/16 eyes a very slight extension of GFP expression beyond the final boundary of the subretinal bleb could be detected. All 3 AAV constructs induced GFP expression in the nerve fiber layer with spread to the optic nerve. Patients treated by subretinal injection should be monitored for possible expansion of the subretinal injection bleb prior to reattachment. Injections in the para-foveal region may expand to lead to a foveal detachment that may be undesirable. Cell-specific promoters may be required to limit spread of expressed transgene to the brain with these

  18. Skeletal Phenotype of Transgenic Mice Expressing the Beta1 Integrin Cytoplasmic Tail In Osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, R. K.; vanderMeulen, M. C. H.; Damsky, D.; Kim, J.-B.; Amblard, D.; Amblard, D.; Nishimura, Y.; Almeida, E.; Iwaniec, U. T.; Wronski, T. J.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    To define the physiologic role of beta1 integrin in bone formation and mechanical loading, transgenic mice were generated by expressing the cytoplasmic tall and transmembrane domain of Beta1 integrin under the control of the osteocalcin promoter. In cultured cells, this truncated fragment of Beta1 can act as a dominant negative. Previously, the matrix of calvariae was shown to be abnormal in transgenic (TG) compared to wildtype (WT) mice. In this study, we analyzed appendicular bone in TG and WT, male and female mice at 14, 35, 63, 90 and 365 days old (n=8-12/gp). To assess beta1 integrin function in mechanical loading, a pilot study using hindlimb unloading by tail suspension was performed. 35d old TG and WT females were hindlimb unloaded for 4 wks (n=3-5). Body mass, bone mineral content, histomorphometric (distal femur) and biomechanical parameters were analyzed. Statistical significance (P less than.05) was defined by ANOVA using the Tukey-Kramer post-hoc test. We confirmed transgene expression by immunoprecipitating then immunoblotting bone lysates using an antibody against the beta1 tail. Body masses of TG mice at 63, 90 and 365d old were greater (16-25%) than WT. Some TG female mice at 365d appeared obese; mean abdominal fat mass was 415% greater in TG than WT mice. Tibiae were longer (5-7%) in TG than WT mice at 63 and 90d. Tibial mineral mass of 35d males was 7% lower in TG than WT mice, but at 63d was 21% higher. The % osteoblast surface in 35d TG mice was 20% higher than WT, and at 63d was 17% lower, while % osteoclast surface did not differ. In 365d mice, cancellous bone volume (125%) and endocortical mineral apposition rate (40%) were greater in TG than WT males but not females. In WT mice, hindlimb unloading caused a reduction in mineral mass of tibiae (-20%) and lumbar vertebrae (-22%) relative to normally loaded controls. Surprisingly, hindlimb unloading also caused a relative reduction (-13%) in humerus mass. The effects of hindlimb unloading on

  19. Enhancing Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV8 Vectors in Different Tissues Using Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhu, Rui; Bi, Jinpeng; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been utilized extensively in gene therapy and gene function studies, as strong transgene expression is a prerequisite for positive outcomes. AAV8 was reported as the most efficient AAV serotype for transduction of the liver, brain and muscle compared with other serotypes. However, AAV8-mediated transduction of human hepatocytes is rather poor with approximately 20-fold lower efficiency compared with that of mouse hepatocytes. Therefore, we applied the woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) to enhance AAV8-mediated transgene expression driven by a combination promoter (CAG promoter) with a CMV-IE enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter for a more efficient viral vector. Transgene expression from recombinant AAV8 (rAAV8) vectors harboring a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter gene with or without WPRE were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that WPRE improved AAV8-mediated RFP expression in different cell lines with clear increases of transgene expression in the liver, brain or muscle of animals. The findings of this study will help to substantially reduce the quantity of viral particles that must be injected in order to reach a therapeutic level of transgene expression in gene therapy. Consequently, such dose reductions may lessen the potential risks associated with high doses of viral vectors. PMID:27076785

  20. Divergent prion strain evolution driven by PrPC expression level in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Le Dur, Annick; Laï, Thanh Lan; Stinnakre, Marie-George; Laisné, Aude; Chenais, Nathalie; Rakotobe, Sabine; Passet, Bruno; Reine, Fabienne; Soulier, Solange; Herzog, Laetitia; Tilly, Gaëlle; Rézaei, Human; Béringue, Vincent; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Laude, Hubert

    2017-01-01

    Prions induce a fatal neurodegenerative disease in infected host brain based on the refolding and aggregation of the host-encoded prion protein PrPC into PrPSc. Structurally distinct PrPSc conformers can give rise to multiple prion strains. Constrained interactions between PrPC and different PrPSc strains can in turn lead to certain PrPSc (sub)populations being selected for cross-species transmission, or even produce mutation-like events. By contrast, prion strains are generally conserved when transmitted within the same species, or to transgenic mice expressing homologous PrPC. Here, we compare the strain properties of a representative sheep scrapie isolate transmitted to a panel of transgenic mouse lines expressing varying levels of homologous PrPC. While breeding true in mice expressing PrPC at near physiological levels, scrapie prions evolve consistently towards different strain components in mice beyond a certain threshold of PrPC overexpression. Our results support the view that PrPC gene dosage can influence prion evolution on homotypic transmission. PMID:28112164

  1. Transgenic mice expressing an artificial zinc finger regulator targeting an endogenous gene.

    PubMed

    Passananti, Claudio; Corbi, Nicoletta; Onori, Annalisa; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Mattei, Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    Zinc finger (ZF) proteins belonging to the Cys2-His2 class provide a simple and versatile framework to design novel artificial transcription factors (ATFs) targeted to the desired genes. Our work is based on ZF ATFs engineered to up-regulate the expression level of the dystrophin-related gene utrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In particular, on the basis of the "recognition code" that defines specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA-binding sites we engineered and selected a new family of artificial transcription factors, whose DNA-binding domain consists in a three zinc finger peptide called "Jazz." Jazz protein binds specifically the 9 bp DNA sequence (5(')-GCT-GCT-GCG-3(')) present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. We generated a transgenic mouse expressing Jazz protein fused to the strong transcriptional activation domain VP16 and under the control of the muscle specific promoter of the myosin light chain gene. Vp16-Jazz mice display a strong up-regulation of the utrophin at both mRNA and protein levels. To our knowledge, this represents the first example of a transgenic mouse expressing an artificial gene coding for a zinc finger-based transcription factor.

  2. Diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) as a model crop to study transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Nadolska-Orczyk, Anna; Pietrusinska, Aleksandra; Binka-Wyrwa, Agnieszka; Kuc, Dominik; Orczyk, Wacław

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation for two diploid breeding lines of potato, and gives a detailed analysis of reporter gene expression. In our lab, these lines were also used to obtain tetraploid somatic hybrids. We tested four newly prepared constructs based on the pGreen vector system containing the selection gene nptII or bar under the 35S or nos promoter. All these vectors carried gus under 35S. We also tested the pDM805 vector, with the bar and gus genes respectively under the Ubi1 and Act1 promoters, which are strong for monocots. The selection efficiency (about 17%) was highest in the stem and leaf explants after transformation with pGreen where nptII was under 35S. About half of the selected plants were confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis to be transgenic and, depending on the combination, 0 to 100% showed GUS expression. GUS expression was strongest in multi-copy transgenic plants where gus was under Act1. The same potato lines carrying multi-copy bar under Ubi1 were also highly resistant to the herbicide Basta. The suggestion of using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of diploid lines of potato as a model crop is discussed herein.

  3. Hydrogel Macroporosity and the Prolongation of Transgene Expression and the Enhancement of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Virani, Farrukh R.; Goodman, Ashley G.; Gossett, Timothy D.; Shin, Seungjin; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of hydrogels for regenerative medicine can be improved through localized gene delivery to enhance their bioactivity. However, current systems typically lead to low-level transgene expression located in host tissue surrounding the implant. Herein, we investigated the inclusion of macropores into hydrogels to facilitate cell ingrowth and enhance gene delivery within the macropores in vivo. Macropores were created within PEG hydrogels by gelation around gelatin microspheres, with gelatin subsequently dissolved by incubation at 37°C. The macropores were interconnected, as evidenced by homogeneous cell seeding in vitro and complete cell infiltration in vivo. Lentivirus loaded within hydrogels following gelation retained its activity relative to the unencapsulated control virus. In vivo, macroporous PEG demonstrated sustained, elevated levels of transgene expression for 6 weeks, while hydrogels without macropores had transient expression. Transduced cells were located throughout the macroporous structure, while non-macroporous PEG hydrogels had transduction only in the adjacent host tissue. Delivery of lentivirus encoding for VEGF increased vascularization relative to the control, with vessels throughout the macropores of the hydrogel. The inclusion of macropores within the hydrogel to enhance cell infiltration enhances transduction and influences tissue development, which has implications for multiple regenerative medicine applications. PMID:22800542

  4. Expression of a functional human adenosine deaminase in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Singhabahu, Sanjeewa; George, John; Bringloe, David

    2013-06-01

    An inherited disorder, adenosine deaminase deficiency is a form of severe combined immunodeficiency, which is ultimately caused by an absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway. The absence of ADA-activity in sufferers eventually results in a dysfunctional immune system due to the build-up of toxic metabolites. To date, this has been treated with mixed success, using PEG-ADA, made from purified bovine ADA coupled to polyethylene glycol. It is likely, however, that an enzyme replacement therapy protocol based on recombinant human ADA would be a more effective treatment for this disease. Therefore, as a preliminary step to produce biologically active human ADA in transgenic tobacco plants a human ADA cDNA has been inserted into a plant expression vector under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter and both human and TMV 5' UTR control regions. Plant vector expression constructs have been used to transform tobacco plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Genomic DNA, RNA and protein blot analyses have demonstrated the integration of the cDNA construct into the plant nuclear genome and the expression of recombinant ADA mRNA and protein in transgenic tobacco leaves. Western blot analysis has also revealed that human and recombinant ADA have a similar size of approximately 41 kDa. ADA-specific activities of between 0.001 and 0.003 units per mg total soluble protein were measured in crude extracts isolated from transformed tobacco plant leaves.

  5. Reduced Mid1 Expression and Delayed Neuromotor Development in daDREAM Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dierssen, Mara; Fedrizzi, Laura; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; de Lagran, María Martinez; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Sahún, Ignasi; Pintado, Belen; Oliveros, Juan C.; Dopazo, Xose M.; Gonzalez, Paz; Brini, Marisa; Mellström, Britt; Carafoli, Ernesto; Naranjo, Jose R.

    2012-01-01

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) is a Ca2+-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Previous work has shown a role for DREAM in cerebellar function regulating the expression of the sodium/calcium exchanger 3 (NCX3) in cerebellar granular neurons to control Ca2+ homeostasis and survival of these neurons. To achieve a global view of the genes regulated by DREAM in the cerebellum, we performed a genome-wide analysis in transgenic cerebellum expressing a Ca2+-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM). Here we show that DREAM regulates the expression of the midline 1 (Mid1) gene early after birth. As a consequence, daDREAM mice exhibit a significant shortening of the rostro-caudal axis of the cerebellum and a delay in neuromotor development early after birth. Our results indicate a role for DREAM in cerebellar function. PMID:22563308

  6. A soluble form of Siglec-9 provides an antitumor benefit against mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tomioka, Yukiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Usui, Tatsufumi; Yamamoto, Sayo; Suyama, Haruka; Ozaki, Kinuyo; Ito, Toshihiro; and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Tumor-associated antigen MUC1 binds to Siglec-9. • Soluble Siglec-9 reduced proliferation of MUC1-positive tumor in transgenic mice. • Soluble Siglec-9 and MUC1 on tumor cells were colocalized in transgenic mice. • MUC1 expression on tumor cells were reduced in soluble Siglec-9 transgenic mice. - Abstract: Tumor-associated MUC1 binds to Siglec-9, which is expected to mediate tumor cell growth and negative immunomodulation. We hypothesized that a soluble form of Siglec-9 (sSiglec-9) competitively inhibits a binding of MUC1 to its receptor molecules like human Siglec-9, leading to provide antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor, and generated transgenic mouse lines expressing sSiglec-9 (sSiglec-9 Tg). When mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 were intraperitoneally transplanted into sSiglec-9 Tg, tumor proliferation was slower with the lower histological malignancy as compared with non-transgenic mice. The sSiglec-9 was detected in the ascites caused by the tumor in the sSiglec-9 Tg, and sSiglec-9 and MUC1 were often colocalized on surfaces of the tumor cells. PCNA immunohistochemistry also revealed the reduced proliferation of the tumor cells in sSiglec-9 Tg. In sSiglec-9 Tg with remarkable suppression of tumor proliferation, MUC1 expressions were tend to be reduced. In the ascites of sSiglec-9 Tg bearing the tumor, T cells were uniformly infiltrated, whereas aggregations of degenerative T cells were often observed in the non-transgenic mice. These results suggest that sSiglec-9 has an antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor in the transgenic mice, which may avoid the negative immunomodulation and/or suppress tumor-associated MUC1 downstream signal transduction, and subsequent tumor proliferation.

  7. Mature-stem expression of a silencing-resistant sucrose isomerase gene drives isomaltulose accumulation to high levels in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Stephen R; Basnayake, Shiromi W V; Moyle, Richard L; Osabe, Kenji; Graham, Michael W; Morgan, Terence E; Birch, Robert G

    2013-05-01

    Isomaltulose (IM) is a natural isomer of sucrose. It is widely approved as a food with properties including slower digestion, lower glycaemic index and low cariogenicity, which can benefit consumers. Availability is currently limited by the cost of fermentative conversion from sucrose. Transgenic sugarcane plants with developmentally-controlled expression of a silencing-resistant gene encoding a vacuole-targeted IM synthase were tested under field conditions typical of commercial sugarcane cultivation. High yields of IM were obtained, up to 483 mm or 81% of total sugars in whole-cane juice from plants aged 13 months. Using promoters from sugarcane to drive expression preferentially in the sugarcane stem, IM levels were consistent between stalks and stools within a transgenic line and across consecutive vegetative field generations of tested high-isomer lines. Germination and early growth of plants from setts were unaffected by IM accumulation, up to the tested level around 500 mm in flanking stem internodes. These are the highest yields ever achieved of value-added materials through plant metabolic engineering. The sugarcane stem promoters are promising for strategies to achieve even higher IM levels and for other applications in sugarcane molecular improvement. Silencing-resistant transgenes are critical to deliver the potential of these promoters in practical sugarcane improvement. At the IM levels now achieved in field-grown sugarcane, direct production of IM in plants is feasible at a cost approaching that of sucrose, which should make the benefits of IM affordable on a much wider scale.

  8. T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes infiltrating murine tumors are not induced to express foxp3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are enriched within a broad range of murine and human solid tumors. The ontogeny of these Foxp3 Tregs - selective accumulation or proliferation of natural thymus-derived Treg (nTreg) or induced Treg (iTreg) converted in the periphery from naïve T cells - is not known. We used several strains of mice in which Foxp3 and EGFP are coordinately expressed to address this issue. We confirmed that Foxp3-positive CD4 T cells are enriched among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and splenocytes (SPL) in B16 murine melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 Foxp3EGFP mice. OT-II Foxp3EGFP mice are essentially devoid of nTreg, having transgenic CD4 T cells that recognize a class II-restricted epitope derived from ovalbumin; Foxp3 expression could not be detected in TIL or SPL in these mice when implanted with ovalbumin-transfected B16 tumor (B16-OVA). Likewise, TIL isolated from B16 tumors implanted in Pmel-1 Foxp3EGFP mice, whose CD8 T cells recognize a class I-restricted gp100 epitope, were not induced to express Foxp3. All of these T cell populations - wild-type CD4, pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 - could be induced in vitro to express Foxp3 by engagement of their T cell receptor (TCR) and exposure to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). B16 melanoma produces TGFβ and both pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 express TCR that should be engaged within B16 and B16-OVA respectively. Thus, CD8 and CD4 transgenic T cells in these animal models failed to undergo peripheral induction of Foxp3 in a tumor microenvironment. PMID:22112546

  9. Robust Transgene Expression from Bicistronic mRNA in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Pringle, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism that provides an opportunity to understand the evolution and functional biology of the lineage that includes the land plants, as well as aspects of the fundamental core biology conserved throughout the eukaryotic phylogeny. Although many tools are available to facilitate genetic, molecular biological, biochemical, and cell biological studies in Chlamydomonas, expression of unselected transgenes of interest (GOIs) has been challenging. In most methods used previously, the GOI and a selectable marker are expressed from two separate mRNAs, so that their concomitant expression is not guaranteed. In this study, we developed constructs that allow expression of an upstream GOI and downstream selectable marker from a single bicistronic mRNA. Although this approach in other systems has typically required a translation-enhancing element such as an internal ribosome entry site for the downstream marker, we found that a short stretch of unstructured junction sequence was sufficient to obtain adequate expression of the downstream gene, presumably through post-termination reinitiation. With this system, we obtained robust expression of both endogenous and heterologous GOIs, including fluorescent proteins and tagged fusion proteins, in the vast majority of transformants, thus eliminating the need for tedious secondary screening for GOI-expressing transformants. This improved efficiency should greatly facilitate a variety of genetic and cell-biological studies in Chlamydomonas and also enable new applications such as expression-based screens and large-scale production of foreign proteins. PMID:27770025

  10. Protein body formation in stable transgenic tobacco expressing elastin-like polypeptide and hydrophobin fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants are recognized as an efficient and inexpensive system to produce valuable recombinant proteins. Two different strategies have been commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants: transient expression mediated by Agrobacterium; or stable transformation of the plant genome. However, the use of plants as bioreactors still faces two main limitations: low accumulation levels of some recombinant proteins and lack of efficient purification methods. Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), hydrophobin I (HFBI) and Zera® are three fusion partners found to increase the accumulation levels of recombinant proteins and induce the formation of protein bodies (PBs) in leaves when targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in transient expression assays. In this study the effects of ELP and HFBI fusion tags on recombinant protein accumulation levels and PB formation was examined in stable transgenic Nicotiana tabacum. Results The accumulation of recombinant protein and PB formation was evaluated in two cultivars of Nicotiana tabacum transformed with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to ELP or HFBI, both targeted and retrieved to the ER. The ELP and HFBI tags increased the accumulation of the recombinant protein and induced the formation of PBs in leaves of stable transgenic plants from both cultivars. Furthermore, these tags induced the formation of PBs in a concentration-dependent manner, where a specific level of recombinant protein accumulation was required for PBs to appear. Moreover, agro-infiltration of plants accumulating low levels of recombinant protein with p19, a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), increased accumulation levels in four independent transgenic lines, suggesting that PTGS might have caused the low accumulation levels in these plants. Conclusion The use of ELP and HFBI tags as fusion partners in stable transgenic plants of tobacco is feasible and promising. In a constitutive environment, these tags

  11. Isopentenyl transferase gene (ipt) downstream transcriptionally fused with gene expression improves the growth of transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-Chun; Duan, Rui-Jun; Hu, Xin-Wen; Li, Kai-Mian; Fu, Shao-Ping

    2010-04-01

    This research reports a promising approach to increase a plant's physiological cytokinin content. This approach also enables the increase to play a role in plant growth and development by introducing the ipt gene to downstream transcriptionally fuse with other genes under the control of a CaMV35S promoter, in which the ipt gene is far from the 35S promoter. According to Kozak's ribosome screening model, expression of the ipt gene is reduced by the terminal codon of the first gene and the internal untranslated nucleotides between the fused genes. In the transgenic plants pVKH35S-GUS-ipt, pVKH35S-AOC-ipt, and pVKH35S-AtGolS2-ipt, cytokinins were increased only two to threefold, and the plants grew more vigorously than the pVKH35S-AOC or pVKH35S-AtGolS2 transgenic plants lacking the ipt gene. The vigorous growth was reflected in rapid plant growth, a longer flowering period, a greater number of flowers, more seed product, and increased chlorophyll synthesis. The AOC and AtGolS2 genes play a role in a plant's tolerance of salt or cold, respectively. When the ipt gene transcriptionally fuses with AOC or AtGolS2 in the frame of AOC-ipt and AtGolS2-ipt, slight cytokinin increases were obtained in their transgenic plants; furthermore, those increases played a positive role in improvements of plant growth. Notably, an increased cytokinin volume at the physiological level, in concert with AtGolS2 expression, enhances a plant's tolerance to cold.

  12. Decreased early atherosclerotic lesions in hypertriglyceridemic mice expressing cholesteryl ester transfer protein transgene.

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, T; Masucci-Magoulas, L; Jiang, X; Walsh, A; Rubin, E; Breslow, J L; Tall, A R

    1995-01-01

    The human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) facilitates the transfer of cholesteryl ester from HDL to triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The activity of CETP results in a reduction in HDL cholesterol levels, but CETP may also promote reverse cholesterol transport. Thus, the net impact of CETP expression on atherogenesis is uncertain. The influence of hypertriglyceridemia and CETP on the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the proximal aorta was assessed by feeding transgenic mice a high cholesterol diet for 16 wk. 13 out of 14 (93%) hypertriglyceridemic human apo CIII (HuCIII) transgenic (Tg) mice developed atherosclerotic lesions, compared to 18 out of 29 (62%) controls. In HuCIII/CETPTg, human apo AI/CIIITg and HuAI/CIII/CETPTg mice, 7 of 13 (54%), 5 of 10 (50%), and 5 of 13 (38%), respectively, developed lesions in the proximal aorta (P < .05 compared to HuCIIITg). The average number of aortic lesions per mouse in HuCIIITg and controls was 3.4 +/- 0.8 and 2.7 +/- 0.6, respectively in HuCIII/CETPTg, HuAI/CIIIg, and HuAI/CIII/CETPTg mice the number of lesions was significantly lower than in HuCIIITg and control mice: 0.9 +/- 0.4, 1.5 +/- 0.5, and 0.9 +/- 0.4, respectively. There were parallel reductions in mean lesion area. In a separate study, we found an increased susceptibility to dietary atherosclerosis in nonhypertriglyceridemic CETP transgenic mice compared to controls. We conclude that CETP expression inhibits the development of early atherosclerotic lesions but only in hypertriglyceridemic mice. PMID:7560101

  13. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of polyploid cereals. The efficiency of selection and transgene expression in wheat.

