Science.gov

Sample records for drop ball tester

  1. Aligner for Elastic Collisions of Dropped Balls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellen, Walter Roy

    1995-01-01

    Discusses an aligner that permits dropping a stack of any number of balls of different sizes, elasticities, hardnesses, or types to observe the rebound of the top ball. Experimental results allow a reasonable comparison with theory. (MVL)

  2. Standardization of Drop Weight Mechanical Properties Tester for Gun Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    Powder," Proceedings of the International Symposium on Gun Propellants, Dover, NJ, p. 2.11, October 1973. P. J. Greidanus , "Simple... Greidanus . A standard drop weight tester was modified by Greidanus so that large pressure impulses of the magnitude experienced in rocket motors could be...Propellants, Dover, NJ, p. 2.11, October 1973- 2. P. J. Greidanus , "Simple Determination of the Mechanical Behavior of Double- Based Rocket

  3. NASA five-ball fatigue tester - Over 20 years of research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.; Parker, R. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The paper reviews, from both a technical and historic perspective, the results of research conducted using the NASA Five-Ball Fatigue Tester. The test rig was conceived by W. J. Anderson in late 1958. The first data was generated in March 1959. Since then a total of approximately 500,000 test hours have been accumulated on a group of eight test rigs which are capable of running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Studies have been conducted to determine the effect on rolling-element fatigue life of contact angle, material hardness, chemistry, heat treatment, and processing, lubricant type and chemistry, elastohydrodynamic film thickness, deformation and wear, vacuum, and temperature as well as Hertzian and residual stresses. Correlation was established between the results obtained using the five-ball tester and those obtained with full-scale rolling-element bearings.

  4. NASA five-ball fatigue tester - Over 20 years of research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.; Parker, R. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The paper reviews, from both a technical and historic perspective, the results of research conducted using the NASA Five-Ball Fatigue Tester. The test rig was conceived by W. J. Anderson in late 1958. The first data was generated in March 1959. Since then a total of approximately 500,000 test hours have been accumulated on a group of eight test rigs which are capable of running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Studies have been conducted to determine the effect on rolling-element fatigue life of contact angle, material hardness, chemistry, heat treatment, and processing, lubricant type and chemistry, elastohydrodynamic film thickness, deformation and wear, vacuum, and temperature as well as Hertzian and residual stresses. Correlation was established between the results obtained using the five-ball tester and those obtained with full-scale rolling-element bearings.

  5. NASA five-ball fatigue tester: Over 20 years of research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.; Parker, R. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect on rolling-element fatigue life of contact angle, material hardness, chemistry, heat treatment and processing, lubricant type and chemistry, elastohydrodynamic film thickness, deformation and wear, vacuum, and temperature as well as Hertzian and residual stresses. Correlation was established between the results obtained using the five-ball tester and those obtained with full scale rolling-element bearings.

  6. Design of High-speed Wear Lifetime Tester of the Instrument Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Gu, J. M.; Sun, Y.; Chen, X. Y.

    2006-10-01

    The instrument ball bearings are the key components of movable components for various kinds of measuring and control instruments; they often operate in the environmental condition of high-speed and light preload. In general, the non metal, disposable oilimpregnated retainer material has been used for these kinds of high precision miniature bearing. The engineering practice shows that the common failure mode of them is the wear which appears under the condition of insufficient lubrication condition. As the results, the vibration and noise will be enlarged, so does the frictional torque, which makes the ball bearings to lose its original working accuracy. It is the lifetime test of bearings that can enable the designers and manufacturers to chose the material of the bearing properly, optimize the product structure, mend the manufacturing technique process, and to enhance the technical level of the bearing products significantly. In this paper, the wear lifetime tester has been designed according to the requirements of the life test for the instrument ball bearings, which consists of the main body of tester, electric system, drive unit and computer measure and control system, etc. The motor spindle has been selected to drive the device which is supported by the aerostatic bearing; frequency conversion speed adjustment mode, its scope of rotating speed is between 0 and 10,000 rpm. A pair of bearings can be tested under the pure axial preload condition, the maximum load is up to 50N, the control accuracy is ±2% the scope of temperature control is up to 200°C. The variation of frictional torque on the bearing couple will be measured by an online torque transducer. The variation of power dissipation can be monitored under arbitrary speed by use of an on-line high-precision power meter. The wear and quality situation of the contact surface of the bearings will be reflected on these two parameters. Meanwhile, the values of temperature and vibration will also be monitored

  7. Strength of thin chemtempered lenses: drop-ball testing.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, W H; Rosenfield, A R; Gulati, S T; Rieger, R A; Hoekstra, K E

    1978-12-01

    Failure heights were measured in drop-ball tests for both chemtempered and heat-tempered plano, white crown glass lenses from five different optical laboratories. It was found that (1) failure height was proportional to the square of the lens thickness, (2) chemtempered lenses substantially thinner than 2.0 mm are as resistant to breakage as 2.0-mm-thick heat-tempered lenses, and (3) a close correlation existed between results of single-drop and multiple-drop tests and between results of tests using rigid and compliant mounts.

  8. Building micro-soccer-balls with evaporating colloidal fakir drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Marín, Álvaro G.; Susarrey-Arce, Arturo; van Housselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    Drop evaporation can be used to self-assemble particles into three-dimensional microstructures on a scale where direct manipulation is impossible. We present a unique method to create highly-ordered colloidal microstructures in which we can control the amount of particles and their packing fraction. To this end, we evaporate colloidal dispersion drops from a special type of superhydrophobic microstructured surface, on which the drop remains in Cassie-Baxter state during the entire evaporative process. The remainders of the drop consist of a massive spherical cluster of the microspheres, with diameters ranging from a few tens up to several hundreds of microns. We present scaling arguments to show how the final particle packing fraction of these balls depends on the drop evaporation dynamics, particle size, and number of particles in the system.

  9. Coefficient of restitution of sports balls: A normal drop test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, Adli; Ismail, K. A.

    2012-09-01

    Dynamic behaviour of bodies during impact is investigated through impact experiment, the simplest being a normal drop test. Normally, a drop test impact experiment involves measurement of kinematic data; this includes measurement of incident and rebound velocity in order to calculate a coefficient of restitution (COR). A high speed video camera is employed for measuring the kinematic data where speed is calculated from displacement of the bodies. Alternatively, sensors can be employed to measure speeds, especially for a normal impact where there is no spin of the bodies. This paper compares experimental coefficients of restitution (COR) for various sports balls, namely golf, table tennis, hockey and cricket. The energy loss in term of measured COR and effects of target plate are discussed in relation to the material and construction of these sports balls.

  10. Measurements of fluid viscosity using a miniature ball drop device.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jay X

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes measurement of fluid viscosity using a small ball drop device. It requires as little as 100 μl of fluid. Each measurement can be performed in seconds. The experiment is designed to yield reliable viscosity values by operating at properly chosen tilt angles and with calibration using well-characterized Newtonian fluids such as mixtures of glycerol and water. It also yields dynamical viscosity of non-Newtonian fluids at moderate shear rates. The device is easy to assemble and it allows for the measurement of viscosity even when the fluid samples are too small to measure using most commercial viscometers or rheometers. Therefore, the technique is particularly useful in characterizing biological fluids such as solutions of proteins, DNA, and polymers frequently used in biomaterial applications.

  11. Measurements of fluid viscosity using a miniature ball drop device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jay X.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes measurement of fluid viscosity using a small ball drop device. It requires as little as 100 μl of fluid. Each measurement can be performed in seconds. The experiment is designed to yield reliable viscosity values by operating at properly chosen tilt angles and with calibration using well-characterized Newtonian fluids such as mixtures of glycerol and water. It also yields dynamical viscosity of non-Newtonian fluids at moderate shear rates. The device is easy to assemble and it allows for the measurement of viscosity even when the fluid samples are too small to measure using most commercial viscometers or rheometers. Therefore, the technique is particularly useful in characterizing biological fluids such as solutions of proteins, DNA, and polymers frequently used in biomaterial applications.

  12. Micro-ball lens structure fabrication based on drop on demand printing the liquid mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Zhu, Li; Chen, Hejuan; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Weiyi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a simple micro-ball lens array (MBLA) fabrication method using a drop-on-demand (DOD) droplet printing technique and liquid mold. The micro-ball droplet array on the hydrophobic surface is used as the liquid mold to fabricate the MBLA. The ultrahigh adhesion force between the micro-ball droplet and the substrate is ascribed to the Wenzel state of the micro-ball droplet, while the replication process with low position error is attributed to the ultrahigh adhesion force between the micro-ball droplet and the substrate and the high viscosity of the micro-ball droplet and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) liquid. The micro-ball lenses (MBLs) with a contact angle of 120° and 150° were fabricated and the important fabrication details were discussed. The optical performance and scanning electron microscope (SEM) data of the MBLs showed that the MBLs had high quality surface morphology and good optical performance.

  13. Building microscopic soccer balls with evaporating colloidal fakir drops

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Álvaro G.; Gelderblom, Hanneke; Susarrey-Arce, Arturo; van Houselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Gardeniers, Johannes G. E.; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation-driven particle self-assembly can be used to generate three-dimensional microstructures. We present a unique method to create colloidal microstructures in which we can control the amount of particles and their packing fraction. To this end, we evaporate colloidal dispersion droplets on a special type of superhydrophobic microstructured surface, on which the droplet remains in Cassie–Baxter state during the entire evaporative process. The remainders of the droplet consist of a massive spherical cluster of the microspheres, with diameters ranging from a few tens up to several hundreds of microns. We present scaling arguments to show how the final particle packing fraction of these balls depends on the dynamics of the droplet evaporation, particle size, and number of particles in the system. PMID:23010925

  14. An alternative to the Drop Ball Test for the measurement of ophthalmic glass fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Scaief, A L

    1975-11-01

    The Drop Ball Test (DBT) has some distinct disadvantages both as a standard measurement for ophthalmic lens fracture resistance and as a research tool. The Static Test (ST) was devised to allow a load and enzrgy analysis of the DBT and enable more rapid and accurate testing of large ophthalmic lens samples. It was found that over 50% of the energy generated in the DBT is absorbed by the lens mount instead of the test lens. This means that the standard DBT height of 50 inches is more an indication of DBT components than lens fracture resistance. Static testing of non-tempered, heat tempered and chemically tempered lenses correlated well with former DBT studies. The ST, however, allowed lens fracture resistance to be represented in pounds-load, a value better understood practically and mathematically.

  15. An undergraduate lab on measuring fluid viscosity using a miniature ball drop device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jay

    2015-11-01

    I would like to describe measurement of fluid viscosity using a small ball drop device. It requires as little as 100 microliters of fluid. Each measurement can be performed in seconds. Through simple experimentation, students observe fluid flow confined in a thin cylindrical tube. They analyze forces and torques on a tiny ball falling and rolling down in an inclined tube. They gain practice in observing and identifying sources of errors and variability in their measurements beyond those indicated by standard error bars. The experiment is designed to yield reliable viscosity values by operating at properly chosen tilt angles and with calibration using well-characterized fluids such as mixtures of glycerol and water. The technique is also useful in research and technological applications as the device is easy to assemble and it allows the measurement of viscosity even when the fluid samples are too small to measure using most commercial viscometers or rheometers. Work Partially Supported by the NSF Fluid Physics Program (Award number CBET 1438033).

  16. The Galileo bias: a naive conceptual belief that influences people's perceptions and performance in a ball-dropping task.

    PubMed

    Oberle, Crystal D; McBeath, Michael K; Madigan, Sean C; Sugar, Thomas G

    2005-07-01

    This research introduces a new naive physics belief, the Galileo bias, whereby people ignore air resistance and falsely believe that all objects fall at the same rate. Survey results revealed that this bias is held by many and is surprisingly strongest for those with formal physics instruction. In 2 experiments, 98 participants dropped ball pairs varying in volume and/or mass from a height of 10 m, with the goal of both balls hitting the ground simultaneously. The majority of participants in both experiments adopted a single strategy consistent with the Galileo bias, showing no improvement across trials. Yet, for participants reporting intentions of dropping both balls at the same time, the differences between release points were significantly greater than 0 ms. These findings support separate but interacting cognition and perception-action systems. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. The Galileo Bias: A Naive Conceptual Belief That Influences People's Perceptions and Performance in a Ball-Dropping Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Crystal D.; McBeath, Michael K.; Madigan, Sean C.; Sugar, Thomas G.

    2005-01-01

    This research introduces a new naive physics belief, the Galileo bias, whereby people ignore air resistance and falsely believe that all objects fall at the same rate. Survey results revealed that this bias is held by many and is surprisingly strongest for those with formal physics instruction. In 2 experiments, 98 participants dropped ball pairs…

  18. Effects of Metal Ions on Viscosity of Aqueous Sodium Carboxylmethylcellulose Solution and Development of Dropping Ball Method on Viscosity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Set, Seng; Ford, David; Kita, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    This research revealed that metal ions with different charges could significantly affect the viscosity of aqueous sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) solution. On the basis of an Ostwald viscometer, an improvised apparatus using a dropping ball for examining the viscosity of liquids/solutions has been developed. The results indicate that the…

  19. Effects of Metal Ions on Viscosity of Aqueous Sodium Carboxylmethylcellulose Solution and Development of Dropping Ball Method on Viscosity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Set, Seng; Ford, David; Kita, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    This research revealed that metal ions with different charges could significantly affect the viscosity of aqueous sodium carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) solution. On the basis of an Ostwald viscometer, an improvised apparatus using a dropping ball for examining the viscosity of liquids/solutions has been developed. The results indicate that the…

  20. The Galileo Bias: A Naive Conceptual Belief That Influences People's Perceptions and Performance in a Ball-Dropping Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Crystal D.; McBeath, Michael K.; Madigan, Sean C.; Sugar, Thomas G.

    2005-01-01

    This research introduces a new naive physics belief, the Galileo bias, whereby people ignore air resistance and falsely believe that all objects fall at the same rate. Survey results revealed that this bias is held by many and is surprisingly strongest for those with formal physics instruction. In 2 experiments, 98 participants dropped ball pairs…

  1. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  2. Cable tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammage, Robert L.

    1990-10-01

    A device for sequentially testing the plurality of connectors in a wiring harness is disclosed. The harness is attached to the tester by means of adapter cables and a rotary switch is used to sequentially, individually test the connectors by passing a current through the connector. If the connector is unbroken, a light will flash to show it is electrically sound. The adapters allow a large number of cable configurations to be tested using a single tester configuration.

  3. TUBE TESTER

    DOEpatents

    Gittings, H.T. Jr.; Kalbach, J.F.

    1958-01-14

    This patent relates to tube testing, and in particular describes a tube tester for automatic testing of a number of vacuum tubes while in service and as frequently as may be desired. In it broadest aspects the tube tester compares a particular tube with a standard tube tarough a difference amplifier. An unbalanced condition in the circuit of the latter produced by excessive deviation of the tube in its characteristics from standard actuates a switch mechanism stopping the testing cycle and indicating the defective tube.

  4. Explosives tester

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S [San Ramon, CA; Howard, Douglas E [Livermore, CA; Eckels, Joel D [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA

    2011-01-11

    An explosives tester that can be used anywhere as a screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are provided. A heater is provided for receiving the first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers.

  5. Drop Tower Setup to Study the Diffusion-driven Growth of a Foam Ball in Supersaturated Liquids in Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Martínez, Patricia; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sperl, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    The diffusion-driven growth of a foam ball is a phenomenon that appears in many manufacturing process as well as in a variety of geological phenomena. Usually these processes are greatly affected by gravity, as foam is much lighter than the surrounding liquid. However, the growth of the foam free of gravity effects is still very relevant, as it is connected to manufacturing in space and to the formation of rocks in meteorites and other small celestial bodies. The aim of this research is to investigate experimentally the growth of a bubble cloud growing in a gas-supersaturated liquid in microgravity conditions. Here, we describe the experiments carried out in the drop tower of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM). In few words, a foam seed is formed with spark-induced cavitation in carbonated water, whose time evolution is recorded with two high-speed cameras. Our preliminary results shed some light on how the size of the foam ball scales with time, in particular at times much longer than what could be studied in normal conditions, i.e. on the surface of the Earth, where the dynamics of the foam is already dominated by gravity after several milliseconds.

  6. Drop Tower Setup to Study the Diffusion-driven Growth of a Foam Ball in Supersaturated Liquids in Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Martínez, Patricia; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sperl, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    The diffusion-driven growth of a foam ball is a phenomenon that appears in many manufacturing process as well as in a variety of geological phenomena. Usually these processes are greatly affected by gravity, as foam is much lighter than the surrounding liquid. However, the growth of the foam free of gravity effects is still very relevant, as it is connected to manufacturing in space and to the formation of rocks in meteorites and other small celestial bodies. The aim of this research is to investigate experimentally the growth of a bubble cloud growing in a gas-supersaturated liquid in microgravity conditions. Here, we describe the experiments carried out in the drop tower of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM). In few words, a foam seed is formed with spark-induced cavitation in carbonated water, whose time evolution is recorded with two high-speed cameras. Our preliminary results shed some light on how the size of the foam ball scales with time, in particular at times much longer than what could be studied in normal conditions, i.e. on the surface of the Earth, where the dynamics of the foam is already dominated by gravity after several milliseconds.

  7. Development of a new testing equipment that combines the working principles of both the split Hopkinson bar and the drop weight testers.

    PubMed

    Adas, Rateb; Haiba, Majed

    2016-01-01

    In the current work, a new high strain rate tensile testing equipment is proposed. The equipment uses a pendulum device to generate an impact load and a three-bar mechanism to bring that load to act upon a specially designed specimen. As the standard impact testing apparatus uses pendulum device and the well-known SHB high strain rate tester adopts the above-mentioned mechanism, the introduced equipment can be dealt with as an impact apparatus in which the base that supports the V-shape specimen is replaced with the three-bar configuration that the traditional SHB uses. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the new tester, virtual design tools were used to determine the most appropriate configuration for it. Then, a detailed design was created, and a full-scale prototype was produced, calibrated, instrumented and tested. The obtained results demonstrate that the new tester is capable of axially straining steel specimens up to failure at a maximum rate of about 250 s(-1), which is reasonable when compared with a more established high strain rate testers.

  8. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  9. A High Temperature Hermetic Primer and a Variable Spring Tester

    SciTech Connect

    Begeal, D.R.

    1994-05-01

    Percussion primers are used at Sandia to ignite energetic components such as pyrotechnic actuators and thermal batteries. This report describes a High Temperature Hermetic Primer (HTHP) that was developed to replace a previous G16 Percussion Primer Subassembly (Gl6PPS). The ignition mix in these primers is the same as in the discontinued Remington 44G16 (KC1O{sub 3}, SbS{sub 3}, and Ca{sub 2}Si). The HTHP has nearly the same sensitivity as the 44G16 and a significantly lower sensitivity than the G16PPS. In parallel with the HTHP development, we also designed a Variable Spring Tester (VST) to determine percussion primer ignition sensitivity with firing pins that have the same mass as those used in field applications. The tester is capable of accelerating firing pins over a velocity range of 100 to 600 inches per second for pins weighing up to 6 grams. The desired impulse can be preselected with an accuracy of better than {plus_minus}1%. The actual impulse is measured on every shot. The VST was characterized using the WW42Cl primer, as well as with the G16PPS and the HTHP. Compared to data from conventional ball drop testers, we found that ignition sensitivities were lower and there was less scatter in the sensitivity data. Our experiments indicate that ignition sensitivity is not strictly energy dependent, but also depends on the rate of deposition, or firing pin velocity in this case. Development results for the HTHP and Variable Spring Tester are discussed and design details are shown.

  10. Pulse Coil Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Set of relays tested easily and repeatedly. Pulse coil tester causes coil under test to generate transient voltage; waveform indicates condition of coil. Tester accommodates assembly of up to four coils at a time.

  11. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  12. Portable Weld Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Douglas

    This training manual, which was developed for employees of an automotive plant, is designed to teach trainees to operate a portable weld tester (Miyachi MM-315). In chapter 1, the weld tester's components are illustrated and described, and the procedure for charging its batteries is explained. Chapter 2 illustrates the weld tester's parts,…

  13. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  14. Portable Weld Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Douglas

    This training manual, which was developed for employees of an automotive plant, is designed to teach trainees to operate a portable weld tester (Miyachi MM-315). In chapter 1, the weld tester's components are illustrated and described, and the procedure for charging its batteries is explained. Chapter 2 illustrates the weld tester's parts,…

  15. Poppet valve tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tellier, G. F.

    1973-01-01

    Tester investigates fundamental factors affecting cyclic life and sealing performance of valve seats and poppets. Tester provides for varying impact loading of poppet against seat and rate of cycling, and controls amount and type of relative motion between sealing faces of seat and poppet. Relative motion between seat and poppet can be varied in three modes.

  16. Rocketdyne LOX bearing tester program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keba, J. E.; Beatty, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    The cause, or causes, for the Space Shuttle Main Engine ball wear were unknown, however, several mechanisms were suspected. Two testers were designed and built for operation in liquid oxygen to empirically gain insight into the problems and iterate solutions in a timely and cost efficient manner independent of engine testing. Schedules and test plans were developed that defined a test matrix consisting of parametric variations of loading, cooling or vapor margin, cage lubrication, material, and geometry studies. Initial test results indicated that the low pressure pump thrust bearing surface distress is a function of high axial load. Initial high pressure turbopump bearing tests produced the wear phenomenon observed in the turbopump and identified an inadequate vapor margin problem and a coolant flowrate sensitivity issue. These tests provided calibration data of analytical model predictions to give high confidence in the positive impact of future turbopump design modification for flight. Various modifications will be evaluated in these testers, since similar turbopump conditions can be produced and the benefit of the modification will be quantified in measured wear life comparisons.

  17. UW VLSI chip tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Neil

    1989-12-01

    We present a design for a low-cost, functional VLSI chip tester. It is based on the Apple MacIntosh II personal computer. It tests chips that have up to 128 pins. All pin drivers of the tester are bidirectional; each pin is programmed independently as an input or an output. The tester can test both static and dynamic chips. Rudimentary speed testing is provided. Chips are tested by executing C programs written by the user. A software library is provided for program development. Tests run under both the Mac Operating System and A/UX. The design is implemented using Xilinx Logic Cell Arrays. Price/performance tradeoffs are discussed.

  18. Bending stresses in spherically hollow ball bearing and fatigue experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Coe, H. H.; Parker, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Spherically hollow balls of 21.7, 50.0, and 56.5 percent mass reduction were operated in ball bearings and in a five-ball fatigue tester with differing outcomes. Available theoretical and experimental treatments of stresses in spherically hollow balls are reviewed and compared. Bending stresses are estimated for these spherically hollow balls to better understand the differences in ball bearing and fatigue test experience.

  19. Explosives tester with heater

    DOEpatents

    Del Eckels, Joel [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA; Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Whipple, Richard E [Livermore, CA; Carter, J Chance [Livermore, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2010-08-10

    An inspection tester system for testing for explosives. The tester includes a body and a swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body. At least one reagent holder and dispenser is operatively connected to the body. The reagent holder and dispenser contains an explosives detecting reagent and is positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagent to the swab unit. A heater is operatively connected to the body and the swab unit is adapted to be operatively connected to the heater.

  20. Common tester platform concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, Michael James

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a case study on the doctrine of a common tester platform, a concept of a standardized platform that can be applicable across the broad spectrum of testing requirements throughout the various stages of a weapons program, as well as across the various weapons programs. The common tester concept strives to define an affordable, next-generation design that will meet testing requirements with the flexibility to grow and expand; supporting the initial development stages of a weapons program through to the final production and surveillance stages. This report discusses a concept investing key leveraging technologies and operational concepts combined with prototype tester-development experiences and practical lessons learned gleaned from past weapons programs.

  1. Cable Tester Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Cables are very important electrical devices that carry power and signals across multiple instruments. Any fault in a cable can easily result in a catastrophic outcome. Therefore, verifying that all cables are built to spec is a very important part of Electrical Integration Procedures. Currently, there are two methods used in lab for verifying cable connectivity. (1) Using a Break-Out Box and an ohmmeter this method is time-consuming but effective for custom cables and (2) Commercial Automated Cable Tester Boxes this method is fast, but to test custom cables often requires pre-programmed configuration files, and cables used on spacecraft are often uniquely designed for specific purposes. The idea is to develop a semi-automatic continuity tester that reduces human effort in cable testing, speeds up the electrical integration process, and ensures system safety. The JPL-Cable Tester Box is developed to check every single possible electrical connection in a cable in parallel. This system indicates connectivity through LED (light emitting diode) circuits. Users can choose to test any pin/shell (test node) with a single push of a button, and any other nodes that are shorted to the test node, even if they are in the same connector, will light up with the test node. The JPL-Cable Tester Boxes offers the following advantages: 1. Easy to use: The architecture is simple enough that it only takes 5 minutes for anyone to learn how operate the Cable Tester Box. No pre-programming and calibration are required, since this box only checks continuity. 2. Fast: The cable tester box checks all the possible electrical connections in parallel at a push of a button. If a cable normally takes half an hour to test, using the Cable Tester Box will improve the speed to as little as 60 seconds to complete. 3. Versatile: Multiple cable tester boxes can be used together. As long as all the boxes share the same electrical potential, any number of connectors can be tested together.

  2. Visual sensitivity tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.; Fitzgerald, J. W.; Rositano, S. A.

    1972-01-01

    Testing device uses closed loop film cassettes to project programmed visual stimuli on screen which the observer views through a lens making the stimuli appear to be at optical infinity. Tester is useful for determining changes in glautomatous visual field sensitivity.

  3. Transformer and Meter Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoms, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Numerically-controlled 5-axis machine tool uses transformer and meter to determine and indicate whether tool is in home position, but lacks built-in test mode to check them. Tester makes possible test, and repair of components at machine rather then replace them when operation seems suspect.

  4. Improved Ronchi tester.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Alfonso, J M; Cordero-Dávila, A; Vergara-Limon, S; Cuautle-Cortes, J

    2001-02-01

    We used a LED in a Ronchi tester to obtain two main improvements: (i) We can choose one of two wavelength bands to illuminate and record the ronchigram, and (ii) we can change the irradiance of the illumination source according to the optical system under test and the detector array. This can be done by use of an adequate electronic circuit.

  5. Fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Evaluation of hot-pressed silicon nitride as a rolling-element bearing material. Two grades of hot-pressed silicon nitride balls were tested under rolling contact conditions in a five-ball fatigue tester. A digital computer program was used to predict the dynamic performance characteristics and fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls relative to that with bearings containing steel balls. The results obtained include the finding that fatigue spalls on silicon nitride balls are similar in appearance to those obtained with typical bearing steels.

  6. Reflections on a Bouncing Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Jim; Lopez, Veronica; Rohr, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    While observing the bounce heights of various kinds of sports balls dropped from different heights onto a variety of surfaces, we thought of the following question: Could measurements of drop and bounce heights of balls of different diameters, but of the same material, falling from different heights, but on the same surface, be expressed by a…

  7. Reflections on a Bouncing Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Jim; Lopez, Veronica; Rohr, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    While observing the bounce heights of various kinds of sports balls dropped from different heights onto a variety of surfaces, we thought of the following question: Could measurements of drop and bounce heights of balls of different diameters, but of the same material, falling from different heights, but on the same surface, be expressed by a…

  8. Inspection tester for explosives

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Simpson, Randall L.; Satcher, Joe H.

    2007-11-13

    An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

  9. Inspection tester for explosives

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Simpson, Randall L.; Satcher, Joe H.

    2010-10-05

    An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

  10. Reflections on a Bouncing Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, Jim; Lopez, Veronica; Rohr, Tyler

    2014-12-01

    While observing the bounce heights of various kinds of sports balls dropped from different heights onto a variety of surfaces, we thought of the following question: Could measurements of drop and bounce heights of balls of different diameters, but of the same material, falling from different heights, but on the same surface, be expressed by a simple mathematical formula? Our objective was to provide a simple classroom ball-drop experiment that produced robust and interesting data sets from which students could address this question. With a suitable choice of variables, all the ball drop data could be collapsed to a single curve, so that given the mass and drop height of the ball, the bounce height could be reasonably estimated (±10% of measured values).

  11. Dropping the Ball on Dropouts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has measured various types of high school graduation, completion, and dropout rates for decades. In 2006, NCES was directed by senior managers in the Education Department to reduce use of its standard graduation and completion rate measures and instead promote the…

  12. Microforce materials tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusaku

    2005-06-01

    A material tester for evaluating the mechanical response of general objects against micro-Newton level impact forces has been proposed. In the tester, an inertial mass is made to collide with the material under test. The impact force acting on the material is measured as the inertial force of the mass. A pneumatic linear bearing is used to realize linear motion with small friction acting on the mass that is the moving part of the bearing. The velocity of the mass is measured highly accurately by means of an optical interferometer. The acceleration, the inertial force, and the position of the mass is numerically calculated from the velocity after the collision measurement. The other force, which is mainly consisted of the friction acting inside the bearing, is determined using the same instrumentations. Using the estimated friction inside the bearing, the measured force is corrected. The force acting on the mass from the material under test of approximately 0.1 mN is measured with the standard uncertainty of approximately 1.4μN.

  13. Single wheel testers, single track testers, and instrumented tractors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Single wheel testers and single track testers are used for determining tractive performance characteristics of tires and tracks. Instrumented tractors are useful in determining the tractive performance of tractors. These machines are also used for determining soil-tire and soil-track interactions,...

  14. Rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5900 balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5900 12.7-mm (1/2-in.) dia was determined in five-ball fatigue testers. The 10% life with the warm headed AMS 5900 balls was equivalent to that of AMS 5749 and over eight times that of AISI M-50. The AMS balls fabricated by cold heading had small surface cracks which initiated fatigue spalls where these cracks were crossed by running tracks. The cold-headed AMS 5900 balls had a 10% fatigue life an order of magnitude less than that of the warm headed balls even when failures on the cold headed balls at visible surface cracks were omitted.

  15. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  16. Spring performance tester for miniature extension springs

    DOEpatents

    Salzbrenner, Bradley; Boyce, Brad

    2017-05-16

    A spring performance tester and method of testing a spring are disclosed that has improved accuracy and precision over prior art spring testers. The tester can perform static and cyclic testing. The spring tester can provide validation for product acceptance as well as test for cyclic degradation of springs, such as the change in the spring rate and fatigue failure.

  17. The Bouncing Ball DOES Come To Rest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Worth J.

    1970-01-01

    Considers a ball which is dropped from a height h above a flat surface and rebounds to a height rh, when r is a positive fraction less than one. The question asked is if the ball continues to fall and rebound in the same manner, how much time is required for the ball to come to rest? (RP)

  18. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  19. Design review of fluid film bearing testers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharrer, Joseph K.

    1993-01-01

    The designs of three existing testers (Hybrid Bearing Tester, OTV Bearing Tester, and Long Life Bearing Tester) owned by NASA were reviewed for their capability to serve as a multi-purpose cryogenic fluid film bearing tester. The primary tester function is the validation of analytical predictions for fluid film bearing steady state and dynamic performance. Evaluation criteria were established for test bearing configurations, test fluids, instrumentation, and test objectives. Each tester was evaluated with respect to these criteria. A determination was made of design improvements which would allow the testers to meet the stated criteria. The cost and time required to make the design changes were estimated. A recommendation based on the results of this study was made to proceed with the Hybrid Bearing Tester.

  20. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  1. Non-Intrusive Cable Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Simpson, Howard J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A cable tester is described for low frequency testing of a cable for faults. The tester allows for testing a cable beyond a point where a signal conditioner is installed, minimizing the number of connections which have to be disconnected. A magnetic pickup coil is described for detecting a test signal injected into the cable. A narrow bandpass filter is described for increasing detection of the test signal. The bandpass filter reduces noise so that a high gain amplifier provided for detecting a test signal is not completely saturate by noise. To further increase the accuracy of the cable tester, processing gain is achieved by comparing the signal from the amplifier with at least one reference signal emulating the low frequency input signal injected into the cable. Different processing techniques are described evaluating a detected signal.

  2. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  3. Spring-Blade Impact Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Alan M.; Champagne, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Record of energy relationships retrieved from compact, portable tester. Spring-blade impact tester developed to support evaluation of tolerance to damage of struts under consideration for use in Space Station. Approach offers potential for determining damage as function of change in relationship between applied and absorbed energies as applied energy successively increased with each impact. Impactor strikes specimen at moment of maximum kinetic energy after spring blades released from cocked position. Concept also provides potential for measuring behavior during impact, and energy relationships retrievable from oscilloscope traces of impact.

  4. What Do Battery Testers Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities to determine whether it is better to test dry cells with an ammeter than with a voltmeter and how best to test alkaline batteries. Discusses classification of disposable testers as instruments. Concludes that a laboratory voltmeter gives a good indication of the condition of an alkaline cell while carbon batteries are best…

  5. What Do Battery Testers Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities to determine whether it is better to test dry cells with an ammeter than with a voltmeter and how best to test alkaline batteries. Discusses classification of disposable testers as instruments. Concludes that a laboratory voltmeter gives a good indication of the condition of an alkaline cell while carbon batteries are best…

  6. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  7. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, four companies including H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay, Old Hickory Clay and Unimin mined ball clay in four states. Based on a preliminary survey of the ball clay industry, production reached 1.32 Mt valued at $53.3 million. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producer state with 61% of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky.

  8. 21 CFR 870.5325 - Defibrillator tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Defibrillator tester. 870.5325 Section 870.5325...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5325 Defibrillator tester. (a) Identification. A defibrillator tester is a device that is connected to the output of a...

  9. 21 CFR 870.5325 - Defibrillator tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Defibrillator tester. 870.5325 Section 870.5325...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5325 Defibrillator tester. (a) Identification. A defibrillator tester is a device that is connected to the output of a...

  10. 21 CFR 870.5325 - Defibrillator tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Defibrillator tester. 870.5325 Section 870.5325...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5325 Defibrillator tester. (a) Identification. A defibrillator tester is a device that is connected to the output of a...

  11. 21 CFR 870.5325 - Defibrillator tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Defibrillator tester. 870.5325 Section 870.5325...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5325 Defibrillator tester. (a) Identification. A defibrillator tester is a device that is connected to the output of a...

  12. 24 CFR 125.107 - Testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testers. 125.107 Section 125.107... INITIATIVES PROGRAM § 125.107 Testers. The following requirements apply to testing activities funded under the FHIP: (a) Testers must not have prior felony convictions or convictions of crimes involving fraud or...

  13. 21 CFR 870.5325 - Defibrillator tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Defibrillator tester. 870.5325 Section 870.5325...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Therapeutic Devices § 870.5325 Defibrillator tester. (a) Identification. A defibrillator tester is a device that is connected to the output of a...

  14. 21 CFR 872.1720 - Pulp tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pulp tester. 872.1720 Section 872.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1720 Pulp tester. (a) Identification. A pulp tester is an AC or...

  15. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The state of the ball clay industry in 1999 is presented. Record highs in the sales and use of ball clay were attained in 1999 due to the continued strength of the U.S. economy. U.S. production was estimated at 1.25 million st for the year, with more than half of that amount mined in Tennessee. Details of the consumption, price, imports, and exports of ball clay in 1999 and the outlook for ball clay over the next few years are provided.