    PubMed

    Przetakiewicz, Anna; Karaś, Agnieszka; Orczyk, Wacław; Nadolska-Orczyk, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Three combinations of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains and vectors were used in the transformation of selected Polish wheat cultivars. The combinations were: two hypervirulent strains, AGL1, containing the pDM805 binary plasmid, and EHA101, containing pGAH; and the common Agro strain LBA4404, harboring the super-binary pTOK233 vector. pDM805 contained bar under the control of Ubi1 promoter, pGAH had nptII under nos, and pTOK233 had hpt under 35S. Additionally, pDM805 and pTOK233 carried the gus reporter gene under the Act1 promoter or 35S promoter, respectively. The highest selection rate was 12.6% and was obtained with EHA101(pGAH) on a kanamycin-containing medium. Sixty-five of the plants grown on that medium were PCR positive. The second best combination was LBA4404(pTOK233) and kanamycin selection, which gave an average transformation rate of 2.3%. Phosphinothricin selection gave 1.0% transformation efficiency, while hygromycin, depending on the strain/vector used, gave from 0.2 to 0.4%. PCR tests in T1 revealed that 67% of the lines showed a 3:1 segregation ratio, and 11% a 15:1 ratio, while in 22%, segregation was non-Mendelian. The high number of T0 transgenic plants containing one copy of the transgene was confirmed via Southern blot analysis. Kanamycin resistance in the T1 generation was very low; in some lines, all the progeny were kanamycin sensitive. GUS expression, only tested in young T1 plants, was in agreement with Mendelian segregation in three out of the twelve tested. The factors influencing the efficiency of selection and transgene expression are discussed in this paper.

  14. An efficient strategy for producing a stable, replaceable, highly efficient transgene expression system in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Long, Dingpei; Lu, Weijian; Zhang, Yuli; Bi, Lihui; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Zhao, Aichun

    2015-03-05

    We developed an efficient strategy that combines a method for the post-integration elimination of all transposon sequences, a site-specific recombination system, and an optimized fibroin H-chain expression system to produce a stable, replaceable, highly efficient transgene expression system in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) that overcomes the disadvantages of random insertion and post-integration instability of transposons. Here, we generated four different transgenic silkworm strains, and of one the transgenic strains, designated TS1-RgG2, with up to 16% (w/w) of the target protein in the cocoons, was selected. The subsequent elimination of all the transposon sequences from TS1-RgG2 was completed by the heat-shock-induced expression of the transposase in vivo. The resulting transgenic silkworm strain was designated TS3-g2 and contained only the attP-flanked optimized fibroin H-chain expression cassette in its genome. A phiC31/att-system-based recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) method could be used to integrate other genes of interest into the same genome locus between the attP sites in TS3-g2. Controlling for position effects with phiC31-mediated RMCE will also allow the optimization of exogenous protein expression and fine gene function analyses in the silkworm. The strategy developed here is also applicable to other lepidopteran insects, to improve the ecological safety of transgenic strains in biocontrol programs.

  15. An efficient strategy for producing a stable, replaceable, highly efficient transgene expression system in silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Long, Dingpei; Lu, Weijian; Zhang, Yuli; Bi, Lihui; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Zhao, Aichun

    2015-01-01

    We developed an efficient strategy that combines a method for the post-integration elimination of all transposon sequences, a site-specific recombination system, and an optimized fibroin H-chain expression system to produce a stable, replaceable, highly efficient transgene expression system in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) that overcomes the disadvantages of random insertion and post-integration instability of transposons. Here, we generated four different transgenic silkworm strains, and of one the transgenic strains, designated TS1-RgG2, with up to 16% (w/w) of the target protein in the cocoons, was selected. The subsequent elimination of all the transposon sequences from TS1-RgG2 was completed by the heat-shock-induced expression of the transposase in vivo. The resulting transgenic silkworm strain was designated TS3-g2 and contained only the attP-flanked optimized fibroin H-chain expression cassette in its genome. A phiC31/att-system-based recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) method could be used to integrate other genes of interest into the same genome locus between the attP sites in TS3-g2. Controlling for position effects with phiC31-mediated RMCE will also allow the optimization of exogenous protein expression and fine gene function analyses in the silkworm. The strategy developed here is also applicable to other lepidopteran insects, to improve the ecological safety of transgenic strains in biocontrol programs. PMID:25739894

  16. Stability of single copy transgene expression in CHOK1 cells is affected by histone modifications but not by DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Shawal; Gugliotta, Agustina; Koenitzer, Jennifer; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2015-02-10

    Intraclonal heterogeneity of genetically modified mammalian cells has been observed as a phenomenon that has a strong impact on overall transgene expression levels and that limits the predictability of transgene expression in genetically modified cells, thereby hampering single cell based screening approaches. The underlying mechanism(s) leading to this variance are poorly understood. To study the dynamics and mechanisms of heterogeneity of early stage silencing we analyzed the expression in more than 100 independent clones of CHOK1 cells that harbour genetically stable integrates of single copy reporter cassettes driven by EF1α and CMV promoters. Single cell analysis showed intraclonal variability with heterogeneity in expression in genetically uniform populations. DNA methylation is a well known mechanism responsible for silencing of gene expression. Interestingly, loss of expression was not associated with DNA methylation of the CMV promoter. However, in most of the clonal populations expression could be increased by inhibitors of the histone deacetylases (HDACi) suggesting that heterogeneity of transgene expression is crucially governed by histone modifications. Further, to determine if the epigenetic status of transgene expression is governed by the chromosomal integration locus we targeted heterologous expression cassettes into two chromosomal sites using recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). The expression status of a particular clone was faithfully re-established when the same promoter used. In this way the problem of early stage cell clone instability can be bypassed. However, upon introduction of an unrelated promoter methylation-independent silencing was observed. Together, these results suggest that histone modifications are the relevant mechanisms by which epigenetic modulation of transgene expression cassettes is governed in the early phase of clone generation.

  17. Specific expression of an oxytocin-enhanced cyan fluorescent protein fusion transgene in the rat hypothalamus and posterior pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Akiko; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ohbuchi, Toyoaki; Onaka, Tatsushi; Young, W. Scott; Dayanithi, Govindan; Yamasaki, Yuka; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Otsubo, Hiroki; Suzuki, Hideaki; Murphy, David; Ueta, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    We have generated rats bearing an oxytocin (OXT)-enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (eCFP) fusion transgene designed from a murine construct previously shown to be faithfully expressed in transgenic mice. In situ hybridisation histochemistry revealed that the OXT-eCFP fusion gene was expressed in the supraoptic (SON) and the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) in these rats. The fluorescence emanating from eCFP was observed only in the SON, the PVN, the internal layer of the median eminence (ME) and the posterior pituitary (PP). In in vitro preparations, freshly dissociated cells from the SON and axon terminals showed clear eCFP fluorescence. Immunohistochemistry for OXT and arginine vasopressin (AVP) revealed that the eCFP fluorescence co-localises with OXT-immunofluorescence, but not with AVP-immunofluorescence in the SON and the PVN. Although the expression levels of the OXT-eCFP fusion gene in the SON and the PVN showed a wide range of variation in transgenic rats, eCFP fluorescence was markedly increased in the SON and the PVN, but decreased in the PP after chronic salt loading. The expression of the OXT gene was significantly increased in the SON and the PVN after chronic salt loading in both non-transgenic and transgenic rats. Compared to wild-type animals, euhydrated and salt-loaded male and female transgenic rats showed no significant differences in plasma osmolality, sodium concentration, OXT and AVP levels, suggesting that the fusion gene expression did not disturb any physiological processes. These results suggest that our new transgenic rat is a valuable new tool to identify OXT-producing neurones and their terminals. PMID:20026620

  18. Lethal cutaneous disease in transgenic mice conditionally expressing type I human T cell leukemia virus Tax.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hakju; Ogle, Louise; Benitez, Bobby; Bohuslav, Jan; Montano, Mauricio; Felsher, Dean W; Greene, Warner C

    2005-10-21

    Type I human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) is etiologically linked with adult T cell leukemia, an aggressive and usually fatal expansion of activated CD4+ T lymphocytes that frequently traffic to skin. T cell transformation induced by HTLV-I involves the action of the 40-kDa viral Tax transactivator protein. Tax both stimulates the HTLV-I long terminal repeat and deregulates the expression of select cellular genes by altering the activity of specific host transcription factors, including cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor, NF-kappaB/Rel, and serum response factor. To study initiating events involved in HTLV-I Tax-induced T cell transformation, we generated "Tet-off" transgenic mice conditionally expressing in a lymphocyte-restricted manner (EmuSR alpha promoter-enhancer) either wild-type Tax or mutant forms of Tax that selectively compromise the NF-kappaB (M22) or CREB/activating transcription factor (M47) activation pathways. Wild-type Tax and M47 Tax-expressing mice, but not M22-Tax expressing mice, developed progressive alopecia, hyperkeratosis, and skin lesions containing profuse activated CD4 T cell infiltrates with evidence of deregulated inflammatory cytokine production. In addition, these animals displayed systemic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. These findings suggest that Tax-mediated activation of NF-kappaB plays a key role in the development of this aggressive skin disease that shares several features in common with the skin disease occurring during the preleukemic stage in HTLV-I-infected patients. Of note, this skin disease completely resolved when Tax transgene expression was suppressed by administration of doxycycline, emphasizing the key role played by this viral oncoprotein in the observed pathology.

  19. Characterization of Fam20C expression in odontogenesis and osteogenesis using transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Du, Er-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Wu-Chen; Kaback, Deborah; Yee, Siu-Pok; Qin, Chun-Lin; George, Anne; Hao, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Fam20C promotes differentiation and mineralization of odontoblasts, ameloblasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes during tooth and bone development. Ablation of the Fam20C gene inhibits bone and tooth growth by increasing fibroblast growth factor 23 in serum and causing hypophosphatemia in conditional knockout mice. However, control and regulation of the expression of Fam20C are still unknown. In this study, we generated a transgenic reporter model which expresses green fluorescence protein (GFP) driven by the Fam20C promoter. Recombineering was used to insert a 16 kb fragment of the mouse Fam20C gene (containing the 15 kb promoter and 1.1 kb of exon 1) into a pBluescript SK vector with the topaz variant of GFP and a bovine growth hormone polyadenylation sequence. GFP expression was subsequently evaluated by histomorphometry on cryosections from E14 to adult mice. Fluorescence was evident in the bone and teeth as early as E17.5. The GFP signal was maintained stably in odontoblasts and osteoblasts until 4 weeks after birth. The expression of GFP was significantly reduced in teeth, alveolar bone and muscle by 8 weeks of age. We also observed colocalization of the GFP signal with the Fam20C antibody in postnatal 1- and 7-day-old animals. Successful generation of Fam20C-GFP transgenic mice will provide a unique model for studying Fam20C gene expression and the biological function of this gene during odontogenesis and osteogenesis. PMID:25537657

  20. Effect of ploidy increase on transgene expression: example from Citrus diploid cybrid and allotetraploid somatic hybrid expressing the EGFP gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shi-Xiao; Cai, Xiao-Dong; Tan, Bin; Li, Ding-Li; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2011-07-01

    Polyploidization is an important speciation mechanism for all eukaryotes, and it has profound impacts on biodiversity dynamics and ecosystem functioning. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been used as an effective marker to visually screen somatic hybrids at an early stage in protoplast fusion. We have previously reported that the intensity of GFP fluorescence of regenerated embryoids was also an early indicator of ploidy level. However, little is known concerning the effects of ploidy increase on the GFP expression in citrus somatic hybrids at the plant level. Herein, allotetraploid and diploid cybrid plants with enhanced GFP (EGFP) expression were regenerated from the fusion of embryogenic callus protoplasts from 'Murcott' tangor (Citrus reticulata Blanco × Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) and mesophyll protoplasts from transgenic 'Valencia' orange (C. sinensis (L.) Osbeck) expressing the EGFP gene, via electrofusion. Subsequent simple sequence repeat (SSR), chloroplast simple sequence repeat and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence analysis revealed that the two regenerated tetraploid plants were true allotetraploid somatic hybrids possessing nuclear genomic DNA of both parents and cytoplasmic DNA from the callus parent, while the five regenerated diploid plants were cybrids containing nuclear DNA of the leaf parent and with complex segregation of cytoplasmic DNA. Furthermore, EGFP expression was compared in cells and protoplasts from mature leaves of these diploid cybrids and allotetraploid somatic hybrids. Results showed that the intensity of GFP fluorescence per cell or protoplast in diploid was generally brighter than in allotetraploid. Moreover, same hybridization signal was detected on allotetraploid and diploid plants by Southern blot analysis. By real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, GFP expression level of the diploid cybrid was revealed significantly higher than that of the allotetraploid somatic hybrid. These results suggest that ploidy

  1. Increased expression of miRNA-146a in Alzheimer’s disease transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.Y.; Cui, J.G.; Hill, J.M.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Zhao, Y.; Lukiw, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    A mouse and human brain-enriched micro-RNA-146a (miRNA-146a) is known to be important in modulating the innate immune response and inflammatory signaling in certain immunological and brain cell types. In this study we examined miRNA-146a levels in early-, moderate- and late-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neocortex and hippocampus, in several human primary brain and retinal cell lines, and in 5 different transgenic mouse models of AD including Tg2576, TgCRND8, PSAPP, 3xTg-AD and 5xFAD. Inducible expression of miRNA-146a was found to be significantly up-regulated in a primary co-culture of human neuronal–glial (HNG) cells stressed using interleukin1-beta (IL-1β), and this up-regulation was quenched using specific NF-κB inhibitors including curcumin. Expression of miRNA-146a correlated with senile plaque density and synaptic pathology in Tg2576 and in 5xFAD transgenic mouse models used in the study of this common neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:20934487

  2. Expression of a coriander desaturase results in petroselinic acid production in transgenic tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Ohlrogge, J.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Little is known about the metabolic origin of petroselinic acid (18:1[Delta][sup 6cis]), the principal fatty acid of the seed oil of most Umbelliferae, Araliaceae, and Garryaceae species. To examine the possibility that petroselinic acid is the product of an acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase, Western blots of coriander and other Umbelliferae seed extracts were probed with antibodies against the [Delta][sup 9]-stearoyl-ACP desaturase of avocado. In these extracts, proteins of 39 and 36 kDa were detected. Of these, only the 36-kDa peptide was specific to tissues which synthesize petroselinic acid. A cDNA encoding the 36-kDa peptide was isolated from a coriander endosperm cDNA library, placed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Expression of this cDNA in transgenic tobacco callus was accompanied by the accumulation of petroselinic acid and [Delta][sup 4]-hexadecenoic acid, both of which were absent from control callus. These results demonstrate the involvement of a 36-kDa putative acyl-ACP desaturase in the biosynthetic pathway of petroselinic acid and the ability to produce fatty acids of unusual structure in transgenic plants by the expression of the gene for this desaturase. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Expression of bioactive single-chain murine IL-12 in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyun; Dolan, Maureen C; Reidy, Michael; Cramer, Carole L

    2008-06-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12), an important immunomodulator for cell-mediated immunity, shows significant potential as a vaccine adjuvant and anticancer therapeutic. However, its clinical application is limited in part by lack of an effective bioproduction system for this complex heterodimeric glycoprotein. Transgenic plants show promise as scalable bioproduction platforms for challenging biopharmaceutical proteins. To test the potential of plants to effectively produce bioactive IL-12, we developed transgenic tobacco plant lines and derived root cultures yielding high levels of mouse IL-12 (MuIL-12). Functional IL-12 is a heterodimer consisting of two disulfide-linked subunits, p35 and p40. To ensure the stoichiometric expression and assembly of p35 and p40, we expressed a single-chain version of MuIL-12. Plant-derived single-chain MuIL-12 was characterized and purified for in vitro bioactivity assays. Our results demonstrated precise cleavage of the endogenous mouse p40 signal peptide in plants as well as addition of N-linked glycans. Plant-derived MuIL-12 triggered induction of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion from mouse splenocytes and stimulated splenocyte proliferation with comparable activities to those observed for commercially available animal cell-derived MuIL-12. These studies indicate that plants produce fully functional MuIL-12 at levels compatible with commercial production and may serve as an effective bioproduction platform for bioactive IL-12s from other species for human or veterinary vaccine and therapeutic applications.

  4. Transgenic Rabbits Expressing Ovine PrP Are Susceptible to Scrapie.

    PubMed

    Sarradin, Pierre; Viglietta, Céline; Limouzin, Claude; Andréoletti, Olivier; Daniel-Carlier, Nathalie; Barc, Céline; Leroux-Coyau, Mathieu; Berthon, Patricia; Chapuis, Jérôme; Rossignol, Christelle; Gatti, Jean-Luc; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Béringue, Vincent; Lantier, Frédéric; Laude, Hubert; Houdebine, Louis-Marie

    2015-08-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases affecting a wide range of mammalian species. They are caused by prions, a proteinaceous pathogen essentially composed of PrPSc, an abnormal isoform of the host encoded cellular prion protein PrPC. Constrained steric interactions between PrPSc and PrPC are thought to provide prions with species specificity, and to control cross-species transmission into other host populations, including humans. Transgenetic expression of foreign PrP genes has been successfully and widely used to overcome the recognized resistance of mouse to foreign TSE sources. Rabbit is one of the species that exhibit a pronounced resistance to TSEs. Most attempts to infect experimentally rabbit have failed, except after inoculation with cell-free generated rabbit prions. To gain insights on the molecular determinants of the relative resistance of rabbits to prions, we generated transgenic rabbits expressing the susceptible V136R154Q171 allele of the ovine PRNP gene on a rabbit wild type PRNP New Zealand background and assessed their experimental susceptibility to scrapie prions. All transgenic animals developed a typical TSE 6-8 months after intracerebral inoculation, whereas wild type rabbits remained healthy more than 700 days after inoculation. Despite the endogenous presence of rabbit PrPC, only ovine PrPSc was detectable in the brains of diseased animals. Collectively these data indicate that the low susceptibility of rabbits to prion infection is not enciphered within their non-PrP genetic background.

  5. Thyroid expression of an A2 adenosine receptor transgene induces thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Ledent, C; Dumont, J E; Vassart, G; Parmentier, M

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is the major intracellular second messenger of thyrotropin (TSH) action on thyroid cells. It stimulates growth as well as the function and differentiation of cultured thyrocytes. The adenosine A2 receptor, which activates adenylyl cyclase via coupling to the stimulating G protein (Gs), has been shown to promote constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade when transfected into various cell types. In order to test whether the A2 receptor was able to function similarly in vivo and to investigate the possible consequences of permanent adenylyl cyclase activation in thyroid cells, lines of transgenic mice were generated expressing the canine A2 adenosine receptor under control of the bovine thyroglobulin gene promoter. Thyroid-specific expression of the A2 adenosine receptor transgene promoted gland hyperplasia and severe hyperthyroidism causing premature death of the animals. The resulting goitre represents a model of hyperfunctioning adenomas: it demonstrates that constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade in such differentiated epithelial cells is sufficient to stimulate autonomous and uncontrolled function and growth. Images PMID:1371462

  6. Constructions of expression vectors of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) and transient expression of transgenes in immature oil palm embryos.

    PubMed

    Ariffin, Norazrin; Abdullah, Ruslan; Rashdan Muad, Mohd; Lourdes, Juanita; Emran, Nurul Ain; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Ismail, Ismanizan; Fadzil, Mohd Fazli Mohd; Ling, Kong Lih; Siddiqui, Yasmeen; Amir, Anna Aryani; Berahim, Zulkarami; Husni Omar, Mohd

    2011-09-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is a polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) bioplastic group with thermoplastic properties is thus high in quality and can be degradable. PHBV can be produced by bacteria, but the process is not economically competitive with polymers produced from petrochemicals. To overcome this problem, research on transgenic plants has been carried out as one of the solutions to produce PHBV in economically sound alternative manner. Four different genes encoded with the enzymes necessary to catalyze PHBV are bktB, phaB, phaC and tdcB. All the genes came with modified CaMV 35S promoters (except for the tdcB gene, which was promoted by the native CaMV 35S promoter), nos terminator sequences and plastid sequences in order to target the genes into the plastids. Subcloning resulted in the generation of two different orientations of the tdcB, pLMIN (left) and pRMIN (right), both 17.557 and 19.967 kb in sizes. Both plasmids were transformed in immature embryos (IE) of oil palm via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Assays of GUS were performed on one-week-old calli and 90% of the calli turned completely blue. This preliminary test showed positive results of integration. Six-months-old calli were harvested and RNA of the calli were isolated. RT-PCR was used to confirm the transient expression of PHBV transgenes in the calli. The bands were 258, 260, 315 and 200 bp in size for bktB, phaB, phaC and tdcB transgenes respectively. The data obtained showed that the bktB, phaB, phaC and tdcB genes were successfully integrated and expressed in the oil palm genome.

  7. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  8. Expression of Escherichia coli branching enzyme in caryopses of transgenic rice results in amylopectin with an increased degree of branching.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Seok; Kim, Jukon; Krishnan, Hari B; Nahm, Baek Hie

    2005-03-01

    Physiochemical properties of starch are dependent on several factors including the relative abundance of amylose and amylopectin, and the degree of branching of amylopectin. Utilizing Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, a construct containing the coding region of branching enzyme of Escherichia coli, under transcriptional control of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) starch-branching enzyme promoter was introduced into rice cv. Nakdong. To enhance glgB expression, the first intron of rice starch-branching enzyme and the matrix attachment region (MAR) sequence from chicken lysozyme were included in the expression vector. Eleven independent transgenic rice plants were generated. Southern blot analysis indicated that the copy number of glgB integrated into transgenic rice varied from one to five. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of starch from transgenic lines revealed that amylopectin from transgenic lines exhibited greater branching than that of non-transgenic rice. The A/B1 ratio in amylopectin increased from 1.3 to 2.3 and the total branching ratio, A+B1/B-rest, increased from 6 to 12 in transgenic rice. The observed increase in the short-chain fractions with a degree of polymerization between 6 and 10 is expected to have a significant effect on retrogradation. Our study demonstrates that amylopectin branching can be altered in vivo, thus changing the physicochemical properties of starch.

  9. Transgenic cotton expressing synthesized scorpion insect toxin AaHIT gene confers enhanced resistance to cotton bollworm (Heliothis armigera) larvae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiahe; Luo, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhian; Tian, Yingchuan; Liang, Aihua; Sun, Yi

    2008-03-01

    A synthetic scorpion Hector Insect Toxin (AaHIT) gene, under the control of a CaMV35S promoter, was cloned into cotton via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Southern blot analyses indicated that integration of the transgene varied from one to more than three estimated copies per genome; seven homozygous transgenic lines with one copy of the T-DNA insert were then selected by PCR and Southern blot analysis. AaHIT expression was from 0.02 to 0.43% of total soluble protein determined by western blot. These homozygous transgenic lines killed larvae of cotton bollworm (Heliothis armigera) by 44-98%. The AaHIT gene could used therefore an alternative to Bt toxin and proteinase inhibitor genes for producing transgenic cotton crops with effective control of bollworm.

  10. Promoter elements required for developmental expression of the maize Adh1 gene in transgenic rice.

    PubMed Central

    Kyozuka, J; Olive, M; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S; Shimamoto, K

    1994-01-01

    To define the regions of the maize alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) promoter that confer tissue-specific expression, a series of 5' promoter deletions and substitution mutations were linked to the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase A (uidA) reporter gene and introduced into rice plants. A region between -140 and -99 not only conferred anaerobically inducible expression in the roots of transgenic plants but was also required for expression in the root cap, embryo, and in endosperm under aerobic conditions. GC-rich (GC-1, GC-2, and GC-3) or GT-rich (GT-1 and GT-2) sequence motifs in this region were necessary for expression in these tissues, as they were in anaerobic expression. Expression in the root cap under aerobic conditions required all the GC- and GT-rich motifs. The GT-1, GC-1, GC-2, and GC-3 motifs, and to a lesser extent the GT-2 motif, were also required for anaerobic responsiveness in rice roots. All elements except the GC-3 motif were needed for endosperm-specific expression. The GC-2 motif and perhaps the GT-1 motif appeared to be the only elements required for high-level expression in the embryos of rice seeds. Promoter regions important for shoot-, embryo-, and pollen-specific expression were proximal to -99, and nucleotides required for shoot-specific expression occurred between positions -72 and -43. Pollen-specific expression required a sequence element outside the promoter region, between +54 and +106 of the untranslated leader, as well as a silencer element in the promoter between -72 and -43. PMID:8061518

  11. Expression levels of antimicrobial peptide tachyplesin I in transgenic Ornithogalum lines affect the resistance to Pectobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Alexander; Joshi, Janak Raj; Carmi, Nir; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-11-20

    The genus Ornithogalum includes several ornamental species that suffer substantial losses from bacterial soft rot caused by Pectobacteria. The absence of effective control measures for use against soft rot bacteria led to the initiation of a project in which a small antimicrobial peptide from an Asian horseshoe crab, tachyplesin (tpnI), was introduced into two commercial cultivars: O. dubium and O. thyrsoides. Disease severity and bacterial colonization were examined in transgenic lines expressing this peptide. Disease resistance was evaluated in six lines of each species by measuring bacterial proliferation in the plant tissue. Three transgenic lines of each species were subjected to further analysis in which the expression level of the transgene was evaluated using RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. The development of disease symptoms and bacterial colonization of the plant tissue were also examined using GFP-expressing strain of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense Pcb3. Confocal-microscopy imaging revealed significantly reduced quantities of bacterial cells in the transgenic plant lines that had been challenged with the bacterium. The results clearly demonstrate that tpnI expression reduces bacterial proliferation, colonization and disease symptom (reduced by 95-100%) in the transgenic plant tissues. The quantity of tpnI transcripts, as measured by qRT-PCR, was negatively correlated with the protection afforded to the plants, as measured by the reduced severity of disease symptoms in the tissue.

  12. Helper virus-mediated downregulation of transgene expression permits production of recalcitrant helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Donna J; Grove, Nathan C; Ng, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAd) that express certain transgene products are impossible to produce because the transgene product is toxic to the producer cells, especially when made in large amounts during vector production. Downregulating transgene expression from the HDAd during vector production is a way to solve this problem. In this report, we show that this can be accomplished by inserting the target sequence for the adenoviral VA RNAI into the 3’ untranslated region of the expression cassette in the HDAd. Thus during vector production, when the producer cells are coinfected with both the helper virus (HV) and the HDAd, the VA RNAI produced by the HV will target the transgene mRNA from the HDAd via the endogenous cellular RNAi pathway. Once the HDAd is produced and purified, transduction of the target cells results in unimpeded transgene expression because of the absence of HV. This simple and universal strategy permits for the robust production of otherwise recalcitrant HDAds. PMID:27331077

  13. Respiratory epithelial cell expression of human transforming growth factor-alpha induces lung fibrosis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Korfhagen, T R; Swantz, R J; Wert, S E; McCarty, J M; Kerlakian, C B; Glasser, S W; Whitsett, J A

    1994-01-01

    Increased production of EGF or TGF-alpha by the respiratory epithelial cells has been associated with the pathogenesis of various forms of lung injury. Growth factors and cytokines are thought to act locally, via paracrine and autocrine mechanisms, to stimulate cell proliferation and matrix deposition by interstitial lung cells resulting in pulmonary fibrosis. To test whether TGF-alpha mediates pulmonary fibrotic responses, we have generated transgenic mice expressing human TGF-alpha under control of regulatory regions of the human surfactant protein C (SP-C) gene. Human TGF-alpha mRNA was expressed in pulmonary epithelial cells in the lungs of the transgenic mice. Adult mice bearing the SP-C-TGF-alpha transgene developed severe pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrotic lesions were observed in peribronchial, peribronchiolar, and perivascular regions, as well as subjacent to pleural surfaces. Lesions consisted of fibrous tissue that included groups of epithelial cells expressing endogenous SP-C mRNA, consistent with their identification as distal respiratory epithelial cells. Peripheral fibrotic regions consisted of thickened pleura associated with extensive collagen deposition. Alveolar architecture was disrupted in the transgenic mice with loss of alveoli in the lung parenchyma. Pulmonary epithelial cell expression of TGF-alpha in transgenic mice disrupts alveolar morphogenesis and produces fibrotic lesions mediated by paracrine signaling between respiratory epithelial and interstitial cells of the lung. Images PMID:8163670

  14. Transgenic poplar trees expressing yeast cadmium factor 1 exhibit the characteristics necessary for the phytoremediation of mine tailing soil.

    PubMed

    Shim, Donghwan; Kim, Sangwoo; Choi, Young-Im; Song, Won-Yong; Park, Jiyoung; Youk, Eun Soo; Jeong, Soon-Chun; Martinoia, Enrico; Noh, Eun-Woon; Lee, Youngsook

    2013-01-01

    Genetic engineering of plants for phytoremediation is thought to be possible based on results using model plants expressing genes involved in heavy metal resistance, which improve the plant's tolerance of heavy metals and accumulation capacity. The next step of progress in this technology requires the genetic engineering of plants that produce large amounts of biomass and the testing of these transgenic plants in contaminated soils. Thus, we transformed a sterile line of poplar Populus alba X P. tremula var. glandulosa with a heavy metal resistance gene, ScYCF1 (yeast cadmium factor 1), which encodes a transporter that sequesters toxic metal(loid)s into the vacuoles of budding yeast, and tested these transgenic plants in soil taken from a closed mine site contaminated with multiple toxic metal(loid)s under greenhouse and field conditions. The YCF1-expressing transgenic poplar plants exhibited enhanced growth, reduced toxicity symptoms, and increased Cd content in the aerial tissue compared to the non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, the plants accumulated increased amounts of Cd, Zn, and Pb in the root, because they could establish an extensive root system in mine tailing soil. These results suggest that the generation of YCF1-expressing transgenic poplar represents the first step towards producing plants for phytoremediation. The YCF1-expressing poplar may be useful for phytostabilization and phytoattenuation, especially in highly contaminated regions, where wild-type plants cannot survive.

  15. A transgenic-cloned pig model expressing non-fluorescent modified Plum

    PubMed Central

    NAGAYA, Masaki; WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAKANO, Kazuaki; ARAI, Yoshikazu; ASANO, Yoshinori; TAKEISHI, Toki; UMEKI, Ikuma; FUKUDA, Tooru; YASHIMA, Sayaka; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs that express fluorescent proteins such as green and red fluorescent proteins have become indispensable biomedical research tools in recent years. Cell or tissue transplantation studies using fluorescent markers should be conducted, wherein the xeno-antigenicity of the fluorescent proteins does not affect engraftment or graft survival. Thus, we aimed to create a transgenic (Tg)-cloned pig that was immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. In the present study, we generated a Tg-cloned pig harboring a derivative of Plum modified by a single amino acid substitution in the chromophore. The cells and tissues of this Tg-cloned pig expressing the modified Plum (mPlum) did not fluoresce. However, western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses clearly showed that the mPlum had the same antigenicity as Plum. Thus, we have obtained primary proof of principle for creating a cloned pig that is immunologically tolerant to fluorescent protein antigens. PMID:27396383

  16. Transgenic over-expression of mammalian heparanase delays prion disease onset and progression

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk Ben-Zaken, O; Nissan, I; Tzaban, S; Taraboulos, A; Zcharia, E; Matzger, S; Shafat, I; Vlodavsky, I; Tal, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular heparan sulfate (HS) has a dual role in scrapie pathogenesis; it is required for PrPSc (scrapie prion protein) formation and facilitates infection of cells, mediating cellular uptake of prions. We examined the involvement of heparanase, a mammalian endoglycosidase degrading HS, in scrapie infection. In cultured cells, heparanase treatment or over-expression resulted in a profound decrease in PrPSc. Moreover, disease onset and progression were dramatically delayed in scrapie infected transgenic mice over-expressing heparanase. Together, our results provide direct in vivo evidence for the involvement of intact HS in the pathogenesis of prion disease and the protective role of heparanase both in terms of susceptibility to infection and disease progression. PMID:26168721

  17. Specimen block counter-staining for localization of GUS expression in transgenic arabidopsis and tobacco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M. K.; Choi, J-W; Jeon, J-H; Franceschi, V. R.; Davin, L. B.; Lewis, N. G.

    2002-01-01

    A simple counter-staining procedure has been developed for comparative beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression and anatomical localization in transgenic herbaceous arabidopsis and tobacco. This protocol provides good anatomical visualization for monitoring chimeric gene expression at both the organ and tissue levels. It can be used with different histochemical stains and can be extended to the study of woody species. The specimens are paraffin-embedded, the block is trimmed to reveal internal structure, safranin-O staining solution is briefly applied to the surface of the block, then washed off and, after drying, a drop of immersion oil is placed on the stained surface for subsequent photographic work. This gives tissue counter-staining with good structural preservation without loss of GUS staining product; moreover, sample observation is rapid and efficient compared to existing procedures.

  18. Enhanced salt stress tolerance in transgenic potato plants expressing IbMYB1, a sweet potato transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Jie; Kim, Myoung-Duck; Deng, Xi-Ping; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Chen, Wei

    2013-12-01

    IbMYB1, a transcription factor (TF) for R2R3-type MYB TFs, is a key regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis during storage of sweet potatoes. Anthocyanins provide important antioxidants of nutritional value to humans, and also protect plants from oxidative stress. This study aimed to increase transgenic potatoes' (Solanum tuberosum cv. LongShu No.3) tolerance to environmental stress and enhance their nutritional value. Transgenic potato plants expressing IbMYB1 genes under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2) promoter (referred to as SM plants) were successfully generated through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Two representative transgenic SM5 and SM12 lines were evaluated for enhanced tolerance to salinity, UV-B rays, and drought conditions. Following treatment of 100 mM NaCl, seedlings of SM5 and SM12 lines showed less root damage and more shoot growth than control lines expressing only an empty vector. Transgenic potato plants in pots treated with 400 mM NaCl showed high amounts of secondary metabolites, including phenols, anthocyanins, and flavonoids, compared with control plants. After treatment of 400 mM NaCl, transgenic potato plants also showed high DDPH radical scavenging activity and high PS II photochemical efficiency compared with the control line. Furthermore, following treatment of NaCl, UV-B, and drought stress, the expression levels of IbMYB1 and several structural genes in the flavonoid biosynthesis such as CHS, DFR, and ANS in transgenic plants were found to be correlated with plant phenotype. The results suggest that enhanced IbMYB1 expression affects secondary metabolism, which leads to improved tolerance ability in transgenic potatoes.

  19. Identification of differentially expressed genes that potentially confer pest resistance in transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong-Jun; Wu, Yu-Jun; Luo, Xi; Shen, Xi-Long; Zhao, De-Gang

    2014-06-15

    Chicken interferon-γ (ChIFN-γ) is both an inhibitor of viral replication and a regulator of numerous immunological functions. However, since little is known about the mechanisms underlying the insect-resistance of transgenic ChIFN-γ, a transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco line was employed in the present study to explore this mechanism. A cDNA microarray (with 43,760 unigenes) was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of transgenic and wild-type (WT) tobacco leaves at two different growth stages. Compared with the WT, 1529 and 405 expressed sequence tags were significantly up- or downregulated on days 119 and 147, respectively. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) are involved in metabolic regulation, cell division and differentiation, material synthesis and transport, signal transduction, and protein synthesis and degradation. Candidate genes that may increase cell density, thicken cell walls, promote secondary metabolite synthesis, and mediate plant hormone-induced resistance responses were used to identify the ChIFN-γ-mediated insect-resistance mechanisms. The insect-resistance of transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco possibly involves unknown signaling pathways, which may directly or indirectly affect DEG expression-mediating genes. The degree of pest resistance increased as the plants grew. Three genes likely to be related to jasmonic acid- or salicylic acid-dependent plant defense responses, including CAF 1, Cop 8/CSN, and HD, are implicated in the insect-resistance of the transgenic plants. The mechanism of transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco resistance also involves RPS20 and other genes that induce microRNA-based gene regulation. The ChIFN-γ-mediated DGEs contribute to insect-resistance in transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco, which provides new insight into the role of ChIFN-γ.

  20. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur.

    PubMed

    Klebig, M L; Wilkinson, J E; Geisler, J G; Woychik, R P

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (Ay) or viable yellow (Avy) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant "obese yellow" a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants.

  1. Over-expression of Arabidopsis CAP causes decreased cell expansion leading to organ size reduction in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Barrero, Roberto A; Umeda, Masaaki; Yamamura, Saburo; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2003-04-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAP) are multifunctional proteins involved in Ras-cAMP signalling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. It has recently been demonstrated that over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic arabidopsis plants causes severe morphological defects owing to loss of actin filaments. To test the generality of the function of AtCAP1 in plants, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing an arabidopsis CAP (AtCAP1) under the regulation of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter were produced. Over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic tobacco plants led to growth abnormalities, in particular a reduction in the size of leaves. Morphological alterations in leaves were the result of reduced elongation of epidermal and mesophyll cells.

  2. [The creation of transgenic tobacco plants expressing fragments of the ARGOS and NtEXPA4 genes in antisense orientation].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Postrigan', B N; Chemeris, A V

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the fragments of the ARGOS and NtEXPA4 genes in antisense orientation have been created. Eleven lines of transgenic plants were investigated and five of them were characterized by a decrease in the sizes of the leaves and flowers as compared to control. Stalk sizes decreased when only the NtEXPA4 gene fragment was used. The organ size of the experimental plants decreased because of a reduction in the level of both cell division and cell expansion. Two lines of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the part of the ARGOS gene in antisense orientation were characterized by a reduction in the level of the NtEXPA1 and NtEXPA4 gene expression.

  3. [Estradiol inducible and flower-specific expression of ARGOS and ARGOS-LIKE genes in transgenic tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Nikonorov, Iu M; Cheremis, A V

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing Arabidopsis thaliana ARGOS and ARGOS-LIKE genes under the control of the chalcone synthase promoter of Petunia hybrid L., as well as the estradiol inducible XVE system, have been obtained. The part of transgenic plants with flower-specific expression of the target genes was characterized by increased flower size, caused by an increase in cell size and quantity in the case of the ARGOS gene and by a stimulation of cell growth via stretching in the case of the ARGOS-LIKE gene. An enhanced expression level of the NtEXPA1, NtEXPA4 genes encoding expansins, NtEXGT gene encoding endo-xyloglucan transferase, and the AINTEGUMENTA-like gene was detected in the flowers of transgenic tobacco plants. In the case of inducible expression of ARGOS and ARGOS-LIKE genes, an increase in leaf, stem and flower size was revealed in several lines of transgenic plants as compared to control. Expression of the ARGOS gene also affected cell number and size in this case, while the ARGOS-LIKE gene mainly influenced cell size via stretching. Inducible expression of the ARGOS gene in flowers mainly provided an enhanced containment of AINTEGUMENTA-like mRNA, while ARGOS-LIKE gene expression resulted in the activation of NtEXPA1 and NtEXGT genes.

  4. Suprabasal desmoglein 3 expression in the epidermis of transgenic mice results in hyperproliferation and abnormal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Anita J; Berika, Mohamed Y; Zhai, Wenwu; Kirk, Sarah E; Ji, Baijing; Hardman, Matthew J; Garrod, David R

    2002-08-01

    The desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) and desmocollin 1 (Dsc1) isoforms of the desmosomal cadherins are expressed in the suprabasal layers of epidermis, whereas Dsg3 and Dsc3 are more strongly expressed basally. This differential expression may have a function in epidermal morphogenesis and/or may regulate the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. To test this hypothesis, we changed the expression pattern by overexpressing human Dsg3 under the control of the keratin 1 (K1) promoter in the suprabasal epidermis of transgenic mice. From around 12 weeks of age, the mice exhibited flaking of the skin accompanied by epidermal pustules and thinning of the hair. Histological analysis of affected areas revealed acanthosis, hypergranulosis, hyperkeratosis, localized parakeratosis, and abnormal hair follicles. This phenotype has some features in common with human ichthyosiform diseases. Electron microscopy revealed a mild epidermal spongiosis. Suprabasally, desmosomes showed incorporation of the exogenous protein by immunogold labeling but were normal in structure. The epidermis was hyperproliferative, and differentiation was abnormal, demonstrated by expression of K14 in the suprabasal layer, restriction of K1, and strong induction of K6 and K16. The changes resembled those found in previous studies in which growth factors, cytokines, and integrins had been overexpressed in epidermis. Thus our data strongly support the view that Dsg3 contributes to the regulation of epidermal differentiation. Our results contrast markedly with those recently obtained by expressing Dsg3 in epidermis under the involucrin promoter. Possible reasons for this difference are considered in this paper.