  16. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  17. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  18. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  19. Ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhoff, Mark

    Ball lightning is alleged by some to be a rare atmospheric phenomenon usually associated with thunderstorms, while others hold that it does not exist. This controversy has continued for centuries. This study comprises a critical evaluation of evidence for the existence of ball lightning. An historical review of the controversy is first presented, giving a chronological account of developments in ball lightning theories and of important observations alleged to be of the phenomenon. Other phenomena which might be mistaken for ball lightning are then subjected to a more detailed study than has hitherto been published, and the means by which such misidentifications could be recognized areestablished. A discussion of psychological and perceptual aspects indicates that descriptions could not always be taken at face value, and that many accounts of alleged ball lightning would be expected to contain substantial inaccuracies. The original intention to evaluate cases of alleged ball lightning already published in scientific journals was abandoned because there was no standardisation of information content, and because the majority of reports contained insufficient information for evaluation. Many reports had been written in a style which indicated an assumption that ball lightning was the cause of the event. Approximately 200 unpublished reports were therefore collected and subjected to evaluation. It was found that the majority of reports of alleged ball lightning could be explained by other means, and there was only a very small residue of reports which could not easily be thus explained. A large proportion of the reports could be attributed to corona discharge effects such as St Elmo's fire, or by familiar effects of conventional linear lightning. The validity of many previously published statistical studies of ball lightning was shown to be doubtful. The thesis concludes with a comparitive discussion of the merits and demerits of some of the diverse physical models

  20. Instrumented Pneumatic-Impact Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, Richard M.; Armendariz, Norman

    1993-01-01

    Pneumatic-impact tester is small pressure chamber equipped with specimen holder and optical port. Device designed to test susceptibility of polymeric material to ignition by "pneumatic impact" in high-pressure gaseous oxygen. Used to determine differences among susceptibilities to ignition of different materials and of different batches of nominally same material proposed for use in systems containing pressurized oxygen. Also used to show characteristics of ignition and combustion.

  1. Instrumented Pneumatic-Impact Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, Richard M.; Armendariz, Norman

    1993-01-01

    Pneumatic-impact tester is small pressure chamber equipped with specimen holder and optical port. Device designed to test susceptibility of polymeric material to ignition by "pneumatic impact" in high-pressure gaseous oxygen. Used to determine differences among susceptibilities to ignition of different materials and of different batches of nominally same material proposed for use in systems containing pressurized oxygen. Also used to show characteristics of ignition and combustion.

  2. A simply constructed but efficacious shock tester for high-g level shock simulation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhengyong; Zhao, Yulong; Liang, Jing

    2012-07-01

    A simply constructed shock tester, different from existing drop table machines, is developed for high-g level shock environment simulation. The theoretical model, structure design, and working principle of the drop tester are described. A prototype device is set up, where a carbon fiber reinforced polymer with a high specific modulus is used. Using a Brüel & Kjær high-g accelerometer, experiments to verify the validity of the design are carried out and results are given. The maximum acceleration level is in excess of 60,000 g, limited only by the manual driving force.

  3. In-Place Filter Tester Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Austin D; Moore, Murray E; Runnels, Joel T; Reeves, Kirk

    2016-05-01

    A portable instrument was developed to determine filter clogging and container leakage of in-place nuclear material storage canisters. This paper describes the development of an in-place filter tester for determining the "as found" condition of unopened canisters. The U.S. Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for nuclear material storage, and air filters in the canister lids allow gases to escape while maintaining an equilibrated pressure without release of radioactive contamination. Diagnosing the filter condition and canister integrity is important for ensuring worker and public safety. Customized canister interfaces were developed for suction clamping (during tests) to two of the canister types in use at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Experimental leakage scenarios included: O-rings fouled with dust, cracked O-rings, and loose canister lids. The prototype tester has a measurement range for air leakage rates from 8.2 × 10 mL s up to 3.0 × 10 mL s. This is sufficient to measure a leak rate of 3.4 × 10 mL s, which is the Los Alamos helium leak criterion for post-drop tested canisters. The In-Place-Filter-Tester cannot measure to the lower value of the helium leak criterion for pre-drop tested canisters (1.0 × 10 mL s). However, helium leak testing requires canister disassembly, while the new in-place filter tester is able to assess the assembled condition of as-found and in-situ canisters.

  4. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, David K.; McKoon, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  5. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, D.K.; McKoon, R.H.

    1993-03-23

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  6. Golf Ball

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Ultra 500 Series golf balls, introduced in 1995 by Wilson Sporting Goods Company, has 500 dimples arranged in a pattern of 60 spherical triangles. The design employs NASA's aerodynamics technology analysis of air loads of the tank and Shuttle orbiter that was performed under the Space Shuttle External Tank program. According to Wilson, this technology provides 'the most symmetrical ball surface available, sustaining initial velocity longer and producing the most stable ball flight for unmatched accuracy and distance.' The dimples are in three sizes, shapes and depths mathematically positioned for the best effect. The selection of dimples and their placement optimizes the interaction of opposing forces of lift and drag. Large dimples reduce air drag, enhance lift, and maintain spin for distance. Small dimples prevent excessive lift that destabilizes the ball flight and the medium size dimples blend the other two.

  7. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  8. NEW APPROACHES: The way balls bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, N. James

    1998-05-01

    The bounce of a ball is a good topic for investigation at either GCSE or A-level. At King's School Canterbury pupils have experimented with both squash balls and inflatable play balls, varying the drop height, pressure and temperature and measuring the effect on bounce height, contact area and contact time. Worthwhile predictions can be made from quite simple theory and the experimental results provide ample opportunities for discussion and evaluation.

  9. Enhanced Master Controller Unit Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Patricia; Johnson, Yvette; Johnson, Brian; Williams, Philip; Burton, Geoffrey; McCoy, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The Enhanced Master Controller Unit Tester (EMUT) software is a tool for development and testing of software for a master controller (MC) flight computer. The primary function of the EMUT software is to simulate interfaces between the MC computer and external analog and digital circuitry (including other computers) in a rack of equipment to be used in scientific experiments. The simulations span the range of nominal, off-nominal, and erroneous operational conditions, enabling the testing of MC software before all the equipment becomes available.

  10. Hispanic Adolescent Pregnancy Testers: A Comparative Analysis of Negative Testers, Childbearers and Aborters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, David K.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Assessed differences between 20 negative and 36 positive pregnancy testers and evaluated pregnancy resolution decision-making process of positive testers. Subjects were Hispanic adolescents requesting pregnancy determination at outpatient clinic. Results indicated that negative and positive testers were similar, although positives were older and…

  11. Evaluation of bearing configurations using the single bearing tester in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, T.; Hall, P.; Thom, R.

    1991-01-01

    Various bearing configurations were tested using the Marshall Space Flight Center single bearing tester with LN2 as the cryogenic coolant. The baseline was one Rocketdyne phase one high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) pump end 45-mm bore bearing. The bearing configurations that were tested included a Salox/M cage configuration, a silicon nitride ball configuration, an elongated cage configuration, and a Bray 601 grease configuration.

  12. Adjustable, Audible Continuity Tester For Delicate Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, William B.

    1988-01-01

    Unit adjustable to resistances up to 35 ohms. Adjustable, audible electrical-continuity tester gives audible indication. Used safely on circuit boards in which semiconductor components installed, and on complementary metal oxide/semiconductor integrated circuits. Tester compact and circuit simple. Built from inexpensive standard components.

  13. The coefficient of restitution for collisions of happy balls, unhappy balls, and tennis balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2000-11-01

    A perfectly happy ball is one that bounces to its original height when dropped on a massive, rigid surface. A completely unhappy ball does not bounce at all. In the former case, the coefficient of restitution (COR) is unity. In the latter case, the COR is zero. It is shown that when an unhappy ball collides with a happy ball, the COR increases from zero to unity as the stiffness of the happy ball decreases from infinity to zero. The COR is independent of the mass of each ball. The implication of reducing the COR of a tennis ball, as a possible means of slowing the serve in tennis, is also considered. It is shown that (a) the COR for a collision with a racket varies with the impact point and is a maximum at the vibration node near the center of the strings, and (b) the serve speed is reduced by only about 20% if the COR for a bounce on the court is reduced to zero.

  14. Environmental tester development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tressler, R.E.

    1998-08-01

    The primary objective is to further develop the environmental tensometer toward commercialization by making key technical refinements, improving the controlling and data-logging software, and testing the system in a potential customer`s laboratory. Progress has been made in Tasks 1 (completed), Task 2 (one half completed), Task 4 (one half completed) of the original work plan. In this report a detailed description of the work completed on the second prototype is explained in detail. A second prototype of the Environmental Tester, a device capable of tensile tests of fibers in controlled environments and at high temperatures, has been designed and is currently being fabricated. The first prototype includes six integrated systems; the testing system, the furnace system, the vacuum system, the mass flow control system, and the computer data acquisition and control (CDAC) system.

  15. Science of Ball Lightning (Fire Ball)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, Yoshi-Hiko

    1989-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Organizing Committee * Preface * Ball Lightning -- The Continuing Challenge * Hungarian Ball Lightning Observations in 1987 * Nature of Ball Lightning in Japan * Phenomenological and Psychological Analysis of 150 Austrian Ball Lightning Reports * Physical Problems and Physical Properties of Ball Lightning * Statistical Analysis of the Ball Lightning Properties * A Fluid-Dynamical Model for Ball Lightning and Bead Lightning * The Lifetime of Hill's Vortex * Electrical and Radiative Properties of Ball Lightning * The Candle Flame as a Model of Ball Lightning * A Model for Ball Lightning * The High-Temperature Physico-Chemical Processes in the Lightning Storm Atmosphere (A Physico-Chemical Model of Ball Lightning) * New Approach to Ball Lightning * A Calculation of Electric Field of Ball Lightning * The Physical Explanation to the UFO over Xinjiang, Northern West China * Electric Reconnection, Critical Ionization Velocity, Ponderomotive Force, and Their Applications to Triggered and Ball Lightning * The PLASMAK™ Configuration and Ball Lightning * Experimental Research on Ball Lightning * Performance of High-Voltage Test Facility Designed for Investigation of Ball Lightning * List of Participants

  16. Determination of Contact Time of Rubber Balls Using a Digital Oscilloscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    We present a new method for determining the contact time of a rubber ball with the rebounding surface by using a sound-detecting electronic circuit and a digital storage oscilloscope. The rubber ball (a tennis ball or squash ball) is dropped from a known height onto a rigid surface and its contact time on first bounce is determined on the…

  17. Determination of Contact Time of Rubber Balls Using a Digital Oscilloscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    We present a new method for determining the contact time of a rubber ball with the rebounding surface by using a sound-detecting electronic circuit and a digital storage oscilloscope. The rubber ball (a tennis ball or squash ball) is dropped from a known height onto a rigid surface and its contact time on first bounce is determined on the…

  18. Precise timing when hitting falling balls.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball.

  19. Precise timing when hitting falling balls

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  20. Dynamic Hardness Tester and Cure Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madigosky, Walter M.; Fiorito, Ralph B.

    1993-01-01

    The Shore hardness tester is used extensively throughout industry to determine the static modulus of materials. The new apparatus described here extends the capability of an indentor-type tester into the dynamic regime, and provides a measurement of the dynamic shear or Young's modulus and loss factor as a function of frequency. The instrument, model and data of typical rubber samples are given and compared to other dynamic measurements.

  1. Measuring the rebound resilience of a bouncing ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2012-09-01

    Some balls which are made of high-quality rubber (an elastomeric) material, such as tennis or squash balls, could be used for the determination of an important property of such materials called resilience. Since a bouncing ball involves a single impact we call this property 'rebound resilience' and express it as the ratio of the rebound height to the initial drop height of the ball. We determine the rebound resilience for three different types of ball by calculating the coefficient of restitution of the ball-surface combination from the experimentally measurable physical quantities, such as initial drop height and time interval between successive bounces. Using these we also determine the contact time of balls with the surface of impact. For measurements we have used audio, motion and surface-temperature sensors that were interfaced through a USB port with a computer.

  2. Four ball best ball 1.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Geoff; Pollard, Graham

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a four-ball-best-ball (4BBB) model for pairs of golf players is set up. The 4BBB match-play scoring system is seen to satisfy a basic requirement of fairness. It is shown that it is not strictly possible to rate individual players as 4BBB players. However, a (reasonably broad) class of individual players is identified such that it is possible to rate them individually as 4BBB players. The capacity of an individual to play birdies is seen to be a very important determinant in being a successful member of a 4BBB pair, but there are other minor factors as well. Consideration is given to equal and unequal 4BBB pairs. The transitive law is seen to apply for 4BBB pairs. Thus, if pair A is better than pair B, and pair B is better than pair C, then pair A must be better than pair C. Correspondingly, if pair A is equal to pair B, and pair B is equal to pair C, then pair A is equal to pair C. Consideration is given to some strategic issues in 4BBB match-play golf. For example, the conditions under which a player should take a greater risk and have a higher probability of obtaining a bogie in order to achieve a higher probability of scoring a birdie, are determined. Also, the conditions under which a player, noting that his partner is about to have a 'bad' hole and score only a par or a bogie, should 'play safe', are determined. Thirdly, players who can interact in certain ways are seen to have an advantage over those pairs that cannot do this. Finally, one pair's optimal strategy when they see that their opponents are about to score a par or a bogie, but not a birdie, is analyzed. Key pointsA model for four-ball-best-ball match-play golf is established, and used to show that, although there can be other factors, the capacity of an individual to play birdies is a very important determinant in that player being a successful member of a four-ball-best-ball pair.Although it is not possible in general to rate play-ers individually as 4BBB players, a class of indi

  3. Defining Assessment Literacy: Is it Different for Language Testers and Non-Language Testers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Heejeong

    2013-01-01

    Language assessment courses (LACs) are taught by professionals who have majored in the area of language testing (language testers or LTs), but also by others who come from different language-related majors (non-language testers, non-LTs). Different language assessment courses may be developed, depending on who teaches the course and the…

  4. Ban Deodorant Ball Mortar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, D. Rae, Jr.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses a demonstration of vertical collision of two balls. Shows the theoretical height ratio using mathematical expression and diagrams. Compares it with researchers' experimental results. Expands the two-ball collision to multi-ball system. (YP)

  5. Effects of turbulence on the drag force on a golf ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are presented of the drag force on a golf ball dropped vertically into a tank of water. As observed previously in air, the drag coefficient drops sharply when the flow becomes turbulent. The experiment would be suitable for undergraduate students since it can be undertaken at low ball speeds and since the effects of turbulence are easily observed on video film. A modified golf ball was used to show how a ball with a smooth and a rough side, such as a cricket ball, is subject to a side force when the ball surface itself is asymmetrical in the transverse direction.

  6. Fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Hot-pressed silicon nitride was evaluated as a rolling-element bearing material. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to test 12.7-mm- diameter silicon nitride balls at maximum Hertz stresses ranging from 4.27 x 10 to the 9th power n/sq m to 6.21 x 10 to the 9th power n/sq m at a race temperature of 328K. The fatigue life of NC-132 hot-pressed silicon nitride was found to be equal to typical bearing steels and much greater than other ceramic or cermet materials at the same stress levels. A digital computer program was used to predict the fatigue life of 120-mm- bore angular-contact ball bearings containing either steel or silicon nitride balls. The analysis indicates that there is no improvement in the lives of bearings of the same geometry operating at DN values from 2 to 4 million where silicon nitride balls are used in place of steel balls.

  7. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  8. High-pressure oxygen impact tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raniere, F. D.; Hood, G. A.; Marker, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    To extend the compatibility evaluation of candidate materials in oxygen, a high-pressure oxygen impact tester has been designed, developed, and installed at NASA/MSFC, Huntsville, Alabama. The tester has an operating range from ambient to 69,000 newton/sq m (10,000 psig) pressures and from the normal boiling point of liquid oxygen to 394 K (121 C) temperatures. The tester was designed to deliver 97.63 joules (72 ft-lb) of impact energy; however, variable height and weight can be achieved for threshold analysis. The system is completely remote and highly automated to furnish safe, reliable operation. High-frequency, fast-response instrumentation capabilities are provided to ensure maximum information output with the hope of minimizing the number of tests required for material acceptance.

  9. (Quickly) Testing the Tester via Path Coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The configuration complexity and code size of an automated testing framework may grow to a point that the tester itself becomes a significant software artifact, prone to poor configuration and implementation errors. Unfortunately, testing the tester by using old versions of the software under test (SUT) may be impractical or impossible: test framework changes may have been motivated by interface changes in the tested system, or fault detection may become too expensive in terms of computing time to justify running until errors are detected on older versions of the software. We propose the use of path coverage measures as a "quick and dirty" method for detecting many faults in complex test frameworks. We also note the possibility of using techniques developed to diversify state-space searches in model checking to diversify test focus, and an associated classification of tester changes into focus-changing and non-focus-changing modifications.

  10. Armstrong Laboratory Space Visual Function Tester Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneal, Melvin R.; Task, H. Lee; Gleason, Gerald A.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on space visual function tester program are presented. Many astronauts and cosmonauts have commented on apparent changes in their vision while on-orbit. Comments have included descriptions of earth features and objects that would suggest enhanced distance visual acuity. In contrast, some cosmonaut observations suggest a slight loss in their object discrimination during initial space flight. Astronauts have also mentioned a decreased near vision capability that did not recover to normal until return to earth. Duntley space vision experiment, USSR space vision experiments, and visual function testers are described.

  11. Television automatic video-line tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhaoxiang; Tang, Dongsheng; Feng, Binghua

    1998-08-01

    The linearity of telescope video-line is an important character for geodetic instruments and micrometer- telescopes. The instrument of 1 inch video-line tester, invented by University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, has been adopted in related instrument criterion and national metering regulation. But in optical and chemical reading with visual alignment, it can cause subjective error and can not give detailed data and so on. In this paper, the author put forward an improvement for video-line tester by using CCD for TV camera, displaying and processing CCD signal through computer, and auto-testing, with advantage of objectivity, reliability, rapid speed and less focusing error.

  12. A formula for comparison of selected sport ball compressibility.

    PubMed

    Dowell, L J; Krebs, G

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a formula to determine and compare the compressibility of selected sport balls. Six balls (basketball, volleyball, soccer ball, baseball, handball, golf ball) were dropped ten times from each of four different heights onto a smooth solid surface overlaid with a white sheet of typing paper, overlaid with a sheet of carbon paper. The diameter of the area of contact of each ball imprinted onto the typing paper was measured in millimetres with calipers. From the data, the distance (d) that each ball compressed for each velocity (v) was calculated. It was found that a linear relationship existed between velocity at impact and the distance for each ball studied. The compressibility coefficient (c) for each ball was calculated and a formula was developed to determine the distance each ball would compress at a given velocity. When velocity is measured in metres per second and the distance a ball compresses is measured in millimetres, the formula to determine d for selected balls, in order of compressibility is: basketball d = 3.07v, volleyball d = 2.90v, soccer ball d = 2.80v, baseball d = 0.77v, handball d = 0.53v, and golf ball d = 0.17v.

  13. A formula for comparison of selected sport ball compressibility.

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, L J; Krebs, G

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a formula to determine and compare the compressibility of selected sport balls. Six balls (basketball, volleyball, soccer ball, baseball, handball, golf ball) were dropped ten times from each of four different heights onto a smooth solid surface overlaid with a white sheet of typing paper, overlaid with a sheet of carbon paper. The diameter of the area of contact of each ball imprinted onto the typing paper was measured in millimetres with calipers. From the data, the distance (d) that each ball compressed for each velocity (v) was calculated. It was found that a linear relationship existed between velocity at impact and the distance for each ball studied. The compressibility coefficient (c) for each ball was calculated and a formula was developed to determine the distance each ball would compress at a given velocity. When velocity is measured in metres per second and the distance a ball compresses is measured in millimetres, the formula to determine d for selected balls, in order of compressibility is: basketball d = 3.07v, volleyball d = 2.90v, soccer ball d = 2.80v, baseball d = 0.77v, handball d = 0.53v, and golf ball d = 0.17v. PMID:1913029

  14. Bouncing Balls that Spin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipp, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When a ball bounces elastically against a floor, the vertical component (v[subscript y]) of the velocity of the ball's mass-center changes sign. This is a special case of the elastic collision of two balls (i.e., two objects, neither of which is much more massive than the other), in which case the balls' post-collision relative velocity (=…

  15. Bouncing Balls that Spin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipp, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When a ball bounces elastically against a floor, the vertical component (v[subscript y]) of the velocity of the ball's mass-center changes sign. This is a special case of the elastic collision of two balls (i.e., two objects, neither of which is much more massive than the other), in which case the balls' post-collision relative velocity (=…

  16. 21 CFR 872.1720 - Pulp tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pulp tester. 872.1720 Section 872.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... battery powered device intended to evaluate the pulpal vitality of teeth by employing high frequency...

  17. 21 CFR 872.1720 - Pulp tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pulp tester. 872.1720 Section 872.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... battery powered device intended to evaluate the pulpal vitality of teeth by employing high frequency...

  18. 21 CFR 872.1720 - Pulp tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pulp tester. 872.1720 Section 872.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... battery powered device intended to evaluate the pulpal vitality of teeth by employing high frequency...

  19. 21 CFR 872.1720 - Pulp tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pulp tester. 872.1720 Section 872.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... battery powered device intended to evaluate the pulpal vitality of teeth by employing high frequency...

  20. Digital sequential solid-state relay tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. L.

    1981-11-01

    The design of the digital sequential solid-state relay tester is described. This equipment is used extensively in simplifying the testing and development of the computer-controlled, motor-driven valve array in the tritium waste treatment section at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  1. New reaction tester accurate within 56 microseconds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H.

    1972-01-01

    Testing device measures simple and disjunctive reaction time of human subject to light stimuli. Tester consists of reaction key, logic card, panel mounted neon indicators, and interconnecting wiring. Device is used for determining reaction times of patients undergoing postoperative neurological therapy.

  2. 21 CFR 882.1410 - Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. 882... Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester is a device used for testing the impedance (resistance to alternating current) of the electrode and lead...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720 Pacemaker electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720 Pacemaker electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3720 Pacemaker electrode function tester. (a) Identification. A pacemaker electrode function tester is a device which...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1410 - Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. 882... Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester is a device used for testing the impedance (resistance to alternating current) of the electrode and...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1410 - Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. 882... Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester is a device used for testing the impedance (resistance to alternating current) of the electrode and...

  8. 21 CFR 882.1410 - Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. 882... Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester is a device used for testing the impedance (resistance to alternating current) of the electrode and...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1410 - Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. 882... Electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph electrode/lead tester is a device used for testing the impedance (resistance to alternating current) of the electrode and...

  10. 7 CFR 801.4 - Tolerances for dockage testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... dockage testers used in performing official inspection services shall be: Item Tolerance Air separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Riddle separation... separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Total...

  11. 7 CFR 801.4 - Tolerances for dockage testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... dockage testers used in performing official inspection services shall be: Item Tolerance Air separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Riddle separation... separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Total...

  12. 7 CFR 801.4 - Tolerances for dockage testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dockage testers used in performing official inspection services shall be: Item Tolerance Air separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Riddle separation... separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Total...

  13. 7 CFR 801.4 - Tolerances for dockage testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dockage testers used in performing official inspection services shall be: Item Tolerance Air separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Riddle separation... separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Total...

  14. 7 CFR 801.4 - Tolerances for dockage testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... dockage testers used in performing official inspection services shall be: Item Tolerance Air separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Riddle separation... separation ±0.10 percent, mean deviation from standard dockage tester using Hard Red Winter wheat Total...

  15. 21 CFR 870.2370 - Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. 870.2370 Section 870.2370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph surface electrode tester is...

  16. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Auditory impedance tester. 874.1090 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in...

  17. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Auditory impedance tester. 874.1090 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in...

  18. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Auditory impedance tester. 874.1090 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in...

  19. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Auditory impedance tester. 874.1090 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in...

  20. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Auditory impedance tester. 874.1090 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in...

  1. 21 CFR 872.1730 - Electrode gel for pulp testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrode gel for pulp testers. 872.1730 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1730 Electrode gel for pulp testers. (a) Identification. An electrode gel for pulp testers is a device intended to be applied to the surface of a tooth...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2370 - Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. 870.2370 Section 870.2370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph surface electrode tester is a...

  3. 21 CFR 870.2370 - Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. 870.2370 Section 870.2370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph surface electrode tester is a...

  4. 21 CFR 870.2370 - Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. 870.2370 Section 870.2370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph surface electrode tester is a...

  5. 21 CFR 870.2370 - Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. 870.2370 Section 870.2370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electrocardiograph surface electrode tester. (a) Identification. An electrocardiograph surface electrode tester is a...

  6. A simplified ductile-brittle transition temperature tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1973-01-01

    The construction and operation of a versatile, simplified bend tester is described. The tester is usable at temperatures from - 192 to 650 C in air. Features of the tester include a single test chamber for cryogenic or elevated temperatures, specimen alining support rollers, and either manual or motorized operation.

  7. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  8. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  9. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  10. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  11. 21 CFR 886.1170 - Color vision tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Color vision tester. 886.1170 Section 886.1170...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1170 Color vision tester. (a) Identification. A color vision tester is a device that consists of various colored materials, such as colored yarns...

  12. Ball valve extractor

    DOEpatents

    Herndon, Charles; Brown, Roger A.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and process for removing a ball valve is provided. The ball valve removal tool provides a handle sliding along the length of a shaft. One end of the shaft is secured within an interior cavity of a ball valve while the opposite end of the shaft defines a stop member. By providing a manual sliding force to the handle, the handle impacts the stop member and transmits the force to the ball valve. The direction of the force is along the shaft of the removal tool and disengages the ball valve from the ball valve housing.

  13. Rolling Motion of a Ball Spinning about a Near-Vertical Axis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    A ball that is projected forward without spin on a horizontal surface will slide for a short distance before it starts rolling. Sliding friction acts to decrease the translation speed v and it acts to increase the rotation speed [omega]. When v = R[omega], where R is the ball radius, the ball will start rolling and the friction force drops almost…

  14. Rolling Motion of a Ball Spinning about a Near-Vertical Axis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    A ball that is projected forward without spin on a horizontal surface will slide for a short distance before it starts rolling. Sliding friction acts to decrease the translation speed v and it acts to increase the rotation speed [omega]. When v = R[omega], where R is the ball radius, the ball will start rolling and the friction force drops almost…

  15. Bearing tester data compilation analysis, and reporting and bearing math modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Integration of heat transfer coefficients, modified to account for local vapor quality, into the 45 mm bearing model has been completed. The model has been evaluated with two flow rates and subcooled and saturated coolant. The evaluation showed that by increasing the flow from 3.6 to 7.0 lbs/sec the average ball temperature was decreased by 102 F, using a coolant temperature of -230 F. The average ball temperature was decreased by 63 F by decreasing the inlet coolant temperature from saturated to -230 F at a flow rate of 7.0 lbs/sec. Since other factors such as friction, cage heating, etc., affect bearing temperatures, the above bearing temperature effects should be considered as trends and not absolute values. The two phase heat transfer modification has been installed in the 57 mm bearing model and the effects on bearing temperatures have been evaluated. The average ball temperature was decreased by 60 F by increasing the flow rate from 4.6 to 9.0 lbs/sec for the subcooled case. By decreasing the inlet coolant temperature from saturation to -24 F, the average ball temperature was decreased 57 F for a flow rate of 9.0 lbs/sec. The technique of relating the two phase heat transfer coefficient to local vapor quality will be applied to the tester model and compared with test data.

  16. A Tester for Carbon Nanotube Mode Lockers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a tester for laser pulsating operation of carbon nanotubes employing a circulator with the extra degree of freedom of the second port to access diversified nanotube samples. The nanotubes are deposited onto the end facet of a dummy optical fiber by spray method that guarantees simple sample loading along with the minimized perturbation of optimized laser cavity condition. Resultant optical spectra, autocorrelation traces and pulse train of the laser outputs with qualified samples are presented.

  17. Dynamic Tester For Rotor Seals And Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1991-01-01

    Simplified apparatus measures performance under vibration. Measures some of dynamic parameters of rotor seals and bearings. Tests damping seals, damping bearings, conventional seals, and conventional bearings. Used with variety of pumped liquids, from water to liquid oxygen or hydrogen. Designed to test bearings and seals of turbopumps, tester rotates shaft at high speed while liquid flows much as it would in real turbopump. Also measures deflections of components.

  18. Dynamic Tester For Rotor Seals And Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1991-01-01

    Simplified apparatus measures performance under vibration. Measures some of dynamic parameters of rotor seals and bearings. Tests damping seals, damping bearings, conventional seals, and conventional bearings. Used with variety of pumped liquids, from water to liquid oxygen or hydrogen. Designed to test bearings and seals of turbopumps, tester rotates shaft at high speed while liquid flows much as it would in real turbopump. Also measures deflections of components.

  19. Having a Ball with Fitness Balls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Fitness programs can be greatly enhanced with the addition of fitness balls. They are a fun, challenging, economical, and safe way to incorporate a cardiovascular, strength, and stretching program for all fitness levels in a physical education setting. The use of these balls has become more popular during the last decade, and their benefits and…

  20. Having a Ball with Fitness Balls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Fitness programs can be greatly enhanced with the addition of fitness balls. They are a fun, challenging, economical, and safe way to incorporate a cardiovascular, strength, and stretching program for all fitness levels in a physical education setting. The use of these balls has become more popular during the last decade, and their benefits and…

  1. The Goldenrod Ball Gall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Richard B.

    1974-01-01

    The paper presents a generalized life history of the goldenrod ball gall, a ball-shaped swelling found almost exclusively on the Canada goldenrod, Solidago canadensis, and caused by a peacock fly know as Eurosta soldiaginis. (KM)

  2. Fizz-Ball Fizzics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moinester, Murray; Gerland, Lars; Liger-Belair, Gerard; Ocherashvili, Aharon

    2012-01-01

    We describe the fluid dynamics principles governing the up-down oscillatory cycling of a bubble-covered, low-density, low-mass ball of material (referred to henceforth as a "fizz-ball") immersed inside a glass of bubbling (super-saturated) carbonated liquid. The bubbles serve to desaturate the liquid of excess CO[subscript 2]. The fizz-ball acts…

  3. Fizz-Ball Fizzics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moinester, Murray; Gerland, Lars; Liger-Belair, Gerard; Ocherashvili, Aharon

    2012-01-01

    We describe the fluid dynamics principles governing the up-down oscillatory cycling of a bubble-covered, low-density, low-mass ball of material (referred to henceforth as a "fizz-ball") immersed inside a glass of bubbling (super-saturated) carbonated liquid. The bubbles serve to desaturate the liquid of excess CO[subscript 2]. The fizz-ball acts…

  4. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  5. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  6. Determination of contact time of rubber balls using a digital oscilloscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Ajay

    2010-11-01

    We present a new method for determining the contact time of a rubber ball with the rebounding surface by using a sound-detecting electronic circuit and a digital storage oscilloscope. The rubber ball (a tennis ball or squash ball) is dropped from a known height onto a rigid surface and its contact time on first bounce is determined on the oscilloscope. Using the known value of the coefficient of restitution (COR) of the ball-surface combination, we also determine the value of air pressure inside the ball.

  7. Development of a second generation rolling contact fatigue tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Satyam U.

    Contact fatigue failure has been in research since the early twentieth century. The need for a second generation sliding-rolling contact fatigue tester was proposed by Gregory Dvorak and Dr. Marcellin Zahui. The first generation RCF tester was used for testing super finishing processes for gear surfaces. The second generation RCF tester was funded by the Advanced Engineering Materials lab of University of North Dakota. Verification of the second generation Rolling Contact Fatigue Tester will be discussed in this thesis including the design details, assembly and testing procedure and to discuss its different parameters. The tester will have the capability of testing hollow specimens using a bobbin eddy current testing probe. This tester will allow a wide range of experiments and is not built for one specific purpose. An eddy current device is used for detecting cracks. The loading force is applied using hydraulic cylinders and a hydraulic power unit. Before testing began, the machine was run for some time at full speed. A lot of minor problems were detected and fixed. Three specimens of AISI 8620 were tested in this tester. All tests gave results matching with some of the other well-known RCF testers. These tests were performed to evaluate mechanical limits of the tester and to evaluate the software performance of the tester.

  8. Balls on the Lawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallows, Colin L.; Shapiro, Lou

    1999-03-01

    In the "tennis ball" problem we are given successive pairs of balls numbered (1,2), (3,4),... At each stage we throw one ball out of the window. After n stages some set of n balls is on the lawn. We find a generating function and a closed formula for the sequence 3, 23, 131, 664, 3166, 14545, 65187, 287060, 1247690,..., the n-th term of which gives the sum over all possible arrangements of the total of the numbers on the balls on the lawn. The problem has connections with "bicolored Motzkin paths" and the ballot problem.

  9. Perceptual elements in Penn & Teller's "Cups and Balls" magic trick.

    PubMed

    Rieiro, Hector; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Macknik, Stephen L

    2013-01-01

    Magic illusions provide the perceptual and cognitive scientist with a toolbox of experimental manipulations and testable hypotheses about the building blocks of conscious experience. Here we studied several sleight-of-hand manipulations in the performance of the classic "Cups and Balls" magic trick (where balls appear and disappear inside upside-down opaque cups). We examined a version inspired by the entertainment duo Penn & Teller, conducted with three opaque and subsequently with three transparent cups. Magician Teller used his right hand to load (i.e. introduce surreptitiously) a small ball inside each of two upside-down cups, one at a time, while using his left hand to remove a different ball from the upside-down bottom of the cup. The sleight at the third cup involved one of six manipulations: (a) standard maneuver, (b) standard maneuver without a third ball, (c) ball placed on the table, (d) ball lifted, (e) ball dropped to the floor, and (f) ball stuck to the cup. Seven subjects watched the videos of the performances while reporting, via button press, whenever balls were removed from the cups/table (button "1") or placed inside the cups/on the table (button "2"). Subjects' perception was more accurate with transparent than with opaque cups. Perceptual performance was worse for the conditions where the ball was placed on the table, or stuck to the cup, than for the standard maneuver. The condition in which the ball was lifted displaced the subjects' gaze position the most, whereas the condition in which there was no ball caused the smallest gaze displacement. Training improved the subjects' perceptual performance. Occlusion of the magician's face did not affect the subjects' perception, suggesting that gaze misdirection does not play a strong role in the Cups and Balls illusion. Our results have implications for how to optimize the performance of this classic magic trick, and for the types of hand and object motion that maximize magic misdirection.

  10. Small-Bolt Torque-Tension Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posey, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    The device described here measures the torque-tension relationship for fasteners as small as #0. The small-bolt tester consists of a plate of high-strength steel into which three miniature load cells are recessed. The depth of the recess is sized so that the three load cells can be shimmed, the optimum height depending upon the test hardware. The three miniature load cells are arranged in an equilateral triangular configuration with the test bolt aligned with the centroid of the three. This is a kinematic arrangement.