  5. Human Treg responses allow sustained recombinant adeno-associated virus–mediated transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Christian; Chulay, Jeffrey D.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Humphries, Margaret; Carey, Brenna; Sandhaus, Robert A.; McElvaney, Noel G.; Messina, Louis; Tang, Qiushi; Rouhani, Farshid N.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Fu, Ann Dongtao; Yachnis, Anthony; Knop, David R.; Ye, Guo-jie; Brantly, Mark; Calcedo, Roberto; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Richman, Lee P.; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Hulme, Maigan A.; Brusko, Todd M.; Wilson, James M.; Flotte, Terence R.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have shown promise for the treatment of several diseases; however, immune-mediated elimination of transduced cells has been suggested to limit and account for a loss of efficacy. To determine whether rAAV vector expression can persist long term, we administered rAAV vectors expressing normal, M-type α-1 antitrypsin (M-AAT) to AAT-deficient subjects at various doses by multiple i.m. injections. M-specific AAT expression was observed in all subjects in a dose-dependent manner and was sustained for more than 1 year in the absence of immune suppression. Muscle biopsies at 1 year had sustained AAT expression and a reduction of inflammatory cells compared with 3 month biopsies. Deep sequencing of the TCR Vβ region from muscle biopsies demonstrated a limited number of T cell clones that emerged at 3 months after vector administration and persisted for 1 year. In situ immunophenotyping revealed a substantial Treg population in muscle biopsy samples containing AAT-expressing myofibers. Approximately 10% of all T cells in muscle were natural Tregs, which were activated in response to AAV capsid. These results suggest that i.m. delivery of rAAV type 1–AAT (rAAV1-AAT) induces a T regulatory response that allows ongoing transgene expression and indicates that immunomodulatory treatments may not be necessary for rAAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:24231351

  6. Enhanced virus resistance in transgenic maize expressing a dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease gene from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiuling; Lu, Yingui; Di, Dianping; Zhang, Zhiyan; Liu, He; Tian, Lanzhi; Zhang, Aihong; Zhang, Yanjing; Shi, Lindan; Guo, Bihong; Xu, Jin; Duan, Xifei; Wang, Xianbing; Han, Chenggui; Miao, Hongqin; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD), caused by several Fijiviruses in the family Reoviridae, is a global disease that is responsible for substantial yield losses in maize. Although some maize germplasm have low levels of polygenic resistance to MRDD, highly resistant cultivated varieties are not available for agronomic field production in China. In this work, we have generated transgenic maize lines that constitutively express rnc70, a mutant E. coli dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease gene. Transgenic lines were propagated and screened under field conditions for 12 generations. During three years of evaluations, two transgenic lines and their progeny were challenged with Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), the causal agent of MRDD in China, and these plants exhibited reduced levels of disease severity. In two normal years of MRDD abundance, both lines were more resistant than non-transgenic plants. Even in the most serious MRDD year, six out of seven progeny from one line were resistant, whereas non-transgenic plants were highly susceptible. Molecular approaches in the T12 generation revealed that the rnc70 transgene was integrated and expressed stably in transgenic lines. Under artificial conditions permitting heavy virus inoculation, the T12 progeny of two highly resistant lines had a reduced incidence of MRDD and accumulation of RBSDV in infected plants. In addition, we confirmed that the RNC70 protein could bind directly to RBSDV dsRNA in vitro. Overall, our data show that RNC70-mediated resistance in transgenic maize can provide efficient protection against dsRNA virus infection.

  7. BAC transgenic mice provide evidence that p53 expression is highly regulated in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Zhang, G X; Zhou, Y; Zhang, C X; Xie, Y Y; Xiang, C; He, X Y; Zhang, Q; Liu, G

    2015-09-17

    p53 is an important tumor suppressor and stress response mediator. Proper control of p53 level and activity is tightly associated with its function. Posttranslational modifications and the interactions with Mdm2 and Mdm4 are major mechanisms controlling p53 activity and stability. As p53 protein is short-lived and hardly detectable in unstressed situations, less is known on its basal level expression and the corresponding controlling mechanisms in vivo. In addition, it also remains obscure how p53 expression might contribute to its functional regulation. In this study, we established bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic E.coli β-galactosidase Z gene reporter mice to monitor p53 expression in mouse tissues and identify important regulatory elements critical for the expression in vivo. We revealed preferentially high level of p53 reporter expressions in the proliferating, but not the differentiated compartments of the majority of tissues during development and tissue homeostasis. In addition, tumors as well as regenerating tissues in the p53 reporter mice also expressed high level of β-gal. Furthermore, both the enhancer box sequence (CANNTG) in the p53 promoter and the 3' terminal untranslated region element were critical in mediating the high-level expression of the reporter. We also provided evidence that cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene was a critical player regulating p53 mRNA expression in proliferating cells and tissues. Finally, we found robust p53 activation preferentially in the proliferating compartment of mouse tissues upon DNA damage and the proliferating cells exhibited an enhanced p53 response as compared with cells in a quiescent state. Together, these results suggested a highly regulated expression pattern of p53 in the proliferating compartment controlled by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and such regulated p53 expression may impose functional significance upon stress by setting up a precautionary mode in defense

  8. Studies on the thymus of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice: effect of transgene expression.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, L A; Healey, D; Simpson, E; Chandler, P; Lund, T; Ritter, M A; Cooke, A

    1994-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a good model of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Autoreactive T cells may play a fundamental role in disease initiation in this model, while disregulation of such cells may result from an abnormal thymic microenvironment. Diabetes is prevented in NOD mice by direct introduction of an E alpha d transgene (NOD-E) or a modified I-A beta chain of NOD origin (NOD-PRO or NOD-ASP). To investigate if disease pathology in NOD mice, protection from disease in transgenic NOD-E and NOD-PRO and partial protection from disease in NOD-ASP can be attributed to alterations in the thymic microenvironment, immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analysis of the thymi of these mouse strains was studied. Thymi from NOD and NOD-E mice showed a progressive increase in thymic B-cell percentage from 12 weeks of age. This was accompanied by a concomitant loss in thymic epithelial cells with the appearance of large epithelial-free areas mainly at the corticomedullary junction, which increased in size and number with age and contained the B-cell clusters. Such thymic B cells did not express CD5 and were absent in CBA, NOD-ASP and NOD-PRO mice as were the epithelial cell-free spaces, even at 5 months of age. Therefore the mechanisms of disease protection in the transgenic NOD-E and NOD-ASP/NOD-PRO mice may differ if these thymic abnormalities are related to disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7523287

  9. Expression of a Pim-1 transgene accelerates lymphoproliferation and inhibits apoptosis in lpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed Central

    Möröy, T; Grzeschiczek, A; Petzold, S; Hartmann, K U

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the Pim-1 kinase are predisposed to develop T-cell lymphomas with a long latency period of about 7-9 months. However, the exact functional basis of the oncogenic activity of Pim-1 remains obscure. C57BL/6 mice homozygous for the lpr mutation develop a well-described lymphoproliferative syndrome at about 26-30 weeks of age. This syndrome is characterized mainly by the accumulation of abnormal T cells in lymph nodes because of the lack of Fas receptor-induced apoptosis. We find that backcross of E mu-Pim-1 transgenics (mice with a transgene that carries the mouse Pim-1 gene under the transcriptional control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene enhancer E mu) into lpr/lpr mice results in strong acceleration of lymphoproliferation and dramatic enlargement of lymph nodes. In addition, we show here that cultured lymph node cells from E mu-Pim-1 lpr/lpr mice are rescued from rapid apoptosis that normally occurs in nontransgenic lpr cells in vitro. We also present evidence that CD4+/CD8+ double-positive thymocytes from lpr/lpr mice are sensitive to dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, although lpr/lpr mice lack the Fas receptor. In contrast, E mu-Pim-1 lpr/lpr animals show considerable protection from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis. These results show that Pim-1 can strongly accelerate lymphoproliferation through inhibition of apoptosis and thereby provide first insight into the functional basis for the oncogenic activity of Pim-1. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7504280

  10. Meiotic drive impacts expression and evolution of x-linked genes in stalk-eyed flies.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Josephine A; Brand, Cara L; Paczolt, Kimberly A; Johns, Philip M; Baker, Richard H; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species.

  11. High-level transgene expression in plant cells: effects of a strong scaffold attachment region from tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, G C; Hall, G; Michalowski, S; Newman, W; Spiker, S; Weissinger, A K; Thompson, W F

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that yeast scaffold attachment regions (SARs) flanking a chimeric beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene increased per-copy expression levels by 24-fold in tobacco suspension cell lines stably transformed by microprojectile bombardment. In this study, we examined the effect of a DNA fragment originally identified in a tobacco genomic clone by its activity in an in vitro binding assay. The tobacco SAR has much greater scaffold binding affinity than does the yeast SAR, and tobacco cell lines stably transformed with constructs containing the tobacco SAR accumulated greater than fivefold more GUS enzyme activity than did lines transformed with the yeast SAR construct. Relative to the control construct, flanking the GUS gene with plant SARs increased overall expression per transgene copy by almost 140-fold. In transient expression assays, the same construct increased expression only approximately threefold relative to a control without SARs, indicating that the full SAR effect requires integration into chromosomal DNA. GUS activity in individual stable transformants was not simply proportional to transgene copy number, and the SAR effect was maximal in cell lines with fewer than approximately 10 transgene copies per tobacco genome. Lines with significantly higher copy numbers showed greatly greatly reduced expression relative to the low-copy-number lines. Our results indicate that strong SARs flanking a transgene greatly increases expression without eliminating variation between transformants. We propose that SARs dramatically reduce the severity or likelihood of homology-dependent gene silencing in cells with small numbers of transgenes but do not prevent silencing of transgenes present in many copies. PMID:8672887

  12. Transgenic expression of fungal accessory hemicellulases in Arabidopsis thaliana triggers transcriptional patterns related to biotic stress and defense response

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alex Yi-Lin; Chan, Kin; Ho, Chi-Yip; Canam, Thomas; Capron, Resmi; Master, Emma R.; Bräutigam, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    The plant cell wall is an abundant and renewable resource for lignocellulosic applications such as the production of biofuel. Due to structural and compositional complexities, the plant cell wall is, however, recalcitrant to hydrolysis and extraction of platform sugars. A cell wall engineering strategy to reduce this recalcitrance makes use of microbial cell wall modifying enzymes that are expressed directly in plants themselves. Previously, we constructed transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana constitutively expressing the fungal hemicellulases: Phanerochaete carnosa glucurnoyl esterase (PcGCE) and Aspergillus nidulans α-arabinofuranosidase (AnAF54). While the PcGCE lines demonstrated improved xylan extractability, they also displayed chlorotic leaves leading to the hypothesis that expression of such enzymes in planta resulted in plant stress. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of transgenic expression of the aforementioned microbial hemicellulases in planta on the host arabidopsis. More specifically, we investigated transcriptome profiles by short read high throughput sequencing (RNAseq) from developmentally distinct parts of the plant stem. When compared to non-transformed wild-type plants, a subset of genes was identified that showed differential transcript abundance in all transgenic lines and tissues investigated. Intriguingly, this core set of genes was significantly enriched for those involved in plant defense and biotic stress responses. While stress and defense-related genes showed increased transcript abundance in the transgenic plants regardless of tissue or genotype, genes involved in photosynthesis (light harvesting) were decreased in their transcript abundance potentially reflecting wide-spread effects of heterologous microbial transgene expression and the maintenance of plant homeostasis. Additionally, an increase in transcript abundance for genes involved in salicylic acid signaling further substantiates our finding that transgenic

  13. Stable transgene expression in primitive human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Teiko; Holt, Nathalia G; Hollis, Roger P; Ge, Shundi; Cannon, Paula M; Crooks, Gay M; Kohn, Donald B

    2009-12-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated integration has been shown to achieve long-term transgene expression in a wide range of host cells. In this study, we improved the SB transposon-mediated gene transfer system for transduction of human CD34(+) stem/progenitor cells by two approaches: (1) to increase the transposition efficacy, a hyperactive mutant of SB, HSB, was used; (2) to improve the expression of the SB transposase and the transgene cassette carried by the transposon, different viral and cellular promoters were evaluated. SB components were delivered in trans into the target cells by Nucleoporation. The SB transposon-mediated integration efficacy was assessed by integrated transgene (enhanced green fluorescent protein [eGFP]) expression both in vitro and in vivo. In purified human cord blood CD34(+) cells, HSB achieved long-term transgene expression in nearly 7-fold more cells than the original SB transposase. Significantly brighter levels of eGFP expression (5-fold) were achieved with the human elongation factor 1alpha (EF1-alpha) promoter in Jurkat human T cells, compared with that achieved with the modified myeloproliferative sarcoma virus long terminal repeat enhancer-promoter (MNDU3); in contrast, the MNDU3 promoter expressed eGFP at the highest level in K-562 myeloid cells. In human CD34(+) cord blood cells studied under conditions directing myeloid differentiation, the highest transgene integration and expression were achieved using the EF1-alpha promoter to express the SB transposase combined with the MNDU3 promoter to express the eGFP reporter. Stable transgene expression was achieved at levels up to 27% for more than 4 weeks of culture after improved gene transfer to CD34(+) cells (average, 17%; n = 4). In vivo studies evaluating engraftment and differentiation of the SB-modified human CD34(+) cells demonstrated that SB-modified human CD34(+) cells engrafted in NOD/SCID/gamma chain(null) (NSG) mice and differentiated into multilineage cell

  14. Field performance of transgenic citrus trees: Assessment of the long-term expression of uidA and nptII transgenes and its impact on relevant agronomic and phenotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The future of genetic transformation as a tool for the improvement of fruit trees depends on the development of proper systems for the assessment of unintended effects in field-grown GM lines. In this study, we used eight transgenic lines of two different citrus types (sweet orange and citrange) transformed with the marker genes β-glucuronidase (uidA) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) as model systems to study for the first time in citrus the long-term stability of transgene expression and whether transgene-derived pleiotropic effects occur with regard to the morphology, development and fruit quality of orchard-grown GM citrus trees. Results The stability of the integration and expression of the transgenes was confirmed in 7-year-old, orchard-grown transgenic lines by Southern blot analysis and enzymatic assays (GUS and ELISA NPTII), respectively. Little seasonal variation was detected in the expression levels between plants of the same transgenic line in different organs and over the 3 years of analysis, confirming the absence of rearrangements and/or silencing of the transgenes after transferring the plants to field conditions. Comparisons between the GM citrus lines with their non-GM counterparts across the study years showed that the expression of these transgenes did not cause alterations of the main phenotypic and agronomic plant and fruit characteristics. However, when comparisons were performed between diploid and tetraploid transgenic citrange trees and/or between juvenile and mature transgenic sweet orange trees, significant and consistent differences were detected, indicating that factors other than their transgenic nature induced a much higher phenotypic variability. Conclusions Our results indicate that transgene expression in GM citrus remains stable during long-term agricultural cultivation, without causing unexpected effects on crop characteristics. This study also shows that the transgenic citrus trees expressing the

  15. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Transgenic Poplar Dwarf Mutant Reveals Numerous Differentially Expressed Genes Involved in Energy Flow

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Guifeng; Li, Huiyu; Jiang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    In our previous research, the Tamarix androssowii LEA gene (Tamarix androssowii late embryogenesis abundant protein Mrna, GenBank ID: DQ663481) was transferred into Populus simonii × Populus nigra. Among the eleven transgenic lines, one exhibited a dwarf phenotype compared to the wild type and other transgenic lines, named dwf1. To uncover the mechanisms underlying this phenotype, digital gene expression libraries were produced from dwf1, wild-type, and other normal transgenic lines, XL-5 and XL-6. Gene expression profile analysis indicated that dwf1 had a unique gene expression pattern in comparison to the other two transgenic lines. Finally, a total of 1246 dwf1-unique differentially expressed genes were identified. These genes were further subjected to gene ontology and pathway analysis. Results indicated that photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism related genes were significantly affected. In addition, many transcription factors genes were also differentially expressed in dwf1. These various differentially expressed genes may be critical for dwarf mutant formation; thus, the findings presented here might provide insight for our understanding of the mechanisms of tree growth and development. PMID:25192286

  16. Cytotoxic immune response blunts long-term transgene expression after efficient retroviral-mediated hepatic gene transfer in rat.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Dominique; Ménoret, Séverine; Chiari, Estelle; Pichard, Virginie; Durand, Sophie; Tesson, Laurent; Moullier, Philippe; Anegon, Ignacio; Ferry, Nicolas

    2002-04-01

    Vectors derived from oncoretroviruses can transduce a small proportion of hepatocytes when injected in the regenerating liver. Transgene expression may be sustained for months without immune response. In striking contrast, we observed a rapid extinction when the intravenous injection of a high input of nuclear beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) expression vector, one day after partial hepatectomy, led to a significant proportion of transduced cells in the liver. Extinction was associated with liver inflammation on tissue sections and appearance of antibodies against the transgene product, while vector genomes became undetectable in liver tissue by PCR. These observations suggested the elimination of transduced cells by an immune response. Transgenic rats tolerant for cytoplasmic beta-gal, or normal rats depleted in CD8 T lymphocytes, steadily expressed the beta-gal vector. In the spleen of normal rats, we detected cytotoxic cells directed against cells expressing beta-gal after the injection of the beta-gal vector. In jaundiced Gunn rats deficient in bilirubin glucuronosyl transferase (BGT1) and treated with a human BGT1 cDNA expression vector, we observed the same kinetics of extinction as well as the appearance of anti-BGT1 antibodies. This study demonstrates that retrovirus-mediated gene transfer may induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes specifically directed against transgene-expressing cells.

  17. Design and construction of an in-plant activation cassette for transgene expression and recombinant protein production in plants.

    PubMed

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A; Harding, Robert M; Dale, James L

    2014-05-01

    Virus-based transgene expression systems have become particularly valuable for recombinant protein production in plants. The dual-module in-plant activation (INPACT) expression platform consists of a uniquely designed split-gene cassette incorporating the cis replication elements of Tobacco yellow dwarf geminivirus (TYDV) and an ethanol-inducible activation cassette encoding the TYDV Rep and RepA replication-associated proteins. The INPACT system is essentially tailored for recombinant protein production in stably transformed plants and provides both inducible and high-level transient transgene expression with the potential to be adapted to diverse crop species. The construction of a novel split-gene cassette, the inducible nature of the system and the ability to amplify transgene expression via rolling-circle replication differentiates this system from other DNA- and RNA-based virus vector systems used for stable or transient recombinant protein production in plants. Here we provide a detailed protocol describing the design and construction of a split-gene INPACT cassette, and we highlight factors that may influence optimal activation and amplification of gene expression in transgenic plants. By using Nicotiana tabacum, the protocol takes 6-9 months to complete, and recombinant proteins expressed using INPACT can accumulate to up to 10% of the leaf total soluble protein.

  18. Muscle-directed gene therapy for phenylketonuria (PKU): Development of transgenic mice with muscle-specific phenylalanine hydroxylase expression

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, C.O.; Messing, A.; Wolff, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an attractive target for gene therapy because of shortcomings in current therapy including lifelong commitment to a difficult and expensive diet, persistent mild cognitive deficits in some children despite adequate dietary therapy, and maternal PKU syndrome. Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is normally expressed only in liver, but we propose to treat PKU by introducing the gene for PAH into muscle. In order to evaluate both the safety and efficacy of this approach, we have a developed a trangenic mouse which expresses PAH in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. The transgene includes promoter and enhancer sequences from the mouse muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene fused to the mouse liver PAH cDNA. Mice which have inherited the transgene are healthy, active, and do not exhibit any signs of muscle weakness or wasting. Ectopic PAH expression in muscle is not detrimental to the health, neurologic function, or reproduction of the mice. Pah{sup enu2} hyperphenylalaninemic mice, a model of human PAH deficiency, bred to carry the transgene have substantial PAH expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle but none in liver. Muscle PAH expression alone does not complement the hyperphenylalaninemic phenotype of Pah{sup enu2} mice. However, administration of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin to transgenic Pah{sup enu2} mice is associated with a 25% mean decrease in serum phenylalanine levels. We predict that ectopic expression of PAH in muscle along with adequate muscle supplies of reduced biopterin cofactor will decrease hyperphenylalaninemia in PKU.

  19. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei; Ouyang, Pin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  20. Generation of transgenic cattle expressing human β-defensin 3 as an approach to reducing susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis infection.

    PubMed

    Su, Feng; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Guanghui; Ru, Kun; Liu, Xin; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Jun; Wu, Yongyan; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Bovine tuberculosis results from infection with Mycobacterium bovis, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis family. Worldwide, M. bovis infections result in economic losses in the livestock industry; cattle production is especially hard-hit by this disease. Generating M. bovis-resistant cattle may potentially mitigate the impact of this disease by reducing M. bovis infections. In this study, we used transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate cattle expressing the gene encoding human β-defensin 3 (HBD3), which confers resistance to mycobacteria in vitro. We first generated alveolar epithelial cells expressing HBD3 under the control of the bovine MUC1 promoter, and confirmed that these cells secreted HBD3 and possessed anti-mycobacterial capacity. We then generated and identified transgenic cattle by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of genetically modified embryos provided evidence that monoclonal transgenic bovine fetal fibroblast cells have an integral reprogramming ability that is similar to that of normal cells. Five genetically modified cows were generated, and their anti-mycobacterial capacities were evaluated. Alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages from these cattle expressed higher levels of HBD3 protein compared with non-transgenic cells and possessed effective anti-mycobacterial capacity. These results suggest that the overall risk of M. bovis infection in transgenic cattle is efficiently reduced, and support the development of genetically modified animals as an effective tool to reduce M. bovis infection.

  1. Expression and characterization of bioactive recombinant human alpha-lactalbumin in the milk of transgenic cloned cows.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Yang, P; Tang, B; Sun, X; Zhang, R; Guo, C; Gong, G; Liu, Y; Li, R; Zhang, L; Dai, Y; Li, N

    2008-12-01

    Improvement of the nutritional value of cow milk with transgenic expression of recombinant human alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) has been previously attempted. However, the detailed characterization of the recombinant protein and analysis of the transgenic milk components are not explored yet. Here, we first report production of healthy transgenic cows by somatic cell nuclear transfer, in which expression of up to 1.55 g/L of recombinant human alpha-LA was achieved. The recombinant human alpha-LA was purified from transgenic milk and displayed physicochemical properties similar to its natural counterpart with respect to molecular weight, structure, and regulatory activity for beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase. Additionally, no N-glycosylation was found in the recombinant human alpha-LA, whereas the endogenous bovine alpha-LA was glycosylated at the unusual site (71)Asn-Ile-(73)Cys. Compared with milk from nontransgenic cows, expression of the transgene did not materially alter milk composition, such as fat and protein content. Our research thus provides scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of humanizing cow milk.