  11. Rotordynamic analysis of a bearing tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalik, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of the solutions of a system of four coupled nonlinear differential equations that model the behavior of the rotating shaft of a bearing tester are studied. In particular, it is shown how the bounds for the rotations of these equations can be obtained from bounds for the solutions of the linearized equations. By studying the behavior of the Fourier transforms of the solution, the approach to the stability boundary can also be predicted. These conclusions are verified by means of numerical solutions of the equations, and of power spectrum density (PSD) plots.

  12. Portable computerized tester improves flight-line maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Y.

    1985-11-01

    The present general purpose and portable Computerized Organizational Level Tester (COLT) for the flight-line maintenance of advanced weapons systems is in effect a fully functioning replica of contemporary automated test equipment architectures previously available only in laboratory test installations. The COLT's automated equipment architecture has been scaled down to a ruggedized, portable, suitcase-sized field tester for both analog and digital equipment. Tester software is designed to minimize programming effort, and possesses a real time executive kernel which transparently interfaces high level user commands with tester hardware. Automatic software-generation tools are incorporated.

  13. Performance of 75-millimeter-bore bearings using electron-beam-welded hollow balls with a diameter ratio of 1.26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Parker, R. J.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the rolling element fatigue life of electron beam-welded hollow balls with a diameter ratio (o.d./i.d.) of 1.26 and to determine the operating characteristics of bearings using these hollow balls. Similar bearings with solid balls were also tested and the data compared. The bearings were operated at shaft speeds up to 28,000 rpm with a thrust load of 2200 N (500 lb). Ball failures during the bearing tests were due to flexure fatigue. The solid and hollow ball bearings tested showed little difference in outer race temperatures and indicated the same bearing torque. The 17.5-mm (0.6875-in.) diameter balls were also tested in the five-ball fatigue tester and showed no significant difference in life when compared with the life of a solid ball.

  14. Stemless ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Kevin (Inventor); Yakos, David (Inventor); Walthall, Bryan (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A stemless ball valve comprising: a right flange; left flange; ball with an axis pin and two travel pins; ball seal on either side of the ball; guide sleeve with inner walls comprising two channels; cartridge guide holder; inner magnetic cartridge; and outer magnetic cartridge. The ball is situated inside of the guide sleeve, and a travel pin is located in each of the two channels. The guide sleeve is situated inside of the cartridge guide holder, which is located adjacent to and outside of the inner magnetic cartridge and secured to the inner magnetic cartridge such that when the inner magnetic cartridge rotates, the cartridge guide holder also rotates. The cartridge guide holder is secured to the guide sleeve such that when the cartridge guide holder rotates, the travel pins move within the channels in the inner walls of the guide sleeve, thereby causing the ball to rotate.

  15. Intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of chest expansion measurement in clients with ankylosing spondylitis and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jagannath; Senjyu, Hideaki; Williams, Linda; White, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of chest expansion (CE) using a tape measure, in people with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and healthy subjects. Twenty-two subjects with AS with a mean age of 41.4 years and 25 healthy subjects with a mean age of 41.0 years were tested in two arm positions: hands on head and arms at the sides, the tape measure being placed at the level of xiphisternum. There were three testers for subjects with AS and two testers for healthy subjects. Three trials in both arm positions were recorded by each tester on two separate occasions which were 10 minutes apart. Results showed intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for intra-tester reliability good (0.85 to 0.97) across the occasions. Intraclass correlation coefficients for inter-tester reliability were also very good (0.93 to 0.97). As reliability is good it is suggested that CE can be used for monitoring disease progression and efficacy of intervention with confidence within tester and between testers.

  16. The bounce of a ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of a bouncing ball is described for several common ball types having different bounce characteristics. Results are presented for a tennis ball, a baseball, a golf ball, a superball, a steel ball bearing, a plasticene ball, and a silly putty ball. The plasticene ball was studied as an extreme case of a ball with a low coefficient of restitution (in fact zero, since the collision is totally inelastic) and the silly putty ball was studied because it has unusual elastic properties. The first three balls were studied because of their significance in the physics of sports. For each ball, a dynamic hysteresis curve is presented to show how energy is lost during and after the collision. The measurement technique is quite simple, it is suited for undergraduate laboratory experiments, and it may provide a useful method to test and approve balls for major sporting events.

  17. Ball Bearing Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Load-deflection relationships for different types of elliptical contacts such as those found in a ball bearing are developed. Simplified expressions that allow quick calculations of deformation to be made simply from a knowledge of the applied load, the material properties, and the geometry of the contacting elements are presented. Ball bearings subjected to radial, thrust and combined ball loads are analyzed. A design criterion for fatigue life of ball bearings is developed. The section of a satisfactory lubricant, as well as describing systems that provide a constant flow of lubricant to the contact, is considered.

  18. Birth of ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, J. J.; Smith, D.; Nelson, K. E.; Crompton, R. W.; Murphy, A. B.

    2012-10-01

    Many observations of ball lightning report a ball of light, about 10 cm in diameter, moving at about walking speed, lasting up to 20 s and frequently existing inside of houses and even aeroplanes. The present paper reports detailed observations of the initiation or birth of ball lightning. In two cases, navigation crew of aircraft saw ball lightning form at the windscreen inside the cockpit of their planes. In the first case, the ball lightning occurred during a thunderstorm, with much lightning activity outside of the plane. In the second case, large "horns" of electrical corona were seen outside of the plane at the surface of the radome, just prior to the formation of the ball lightning. A third case reports ball lightning formed inside of a house, during a thunderstorm, at a closed glass window. It is proposed, based on two-dimensional calculations of electron and ion transport, that ball lightning in these cases is driven and formed by atmospheric ions impinging and collecting on the insulating surface of the glass or Perspex windows. This surface charge can produce electric fields inside of the cockpit or room sufficient to sustain an electric discharge. Charges of opposite sign to those outside of the window accumulate on the inside surface of the glass, leaving a ball of net charge moving inside of the cockpit or room to produce a pulsed discharge on a microsecond time scale.

  19. Quartz ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, C.; Ingle, W. M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A ball valve particularly suited for use in the handling of highly corrosive fluids is described. It is characterized by a valve housing formed of communicating segments of quartz tubing, a pair of communicating sockets disposed in coaxial alignment with selected segments of tubing for establishing a pair of inlet ports communicating with a common outlet port, a ball formed of quartz material supported for displacement between the sockets and configured to be received alternately thereby, and a valve actuator including a rod attached to the ball for selectively displacing the ball relative to each of the sockets for controlling fluid flow through the inlet ports.

  20. Physics of ball sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C.; Clanet, C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball sports have been part of human history for thousands of years [1]. Nowadays, 13 of them are part of the Olympic games (badminton, basketball, beach volley, football/soccer, golf, handball, hockey, rugby, table tennis, tennis, volleyball, water polo, ice hockey). All these games differ by launcher (hand, club, racket, bat), ball (size, shape and mass), pitch size and number of players. These differences induce different ball velocities. Apart from the velocities and the way to maximize them, we discuss in this article the ball trajectories and their impact on the size of sports fields.

  1. Drop deployment system for crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A crystal growth apparatus is presented. It utilizes a vapor diffusion method for growing protein crystals, and particularly such an apparatus wherein a ball mixer is used to mix the fluids that form a drop within which crystals are grown. Particular novelty of this invention lies in utilizing a ball mixer to completely mix the precipitate and protein solutions prior to forming the drop. Additional novelty lies in details of construction of the vials, the fluid deployment system, and the fluid storage system of the preferred embodiment.

  2. Drop dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The drop dynamics module is a Spacelab-compatible acoustic positioning and control system for conducting drop dynamics experiments in space. It consists basically of a chamber, a drop injector system, an acoustic positioning system, and a data collection system. The principal means of collecting data is by a cinegraphic camera. The drop is positioned in the center of the chamber by forces created by standing acoustic waves generated in the nearly cubical chamber (about 12 cm on a side). The drop can be spun or oscillated up to fission by varying the phse and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The system is designed to perform its experiments unattended, except for start-up and shutdown events and other unique events that require the attention of the Spacelab payload specialist.

  3. 21 CFR 872.1730 - Electrode gel for pulp testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrode gel for pulp testers. 872.1730 Section 872.1730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...) Identification. An electrode gel for pulp testers is a device intended to be applied to the surface of a...

  4. 21 CFR 872.1730 - Electrode gel for pulp testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrode gel for pulp testers. 872.1730 Section 872.1730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...) Identification. An electrode gel for pulp testers is a device intended to be applied to the surface of a...

  5. 21 CFR 872.1730 - Electrode gel for pulp testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrode gel for pulp testers. 872.1730 Section 872.1730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...) Identification. An electrode gel for pulp testers is a device intended to be applied to the surface of a...

  6. 21 CFR 872.1730 - Electrode gel for pulp testers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrode gel for pulp testers. 872.1730 Section 872.1730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...) Identification. An electrode gel for pulp testers is a device intended to be applied to the surface of a...

  7. Operating manual for the miniservo-control tester

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rapp, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    Ever since the implementation of servo-control units (regular and minimodels) with manometers at U. S. Geological Survey streamflow stations, the need for an effective and efficient servo-control unit tester has been paramount among field personnel. In numerous cases, servo-control unit failures were blamed on battery failures and vice versa. There was no valid instrument to definitively identify cause of failure, let alone properly diagnose the servo-control/manometer system. In 1983, two servo-control unit testers were developed and fabricated. One was mechanical in fabrication, operation, and serviceability; the other was electronic. The testers were extensively used and evaluated in Maine, Ohio, Kansas, and Louisiana under a wide range of environmental conditions. The consensus to integrate the best aspects of both testers into one instrument allowed the Survey to finally solve its long-time need for an effective, efficient servo-control unit tester. (USGS)

  8. Sixty-four-Channel Inline Cable Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Faults in wiring are a serious concern for the aerospace and aeronautics (commercial, military, and civil) industries. A number of accidents have occurred because faulty wiring created shorts or opens that resulted in the loss of control of the aircraft or because arcing led to fires and explosions. Some of these accidents have resulted in the massive loss of lives (such as in the TWA Flight 800 accident). Circuits on the Space Shuttle have also failed because of faulty insulation on wiring. STS-93 lost power when a primary power circuit in one engine failed and a second engine had a backup power circuit fault. Cables are usually tested on the ground after the crew reports a fault encountered during flight. Often such failures result from vibration and cannot be replicated while the aircraft is stationary. It is therefore important to monitor faults while the aircraft is in operation, when cables are more likely to fail. Work is in progress to develop a cable fault tester capable of monitoring up to 64 individual wires simultaneously. Faults can be monitored either inline or offline. In the inline mode of operation, the monitoring is performed without disturbing the normal operation of the wires under test. That is, the operations are performed unintrusively and are essentially undetectable for the test signal levels are below the noise floor. A cable can be monitored several times per second in the offline mode and once a second in the inline mode. The 64-channel inline cable tester not only detects the occurrence of a fault, but also determines the type of fault (short/open) and the location of the fault. This will enable the detection of intermittent faults that can be repaired before they become serious problems.

  9. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  10. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  11. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  12. An investigation to examine the inter-tester and intra-tester reliability of the Rolimeter knee tester, and its sensitivity in identifying knee joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Julian; Hatcher, Alison; Arbuthnot, Jamie; McNicholas, Mike

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the Rolimeter knee tester (Aircast, Europe) as reliable and clinically sensitive tool for identifying and quantifying knee joint laxity utilising a sample of both known ACLD and normal knees. Thirty matched subjects (15 known ACLD and 15 normal subjects) were tested for knee joint laxity using the Rolimeter. Each subject was measured at both 90 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion, by each of the six investigators. This was then repeated again by all six investigators so that inter-tester and intra-tester reliability could be examined. Results showed that there was good reliability between testers, and intra-tester reliability was good for both left and right knees in both 90 degrees and 30 degrees of flexion. Results also demonstrated a high level of sensitivity for determining knee joint laxity in ACLD compared to normal knees. The Rolimeter knee tester is a reliable device for quantifying knee joint laxity, and is sensitive enough to identify anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

  13. On the acoustic signature of golf ball impact.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kevin; Axe, John D

    2002-08-01

    In this paper, we present results on the measurement and analysis of the sound that is produced by the sharp impact loading of a golf ball by a flat massive object (e.g. the face of a golf club). We discuss: (a) the motivation for such a study; (b) some necessary background information on how golf balls vibrate; (c) the techniques used to acquire and analyse the data; and (d) an analysis of the sound made by dropping balls on a smooth, massive concrete target surface. These results establish a simple method for rapid and non-destructive measurement of the effective high-frequency elastic shear moduli of balls and ball cores.

  14. Tunguska dark matter ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-04-01

    It is suggested that the Tunguska event in June 1908 was due to a cm-large ball of a condensate of bound states of 6 top and 6 antitop quarks containing highly compressed ordinary matter. Such balls are supposed to make up the dark matter as we earlier proposed. The expected rate of impact of this kind of dark matter ball with the earth seems to crudely match a time scale of 200 years between the impacts. The main explosion of the Tunguska event is explained in our picture as material coming out from deep within the earth, where it has been heated and compressed by the ball penetrating to a depth of several thousand km. Thus the effect has some similarity with volcanic activity as suggested by Kundt. We discuss the possible identification of kimberlite pipes with earlier Tunguska-like events. A discussion of how the dark matter balls may have formed in the early universe is also given.

  15. Stemless ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Kevin (Inventor); Yakos, David (Inventor); Walthall, Bryan (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A stemless ball valve comprising two flanges and a ball with a channel, two axis pins and two travel pins. One end of each axis and travel pin is fixedly attached to the ball, and the other end of each axis pin is lodged into a notch in the first or second flange such that the axis pin is allowed to rotate in the notch. The guide sleeve comprises two channels, and one end of each travel pin is situated within one of the two channels in the guide sleeve. An outer magnetic cartridge causes the inner magnetic cartridge and guide sleeve to rotate, and when the guide sleeve rotates, the travel pins move up and down within the channels in the guide sleeve. The movement of the travel pins within the channels in the guide sleeve causes the ball to rotate, thereby opening and closing the ball valve.

  16. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  17. The Hobart Time Ball and Time Gun: a Critical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinns, Roger

    2011-07-01

    Discussion at the Royal Society in Hobart in 1865 and acoustic experiments in 1868 led to a combined time ball and time gun service in Hobart from March 1875. Complaints from residents led to relocation of the gun a month later, but it was then fired from Queen's Battery in the Domain for half a century. The drop of the ball at Battery Point was always the master signal; the gun was fired when the ball was seen to drop. During the early years, private citizens in Hobart provided the time reference. From September 1886, an electric telegraph signal from Hobart Observatory was used to provide correct time to the ball operator, but signals were of questionable accuracy. During February 1910, the source of the telegraph signal was changed from Hobart Observatory to Melbourne Observatory, but the service was still unreliable and there was pressure to re-equip Hobart Observatory. Finally, automatic dropping of the time ball by telegraph from Melbourne was introduced in November 1910. The time ball service ended in February 1927. The time gun had probably ceased to operate by the end of 1923, but before that date there were sometimes long gaps in the time gun service, particularly on Sundays.

  18. Comparison of established systems for measuring the dustiness of powders with the UNC Dustiness Tester developed especially for pharmaceutical substances.

    PubMed

    Bach, Sylvia; Eickmann, Udo; Schmidt, Eberhard

    2013-10-01

    Four methods for evaluating the dustiness of powders have been compared. The relatively new UNC Dustiness Tester first described by Boundy et al. (2006) in the Annals of Occupational Hygiene, which was developed specifically for the measurement of hazardous and/or highly potent substances, a single-drop device, a rotating-drum method, and a continuous drop-down apparatus. The four methods show four different ratings of dustiness for nine reference materials. This article describes the differences, explores reasons for the deviations, identifies a need for distinct dustiness test methods, and highlights the significance for occupational health and safety.

  19. Happy Balls, Unhappy Balls, and Newton's Cradle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David

    2010-01-01

    The intricacies of Newton's Cradle are well covered in the literature going as far back as the time of Newton! These discussions generally center on the highly elastic collisions of metal spheres. Thanks to the invention of happy and unhappy balls, you can build and study the interaction of less elastic systems (see Fig. 1).

  20. Happy Balls, Unhappy Balls, and Newton's Cradle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David

    2010-01-01

    The intricacies of Newton's Cradle are well covered in the literature going as far back as the time of Newton! These discussions generally center on the highly elastic collisions of metal spheres. Thanks to the invention of happy and unhappy balls, you can build and study the interaction of less elastic systems (see Fig. 1).

  1. The Rocketdyne Multifunction Tester. Part 1: Test Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Brian T.; Scharrer, Joseph K.; Sutton, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    The Rocketdyne Multifunction Tester is a general purpose test apparatus which utilizes axial and radial magnetic bearings as shaft excitation devices. The tester is modular in design so that different seal and bearing packages can be tested on the same test stand. The tester will be used for rotordynamic coefficient extraction, as well as life and fluid/material compatibility evaluations. Use of a magnetic bearing as a shaft excitation device opens up many possibilities for shaft excitation and rotordynamic coefficient extraction. In addition to describing the basic apparatus, some of the excitation and extraction methods are described. Some of the excitation methods to be discussed include random, aperiodic, harmonic, impulse and chirp.

  2. Four-ball wear test for engine oil evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.S.; Hsu, S.M.

    1980-11-01

    In this study, several procedures using the four-ball wear tester have been evaluated using the ASTM engine reference oils. Based on the experimental results the following conclusions can be reached: (1) the normally used slow-sliding and fast-sliding 4-Ball wear procedures did not rank the reference oils correctly; (2) the oxidation coupled slow-sliding wear test procedure gave encouraging results to correlate with engine tests; (3) the step-loading seizure procedure correlated the five reference oils correctly. Both the oxidation-wear coupled and seizure test procedures will be examined further. Wear debris analysis and differential infrared spectroscopy will be used to investigate the mechanism in these procedures.

  3. Evaluation of load-life relation with ball bearings at 500 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of the literature suggests that a stress-life exponent of approximately 12 is typical of vacuum-processed steels for ball bearings rather than the exponent of 9 which has been generally accepted by the bearing industry and bearing users. Tests run with vacuum-degassed AISI 52100 balls in the five-ball fatigue tester at four maximum Hertz stress levels in the range from 650,000 to 875,000 psi showed good agreement with the literature. However, tests run with consumable-electrode vacuum melted AISI M-50 steel angular-contact ball bearings at 500 F at three thrust loads did not show significant deviation from the accepted ninth power stress-life relation.

  4. Dynamic tester for rotor seals and bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, George L. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A dynamic tester for testing vibration damping seals and bearings is constructed having a hollow shaft extending through the seal or bearing, with the shaft internally supported at each end by fluid bearings on hollow bosses connected to an interior of an enclosure, with no rolling members connected to the shaft is described. A high pressure working fluid is forced through the hollow bosses to operate the bearings. Additionally, the shaft is provided with a reaction turbine that angularly vents a portion of the high pressure working fluid in order to rotate the shaft at high speed, up to 40,000 rpm. The seal or bearing is mounted in a bushing, in turn supported by rods to a shaking device that vibrates the seal or bearing as the shaft is rotated. A plurality of proximity sensors are mounted from outside the enclosure to sense shaft and seal bushing vibrations, and a plurality of pressure ports are disposed in the enclosure to allow sensing of dynamic and static pressures of the testing apparatus.

  5. Introduction to ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of a ball bearing is to provide a relative positioning and rotational freedom while transmitting a load between two structures, usually a shaft and a housing. For high rotational speeds (e.g., in gyroscope ball bearings) the purpose can be expanded to include rotational freedom with practically no wear in the bearing. This condition can be achieved by separating the bearing parts with a coherent film of fluid known as an elastohydrodynamic film. This film can be maintained not only when the bearing carries the load on a shaft, but also when the bearing is preloaded to position the shaft to within micro- or nano-inch accuracy and stability. Background information on ball bearings is provided, different types of ball bearings and their geometry and kinematics are defined, bearing materials, manufacturing processes, and separators are discussed. It is assumed, for the purposes of analysis, that the bearing carries no load.

  6. Space Balls Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-22

    NASA Spitzer Space Telescope has at last found buckyballs resembling soccer balls in space shown in this artist concept using Hubble picture of the NGC 2440 nebula. Hubble image cred: NASA, ESA, STScI

  7. Super Ball Bot

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Tensegrity Robot: Child's Play or Space Tech? Super Ball Bot is an all-in-one landing and mobility platform based on tensegrity structures, allowing for lower-cost, and more reliable planetary miss...

  8. Quartz ball value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, C.; Ingle, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Quartz ball valve consisting of two quartz joints sealed back-to-back and seated in quartz sockets perform at temperatures of up to 1,250 C and in corrosive chemical environments without contamination or degradation.

  9. A systems tester for compact HPG component development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, W. A.; Vaughn, M. R.

    1984-03-01

    To facilitate the development of more compact homopolar generators (HPGs), the compact HPG systems tester was designed and built to develop the system and component technology necessary to design HPGs having energy densities of up to 60 MJ/cu m. The systems tester is one-half of a full-scale counter-rotating HPG storing 2.5 MJ at 6,900 rpm and generating 20 V. Incorporated in the tester are two new types of components, face brushes and a stationary-shaft hydrostatic bearing, which will lead to HPG designs that will rotate a larger fraction of the magnetic circuit while eliminating much of the stationary support structure. The systems tester is designed to provide a facility for future bearing research and development of the higher-current-density brushgear required for drawing larger currents from the smaller slip ring areas of more compact machines.

  10. Solving ball lightning—A reply to Stefan and Massey (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Peter Francis

    2009-06-01

    Comments are made on the ball lightning paper of Stephan and Massey [Stefan, K.D., Massey, N., 2008. Burning molten metallic sphere: One class of ball lightning? Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 70, 1589-1596] that describes their [`]welding drop' theory. An alternative theory is offered based on combustion inside an atmospheric vortex. The [`]vortex fireball' hypothesis has good explanatory capability in regard to published ball lightning properties.

  11. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  12. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  13. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  14. A Cheap, Semiquantitative Hand-Held Conductivity Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacky, Susan K. S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a design for a hand-held conductivity tester powered by a 9V battery that gives semi-quantitative results for aqueous electrolyte solutions of concentrations ranging from 0.001 M to 0.1 M. The tester uses a bar-graph LED driven by an LM3914 integrated circuit to indicate the level of conductivity. A list of parts, procedures, and results…

  15. A Cheap, Semiquantitative Hand-Held Conductivity Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacky, Susan K. S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a design for a hand-held conductivity tester powered by a 9V battery that gives semi-quantitative results for aqueous electrolyte solutions of concentrations ranging from 0.001 M to 0.1 M. The tester uses a bar-graph LED driven by an LM3914 integrated circuit to indicate the level of conductivity. A list of parts, procedures, and results…

  16. A proposal for dynamic calibration of brake tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Paulo L. S.; Couto, Paulo R. G.; Cabral, Luiz C.; Reis, Ronaldo G.; Zillner, Marcos

    2015-10-01

    In Brazil there are about 400 security inspection lines carrier operating in Inspection Bodies accredited by Cgcre Inmetro [1]. The equipment in this proposal is a Brake Tester that measure vehicle braking forces and it is a component of an inspection line. This paper proposes a dynamic Brake Tester calibration using a reference torque transducer. This article can also be the basis for future discussions of the revised standard manufacturing of vehicle inspection line according to ABNT NBR 14040 [2].

  17. Design and Fabrication of a Prototype Tracer Surveillance Tester

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    SCHEDULE 16. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT fo/tfi/a ReporO Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 17 . DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the...Functional Testing of Tracer Surveillance Tester 13 The Effect of Orifice Area of Tracer Retainer 17 Correlation of TST Results with Proving Ground...tester 3 2 Possible failure modes of M13 tracer 7 3 Summary of TST results j^^ 4 Effect of orifice size and shape on tracer burn time 17 5 Burn

  18. Hex ball torque test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, B. A.; Foster, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed on four flight-type hex ball universal joints in order to characterize and determine the actual load-carrying capability of this device. The universal joint is a part of manual actuation rods for scientific instruments within the Hubble Space Telescope. It was found that the hex ball will bind slightly during the initial load application. This binding did not affect the function of the universal joint, and the units would wear-in after a few additional loading cycles. The torsional yield load was approximately 50 ft-lb, and was consistent among the four test specimens. Also, the torque required to cause complete failure exceeded 80 ft-lb. It is concluded that the hex ball universal joint is suitable for its intended applications.

  19. Dynamic Stability of Equilibrium Capillary Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, William M.; Kim, Inwon C.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a model for contact angle motion of quasi-static capillary drops resting on a horizontal plane. We prove global in time existence and long time behavior (convergence to equilibrium) in a class of star-shaped initial data for which we show that topological changes of drops can be ruled out for all times. Our result applies to any drop which is initially star-shaped with respect to a small ball inside the drop, given that the volume of the drop is sufficiently large. For the analysis, we combine geometric arguments based on the moving-plane type method with energy dissipation methods based on the formal gradient flow structure of the problem.

  20. Split Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the presence of non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in (1 , 1) spacetime dimensions. The model engenders the global U (1) symmetry and is of the k-field type, since it contains a new term, of the fourth-order power in the derivative of the complex scalar field. It supports analytical solution of the Q-ball type which is stable quantum mechanically. The new solution engenders an interesting behavior, with the charge and energy densities unveiling a splitting profile.

  1. Ball valve safety screen

    SciTech Connect

    Bolding, B.H.

    1981-09-01

    A device for preventing unwanted objects from entering the ball assembly of a float collar or float shoe and otherwise damaging or plugging the valve mechanism therein is disclosed. The device comprises a screen constructed of expanded metal and rigidly affixed to the interior of the float collar or float shoe above the ball valve assembly. The screen portion is either mounted to the interior surface of the float collar sleeve by an annular structural member or mounted to a structural band which is partially embedded in the concrete portion of the float collar or casing guide shoe.

  2. The Mathematics of Bouncing Balls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Describes an activity which uses the computer to produce an environment that encourages an inductive reasoning approach to ratio and proportion through a billiard ball simulation. Provides examples of graphs and bouncing ball data. (RT)

  3. Dropping the Montagnard Ball: A Failure to Capitalize

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    as slash and burn agriculture where they grow foods such as eggplant, corn, cucumbers and rice. Consequently, fertile land is a top commodity for...was the result of a Southeast Asia study conducted in 1961 which concluded that the Viet Cong (VC) domination of the strategically located central...simply trying to use them for their own cause. 9 This and many other factors were considered during the study and the final solution was the

  4. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  5. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  6. Visual Skills: Watch the Ball?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Sue

    1989-01-01

    In tennis as well as in other racket/paddle sports, simply watching the ball does not guarantee success in hitting the ball to the desired location. Teachers and coaches should teach players to integrate available visual, spatial, and kinesthetic information. Several drills for good ball contact are outlined. (IAH)

  7. Visual Skills: Watch the Ball?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Sue

    1989-01-01

    In tennis as well as in other racket/paddle sports, simply watching the ball does not guarantee success in hitting the ball to the desired location. Teachers and coaches should teach players to integrate available visual, spatial, and kinesthetic information. Several drills for good ball contact are outlined. (IAH)

  8. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, Roy A.; von Holle, William G.

    1983-01-01

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

  9. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

    1983-08-16

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

  10. Stemless Ball Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Robert K.; Yakos, David; Walthall, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This invention utilizes a new method of opening and closing a ball valve. Instead of rotating the ball with a perpendicular stem (as is the case with standard ball valves), the ball is rotated around a fixed axis by two guide pins. This innovation eliminates the leak point that is present in all standard ball valves due to the penetration of an actuation stem through the valve body. The VOST (Venturi Off-Set-Technology) valve has been developed for commercial applications. The standard version of the valve consists of an off-set venturi flow path through the valve. This path is split at the narrowest portion of the venturi, allowing the section upstream from the venturi to be rotated. As this rotation takes place, the venturi becomes restricted as one face rotates with respect to the other, eventually closing off the flow path. A spring-loaded seal made of resilient material is embedded in the upstream face of the valve, making a leak-proof seal between the faces; thus a valve is formed. The spring-loaded lip seal is the only seal that can provide a class six, or bubble-tight, seal against the opposite face of the valve. Tearing action of the seal by high-velocity gas on this early design required relocation of the seal to the downstream face of the valve. In the stemless embodiment of this valve, inner and outer magnetic cartridges are employed to transfer mechanical torque from the outside of the valve to the inside without the use of a stem. This eliminates the leak path caused by the valve stems in standard valves because the stems penetrate through the bodies of these valves.

  11. Rolling-element fatigue life of silicon nitride balls: Preliminary test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    Hot pressed silicon nitride was evaluated as a rolling element bearing material. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to test 12.7 mm (0.500 in.) diameter balls at a maximum Hertz stress of 800,000 psi at a race temperature of 130 F. The fatigue spalls in the silicon nitride resembled those in typical bearing steels. The ten-percent fatigue life of the silicon nitride balls was approximately one-eighth to one-fifth that of typical bearing steels (52100 and M-50). The load capacity of the silicon nitride was approximately one-third that of typical bearing steels. The load capacity of the silicon nitride was significantly higher than previously tested ceramic materials for rolling element bearings.

  12. Rolling-element fatigue life of silicon nitride balls. [as compared to that of steel, ceramic, and cermet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    The five-ball fatigue tester was used to evaluate silicon nitride as a rolling-element bearing material. Results indicate that hot-pressed silicon nitride running against steel may be expected to yield fatigue lives comparable to or greater than those of bearing quality steel running against steel at stress levels typical rolling-element bearing application. The fatigue life of hot-pressed silicon nitride is considerably greater than that of any ceramic or cermet tested. Computer analysis indicates that there is no improvement in the lives of 120-mm-bore angular--contact ball bearings of the same geometry operating at DN values from 2 to 4 million where hot-pressed silicon nitride balls are used in place of steel balls.

  13. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... connected to an implanted pacemaker lead that supplies an accurately calibrated, variable pacing pulse...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3720 - Pacemaker electrode function tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker electrode function tester. 870.3720 Section 870.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... connected to an implanted pacemaker lead that supplies an accurately calibrated, variable pacing pulse...

  15. Colour of Tester Effects on Children's Expressed Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, K. C.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses a study of student attitudes, preferences, and stereotyping among White Britons and West Indian students in an English secondary school. Findings indicated that factors such as the race of the tester influenced the test situation. For journal availability, see SO 506 785. (DB)

  16. A remote tester for surge arresters: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.H.

    1986-12-01

    Laboratory studies show that the most probable indication that a surge arrester is failing is electromagnetic energy emission. In field trials by eight utilities, a tester designed to detect radiofrequency emissions located defective arresters, but stray emissions in the environment limited its performance.

  17. An automated data collection system for a Charpy impact tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigman, Bernard J.; Spiegel, F. Xavier

    1993-01-01

    A method for automated data collection has been developed for a Charpy impact tester. A potentiometer is connected to the pivot point of the hammer and measures the angular displacement of the hammer. This data is collected with a computer and, through appropriate software, accurately records the energy absorbed by the specimen. The device can be easily calibrated with minimal effort.

  18. The inertia ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, Karen

    2001-01-01

    We used this activity in the Eastern Massachusetts Physics Olympics and were pleased to find in it an important teaching tool for the concept of circular motion. I now introduce centripetal force in my class with this activity. Using only the "business end" of a broom, team members will push a bowling ball from the starting line along a masking-tape course without going outside the tape or hitting one of the pylons.

  19. Bowling Ball Spotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-01-01

    Exactatron, an accurate weighing and spotting system in bowling ball manufacture, was developed by Ebonite International engineers with the assistance of a NASA computer search which identified Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) technology. The JPL research concerned a means of determining the center of an object's mass, and an apparatus for measuring liquid viscosity, enabling Ebonite to identify the exact spotting of the drilling point for top weighting.

  20. Ball Lightning Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, V. L.; Nikitin, A. I.; Dijkhuis, G. C.

    Ball lightning (BL) researches' review and theoretical models of three different authors are presented. The general review covers investigations from 1838 until the present day, and includes a discussion on observation data, experimental modeling, and theoretical approaches. Section 6.1 is written by Bychkov and Nikitin; authors of the sections 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4 are, respectively, Bychkov, Nikitin and Dijkhuis.

  1. Inter-tester Agreement in Refractive Error Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiayan; Maguire, Maureen G.; Ciner, Elise; Kulp, Marjean T.; Quinn, Graham E.; Orel-Bixler, Deborah; Cyert, Lynn A.; Moore, Bruce; Ying, Gui-Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the inter-tester agreement of refractive error measurements between lay and nurse screeners using the Retinomax Autorefractor (Retinomax) and the SureSight Vision Screener (SureSight). Methods Trained lay and nurse screeners measured refractive error in 1452 preschoolers (3- to 5-years old) using the Retinomax and the SureSight in a random order for screeners and instruments. Inter-tester agreement between lay and nurse screeners was assessed for sphere, cylinder and spherical equivalent (SE) using the mean difference and the 95% limits of agreement. The mean inter-tester difference (lay minus nurse) was compared between groups defined based on child’s age, cycloplegic refractive error, and the reading’s confidence number using analysis of variance. The limits of agreement were compared between groups using the Brown-Forsythe test. Inter-eye correlation was accounted for in all analyses. Results The mean inter-tester differences (95% limits of agreement) were −0.04 (−1.63, 1.54) Diopter (D) sphere, 0.00 (−0.52, 0.51) D cylinder, and −0.04 (1.65, 1.56) D SE for the Retinomax; and 0.05 (−1.48, 1.58) D sphere, 0.01 (−0.58, 0.60) D cylinder, and 0.06 (−1.45, 1.57) D SE for the SureSight. For either instrument, the mean inter-tester differences in sphere and SE did not differ by the child’s age, cycloplegic refractive error, or the reading’s confidence number. However, for both instruments, the limits of agreement were wider when eyes had significant refractive error or the reading’s confidence number was below the manufacturer’s recommended value. Conclusions Among Head Start preschool children, trained lay and nurse screeners agree well in measuring refractive error using the Retinomax or the SureSight. Both instruments had similar inter-tester agreement in refractive error measurements independent of the child’s age. Significant refractive error and a reading with low confidence number were associated with worse inter-tester

  2. Water ball collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    What happens if a stainless steel ball hits a water ball in the weightless space ot the Universe? In other words, it was the objective of our experiments in the Space to observe the surface tension of liquid by means of making a solid collide with a liquid. Place a small volume of water between 2 glass sheets to make a thin water membrane: the 2 glass sheets cannot be separated unless an enormous force is applied. It is obvious from this phenomenom that the surface tension of water is far greater than presumed. On Earth, however, it is impossible in most cases to observe only the surface tension of liquid, because gravity always acts on the surface tension. Water and stainless steel balls were chosen the liquid and solids for the experiments. Because water is the liquid most familiar to us, its properties are well known. And it is also of great interest to compare its properties on the Earth with those in the weightless space.

  3. Great (Flame) Balls of Fire! Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-number-2 (SOFBALL-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul; Weiland, Karen J.; Over, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Everyone knows that an automobile engine wastes fuel and energy when it runs with a fuel-rich mixture. 'Lean' burning, mixing in more air and less fuel, is better for the environment. But lean mixtures also lead to engine misfiring and rough operation. No one knows the ultimate limits for lean operation, for 'weak' combustion that is friendly to the environment while still moving us around. This is where the accidental verification of a decades-old prediction may have strong implications for designing and running low-emissions engines in the 21st century. In 1944, Soviet physicist Yakov Zeldovich predicted that stationary, spherical flames are possible under limited conditions in lean fuel-air mixtures. Dr. Paul Ronney of the University of Southern California accidentally discovered such 'flame balls' in experiments with lean hydrogen-air mixtures in 1984 during drop-tower experiments that provided just 2.2 seconds of near weightlessness. Experiments aboard NASA's low-g aircraft confirmed the results, but a thorough investigation was hampered by the aircraft's bumpy ride. And stable flame balls can only exist in microgravity. The potential for investigating combustion at the limits of flammability, and the implications for spacecraft fire safety, led to the Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-number (SOFBALL) experiment flown twice aboard the Space Shuttle on the Microgravity Sciences Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) in 1997. Success there led to the planned reflight on STS-107. Flame balls are the weakest fires yet produced in space or on Earth. Typically each flame ball produced only 1 watt of thermal power. By comparison, a birthday candle produces 50 watts. The Lewis-number measures the rate of diffusion of fuel into the flame ball relative to the rate of diffusion of heat away from the flame ball. Lewis-number mixtures conduct heat poorly. Hydrogen and methane are the only fuels that provide low enough Lewis-numbers to produce stable flame balls, and even then only for

  4. Great (Flame) Balls of Fire! Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-number-2 (SOFBALL-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul; Weiland, Karen J.; Over, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Everyone knows that an automobile engine wastes fuel and energy when it runs with a fuel-rich mixture. 'Lean' burning, mixing in more air and less fuel, is better for the environment. But lean mixtures also lead to engine misfiring and rough operation. No one knows the ultimate limits for lean operation, for 'weak' combustion that is friendly to the environment while still moving us around. This is where the accidental verification of a decades-old prediction may have strong implications for designing and running low-emissions engines in the 21st century. In 1944, Soviet physicist Yakov Zeldovich predicted that stationary, spherical flames are possible under limited conditions in lean fuel-air mixtures. Dr. Paul Ronney of the University of Southern California accidentally discovered such 'flame balls' in experiments with lean hydrogen-air mixtures in 1984 during drop-tower experiments that provided just 2.2 seconds of near weightlessness. Experiments aboard NASA's low-g aircraft confirmed the results, but a thorough investigation was hampered by the aircraft's bumpy ride. And stable flame balls can only exist in microgravity. The potential for investigating combustion at the limits of flammability, and the implications for spacecraft fire safety, led to the Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-number (SOFBALL) experiment flown twice aboard the Space Shuttle on the Microgravity Sciences Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) in 1997. Success there led to the planned reflight on STS-107. Flame balls are the weakest fires yet produced in space or on Earth. Typically each flame ball produced only 1 watt of thermal power. By comparison, a birthday candle produces 50 watts. The Lewis-number measures the rate of diffusion of fuel into the flame ball relative to the rate of diffusion of heat away from the flame ball. Lewis-number mixtures conduct heat poorly. Hydrogen and methane are the only fuels that provide low enough Lewis-numbers to produce stable flame balls, and even then only for

  5. 77 FR 64588 - Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Calibrating Units for Breath Alcohol Testers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... of Calibrating Units for Breath Alcohol Testers AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety... conform to the Model Specifications for Calibrating Units for Breath Alcohol Tester (CUs) dated, June 25...) published a standard for Calibrating Units for Breath Alcohol Testers. A Qualified Products List of...

  6. Polyurethane retainers for ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of a new ball bearing retainer material is reported. A special composite polyurethane foam ball retainer has been developed that has virtually zero wear, is chemically inert to hydrocarbon lubricants, and stores up to 60 times as much lubricant per unit volume as the most commonly used retainer material, cotton phenolic. This new retainer concept shows promise of years of ball bearing operation without reoiling, based on life testing in high vacuum.

  7. Physics in a Glitter Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trikosko, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Maui Toys' Water Bouncer (Fig. 1) is a water-filled ball containing glitter. Buy one and put it on your desk and students can't keep their hands off of it. Pitch the ball in the air giving it a quick spin. When you catch it you will see a sparkling vortex. Twist the ball around different ways and the angular momentum of the fluid keeps the axis of…

  8. Physics in a Glitter Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trikosko, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Maui Toys' Water Bouncer (Fig. 1) is a water-filled ball containing glitter. Buy one and put it on your desk and students can't keep their hands off of it. Pitch the ball in the air giving it a quick spin. When you catch it you will see a sparkling vortex. Twist the ball around different ways and the angular momentum of the fluid keeps the axis of…

  9. PEPC LRU: Ball Support Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T

    1999-05-14

    The PEPC LRU upper ball support assembly consists of a ball and a pneumatic air cylinder/conical seat latching mechanism to be attached to the optics support frame,and a ball attached to the PEPC LRU. Both components are designed to allow manual positioning in three axes. Upon insertion of the PEPC LRU into the structure, the upper pneumatic cylinder is actuated to latch the two assemblies together through the conical seat device to grab the lower ball to support the LRU weight. To be conservative, the design load for the assembly is 1500 pounds (the prototype PEPC LRU weight was measured to be near 1380 pounds).

  10. Individual ball possession in soccer

    PubMed Central

    Hoernig, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes models for detecting individual and team ball possession in soccer based on position data. The types of ball possession are classified as Individual Ball Possession (IBC), Individual Ball Action (IBA), Individual Ball Control (IBC), Team Ball Possession (TBP), Team Ball Control (TBC) und Team Playmaking (TPM) according to different starting points and endpoints and the type of ball control involved. The machine learning approach used is able to determine how long the ball spends in the sphere of influence of a player based on the distance between the players and the ball together with their direction of motion, speed and the acceleration of the ball. The degree of ball control exhibited during this phase is classified based on the spatio-temporal configuration of the player controlling the ball, the ball itself and opposing players using a Bayesian network. The evaluation and application of this approach uses data from 60 matches in the German Bundesliga season of 2013/14, including 69,667 IBA intervals. The identification rate was F = .88 for IBA and F = .83 for IBP, and the classification rate for IBC was κ = .67. Match analysis showed the following mean values per match: TBP 56:04 ± 5:12 min, TPM 50:01 ± 7:05 min and TBC 17:49 ± 8:13 min. There were 836 ± 424 IBC intervals per match and their number was significantly reduced by -5.1% from the 1st to 2nd half. The analysis of ball possession at the player level indicates shortest accumulated IBC times for the central forwards (0:49 ± 0:43 min) and the longest for goalkeepers (1:38 ± 0:58 min), central defenders (1:38 ± 1:09 min) and central midfielders (1:27 ± 1:08 min). The results could improve performance analysis in soccer, help to detect match events automatically, and allow discernment of higher value tactical structures, which is based on individual ball possession. PMID:28692649

  11. Individual ball possession in soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; Hoernig, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes models for detecting individual and team ball possession in soccer based on position data. The types of ball possession are classified as Individual Ball Possession (IBC), Individual Ball Action (IBA), Individual Ball Control (IBC), Team Ball Possession (TBP), Team Ball Control (TBC) und Team Playmaking (TPM) according to different starting points and endpoints and the type of ball control involved. The machine learning approach used is able to determine how long the ball spends in the sphere of influence of a player based on the distance between the players and the ball together with their direction of motion, speed and the acceleration of the ball. The degree of ball control exhibited during this phase is classified based on the spatio-temporal configuration of the player controlling the ball, the ball itself and opposing players using a Bayesian network. The evaluation and application of this approach uses data from 60 matches in the German Bundesliga season of 2013/14, including 69,667 IBA intervals. The identification rate was F = .88 for IBA and F = .83 for IBP, and the classification rate for IBC was κ = .67. Match analysis showed the following mean values per match: TBP 56:04 ± 5:12 min, TPM 50:01 ± 7:05 min and TBC 17:49 ± 8:13 min. There were 836 ± 424 IBC intervals per match and their number was significantly reduced by -5.1% from the 1st to 2nd half. The analysis of ball possession at the player level indicates shortest accumulated IBC times for the central forwards (0:49 ± 0:43 min) and the longest for goalkeepers (1:38 ± 0:58 min), central defenders (1:38 ± 1:09 min) and central midfielders (1:27 ± 1:08 min). The results could improve performance analysis in soccer, help to detect match events automatically, and allow discernment of higher value tactical structures, which is based on individual ball possession.

  12. Rolling-element fatigue lives of AISI 52100 steel balls with several synthetic lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rolling-element fatigue tests were run with three synthetic lubricants with and without antiwear additives and with a paraffinic mineral oil at race temperatures of 336 to 353 K (146 146 to 175 F). The five-ball fatigue tester was used with steel balls to evaluate the relative fatigue lives with each of six lubricant-additive combinations. The tests were run at 5,520 MPa (800,000psi) maximum Hertz stress, 10,000 rpm shaft speed, and 30 deg contact angle. The lubricants tested have similar kinetic viscosities at 372 K (210 F) ranging from 0.034 to 0.089 sq cm/sec (3.4 to 8.9 cS). At these conditions, the mode of failure in the five-ball fatigue tester was classical subsurface rolling-element fatigue. The baseline for comparison of fatigue life was the paraffinic mineral oil without additives. The effects of the synthetic lubricants and their additives, which are useful for boundary lubrication, oxidation or foam inhibition, were evaluated.

  13. Standard method for measuremet of extreme-pressure properties of lubricating grease (four-ball method)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method covers the determination of the load-carrying properties of lubricating greases. Two determinations are made: load-wear index (formely called mean-hertz load), and weld point, by means of the four-ball extreme-pressure (EP) tester. The tester is operated with one steel ball under load rotating against three steel balls held stationary in the form of a cradle. The rotating speed is 1770 +- 60 rpm. Lubricating greases are brought to 27 +- 8/sup 0/C (80 +- 15/sup 0/F) and then subjected to a series of tests of 10-s duration at increasing loads until welding occurs. This method, used for specification purposes, differentiates between lubricating greases having low, medium, and high level of extreme-pressure properties. The results do not necessarily correlate with results from service. It is noted that lubricating greases that have as their fluid component a silicone, halogenated silicone, or a mixture comprising silicone fluid and petroleum oil, are not applicable to this method of test.

  14. The "Policy Cycle": A Ball by Ball Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Richard; Troyna, Barry

    1994-01-01

    Concerned with Stephen Ball's theoretical and empirical contribution to contemporary "education policy sociology," this article examines the efficacy of his theoretical eclecticism, highlighting incompatibilities in his interpretation and application of certain social and political theorists. Ball's representation of the policy cycle, as…

  15. Dynamic characterization of a new accelerated heart valve tester.

    PubMed

    Menzler, F; Haubold, A D; Hwang, N H

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new accelerated prosthetic heart valve tester prototype that incorporates a camshaft and poppet valves. A three element Windkessel system is used to mimic the afterload of the human systemic circulation. The device is capable of testing eight valves simultaneously at a rate up to 1,250 cycles/min, while the flow rate, the pressure, and the valve loading can be monitored and adjusted individually. The tester was characterized and calibrated using a set of eight Carpentier-Edwards bioprostheses at a flow rate varying between 3 and 5 L/min. The experiment was carried out with the pressure difference across the closed heart valve maintained between 140 and 190 mmHg. Smooth and complete opening and closing of the valve leaflets was achieved at all cycling rates. This confirms that the velocity profiles approaching the test valves were uniform, an important factor that allows the test valves to open and close synchronously each time.

  16. Non-Intrusive Impedance-Based Cable Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Simpson, Howard J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A non-intrusive electrical cable tester determines the nature and location of a discontinuity in a cable through application of an oscillating signal to one end of the cable. The frequency of the oscillating signal is varied in increments until a minimum, close to zero voltage is measured at a signal injection point which is indicative of a minimum impedance at that point. The frequency of the test signal at which the minimum impedance occurs is then employed to determine the distance to the discontinuity by employing a formula which relates this distance to the signal frequency and the velocity factor of the cable. A numerically controlled oscillator is provided to generate the oscillating signal, and a microcontroller automatically controls operation of the cable tester to make the desired measurements and display the results. The device is contained in a portable housing which may be hand held to facilitate convenient use of the device in difficult to access locations.

  17. Crystal Ball Replica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajamian, John

    2016-09-01

    The A2 collaboration of the Institute for Nuclear Physics of Johannes Gutenberg University performs research on (multiple) meson photoproduction and nucleon structure and dynamics using a high energy polarized photon beam at specific targets. Particles scattered from the target are detected in the Crystal Ball, or CB. The CB is composed of 672 NaI crystals that surround the target and can analyze particle type and energy of ejected particles. Our project was to create a replica of the CB that could display what was happening in real time on a 3 Dimensional scale replica. Our replica was constructed to help explain the physics to the general public, be used as a tool when calibrating each of the 672 NaI crystals, and to better analyze the electron showering of particles coming from the target. This poster will focus on the hardware steps necessary to construct the replica and wire the 672 programmable LEDS in such a way that they can be mapped to correspond to the Crystal Ball elements. George Washington NSF Grant.

  18. Crystal Ball Functional Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnick, David

    2016-09-01

    The A2 collaboration of the MAinz MIkrotron is dedicated to studying meson production and nucleon structure and behavior via photon scattering. The photons are made via bremsstrahlung process and energy-tagged using the Glasgow Photon tagger. The photon beam then interacts in a variety of targets: cryogenic, polarized or solid state, and scattered particles deposit their energy within the NaI crystals. Scintillators are able to give results on particles energy and time. Events are reconstructed by combining information from the Tagging spectrometer, the Crystal Ball detector, the TAPS forward wall spectrometer, a Cherenkov detector, and multi-wire proportional chambers. To better understand the detector and experimental events, a live display was built to show energies deposited in crystals in real-time. In order to show a range of energies and particles, addressable LEDs that are individually programmable were used. To best replicate the Crystal Ball, 3D printing technology was employed to build a similar highly segmented icosahedron that can hold each LED, creating a 3D representation of what photons see during experiments. The LEDs were controlled via Arduino microcontroller. Finally, we implemented the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System to grab live event data, and a simple program converts this data in to color and crystal number data that is able to communicate with the Arduino. Using these simple parts, we can better visualize and understand the tools used in nuclear physics. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. IIA-1358175.

  19. Atmospheric Ball Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurden, C. J. V.; Wurden, G. A.

    2008-11-01

    Free-floating atmospheric pressure copper hydroxyl ball plasmas have been studied in air and helium atmospheres, using still and high speed photography (up to 20,000 fps), collimated photodiodes, and spectroscopy. A fine boundary layer between the greenish Cu-OH cloud, and the air, is orange in color. However, when the discharge is initiated into a helium atmosphere, the boundary layer is no longer visible, suggesting that the visible boundary was caused by interactions with oxygen. We have studied scaling of the 10-cm diameter ball plasmas with both the size of the water bucket, and the applied discharge voltage, over the range of 500-5000 volts. When looking at the initial spider-leg breakdown above the water surface, the ratio of H-alpha to H-beta lines suggests a temperature of ˜0.3 eV. This is also consistent with the presence of molecular lines of OH, and perhaps CuOH2 in the rising cloud. The cloud is affected by, but can penetrate through an aluminum window screen mesh.

  20. Orbital fatigue tester for use in Skylab experiment T032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandorff, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    A prototype fatigue test machine is described which is suitable for use by an astronaut in conducting constant amplitude materials fatigue tests aboard a Skylab or space shuttle vehicle. The machine is comparised of a mechanical tester, which would be passed through a small (7.6-inch square) airlock to be supported in the space environment on an extendible boom, and a control console, which would provide remote control from within the space vehicle.

  1. The WAFTER: A versatile wear and friction tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewsbury, P.

    1987-06-01

    Described are the design and use of a pins-on-disc wear and friction testing machine, constructed for use in the Wear Technology Group. The tester is capable of assessing sliding wear at speeds up to 4 m/sec and loads up to 40 N. During a wear run the friction and contact resistance are constantly monitored giving a clear picture of the condition of the surfaces.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of the Venturi Dustiness Tester

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Prahit; Ghia, Urmila; Turkevich, Leonid A.

    2017-01-01

    Dustiness quantifies the propensity of a finely divided solid to be aerosolized by a prescribed mechanical stimulus. Dustiness is relevant wherever powders are mixed, transferred or handled, and is important in the control of hazardous exposures and the prevention of dust explosions and product loss. Limited quantities of active pharmaceutical powders available for testing led to the development (at University of North Carolina) of a Venturi-driven dustiness tester. The powder is turbulently injected at high speed (Re ~ 2 × 104) into a glass chamber; the aerosol is then gently sampled (Re ~ 2 × 103) through two filters located at the top of the chamber; the dustiness index is the ratio of sampled to injected mass of powder. Injection is activated by suction at an Extraction Port at the top of the chamber; loss of powder during injection compromises the sampled dustiness. The present work analyzes the flow inside the Venturi Dustiness Tester, using an Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes formulation with the k-ω Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. The simulation considers single-phase flow, valid for small particles (Stokes number Stk <1). Results show that ~ 24% of fluid-tracers escape the tester before the Sampling Phase begins. Dispersion of the powder during the Injection Phase results in a uniform aerosol inside the tester, even for inhomogeneous injections, satisfying a necessary condition for the accurate evaluation of dustiness. Simulations are also performed under the conditions of reduced Extraction-Port flow; results confirm the importance of high Extraction-Port flow rate (standard operation) for uniform distribution of fluid tracers. Simulations are also performed under the conditions of delayed powder injection; results show that a uniform aerosol is still achieved provided 0.5 s elapses between powder injection and sampling. PMID:28638167

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of the Venturi Dustiness Tester.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Prahit; Ghia, Urmila; Turkevich, Leonid A

    2017-05-01

    Dustiness quantifies the propensity of a finely divided solid to be aerosolized by a prescribed mechanical stimulus. Dustiness is relevant wherever powders are mixed, transferred or handled, and is important in the control of hazardous exposures and the prevention of dust explosions and product loss. Limited quantities of active pharmaceutical powders available for testing led to the development (at University of North Carolina) of a Venturi-driven dustiness tester. The powder is turbulently injected at high speed (Re ~ 2 × 10(4)) into a glass chamber; the aerosol is then gently sampled (Re ~ 2 × 10(3)) through two filters located at the top of the chamber; the dustiness index is the ratio of sampled to injected mass of powder. Injection is activated by suction at an Extraction Port at the top of the chamber; loss of powder during injection compromises the sampled dustiness. The present work analyzes the flow inside the Venturi Dustiness Tester, using an Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes formulation with the k-ω Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. The simulation considers single-phase flow, valid for small particles (Stokes number Stk <1). Results show that ~ 24% of fluid-tracers escape the tester before the Sampling Phase begins. Dispersion of the powder during the Injection Phase results in a uniform aerosol inside the tester, even for inhomogeneous injections, satisfying a necessary condition for the accurate evaluation of dustiness. Simulations are also performed under the conditions of reduced Extraction-Port flow; results confirm the importance of high Extraction-Port flow rate (standard operation) for uniform distribution of fluid tracers. Simulations are also performed under the conditions of delayed powder injection; results show that a uniform aerosol is still achieved provided 0.5 s elapses between powder injection and sampling.

  4. Tester Detects Steady-Short Or Intermittent-Open Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bobby L.

    1990-01-01

    Momentary open circuits or steady short circuits trigger buzzer. Simple, portable, lightweight testing circuit sounds long-duration alarm when it detects steady short circuit or momentary open circuit in coaxial cable or other two-conductor transmission line. Tester sensitive to discontinuities lasting 10 microseconds or longer. Used extensively for detecting intermittent open shorts in accelerometer and extensometer cables. Also used as ordinary buzzer-type continuity checker to detect steady short or open circuits.

  5. Tester Detects Steady-Short Or Intermittent-Open Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bobby L.

    1990-01-01

    Momentary open circuits or steady short circuits trigger buzzer. Simple, portable, lightweight testing circuit sounds long-duration alarm when it detects steady short circuit or momentary open circuit in coaxial cable or other two-conductor transmission line. Tester sensitive to discontinuities lasting 10 microseconds or longer. Used extensively for detecting intermittent open shorts in accelerometer and extensometer cables. Also used as ordinary buzzer-type continuity checker to detect steady short or open circuits.

  6. Built-in-Test and External Tester Reliability Characteristics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    assembly , or part. This function of BIT is the most complicated and is the one which has the biggest payoff in terms of support costs. BIT, to be...control logic assemblies (CLAs) which provide electrical control signals to numerous actuators, relays and advisury lights. The tester can also check the...Unit Code Abbreviation Predicted MTBF Automatic Signal Acquisition Unit 55AAO SAR-A 8621 Manual Signal Acquisition Unit 55AC0 SAR-M 7752 Maintenance Data

  7. Combat Ration Network for Technology Implementation. Universal Benchtop Package Tester

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    completed the testing chamber modifications as scheduled. Polytrays filled with Creamed Ground Beef , Pork Sausage in Brine, and Turkey Slices were...were requested and delivered from DDJC; Potatoes with Bacon, Beef Hash, Beef Patties , and Chicken Chow Mein. Wornick crated the tester and have it...trays of four products, 100 total, consisting of Chicken Chow Mein – Pumpable, Beef Patties in Brine – Placeable, Beef Hash – Pumpable, Potatoes with

  8. Behaviour of a Bouncing Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    The bounce of a ball is a seemingly innocuous event that can be used to illustrate many aspects of elementary and even advanced mechanics. Both normal and oblique bounces on a rigid surface are considered in this article, emphasizing qualitative features of the bounce process. If the ball bounces at an oblique angle then it can slide throughout…

  9. Behaviour of a Bouncing Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    The bounce of a ball is a seemingly innocuous event that can be used to illustrate many aspects of elementary and even advanced mechanics. Both normal and oblique bounces on a rigid surface are considered in this article, emphasizing qualitative features of the bounce process. If the ball bounces at an oblique angle then it can slide throughout…

  10. Corrosion-Resistant Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdankiewicz, E. M.; Linaburg, E. L.; Lytle, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Self-lubricating bearing system withstands highly corrosive environment of wastewater-recycling unit. New bearings contain cobalt-based-alloy balls and races, graphite/polyimide polymer ball cages, and single integral polytetrafluoroethylene seals on wet sides. Materials and design prevent corrosion by acids and provide lubrication.

  11. What makes bowling balls hook?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    2004-09-01

    This article presents exact equations of motion for a rotating bowling ball in a form that explicitly separates contributions due to nonequal principal moments of inertia, center-of-mass offset, and friction between the ball and lane. A computer program that solves the equations demonstrates that all of these factors are important for a realistic analysis of bowling. These factors significantly affect how much balls hook, that is, deflect sideways and approach the pins at an oblique angle. Simulations that approximate real bowling conditions indicate that the largest contribution comes from variable friction along the lane, that is, bowling lanes are generally prepared so that lane friction is higher by a factor of 2 or more along the last one-third of the ball's trajectory. The analysis supports most (but not all) of the guidelines that bowlers have developed for predicting ball performance.

  12. The ISOLDE Silicon Ball

    SciTech Connect

    Fraile, L.M.

    2003-09-16

    The investigation of weakly bound nuclei close to the particle driplines makes necessary the development of new spectroscopy devices with the capability of detecting charged particles and precisely determining their energy, angular distribution and nature. With this aim the ISOLDE Silicon Ball is under construction. It is a charged particle spectroscopy device with the requirements of high geometrical efficiency and broad energy range coverage, designed for the investigation of the exotic nuclei produced at ISOLDE and at other similar facilities. In order to allow for particle identification the simultaneous use of the Time of Flight (TOF) and Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques is intended. Recoil tagging capabilities, suitable for transfer reactions to be performed at REX-ISOLDE, should be foreseen for a future development. The design and realization of the first prototype, together with the first tests are reported.

  13. Inter-tester and intra-tester reliability of ultrasound imaging measurements of abdominal muscles in adolescents with and without idiopathic scoliosis: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hoe S; Yoo, Ji W; Lee, Bo A; Choi, Chang K; You, Joshua H

    2014-01-01

    The present study established inter-tester and intra-tester reliabilities of ultrasound imaging and diagnostically differentiated muscle imbalances in lateral abdominal muscle sizes between normal adolescents and adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Fifteen adolescents with AIS were age- and gender-matched with 15 normal adolescents. There was no significant difference between bilateral abdominal muscles in normal adolescents, but there was a significant difference between bilateral abdominal muscles in adolescents with AIS (P<0.05). Overall, inter-tester and intra-tester reliabilities in normal and AIS adolescents ranged from 0.801-0.984. This novel study shows that using ultrasound imaging to measure lateral abdominal muscle thickness is: (1) highly reliable between and within the testers; and (2) capable of distinguishing between subjects with and without pathological muscle morphology due to AIS.

  14. Coalescence of a Drop inside another Drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugundhan, Vivek; Jian, Zhen; Yang, Fan; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    Coalescence dynamics of a pendent drop sitting inside another drop, has been studied experimentally and in numerical simulations. Using an in-house fabricated composite micro-nozzle, a smaller salt-water drop is introduced inside a larger oil drop which is pendent in a tank containing the same liquid as the inner drop. On touching the surface of outer drop, the inner drop coalesces with the surrounding liquid forming a vortex ring, which grows in time to form a mushroom-like structure. The initial dynamics at the first bridge opening up is quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), while matching the refractive index of the two liquids. The phenomenon is also numerically simulated using the open-source code Gerris. The problem is fully governed by two non-dimensional parameters: the Ohnesorge number and the diameter ratios of the two drops. The validated numerical model is used to better understand the dynamics of the phenomenon. In some cases a coalescence cascade is observed with liquid draining intermittently and the inner drop reducing in size.

  15. Conformal Contact Problems of Ball-socket and Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhangang; Hao, Caizhe

    This paper focuses attention on non-conformal and almost conformal contact of ball and ball-socket. Two-dimensional finite element models are developed to calculate the normal contact stress distribution and contact area. The effects of geometry dimension and external load on the contact pressure distribution and contact region are presented, respectively. Meanwhile, the results of FEM and solutions of Hertz contact theory are compared. The results indicates that contact state of ball and ball-socket changes from point contact to area contact with the increasing of the dimensionless number-curvature radius coefficient f and the number of f =0.536 (≈0.54) is critical parameter causing the change.

  16. Rolling-element fatigue life of AISI M-50 and 18-4-1 balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1978-01-01

    Rolling element fatigue studies were conducted with AISI M-50, EFR 18-4-1, and VAR 18-4-1. Groups of 12.7 mm (1/2-in) diameter balls of each material were tested in the five ball fatigue tester. Test conditions included a load of 1540 N (347 lbf) giving a maximum Hertz stress of 5520 MPa (800 000 psi), a shaft speed of 10,700 rpm, and a contact angle of 30 deg. Tests were run at a race temperature of 339 K (150 F) with a type 2 ester lubricant. The rolling element fatigue life of AISI M-50 was not significantly different from that of EFR 18-4-1 or VAR 18-4-1 based on a statistical comparison of the test results.

  17. PCB Tester Selection for Future Systems. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    cannot be sufficiently flexible for all respondents. 3- 7 The questionnaire (as listed in Appendix E) was mailed to MUG members and/or followed up by...PCB TESTER SELECTION FOR FUTURE SYSTEMS C - F30602-99-C-0146 PE - 62702F 6, AUTHOR(S) PR - 2338 TA - 02 William Schmitt WU - 4D 7 . PERFORMING...3.2.4.1 RESEARCH ........................................ 3-6 3.2.4.2 STUDIES AND REPORT SELECTION .................. 3- 7 3.2.5 ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY SURVEY

  18. Rolling Motion of a Ball Spinning About a Near-Vertical Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    A ball that is projected forward without spin on a horizontal surface will slide for a short distance before it starts rolling. Sliding friction acts to decrease the translation speed v and it acts to increase the rotation speed ω. When v = Rω, where R is the ball radius, the ball will start rolling and the friction force drops almost to zero since the contact point at the bottom of the ball comes to rest on the surface. The coefficient of rolling friction is much smaller than that for sliding friction. A different situation arises if the ball is projected forward while it is spinning about a vertical or near vertical axis. The latter situation arises in many ball sports. It arises if a player attempts to curve a ball down a bowling alley, or when a billiards player imparts sidespin or "English" to a ball,2 and it can arise in golf if a player strikes a ball with a putter at a point well away from the middle of the putter head. The situation also arises in the game of curling,3 although in that case the object that is projected is a cylindrical rock rather than a spherical ball, and it arises in tennis when a ball lands on the court spinning about a near vertical axis, as it does in both a slice serve and a kick serve. In a slice serve, the axis is almost vertical. In a kick serve, the axis is tilted about 30 degrees away from the vertical in order to increase the amount of topspin.4

  19. Experimental Analysis of Damping and Tribological Characteristics of Nano-CuO Particle Mixed Lubricant in Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, E.; Sivakumar, K.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental analysis of damping capacity and tribological characteristics of nano CuO added Servosystem 68 lubricant is attempted. CuO nano particles were synthesized by aqueous precipitation method and characterized. Prior to dispersion into lubricant, CuO nano particles were coated with 0.2 wt.% surfactant (Span-80) to stabilize the nano fluid. Tribological characteristics of particle added lubricant were tested in ASTM D 4172 four ball wear tester. Scanning electron microscopy test results of worn surfaces of nano CuO particle added lubricant were smoother than base lubricant. The particle added lubricant was applied in a new ball bearing and three defected ball bearings. When particle added lubricant was used, the ball defected bearing's vibration amplitude was reduced by 21.94% whereas it was 16.46% for new bearing and was ≤ 11% for other defected bearings. The formation of protection film of CuO over ball surface and regime of full film lubrication near the ball zone were observed to be reason for improved damping of vibrations.

  20. Enhancing the Bounce of a Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2010-01-01

    In sports such as baseball, softball, golf, and tennis, a common objective is to hit the ball as fast or as far as possible. Another common objective is to hit the ball so that it spins as fast as possible, since the trajectory of the ball through the air is strongly affected by ball spin. In an attempt to enhance both the coefficient of…

  1. Enhancing the Bounce of a Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2010-01-01

    In sports such as baseball, softball, golf, and tennis, a common objective is to hit the ball as fast or as far as possible. Another common objective is to hit the ball so that it spins as fast as possible, since the trajectory of the ball through the air is strongly affected by ball spin. In an attempt to enhance both the coefficient of…

  2. History of ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowson, D.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The familiar precision rolling-element bearings of the twentieth century are products of exacting technology and sophisticated science. Their very effectiveness and basic simplicity of form may discourage further interest in their history and development. Yet the full story covers a large portion of recorded history and surprising evidence of an early recognition of the advantages of rolling motion over sliding action and progress toward the development of rolling-element bearings. The development of rolling-element bearings is followed from the earliest civilizations to the end of the eighteenth century. The influence of general technological developments, particularly those concerned with the movement of large building blocks, road transportation, instruments, water-raising equipment, and windmills are discussed, together with the emergence of studies of the nature of rolling friction and the impact of economic factors. By 1800 the essential features of ball and rolling-element bearings had emerged and it only remained for precision manufacture and mass production to confirm the value of these fascinating machine elements.

  3. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  4. MODIFIED BALL AND SOCKET COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Kalen, D.D.

    1961-05-23

    A ball and socket coupling arrangement is described in which the male and female members may be engaged or disengaged without visual aid. The female member has an internal spherical seat through which slots are provided to accommodate appropriately arranged and shaped ribs in the ball member. After engagement of the members, one or both are rotated to lock them together to prevent accidental disengagement. (AEC)

  5. Modified Ball and Socket Coupling

    DOEpatents

    Conley, Jr, W. R.; Pitman, R. W.

    1961-05-23

    A ball and socket coupling arrangement is given in which the male and female members may be engaged or disengaged without visual aid. The female member has an internal spherical seat through which slots are provided to accommodate appropriately arranged and shaped ribs in the male ball member. After engagement of the members, one or both are rotated to lock them together to prevent accidental disengagement.

  6. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, F. Jr.; Schatzel, S.J.

    1998-04-21

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas; a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers and a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container; and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use. 5 figs.

  7. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Jr., Fred; Schatzel, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas- a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers, a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container, and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use.

  8. Test strategies for industrial testers for converter controls equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleniuk, P.; Di Cosmo, M.; Kasampalis, V.; Nisbet, D.; Todd, B.; Uznański, S.

    2017-04-01

    Power converters and their controls electronics are key elements for the operation of the CERN accelerator complex, having a direct impact on its availability. To prevent early-life failures and provide means to verify electronics, a set of industrial testers is used throughout the converters controls electronics' life cycle. The roles of the testers are to validate mass production during the manufacturing phase and to provide means to diagnose and repair failed modules that are brought back from operation. In the converter controls electronics section of the power converters group in the technology department of CERN (TE/EPC/CCE), two main test platforms have been adopted: a PXI platform for mixed analogue-digital functional tests and a JTAG Boundary-Scan platform for digital interconnection and functional tests. Depending on the functionality of the device under test, the appropriate test platforms are chosen. This paper is a follow-up to results presented at the TWEPP 2015 conference, adding the boundary scan test platform and the first results from exploitation of the test system. This paper reports on the test software, hardware design and test strategy applied for a number of devices that has resulted in maximizing test coverage and minimizing test design effort.

  9. Drop deployment system for crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a crystal growth apparatus (10) generally used for growing protein crystals wherein a vapor diffusion method is used for growing the crystals. In this apparatus, a precipitating solution and a solution containing dissolved crystalline material are stored in separate vials (12, 14), each having a resilient diaphragm (28) across one end and an opening (24) with a puncturable septum (26) thereacross at an opposite end. The vials are placed in receptacles (30) having a manifold (41) with a manifold diaphragm (42) in contact with the vial diaphragm at one end of the receptacle and a hollow needle (36) for puncturing the septum at the other end of the manifold. The needles of each vial communicate with a ball mixer (40) that mixes the precipitate and protein solutions and directs the mixed solution to a drop support (64) disposed in a crystal growth chamber (16), the drop support being a tube with an inner bevelled surface (66) that provides more support for the drop (68) than the tubes of the prior art. A sealable storage region (70) intermediate the drop support and mixer provides storage of the drop (68) and the grown crystals.

  10. Predicting brain acceleration during heading of soccer ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Zahari; Hasnun Arif Hassan, Mohd; Azri Aris, Mohd; Anuar, Zulfika

    2013-12-01

    There has been a long debate whether purposeful heading could cause harm to the brain. Studies have shown that repetitive heading could lead to degeneration of brain cells, which is similarly found in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. A two-degree of freedom linear mathematical model was developed to study the impact of soccer ball to the brain during ball-to-head impact in soccer. From the model, the acceleration of the brain upon impact can be obtained. The model is a mass-spring-damper system, in which the skull is modelled as a mass and the neck is modelled as a spring-damper system. The brain is a mass with suspension characteristics that are also defined by a spring and a damper. The model was validated by experiment, in which a ball was dropped from different heights onto an instrumented dummy skull. The validation shows that the results obtained from the model are in a good agreement with the brain acceleration measured from the experiment. This findings show that a simple linear mathematical model can be useful in giving a preliminary insight on what human brain endures during a ball-to-head impact.