  2. Longitudinal evaluation of expression of virally delivered transgenes in gerbil cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mauck, Matthew C.; Mancuso, Katherine; Kuchenbecker, James A.; Connor, Thomas B.; Hauswirth, William W.; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Delivery of foreign opsin genes to cone photoreceptors using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a potential tool for studying the basic mechanisms underlying cone based vision and for treating vision disorders. We used an in vivo retinal imaging system to monitor, over time, expression of virally-delivered genes targeted to cone photoreceptors in the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus). Gerbils have a well-developed photopic visual system, with 11-14% of their photoreceptors being cones. We used replication deficient serotype 5 rAAV to deliver a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP). In an effort to direct expression of the gene specifically to either S or M cones, the transgene was under the control of either the human X-chromosome opsin gene regulatory elements, i.e., an enhancer termed the Locus Control Region (LCR) and L promoter, or the human S-opsin promoter. Longitudinal fluorescence images reveal that gene expression is first detectable about 14 days post-injection, reaches a peak after about 3 months, and is observed more than a year post-injection if the initial viral concentration is sufficiently high. The regulatory elements are able to direct expression to a subpopulation of cones while excluding expression in rods and non-photoreceptor retinal cells. When the same viral constructs are used to deliver a human long-wavelength opsin gene to gerbil cones, stimulation of the introduced human photopigment with long-wavelength light produces robust cone responses. PMID:18598398

  3. Integration and expression of a rabbit liver cytochrome P-450 gene in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, K; Noji, M; Ohmori, S; Imai, Y; Murakoshi, I

    1991-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 is involved in the oxidative metabolism of a broad range of substrates. We have made a chimeric construct, pSN002, containing the cDNA for rabbit liver cytochrome P-450 (IIC14) under the control of the TR2' promoter for mannopine synthase in the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid. Nicotiana tabacum was transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring a cointegrated plasmid pSN002::pGV2260. The presence of mRNA and of the translated protein from the chimeric cytochrome P-450 gene in transgenic plants was confirmed by RNA blot hybridization and by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. The transformants in which the foreign cytochrome P-450 protein is expressed show marked phenotypic changes, notably a tendency rapidly to senesce. We detected 2-propenylpyrrolidine, a degradative metabolite of nicotine alkaloids, in transgenic tobacco showing this pronounced phenotypic change. Such metabolism is likely to be due to the effect of senescence and not directly to the presence of the cytochrome P-450. Images PMID:1714583

  4. Transgenic organisms expressing genes from Bacillus thuringiensis to combat insect pests.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Borovsky, Dov; Boussiba, Sammy; Einav, Monica; Gindin, Galina; Horowitz, A Rami; Kolot, Mikhail; Melnikov, Olga; Mendel, Zvi; Yagil, Ezra

    2010-01-01

    Various subspecies (ssp.) of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are considered the best agents known so far to control insects, being highly specific and safe, easily mass produced and with long shelf life.1 The para-crystalline body that is produced during sporulation in the exosporium includes polypeptides named δ-endotoxins, each killing a specific set of insects. The different entomopathogenic toxins of various Bt ssp. can be manipulated genetically in an educated way to construct more efficient transgenic bacteria or plants that express combinations of toxin genes to control pests.2 Joint research projects in our respective laboratories during the last decade demonstrate what can be done by implementing certain ideas using molecular biology with Bt ssp. israelensis (Bti) as a model system. Here, we describe our progress achieved with Gram-negative bacterial species, including cyanobacteria, and some preliminary experiments to form transgenic plants, mainly to control mosquitoes (Diptera), but also a particular Lepidopteran and Coleopteran pest species. In addition, a system is described by which environment-damaging genes can be removed from the recombinants thus alleviating procedures for obtaining permits to release them in nature.

  5. Generation of embryonic stem cells and transgenic mice expressing green fluorescence protein in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Suling; Maxwell, Sarah; Jimenez-Beristain, Antonio; Vives, Joaquim; Kuehner, Eva; Zhao, Jiexin; O'Brien, Carmel; de Felipe, Carmen; Semina, Elena; Li, Meng

    2004-03-01

    We have generated embryonic stem (ES) cells and transgenic mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP) inserted into the Pitx3 locus via homologous recombination. In the central nervous system, Pitx3-directed GFP was visualized in dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. Live primary DA neurons can be isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting from these transgenic mouse embryos. In culture, Pitx3-GFP is coexpressed in a proportion of ES-derived DA neurons. Furthermore, ES cell-derived Pitx3-GFP expressing DA neurons responded to neurotrophic factors and were sensitive to DA-specific neurotoxin N-4-methyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine. We anticipate that the Pitx3-GFP ES cells could be used as a powerful model system for functional identification of molecules governing mDA neuron differentiation and for preclinical research including pharmaceutical drug screening and transplantation. The Pitx3 knock-in mice, on the other hand, could be used for purifying primary neurons for molecular studies associated with the midbrain-specific DA phenotype at a level not previously feasible. These mice would also provide a useful tool to study DA fate determination from embryo- or adult-derived neural stem cells.

  6. Expression of Arabidopsis Bax Inhibitor-1 in transgenic sugarcane confers drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Daniel Alves; Melotto-Passarin, Danila Montewka; Barbosa, Mariana de Almeida; Santos, Flavio Dos; Gomez, Sergio Gregorio Perez; Massola Júnior, Nelson Sidnei; Lam, Eric; Carrer, Helaine

    2016-09-01

    The sustainability of global crop production is critically dependent on improving tolerance of crop plants to various types of environmental stress. Thus, identification of genes that confer stress tolerance in crops has become a top priority especially in view of expected changes in global climatic patterns. Drought stress is one of the abiotic stresses that can result in dramatic loss of crop productivity. In this work, we show that transgenic expression of a highly conserved cell death suppressor, Bax Inhibitor-1 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtBI-1), can confer increased tolerance of sugarcane plants to long-term (>20 days) water stress conditions. This robust trait is correlated with an increased tolerance of the transgenic sugarcane plants, especially in the roots, to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress by the protein glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin. Our findings suggest that suppression of ER stress in C4 grasses, which include important crops such as sorghum and maize, can be an effective means of conferring improved tolerance to long-term water deficit. This result could potentially lead to improved resilience and yield of major crops in the world.

  7. Transgenic organisms expressing genes from Bacillus thuringiensis to combat insect pests§

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Dov, Eitan; Borovsky, Dov; Boussiba, Sammy; Einav, Monica; Gindin, Galina; Horowitz, A Rami; Kolot, Mikhail; Melnikov, Olga; Mendel, Zvi; Yagil, Ezra

    2010-01-01

    Various subspecies (ssp.) of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are considered the best agents known so far to control insects, being highly specific and safe, easily mass produced and with long shelf life.1 The para-crystalline body that is produced during sporulation in the exosporium includes polypeptides named δ-endotoxins, each killing a specific set of insects. The different entomopathogenic toxins of various Bt ssp. can be manipulated genetically in an educated way to construct more efficient transgenic bacteria or plants that express combinations of toxin genes to control pests.2 Joint research projects in our respective laboratories during the last decade demonstrate what can be done by implementing certain ideas using molecular biology with Bt ssp. israelensis (Bti) as a model system. Here, we describe our progress achieved with Gram-negative bacterial species, including cyanobacteria, and some preliminary experiments to form transgenic plants, mainly to control mosquitoes (Diptera), but also a particular Lepidopteran and Coleopteran pest species. In addition, a system is described by which environment-damaging genes can be removed from the recombinants thus alleviating procedures for obtaining permits to release them in nature. PMID:21326834

  8. Transgenic cotton expressing Cry10Aa toxin confers high resistance to the cotton boll weevil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thuanne Pires; Arraes, Fabricio Barbosa Monteiro; Lourenço-Tessutti, Isabela Tristan; Silva, Marilia Santos; Lisei-de-Sá, Maria Eugênia; Lucena, Wagner Alexandre; Macedo, Leonardo Lima Pepino; Lima, Janaina Nascimento; Santos Amorim, Regina Maria; Artico, Sinara; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; Mattar Silva, Maria Cristina; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2017-01-12

    Genetically modified (GM) cotton plants that effectively control cotton boll weevil (CBW), which is the most destructive cotton insect pest in South America, are reported here for the first time. This work presents the successful development of a new GM cotton with high resistance to CBW conferred by Cry10Aa toxin, a protein encoded by entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) gene. The plant transformation vector harbouring cry10Aa gene driven by the cotton ubiquitination-related promoter uceA1.7 was introduced into a Brazilian cotton cultivar by biolistic transformation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays revealed high transcription levels of cry10Aa in both T0 GM cotton leaf and flower bud tissues. Southern blot and qPCR-based 2(-ΔΔCt) analyses revealed that T0 GM plants had either one or two transgene copies. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of Cry10Aa protein expression showed variable protein expression levels in both flower buds and leaves tissues of T0 GM cotton plants, ranging from approximately 3.0 to 14.0 μg g(-1) fresh tissue. CBW susceptibility bioassays, performed by feeding adults and larvae with T0 GM cotton leaves and flower buds, respectively, demonstrated a significant entomotoxic effect and a high level of CBW mortality (up to 100%). Molecular analysis revealed that transgene stability and entomotoxic effect to CBW were maintained in T1 generation as the Cry10Aa toxin expression levels remained high in both tissues, ranging from 4.05 to 19.57 μg g(-1) fresh tissue, and the CBW mortality rate remained around 100%. In conclusion, these Cry10Aa GM cotton plants represent a great advance in the control of the devastating CBW insect pest and can substantially impact cotton agribusiness.

  9. A 470 bp WAP-promoter fragment confers lactation independent, progesterone regulated mammary-specific gene expression in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lipnik, Karoline; Petznek, Helga; Renner-Müller, Ingrid; Egerbacher, Monika; Url, Angelika; Salmons, Brian; Günzburg, Walter H; Hohenadl, Christine

    2005-04-01

    The ability of a 470 bp sub-fragment of the murine whey acidic protein (WAP) promoter in the context of a retroviral expression plasmid to direct gene expression to mammary epithelial cells was analysed in a number of independent transgenic mouse lines. In contrast to previous findings with the genuine 2.5 kb promoter fragment, our studies revealed a highly mammary gland-specific expression detectable only in non-lactating animals. This suggested a mainly progesterone-regulated activity of the short fragment. Therefore, transgene expression was examined in the progesterone-determined estrous cycle and during pregnancy. In accordance with in vitro data from stably transfected cell lines, in both situations expression was upregulated at stages associated with high progesterone levels. Taken together these data provide deeper insight into WAP-promoter regulation and stress the usefulness of the shortened fragment for a lactation independent mammary-targeted expression.

  10. Human beta-globin gene expression in transgenic mice is enhanced by a distant DNase I hypersensitive site.

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, P T; Liu, D P; Liu, W; Chang, J C; Kan, Y W

    1989-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that erythroid-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located far upstream of the human beta-globin gene are important in regulating beta-globin gene expression. We used the polymerase chain reaction technique to amplify and clone an 882-base-pair DNA fragment spanning one of these HS, designated HSII, which is located 54 kilobases upstream of the beta-globin gene. The cloned HSII fragment was linked to a human beta-globin gene in either the genomic (HSII-beta) or antigenomic (HSII-beta) orientation. These two constructs and a beta-globin gene alone (beta) were injected into fertilized mouse eggs, and expression was analyzed in liver and brain from day-16 transgenic fetuses. Five of 7 beta-transgenic fetuses expressed human beta-globin mRNA, but the level of expression per gene copy was low, ranging from 0.93 to 22.4% of mouse alpha-globin mRNA (average 9.9%). In contrast, 11 of 12 HSII-beta transgenic fetuses expressed beta-globin mRNA at levels per gene copy ranging from 31.3 to 336.6% of mouse alpha-globin mRNA (average 139.5%). Only three fetuses containing intact copies of the HSII-beta construct were produced. Two of three expressed human beta-globin mRNA at levels per gene copy of 179.2 and 387.1%. Expression of human beta-globin mRNA was tissue-specific in all three types of transgenic fetuses. These studies demonstrate that a small DNA fragment containing a single erythroid-specific HS can stimulate high-level human beta-globin gene expression in transgenic mice. Images PMID:2780563

  11. Generation and characterization of transgenic plum lines expressing gafp-1 with the bul409 promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gastrodia anti fungal protein (GAFP-1) is a mannose-binding lectin that can confer increased disease resistance in transgenic tobacco and plum. In all previously-generated transgenic lines, the gene was under the control of the 35SCaMV promoter. In this study, transgenic plum lines were create...

  12. A rice chloroplast transit peptide sequence does not alter the cytoplasmic localization of sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase expressed in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Lee, Kyungjin; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-09-01

    Ectopic overexpression of melatonin biosynthetic genes of animal origin has been used to generate melatonin-rich transgenic plants to examine the functional roles of melatonin in plants. However, the subcellular localization of these proteins expressed in the transgenic plants remains unknown. We studied the localization of sheep (Ovis aries) serotonin N-acetyltransferase (OaSNAT) and a translational fusion of a rice SNAT transit peptide to OaSNAT (TS:OaSNAT) in plants. Laser confocal microscopy analysis revealed that both OaSNAT and TS:OaSNAT proteins were localized to the cytoplasm even with the addition of the transit sequence to OaSNAT. Transgenic rice plants overexpressing the TS:OaSNAT fusion transgene exhibited high SNAT enzyme activity relative to untransformed wild-type plants, but lower activity than transgenic rice plants expressing the wild-type OaSNAT gene. Melatonin levels in both types of transgenic rice plant corresponded well with SNAT enzyme activity levels. The TS:OaSNAT transgenic lines exhibited increased seminal root growth relative to wild-type plants, but less than in the OaSNAT transgenic lines, confirming that melatonin promotes root growth. Seed-specific OaSNAT expression under the control of a rice prolamin promoter did not confer high levels of melatonin production in transgenic rice seeds compared with seeds from transgenic plants expressing OaSNAT under the control of the constitutive maize ubiquitin promoter.

  13. Genetic transformation and expression of transgenic lines of Populus x euramericana with insect-resistance and salt-tolerance genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, R L; Wang, A X; Zhang, J; Dong, Y; Yang, M S; Wang, J M

    2016-04-29

    We characterized new transgenic varieties of poplar with multiple insect-resistant and salt stress tolerant genes. Two insect-resistant Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes, Cry1Ac and Cry3A, and a salt-tolerant gene, Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) were inserted into a vector, p209-Cry1Ac-Cry3A-BADH. The clone of Populus x euramericana was transformed by the vector using the Agrobacterium-mediated method. Three transgenic lines were assessed using genetic detection and resistance expression analysis. PCR revealed that exogenous genes Cry1Ac, Cry3A, BADH and selective marker gene NPTII were present in three transgenic lines. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) showed significant differences in the transcriptional abundance of three exogenous genes in different lines. Results of assays for Bt toxic proteins showed that the Cry1Ac and Cry3A toxic protein content of each line was 12.83-26.32 and 2108.91-2724.79 ng/g, respectively. The Cry1Ac toxic protein content of different lines was significantly different; the Cry3A toxic protein content was about 100 times higher than that of the Cry1Ac toxic protein. The insect-resistance test revealed the mortality rate of transgenic lines to Hyphantria cunea L1 larvae varied by 42.2-66.7%, which was significantly higher than non-transgenic lines. The mortality rate of L1 and L2 Plagiodera versicolora larvae was 100%. The insecticidal effect of transgenic lines to P. versicolora larvae was higher than that to H. cunea larvae. NaCl stress tolerance of three transgenic lines under 3-6% NaCl concentration was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic lines.

  14. Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants Expressing Tomato Glutathione S-Transferase Showed Enhanced Resistance to Salt and Drought Stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Xing, Xiao-Juan; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Xue, Yong; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Although glutathione S-transferases (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) are involved in response to abiotic stress, limited information is available regarding gene function in tomato. In this study, a GST gene from tomato, designated LeGSTU2, was cloned and functionally characterized. Expression profile analysis results showed that it was expressed in roots and flowers, and the transcription was induced by salt, osmotic, and heat stress. The gene was then introduced to Arabidopsis by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants were normal in terms of growth and maturity compared with wild-type plants. Transgenic plants also showed an enhanced resistance to salt and osmotic stress induced by NaCl and mannitol. The increased tolerance of transgenic plants was correlated with the changes in proline, malondialdehyde and antioxidative emzymes activities. Our results indicated that the gene from tomato plays a positive role in improving tolerance to salinity and drought stresses in Arabidopsis.

  15. Expression of a cyanobacterial {del}{sup 6}-desaturase gene results in {gamma}-linolenic acid production in transgenic plants

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.S.; Thomas, T.L.

    1996-05-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a nutritionally important fatty acid in human and animal diets, is not produced in oil seed crops. Many oil seed plants, however, produce significant quantities of linoleic acid, a fatty acid that could be converted to GLA by the enzyme {del}{sup 6}-desaturase if it were present. As a first step to producing GLA in oil seed crops, we have cloned a cyanobacterial {del}{sup 6}-desaturase gene. Expression of this gene in transgenic tobacco resulted in GLA accumulation. Octadecatetraenoic acid, a highly unsaturated, industrially important fatty acid, was also found in transgenic tobacco plants expressing the cyanobacterial {del}{sup 6}-desaturase. This is the first example of engineering the production of `novel` polyunsaturated fatty acids in transgenic plants. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Efficient and transgene-free genome editing in wheat through transient expression of CRISPR/Cas9 DNA or RNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liang, Zhen; Zong, Yuan; Wang, Yanpeng; Liu, Jinxing; Chen, Kunling; Qiu, Jin-Long; Gao, Caixia

    2016-01-01

    Editing plant genomes is technically challenging in hard-to-transform plants and usually involves transgenic intermediates, which causes regulatory concerns. Here we report two simple and efficient genome-editing methods in which plants are regenerated from callus cells transiently expressing CRISPR/Cas9 introduced as DNA or RNA. This transient expression-based genome-editing system is highly efficient and specific for producing transgene-free and homozygous wheat mutants in the T0 generation. We demonstrate our protocol to edit genes in hexaploid bread wheat and tetraploid durum wheat, and show that we are able to generate mutants with no detectable transgenes. Our methods may be applicable to other plant species, thus offering the potential to accelerate basic and applied plant genome-engineering research. PMID:27558837

  17. Over-expression of the cucumber expansin gene (Cs-EXPA1) in transgenic maize seed for cellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangwoong; Devaiah, Shivakumar P; Choi, Seo-eun; Bray, Jeff; Love, Robert; Lane, Jeffrey; Drees, Carol; Howard, John H; Hood, Elizabeth E

    2016-04-01

    Plant cell wall degradation into fermentable sugars by cellulases is one of the greatest barriers to biofuel production. Expansin protein loosens the plant cell wall by opening up the complex of cellulose microfibrils and polysaccharide matrix components thereby increasing its accessibility to cellulases. We over-expressed cucumber expansin in maize kernels to produce enough protein to assess its potential to serve as an industrial enzyme for applications particularly in biomass conversion. We used the globulin-1 embryo-preferred promoter to express the cucumber expansin gene in maize seed. Expansin protein was targeted to one of three sub-cellular locations: the cell wall, the vacuole, or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To assess the level of expansin accumulation in seeds of transgenic kernels, a high throughput expansin assay was developed. The highest expressing plants were chosen and enriched crude expansin extract from those plants was tested for synergistic effects with cellulase on several lignocellulosic substrates. Activity of recombinant cucumber expansin from transgenic kernels was confirmed on these pretreated substrates. The best transgenic lines (ER-targeted) can now be used for breeding to increase expansin expression for use in the biomass conversion industry. Results of these experiments show the success of expansin over-expression and accumulation in transgenic maize seed without negative impact on growth and development and confirm its synergistic effect with cellulase on deconstruction of complex cell wall substrates.

  18. Expression of a pathogen-induced cysteine protease (AdCP) in tapetum results in male sterility in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pawan; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Dilip; Vijayan, Sambasivam; Ahmed, Israr; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2014-06-01

    Usable male sterility systems have immense potential in developing hybrid varieties in crop plants, which can also be used as a biological safety containment to prevent horizontal transgene flow. Barnase-Barstar system developed earlier was the first approach to engineer male sterility in plants. In an analogous situation, we have evolved a system of inducing pollen abortion and male sterility in transgenic tobacco by expressing a plant gene coding for a protein with known developmental function in contrast to the Barnase-Barstar system, which deploys genes of prokaryotic origin, i.e., from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. We have used a plant pathogen-induced gene, cysteine protease for inducing male sterility. This gene was identified in the wild peanut, Arachis diogoi differentially expressed when it was challenged with the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata. Arachis diogoi cysteine protease (AdCP) was expressed under the strong tapetum-specific promoter (TA29) and tobacco transformants were generated. Morphological and histological analysis of AdCP transgenic plants showed ablated tapetum and complete pollen abortion in three transgenic lines. Furthermore, transcript analysis displayed the expression of cysteine protease in these male sterile lines and the expression of the protein was identified in western blot analysis using its polyclonal antibody raised in the rabbit system.