  11. Eye Drop Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Drop Tips en Español email Send this article ... the reach of children. Steps For Putting In Eye Drops: Start by tilting your head backward while ...

  12. Attracting Water Drops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Ron Garan perform the Attracting Water Drops experiment from Chabad Hebrew Academy in San Diego, Calif. This research determines if a free-floating water drop can be att...

  13. Intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia measurement at the hallux.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Alex; Lanting, Sean; Chuter, Vivienne

    2015-05-01

    Post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia (PORH) is a measurement of the vasodilatory capacity of the microvasculature that is associated with cardiovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease and foot ulceration. The reliability of its measurement in the hallux (great toe) for clinical and research purposes has not been adequately assessed. This study assesses both the intra-tester reliability and inter-tester reliability of four methods of assessing PORH in the hallux. A within-subject repeated measures design was used. Forty-two participants underwent PORH testing using four methods: pressure measurement with photoplethysmography; an automated laser Doppler technique with local heating; an automated laser Doppler technique without local heating; and a manual laser Doppler technique. Participants underwent testing on two occasions with a three to 14 day interval. Laser Doppler measurement with a heating probe was found to be the most reliable method of PORH measurement. The index of the area under the curve pre- and post-occlusion and peak perfusion as a percentage of baseline were the most reliable variables. PORH can be reliably measured using laser Doppler when combined with a heating probe. Further research is required to determine the clinical utility of photoplethysmography in the measurement of PORH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Eye drop neurology.

    PubMed

    Bennetto, Luke; Guly, Catherine; Ormerod, Ian; Plant, Gordon T

    2014-06-01

    Eye drops can help to diagnose and prevent complications of neurological disorders. Guttae ophthalmicae (eye drops) are generally safe because the drugs rarely achieve significant systemic concentrations, although there are rare exceptions. This article covers contemporary pharmacological pupil testing; how to dilate a pupil safely; common reasons why pupils do not respond to drops; and corneal lubrication to prevent complications of weak eye closure.

  15. Enhancing the Bounce of a Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2010-10-01

    In sports such as baseball, softball, golf, and tennis, a common objective is to hit the ball as fast or as far as possible. Another common objective is to hit the ball so that it spins as fast as possible, since the trajectory of the ball through the air is strongly affected by ball spin. In an attempt to enhance both the coefficient of restitution (COR) and the spin of a golf ball, I conducted several experiments to see what would happen when a 45-g, 42.8-mm diameter golf ball bounced on: (a) a 58-mm diameter, 103-g Super Ball®; (b) an 8-mm thick, 56-mm diameter circular disk of Super Ball material cut from a large Super Ball and glued to a 3.4-kg lead brick; and (c) a 3-mm thick sheet of rubber glued to a 3.4-kg lead brick. (See Fig. 1.)

  16. Particle creation from Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stephen S.

    2006-11-01

    Non-topological solitons, Q-balls can arise in many particle theories with U(1) global symmetries. As was shown by Cohen et al. [A.G. Cohen, S.R. Coleman, H. Georgi, A. Manohar, The evaporation of Q-balls, Nucl. Phys. B 272 (1986) 301], if the corresponding scalar field couples to massless fermions, large Q-balls are unstable and evaporate, producing a fermion flux proportional to the Q-ball's surface. In this paper we analyse Q-ball instabilities as a function of Q-ball size ans fermion mass. In particular, we construct an exact quantum-mechanical description of the evaporating Q-ball. This new construction provides an alternative method to compute Q-ball's evaporation rates. We shall also find the new expression for the upper bound on evaporation as a function of the produced fermion mass and study the effects of Q ball's size on particle production.

  17. Hand-Drawn Resistors and a Simple Tester Using a Light-Emitting Diode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Abe, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    A thick line drawn on a sheet of paper with a 6B pencil is electrically conductive and its resistance can be roughly estimated using a simple tester made of a light-emitting diode (LED) and a lithium coin-type cell. Using this hand-drawn resistor and the LED tester, we developed teaching materials that help students to understand how electrical…

  18. Hand-Drawn Resistors and a Simple Tester Using a Light-Emitting Diode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Abe, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    A thick line drawn on a sheet of paper with a 6B pencil is electrically conductive and its resistance can be roughly estimated using a simple tester made of a light-emitting diode (LED) and a lithium coin-type cell. Using this hand-drawn resistor and the LED tester, we developed teaching materials that help students to understand how electrical…

  19. Genetic and environmental influences on temperament in middle childhood: analyses of teacher and tester ratings.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, S; Saudino, K J; Plomin, R; Fulker, D W; DeFries, J C

    1996-04-01

    Parent ratings of temperament in infancy and childhood yield evidence for genetic influence in twin studies but not in adoption studies. The present study used the sibling adoption design to investigate teacher and tester ratings of temperament in middle childhood. When each child was 7 years old, ratings on the Colorado Childhood Temperament Inventory were obtained from a teacher and tester for more than 50 pairs each of adoptive and nonadoptive siblings in the Colorado Adoption Project. Significant genetic influence emerged for both teacher and tester ratings of Activity, for tester ratings of Sociability, and for teacher ratings of Emotionality. Results obtained from bivariate genetic analysis suggest that the modest covariance between teacher and tester ratings of Activity is entirely mediated genetically. Except for teacher ratings of Attention Span, evidence of shared family environment was nonsignificant, despite the power of the sibling adoption design to detect it.

  20. Drop coalescence studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikumar, A. V.; Wang, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to understand the detailed mechanics of the coalescence of liquid drops. The experiments are being conducted in an immiscible acoustic levitator with degassed water as the host medium. Typically, a quasineutrally buoyant drop of silicon oil mixed with bromobenzene is levitated close to the velocity node of the levitator. A second drop of the same liquid is introduced, and as it slowly seeks levitation position, the drops coalesce. Coalescence is delayed until the host film between drops is completely drained. Following coalescence, the excess surface energy in the coalesced drop is dissipated through shape oscillations. The final events of film rupture followed by drop coalescence are rapid and are photographically studied with high-speed video (1000 fps). The laser-induced fluorescence technique is used to visualize the dynamics of host film drainage. The details of the coalescence mechanics are presented.

  1. A portable fracture toughness tester for biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvell, B. W.; Lee, P. K. D.; Yuen, T. D. B.; Lucas, P. W.

    1996-06-01

    A portable mechanical tester is described which is both lightweight and cheap to produce. The machine is simple and convenient to operate and requires only a minimum of personnel training. It can be used to measure the fundamental mechanical properties of pliant solids, particularly toughness (in the sense of `work of fracture') using either scissors or wedge tests. This is achieved through a novel hardware integration technique. The circuits are described. The use of the machine does not require a chart recorder but it can be linked to a personal computer, either to show force - displacement relationships or for data storage. The design allows the use of any relatively `soft' mechanical test, i.e. tests in which the deformability of the frame of the machine and its load cell do not introduce significant errors into the results. Examples of its use in measuring the toughness of biomaterials by scissors (paper, wood) and wedges (mung bean starch gels) are given.

  2. MSFC cryogenic turbopump bearing tester results and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, F. J.; Cody, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A full scale High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) bearing tester has been developed, and an existing test stand modified, to simulate turbopump operating conditions for Space Shuttle Main Engine HPOTP design. Following a description of test facilities and procedures, design certification and calibration tests, and tests at a moderate axial load, are discussed. Results show that a bearing life of about 4500 seconds is comparable to the life experienced in the engine pump at nominal high power level operating conditions, and that although increased coolant flow increased fluid viscous work and bearing loads, a net decrease in bearing temperature was noted. Increased coolant flow is found to improve bearing cooling for marginal conditions, and bearing temperatures are shown to become more sensitive to coolant flow as shaft speed is increased. For the 6.4 lbs/s test conditions, the heat generated in a bearing pair is determined to be about 67 percent viscous work and 33 percent contact friction.

  3. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1990-11-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  4. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  5. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1990-01-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  6. A multicommutated tester of bioreactors for flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Pokrzywnicka, Marta; Kamiński, Jacek; Michalec, Michał; Koncki, Robert; Tymecki, Łukasz

    2016-11-01

    Enzymes are often used in the modern analytical procedures allowing selective recognition and conversion of target analytes into easily detected products. In flow analysis systems, enzymes are predominantly applied in the immobilized forms as flow-through bioreactors. In this research the multicommutated flow analysis (MCFA) system for evaluation and comparison of analytical parameters of bioreactors has been developed. The MCFA manifold allows simultaneous testing up to four bioreactors, but if necessary their number can be easily increased. The system allows comparison of several parameters of tested bioreactors including activity, repeatability, reproducibility, operational and storage stability. The performance of developed bioreactor tester is presented using urea-urease model system based on plastic open-tubular bioreactor with covalently immobilized enzyme. Product of enzymatic reaction is detected using two different chemical methods and by dedicated optoelectronic ammonium detectors. Moreover, the utility of developed MCFA manifold for evaluation of other enzyme bioreactors is demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Heat flux measurement in SSME turbine blade tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1990-01-01

    Surface heat flux values were measured in the turbine blade thermal cycling tester located at NASA-Marshall. This is the first time heat flux has been measured in a space shuttle main engine turbopump environment. Plots of transient and quasi-steady state heat flux data over a range of about 0 to 15 MW/sq m are presented. Data were obtained with a miniature heat flux gage device developed at NASA-Lewis. The results from these tests are being incorporated into turbine design models. Also, these gages are being considered for airfoil surface heat flux measurement on turbine vanes mounted in SSME turbopump test bed engine nozzles at Marshall. Heat flux effects that might be observed on degraded vanes are discussed.

  8. Microprocessor tester for the treat upgrade reactor trip system

    SciTech Connect

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Bucher, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The upgrading of the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility at ANL-Idaho has been designed to provide additional experimental capabilities for the study of core disruptive accident (CDA) phenomena. In addition, a programmable Automated Reactor Control System (ARCS) will permit high-power transients up to 11,000 MW having a controlled reactor period of from 15 to 0.1 sec. These modifications to the core neutronics will improve simulation of LMFBR accident conditions. Finally, a sophisticated, multiply-redundant safety system, the Reactor Trip System (RTS), will provide safe operation for both steady state and transient production operating modes. To insure that this complex safety system is functioning properly, a Dedicated Microprocessor Tester (DMT) has been implemented to perform a thorough checkout of the RTS prior to all TREAT operations.

  9. Initial development of an electronic testis rigidity tester.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros; Tsakiridis, Odysseus

    2011-03-22

    We aimed to develop our previously presented mechanical device, the Testis Rigidity Tester (TRT), into an electronic system (Electronic Testis Rigidity Tester, ETRT) by applying tactile imaging, which has been used successfully with other solid organs. A measuring device, located at the front end of the ETRT incorporates a tactile sensor comprising an array of microsensors. By application of a predetermined deformation of 2 mm, increased pressure alters linearly the resistance of each microsensor, producing changes of voltage. These signals were amplified, filtered, and digitized, and then processed by an electronic collector system, which presented them as a color-filled contour plot of the area of the testis coming into contact with the sensor. Testis models of different rigidity served for initial evaluation of ETRT; their evacuated central spaces contained different, increasing glue masses. An independent method of rigidity measurement, using an electric weight scale and a micrometer, showed that the more the glue injected, the greater the force needed for a 2-mm deformation. In a preliminary test, a single sensor connected to a multimeter showed similar force measurement for the same deformation in these phantoms. For each of the testis models compressed in the same manner, the ETRT system offered a map of pressures, represented by a color scale within the contour plot of the contact area with the sensor. ETRT found certain differences in rigidity between models that had escaped detection by a blind observer. ETRT is easy to use and provides a color-coded "insight" of the testis internal structure. After experimental testing, it could be valuable in intraoperative evaluation of testes, so that the surgeon can decide about orchectomy or orcheopexy.

  10. MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in MIPP) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 {micro}s respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 second spill and read them out in {approx}50 seconds between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab. An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

  11. The Automated Bicron Tester: Automated electronic instrument diagnostic, testing, and alignment system with records generation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, G.S.; Maddox, S.R.; Turner, G.W.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1995-11-01

    The Bicron Surveyor MX is a portable radiation monitoring instrument used by the Office of Radiation Protection at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This instrument must be calibrated in order to assure reliable operation. A manual calibration procedure was developed, but it was time consuming and repetitive. Therefore, an automated tester station that would allow the technicians to calibrate the instruments faster and more reliably was developed. With the automated tester station, calibration records and accountability could be generated and maintained automatically. This allows the technicians to concentrate on repairing defective units. The Automated Bicron Tester consists of an operator interface, an analog board, and a digital controller board. The panel is the user interface that allows the technician to communicate with the tester. The analog board has an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) that converts the signals from the instrument into digital data that the tester can manipulate. The digital controller board contains the circuitry to perform the test and to communicate the results to the host personal computer (PC). The tester station is connected to the unit under test through a special test harness that attaches to a header on the Bicron. The tester sends pulse trains to the Bicron and measures the resulting meter output. This is done to determine if the unit is functioning properly. The testers are connected to the host PC through an RS-485 serial line. The host PC polls all the tester stations that are connected to it and collects data from those that have completed a calibration. It logs these data and stores the record in a format ready for export to the Maintenance, Accountability, Jobs, and Inventory Control (MAJIC) database. It also prints a report. The programs for the Automated Bicron Tester and the host are written in the C language.

  12. Ball lightning risk to aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, R.; Keul, A.

    2009-04-01

    Lightning is a rare but regular phenomenon for air traffic. Aircraft are designed to withstand lightning strikes. Research on lightning and aircraft can be called detailed and effective. In the last 57 years, 18 reported lightning aviation disasters with a fatality figure of at least 714 persons occurred. For comparison, the last JACDEC ten-year average fatality figure was 857. The majority encountered lightning in the climb, descent, approach and/or landing phase. Ball lightning, a metastable, rare lightning type, is also seen from and even within aircraft, but former research only reported individual incidents and did not generate a more detailed picture to ascertain whether it constitutes a significant threat to passenger and aircraft safety. Lacking established incident report channels, observations were often only passed on as "air-travel lore". In an effort to change this unsatisfactory condition, the authors have collected a first international dataset of 38 documented ball lightning aircraft incidents from 1938 to 2001 involving 13 reports over Europe, 13 over USA/Canada, and 7 over Russia. 18 (47%) reported ball lightning outside the aircraft, 18 (47%) inside, 2 cases lacked data. 8 objects caused minor damage, 8 major damage (total: 42%), only one a crash. No damage was reported in 18 cases. 3 objects caused minor crew injury. In most cases, ball lightning lasted several seconds. 11 (29%) incidents ended with an explosion of the object. A cloud-aircraft lightning flash was seen in only 9 cases (24%) of the data set. From the detailed accounts of air personnel in the last 70 years, it is evident that ball lightning is rarely, but consistently observed in connection with aircraft and can also occur inside the airframe. Reports often came from multiple professional witnesses and in several cases, damages were investigated by civil or military authorities. Although ball lightning is no main air traffic risk, the authors suggest that incident and accident

  13. Finger Injuries in Ball Sports.

    PubMed

    Netscher, David T; Pham, Dang T; Staines, Kimberly Goldie

    2017-02-01

    Finger injuries are common in athletes playing in professional ball sports. Understanding the intricate anatomy of the digit is necessary to properly diagnose and manage finger injuries. Unrecognized or poorly managed finger injuries can lead to chronic deformities that can affect an athlete's performance. Multiple factors and treatment options should be considered to provide the best functional outcome and rapid return to play for an athlete. This article discusses the mechanism of injury, diagnosis, treatment, and return-to-play recommendations for common finger injuries in ball sports.

  14. Hardnesses of metal parts and constructions measured for comparison by small hardness testers with different principles of operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyunin, V. M.; Karimbekov, M. A.; Marchenkov, A. Yu.; Demidov, A. N.

    2016-12-01

    The existing handheld and portable hardness testers are classified depending on their operating principles. The advantages and disadvantages of the measurement procedures and the hardness testers are considered. The hardnesses of the metal parts with different masses and stiffness are measured by mechanical and physical-mechanical hardness testers and compared. The test errors are estimated. Recommendations for the calibration of the hardness testers of physical and mechanical operating principles are given.

  15. Acting Administrator Lightfoot Visits Ball Aerospace

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-06

    Acting NASA Deputy Administrator Lesa Roe, right, speaks with Rob Strain, president of Ball Aerospace, Thursday, April 6, 2017 during a visit to Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  16. 2012 Problem 15: Frustrating Golf Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Zhu, Zheyuan; Gao, Wenli; Wang, Sihui

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the condition for a golf ball to escape from a hole. The two determining factors are the ball's initial velocity v0 and its deviation from the center of the hole d. There is a critical escaping velocity vc for every deviation d. The ball's motion is analyzed by calculating the change of velocity whenever the ball collides with the hole. The critical conditions predicted by our theory are verified through experiment.

  17. Silicon Nitride Balls For Cryogenic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, Myles F.; Ng, Lillian W.

    1990-01-01

    Resistance to wear greater than that of 440C steel. Experiments show lives of ball bearings immersed in liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen increased significantly when 440C steel balls (running on 440C steel races) replaced by balls of silicon nitride. Developed for use at high temperatures, where lubrication poor or nonexistent. Best wear life of any bearing tested to date and ball material spalls without fracturing. Plans for future tests call for use of liquid oxygen as working fluid.

  18. Scanning drop sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Shinde, Aniketa A.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Jones, Ryan J.; Marcin, Martin R.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical or electrochemical and photochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  19. Scanning drop sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  20. Does Ease to Block a Ball Affect Perceived Ball Speed? Examination of Alternative Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Jessica K.; Sugovic, Mila

    2012-01-01

    According to an action-specific account of perception, the perceived speed of a ball can be a function of the ease to block the ball. Balls that are easier to stop look like they are moving slower than balls that are more difficult to stop. This was recently demonstrated with a modified version of the classic computer game Pong (Witt & Sugovic,…

  1. Laboratory-produced ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golka, Robert K., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    For 25 years I have actively been searching for the true nature of ball lightning and attempting to reproduce it at will in the laboratory. As one might expect, many unidentified lights in the atmosphere have been called ball lightning, including Texas Maffa lights (automobile headlights), flying saucers (UFOs), swamp gas in Ann Arbor, Michigan, etc. For 15 years I thought ball lightning was strictly a high-voltage phenomenon. It was not until 1984 when I was short-circuiting the electrical output of a diesel electric railroad locomotive that I realized that the phenomenon was related more to a high current. Although I am hoping for some other types of ball lightning to emerge such as strictly electrostatic-electromagnetic manifestations, I have been unlucky in finding laboratory provable evidence. Cavity-formed plasmodes can be made by putting a 2-inch burning candle in a home kitchen microwave oven. The plasmodes float around for as long as the microwave energy is present.

  2. Reflections on a Disco Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2016-01-01

    A disco ball is a spherical object covered with small plane mirrors. When light reflects on these mirrors, it is scattered in many directions, producing a novel effect. The mirror globe is usually set to rotate, creating a profusion of moving spots (Fig. 1). In this article, we present a geometrical description of the movement of these spots and…

  3. Idea Bank: Wiffle Ball Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael

    2009-01-01

    Projectile motion, a cornerstone topic of introductory physics, is usually a student's first exposure to the problem-solving techniques used in this subject. Often, this is an inactive learning experience--students work with pencil and paper to read and solve projectile motion problems (e.g., diagrams and descriptions of balls being hit, kicked,…

  4. Idea Bank: Wiffle Ball Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael

    2009-01-01

    Projectile motion, a cornerstone topic of introductory physics, is usually a student's first exposure to the problem-solving techniques used in this subject. Often, this is an inactive learning experience--students work with pencil and paper to read and solve projectile motion problems (e.g., diagrams and descriptions of balls being hit, kicked,…

  5. Secrets of the Crystal Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croucher, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how a crystal ball known as "The Flash Mind Reader" is played. "The Flash Mind Reader" is a mathematics game in which the player is invited to select any-two digit number and then subtract the sum of these two digits from the original number. A chart is provided in which the (adjusted) number they obtained will have a symbol…

  6. Reflections on a Disco Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2016-01-01

    A disco ball is a spherical object covered with small plane mirrors. When light reflects on these mirrors, it is scattered in many directions, producing a novel effect. The mirror globe is usually set to rotate, creating a profusion of moving spots (Fig. 1). In this article, we present a geometrical description of the movement of these spots and…

  7. Drag on Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  8. Intra and inter-tester reliability of the tuck jump assessment.

    PubMed

    Herrington, Lee; Myer, Gregory D; Munro, Allan

    2013-08-01

    To assess the inter-tester and intra-tester reliability of the tuck jump test. Repeated measures. University Human Performance laboratory. Five male and 5 female athletes undertook the Tuck jump test which was then assessed by two independent assessors. Score from the video assessment of the tuck jump test by two independent assessors on two separate occasions. Average percentage of exact agreement (PEA) between the two testers across all scoring criteria for all subjects was 93% (range 80-100%). Both testers were in absolute 100% agreement in 5 out of 10 subjects for all of the scoring criteria. The kappa measure of agreement was k = 0.88 which is very good/excellent. The intra-tester PEA ranged 87.2%-100%, with kappa values of k = 0.86-1.0. The study showed very good-excellent intra-tester and inter-tester reliability for both examiners when comparing their individual scores of the tuck jump test across two analysis sessions. These findings indicate that the proposed tuck jump assessment is reliable to identify abnormal landing mechanics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Design and Verification of an FPGA-based Bit Error Rate Tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Annie; Gong, Datao; Hou, Suen; Liu, Chonghan; Liang, Futian; Liu, Tiankuan; Su, Da-Shung; Teng, Ping-Kun; Ye, Jingbo

    Bit error rate (BER) is the principle measure of performance of a data transmission link. With the integration of high-speed transceivers inside a field programmable gate array (FPGA), the BER testing can now be handled by transceiver-enabled FPGA hardware. This provides a cheaper alternative to dedicated table-top equipment and offers the flexibility of test customization and data analysis. This paper presents a BER tester implementation based on the Altera Stratix II GX and IV GT development boards. The architecture of the tester is described. Lab test results and field test data analysis are discussed. The Stratix II GX tester operates at up to 5 Gbps and the Stratix IV GT tester operates at up to 10 Gbps, both in 4 duplex channels. The tester deploys a pseudo random bit sequence (PRBS) generator and detector, a transceiver controller, and an error logger. It also includes a computer interface for data acquisition and user configuration. The tester's functionality was validated and its performance characterized in a point-to-point serial optical link setup. BER vs. optical receiver sensitivity was measured to emulate stressed link conditions. The Stratix II GX tester was also used in a proton test on a custom designed serializer chip to record and analyse radiation-induced errors.

  10. Lightweight, high speed bearing balls: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Low mass bearing balls with hardened iron-plated surfaces can eliminate problems of low fatigue strength and flexure fatigue, and lead to increased life and reliability of high speed ball bearings. Low mass balls exert lower centrifugal forces on outer race of bearing thus eliminating detrimental effect of high speed operation.

  11. Flare angles measured with ball gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, D.; Wall, W. A.

    1968-01-01

    Precision tungsten carbide balls measure the internal angle of flared joints. Measurements from small and large balls in the flare throat to an external reference point are made. The difference in distances and diameters determine the average slope of the flare between the points of ball contact.

  12. Playing Ball in a Space Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    How does artificial gravity affect the path of a thrown ball? This paper contrasts ball trajectories on the Little Prince's asteroid planet B-612 and Arthur C. Clarke's rotating-drum spacecraft of 2001, and demonstrates curve balls with multiple loops in the latter environment.

  13. Playing Ball in a Space Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    How does artificial gravity affect the path of a thrown ball? This paper contrasts ball trajectories on the Little Prince's asteroid planet B-612 and Arthur C. Clarke's rotating-drum spacecraft of 2001, and demonstrates curve balls with multiple loops in the latter environment.

  14. Encapsulated Ball Bearings for Rotary Micro Machines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    properties between 440C stainless steel balls and silicon are quite low when compared to pure sliding motion due to the rolling nature. The frictional...fabrication of the rotary ball bearing is based on commercially available 440C stainless steel balls with a diameter, dball, of 285 µm and a lot diameter

  15. Tester Board for testing mass-produced SMB modules for CMS Preshower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikzhanin, Y. S.; Chou, C. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Lee, Y. J.; Shiu, J. G.; Sun, C. D.; Wang, Y. Z.

    2007-09-01

    We have developed a Tester Board to test the electrical characteristics of the System Motherboard (SMB) for the CMS Preshower detector at CERN. The board is designed to test input resistances, output resistances, connections, interconnections and possible short- circuits of a module having up to 640 connector pins. The Tester Board is general-purpose in nature: it could be used to test any electronic module or cable by using dedicated cable sets. The module can detect a variety of problems not detected by either functional tests or the "flying probes" technique. The design, algorithms and results of using the Tester Board during mass production of CMS Preshower SMBs are presented.

  16. Design and verification of a bit error rate tester in Altera FPGA for optical link developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, T.; Chang, J.; Gong, D.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Xiang, A.; Ye, J.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a custom bit error rate (BER) tester implementation in an Altera Stratix II GX signal integrity development kit. This BER tester deploys a parallel to serial pseudo random bit sequence (PRBS) generator, a bit and link status error detector and an error logging FIFO. The auto-correlation pattern enables receiver synchronization without specifying protocol at the physical layer. The error logging FIFO records both bit error data and link operation events. The tester's BER and data acquisition functions are utilized in a proton test of a 5 Gbps serializer. Experimental and data analysis results are discussed.

  17. Drops in Space: Super Oscillations and Surfactant Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apfel, Robert E.; Tian, Yuren; Jankovsky, Joseph; Shi, Tao; Chen, X.; Holt, R. Glynn; Trinh, Eugene; Croonquist, Arvid; Thornton, Kathyrn C.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.; Coleman, Catherine; Leslie, Fred W.; Matthiesen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    An unprecedented microgravity observation of maximal shape oscillations of a surfactant-bearing water drop the size of a ping pong ball was observed during a mission of Space Shuttle Columbia as part of the second United States Microgravity Laboratory-USML-2 (STS-73, October 20-November 5, 1995). The observation was precipitated by the action of an intense sound field which produced a deforming force on the drop. When this deforming force was suddenly reduced, the drop executed nearly free and axisymmetric oscillations for several cycles, demonstrating a remarkable amplitude of nonlinear motion. Whether arising from the discussion of modes of oscillation of the atomic nucleus, or the explosion of stars, or how rain forms, the complex processes influencing the motion, fission, and coalescence of drops have fascinated scientists for centuries. Therefore, the axisymmetric oscillations of a maximally deformed liquid drop are noteworthy, not only for their scientific value but also for their aesthetic character. Scientists from Yale University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Vanderbilt University conducted liquid drop experiments in microgravity using the acoustic positioning/manipulation environment of the Drop Physics Module (DPM). The Yale/JPL group's objectives were to study the rheological properties of liquid drop surfaces on which are adsorbed surfactant molecules, and to infer surface properties such as surface tension, Gibb's elasticity, and surface dilatational viscosity by using a theory which relies on spherical symmetry to solve the momentum and mass transport equations.

  18. Drop Tower Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  19. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  20. Drop Tower Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  1. Axisymmetric Liquid Hanging Drops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meister, Erich C.; Latychevskaia, Tatiana Yu

    2006-01-01

    The geometry of drops hanging on a circular capillary can be determined by numerically solving a dimensionless differential equation that is independent on any material properties, which enables one to follow the change of the height, surface area, and contact angle of drops hanging on a particular capillary. The results show that the application…

  2. Axisymmetric Liquid Hanging Drops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meister, Erich C.; Latychevskaia, Tatiana Yu

    2006-01-01

    The geometry of drops hanging on a circular capillary can be determined by numerically solving a dimensionless differential equation that is independent on any material properties, which enables one to follow the change of the height, surface area, and contact angle of drops hanging on a particular capillary. The results show that the application…

  3. Fate of thermal log type Q balls

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kamada, Kohei; Kasuya, Shinta; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-11-15

    We study time evolution of the Q ball in thermal logarithmic potential using lattice simulations. As the temperature decreases due to the cosmic expansion, the thermal logarithmic term in the potential is eventually overcome by a mass term, and we confirm that the Q ball transforms from the thick-wall type to the thin-wall type for a positive coefficient of radiative corrections to the mass term, as recently suggested. Moreover, we find that the Q ball finally ''melts down'' when the Q-ball solution disappears. We also discuss the effects of this phenomenon on the detectability of gravitational waves from the Q-ball formation.

  4. Nano-porous calcium phosphate balls.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Ildyko; Kosmella, Sabine; Prietzel, Claudia; Bagdahn, Christian; Koetz, Joachim

    2015-08-01

    By dropping a NaH2PO4·H2O precursor solution to a CaCl2 solution at 90°C under continuous stirring in presence of two biopolymers, i.e. gelatin (G) and chitosan (C), supramolecular calcium phosphate (CP) card house structures are formed. Light microscopic investigations in combination with scanning electron microscopy show that the GC-based flower-like structure is constructed from very thin CP platelets. Titration experiments indicate that H-bonding between both biopolymers is responsible for the synergistic effect in presence of both polymers. Gelatin-chitosan-water complexes play an important role with regard to supramolecular ordering. FTIR spectra in combination with powder X-ray diffraction show that after burning off all organic components (heating up >600°C) dicalcium and tricalcium phosphate crystallites are formed. From high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) it is obvious to conclude, that individual crystal platelets are dicalcium phosphates, which build up ball-like supramolecular structures. The results reveal that the GC guided crystal growth leads to nano-porous supramolecular structures, potentially attractive candidates for bone repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Visual Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT) Uncertainty Analysis (Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, A.; Lewandowski, A.; Wendelin, T.

    2010-10-01

    In 1997, an uncertainty analysis was conducted of the Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT). In 2010, we have completed a new analysis, based primarily on the geometric optics of the system, and it shows sensitivities to various design and operational parameters. We discuss sources of error with measuring devices, instrument calibrations, and operator measurements for a parabolic trough mirror panel test. These help to guide the operator in proper setup, and help end-users to understand the data they are provided. We include both the systematic (bias) and random (precision) errors for VSHOT testing and their contributions to the uncertainty. The contributing factors we considered in this study are: target tilt; target face to laser output distance; instrument vertical offset; laser output angle; distance between the tool and the test piece; camera calibration; and laser scanner. These contributing factors were applied to the calculated slope error, focal length, and test article tilt that are generated by the VSHOT data processing. Results show the estimated 2-sigma uncertainty in slope error for a parabolic trough line scan test to be +/-0.2 milliradians; uncertainty in the focal length is +/- 0.1 mm, and the uncertainty in test article tilt is +/- 0.04 milliradians.

  6. Explosive component acceptance tester using laser interferometer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickstrom, Richard D.; Tarbell, William W.

    1993-01-01

    Acceptance testing of explosive components requires a reliable and simple to use testing method that can discern less than optimal performance. For hot-wire detonators, traditional techniques use dent blocks or photographic diagnostic methods. More complicated approaches are avoided because of their inherent problems with setup and maintenance. A recently developed tester is based on using a laser interferometer to measure the velocity of flying plates accelerated by explosively actuated detonators. Unlike ordinary interferometers that monitor displacement of the test article, this device measures velocity directly and is commonly used with non-spectral surfaces. Most often referred to as the VISAR technique (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflecting Surface), it has become the most widely-accepted choice for accurate measurement of velocity in the range greater than 1 mm/micro-s. Traditional VISAR devices require extensive setup and adjustment and therefore are unacceptable in a production-testing environment. This paper describes a new VISAR approach which requires virtually no adjustments, yet provides data with accuracy comparable to the more complicated systems. The device, termed the Fixed-Cavity VISAR, is currently being developed to serve as a product verification tool for hot-wire detonators and slappers. An extensive data acquisition and analysis computer code was also created to automate the manipulation of raw data into final results.

  7. Electric pulp tester conductance through various interface media.

    PubMed

    Mickel, André K; Lindquist, Kimberly A D; Chogle, Sami; Jones, Jefferson J; Curd, Francis

    2006-12-01

    A conducting media is necessary when using an electric pulp tester (EPT). The objective of this study was to observe differences in conductance through various media. We hypothesized that variations in current conductance through different media exist. The pulp chamber of a freshly extracted premolar was exposed, and the cathode of a voltmeter was inserted into the pulpal tissue. The anode was coupled to the EPT handpiece. The measurement taken during dry (no interface media) EPT tip-to-tooth contact was 0 V, which served as negative control. EPT tip directly touching the cathode measured 3.9V and served as positive control. A number of media readily available in the dental office were tested. Data was analyzed using single factor ANOVA. Listerine (3.3) conducted the most voltage (p<0.5). Of nonliquids, K-Y Brand UltraGel and Crest Baking Soda & Peroxide Whitening Tartar Control toothpaste recorded significantly (p<0.05) higher voltage readings (1.4 V).

  8. Screening of stabilized crosslinked polyethylene using a novel wear tester.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, M; Gonzalez-Mora, V; Chiesa, R; Cigada, A; Stroosnijder, M F

    2002-01-01

    A novel pin-on-disk type wear tester is described allowing a rapid screening of different types of polyethylene under both unidirectional and multidirectional sliding motion. The wear of four polyethylene materials sliding against a roughened CoCrMo alloy was evaluated: a non-irradiated UHMWPE, a UHMWPE irradiated with a dose of 25 kGy in air, and two types of crosslinked UHMWPE (100 kGy, air), which were subjected to a stabilization heat treatment in nitrogen at 155 degrees C for 72 hours (XLPE I) and in water at 130 degrees C for 72 hours (XLPE II), respectively.Under multidirectional sliding conditions both types of XLPE exhibited significantly less wear with respect to the 25 kGy irradiated UHMWPE and the non-irradiated UHMWPE, even under the rough counterface conditions applied. Under unidirectional sliding motion both types of XLPE exhibited the highest wear of all materials tested, because the orientation hardening effect acting under linear lubricated condition is less pronounced for crosslinked polyethylene.

  9. Ceramic Rail-Race Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzer, Mark A.; Mungas, Greg S.; Peters, Gregory H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-lubricated ball bearings featuring rail races have been proposed for use in mechanisms that are required to function in the presence of mineral dust particles in very low-pressure, dry environments with extended life. Like a conventional ball bearing, the proposed bearing would include an inner and an outer ring separated by balls in rolling contact with the races. However, unlike a conventional ball bearing, the balls would not roll in semi-circular or gothic arch race grooves in the rings: instead, the races would be shaped to form two or more rails (see figure). During operation, the motion of the balls would push dust particles into the spaces between the rails where the particles could not generate rolling resistance for the balls

  10. SPHERES ultrasound beacon tester floats in Node 1 during Expedition 8

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-24

    ISS008-E-19132 (24 March 2004) --- The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester floats in the Unity node of the International Space Station.

  11. Pulse shaping techniques for a high-g shock tester based on collision principle.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhengyong; Tang, Chuansheng; Li, Yang; Han, Junliang; Wu, Guoxiong

    2016-09-01

    Pulse shaping techniques are discussed in this paper for the practicability of a developed high-g shock tester. The tester is based on collision principle where there is a one-level velocity amplifier. A theoretical and experimental study of pulse shaping techniques is presented. A model was built and theoretical formulae were deduced for the shock peak acceleration and its duration. Then theoretical analysis and some experiments were conducted. The test results verify the validity of theoretical model and show that the shock tester can generate the expected high-g shock pulses by integrated usage of different impact velocities and pulse shapers made from different materials. This is important in practical applications where the items under test can be shown to excite specific resonances at predetermined acceleration levels using the shock tester.

  12. Measurements of drag and lift on smooth balls in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod; Lindsey, Crawford

    2017-07-01

    Measurements are presented on the drag and lift coefficients for three relatively smooth balls launched in air and tracked with two cameras separated horizontally by 6.4 m. The ball spin was varied in order to investigate whether the Magnus force would increase or decrease when the ball spin was increased. For one ball, the Magnus force increased. For another ball, the Magnus force decreased almost to zero after reaching a maximum. For the third ball, the Magnus force was negative at low ball spins and positive at high ball spins. For one of the balls, the ball spin increased with time as it travelled through the air.

  13. Stabbing balls and simplifying proteins.

    PubMed

    Daescu, Ovidiu; Luo, Jun

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of stabbing a sequence of indexed balls B = {B1,B2, . . . , Bn} in R(3), where Bi (1 ball Bk; the goal is to minimise m. The problem finds applications in simplification of molecule chains for visualisation, matching and efficient searching in molecule and protein databases. We implemented the algorithm and created a web server where one can input a pdb file and get the simplified protein chains. We did experiments on thousands of proteins from the PDB Bank to estimate the simplification ratio achieved.

  14. Reflections on a Disco Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2016-12-01

    A disco ball is a spherical object covered with small plane mirrors. When light reflects on these mirrors, it is scattered in many directions, producing a novel effect. The mirror globe is usually set to rotate, creating a profusion of moving spots (Fig. 1). In this article, we present a geometrical description of the movement of these spots and an experimental activity to test the model.

  15. QTL detection in maize testcross progenies as affected by related and unrelated testers.

    PubMed

    Frascaroli, Elisabetta; Canè, Maria Angela; Pè, Mario Enrico; Pea, Giorgio; Morgante, Michele; Landi, Pierangelo

    2009-03-01

    The evaluation of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) per se can be biased by inbreeding depression in case of allogamous species. To overcome this drawback, RILs can be evaluated in combination with testers; however, testers can carry dominant alleles at the quantitative trait loci (QTL), thus hampering their detection. This study was conducted on the maize (Zea mays L.) population of 142 RILs derived from the single cross B73 x H99 to evaluate the role of different testers in affecting: (1) QTL detection, (2) the estimates of their effects, and (3) the consistency of such estimates across testers. Testcrosses (TCs) were produced by crossing RILs with inbred testers B73 [TC(B)], H99 [TC(H)], and Mo17 [TC(M)]. TCs were field tested in three environments. TC(B) mean was higher than TC(H) mean for all traits, while TC(M) mean was the highest for plant vigor traits and grain yield. As to the number of detected QTL, tester Mo17 was superior to H99 and B73 for traits with prevailing additive effects. Several overlaps among the QTL were detected in two or all the three TC populations with QTL effects being almost always consistent (same sign). For traits with prevailing dominance-overdominance effects, as grain yield, the poor performing tester H99 was clearly the most effective; fewer overlaps were found and some of them were inconsistent (different sign). Epistatic interactions were of minor importance. In conclusion, the three testers proved to affect QTL detection and estimation of their effects, especially for traits showing high dominance levels.

  16. Keeping Your Eyes Continuously on the Ball While Running for Catchable and Uncatchable Fly Balls

    PubMed Central

    Postma, Dees B. W.; den Otter, A. Rob; Zaal, Frank T. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    When faced with a fly ball approaching along the sagittal plane, fielders need information for the control of their running to the interception location. This information could be available in the initial part of the ball trajectory, such that the interception location can be predicted from its initial conditions. Alternatively, such predictive information is not available, and running to the interception location involves continuous visual guidance. The latter type of control would predict that fielders keep looking at the approaching ball for most of its flight, whereas the former type of control would fit with looking at the ball during the early part of the ball's flight; keeping the eyes on the ball during the remainder of its trajectory would not be necessary when the interception location can be inferred from the first part of the ball trajectory. The present contribution studied visual tracking of approaching fly balls. Participants were equipped with a mobile eye tracker. They were confronted with tennis balls approaching from about 20 m, and projected in such a way that some balls were catchable and others were not. In all situations, participants almost exclusively tracked the ball with their gaze until just before the catch or until they indicated that a ball was uncatchable. This continuous tracking of the ball, even when running close to their maximum speeds, suggests that participants employed continuous visual control rather than running to an interception location known from looking at the early part of the ball flight. PMID:24670972

  17. Keeping your eyes continuously on the ball while running for catchable and uncatchable fly balls.

    PubMed

    Postma, Dees B W; den Otter, A Rob; Zaal, Frank T J M

    2014-01-01

    When faced with a fly ball approaching along the sagittal plane, fielders need information for the control of their running to the interception location. This information could be available in the initial part of the ball trajectory, such that the interception location can be predicted from its initial conditions. Alternatively, such predictive information is not available, and running to the interception location involves continuous visual guidance. The latter type of control would predict that fielders keep looking at the approaching ball for most of its flight, whereas the former type of control would fit with looking at the ball during the early part of the ball's flight; keeping the eyes on the ball during the remainder of its trajectory would not be necessary when the interception location can be inferred from the first part of the ball trajectory. The present contribution studied visual tracking of approaching fly balls. Participants were equipped with a mobile eye tracker. They were confronted with tennis balls approaching from about 20 m, and projected in such a way that some balls were catchable and others were not. In all situations, participants almost exclusively tracked the ball with their gaze until just before the catch or until they indicated that a ball was uncatchable. This continuous tracking of the ball, even when running close to their maximum speeds, suggests that participants employed continuous visual control rather than running to an interception location known from looking at the early part of the ball flight.

  18. Dropping the Devil's Advocate: One Novice Language Tester's Shifting Interactional Practices across a Series of Speaking Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyland, Christopher; Greer, Tim; Rettig-Miki, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This study employs longitudinal Conversation Analysis (CA) to examine one TA's follow-up contributions in a series of EFL group discussion tests. By tracking the TA's interactional practices across 18 groups, we observe how she adapts her turn design by increasingly aligning towards that of the novice English speakers. The TA initially attempts to…

  19. Evaluation of disintegration properties of orally rapidly disintegrating tablets using a novel disintegration tester.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Keita; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a new disintegration tester that can determine not only the disintegration time of orally rapidly disintegrating tablets (ODT), but also the disintegration behavior and mechanism. Using the tester, the disintegration properties of the tablets prepared in a previous study were examined. The purpose of this study is to confirm the utility of the tester as an instrument for evaluating the disintegration properties of ODT and determine relations among time, behavior and mechanism of the disintegration. Results demonstrated that in vitro disintegration time in the tester is similar to that in the commercial disintegration tester for ODT and is highly correlated with oral disintegration time. Observations of disintegration process revealed that a difference in disintegration behavior between tablets compressed at 50-75 MPa and 100 MPa; the disintegration behavior of the tablets were designated immediate disintegrating type and gradual disintegrating type, respectively. The dynamic swelling profile and water absorption profile indicated that the disintegration mechanism of the tablets involved wicking action induced by swelling of the disintegrant; the disintegration time was closely related to the initial rates of swelling and water absorption. Furthermore, the mechanism of water absorption of tablets compressed at 50-75 MPa and 100 MPa shows anomalous diffusion and case-II transport, respectively. The shift in this mechanism is consistent with differences in disintegration time and behavior between the tablets. These findings suggest that information on disintegration properties obtained by our tester is useful for understanding of disintegration phenomena of ODT.

  20. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  1. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes used to treat eye diseases, such as amblyopia and inflammation. How long do dilating drops last? ... used to treat certain eye diseases, such as amblyopia and inflammation in the eye. These therapeutic dilating ...

  2. Bosnia Air Drop Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    both MREs and HDRs. Bulk food included sacks of wheat flour and sugar, pulses ( beans , peas, IH-15 lentils ), dried whole milk, canned meat, biscuits...drops will almost certainly be requested in future humanitarian assistance operations, despite ongoing debate about relative costs and benefits of such... benefit policymakers and planners in future humanitarian operations. It was this background that established the requirement to assess the air drop

  3. Orion Swing Drop 6

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-25

    Water impact test of an 18,000-pound (8,165 kilogram) test version of the Orion spacecraft at NASA's Langley Research Center. NASA is swing drop testing this Orion capsule mock-up at Langley's Hydro Impact Basin to certify the actual Orion spacecraft for water landings. In a series of tests, Orion is being dropped in a variety of different conditions to help fine-tune NASA's predictions of Orion's landing loads.

  4. Drop Tower Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Ground based microgravity facilities are an important proving ground for space experiments, ground-based research and space hardware risk mitigation. An overview of existing platforms will be discussed with an emphasis on drop tower capabilities. The potential for extension to partial gravity conditions will be discussed. Input will be solicited from attendees for their potential to use drop towers in the future and the need for enhanced capabilities (e.g. partial gravity)

  5. Fluid Mechanics of Cricket and Tennis Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.

    2009-11-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in defining the flight of a ball that is struck or thrown through the air in almost all ball sports. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can often deviate from its initial straight path, resulting in a curved, or sometimes an unpredictable, flight path. It is particularly fascinating that that not all the parameters that affect the flight of a ball are always under human influence. Lateral deflection in flight, commonly known as swing, swerve or curve, is well recognized in cricket and tennis. In tennis, the lateral deflection is produced by spinning the ball about an axis perpendicular to the line of flight, which gives rise to what is commonly known as the Magnus effect. It is now well recognized that the aerodynamics of sports balls are strongly dependent on the detailed development and behavior of the boundary layer on the ball's surface. A side force, which makes a ball curve through the air, can also be generated in the absence of the Magnus effect. In one of the cricket deliveries, the ball is released with the seam angled, which trips the laminar boundary layer into a turbulent state on that side. The turbulent boundary layer separates relatively late compared to the laminar layer on the other side, thereby creating a pressure difference and hence side force. The fluid mechanics of a cricket ball become very interesting at the higher Reynolds numbers and this will be discussed in detail. Of all the round sports balls, a tennis ball has the highest drag coefficient. This will be explained in terms of the contribution of the ``fuzz" drag and how that changes with Reynolds number and ball surface wear. It is particularly fascinating that, purely through historical accidents, small disturbances on the ball surface, such as the stitching on cricket balls and the felt cover on tennis balls are all about the right size to affect boundary layer transition and development in the Reynolds numbers of interest. The fluid

  6. Fatigue life of silicon nitride balls

    SciTech Connect

    Galbato, A.T.; Cundill, R.T.; Harris, T.A. SKF Engineering and Research Center, Nieuwegein Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park )

    1992-11-01

    Because its specific weight is 40 percent that of steel, silicon nitride has been considered as a rolling element material in very high speed ball and roller bearings. Furthermore, similar to steel components, hot pressed silicon nitride rolling components, when properly manufactured, have demonstrated the capacity to fail in a non-catastrophic manner, i.e., fatigue of the rolling contact surfaces. In this investigation, hot isostatically-pressed silicon nitride balls were endurance-tested using a NASA 5-ball rig and the results were compared against similarly tested VIMVAR M50 balls. The silicon nitride balls demonstrated fatigue lives many times those obtained for the M50 balls. Therefore it is concluded that silicon nitride can be effectively employed in applications where steel rolling element life has previously proved to be a limiting factor. 12 refs.

  7. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  8. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  9. Grease test system for improved life of ball and roller bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinlein, E. )

    1992-12-01

    An earlier developed system (FE9) for mechanodynamical testing of lubricating greases for ball and rolling bearings was used to assess, at temperatures between 100 and 200 C, grease lives of the following lubricating greases used in this test system: a standard grease, lithium soap, NLGI class 3 grease, a special grease for high temperatures, and a special grease not suitable for high temperatures. The paper describes the design of FE9 tester, the test rig, the test procedure, and the results of evaluation. It was found that lowering the test temperature led to a steeper increase of the grease life. Starved lubrication was found to be the major cause of failure at moderate temperatures, especially at the areas of sliding motion, such as betweeen cage and the rolling element. 9 refs.

  10. Apparatus Would Measure Temperatures Of Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, John C.; Fredricks, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    Rig for testing ball bearings under radial and axial loads and measuring surface temperatures undergoing development. Includes extensible thermocouples: by means of bellows as longitudinal positioners, thermocouples driven into contact with bearing balls to sense temperatures immediately after test run. Not necessary to disassemble rig or to section balls to obtain indirect indications of maximum temperatures reached. Thermocouple measurements indicate temperatures better than temperature-sensitive paints.

  11. Multifractal properties of ball milling dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Budroni, M. A. Pilosu, V.; Rustici, M.; Delogu, F.

    2014-06-15

    This work focuses on the dynamics of a ball inside the reactor of a ball mill. We show that the distribution of collisions at the reactor walls exhibits multifractal properties in a wide region of the parameter space defining the geometrical characteristics of the reactor and the collision elasticity. This feature points to the presence of restricted self-organized zones of the reactor walls where the ball preferentially collides and the mechanical energy is mainly dissipated.

  12. Acting Administrator Lightfoot Visits Ball Aerospace

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-06

    Acting NASA Deputy Administrator Lesa Roe, second from left, and acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot, second from left, are seen with Mike Gazarik, vice president of Engineering at Ball Aerospace, left and Shawn Conley, test operations manager at Ball Aerospace, left, in front of the large semi-anechoic chamber, Thursday, April 6, 2017 during a visit to Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  13. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  14. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, J.B.

    1984-03-13

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out is disclosed. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine. 3 figs.

  15. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, J.B.

    1982-03-15

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  16. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, James B.

    1984-01-01

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls (10, 12) are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit (14) and a rigid member (16, 18, 20, 22, 24). One gage ball (10) is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly (34) which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball (12) is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly (38) which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball (12) is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball (10). As the moving ball (12) executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls (10, 12) caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly (50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60) actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit (14). Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball (10) locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  17. Effect of ball geometry on endurance limit in bending of drilled balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Four designs of drilled (cylindrically hollow) balls were tested for resistance to bending fatigue. Bending fatigue has been demonstrated to be a limiting factor in previous evaluations of the drilled ball concept. A web reinforced drilled ball was most successful in resisting bending fatigue. Another design of through drilled design, involving a heavier wall than the standard reference ball, also showed significant improvement in resistance to bending fatigue.

  18. The Soccer-Ball Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2014-07-01

    The idea that Lorentz-symmetry in momentum space could be modified but still remain observer-independent has received quite some attention in the recent years. This modified Lorentz-symmetry, which has been argued to arise in Loop Quantum Gravity, is being used as a phenomenological model to test possibly observable effects of quantum gravity. The most pressing problem in these models is the treatment of multi-particle states, known as the 'soccer-ball problem'. This article briefly reviews the problem and the status of existing solution attempts.

  19. The Controllable Ball Joint Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yung Cheng; Chieng, Wei-Hua; Ho, Shrwai

    A controllable ball joint mechanism with three rotational degrees of freedom is proposed in this paper. The mechanism is composed of three bevel gears, one of which rotates with respect to a fixed frame and the others rotate with respect to individual floating frames. The output is the resultant motion of the differential motions by the motors that rotates the bevel gears at the fixed frame and the floating frames. The mechanism is capable of a large rotation, and the structure is potentially compact. The necessary inverse and forward kinematic analyses as well as the derivation of kinematic singularity are provided according to the kinematical equivalent structure described in this paper.

  20. Two-ball Newton's cradle.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Newton's cradle for two balls with Hertzian interactions is considered as a hybrid system, and this makes it possible to derive return maps for the motion between collisions in an exact form despite the fact that the three-halves interaction law cannot be solved in closed form. The return maps depend on a constant whose value can only be determined numerically, but solutions can be written down explicitly in terms of this parameter, and we compare this with the results of simulations. The results are in fact independent of the details of the interaction potential.

  1. A finger-like hardness tester based on the contact electromechanical impedance of a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ji; Li, Faxin

    2015-10-01

    We proposed a finger-like hardness tester based on the electromechanical impedance of a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever. A Vickers indenter was fabricated to the free end of the bimorph to contact the sample. The contact force was monitored by a strain gauge and the contact area was obtained by tracking the bimorph's resonance frequency. The bimorph-sample contact system was modeled by the electromechanical equivalent circuit method. Verification experiments on standard hardness samples were conducted and the measured hardness values agreed well with those given by a conventional Vickers hardness tester. Further hardness measurement on a gear wheel showed that the proposed hardness tester is very adaptive and can be used for inner surface testing or in situ testing, where other hardness testers may not be applicable. The proposed hardness tester can be regarded as an improved ultrasonic hardness tester.

  2. Mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of naphthoquinones for Ames Salmonella tester strains

    SciTech Connect

    Hakura, Atsushi; Mochida, Hisatoshi; Tsutsui, Yoshie; Yamatsu, Kiyomi

    1994-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in quinone cytotoxicity, especially mutagenicity, are still largely unknown. In order to better understand the molecular aspects of the mechanisms of quinone mutagenicity and cytotoxicity, we examined them by using a series of 13 simple structural naphthoquinone (NQ) derivatives for 9 Ames Salmonella mutagenicity tester strains in the presence or absence of liver homogenate S9 mix from rats induced with phenobarbital and 5,6-benzoflavone. Most NQs used in this study showed mutagenicity with and/or without S9 mix. The most potent mutagenic NQ was 2,3-dichloro-1,4-NQ, with mutagenicity of 18 induced revertents/nmol/plate for strain TA104 without S9 mix. Among the strains used, TA104, which is sensitive to oxidative mutagens, was the most sensitive to the NQs, and the second most sensitive strain was TA2637, which detects bulky DNA adducts. The relationship of mutagenic potency to the one-electron reduction potential with TA104 suggested that the higher redox potential NQs were more mutagenic than the lower redox potential NQs. The cytotoxic effect of the NQs was largely dependent on the structures of their substituents. It was suggested that the higher redox potential NQs were more cytotoxic than the lower redox potential NQs for all of the strains used, in contrast to the mutagenicity of the NQs. The presence of S9 mix decreased the cytotoxic effect of the NQs, the extent of which was also largely dependent on the structures of their substituents and is in accordance with the order of the height of the one-electron reduction potentials. These results indicate that the mutagenicity of NQs in Salmonella typhimurium was due to oxidative damage produced with activated oxygen species such as hydroxy radical and superoxide anion radical, which are generated as a result of the reduction of the NQs, and to bulky NQ-DNA adducts accounting for their electrophilic property, whose contribution was largely dependent on the substituents of NQs.

  3. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  4. Complex Drop Impact Morphology.

    PubMed

    Grishaev, Viktor; Iorio, Carlo Saverio; Dubois, Frank; Amirfazli, A

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this work is to understand the changes in the observed phenomena during particle-laden drop impact. The impact of millimeter-size drops was investigated onto hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (polycarbonate) substrates. The drops were dispersions of water and spherical and nearly iso-dense hydrophobic particles with diameters of 200 and 500 μm. The impact was studied by side and bottom view images in the range 150 ≤ We ≤ 750 and 7100 ≤ Re ≤ 16400. The particles suppressed the appearance of singular jetting and drop partial rebound but promoted splashing, receding breakup, and rupture. The drops with 200 μm particles spread in two phases: fast and slow, caused by inertial and capillary forces, respectively. Also, the increase in volume fraction of 200 μm particle led to a linear decrease in the maximum spreading factor caused by the inertia force on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. The explanation of this reduction was argued to be the result of energy dissipation through frictional losses between particles and the substrate.

  5. Magnetic properties of ball-milled SrFe12O19 particles consolidated by Spark-Plasma Sintering

    PubMed Central

    Stingaciu, Marian; Topole, Martin; McGuiness, Paul; Christensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    The room-temperature magnetic properties of ball-milled strontium hexaferrite particles consolidated by spark-plasma sintering are strongly influenced by the milling time. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the ball-milled SrFe12O19 particles to have sizes varying over several hundred nanometers. X-Ray powder-diffraction studies performed on the ball-milled particles before sintering clearly demonstrate the occurrence of a pronounced amorphization process. During sintering at 950 oC, re-crystallization takes place, even for short sintering times of only 2 minutes and transformation of the amorphous phase into a secondary phase is unavoidable. The concentration of this secondary phase increases with increasing ball-milling time. The remanence and maximum magnetization values at 1T are weakly influenced, while the coercivity drops dramatically from 2340 Oe to 1100 Oe for the consolidated sample containing the largest amount of secondary phase. PMID:26369360

  6. Magnetic properties of ball-milled SrFe12O19 particles consolidated by Spark-Plasma Sintering.

    PubMed

    Stingaciu, Marian; Topole, Martin; McGuiness, Paul; Christensen, Mogens

    2015-09-15

    The room-temperature magnetic properties of ball-milled strontium hexaferrite particles consolidated by spark-plasma sintering are strongly influenced by the milling time. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the ball-milled SrFe12O19 particles to have sizes varying over several hundred nanometers. X-Ray powder-diffraction studies performed on the ball-milled particles before sintering clearly demonstrate the occurrence of a pronounced amorphization process. During sintering at 950 °C, re-crystallization takes place, even for short sintering times of only 2 minutes and transformation of the amorphous phase into a secondary phase is unavoidable. The concentration of this secondary phase increases with increasing ball-milling time. The remanence and maximum magnetization values at 1T are weakly influenced, while the coercivity drops dramatically from 2340 Oe to 1100 Oe for the consolidated sample containing the largest amount of secondary phase.

  7. A Comparative Study of Two Types of Ball-on-Ball Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes three methods of measuring the coefficient of restitution (CoR) for two different types of ball-on-ball collision. The first collision type (for which two different CoR measurement procedures are described) is a static, hanging steel ball forming part of a Newton's cradle arrangement, which is then hit by its adjacent…

  8. Comparison of the Phase Metrics DFHT IV and Zygo Pegasus 2000 Fly Height Testers.

    PubMed

    Strunk, C W; Zahn, C C; Sides, P J

    2001-09-01

    The performance of the Phase Metrics DFHT IV (DFHT) fly height tester was compared with the performance of the Zygo Pegasus 2000 (P2000) fly height tester. The testers showed comparable repeatabilities (0.25 nm for the DFHT and 0.30 nm for the P2000) and correlated well at all points except at the center rail trailing edge. The DFHT had a measurement uncertainty of 0.76 nm at a fly height of 25 nm and 0.35 nm near contact. Similarly the P2000 exhibited an uncertainty of 1 nm at 25 nm and 0.5 nm at contact. The measurement uncertainty of the DFHT is due to calibration at a location different from the measurement location; for the P2000, it is primarily due to residual uncertainty in the correction for stress-induced birefringence in the test disk. The P2000 did not recognize the presence of small diamondlike carbon bumps on the air bearing surface. There was a consistent 3-nm absolute offset between the fly height measurements of the two testers. Neither tester possessed a clear advantage over the other in the approaching era of near-contact recording.

  9. Intra- and inter-tester reliability of sensibility testing in leprosy.

    PubMed

    van Brakel, W H; Khawas, I B; Gurung, K S; Kets, C M; van Leerdam, M E; Drever, W

    1996-09-01

    We conducted an intra- and inter-tester agreement study of three sensory screening tests used in nerve function assessment of leprosy patients: the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM) test, moving 2-point discrimination (M2PD), and the pin prick test. The weighted kappa (Kw) statistic was used as the reliability coefficient. The SWM had intra-observer Kws ranging from 0.83 to 0.92 and inter-observer Kws ranging from 0.76 to 0.89. The M2PD had intra- and inter-tester Kws ranging from 0.75 to 0.82 and 0.54 to 0.82, respectively. Inter-tester agreement for the pin prick test ranged from 0.45 to 0.85. There was evidence that the main source of variability between testers was testing skill and experience. Among the experienced physiotechnicians there was no significant difference between intra- and inter-tester reliability. We conclude that reliability of the SWM test was very good, closely followed by the M2PD test. Reliability of the pin prick test was less good than that of the SWM and M2PD, making it less suitable for serial testing.

  10. The Rocketdyne Multifunction Tester. Part 2: Operation of a Radial Magnetic Bearing as an Excitation Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, L. A.; Murphy, Brian T.; Lang, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of the magnetic bearing used as an excitation source in the Rocketdyne Multifunction Tester is described. The tester is scheduled for operation during the summer of 1990. The magnetic bearing can be used in two control modes: (1) open loop mode, in which the magnetic bearing operates as a force actuator; and (2) closed loop mode, in which the magnetic bearing provides shaft support. Either control mode can be used to excite the shaft; however, response of the shaft in the two control modes is different due to the alteration of the eigenvalues by closed loop mode operation. A rotordynamic model is developed to predict the frequency response of the tester due to excitation in either control mode. Closed loop mode excitation is shown to be similar to the excitation produced by a rotating eccentricity in a conventional bearing. Predicted frequency response of the tester in the two control modes is compared, and the maximum response is shown to be the same for the two control modes when synchronous unbalance loading is not considered. The analysis shows that the response of this tester is adequate for the extraction of rotordynamic stiffness, damping, and inertia coefficients over a wide range of test article stiffnesses.

  11. Forces applied with a hoof tester to cadaver feet vary widely between users.

    PubMed

    Arndt, J L; Pfau, T; Day, P; Pardoe, C; Bolt, D M; Weller, R

    2013-02-16

    Hoof testers are commonly used in equine practice. In this study, we determined the intraoperator and interoperator reliability of force application with hoof testers for different groups: experienced veterinarians, novices and farriers. For this purpose, we have developed and validated an instrumented hoof tester. Forces varied significantly between the different regions of the foot for experienced operators applying the highest forces to the heels, then the frog, then the toe, and the lowest forces to the quarters. Novices applied significantly more force to the toe versus the frog. Intraoperator reliability varied significantly between regions and operators. Novices had the narrowest width of limits of agreement for the frog and heel, but the widest for the toe and the quarters, whereas farriers had the narrowest width of agreement for the toe and quarter. Force application differed significantly between groups for the frog and heel regions, but not the toe and quarters. Veterinarians applied higher forces to the frog compared with farriers and novices, and higher forces to the heel compared with novices. This study showed that hoof tester forces vary widely within and between operators, and standardisation of hoof tester use is needed to make this diagnostic test more reliable.

  12. Does tester experience influence the reliability with which 3D gait kinematics are collected in healthy adults?

    PubMed

    Leigh, Ryan J; Pohl, Michael B; Ferber, Reed

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether tester experience influences the reliability of three-dimensional gait collections. Reliability study. Ten healthy subjects visited a university gait laboratory on two separate days and underwent a walking gait analysis. During each visit, kinematic data were collected by a biomechanist with 8 years of 3D gait analysis experience (EXP) and a physical therapist with no previous 3D gait analysis experience (NOV). Joint kinematic angles were calculated using either a functional or predictive joint identification method. Within-tester and between-tester measures of reliability were determined by calculating the root mean square error (RMS) and coefficient of multiple correlations (CMC). Within-tester RMS and CMC values were not significantly different (P > 0.05) between the EXP and NOV testers using either a functional or predictive joint approach. Within-tester CMC values exceeded 0.90 for both testers across all kinematic variables. Between-tester CMC reliability values were greater than 0.85 for all variables measured. Following basic training, a physiotherapy clinician with no previous 3D gait experience is as reliable as an experienced gait biomechanist with respect to marker placement accuracy. In addition, reliability comparisons between an experienced and novice tester appear independent of the joint identification method chosen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Drum drop test report

    SciTech Connect

    McBeath, R.S.

    1995-02-28

    Testing was performed to determine actual damage to drums when dropped from higher than currently stacked elevations. The drum configurations were the same as they are placed in storage; single drums and four drums banded to a pallet. Maximum drop weights were selected based on successful preliminary tests. Material was lost from each of the single drum tests while only a small amount of material was lost from one of the pelletized drums. The test results are presented in this report. This report also provides recommendations for further testing to determine the appropriate drum weight which can be stored on a fourth tier.

  14. A measurement of a control rod drop using an LVDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Ho; Huh, Hyung; Yu, Je-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2010-03-01

    A control element drive mechanism is a reactor regulating system, which is to insert, withdraw, or maintain a control rod containing neutron-absorbing material within a reactor core to control the reactivity of the reactor. The ball-screw type CEDM for the small and medium research reactor has a spring-hydraulic damper to reduce the impact force due to the free drop of the CEDM. This paper describes the experimental results to obtain the drop characteristics of the CEDM. The tests are performed by using a full-scale structure except the control element assembly, and a drop time and displacement after an impact are measured by using an LVDT. The influences of the rod weight and the drop height on the drop behavior are also estimated on the basis of test results. In case of the longest stroke, the drop time of the control rod is within 4.5 seconds to meet the design requirement. The behavior after the impact shows a general damping motion of the spring-damper system, and the maximum displacement is measured as 15.6 mm.

  15. A measurement of a control rod drop using an LVDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Ho; Huh, Hyung; Yu, Je-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2009-12-01

    A control element drive mechanism is a reactor regulating system, which is to insert, withdraw, or maintain a control rod containing neutron-absorbing material within a reactor core to control the reactivity of the reactor. The ball-screw type CEDM for the small and medium research reactor has a spring-hydraulic damper to reduce the impact force due to the free drop of the CEDM. This paper describes the experimental results to obtain the drop characteristics of the CEDM. The tests are performed by using a full-scale structure except the control element assembly, and a drop time and displacement after an impact are measured by using an LVDT. The influences of the rod weight and the drop height on the drop behavior are also estimated on the basis of test results. In case of the longest stroke, the drop time of the control rod is within 4.5 seconds to meet the design requirement. The behavior after the impact shows a general damping motion of the spring-damper system, and the maximum displacement is measured as 15.6 mm.

  16. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  17. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  18. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  19. Using Ruby Balls As Fiducial Marks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, Nance M.

    1990-01-01

    Combination of basic and advanced techniques yields new capability for inspection. In new technique, surface first inspected with fluorescent penetrant dye to reveal flaws. Ruby ball of known diameter placed near flaw having to be measured. Flaw and ball observed through magnifying video system that can "freeze" image.

  20. Ball Bounce Experiment. Grades 3-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Erik; Ryan, Emily; Swift, Charles

    Many of today's popular sports are based around the use of a ball yet none are alike. In fact, they are all designed with specific characteristics in mind. In this activity, students investigate different balls' ability to bounce and represent the data they collect graphically. This activity uses a time frame of 100 minutes. (Author/SOE)

  1. Some Mathematics and Physics of Ball Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Gives examples on the applications of arithmetic, geometry, and some calculus, vector algebra, and mechanics to ball games. Suggestions for further interesting investigations are provided together with references to other articles and books on applications of mathematics and physics to ball games and sports in general. (JN)

  2. Acting Administrator Lightfoot Visits Ball Aerospace

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-06

    Acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot, left, views a clean room with Tim Schoenweis, senior project engineer for the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) at Ball Aerospace, right, Thursday, April 6, 2017 at Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  3. Acting Administrator Lightfoot Visits Ball Aerospace

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-06

    Acting NASA Deputy Administrator Lesa Roe, center, views a clean room with Tim Schoenweis, senior project engineer for the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) at Ball Aerospace, left, Thursday, April 6, 2017 at Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  4. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  5. Design and analysis of a toroidal tester for the measurement of core losses under axial compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatawneh, Natheer; Rahman, Tanvir; Lowther, David A.; Chromik, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Electric machine cores are subjected to mechanical stresses due to manufacturing processes. These stresses include radial, circumferential and axial components that may have significant influences on the magnetic properties of the electrical steel and hence, on the output and efficiencies of electrical machines. Previously, most studies of iron losses due to mechanical stress have considered only radial and circumferential components. In this work, an improved toroidal tester has been designed and developed to measure the core losses and the magnetic properties of electrical steel under a compressive axial stress. The shape of the toroidal ring has been verified using 3D stress analysis. Also, 3D electromagnetic simulations show a uniform flux density distribution in the specimen with a variation of 0.03 T and a maximum average induction level of 1.5 T. The developed design has been prototyped, and measurements were carried out using a steel sample of grade 35WW300. Measurements show that applying small mechanical stresses normal to the sample thickness rises the delivered core losses, then the losses decrease continuously as the stress increases. However, the drop in core losses at high stresses does not go lower than the free-stress condition. Physical explanations for the observed trend of core losses as a function of stress are provided based on core loss separation to the hysteresis and eddy current loss components. The experimental results show that the effect of axial compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel at high level of inductions becomes less pronounced.

  6. The principal time balls of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinns, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Accurate time signals in New Zealand were important for navigation in the Pacific. Time balls at Wellington and Lyttelton were noted in the 1880 Admiralty list of time signals, with later addition of Otago. The time ball service at Wellington started in March 1864 using the first official observatory in New Zealand, but there was no Wellington time ball service during a long period of waterfront redevelopment during the 1880s. The time ball service restarted in November 1888 at a different harbour location. The original mechanical apparatus was used with a new ball, but the system was destroyed by fire in March 1909 and was never replaced. Instead, a time light service was inaugurated in 1912. The service at Lyttelton, near Christchurch, began in December 1876 after construction of the signal station there. It used telegraph signals from Wellington to regulate the time ball. By the end of 1909, it was the only official time ball in New Zealand, providing a service that lasted until 1934. The Lyttelton time ball tower was an iconic landmark in New Zealand that had been carefully restored. Tragically, the tower collapsed in the 2011 earthquakes and aftershocks that devastated Christchurch. A daily time ball service at Port Chalmers, near Dunedin, started in June 1867, initially using local observatory facilities. The service appears to have been discontinued in October 1877, but was re-established in April 1882 as a weekly service, with control by telegraph from Wellington. The service had been withdrawn altogether by the end of 1909. Auckland never established a reliable time ball service, despite provision of a weekly service for mariners by a public-spirited citizen between August 1864 and June 1866. A time ball was finally installed on the Harbour Board building in 1901, but the signal was unreliable and it ceased in 1902. Complaints from ships' masters led to various proposals to re-establish a service. These concluded with erection of a time ball on the new

  7. Life after Dropping Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, David E.

    Why dropouts left school, what they thought about school and teachers, what their lives have been after dropping out, and what made them return to an alternative program for school completion were questions examined in a study in progress in Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania). To date, 88 early school leavers in the Job Corps have been interviewed.…

  8. PCB tester selection for future systems. Volume 1. Final report, August 1989-June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, W.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes a computer program (to run on an IBM compatible PC) designed to aid in the selection of a PCB tester, given the characteristics of the PC board to be tested. The program contains a limited data base of PCB testers, and others may be added easily. This report also provides a specification for a limited family of PCB testers to fill the gap between what the U.S. Air Force is expected to need and what is expected to be available within the next four to six years. The parameters used in the computer program and the specification are based on a survey of military and commercial PCBs - both those now available and those expected to come on line within the next four to six years. The results of the survey are covered in volume 2 - available from DTIC. Automatic Test Equipment, Technology Forecast, Air Force Avionics.