  19. Generation of a Transgenic Mouse for Colorectal Cancer Research with Intestinal Cre-Expression Limited to the Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yingben; Johnson, Robert; DeSmet, Marsha; Snyder, Paul W.; Fleet, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Genetically modified mice have been used for colon cancer research but findings from these models are confounded by expression of cancer in multiple organs. We sought to create a transgenic mouse with Cre recombinase (Cre) expression limited to the epithelial cells of the large intestine and use this model to study colon cancer driven by adenomatosis polyposis coli (APC) gene inactivation. A promoter/enhancer from the mouse carbonic anhydrase I gene was used to generate a Cre expressing transgenic mouse (CAC). After characterizing transgene expression and distribution, CAC mice were crossed to APC580S mice to generate mice with APC inactivation at one (CAC; APC580S/+) or both alleles (CAC; APC580S/580S). Transgene expression was limited to the epithelial cells of the cecum and colon, extended from the crypt base to the luminal surface, and was expressed in approximately 15% of the crypts. No abnormal gross phenotype was seen in 3 or 6 wk CAC; APC580S/+ mice but CAC; APC580S/580S mice had significant mucosal hyperplasia in the colon at 3 wk that developed into tumors by 6 wk. By 10 wk, 20% of CAC; APC580S/+ mice developed adenomatous lesions in the distal colon (3.0±0.4 mm, 1.1 per mouse). Dextran sulfate sodium treatment increased the incidence and number of tumors and this occurred predominantly in distal colon. Our new model has improved features for colon cancer research i.e. transgene expression is limited to the epithelium of the large bowel with normal cells found next to genetically modified cells. PMID:20663863

  20. Deciphering the impact of parameters influencing transgene expression kinetics after repeated cell transduction with integration-deficient retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schott, Juliane W; Jaeschke, Nico M; Hoffmann, Dirk; Maetzig, Tobias; Ballmaier, Matthias; Godinho, Tamaryin; Cathomen, Toni; Schambach, Axel

    2015-05-01

    Lentiviral and gammaretroviral vectors are state-of-the-art tools for transgene expression within target cells. The integration of these vectors can be deliberately suppressed to derive a transient gene expression system based on extrachromosomal circular episomes with intact coding regions. These episomes can be used to deliver DNA templates and to express RNA or protein. Importantly, transient gene transfer avoids the genotoxic side effects of integrating vectors. Restricting their applicability, episomes are rapidly lost upon dilution in dividing target cells. Addressing this limitation, we could establish comparably stable percentages of transgene-positive cells over prolonged time periods in proliferating cells by repeated transductions. Flow cytometry was applied for kinetic analyses to decipher the impact of individual parameters on the kinetics of fluoroprotein expression after episomal retransduction and to visualize sequential and simultaneous transfer of heterologous fluoroproteins. Expression windows could be exactly timed by the number of transduction steps. The kinetics of signal loss was affected by the cell proliferation rate. The transfer of genes encoding fluoroproteins with different half-lives revealed a major impact of protein stability on temporal signal distribution and accumulation, determining optimal retransduction intervals. In addition, sequential transductions proved broad applicability in different cell types and using different envelope pseudotypes without receptor overload. Stable percentages of cells coexpressing multiple transgenes could be generated upon repeated coadministration of different episomal vectors. Alternatively, defined patterns of transgene expression could be recapitulated by sequential transductions. Altogether, we established a methodology to control and adjust a temporally defined window of transgene expression using retroviral episomal vectors. Combined with the highly efficient cell entry of these vectors while

  1. Transgenic expression of CYP7A1 in LDL receptor-deficient mice blocks diet-induced hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Eric P; Gutierrez, Alejandra; Davis, Roger A

    2006-07-01

    Constitutive expression of a cholesterol-7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) transgene in LDL receptor-deficient mice blocked the ability of a cholesterol-enriched diet to increase plasma levels of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. LDL receptor-deficient mice expressing the CYP7A1 transgene exhibited complete resistance to diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and to the accumulation of cholesterol in the liver. Hepatic mRNA expression of liver X receptor-inducible ABCG5 and ABCG8 was decreased in CYP7A1 transgenic, LDL receptor-deficient mice fed a cholesterol-enriched diet. Thus, increased biliary cholesterol excretion could not account for the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. CYP7A1 transgenic, LDL receptor-deficient mice fed the cholesterol-enriched diet exhibited decreased jejunal Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) mRNA expression, an important mediator of intestinal cholesterol absorption. A taurocholate-enriched diet also decreased NPC1L1 mRNA expression in a farnesoid X receptor-independent manner. Reduced expression of NPC1L1 mRNA was associated with decreased cholesterol absorption ( approximately 20%; P < 0.05) exhibited by CYP7A1 transgenic LDL receptor-deficient mice fed the cholesterol-enriched diet. The combined data show that enhanced expression of CYP7A1 is an effective means to prevent the accumulation of cholesterol in the liver and of atherogenic apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in plasma.

  2. Mind-controlled transgene expression by a wireless-powered optogenetic designer cell implant

    PubMed Central

    Folcher, Marc; Oesterle, Sabine; Zwicky, Katharina; Thekkottil, Thushara; Heymoz, Julie; Hohmann, Muriel; Christen, Matthias; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Buchmann, Peter; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic devices for traceless remote control of gene expression may provide new treatment opportunities in future gene- and cell-based therapies. Here we report the design of a synthetic mind-controlled gene switch that enables human brain activities and mental states to wirelessly programme the transgene expression in human cells. An electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain–computer interface (BCI) processing mental state-specific brain waves programs an inductively linked wireless-powered optogenetic implant containing designer cells engineered for near-infrared (NIR) light-adjustable expression of the human glycoprotein SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase). The synthetic optogenetic signalling pathway interfacing the BCI with target gene expression consists of an engineered NIR light-activated bacterial diguanylate cyclase (DGCL) producing the orthogonal second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which triggers the stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-dependent induction of synthetic interferon-β promoters. Humans generating different mental states (biofeedback control, concentration, meditation) can differentially control SEAP production of the designer cells in culture and of subcutaneous wireless-powered optogenetic implants in mice. PMID:25386727

  3. Physiological levels of HBB transgene expression from S/MAR element-based replicating episomal vectors.

    PubMed

    Sgourou, Argyro; Routledge, Samantha; Spathas, Dionysios; Athanassiadou, Aglaia; Antoniou, Michael N

    2009-08-20

    Replicating episomal vectors (REV) are in principle able to provide long-term transgene expression in the absence of integration into the target cell genome. The scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) located 5' of the human beta-interferon gene (IFNB1) has been shown to confer a stable episomal replication and retention function within plasmid vectors when stably transfected and selected in mammalian cells. The minimal requirement for the IFNB1 S/MAR to function in DNA replication and episomal retention is transcription through this element. We used the erythroid beta-globin locus control region-beta-globin gene (betaLCR-HBB) microlocus cassette as a model to assess tissue-specific expression from within an IFNB1 S/MAR-based plasmid REV. The betaLCR-HBB plus S/MAR combination constructs provided either high or low levels of transcription through the S/MAR element. Our results show that the betaLCR-HBB microlocus is able to reproducibly and stably express at full physiological levels on an episome copy number basis. In addition, our data show that even low levels of transcription from betaLCR-HBB through the S/MAR element are sufficient to allow efficient episomal replication and retention. These data provide the principles upon which generic and flexible expression cassette-S/MAR-based REVs can be designed for a wide range of applications.

  4. Expression of the hepatitis delta virus large and small antigens in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot, S; Huang, S N; Xia, Y P; La Monica, N; Lai, M M; Chisari, F V

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous infection with hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) in humans is often associated with severe viral liver disease including fulminant hepatitis. Since HBV is thought to be noncytopathic to the hepatocyte, the enhanced disease severity observed during dual infection has been attributed to either simultaneous immune responses against the two viruses or direct cytotoxic effects of HDV products on the hepatocyte or both. To examine these alternate possibilities, we produced transgenic mice that express the small and large delta antigens (HDAg) in hepatocyte nuclei at levels equal to those observed during natural HDV infection. No biological or histopathological evidence of liver disease was detectable during 18 months of observation, suggesting that neither the large nor small form of HDAg is directly cytopathic to the hepatocyte in vivo. Images PMID:8289334

  5. Quinic acids from Aster caucasicus and from transgenic callus expressing a beta-amyrin synthase.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, Paola; Cammareri, Maria; Malafronte, Nicola; Consiglio, M Federica; Gualtieri, Maria Josefina; Conicella, Clara

    2011-11-01

    Several different classes of secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, triterpenoid saponins and quinic acid derivatives, are found in Aster spp. (Fam. Asteraceae). Several Aster compounds revealed biological as well as pharmacological activities. In this work, a phytochemical investigation of A. caucasicus evidenced the presence of quinic acid derivatives, as well as the absence of triterpene saponins. To combine in one species the production of different phytochemicals, including triterpenes, an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of A. caucasicus was set up to introduce A. sedifolius beta-amyrin synthase (AsOXA1)-encoding gene under the control of the constitutive promoter CaMV35S. The quali-quantitative analysis of transgenic calli with ectopic expression of AsOXA1 showed, in one sample, a negligible amount of triterpene saponins combined with higher amount of quinic acid derivatives as compared with the wild type callus.

  6. Allotopic expression of ATP6 in the mouse as a transgenic model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, David A; Pinkert, Carl A

    2015-01-01

    Progress in animal modeling of polymorphisms and mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is not as developed as nuclear transgenesis due to a host of cellular and physiological distinctions. mtDNA mutation modeling is of critical importance as mutations in the mitochondrial genome give rise to a variety of pathological conditions and play a contributing role in many others. Nuclear localization and transcription of mtDNA genes followed by cytoplasmic translation and transport into mitochondria (allotopic expression, AE) provide an opportunity to create in vivo modeling of a targeted mutation in mitochondrial genes and has been suggested as a strategy for gene replacement therapy in patients harboring mitochondrial DNA mutations. Here, we use our AE approach to transgenic mouse modeling of the pathogenic human T8993G mutation in mtATP6 as a case study for designing AE animal models.

  7. Expression of cholera toxin B subunit oligomers in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, T; Chong, D K; Merritt, J L; Langridge, W H

    1997-11-01

    A gene encoding the cholera toxin B subunit protein (CTB), fused to an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (SEKDEL) was inserted adjacent to the bi-directional mannopine synthase P2 promoter in a plant expression vector containing a bacterial luciferase AB fusion gene (luxF) linked to the P1 promoter. Potato leaf explants were transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the vector and kanamycin-resistant plants were regenerated. The CTB-SEKDEL fusion gene was identified in the genomic DNA of bioluminescent plants by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Immunoblot analysis indicated that plant-derived CTB protein was antigenically indistinguishable from bacterial CTB protein, and that oligomeric CTB molecules (M(r) approximately 50 kDa) were the dominant molecular species isolated from transgenic potato leaf and tuber tissues. Similar to bacterial CTB, plant-synthesized CTB dissociated into monomers (M(r) approximately 15 kDa) during heat or acid treatment. The maximum amount of CTB protein detected in auxin-induced transgenic potato leaf and tuber tissues was approximately 0.3% of total soluble plant protein. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods indicated that plant-synthesized CTB protein bound specifically to GM1-ganglioside, the natural membrane receptor of cholera toxin. In the presence of the SEKDEL signal, CTB protein accumulates in potato tissues and is assembled into an oligomeric form that retains native biochemical and immunological properties. The expression of oligomeric CTB protein with immunological and biochemical properties identical to native CTB protein in edible plants opens the way for preparation of inexpensive food plant-based oral vaccines for protection against cholera and other pathogens in endemic areas throughout the world.

  8. Peripheral B cell tolerance and function in transgenic mice expressing an IgD superantigen.

    PubMed

    Duong, Bao Hoa; Ota, Takayuki; Aït-Azzouzene, Djemel; Aoki-Ota, Miyo; Vela, José Luis; Huber, Christoph; Walsh, Kevin; Gavin, Amanda L; Nemazee, David

    2010-04-15

    Transitional B cells turn over rapidly in vivo and are sensitive to apoptosis upon BCR ligation in vitro. However, little direct evidence addresses their tolerance sensitivity in vivo. A key marker used to distinguish these cells is IgD, which, through alternative RNA splicing of H chain transcripts, begins to be coexpressed with IgM at this stage. IgD is also expressed at high levels on naive follicular (B-2) and at lower levels on marginal zone and B-1 B cells. In this study, mice were generated to ubiquitously express a membrane-bound IgD-superantigen. These mice supported virtually no B-2 development, a greatly reduced marginal zone B cell population, but a relatively normal B-1 compartment. B cell development in the spleen abruptly halted at the transitional B cell population 1 to 2 stage, a block that could not be rescued by either Bcl-2 or BAFF overexpression. The developmentally arrested B cells appeared less mature and turned over more rapidly than nontransgenic T2 cells, exhibiting neither conventional features of anergy nor appreciable receptor editing. Paradoxically, type-2 T-independent responses were more robust in the transgenic mice, although T-dependent responses were reduced and had skewed IgL and IgH isotype usages. Nevertheless, an augmented memory response to secondary challenge was evident. The transgenic mice also had increased serum IgM, but diminished IgG, levels mirrored by the increased numbers of IgM(+) plasma cells. This model should facilitate studies of peripheral B cell tolerance, with the advantages of allowing analysis of polyclonal populations, and of B cells naturally lacking IgD.

  9. Transgenic Rabbits Expressing Ovine PrP Are Susceptible to Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Sarradin, Pierre; Viglietta, Céline; Limouzin, Claude; Andréoletti, Olivier; Daniel-Carlier, Nathalie; Barc, Céline; Leroux-Coyau, Mathieu; Berthon, Patricia; Chapuis, Jérôme; Rossignol, Christelle; Gatti, Jean-Luc; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Béringue, Vincent; Lantier, Frédéric; Laude, Hubert; Houdebine, Louis-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases affecting a wide range of mammalian species. They are caused by prions, a proteinaceous pathogen essentially composed of PrPSc, an abnormal isoform of the host encoded cellular prion protein PrPC. Constrained steric interactions between PrPSc and PrPC are thought to provide prions with species specificity, and to control cross-species transmission into other host populations, including humans. Transgenetic expression of foreign PrP genes has been successfully and widely used to overcome the recognized resistance of mouse to foreign TSE sources. Rabbit is one of the species that exhibit a pronounced resistance to TSEs. Most attempts to infect experimentally rabbit have failed, except after inoculation with cell-free generated rabbit prions. To gain insights on the molecular determinants of the relative resistance of rabbits to prions, we generated transgenic rabbits expressing the susceptible V136R154Q171 allele of the ovine PRNP gene on a rabbit wild type PRNP New Zealand background and assessed their experimental susceptibility to scrapie prions. All transgenic animals developed a typical TSE 6–8 months after intracerebral inoculation, whereas wild type rabbits remained healthy more than 700 days after inoculation. Despite the endogenous presence of rabbit PrPC, only ovine PrPSc was detectable in the brains of diseased animals. Collectively these data indicate that the low susceptibility of rabbits to prion infection is not enciphered within their non-PrP genetic background. PMID:26248157

  10. In Vivo Recognition of Ovalbumin Expressed by Transgenic Leishmania Is Determined by Its Subcellular Localization1

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, Sara; Gray, Peter M.; Colpitts, Sara L.; Scott, Phillip; Kaye, Paul M.; Smith, Deborah F.

    2009-01-01

    The importance of the site of Ag localization within microbial pathogens for the effective generation of CD8+ T cells has been studied extensively, generally supporting the view that Ag secretion within infected target cells is required for optimal MHC class I-restricted Ag presentation. In contrast, relatively little is known about the importance of pathogen Ag localization for the activation of MHC class II-restricted CD4+ T cells, despite their clear importance for host protection. We have used the N-terminal targeting sequence of Leishmania major hydrophilic acylated surface protein B to generate stable transgenic lines expressing physiologically relevant levels of full-length OVA on the surface of metacyclic promastigotes and amastigotes. In addition, we have mutated the hydrophilic acylated surface protein B N-terminal acylation sequence to generate control transgenic lines in which OVA expression is restricted to the parasite cytosol. In vitro, splenic dendritic cells are able to present membrane-localized, but not cytosolic, OVA to OVA-specific DO.11 T cells. Strikingly and unexpectedly, surface localization of OVA is also a strict requirement for recognition by OVA-specific T cells (DO.11 and OT-II) and for the development of OVA-specific Ab responses in vivo. However, recognition of cytosolic OVA could be observed with increasing doses of infection. These data suggest that, even under in vivo conditions, where varied pathways of Ag processing are likely to operate, the site of Leishmania Ag localization is an important determinant of immunogenicity and hence an important factor when considering the likely candidacy of vaccine Ags for inducing CD4+ T cell-dependent immunity. PMID:16585577

  11. Cell-type-specific and hypoxia-inducible expression of the human erythropoietin gene in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Semenza, G.L.; Nejfelt, M.K.; Gearhart, J.D.; Antonarakis, S.E. ); Koury, S.T. )

    1991-10-01

    Synthesis of erythropoietin, the primary humoral regulator or erythropoiesis, in liver and kidney is inducible by anemia or hypoxia. Analysis of human erythropoietin gene expression in transgenic mice revealed that sequences located 6-14 kilobases 5{prime} to the gene direct expression to the kidney, whereas sequences within the immediate 3{prime}-flanking region control hepatocyte-specific expression. Human erythropoietin transcription initiation sites were differentially utilized in liver and kidney. Inducible transgene expression was precisely targeted to peritubular interstitial cells in the renal cortex that synthesize endogenous mouse erythropoietin. These studies demonstrate that multiple erythropoietin gene regulatory elements control cello-type-specific expression and inducibility by a fundamental physiologic stimulus, hypoxia.

  12. Generation of an ABCG2{sup GFPn-puro} transgenic line - A tool to study ABCG2 expression in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Orford, Michael; Mean, Richard; Lapathitis, George; Genethliou, Nicholas; Panayiotou, Elena; Panayi, Helen; Malas, Stavros

    2009-06-26

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter 2 (ABCG2) is expressed by stem cells in many organs and in stem cells of solid tumors. These cells are isolated based on the side population (SP) phenotype, a Hoechst 3342 dye efflux property believed to be conferred by ABCG2. Because of the limitations of this approach we generated transgenic mice that express Nuclear GFP (GFPn) coupled to the Puromycin-resistance gene, under the control of ABCG2 promoter/enhancer sequences. We show that ABCG2 is expressed in neural progenitors of the developing forebrain and spinal cord and in embryonic and adult endothelial cells of the brain. Using the neurosphere assay, we isolated tripotent ABCG2-expressing neural stem cells from embryonic mouse brain. This transgenic line is a powerful tool for studying the expression of ABCG2 in many tissues and for performing functional studies in different experimental settings.

  13. A Transposon-Mediated System for Flexible Control of Transgene Expression in Stem and Progenitor-Derived Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Molina, Jessica; Dutra-Clarke, Marina; Kim, Gi Bum; Levy, Rachelle; Schreiber-Stainthorp, William; Danielpour, Moise; Breunig, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Precise methods for transgene regulation are important to study signaling pathways and cell lineages in biological systems where gene function is often recycled within and across lineages. We engineered a genetic toolset for flexible transgene regulation in these diverse cellular contexts. Specifically, we created an optimized piggyBac transposon-based system, allowing for the facile generation of stably transduced cell lineages in vivo and in vitro. The system, termed pB-Tet-GOI (piggyBac-transposable tetracycline transactivator-mediated flexible expression of a genetic element of interest), incorporates the latest generation of tetracycline (Tet) transactivator and reverse Tet transactivator variants—along with engineered mutants—in order to provide regulated transgene expression upon addition or removal of doxycycline (dox). Altogether, the flexibility of the system allows for dox-induced, dox-suppressed, dox-resistant (i.e., constitutive), and dox-induced/constitutive regulation of transgenes. This versatile strategy provides reversible temporal regulation of transgenes with robust inducibility and minimal leakiness. PMID:25702640

  14. A transposon-mediated system for flexible control of transgene expression in stem and progenitor-derived lineages.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Molina, Jessica; Dutra-Clarke, Marina; Kim, Gi Bum; Levy, Rachelle; Schreiber-Stainthorp, William; Danielpour, Moise; Breunig, Joshua J

    2015-03-10

    Precise methods for transgene regulation are important to study signaling pathways and cell lineages in biological systems where gene function is often recycled within and across lineages. We engineered a genetic toolset for flexible transgene regulation in these diverse cellular contexts. Specifically, we created an optimized piggyBac transposon-based system, allowing for the facile generation of stably transduced cell lineages in vivo and in vitro. The system, termed pB-Tet-GOI (piggyBac-transposable tetracycline transactivator-mediated flexible expression of a genetic element of interest), incorporates the latest generation of tetracycline (Tet) transactivator and reverse Tet transactivator variants--along with engineered mutants--in order to provide regulated transgene expression upon addition or removal of doxycycline (dox). Altogether, the flexibility of the system allows for dox-induced, dox-suppressed, dox-resistant (i.e., constitutive), and dox-induced/constitutive regulation of transgenes. This versatile strategy provides reversible temporal regulation of transgenes with robust inducibility and minimal leakiness.

  15. Comparative analysis of laparoscopic and ultrasound-guided biopsy methods for gene expression analysis in transgenic goats.

    PubMed

    Melo, C H; Sousa, F C; Batista, R I P T; Sanchez, D J D; Souza-Fabjan, J M G; Freitas, V J F; Melo, L M; Teixeira, D I A

    2015-07-31

    The present study aimed to compare laparoscopic (LP) and ultrasound-guided (US) biopsy methods to obtain either liver or splenic tissue samples for ectopic gene expression analysis in transgenic goats. Tissue samples were collected from human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF)-transgenic bucks and submitted to real-time PCR for the endogenous genes (Sp1, Baff, and Gapdh) and the transgene (hG-CSF). Both LP and US biopsy methods were successful in obtaining liver and splenic samples that could be analyzed by PCR (i.e., sufficient sample sizes and RNA yield were obtained). Although the number of attempts made to obtain the tissue samples was similar (P > 0.05), LP procedures took considerably longer than the US method (P = 0.03). Finally, transgene transcripts were not detected in spleen or liver samples. Thus, for the phenotypic characterization of a transgenic goat line, investigation of ectopic gene expression can be made successfully by LP or US biopsy, avoiding the traditional approach of euthanasia.