  9. PCB tester selection for future systems. Volume 2. Final report, August 1989-June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, W.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes a computer program (to run on an IBM compatible PC) designed to aid in the selection of a PCB tester, given the characteristics of the PC board to be tested. The program contains a limited data base of PCB testers, and others may be added easily. This report also provides a specification for a limited family of PCB testers to fill the gap between what the U.S. Air Force is expected to need and what is expected to be available within the next four to six years. The parameters used in the computer program and the specification are based on a survey of military and commercial PCBs - both those now available and those expected to come on line within the next four to six years. The results of the survey are covered in volume 2 - available from DTIC. Automatic Test Equipment, Technology Forecast, Air Force Avionics.

  10. System architecture of a gallium arsenide one-gigahertz digital IC tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouts, Douglas J.; Johnson, John M.; Butner, Steven E.; Long, Stephen I.

    1987-01-01

    The design for a 1-GHz digital integrated circuit tester for the evaluation of custom GaAs chips and subsystems is discussed. Technology-related problems affecting the design of a GaAs computer are discussed, with emphasis on the problems introduced by long printed-circuit-board interconnect. High-speed interface modules provide a link between the low-speed microprocessor and the chip under test. Memory-multiplexer and memory-shift register architectures for the storage of test vectors are described in addition to an architecture for local data storage consisting of a long chain of GaAs shift registers. The tester is constructed around a VME system card cage and backplane, and very little high-speed interconnect exists between boards. The tester has a three part self-test consisting of a CPU board confidence test, a main memory confidence test, and a high-speed interface module functional test.

  11. System architecture of a gallium arsenide one-gigahertz digital IC tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouts, Douglas J.; Johnson, John M.; Butner, Steven E.; Long, Stephen I.

    1987-01-01

    The design for a 1-GHz digital integrated circuit tester for the evaluation of custom GaAs chips and subsystems is discussed. Technology-related problems affecting the design of a GaAs computer are discussed, with emphasis on the problems introduced by long printed-circuit-board interconnect. High-speed interface modules provide a link between the low-speed microprocessor and the chip under test. Memory-multiplexer and memory-shift register architectures for the storage of test vectors are described in addition to an architecture for local data storage consisting of a long chain of GaAs shift registers. The tester is constructed around a VME system card cage and backplane, and very little high-speed interconnect exists between boards. The tester has a three part self-test consisting of a CPU board confidence test, a main memory confidence test, and a high-speed interface module functional test.

  12. Ball bearing heat analysis program (BABHAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Ball Bearing Heat Analysis Program (BABHAP) is an attempt to assemble a series of equations, some of which are non-linear algebraic systems, in a logical order, which when solved, provide a complex analysis of load distribution among the balls, ball velocities, heat generation resulting from friction, applied load, and ball spinning, minimum lubricant film thickness, and many additional characteristics of ball bearing systems. Although initial design requirements for BABHAP were dictated by the core limitations of the PDP 11/45 computer, (approximately 8K of real words with limited number of instructions) the program dimensions can easily be expanded for large core computers such as the UNIVAC 1108. The PDP version of BABHAP is also operational on the UNIVAC system with the exception that the PDP uses 029 punch and the UNIVAC uses 026. A conversion program was written to allow transfer between machines.

  13. Inter-tester reliability of non-invasive technique for measurement of innominate motion.

    PubMed

    Adhia, Divya Bharatkumar; Bussey, Melanie D; Mani, Ramakrishnan; Jayakaran, Prasath; Aldabe, Daniela; Milosavljevic, Stephan

    2012-02-01

    Although the complex anatomical orientation and position of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) has rendered their 3D kinematic evaluation difficult, recent techniques of palpation-digitization of pelvic landmarks using electromagnetic tracking device have been able to accurately and non-invasively quantify the subtle SIJ kinematics. While this technique demonstrates radiographic validity and high test-retest reliability, it is yet to be assessed with regards to inter-tester and trial-to-trial reliability. A single-group repeated measure design using 4 testers was conducted to evaluate the inter-tester and trial-to-trial reliability of palpation-digitization technique for innominate vector length measurements using the Polhemus electromagnetic tracking device. Fourteen young, healthy adults between the ages of 18-40 years participated in the study. The innominate vector length was calculated from 3D co-ordinates of palpated and digitized pelvic landmarks in two test positions of hip. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how palpation-digitization errors for pelvic landmarks impacts on innominate angle calculation. Reliability indexes of Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (≥0.97) and Standard error of measurement (SEM) (≤2.02 mm) demonstrated very high inter-tester and trial-to-trial reliability and accuracy of palpation-digitization technique for innominate vector length measurements, irrespective of the two test positions. A higher consistency of measurements was obtained within-testers as compared to between testers, and sensitivity analysis demonstrated a negligible influence of palpation-digitization errors on the innominate angle measurements. The results support clinical and research utility of this technique for non-invasive kinematic evaluation of SIJ motion for this population. Further research on the use of this palpation-digitization technique in symptomatic population is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An improved evaluation of surface finish with a three dimensional tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    GRANDADAM; PREBET; RIOUT

    1980-01-01

    The design and programming of an automated three dimensional surface finish tester is described. The device produces a three dimensional image of the microscopic texture of the examined surface. The surface finish tester presents the following advantages over conventional profilometry: (1) more complete exploration of surface texture by successive probe sweeps; (2) automation of measuring and calculating; (3) more accurate representation of the derived parameters; (4) analysis of the degree of homogeneity of the surface; (5) three dimensional graphic representation accurately depicting the state of the surface; (6) detection of local imperfections; and (7) detection of scoring that occurred during machining.

  15. Deoxyribonucleic acid repair in Bacillus subtilis: development of competent cells into a tester for carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Yasbin, R.E.; Miehl, R.

    1980-04-01

    The development of competent transformed Bacillus subtilis into a tester system for carcinogens is described. Precocious or noninduced activation of SOS functions occurs in competent cells. Thus, lower doses or concentrations of SOS inducing agents are needed to cause cell death due to indigenous prophage activation and lysis of bacteria. The two known defective prophages in B. subtilis enhance the sensitivity of competent cells to the carcinogens ultraviolet light, mitomycin C, and methyl methanesulfonate. However, these same cells have no enhanced sensitivity for the non-carcinogenic ethyl methanesulfonate or for nalidixic acid. Therefore, competent B. subtilis appears to be a sensitive tester for carcinogens.

  16. USAF bioenvironmental noise data handbook. Volume 168: MB-3 tester, pressurized cabin leakage, aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, T. H.

    1982-06-01

    The MB-3 Tester is an electric motor-driven cabin leakage tester designed to furnish pressurized air to the aircraft at controlled pressures and temperatures during ground pressurization of aircraft cockpits and pressurized compartments. This report provides measured data defining the bioacoustic environments produced by this unit operating at a normal rated/load condition. Near-field data are reported for 37 locations in a wide variety of physical and psychoacoustic measures: overall and band sound pressure levels, C-weighted and A-weighted sound levels, preferred speech interference level, perceived noise level, and limiting times for total daily exposure of personnel with and without standard Air Force ear protectors.

  17. Ready for the Cosmic Ball

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Something appears to be peering through a shiny red mask, in this new false-colored image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The mysterious blue eyes are actually starlight from the cores of two merging galaxies, called NGC 2207 and IC 2163. The mask is the galaxies' dusty spiral arms.

    NGC 2207 and IC 2163 recently met and began a sort of gravitational tango about 40 million years ago. The two galaxies are tugging at each other, stimulating new stars to form. Eventually, this cosmic ball will come to an end, when the galaxies meld into one. The dancing duo is located 140 million light-years away in the Canis Major constellation.

    The Spitzer image reveals that the galactic mask is adorned with strings of pearl-like beads. These dusty clusters of newborn stars, called 'beads on a string' by astronomers, appear as white balls throughout the arms of both galaxies. They were formed when the galaxies first interacted, forcing dust and gas to clump together into colonies of stars.

    This type of beading has been seen before in other galaxies, but it took Spitzer's infrared eyes to identify them in NGC 2207 and IC 2163. Spitzer was able to see the beads because the stars inside heat up surrounding dust, which then radiates with infrared light.

    The biggest bead lighting up the left side of the mask is also the densest. In fact, some of its central stars might have merged to form a black hole. (Now, that would be quite the Mardi Gras mask!)

    This picture, taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera, is a four-channel composite. It shows light with wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue); 4.5 microns (green); and 5.8 and 8.0 microns (red). The contribution from starlight (measured at 3.6 microns) has been subtracted from the 5.8- and 8-micron channels to enhance the visibility of the dust features.

  18. Ready for the Cosmic Ball

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Something appears to be peering through a shiny red mask, in this new false-colored image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The mysterious blue eyes are actually starlight from the cores of two merging galaxies, called NGC 2207 and IC 2163. The mask is the galaxies' dusty spiral arms.

    NGC 2207 and IC 2163 recently met and began a sort of gravitational tango about 40 million years ago. The two galaxies are tugging at each other, stimulating new stars to form. Eventually, this cosmic ball will come to an end, when the galaxies meld into one. The dancing duo is located 140 million light-years away in the Canis Major constellation.

    The Spitzer image reveals that the galactic mask is adorned with strings of pearl-like beads. These dusty clusters of newborn stars, called 'beads on a string' by astronomers, appear as white balls throughout the arms of both galaxies. They were formed when the galaxies first interacted, forcing dust and gas to clump together into colonies of stars.

    This type of beading has been seen before in other galaxies, but it took Spitzer's infrared eyes to identify them in NGC 2207 and IC 2163. Spitzer was able to see the beads because the stars inside heat up surrounding dust, which then radiates with infrared light.

    The biggest bead lighting up the left side of the mask is also the densest. In fact, some of its central stars might have merged to form a black hole. (Now, that would be quite the Mardi Gras mask!)

    This picture, taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera, is a four-channel composite. It shows light with wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue); 4.5 microns (green); and 5.8 and 8.0 microns (red). The contribution from starlight (measured at 3.6 microns) has been subtracted from the 5.8- and 8-micron channels to enhance the visibility of the dust features.

  19. Friction and wear performance of bearing ball sliding against diamond-like carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shenjiang; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Kar, Satyananda; Li, Dangjuan; Su, Junhong

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the tribological properties of bearing steel ball (Japan standard, SUJ2) sliding against tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) coatings and amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) coatings. The reciprocating sliding testes are performed with ball-on-plate friction tester in ambient air condition. Analysis of friction coefficient, wear volume and microstructure in wear scar are carried out using optical microscopy, atom force morphology (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show the SUJ2 on ta-C coating has low friction coefficient (around 0.15) but high wear loss. In contrast, the low wear loss of SUJ2 on a-C:H coating with high (around 0.4) and unsteady friction coefficient. Some Fe2O3, FeO and graphitization have been found on the wear scar of SUJ2 sliding against ta-C coating. Nearly no oxide materials exist on the wear scar of SUJ2 against a-C:H coating. The mechanism and hypothesis of the wear behavior have been investigated according to the measurement results. This study will contribute to proper selection and understand the tribological performance of bearing steels against DLC coatings.

  20. Dolphin underwater bait-balling behaviors in relation to group and prey ball sizes.

    PubMed

    Vaughn-Hirshorn, Robin L; Muzi, Elisa; Richardson, Jessica L; Fox, Gabriella J; Hansen, Lauren N; Salley, Alyce M; Dudzinski, Kathleen M; Würsig, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    We characterized dusky dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) feeding behaviors recorded on underwater video, and related behaviors to variation in prey ball sizes, dolphin group sizes, and study site (Argentina versus New Zealand, NZ). Herding behaviors most often involved dolphins swimming around the side or under prey balls, but dolphins in Argentina more often swam under prey balls (48% of passes) than did dolphins in NZ (34% of passes). This result may have been due to differences in group sizes between sites, since groups are larger in Argentina. Additionally, in NZ, group size was positively correlated with proportion of passes that occurred under prey balls (p<0.001). Prey-capture attempts most often involved capturing fish from the side of prey balls, but dolphins in Argentina more often swam through prey balls (8% of attempts) than did dolphins in NZ (4% of attempts). This result may have been due to differences in prey ball sizes between sites, since dolphins fed on larger prey balls in Argentina (>74m(2)) than in NZ (maximum 33m(2)). Additionally, in NZ, dolphins were more likely to swim through prey balls to capture fish when they fed on larger prey balls (p=0.025). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Drop tube technical tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Criteria, using fundamental thermochemical dynamics, were developed to assist a scientist using the Drop Tube Facility in designing a good experiment. The types of parameters involved in designing the experiments include the type of furnace, the type of atmosphere, and in general which materials are better behaved than others as determined by past experience in the facility. One of the major advantages of the facility lies in its ability to provide large undercoolings in the cooling curve during the drops. A beginning was to consider the effect of oxygen and other gases upon the amount of undercooling observed. The starting point of the thermochemistry was given by Ellingham and later transformed into what is known as the Richardson Chart. The effect of surface oxidations upon the nucleation phenomena can be observed in each specimen.

  2. Cricket Ball Aerodynamics: Myth Versus Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Koga, Demmis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in the flight of a cricket ball released by a bowler. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can follow a curved flight path that is not always under the control of the bowler. ne basic aerodynamic principles responsible for the nonlinear flight or "swing" of a cricket ball were identified several years ago and many papers have been published on the subject. In the last 20 years or so, several experimental investigations have been conducted on cricket ball swing, which revealed the amount of attainable swing, and the parameters that affect it. A general overview of these findings is presented with emphasis on the concept of late swing and the effects of meteorological conditions on swing. In addition, the relatively new concept of "reverse" swing, how it can be achieved in practice and the role in it of ball "tampering", are discussed in detail. A discussion of the "white" cricket ball used in last year's World Cup, which supposedly possesses different swing properties compared to a conventional red ball, is also presented.

  3. Numerical simulation of ball-racket impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingpang

    The collision of a ball with a tennis racket is usually modeled in terms of rigid body dynamics or an elastic system involving only a few springs. In this paper, we study the impact between a tennis ball and racket, by modeling the tennis ball in two different yaws. One method models the tennis ball as a Hertz elastic body and the other one models the ball by a more accurate finite element analysis. In the first model, we assume that the elastic properties of the ball obeys Hertz's law. In the finite element model, we consider the tennis ball as a shell witch is a elastic system constructed out of many isotropic small linear flat, elements, witch have both elastic and damping properties. The damping in each way is approximated as viscous term. In both methods, we study the static condition of deformation against a rigid surface before applying these models to dynamical processes. We compare these two methods and eventually determine how the racket parameters effect the performance of the racket, using numerical simulations. Comparison with experiment are show to confirm the general conclusion of the model.

  4. Viscoelastic modelling of tennis ball properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissler, L.; Jones, R.; Leaney, P. G.; Harland, A.

    2010-06-01

    An explicit finite element (FE) tennis ball model which illustrates the effects of the viscoelastic materials of a tennis ball on ball deformation and bounce during normal impacts is presented. A tennis ball is composed of a rubber core and a fabric cover comprised of a wool-nylon mix which exhibit non-linear strain rate properties during high velocity impacts. The rubber core model was developed and validated using low strain rate tensile tests on rubber samples as well as high velocity normal impacts of pressurised cores at velocities ranging from 15 m/s to 50 m/s. The impacts were recorded using a high speed video (HSV) camera to determine deformation, impact time and coefficient of restitution (COR). The material properties of the core model were tuned to match the HSV results. A two component anisotropic fabric model was created which included artificial Rayleigh damping to account for hysteresis effects, and the core model 'tuning' process was used to refine the cloth layer. The ball model's parameters were in good agreement with experimental data at all velocities for both cores and complete balls, and a time sequenced comparison of HSV ball motion and FE model confirmed the validity of the model.

  5. Exploding Water Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Water has the unusual property that it expands on freezing, so that ice has a specific gravity of 0.92 compared to 1.0 for liquid water. The most familiar demonstration of this property is ice cubes floating in a glass of water. A more dramatic demonstration is the ice bomb shown in Fig. 1. Here a cast iron flask is filled with water and tightly stoppered. The flask is then cooled, either by leaving it outdoors in winter or by immersing it in a cryogenic fluid, until the water freezes. As the water freezes and expands, the pressure inside the flask increases dramatically, eventually becoming sufficient to fracture the metal walls of the enclosure. A related, but much less familiar, phenomenon is the explosive fracturing of small water drops upon freezing. That water drops can fracture in this way has been known for many years, and the phenomenon has been described in detail in the atmospheric sciences literature, where it is seen as relevant to the freezing of raindrops as they fall through cold air. Carefully controlled experiments have been done documenting how the character and frequency of fracture is affected by such variables as drop size, rate of cooling, chemistry of dissolved gases, etc. Here I describe instead a simple demonstration of fracture suitable for video analysis and appropriate for study at the introductory physics level. Readers may also be interested in other characteristics of freezing and fragmenting water drops, for example, charge separation upon fracture and the appearance of spikes and bulges on the surface.

  6. Electrostatic drops in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Isabel J.; Schmidt, Erin; Weislogel, Mark M.; Pettit, Donald

    2016-11-01

    We present what we think are the first intentional electrostatic orbits in the near-weightless environment of a drop tower. Classical physics problems involving Coulombic forces in orbital mechanics have traditionally been confined to thought experiments due to practical terrestrial experimental limitations, namely, the preponderance of gravity. However, the use of a drop tower as an experimental platform can overcome this challenge for brief periods. We demonstrate methanol-water droplets in orbit around a variety of charged objects- some of which can be used to validate special cases of N-body systems. Footage collected via a high-speed camera is analyzed and orbital trajectories are compared with existing theoretical predictions. Droplets of diameters 0.5 to 2mm in a variety of obits are observed. Due to the repeatability of drop tower initial conditions and effective low-g environment, such experiments may be used to construct empirical analogues and confirm analyses toward the benefit of other fields including space and planetary science. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12A047A, Portland State LSAMP, Robert E. McNair Scholars Program.

  7. Trajectory analysis of a soccer ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric; Carré, Matt J.

    2009-11-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two cameras recorded portions of its trajectory. Drag coefficients were obtained from range measurements for no-spin trajectories, for which the drag coefficient does not vary appreciably during the ball's flight. Lift coefficients were obtained from the trajectories immediately following the ball's launch, in which Reynolds number and spin parameter do not vary much. We obtain two values of the lift coefficient for spin parameters that had not been obtained previously. Our codes for analyzing the trajectories are freely available to educators and students.

  8. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  9. Rotating boson stars and Q-balls

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; List, Meike

    2005-09-15

    We consider axially symmetric, rotating boson stars. Their flat-space limits represent spinning Q-balls. We discuss their properties and determine their domain of existence. Q-balls and boson stars are stationary solutions and exist only in a limited frequency range. The coupling to gravity gives rise to a spiral-like frequency dependence of the boson stars. We address the flat-space limit and the limit of strong gravitational coupling. For comparison we also determine the properties of spherically symmetric Q-balls and boson stars.

  10. Horizontal stability of a bouncing ball.

    PubMed

    McBennett, Brendan G; Harris, Daniel M

    2016-09-01

    We present an investigation of a partially elastic ball bouncing on a vertically vibrated concave parabolic surface in two dimensions. In particular, we demonstrate that simple vertical motion, wherein the ball bounces periodically at the parabola's vertex, is unstable to horizontal perturbations when the parabolic coefficient defining the surface shape exceeds a critical value. The result is a new periodic solution where the ball bounces laterally over the vertex. As the parabola is further steepened, this new solution also becomes unstable which gives rise to other complex periodic and chaotic bouncing states, all characterized by persistent lateral motion.

  11. Rediscovery of lake balls in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Donald W.; Hiltunen, Jarl K.; Owens, Randall W.

    1983-01-01

    For the first time in 70 years, the occurrence of a 'lake ball' in Lake Michigan is here reported in the literature. According to a published system of classification, the object we collected in 1978 was a 'false' lake ball. Dissection revealed that it was colonized by 5 chironomid larvae and 162 oligochaetes. The species and numerical proportions of the oligochaetes indicated that it was formed in or near the mouth of a eutrophic tributary rather than in the open waters of Lake Michigan where it was found. Because of their mobility, false lake balls may be ecologically important, serving as natural vehicles for the dispersal of invertebrates.

  12. Designing Hollow Nano Gold Golf Balls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure. PMID:24937196

  13. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  14. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  15. Designing hollow nano gold golf balls.

    PubMed

    Landon, Preston B; Mo, Alexander H; Zhang, Chen; Emerson, Chris D; Printz, Adam D; Gomez, Alan F; DeLaTorre, Christopher J; Colburn, David A M; Anzenberg, Paula; Eliceiri, Matthew; O'Connell, Connor; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-07-09

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure.

  16. Titanium carbide coatings for aerospace ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, Hans J.; Haenni, Werner; Hintermann, HANS-E.

    1988-01-01

    In conventional ball bearings, steel to steel contacts between the balls and the raceways are at the origin of microwelds which lead to material transfer, surface roughening, lubricant breakdown, and finally to a loss in the bearing performances. To minimize the microwelding tendencies of the contacting partners it is necessary to modify their surface materials; the solid to solid collisions themselves are difficult to avoid. The use of titanium carbide coated steel balls can bring spectacular improvements in the performances and lifetimes of both oil-grease lubricated and oil-grease free bearings in a series of severe applications.

  17. Liquid drops and surface tension with smoothed particle applied mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, S.; Posch, H. A.

    2000-10-01

    Smoothed particle applied mechanics (SPAM), also referred to as smoothed particle hydrodynamics, is a Lagrangian particle method for the simulation of continuous flows. Here we apply it to the formation of a liquid drop, surrounded by its vapor, for a van der Waals (vdW) fluid in two dimensions. The cohesive pressure of the vdW equation of state gives rise to an attractive, central force between the particles with an interaction range which is assumed to exceed the interaction range of all the other smoothed forces in the SPAM equations of motion. With this assumption, stable drops are formed, and the vdW phase diagram is well reproduced by the simulations. Below the critical temperature, the surface tension for equilibrated drops may be computed from the pressure excess in their centers. It agrees very well with the surface tension independently determined from the vibrational frequency of weakly excited drops. We also study strongly deformed drops performing large-amplitude oscillations, which are reminiscent of the oscillations of a large ball of water under microgravity conditions. In an appendix we comment on the limitations of SPAM by studying the violation of angular momentum conservation, which is a consequence of noncentral forces contributed by the full Newtonian viscous stress tensor.

  18. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard...

  3. Direct Labeling, Tester Expectancy and Delay Maintenance Behavior in Scottish Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Fiona K.; Toner, Ignatius J.

    1984-01-01

    Investigates the influence on Scottish preschool children's self-control of labels regarding patience given directly to the children themselves, and of the expectations regarding the children's patience provided to adult testers. Childrens self-control was assessed in a task in which each child's possession of accumulating candy rewards was made…

  4. Direct Labeling, Tester Expectancy and Delay Maintenance Behavior in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Fiona K.; Toner, Ignatius J.

    This study explored the hypotheses that (1) young children told (labeled) directly that they were "patient" by adults would demonstrate more subsequent self-control than children given an irrelevant label, and that (2) adult tester expectations regarding the children's self-control would influence only the subjects given the irrelevant…

  5. Dynamic simulation of a displacement-controlled total knee replacement wear tester.

    PubMed

    Lanovaz, J L; Ellis, R E

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a dynamic finite element method (FEM) model of a commercial displacement-controlled total knee replacement (TKR) wear tester. The first goal of the study was to validate the model, which included both the wear tester and the TKR components. Convergence simulations and experimental testing were performed. These included a novel experimental determination of the coefficient of friction and an evaluation of predicted joint contact areas by comparing simulation results with experimental data collected using pressure-sensitive film. The second goal of this study was to develop a procedure for implementing force-based testing protocols on a displacement-controlled TKR wear tester. A standard force-based cyclic wear-testing protocol was simulated using the FEM model and resulting displacement waveforms were extracted. These were used as control inputs to the physical wear tester and an experimental wear test was performed. Reaction loads on the tibial components were measured and compared with the simulated results. The model was capable of accurately predicting the tibial loads throughout the test cycle, verifying the model's contact mechanics. The study demonstrated the use of computational modelling to convert a force-based testing protocol into displacement-based control parameters for use in a displacement-controlled mechanical testing system.

  6. High inter-tester reliability of the new mobility score in patients with hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Bandholm, Thomas; Foss, Nicolai Bang; Ekdahl, Charlotte; Kehlet, Henrik

    2008-07-01

    To assess the inter-tester reliability of the New Mobility Score in patients with acute hip fracture. An inter-tester reliability study. Forty-eight consecutive patients with acute hip fracture at a median age of 84 (interquartile range, 76-89) years; 40 admitted from their own home and 8 from nursing homes to an acute orthopaedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. The New Mobility Score, which evaluates the prefracture functional level with a score from 0 (not able to walk at all) to 9 (fully independent), was assessed by 2 independent physiotherapists at the orthopaedic ward. Inter-tester reliability was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC1.1) and the standard error of measurement (SEM). The ICC between the 2 physiotherapists was 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-0.99 and the SEM was 0.42, 95% CI -0.40-1.24 New Mobility Score points. No systematic between-rater bias was observed (p>0.05). Patients who were scored differently by the 2 physiotherapists had significantly lower mental scores (p=0.02). The inter-tester reliability of the New Mobility Score is very high and can be recommended to evaluate the prefracture functional level in patients with acute hip fracture.

  7. Doctors' Orders for Language Testers: The Origin and Purpose of Ethical Codes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Kenneth; Davies, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Considers how far a code of ethics makes language testing an open profession and notes the dangers of face validity and of hypocrisy. Discusses the need for a code of practice to provide detailed guidance to language testers with regard to their professional responsibilities. (Author/VWL)

  8. Reliability of knee joint range of motion and circumference measurements after total knee arthroplasty: does tester experience matter?

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Christensen, Malene; Christensen, Stine Sommer; Olsen, Marie; Bandholm, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Two of the most utilized outcome measures to assess knee joint range of motion (ROM) and intra-articular effusion are goniometry and circumference, respectively. Neither goniometry nor circumference of the knee joint have been examined for both intra-tester and inter-tester in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference in patients with TKA when administered by physiotherapists (testers) with different clinical experience. The design was an intra-tester, inter-tester and intra-day reliability study. Nineteen outpatients (10 females) having received a TKA were examined by an inexperienced and an experienced physiotherapist. Following a standardized protocol, active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were obtained using a universal goniometer and a tape measure, respectively. To establish reliability, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,1)) and smallest real difference (SRD) were calculated. The knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were generally reliable (ICC > 0.8) within and between physiotherapists (except passive knee extension). Changes in knee joint ROM of more than 6.6 degrees and 10 degrees (except active knee flexion) and knee joint circumference of more than 1.0 cm and 1.63 cm represent a real clinical improvement (SRD) or deterioration for a single individual within and between physiotherapists, respectively. Generally, the experienced tester recorded larger knee joint ROM and lower circumference values than that of the inexperienced tester. In clinical practice, we suggest that repeated knee goniometric and circumferential measurements should be recorded by the same physiotherapist in individual patients with TKA. Tester experience appears not to influence the degree of reliability. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Aids for eye drop administration.

    PubMed

    Davies, Isaiah; Williams, Andrew M; Muir, Kelly W

    One aspect to eye drop adherence is successful instillation of the drops; however, it is well known that many patients struggle with this task. Difficulties may include aiming their drops, extending their neck, preventing excess drop leakage, avoiding contamination of the bottle tip, and generating enough force to expel a drop from the bottle. Instillation aids are devices that aim to ameliorate one or more of these barriers. We review the literature on instillation aids to describe the options available to patients and to report evaluations of their efficacy. Most instillation aids studied improved objective or subjective outcomes of eye drop instillation, including improved rates of successful administration and increased patient satisfaction compared with standard eye-drop bottles. Although further research is warranted, instillation aids may be an underutilized resource for the many patients who struggle to administer their own eye drops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Leidenfrost Drop on a Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2008-11-01

    When deposited on a hot plate, a water droplet evaporates quickly. However, a vapor film appears under the drop above a critical temperature, called Leidenfrost temperature, which insulates the drop from its substrate. Linke & al (2006) reported a spontaneous movement of such a drop, when deposited on a ratchet. We study here the case of a flat substrate decorated with a single micrometric step. The drop is deposited on the lower part of the plate and pushed towards the step at small constant velocity. If the kinetic energy of the drop is sufficient, it can climb up the step. In that case, depending on the substrate temperature, the drop can either be decelerated or accelerated by the step. We try to understand the dynamics of these drops, especially the regime where they accelerate. Taking advantage of this phenomenon, we could then build a multiple-step setup, making it possible for a Leidenfrost drop to climb stairs.

  11. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Gerson Silva; Pavão, Antonio Carlos; Alpes de Vasconcelos, Elder; Mendes, Odim; da Silva, Eronides Felisberto

    2007-01-26

    We performed electric arc discharges in pure Si to generate luminous balls with lifetime in the order of seconds and several properties usually reported for natural ball lightning. This simple experiment does not rely on energy sources and excitation mechanisms that are improbable in the natural phenomenon and clearly demonstrates the role of vaporization and oxidation of Si, as proposed by the Abrahamson-Dinniss theory for ball-lightning formation.

  12. How Magnus Bends the Flying Ball--Experimenting and Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timková, V.; Ješková, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Students are well aware of the effect of the deflection of sports balls when they have been given a spin. A volleyball, tennis, or table tennis ball served with topspin results in an additional downward force that makes the ball difficult to catch and return. In soccer, the effect of sidespin causes the ball to curve unexpectedly sideways,…

  13. Sensitivity of Turbutester and Accuhaler tester in asthmatic children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Direkwattanachai, Chalerat; Benjaponpitak, Suwat; Kamchaisatian, Wasu; Sasisakulporn, Cherapat; Teawsomboonkit, Wanlapa

    2010-02-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPI) are alternative devices for delivering medication for treatment of asthma. The amount of drug delivery to the lungs is directly influenced by peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR). A minimum PIFR of -30 L/min is needed for the Turbuhaler and Accuhaler. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the Turbutester and Accuhaler tester in detecting the minimum and optimum PIFR for the Turbuhaler and Accuhaler in asthmatic children, PIFR was measured using the In-Check Dial through the internal resistance of the Turbuhaler and Accuhaler and compared according to the child's ability to make a whistle sound via both testers. A total of 259 asthmatic children were studied: 20 pre-school children, aged 5-6 years; 174 school-age children, aged 7-12 years; and 65 adolescents, aged 13-18 years. The sensitivity of the Turbutester and Accuhaler tester to detect optimum PIFR were 98.40% and 97.2%, respectively. In the comparison among age groups, the sensitivity of the Accuhaler tester to detect optimum or minimum PIFR for the Accuhaler was 95%, 97.7% and 95.4%, respectively. The sensitivity of the Turbutester to detect optimum PIFR for the Turbuhaler was 94.4%, 98.8% and 98.5%, respectively. The sensitivity of the Turbutester to detect minimum PIFR for the Turbuhaler was 94.7%, 100% and 100%, respectively. There were no significant differences in percentage of having optimum or minimum PIFR among asthma severity and current device usage in all age groups. Most children aged at least 5 years could generate enough PIFR to use dry powder inhaler devices. Both the Turbutester and Accuhaler tester were found to have high sensitivity in detecting optimum and minimum required PIFR.

  14. Static Load Distribution in Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A numerical procedure for computing the internal loading distribution in statically loaded, single-row, angular-contact ball bearings when subjected to a known combined radial and thrust load is presented. The combined radial and thrust load must be applied in order to avoid tilting between inner and outer rings. The numerical procedure requires the iterative solution of Z + 2 simultaneous nonlinear equations - where Z is the number of the balls - to yield an exact solution for axial and radial deflections, and contact angles. Numerical results for a 218 angular-contact ball bearing have been compared with those from the literature and show significant differences in the magnitudes of the ball loads, contact angles, and the extent of the loading zone.

  15. Does soccer ball heading cause retinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Reed, William F; Feldman, Kenneth W; Weiss, Avery H; Tencer, Alan F

    2002-04-01

    To define forces of youth soccer ball heading (headers) and determine whether heading causes retinal hemorrhage. Regional Children's Hospital, youth soccer camp. Male and female soccer players, 13 to 16 years old, who regularly head soccer balls. Dilated retinal examination, after 2-week header diary, and accelerometer measurement of heading a lofted soccer ball. Twenty-one youth soccer players, averaging 79 headers in the prior 2 weeks, and 3 players who did not submit header diaries lacked retinal hemorrhage. Thirty control subjects also lacked retinal hemorrhage. Seven subjects heading the ball experienced linear cranial accelerations of 3.7 +/- 1.3g. Rotational accelerations were negligible. Headers, not associated with globe impact, are unlikely to cause retinal hemorrhage. Correctly executed headers did not cause significant rotational acceleration of the head, but incorrectly executed headers might.

  16. Improve pumping efficiency with PSZ ceramic balls

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, J. )

    1989-04-01

    partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) ceramic balls used today in downhole pumps improve both the efficiency and run time of sucker rod pumping systems. Recent field tests showed the balls increased the average run time of downhole pumps by 440%. While there are other types of stabilizers, only magnesia PSZ is appropriate for downhole pumps. The more commonly found alloy balls and carbide balls have been found to deform and not seal under these conditions. PSZ is most notable for its resistance to breaking from impact. A nonductile material, it will make a perfect seal on the seat despite any impact, enhancing its use in fluid pound situations. Other PSZ applications in downhole pumps and related equipment include plunger inserts, discharge inserts, plunger rings, choke parts, pressure relief valve components, and triplex pump plungers.

  17. Impact of a ping-pong ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2017-05-01

    Measurements are presented of the impact time, peak force and centre of mass displacement of a ping-pong ball impacting vertically on a hard, horizontal surface. The results are compared with a recent measurement described in this journal.

  18. Bouncing Balls and Hot Rod Races.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibbs, Peggy; Sherrill, Donna

    This paper presents the Bouncing Ball Experiment which models quadratic and exponential functions, and the Hot Rod Races activity that explores velocity and acceleration. Activities include directions for the use of TI-82 and TI-83 calculators. (YDS)

  19. Contact Sensors on Ceramic Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jia; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Romero, Edwar

    2002-01-01

    Integration of micro contact sensors onto a ball bearing is a critical technology necessary for on-line bearing health monitoring in an industrial harsh environment and evaluation of the bearing performance and design. The current planner fabrication methods offered by the MEMS technology restrict the possibility of integrating micro sensor onto a double contoured bearing surface in a more traditional manufacturing environment. We have developed an unique technique to directly fabricate micron-sized pressure and temperature sensors onto a miniature ceramic ball bearing. A complete fabrication process, based on sensor design, surface preparation, optimized sputtering parameters, photolithographic techniques and sensor post-treatment, is described. Pressure and temperature measurement results on a miniature ceramic ball bearing show good correlation with numerical thermal-EHL analysis and good wear resistance. Keywords: Ball Bearing, Thin film Sensor, Pressure sensor, Temperature Sensor, adhesion, wear resistance, Non-developable surface, and thermal-EHL.