  16. Field resistance to Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae in transgenic cotton expressing the plant defensin NaD1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    The plant defensin NaD1, from Nicotiana alata, has potent antifungal activity against a range of filamentous fungi including the two important cotton pathogens, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (Fov) and Verticillium dahliae. Transgenic cotton plants expressing NaD1 were produced and plants from three events were selected for further characterization. Homozygous plants were assessed in greenhouse bioassays for resistance to Fov. One line (D1) was selected for field trial testing over three growing seasons in soils naturally infested with Fov and over two seasons in soils naturally infested with V. dahliae. In the field trials with Fov-infested soil, line D1 had 2–3-times the survival rate, a higher tolerance to Fov (higher disease rank), and a 2–4-fold increase in lint yield compared to the non-transgenic Coker control. When transgenic line D1 was planted in V. dahliae-infested soil, plants had a higher tolerance to Verticillium wilt and up to a 2-fold increase in lint yield compared to the non-transgenic Coker control. Line D1 did not exhibit any detrimental agronomic features compared to the parent Coker control when plants were grown in non-diseased soil. This study demonstrated that the expression of NaD1 in transgenic cotton plants can provide substantial resistance to two economically important fungal pathogens. PMID:24502957

  17. Overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) in the epidermis of transgenic mice: inhibition or stimulation of proliferation depending on the pattern of transgene expression and formation of psoriatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) belongs to the family of TGF-beta- related growth factors. In the developing epidermis, expression of BMP- 6 coincides with the onset of stratification. Expression persists perinatally but declines after day 6 postpartum, although it can still be detected in adult skin by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. We constitutively overexpressed BMP-6 in suprabasal layers of interfollicular epidermis in transgenic mice using a keratin 10 promoter. All mice expressing the transgene developed abnormalities in the skin, indicating an active transgene-derived factor. Depending on the pattern of transgene expression, the effects on proliferation and differentiation were completely opposite. Strong and uniform expression of the BMP-6 transgene resulted in severe repression of cell proliferation in embryonic and perinatal epidermis but had marginal effects on differentiation. Weaker and patchy expression of the transgene evoked strong hyperproliferation and parakeratosis in adult epidermis and severe perturbations of the usual pattern of differentiation. These perturbations included changes in the expression of keratins and integrins. Together with an inflammatory infiltrate both in the dermis and in the epidermis, these aspects present all typical histological and biochemical hallmarks of a human skin disease: psoriasis. PMID:8858176

  18. Testis hormone-sensitive lipase expression in spermatids is governed by a short promoter in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Blaise, R; Guillaudeux, T; Tavernier, G; Daegelen, D; Evrard, B; Mairal, A; Holm, C; Jégou, B; Langin, D

    2001-02-16

    A testicular form of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL(tes)), a triacylglycerol lipase, and cholesterol esterase, is expressed in male germ cells. Northern blot analysis showed HSL(tes) mRNA expression in early spermatids. Immunolocalization of the protein in human and rodent seminiferous tubules indicated that the highest level of expression occurred in elongated spermatids. We have previously shown that 0.5 kilobase pairs of the human HSL(tes) promoter directs testis-specific expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene in transgenic mice and determined regions binding nuclear proteins expressed in testis but not in liver (Blaise, R., Grober, J., Rouet, P., Tavernier, G., Daegelen, D., and Langin, D. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 9327-9334). Mutation of a SRY/Sox-binding site in one of the regions did not impair in vivo testis-specific expression of the reporter gene. Further transgenic analyses established that 95 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site were sufficient for correct testis expression. In gel retardation assays using early spermatid nuclear extracts, a germ cell-specific DNA-protein interaction was mapped between -46 and -29 base pairs. The DNA binding nuclear protein showed properties of zinc finger transcription factors. Mutation of the region abolished reporter gene activity in transgenic mice, showing that it is necessary for testis expression of HSL(tes).

  19. Field-Evolved Resistance in Corn Earworm to Cry Proteins Expressed by Transgenic Sweet Corn

    PubMed Central

    Dively, Galen P.; Finkenbinder, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Background Transgenic corn engineered with genes expressing insecticidal toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bt) are now a major tool in insect pest management. With its widespread use, insect resistance is a major threat to the sustainability of the Bt transgenic technology. For all Bt corn expressing Cry toxins, the high dose requirement for resistance management is not achieved for corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), which is more tolerant to the Bt toxins. Methodology/Major Findings We present field monitoring data using Cry1Ab (1996–2016) and Cry1A.105+Cry2Ab2 (2010–2016) expressing sweet corn hybrids as in-field screens to measure changes in field efficacy and Cry toxin susceptibility to H. zea. Larvae successfully damaged an increasing proportion of ears, consumed more kernel area, and reached later developmental stages (4th - 6th instars) in both types of Bt hybrids (Cry1Ab—event Bt11, and Cry1A.105+Cry2Ab2—event MON89034) since their commercial introduction. Yearly patterns of H. zea population abundance were unrelated to reductions in control efficacy. There was no evidence of field efficacy or tissue toxicity differences among different Cry1Ab hybrids that could contribute to the decline in control efficacy. Supportive data from laboratory bioassays demonstrate significant differences in weight gain and fitness characteristics between the Maryland H. zea strain and a susceptible strain. In bioassays with Cry1Ab expressing green leaf tissue, Maryland H. zea strain gained more weight than the susceptible strain at all concentrations tested. Fitness of the Maryland H. zea strain was significantly lower than that of the susceptible strain as indicated by lower hatch rate, longer time to adult eclosion, lower pupal weight, and reduced survival to adulthood. Conclusions/Significance After ruling out possible contributing factors, the rapid change in field efficacy in recent years and decreased susceptibility of H. zea to Bt

  20. Generation of an optimized lentiviral vector encoding a high-expression factor VIII transgene for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J M; Denning, G; Doering, C B; Spencer, H T

    2013-06-01

    We previously compared the expression of several human factor VIII (fVIII) transgene variants and demonstrated the superior expression properties of B domain-deleted porcine fVIII. Subsequently, a hybrid human/porcine fVIII molecule (HP-fVIII) comprising 91% human amino-acid sequence was engineered to maintain the high-expression characteristics of porcine fVIII. The bioengineered construct then was used effectively to treat knockout mice with hemophilia A. In the current study, we focused on optimizing self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector systems by analyzing the efficacy of various lentiviral components in terms of virus production, transduction efficiency and transgene expression. Specifically, three parameters were evaluated: (1) the woodchuck hepatitis post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE), (2) HIV versus SIV viral vector systems and (3) various internal promoters. The inclusion of a WPRE sequence had negligible effects on viral production and HP-fVIII expression. HIV and SIV vectors were compared and found to be similar with respect to transduction efficiency in both K562s and HEK-293T cells. However, there was an enhanced expression of HP-fVIII by the SIV system, which was evident in both K562 and BHK-M cell lines. To further compare expression of HP-fVIII from an SIV-based lentiviral system, we constructed expression vectors containing the high expression transgene and a human elongation factor-1 alpha, cytomegalovirus (CMV) or phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. Expression was significantly greater from the CMV promoter, which also yielded therapeutic levels of HP-fVIII in hemophilia A mice. Based on these studies, an optimized vector contains the HP-fVIII transgene driven by a CMV internal promoter within a SIV-based lentiviral backbone lacking a WPRE.

  1. Transient Depletion of Kupffer Cells Leads to Enhanced Transgene Expression in Rat Liver Following Retrograde Intrabiliary Infusion of Plasmid DNA and DNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hui; Jiang, Xuan; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this report, we have demonstrated that by temporarily removing Kupffer cells (KCs), the transgene expression levels mediated by retrograde intrabiliary infusion (RII) of plasmid DNA, polyethylenimine-DNA, and chitosan nanoparticles were enhanced by 1,927-, 131-, and 23,450-fold, respectively, in comparison with the respective groups without KC removal. KC removal also led to significantly prolonged transgene expression in the liver that received all three carriers. This increased transgene expression was correlated with significantly reduced serum tumor necrosis factor-α level as an indicator for KC activation. These results suggest that KC activation is a significant contributing factor to the lowered transgene expression by polycation-DNA nanoparticles delivered by RII. More importantly, the combination of RII and transient removal of KCs may be adopted as an effective approach to achieving high and persistent transgene expression in the liver mediated by nonviral nanoparticles. PMID:21091274

  2. Transgenic Leucaena leucocephala expressing the Rhizobium gene pydA encoding a meta-cleavage dioxygenase shows reduced mimosine content.

    PubMed

    Jube, Sandro L R; Borthakur, Dulal

    2010-04-01

    The use of the tree-legume Leucaena leucocephala (leucaena), which contains high levels of proteins in its foliage, is limited due to the presence of the toxic free amino acid mimosine. The goal of this research was to develop transgenic leucaena with reduced mimosine content. Two genes, pydA and pydB, encoding a meta-cleavage dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.2) and a pyruvate hydrolase (EC 3.7.1.6), respectively, from the mimosine-degrading leucaena symbiont Rhizobium sp. strain TAL1145, were used to transform leucaena. These bacterial genes were sequence-optimized for expression in leucaena and cloned into the plant binary vector pCAMBIA3201 for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Using immature zygotic embryos as the start explant material, six pydA and three pydB transgenic lines were developed. The presence and expression of the bacterial genes in the transgenic lines were verified by PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR, and Southern analyses. HPLC analyses of the transgenic plants determined that the mimosine contents of the pydA-expressing lines were reduced up to 22.5% in comparison to the wild-type. No significant reduction in mimosine content was observed in the pydB-expressing lines. This is the first example of using a gene from a bacterial symbiont to reduce the toxicity of a tree-legume.

  3. Improvement of a Monopartite Ecdysone Receptor Gene Switch and Demonstration of its Utility in Regulation of Transgene Expression in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical inducible gene regulation systems provide essential tools for the precise regulation of transgene expression in plants and animals. We have recent developed a two-hybrid ecdysone receptor (EcR) gene regulation system that works in conjunction with the retinoid X receptor of Locusta migrato...

  4. [Quantitative criteria for the estimation of the effectiveness of bioluminescence expression in natural and transgenic luminescent bacteria].

    PubMed

    Gusev, A A; Kargatova, T V; Medvedeva, S E; Popova, L Iu

    2008-01-01

    Computation coefficients for estimating the effectiveness of bioluminescence expression in natural luminescent bacteria P. leiognathi 54 and transgenic strain E. coli Z905/pPHL7 bearing lux-operon in multicopy plasmid are suggested, and their use on the molecular, cell, and population levels was considered. It was shown that, on the population level, all transgenic variants got the better of natural variants of P. leiognathi 54 irrespective of the type of lux-operon regulation. On the cell level, in the bright and dim variants of the transgenic strain, the effectiveness of bioluminescence expression increases by several orders. On the level of one lux-operon, the effectiveness of expression of the bright variant of transgenic strain is substantially higher than in the natural bright variant; in dim variants, the efficiency values are similar, and the effectiveness of bioluminescence expression in the dark variant of E. coli Z905-2 /pPHL7 is by two orders lower than that in the dark variant of P. leiognathi 54.

  5. Targeted expression of SV40 T antigen in the hair follicle of transgenic mice produces an aberrant hair phenotype.

    PubMed

    Keough, R; Powell, B; Rogers, G

    1995-03-01

    Directed expression of SV40 large T antigen (TAg) in transgenic mice can induce tissue-specific tumorigenesis and useful cell lines exhibiting differentiated characteristics can be established from resultant tumor cells. In an attempt to produce an immortalised mouse hair follicle cortical cell line for the study of hair keratin gene control, SV40 TAg expression was targeted to the hair follicles of transgenic mice using a sheep hair gene promoter. Expression of SV40 TAg in the follicle cortex disrupted normal fiber ultrastructure, producing a marked phenotypic effect. Affected hairs were wavy or severely kinked (depending on the severity of the phenotype) producing an appearance ranging from a ruffled coat to a stubble covering the back of the mouse. The transgenic hairs appeared to be weakened at the base of the fibers, leading to premature hair-loss and a thinner pelage, or regions of temporary nudity. No follicle tumors or neoplasia were apparent and immortalisation of cortical cells could not be established in culture. In situ hybridisation studies in the hair follicle using histone H3 as a cell proliferation marker suggested that cell proliferation had ceased prior to commencement of K2.10-TAg expression and was not re-established in the differentiating cortical cells. Hence, TAg was unable to induce cell immortalisation at that stage of cortical cell differentiation. However, transgenic mice developed various other abnormalities including vertebral abnormalities and bladder, liver and intestinal tumors, which resulted in reduced life expectancy.

  6. Adaptive mutation in nuclear export protein allows stable transgene expression in a chimaeric influenza A virus vector.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina; Shurygina, Anna-Polina; Wolf, Brigitte; Wolschek, Markus; Enzmann, Florian; Sansyzbay, Abylay; Khairullin, Berik; Sandybayev, Nurlan; Stukova, Marina; Kiselev, Oleg; Egorov, Andrej; Bergmann, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The development of influenza virus vectors with long insertions of foreign sequences remains difficult due to the small size and instable nature of the virus. Here, we used the influenza virus inherent property of self-optimization to generate a vector stably expressing long transgenes from the NS1 protein ORF. This was achieved by continuous selection of bright fluorescent plaques of a GFP-expressing vector during multiple passages in mouse B16f1 cells. The newly generated vector acquired stability in IFN-competent cell lines and in vivo in murine lungs. Although improved vector fitness was associated with the appearance of four coding mutations in the polymerase (PB2), haemagglutinin and non-structural (NS) segments, the stability of the transgene expression was dependent primarily on the single mutation Q20R in the nuclear export protein (NEP). Importantly, a longer insert, such as a cassette of 1299 nt encoding two Mycobacterium tuberculosis Esat6 and Ag85A proteins, could substitute for the GFP transgene. Thus, the inherent property of the influenza virus to adapt can also be used to adjust a vector backbone to give stable expression of long transgenes.

  7. Growth hormone (GH) increases cognition and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA and NMDA) in transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Studzinski, Ana Lupe Motta; Barros, Daniela Martí; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2015-11-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like factor I (GH/IGF-I) somatotropic axis is responsible for somatic growth in vertebrates, and has important functions in the nervous system. Among these, learning and memory functions related to the neural expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, mainly types AMPA (α-amino-3hydroxy-5methylisoxazole-4propionic) and NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) can be highlighted. Studies on these mechanisms have been almost exclusively conducted on mammal models, with little information available on fish. Consequently, this study aimed at evaluating the effects of the somatotropic axis on learning and memory of a GH-transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) model (F0104 strain). Long-term memory (LTM) was tested in an inhibitory avoidance apparatus, and brain expression of igf-I and genes that code for the main subunits of the AMPA and NMDA receptors were evaluated. Results showed a significant increase in LTM for transgenic fish. Transgenic animals also showed a generalized pattern of increase in the expression of AMPA and NMDA genes, as well as a three-fold induction in igf-I expression in the brain. When analyzed together, these results indicate that GH, mediated by IGF-I, has important effects on the brain, with improvement in LTM as a result of increased glutamate receptors. The transgenic strain F0104 was shown to be an interesting model for elucidating the intricate mechanisms related to the effect of the somatotropic axis on learning and memory in vertebrates.

  8. Ectopic expression of cytosolic superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase leads to salt stress tolerance in transgenic plums.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Faize, Mohamed; Barba-Espin, Gregorio; Faize, Lydia; Petri, Cesar; Hernández, José Antonio; Burgos, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    To fortify the antioxidant capacity of plum plants, genes encoding cytosolic antioxidants ascorbate peroxidase (cytapx) and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (cytsod) were genetically engineered in these plants. Transgenic plum plants expressing the cytsod and/or cytapx genes in cytosol have been generated under the control of the CaMV35S promoter. High levels of cytsod and cytapx gene transcripts suggested that the transgenes were constitutively and functionally expressed. We examined the potential functions of cytSOD and cytAPX in in vitro plum plants against salt stress (100 mm NaCl). Several transgenic plantlets expressing cytsod and/or cytapx showed an enhanced tolerance to salt stress, mainly lines C5-5 and J8-1 (expressing several copies of sod and apx, respectively). Transformation as well as NaCl treatments influenced the antioxidative metabolism of plum plantlets, including enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. Transgenic plantlets exhibited higher contents of nonenzymatic antioxidants glutathione and ascorbate than nontransformed control, which correlated with lower accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. Overall, our results suggest that transformation of plum plants with genes encoding antioxidant enzymes enhances the tolerance to salinity.

  9. Production of transgenic cashmere goat embryos expressing red fluorescent protein and containing IGF1 hair-follicle-cell specific expression cassette by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, XuDong; Yang, DongShan; Ao, XuDong; Wu, Xia; Li, GuangPeng; Wang, LingLing; Bao, Ming-Tao; Xue, Lian; Bou, ShorGan

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with pCDsR-KI, a hair-follicle-cell specific expression vector for insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) that contains two markers for selection (red fluorescent protein gene and neomycin resistant gene). The transgenic fibroblasts cell lines were obtained after G418 selection. Prior to the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the maturation rate of caprine cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) was optimized to an in vitro maturation time of 18 h. Parthenogenetic ooctyes were used as a model to investigate the effect of two activation methods, one with calcium ionophore IA23187 plus 6-DMAP and the other with ethanol plus 6-DMAP. The cleavage rates after 48 h were respectively 88.7% and 86.4%, with no significant difference (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the cleavage rate and the blastocyst rate in two different media (SO-Faa and CR1aa; 86.3% vs 83.9%, P>0.05 and 23.1% vs 17.2%, P>0.05). The fusion rate of a 190 V/mm group (62.4%) was significantly higher than 130 V/mm (32.8%) and 200 V/mm (42.9%), groups (P>0.05). After transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (TSCNT) manipulation, 203 reconstructed embryos were obtained in which the cleavage rate after in vitro development (IVD) for 48 h was 79.3% (161/203). The blastocyst rate after IVD for 7 to 9 d was 15.3% (31/203). There were 17 embryos out of 31 strongly expressing red fluorescence. Two of the red fluorescent blastocysts were randomly selected to identify transgene by polymerase chain reaction. Both were positive. These results showed that: (i) RFP and Neo ( r ) genes were correctly expressed indicating that transgenic somatic cell lines and positive transgenic embryos were obtained; (ii) one more selection at the blastocyst stage was necessary although the donor cells were transgenic positive, because only partially transgenic embryos expressing red fluorescence were obtained; and (iii) through TSCNT manipulation and

  10. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, A. L.; Daugherty, C. J.; Bihn, E. A.; Chapman, D. K.; Norwood, K. L.; Ferl, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    The use of plants as integral components of life support systems remains a cornerstone of strategies for long-term human habitation of space and extraterrestrial colonization. Spaceflight experiments over the past few decades have refined the hardware required to grow plants in low-earth orbit and have illuminated fundamental issues regarding spaceflight effects on plant growth and development. Potential incipient hypoxia, resulting from the lack of convection-driven gas movement, has emerged as a possible major impact of microgravity. We developed transgenic Arabidopsis containing the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces the plant hypoxia response and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. The staining patterns resulting from a 5-d mission on the orbiter Columbia during mission STS-93 indicate that the Adh/GUS reporter gene was activated in roots during the flight. However, the patterns of expression were not identical to terrestrial control inductions. Moreover, although terrestrial hypoxia induces Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex, no apex staining was observed in the spaceflight plants. This indicates that either the normal hypoxia response signaling is impaired in spaceflight or that spaceflight inappropriately induces Adh/GUS activity for reasons other than hypoxia.

  11. Osmyb4 expression improves adaptive responses to drought and cold stress in transgenic apples.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Gemma; Biricolti, Stefano; Locatelli, Franca; Baldoni, Elena; Mattana, Monica

    2008-10-01

    Constitutive expression of the rice cold-inducible Osmyb4 gene in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants improves adaptive responses to cold and drought stress, most likely due to the constitutive activation of several stress-inducible pathways and to the accumulation of several compatible solutes (e.g., glucose, fructose, sucrose, proline, glycine betaine and some aromatic compounds). Although the Osmyb4 gene seems able to activate stress responsive pathways in different species, we previously reported that its specific effect on stress tolerance depends on the transformed species. In the present work, we report the effects of the Osmyb4 expression for improving the stress response in apple (Malus pumila Mill.) plants. Namely, we found that the ectopic expression of the Myb4 transcription factor improved physiological and biochemical adaptation to cold and drought stress and modified metabolite accumulation. Based on these results it may be of interest to use Osmyb4 as a tool for improving the productivity of woody perennials under environmental stress conditions.