  20. Acting Administrator Lightfoot Visits Ball Aerospace

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-06

    Acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot, center, is seen during a visit to the environmental test facilities at Ball Aerospace, Thursday, April 6, 2017 in Boulder, Colo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  1. Reexamination of Ball-Race Conformity Effects on Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis in this report considers the life of the ball set as well as the respective lives of the races to reassess the effect of ball-race conformity on ball bearing life. The related changes in ball bearing life are incorporated in life factors that can be used to modify the bearing predicted life using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations and the ANSI/ABMA and ISO Standards. Two simple algebraic relationships were established to calculate life factors LF(sub c) to determine the effect of inner- and outer-race conformity combinations on bearing L(sub 10) life for deepgroove and angular-contact ball bearings, respectively. Depending on the bearing type and series as well as conformity combinations, the calculated life for deep-groove ball bearings can be over 40 percent less than that calculated by the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. For angular-contact ball bearings, the life can vary between +16 and -39 percent from that calculated by the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. Comparing the two ball bearing types, the life factors LF(sub c) for the deep-groove bearings can be as much as 40 percent lower than that for angular-contact ball bearings.

  2. Middle finger and ball movements around ball release during baseball fastball pitching.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomoyuki; Jinji, Tsutomu; Hirayama, Daisaku; Nasu, Daiki; Ozaki, Hiroki; Kumagawa, Daisuke

    2017-02-28

    The objectives of this study were to investigate middle finger movements and dynamics of ball movements around the instant of ball release during baseball pitching. Baseball pitching from an indoor mound among 14 semi-professional pitchers was captured using a motion capture system with 16 high-speed cameras (1,000 Hz). Kinematics of middle finger joints, ball rotation, and force applied to the ball were calculated. The proximal and distal interphalangeal joints continued to extend until the instant of ball release, then abruptly flexed. The abrupt flexion lasted for only several milliseconds, followed by a short extension phase. The finger made a quick double cycle of extension-flexion movement, suggesting that it attained high stiffness resulting from co-contraction. The ball began to roll up to the tip of the finger 8 ± 1 ms before ball release owing to the start of extension or the increased angular velocity of extension for the proximal interphalangeal joint. A mean force of 195 ± 27 N was applied in the proximal direction of the hand at the same time as the beginning of ball rolling, and a mean force of 109 ± 22 N was applied to the throwing direction just before ball release.

  3. Theory of Compound Liquid Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamic behavior is analyzed for drop within drop within infinite fluid. Report gives theoretical basis for understanding behavior of compound drops. Aids in planning and interpreting experiments in laboratory, spacecraft, and research aircraft. Provides insight into fabrication of target pellets for nuclear fusion.

  4. Crystal ball single event display

    SciTech Connect

    Grosnick, D.; Gibson, A.; Allgower, C.; Alyea, J. |

    1997-10-15

    The Single Event Display (SED) is a routine that is designed to provide information graphically about a triggered event within the Crystal Ball. The SED is written entirely in FORTRAN and uses the CERN-based HICZ graphing package. The primary display shows the amount of energy deposited in each of the NaI crystals on a Mercator-like projection of the crystals. Ten different shades and colors correspond to varying amounts of energy deposited within a crystal. Information about energy clusters is displayed on the crystal map by outlining in red the thirteen (or twelve) crystals contained within a cluster and assigning each cluster a number. Additional information about energy clusters is provided in a series of boxes containing useful data about the energy distribution among the crystals within the cluster. Other information shown on the event display include the event trigger type and data about {pi}{sup o}`s and {eta}`s formed from pairs of clusters as found by the analyzer. A description of the major features is given, along with some information on how to install the SED into the analyzer.

  5. Gravitational waves from Q-ball formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kamada, Kohei; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-04-15

    We study the detectability of the gravitational waves (GWs) from the Q-ball formation associated with the Affleck-Dine (AD) mechanism, taking into account both the dilution effects due to Q-ball domination and to finite temperature. The AD mechanism predicts the formation of nontopological solitons, Q-balls, from which GWs are generated. Q-balls with large conserved charge Q can produce a large amount of GWs. On the other hand, the decay rate of such Q-balls is so small that they may dominate the energy density of the Universe, which implies that GWs are significantly diluted and that their frequencies are redshifted during the Q-ball dominated era. Thus, the detectability of the GWs associated with the formation of Q-balls is determined by these two competing effects. We find that there is a finite but small parameter region where such GWs may be detected by future detectors such as DECIGO or BBO, only in the case when the thermal logarithmic potential dominates the potential of the AD field. Otherwise GWs from Q-balls would not be detectable even by these futuristic detectors: {Omega}{sub GW}{sup 0}<10{sup -21}. Unfortunately, for such parameter region the present baryon asymmetry of the Universe can hardly be explained unless one fine-tunes A-terms in the potential. However the detection of such a GW background may give us an information about the early Universe, for example, it may suggest that the flat directions with B-L=0 are favored.

  6. Fracture analysis of HPOTP bearing balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture analysis conducted on four HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) bearing balls from the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) is described. Nondestructive evaluation, optical microscopy, and transmission microscopy techniques were used in the analysis. The cracks are initiated at or close to the ball surface under conditions of high cyclic stresses and high coefficient of friction. The cracks lead to spalls and subsequent crack propagation occurs by fatigue mode under concentrated loading of cyclic nature.

  7. Acting Administrator Lightfoot Visits Ball Aerospace

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-06

    Michael Dean, senior project engineer for the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program at Ball Aerospace, right, speaks with acting NASA Deputy Administrator Lesa Roe, second from left, and acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot, center, about the 20ft. by 24 ft. vertical thermal vacuum chamber, Thursday, April 6, 2017 during a visit to Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  8. Fractal aggregates in tennis ball systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, J.; Bandín, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-09-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the images of the cluster of balls, following Forrest and Witten's pioneering studies on the aggregation of smoke particles, to estimate their fractal dimension.

  9. Drop foot corrective device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A light weight, economical device to alleviate a plurality of difficulties encountered in walking by a victim suffering from a drop foot condition is discussed. A legband girdles the leg below the knee and above the calf providing an anchor point for the upper end of a ligament having its lower end attached to a toe of a shoe or a toe on the foot. The ligament is of such length that the foot is supported thereby and retained in a normal position during walking.

  10. Development of a Low-Cost and High-speed Single Event Effects Testers based on Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. W.; Kim, H.; Berg, M.; LaBel, K. A.; Stansberry, S.; Friendlich, M.; Irwin, T.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of a low cost, high speed tester reconfigurable Field Programmable Gata Array (FPGA) is shown. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) Objectives; 3) Tester Descriptions; 4) Tester Validations and Demonstrations; 5) Future Work; and 6) Summary.

  11. Phonocardiographic diagnosis of aortic ball variance.

    PubMed

    Hylen, J C; Kloster, F E; Herr, R H; Hull, P Q; Ames, A W; Starr, A; Griswold, H E

    1968-07-01

    Fatty infiltration causing changes in the silastic poppet of the Model 1000 series Starr-Edwards aortic valve prostheses (ball variance) has been detected with increasing frequency and can result in sudden death. Phonocardiograms were recorded on 12 patients with ball variance confirmed by operation and of 31 controls. Ten of the 12 patients with ball variance were distinguished from the controls by an aortic opening sound (AO) less than half as intense as the aortic closure sound (AC) at the second right intercostal space (AO/AC ratio less than 0.5). Both AO and AC were decreased in two patients with ball variance, with the loss of the characteristic high frequency and amplitude of these sounds. The only patient having a diminished AO/AC ratio (0.42) without ball variance at reoperation had a clot extending over the aortic valve struts. The phonocardiographic findings have been the most reliable objective evidence of ball variance in patients with Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis of the Model 1000 series.

  12. Heated-Pressure-Ball Monopropellant Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, William D.

    2005-01-01

    A recent technology disclosure presents a concept for a monopropellant thermal spacecraft thruster that would feature both the simplicity of a typical prior pressure-fed propellant supply system and the smaller mass and relative compactness of a typical prior pump-fed system. The source of heat for this thruster would likely be a nuclear- fission reactor. The propellant would be a cryogenic fluid (a liquefied low-molecular-weight gas) stored in a tank at a low pressure. The propellant would flow from the tank, through a feedline, into three thick-walled spherical tanks, denoted pressure balls, that would be thermally connected to the reactor. Valves upstream and downstream of the pressure balls would be operated in a three-phase cycle in which propellant would flow into one pressure ball while the fluid underwent pressurization through heating in another ball and pressurized propellant was discharged from the remaining ball into the reactor. After flowing through the reactor, wherein it would be further heated, the propellant would be discharged through an exhaust nozzle to generate thrust. A fraction of the pressurized gas from the pressure balls would be diverted to maintain the desired pressure in the tank.

  13. The ball SITE sign: Ball sports-induced targetoid erythema in a racquetball player

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous injury following impact of a high velocity ball to the skin may result in either erythema or purpura or both. The lesion typically appears as an annular ring of erythema with or without accompanying ecchymosis when the skin is contacted by a paintball, a ping pong ball, a racquetball or a squash ball. Purpose: To describe a girl with targetoid erythema following impact of a racquetball on her flank and back and to review other sports associated with this response to skin injury. Methods: PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination: ball, erythema, paint, ping pong, purpura, racquetball, sign, site, sports, squash, targetoid. All papers were reviewed and relevant manuscripts, along with their reference citations, were evaluated. Results: A 13-year-old girl developed an annular red ring surrounding a central area of normal appearing skin on her right flank and upper back where a racquetball traveling at a high velocity contacted her skin. Similar appearing lesions of targetoid erythema have been described at the cutaneous impact sites of either paintballs, ping pong balls, squash balls; in addition to erythema, purpura may also concurrently appear or subsequently develop at the contact location of the ball with the skin. Conclusions: Targetoid erythema is a pathognomonic cutaneous presentation resulting from the impact of either a paintball, ping pong ball, racquetball or squash ball—that is traveling at a high velocity—with a sport participant’s skin. The ball SITE (sports-induced targetoid erythema) sign is suggested as a unifying nomenclature to designate this unique, ball sport-associated, cutaneous dermatosis in athletes participating in sports in which high velocity impact of the ball with the skin may occur. PMID:26336625

  14. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation.

  15. Comparison of high speed impact test of solder joints with board level drop test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruprasad, Pradosh

    Efforts have been made in this study to evaluate the characteristics of solder joint failure by using a new high speed impact tester. First, the dynamics and characteristics of the test vehicle in a board level drop test have been evaluated. A thorough understanding of the behavior of the test vehicle is examined by characterizing its response under different test profiles and board dimensions. This is done in an attempt to optimize the test procedure used to qualify electronic products subjected to high strain rate drop/shock environment. The effects of peak acceleration and change in velocity of the impact pulse on the reliability of the test vehicle have been studied. In situ strain measurements have been used to aid us in characterizing the board response under high strain rate loading conditions. Also finite element analysis has been used to better understand the board response under different loading conditions. Based on the experimental results and analysis, ways to improvise the drop test setup have been discussed. A more thorough understanding of the solder joint behavior is examined by characterizing the behavior with respect to varying impact profiles on a new pendulum fatigue and a high speed impact tester. This is done in an attempt to address solder joint failures in actual product that may be operating under high strain rate or shock environments and to reduce the actual test time needed for a board level drop test. Comparison between the high speed pendulum impact test and drop test was primarily made by evaluating the failure modes from these two tests. Energy absorbed by the solder in a single impact has been used to predict the reliability in a board level test.

  16. Use of the standard rubber ball as an impact source with heavyweight concrete floors.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Lee, Pyoung Jik; Sato, Shin-ichi

    2009-07-01

    To select an appropriate standard floor impact source to simulate real floor impacts, objective and subjective evaluations of the floor impact sounds were conducted in a box-frame-type structure with reinforced concrete slab floors. The sounds simulated in the test were those that would result from an adult walking barefoot, children running and jumping (represented by a heavy-weight impact source, such as a bang machine or an impact ball), as well as those of a person walking in high-heels or a lightweight object being dropped (represented by a tapping machine). Similarity tests between human-made impact sounds and standard heavy-weight impact sounds were performed. Sound quality (SQ) metrics were used to predict the results of the similarity tests. These results showed that the impact sound of an impact ball is more similar to a human-made impact sound than the sound of a bang machine. A multiple regression analysis showed that loudness and roughness are significant factors describing the results of similarity judgment among SQ metrics. Much of the data from the standard impact sources, measured in reinforced concrete floors with rigid floor coverings, have been collected. An empirical relationship was established to convert the impact pressure sound level from the bang machine or tapping machine to that from the impact ball. This study indicates that the use of an impact ball is reliable for simulating human impact sounds.

  17. Test and Evaluation of the MT 75 Rope Tester - A Hand-Held NDT Wire-Rope Inspection Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    CLASSIFICAION or TMIS *iGIR(mh Dae Enteind) Library Card Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory TEST AND EVALUATION OF THlE MT 75 ROPE TESTER - I AND-HELD NDT ...programs. MT 75 ROPE TESTER The NT 75 is a hand-held NDT wire rope inspection device that uses the DC method of detection. The NT 75 is 6 inches long...TN NO: N-1661 TEST AND EVALUATION OF THE MT 75 TITLE: ROPE TESTER - A HAND-HELD NDT WIRE- ROPE INSPECTION DEVICE J: AD A12 h 79 0 AUTHOR: L. D

  18. Ball to separator contact forces in angular contact ball bearings under thrust and radial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental data are reported on ball to cage contact forces in a 110 mm bore ball bearing operating at speeds to 12,000 rpm under radial and thrust loads. Information is also reported on cage to inner race land contact force, cage to inner race land clearance, and cage to shaft speed ratios.

  19. A comparative study of two types of ball-on-ball collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Colin

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes three methods of measuring the coefficient of restitution (CoR) for two different types of ball-on-ball collision. The first collision type (for which two different CoR measurement procedures are described) is a static, hanging steel ball forming part of a Newton’s cradle arrangement, which is then hit by its adjacent identical ball, swinging down from an angle. The second scenario (for which one CoR measurement procedure is described) is a snooker ball interaction in which the cue ball rolls in, and collides with, a static coloured ball (both balls being of a resin composition). The investigation requires only readily available and inexpensive equipment, together with an open-source video analysis programme, called ‘Tracker’2. Perhaps surprisingly, the experiment yields widely differing CoR values for the two types of interaction. This variance cannot be solely accounted for by the difference in physical properties of the respective balls’ compositions. The paper then describes, in theoretical terms, the details of the dynamic interactions in each example, and hence validates the surprising discrepancy in the two results obtained empirically.

  20. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls.

    PubMed

    Asai, Takeshi; Seo, Kazuya

    2013-12-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through a wind tunnel test and ball trajectory simulations, this study shows that the aerodynamic resistance of the new 32-panel soccer ball is larger in the high-speed region and lower in the middle-speed region than that of the previous 14- and 8-panel balls. The critical Reynolds number of the Roteiro, Teamgeist II, Jabulani, and Tango 12 was ~2.2 × 10(5) (drag coefficient, C d  ≈ 0.12), ~2.8 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), ~3.3 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), and ~2.4 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.15), respectively. The flight trajectory simulation suggested that the Tango 12, one of the newest soccer balls, has less air resistance in the medium-speed region than the Jabulani and can thus easily acquire large initial velocity in this region. It is considered that the critical Reynolds number of a soccer ball, as considered within the scope of this experiment, depends on the extended total distance of the panel bonds rather than the small designs on the panel surfaces.

  1. Drop tube research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    This report covers the activities performed in the Drop Tube Study which The University of Alabama in Huntsville designed, fabricated and performed various low gravity experiments in materials processing from November 1, 1991 through October 30, 1992. During the performance of this contract the utilization of these ground-based containerless processing facilities has been instrumental in providing the opportunity to determine the feasibility of performing a number of solidification experiments in a simulated space environment, without the expense of a space-based experiment. A number of periodic reports have been given to the TCOR during the course of this contract hence this final report is meant only to summarize the many activities performed and not redundantly cover materials already submitted.

  2. Ball machine usage in tennis: movement initiation and swing timing while returning balls from a ball machine and from a real server.

    PubMed

    Carboch, Jan; Süss, Vladimir; Kocib, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Practicing with the use of a ball machine could handicap a player compared to playing against an actual opponent. Recent studies have shown some differences in swing timing and movement coordination, when a player faces a ball projection machine as opposed to a human opponent. We focused on the time of movement initiation and on stroke timing during returning tennis serves (simulated by a ball machine or by a real server). Receivers' movements were measured on a tennis court. In spite of using a serving ball speed from 90 kph to 135 kph, results showed significant differences in movement initiation and backswing duration between serves received from a ball machine and serves received from a real server. Players had shorter movement initiation when they faced a ball machine. Backswing duration was longer for the group using a ball machine. That demonstrates different movement timing of tennis returns when players face a ball machine. Use of ball machines in tennis practice should be limited as it may disrupt stroke timing. Key pointsPlayers have shorter initial move time when they are facing the ball machine.Using the ball machine results in different swing timing and movement coordination.The use of the ball machine should be limited.

  3. Ball Machine Usage in Tennis: Movement Initiation and Swing Timing While Returning Balls from a Ball Machine and from a Real Server

    PubMed Central

    Carboch, Jan; Süss, Vladimir; Kocib, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Practicing with the use of a ball machine could handicap a player compared to playing against an actual opponent. Recent studies have shown some differences in swing timing and movement coordination, when a player faces a ball projection machine as opposed to a human opponent. We focused on the time of movement initiation and on stroke timing during returning tennis serves (simulated by a ball machine or by a real server). Receivers’ movements were measured on a tennis court. In spite of using a serving ball speed from 90 kph to 135 kph, results showed significant differences in movement initiation and backswing duration between serves received from a ball machine and serves received from a real server. Players had shorter movement initiation when they faced a ball machine. Backswing duration was longer for the group using a ball machine. That demonstrates different movement timing of tennis returns when players face a ball machine. Use of ball machines in tennis practice should be limited as it may disrupt stroke timing. Key points Players have shorter initial move time when they are facing the ball machine. Using the ball machine results in different swing timing and movement coordination. The use of the ball machine should be limited. PMID:24790483

  4. Effect of a ball skill intervention on children's ball skills and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Westendorp, Marieke; Houwen, Suzanne; Hartman, Esther; Mombarg, Remo; Smith, Joanne; Visscher, Chris

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the effect of a 16-wk ball skill intervention on the ball skills, executive functioning (in terms of problem solving and cognitive flexibility), and in how far improved executive functioning leads to improved reading and mathematics performance of children with learning disorders. Ninety-one children with learning disorders (age 7-11 yr old) were recruited from six classes in a Dutch special-needs primary school. The six classes were assigned randomly either to the intervention or to the control group. The control group received the school's regular physical education lessons. In the intervention group, ball skills were practiced in relative static, simple settings as well as in more dynamic and cognitive demanding settings. Both groups received two 40-min lessons per week. Children's scores on the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (ball skills), Tower of London (problem solving), Trail Making Test (cognitive flexibility), Dutch Analysis of Individual Word Forms (reading), and the Dutch World in Numbers test (mathematics) at pretest, posttest, and retention test were used to examine intervention effects. The results showed that the intervention group significantly improved their ball skills, whereas the control group did not. No intervention effects were found on the cognitive parameters. However, within the intervention group, a positive relationship (r = 0.41, P = 0.007) was found between the change in ball skill performance and the change in problem solving: the larger children's improvement in ball skills, the larger their improvement in problem solving. The present ball skill intervention is an effective instrument to improve the ball skills of children with learning disorders. Further research is needed to examine the effect of the ball skill intervention on the cognitive parameters in this population.

  5. The Failure Models of Lead Free Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu Solder Joint Reliability Under Low-G and High-G Drop Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian; Lei, YongPing; Lin, Jian; Fu, HanGuang; Wu, Zhongwei

    2017-02-01

    The reliability of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu (SAC 305) solder joint under a broad level of drop impacts was studied. The failure performance of solder joint, failure probability and failure position were analyzed under two shock test conditions, i.e., 1000 g for 1 ms and 300 g for 2 ms. The stress distribution on the solder joint was calculated by ABAQUS. The results revealed that the dominant reason was the tension due to the difference in stiffness between the print circuit board and ball grid array, and the maximum tension of 121.1 MPa and 31.1 MPa, respectively, under both 1000 g or 300 g drop impact, was focused on the corner of the solder joint which was located in the outmost corner of the solder ball row. The failure modes were summarized into the following four modes: initiation and propagation through the (1) intermetallic compound layer, (2) Ni layer, (3) Cu pad, or (4) Sn-matrix. The outmost corner of the solder ball row had a high failure probability under both 1000 g and 300 g drop impact. The number of failures of solder ball under the 300 g drop impact was higher than that under the 1000 g drop impact. The characteristic drop values for failure were 41 and 15,199, respectively, following the statistics.

  6. Flight trajectory of a rotating golf ball with grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Moonheum; Kim, Jooha; Choi, Haecheon

    2014-11-01

    Dimples are known to reduce drag on a sphere by the amount of 50% as compared to a smooth surface. Despite the advantage of reducing drag, dimples deteriorate the putting accuracy owing to their sharp edges. To minimize this putting error but maintain the same flight distance, we have devised a grooved golf ball (called G ball hereafter) for several years. In this study, we modify the shape and pattern of grooves, and investigate the flow characteristics of the G ball by performing wind-tunnel experiments at the Reynolds numbers of 0 . 5 ×105 - 2 . 5 ×105 and the spin ratios (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 - 0.6 that include the real golf-ball velocity and rotational speed. We measure the drag and lift forces on the rotating G ball and compare them with those of a smooth ball and two well-known dimpled balls. The lift-to-drag ratio of the G ball is much higher than that of a smooth ball and is in between those of the two dimpled balls. The trajectories of flying golf balls are computed. The flight distance of G ball is almost the same as that of one dimpled ball but slightly shorter than that of the other dimpled ball. The fluid-dynamic aspects of these differences will be discussed at the talk. Supported by 2011-0028032, 2014M3C1B1033980.

  7. The dynamic impact characteristics of tennis balls with tennis rackets.

    PubMed

    Haake, S J; Carré, M J; Goodwill, S R

    2003-10-01

    The dynamic properties of six types of tennis balls were measured using a force platform and high-speed digital video images of ball impacts on rigidly clamped tennis rackets. It was found that the coefficient of restitution reduced with velocity for impacts on a rigid surface or with a rigidly clamped tennis racket. Pressurized balls had the highest coefficient of restitution, which decreased by 20% when punctured. Pressureless balls had a coefficient of restitution approaching that of a punctured ball at high speeds. The dynamic stiffness of the ball or the ball-racket system increased with velocity and pressurized balls had the highest stiffness, which decreased by 35% when punctured. The characteristics of pressureless balls were shown to be similar to those of punctured balls at high velocity and it was found that lowering the string tension produced a smaller range of stiffness or coefficient of restitution. It was hypothesized that players might consider high ball stiffness to imply a high coefficient of restitution. Plots of coefficient of restitution versus stiffness confirmed the relationship and it was found that, generally, pressurized balls had a higher coefficient of restitution and stiffness than pressureless balls. The players might perceive these parameters through a combination of sound, vibration and perception of ball speed off the racket.

  8. Dark matter balls help supernovae to explode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-10-01

    As a solution to the well-known problem that the shock wave potentially responsible for the explosion of a supernova actually tends to stall, we propose a new energy source arising from our model for dark matter. Our earlier model proposed that dark matter should consist of cm-large white dwarf-like objects kept together by a skin separating two different sorts of vacua. These dark matter balls or pearls will collect in the middle of any star throughout its lifetime. At some stage during the development of a supernova, the balls will begin to take in neutrons and then other surrounding material. By passing into a ball nucleons fall through a potential of order 10 MeV, causing a severe production of heat — of order 10 foe for a solar mass of material eaten by the balls. The temperature in the iron core will thereby be raised, splitting up the iron into smaller nuclei. This provides a mechanism for reviving the shock wave when it arrives and making the supernova explosion really occur. The onset of the heating due to the dark matter balls would at first stop the collapse of the supernova progenitor. This opens up the possibility of there being two collapses giving two neutrino outbursts, as apparently seen in the supernova SN1987A — one in Mont Blanc and one 4 h 43 min later in both IMB and Kamiokande.

  9. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  10. When adolescents drop the ball: sustainability of physical activity in youth.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Mathieu; Gray-Donald, Katherine; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Paradis, Gilles; Hanley, James

    2009-07-01

    A majority of youth do not attain the recommended levels of physical activity. To develop interventions that will be more efficient at enabling healthy levels of physical activity during adolescence, a better understanding is needed about which specific types of physical activity adolescents are more likely to sustain and when they tend to stop participating in each specific type of activity. From 1999 to 2005, 1276 adolescents, initially aged 12-13 years, completed a 7-day physical activity recall every 3 months during each of 5 years of secondary school. The prevalence of participation in each of 29 specific physical activities in each of Grades 7-11 was computed. Survival analyses were used to estimate when adolescents who reported each activity at baseline tended to discontinue the activity. All analyses were conducted in 2008. The prevalence of participation in most activities declined over the 5 years; it did not increase for any activity. Within 2 years of baseline, the majority of adolescents discontinued participation in most activities in which they had reported participation at baseline. Sustained participation in a specific activity related both to its intensity (90%, 73%, and 40% of girls and 77%, 86%, and 60% of boys sustained participation in light-, moderate-, and vigorous-intensity activities, respectively) and its format (41% and 89% of girls and 69% and 90% of boys sustained participation in team and individual physical activities, respectively). Participation in almost all physical activities declined during adolescence. The time of discontinuation varied across activity types. Promoting activities that attract and sustain secondary school students may improve physical activity levels throughout adolescence.

  11. An automated digital data collection and analysis system for the Charpy Impact Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohne, Glenn S.; Spiegel, F. Xavier

    1994-01-01

    The standard Charpy Impact Tester has been modified by the addition of a system of hardware and software to improve the accuracy and consistency of measurements made during specimen fracturing experiments. An optical disc, light source, and detector generate signals that indicate the pendulum position as a function of time. These signals are used by a computer to calculate the velocity and kinetic energy of the pendulum as a function of its position.

  12. The Design of a Four Square Gear Tester for Noise and Vibration Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    Four Square Gear Tester ...... . 25 2.3 The Speed-Torque Relationship of Contraves Blower Ventilated Motor ....... ..................... ... 31 2.4...The Speed-Torque Relationship of Contraves Self- Ventilated Motor ....... ..................... ... 32 2.5 The Contraves Motor...34 2.6 The Contraves Motor Mounted Blower ... ............ ... 35 2.7 The Fixed-Fixed End Condition (to determine the natural frequency of the

  13. Review of LOX Bearing and Seal Materials Tester (BSMT) radial load system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Kannel, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Problems concerning the bearings in the high pressure oxygen turbopumps (HPOTP) were investigated. The tasks involved: failure analyses, bearing dynamics calculations, lubrication studies, wear studies, and analyses of thermal transients. The radial load system on MSFC's bearing and seal tester used to study components for the HPOTP in liquid oxygen (LOX) is analyzed and the wear behavior of AISI 440C steel with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) lubrication is studied.

  14. Advances in tribological testing of artificial joint biomaterials using multidirectional pin-on-disk testers

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, D.; Siskey, R.S.; Haider, H.; Saikko, V.; Ahlroos, T.; Kurtz, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of numerous formulations of Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), which is widely used as a bearing material in orthopedic implants, necessitated screening of bearing couples to identify promising iterations for expensive joint simulations. Pin-on-disk (POD) testers capable of multidirectional sliding can correctly rank formulations of UHMWPE with respect to their predictive in vivo wear behavior. However, there are still uncertainties regarding POD test parameters for facilitating clinically relevant wear mechanisms of UHMWPE. Studies on the development of POD testing were briefly summarized. We systematically reviewed wear rate data of UHMWPE generated by POD testers. To determine if POD testing was capable of correctly ranking bearings and if test parameters outlined in ASTM F732 enabled differentiation between wear behavior of various formulations, mean wear rates of non-irradiated, conventional (25–50 kGy) and highly crosslinked (≥90 kGy) UHMWPE were grouped and compared. The mean wear rates of non-irradiated, conventional and highly crosslinked UHMWPEs were 7.03, 5.39 and 0.67 mm3/MC. Based on studies that complied with the guidelines of ASTM F732, the mean wear rates of non-irradiated, conventional and highly crosslinked UHMWPEs were 0.32, 0.21 and 0.04 mm3/km, respectively. In both sets of results, the mean wear rate of highly crosslinked UHMPWE was smaller than both conventional and non-irradiated UHMWPEs (p<0.05). Thus, POD testers can compare highly crosslinked and conventional UHMWPEs despite different test parameters. Narrowing the allowable range for standardized test parameters could improve sensitivity of multi-axial testers in correctly ranking materials. PMID:23831149

  15. High concentration (2500 suns), high throughput, automated flash tester with calibrated color balance and intensity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludowise, Michael; Taylor, Sean; Lucow, Ewelina; Chan, Hing

    2008-08-01

    SolFocus has designed and built a flexible and adaptable solar flash tester capable of reaching in excess of 2500x suns flux using a commercially available Xenon flash and power supply. Using calibrated isotype cells and photodetectors, the intensity and color balance of the flash are controlled through software algorithms that compensate for tube aging and thermal drift. The data acquisition system dynamically normalizes each of the 1600 I-V data pairs to the lamp intensity during each flash. Up to 32 cells can be measured simultaneously, with a flash re-cycle time of 3 seconds. The dynamic current range is 100μA to 10A over 0 to 5V. Test ranges are limited by user input through a modern GUI screen. The system is mated to a commercially available probe station tester which allows automated testing of up to 150mm diameter wafers, and is capable of testing a 4000 cell wafer in less than 8 minutes. The core software and optical components are easily adaptable to receiver and full panel testing as well. Data on the calibration and performance of the flash tester, the dynamic range achieved in test, and throughputs obtained during operation are presented.

  16. The design and analysis of single flank transmission error tester for loaded gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassett, Duane E.; Houser, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    To strengthen the understanding of gear transmission error and to verify mathematical models which predict them, a test stand that will measure the transmission error of gear pairs under design loads has been investigated. While most transmission error testers have been used to test gear pairs under unloaded conditions, the goal of this report was to design and perform dynamic analysis of a unique tester with the capability of measuring the transmission error of gears under load. This test stand will have the capability to continuously load a gear pair at torques up to 16,000 in-lb at shaft speeds from 0 to 5 rpm. Error measurement will be accomplished with high resolution optical encoders and the accompanying signal processing unit from an existing unloaded transmission error tester. Input power to the test gear box will be supplied by a dc torque motor while the load will be applied with a similar torque motor. A dual input, dual output control system will regulate the speed and torque of the system. This control system's accuracy and dynamic response were analyzed and it was determined that proportional plus derivative speed control is needed in order to provide the precisely constant torque necessary for error-free measurement.

  17. Gas-pressurized dispersive powder flow tester for low volume sample characterization.

    PubMed

    Majid, Ainnur Marlyana Abd; Wong, Tin Wui

    2013-05-01

    The conventional powder flow testers require sample volumes larger than 40g and are met with experimental hiccups due to powder cohesion. This study designed a gas-pressurized dispersive powder flow tester where a high velocity air is used to disaggregate powder (9g) and eliminate its cohesion. The pressurized gas entrained solid particles leaving an orifice where the distance, surface area, width and weight of particle dispersion thereafter are determined as flow index. The flow indices of seven lactose grades with varying size, size distribution, shape, morphology, bulk and tapped densities characteristics were examined. They were compared against Hausner ratio and Carr's index parameters of the same powder mass. Both distance and surface area attributes of particle dispersion had significant negative correlations with Hausner ratio and Carr's index values of lactose. The distance, surface area and ease of particle dispersion varied proportionately with circular equivalent, surface weighted mean and volume weighted mean diameters of lactose, and inversely related to their specific surface area and elongation characteristics. Unlike insensitive Hausner ratio and Carr's index, an increase in elongation property of lactose particles was detectable through reduced powder weight loss from gas-pressurized dispersion as a result of susceptible particle blockage at orifice. The gas-pressurized dispersive tester is a useful alternative flowability measurement device for low volume and cohesive powder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A dynamic tester to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbin; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal and moisture behaviour of the microclimate of textiles is crucial in determining the physiological comfort of apparel, but it has not been investigated sufficiently due to the lack of particular evaluation techniques. Based on sensing, temperature controlling and wireless communicating technology, a specially designed tester has been developed in this study to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of the surface of textiles in moving status. A temperature acquisition system and a temperature controllable hotplate have been established to test temperature and simulate the heat of human body, respectively. Relative humidity of the surface of fabric in the dynamic process has been successfully tested through sensing. Meanwhile, wireless communication technology was applied to transport the acquired data of temperature and humidity to computer for further processing. Continuous power supply was achieved by intensive contact between an elastic copper plate and copper ring on the rotating shaft. This tester provides the platform to evaluate the thermal and moisture behaviour of textiles. It enables users to conduct a dynamic analysis on the temperature and humidity together with the thermal and moisture transport behaviour of the surface of fabric in moving condition. Development of this tester opens the door of investigation on the micro-climate of textiles in real time service, and eventually benefits the understanding of the sensation comfort and wellbeing of apparel wearers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. PH Tester Gauge Repeatability and Reproducibility Study for WO3 Nanostructure Hydrothermal Growth Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Rashid, Amirul; Hayati Saad, Nor; Bien Chia Sheng, Daniel; Yee, Lee Wai

    2014-06-01

    PH value is one of the important variables for tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanostructure hydrothermal synthesis process. The morphology of the synthesized nanostructure can be properly controlled by measuring and controlling the pH value of the solution used in this facile synthesis route. Therefore, it is very crucial to ensure the gauge used for pH measurement is reliable in order to achieve the expected result. In this study, gauge repeatability and reproducibility (GR&R) method was used to assess the repeatability and reproducibility of the pH tester. Based on ANOVA method, the design of experimental metrics as well as the result of the experiment was analyzed using Minitab software. It was found that the initial GR&R value for the tester was at 17.55 % which considered as acceptable. To further improve the GR&R level, a new pH measuring procedure was introduced. With the new procedure, the GR&R value was able to be reduced to 2.05%, which means the tester is statistically very ideal to measure the pH of the solution prepared for WO3 hydrothermal synthesis process.

  20. Effect of Microgravity on Several Visual Functions During STS Shuttle Missions: Visual Function Tester-model 1 (VFT-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneal, Melvin R.; Task, H. Lee; Genco, Louis V.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the effect of microgravity on several visual functions during STS shuttle missions are presented. The purpose, methods, results, and discussion are discussed. The visual function tester model 1 is used.