  12. Transgene Expression Patterns Indicate That Spaceflight Affects Stress Signal Perception and Transduction in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Daugherty, Christine J.; Bihn, Elizabeth A.; Chapman, David K.; Norwood, Kelly L.L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The use of plants as integral components of life support systems remains a cornerstone of strategies for long-term human habitation of space and extraterrestrial colonization. Spaceflight experiments over the past few decades have refined the hardware required to grow plants in low-earth orbit and have illuminated fundamental issues regarding spaceflight effects on plant growth and development. Potential incipient hypoxia, resulting from the lack of convection-driven gas movement, has emerged as a possible major impact of microgravity. We developed transgenic Arabidopsis containing the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces the plant hypoxia response and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. The staining patterns resulting from a 5-d mission on the orbiter Columbia during mission STS-93 indicate that the Adh/GUS reporter gene was activated in roots during the flight. However, the patterns of expression were not identical to terrestrial control inductions. Moreover, although terrestrial hypoxia induces Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex, no apex staining was observed in the spaceflight plants. This indicates that either the normal hypoxia response signaling is impaired in spaceflight or that spaceflight inappropriately induces Adh/GUS activity for reasons other than hypoxia. PMID:11402191

  13. Transgene expression of Drosophila melanogaster nucleoside kinase reverses mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Shuba; Zhou, Xiaoshan; Paredes, João A; Kuiper, Raoul V; Curbo, Sophie; Karlsson, Anna

    2013-02-15

    A strategy to reverse the symptoms of thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency in a mouse model was investigated. The nucleoside kinase from Drosophila melanogaster (Dm-dNK) was expressed in TK2-deficient mice that have been shown to present with a severe phenotype caused by mitochondrial DNA depletion. The Dm-dNK(+/-) transgenic mice were shown to be able to rescue the TK2-deficient mice. The Dm-dNK(+/-)TK2(-/-) mice were normal as judged by growth and behavior during the observation time of 6 months. The Dm-dNK-expressing mice showed a substantial increase in thymidine-phosphorylating activity in investigated tissues. The Dm-dNK expression also resulted in highly elevated dTTP pools. The dTTP pool alterations did not cause specific mitochondrial DNA mutations or deletions when 6-month-old mice were analyzed. The mitochondrial DNA was also detected at normal levels. In conclusion, the Dm-dNK(+/-)TK2(-/-) mouse model illustrates how dTMP synthesized in the cell nucleus can compensate for loss of intramitochondrial dTMP synthesis in differentiated tissue. The data presented open new possibilities to treat the severe symptoms of TK2 deficiency.

  14. [Changes of ocular biological parameters and Lumican expression in the monocularly deprivation myopic model of mutant Lumican transgenic mice].

    PubMed

    Sun, M S; Song, Y Z; Zhang, F J; Tao, J; Liu, Y B

    2016-11-11

    Objective: To investigate ocular changes in the monocularly deprivation myopic model of mutant Lumican transgenic mice. Comparing influences on biological parameters and sclera development between Lumican transgenic and form deprivation mice, and to prepare for further study of pathogenesis of pathological myopia (PM). Methods: Experimental research. Lumican transgenic mice and wild mice were monocularly lid-sutured at ten days after birth. All eyes were divided into 6 groups, group A(32 eyes): control eyes in transgenic mice; group B(34 eyes): sutured eyes in transgenic mice; group C(34 eyes): fellow eyes in transgenic mice; group D(28 eyes): control eyes in wild mice; group E(32 eyes): sutured eyes in wild mice; group F(32 eyes): fellow eyes in wild mice. Refraction was measured by streak retinoscopye and axial length was measured by vernier caliper at 8 weeks (56 days) after birth. Lumican expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR in all groups. Results: The refraction in group B and group E were (-0.38±1.10) D and (0.14±1.26)D respectively, which were significantly different compared with contralateral groups and normal control groups (F=9.525, 10.067; P<0.01). The mean axial length were also increased in group B ((3.28 ± 0.07)mm and group E (3.24 ± 0.09)mm, (F=7.183, 6.671; P<0.05). Expression level of Lumican mRNA in sclera was increased in group B, which was significantly different from group A and group C (F= 6.262; P<0.05). The expression of Lumican mRNA was increased in group B and C when compared with group E and F (t=4.772, 2.218, P<0.05). Conclusions: Form-deprivation in mutant Lumican transgenic mice causes myopic changes in deprived eyes. The gene expression level of Lumican in sclera of transgenic mice is significantly increased compared with contralateral eyes or that of wild group. Lumican mutation may effect the development of PM, and the interaction of genetic and environmental factors may lead to development of PM. (Chin J

  15. Induced expression of AtLEC1 and AtLEC2 differentially promotes somatic embryogenesis in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengdan; Liu, Chuanliang; Xia, Han; Bi, Yuping; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Zhao, Shuzhen; Hou, Lei; Li, Fuguang; Wang, Xingjun

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON (LEC) genes, AtLEC1 and AtLEC2, are important embryonic regulators that play key roles in morphogenesis and maturation phases during embryo development. Ectopic expression of AtLEC1 and AtLEC2 in tobacco caused abnormality in transgenic seedling. When transgenic seeds germinated on medium containing 30 µM DEX, LEC1 transgenic seedlings were ivory and fleshy, with unexpanded cotyledons, stubby hypocotyls, short roots and no obvious callus formation at the shoot meristem position. While LEC2 transgenic seedlings formed embryonic callus on the shoot apical meristem and somatic embryo-like structures emerged from the surface of the callus. When callus were transferred to hormone free MS0 medium more shoots were regenerated from each callus. However, shoot formation was not observed in LEC1 overexpressors. To investigate the mechanisms of LEC2 in somatic embryogenesis, we studied global gene expression by digital gene expression profiling analysis. The results indicated that ectopic expression of LEC2 genes induced accumulation of embryo-specific proteins such as seed storage proteins, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes, products of steroid biosynthesis related genes and key regulatory genes of the embryo development. Genes of plant-specific transcription factors such as NAC domain protein, AP2 and GRAS family, resistance-related as well as salicylic acid signaling related genes were up-regulated in LEC2 transgenic seedlings. Ectopi c expression of LEC2 induced large number of somatic embryo formation and shoot regeneration but 20 d DEX induction of LEC1 is not sufficient to induce somatic embryogenesis and shoot formation. Our data provide new information to understand the mechanisms on LEC2 gene's induction of somatic embryogenesis.

  16. Remote sensing of gene expression in Planta: transgenic plants as monitors of exogenous stress perception in extraterrestrial environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manak, Michael S.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Sehnke, Paul C.; Ferl, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Transgenic arabidopsis plants containing the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were developed as biological sensors for monitoring physiological responses to unique environments. Plants were monitored in vivo during exposure to hypoxia, high salt, cold, and abcissic acid in experiments designed to characterize the utility and responses of the Adh/GFP biosensors. Plants in the presence of environmental stimuli that induced the Adh promoter responded by expressing GFP, which in turn generated a detectable fluorescent signal. The GFP signal degraded when the inducing stimulus was removed. Digital imaging of the Adh/GFP plants exposed to each of the exogenous stresses demonstrated that the stress-induced gene expression could be followed in real time. The experimental results established the feasibility of using a digital monitoring system for collecting gene expression data in real time from Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) biosensor plants during space exploration experiments.

  17. Vesicles Cytoplasmic Injection: An Efficient Technique to Produce Porcine Transgene-Expressing Embryos.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, C G; Bevacqua, R J; Lorenzo, M S; Tello, M F; Willis, M; Buemo, C P; Lombardo, D M; Salamone, D F

    2016-08-01

    The use of vesicles co-incubated with plasmids showed to improve the efficiency of cytoplasmic injection of transgenes in cattle. Here, this technique was tested as a simplified alternative for transgenes delivery in porcine zygotes. To this aim, cytoplasmic injection of the plasmid alone was compared to the injection with plasmids co-incubated with vesicles both in diploid parthenogenic and IVF zygotes. The plasmid pcx-egfp was injected circular (CP) at 3, 30 and 300 ng/μl and linear (LP) at 30 ng/μl. The experimental groups using parthenogenetic zygotes were as follows: CP naked at 3 ng/μl (N = 105), 30 ng/μl (N = 95) and 300 ng/μl (N = 65); Sham (N = 105); control not injected (N = 223); LP naked at 30 ng/μl (N = 78); LP vesicles (N = 115) and Sham vesicles (N = 59). For IVF zygotes: LP naked (N = 44) LP vesicles (N = 94), Sham (N = 59) and control (N = 79). Cleavage, blastocyst and GFP+ rates were analysed by Fisher's test (p < 0.05). The parthenogenic CP naked group showed lower cleavage respect to control (p < 0.05). The highest concentration of plasmids to allow development to blastocyst stage was 30 ng/μl. There were no differences in DNA fragmentation between groups. The parthenogenic LP naked group resulted in high GFP rates (46%) and also allowed the production of GFP blastocysts (33%). The cytoplasmic injection with LP vesicles into parthenogenic zygotes allowed 100% GFP blastocysts. Injected IVF showed higher cleavage rates than control (p < 0.05). In IVF zygotes, only the use of vesicles produced GFP blastocysts. The use of vesicles co-incubated with plasmids improves the transgene expression efficiency for cytoplasmic injection in porcine zygotes and constitutes a simple technique for easy delivery of plasmids.

  18. Transgenic Expression of Osteoactivin/gpnmb Enhances Bone Formation in Vivo and Osteoprogenitor Differentiation ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Frara, Nagat; Abdelmagid, Samir M.; Sondag, Gregory R.; Moussa, Fouad M.; Yingling, Vanessa R.; Owen, Thomas A.; Popoff, Steven N.; Barbe, Mary F.; Safadi, Fayez F.

    2015-01-01

    Initial identification of osteoactivin (OA)/glycoprotein non-melanoma clone B (gpnmb) was demonstrated in an osteopetrotic rat model, where OA expression was increased 3-fold in mutant bones, compared to normal. OA mRNA and protein expression increase during active bone regeneration post-fracture, and primary rat osteoblasts show increased OA expression during differentiation in vitro. To further examine OA/gpnmb as an osteoinductive agent, we characterized the skeletal phenotype of transgenic mouse overexpressing OA/gpnmb under the CMV-promoter (OA-Tg). Western blot analysis showed increased OA/gpnmb in OA-Tg osteoblasts, compared to wild-type (WT). In OA-Tg mouse femurs versus WT littermates, micro-CT analysis showed increased trabecular bone volume and thickness, and cortical bone thickness; histomorphometry showed increased osteoblast numbers, bone formation and mineral apposition rates in OA-Tg mice; and biomechanical testing showed higher peak moment and stiffness. Given that OA/gpnmb is also over-expressed in osteoclasts in OA-Tg mice, we evaluated bone resorption by ELISA and histomorphometry, and observed decreased serum CTX-1 and RANK-L, and decreased osteoclast numbers in OA-Tg, compared to WT mice, indicating decreased bone remodeling in OA-Tg mice. The proliferation rate of OA-Tg osteoblasts in vitro was higher, compared to WT, as was alkaline phosphatase staining and activity, the latter indicating enhanced differentiation of OA-Tg osteoprogenitors. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed increased TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptors I and II expression in OA-Tg osteoblasts, compared to WT. Together, these data suggest that OA overexpression has an osteoinductive effect on bone mass in vivo and stimulates osteoprogenitor differentiation ex vivo. PMID:25899717

  19. Mouse insulin cells expressing an inducible RIPCre transgene are functionally impaired.

    PubMed

    Teitelman, Gladys; Kedees, Mamdouh

    2015-02-06

    We used cre-lox technology to test whether the inducible expression of Cre minimize the deleterious effect of the enzyme on beta cell function. We studied mice in which Cre is linked to a modified estrogen receptor (ER), and its expression is controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP). Following the injection of tamoxifen (TM), CreER- migrates to the nucleus and promotes the appearance of a reporter protein, enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), in cells. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that 46.6 ± 2.1% insulin cells of adult RIPCreER- EYFP expressed EYFP. RIPCreER-EYFP (+TM) mice were normoglycemic throughout the study, and their glucose tolerance test results were similar to control CD-1 mice. However, an extended exposure to reagents that stimulate insulin synthesis was detrimental to the survival of IN+EYFP+cells. The administration of an inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP4i), which prevents the cleavage of glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), to adult RIPCreER-EYFP mice lead to a decrease in the percentage of IN+EYFP+ to 17.5 ± 1.73 and a significant increase in apoptotic cells in islets. Similarly, a 2-week administration of the GLP-1 analog exendin 4 (ex-4) induced an almost complete ablation of IN+ expressing a different reporter protein and a significant decrease in the beta cell mass and rate of beta cell proliferation. Since normal beta cells do not die when induced to increase insulin synthesis, our observations indicate that insulin cells expressing an inducible RIPCre transgene are functionally deficient. Studies employing these mice should carefully consider the pitfalls of the Cre-Lox technique.

  20. Malus hupehensis NPR1 induces pathogenesis-related protein gene expression in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-Y; Qiao, Y-S; Lv, D; Gao, Z-H; Qu, S-C; Zhang, Z

    2012-03-01

    Most commercially grown apple cultivars are susceptible to fungal diseases. Malus hupehensis has high resistance to many diseases affecting apple cultivars. Understanding innate defence mechanisms would help to develop disease-resistant apple crops. Non-expressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) plays a key role in regulating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated systemic acquired resistance (SAR). MhNPR1 cDNA, corresponding to genomic DNA and its 5' flanking sequences, was isolated from M. hupehensis. Sequence analysis showed that the regulatory mechanism for oligomer-monomer transition of the MhNPR1 protein in apple might be similar to that of GmNPR1 in soybean, but different from that of AtNPR1 in Arabidopsis. No significant differences in MhNPR1 expression were found in M. hupehensis after infection with Botryosphaeria berengeriana, showing that MhNPR1 might be regulated by pathogens at the protein level, as described for Arabidopsis and grapevine. SA treatment significantly induced MhNPR1 expression in leaves, stems and roots, while methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment induced MhNPR1 expression in roots, but not in leaves or stems. The expression of MhNPR1 was highly increased in roots, moderately in leaves, and did not change in stems after treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). SAR marker genes (MhPR1 and MhPR5) were induced by SA, MeJA and ACC in leaves, stems and roots. Overexpression of MhNPR1 significantly induced the expression of pathogenesis-related genes (NtPR1, NtPR3 and NtPR5) in transgenic tobacco plants and resistance to the fungus Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that MhNPR1 orthologues are a component of the SA defence signalling pathway and SAR is induced in M. hupehensis.

  1. Transgenic plants expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein show increased resistance and toxicity to both chewing and sucking pests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Min; Li, Jie; Zhu, Jin-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Shu; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Chen, Xue-Xin; Li, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The adoption of pest-resistant transgenic plants to reduce yield losses and decrease pesticide use has been successful. To achieve the goal of controlling both chewing and sucking pests in a given transgenic plant, we generated transgenic tobacco, Arabidopsis, and rice plants expressing the fusion protein, AaIT/GNA, in which an insecticidal scorpion venom neurotoxin (Androctonus australis toxin, AaIT) is fused to snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA). Compared with transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing AaIT or GNA, transgenic plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited increased resistance and toxicity to one chewing pest, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Transgenic tobacco and rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA showed increased resistance and toxicity to two sucking pests, the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, and the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, respectively. Moreover, in the field, transgenic rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited a significant improvement in grain yield when infested with N. lugens. This study shows that expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein in transgenic plants can be a useful approach for controlling pests, particularly sucking pests which are not susceptible to the toxin in Bt crops.

  2. Production of an active feline interferon in the cocoon of transgenic silkworms using the fibroin H-chain expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, H. . E-mail: Hiroyuki_Kurihara@nts.toray.co.jp; Sezutsu, H.; Tamura, T.; Yamada, K.

    2007-04-20

    We constructed the fibroin H-chain expression system to produce recombinant proteins in the cocoon of transgenic silkworms. Feline interferon (FeIFN) was used for production and to assess the quality of the product. Two types of FeIFN fusion protein, each with N- and C-terminal sequences of the fibroin H-chain, were designed to be secreted into the lumen of the posterior silk glands. The expression of the FeIFN/H-chain fusion gene was regulated by the fibroin H-chain promoter domain. The transgenic silkworms introduced these constructs with the piggyBac transposon-derived vector, which produced the normal sized cocoons containing each FeIFN/H-chain fusion protein. Although the native-protein produced by transgenic silkworms have almost no antiviral activity, the proteins after the treatment with PreScission protease to eliminate fibroin H-chain derived N- and C-terminal sequences from the products, had very high antiviral activity. This H-chain expression system, using transgenic silkworms, could be an alternative method to produce an active recombinant protein and silk-based biomaterials.

  3. Ectopic expression of Tsi1 in transgenic hot pepper plants enhances host resistance to viral, bacterial, and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; Park, Jeong Mee; An, Jong-Min; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2002-10-01

    In many plants, including hot pepper plants, productivity is greatly affected by pathogen attack. We reported previously that tobacco stress-induced gene 1 (Tsi1) may play an important role in regulating stress responsive genes and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. In this study, we demonstrated that overexpression of Tsi1 gene in transgenic hot pepper plants induced constitutive expression of several PR genes in the absence of stress or pathogen treatment. The transgenic hot pepper plants expressing Tsi1 exhibited resistance to Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Furthermore, these transgenic plants showed increased resistance to a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and also an oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. These results suggested that ectopic expression of Tsi1 in transgenic hot pepper plants enhanced the resistance of the plants to various pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and oomycete. These results suggest that using transcriptional regulatory protein genes may contribute to developing broad-spectrum resistance in crop plants.

  4. RNAi mediated inhibition of viroid infection in transgenic plants expressing viroid-specific small RNAs derived from various functional domains

    PubMed Central

    Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Kasai, Atsushi; Sugawara, Kohei; Yamamoto, Hideki; Yamazaki, Yuto; He, Ying-Hong; Takada, Nobuyuki; Goto, Hideki; Shindo, Sahori; Harada, Takeo; Sano, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop RNAi-mediated viroid-resistant transgenic plants using nearly full-length Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) hairpin RNA (hpRNA) were successful; however unusual phenotypes resembling viroid infection occurred. Therefore, in the present work, transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana lines expressing both partial and truncated versions of PSTVd hpRNA were developed. Specifically, seven partial or truncated versions of PSTVd sequences were selected according to the hotspots of both PSTVd-sRNAs and functional domains of the PSTVd. A total of 21 transgenic lines Nicotiana benthamiana were developed under the control of either the CaMV-35S or the CoYMV promoters. All of the transgenic lines established here were monitored for the induction of phenotypic changes, for PSTVd-sRNA expression and for the resistance against PSTVd infection. Additionally, this study demonstrates the use of inverted repeat construct sequences as short as 26- to -49 nucleotides for both the efficient expression of the PSTVd-sRNA and the inhibition of PSTVd infection. PMID:26656294

  5. pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 expression enhances nitrogen uptake efficiency and grain yield in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingguang; Fan, Xiaoru; Qian, Kaiyun; Zhang, Yong; Song, Miaoquan; Liu, Yu; Xu, Guohua; Fan, Xiaorong

    2017-02-22

    The nitrate (NO3-) transporter has been selected as an important gene maker in the process of environmental adoption in rice cultivars. In this work, we transferred another native OsNAR2.1 promoter with driving OsNAR2.1 gene into rice plants. The transgenic lines with exogenous pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 constructs showed enhanced OsNAR2.1 expression level, compared with wild type (WT), and (15) N influx in roots increased 21%-32% in response to 0.2 mm and 2.5 mm 15NO3- and 1.25 mm (15) NH4(15) NO3 . Under these three N conditions, the biomass of the pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 transgenic lines increased 143%, 129% and 51%, and total N content increased 161%, 242% and 69%, respectively, compared to WT. Furthermore in field experiments we found the grain yield, agricultural nitrogen use efficiency (ANUE), and dry matter transfer of pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 plants increased by about 21%, 22% and 21%, compared to WT. We also compared the phenotypes of pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 and pOsNAR2.1:OsNRT2.1 transgenic lines in the field, found that postanthesis N uptake differed significantly between them, and in comparison with the WT. Postanthesis N uptake (PANU) increased approximately 39% and 85%, in the pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 and pOsNAR2.1:OsNRT2.1 transgenic lines, respectively, possibly because OsNRT2.1 expression was less in the pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 lines than in the pOsNAR2.1:OsNRT2.1 lines during the late growth stage. These results show that rice NO3(-) uptake, yield and NUE were improved by increased OsNAR2.1 expression via its native promoter.

  6. Enhanced resveratrol accumulation in rolB transgenic cultures of Vitis amurensis correlates with unusual changes in CDPK gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, Alexandra S; Kiselev, Konstantin V; Veselova, Marina V; Isaeva, Galina A; Fedoreyev, Sergey A; Zhuravlev, Yuri N

    2009-07-15

    It has been established that transformation of Vitis amurensis callus culture with the plant oncogene rolB of Agrobacterium rhizogenes results in a high level of resveratrol production in the transformed culture. In the present report, we investigated two rolB transgenic V. amurensis cell cultures with different levels of rolB expression and resveratrol production. We examined whether the calcium ion flux and later steps of the calcium-mediated signal transduction pathway play a role in resveratrol biosynthesis in the rolB transgenic cultures. It has been shown that the calcium channel blockers, LaCl(3), verapamil, and niflumic acid, significantly reduced the accumulation of resveratrol in the rolB transgenic cultures. The number of the calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) transcript variants and abundance of some of the transcripts were considerably altered in the rolB transgenic cell cultures, as revealed by frequency analysis of RT-PCR products and real-time PCR. Some unusual CDPK transcripts with deletions and insertions in the kinase domain were isolated from cDNA probes of rolB-transformed cells. These results suggest that active resveratrol biosynthesis in rolB transgenic cultures of V. amurensis is Ca2+ dependent. We propose that the rolB gene has an important role in regulation of calcium-dependent transduction pathways in transformed cells.

  7. Inducible Transgene Expression in Human iPS Cells Using Versatile All-in-One piggyBac Transposons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Il; Oc