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Sample records for drop evaporation test

  1. Modeling nanofluid sessile drop evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William J.; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.

    2017-07-01

    Modeling predictions for the evaporation of nanofluid pinned sessile drops are reported. Drops of fluids containing suspended nanoparticles have reduced evaporation rates relative to their pure fluid counterparts due to the agglomeration of nanoparticles at the surface resulting in a reduction in available liquid at the drop surface for evaporation. The present model implements a mechanism for the reduction in the surface concentration of the evaporating liquid based on the fractal geometry of nanoparticle agglomerates. Nanoparticle packing near the drop pinned contact line results in regions where a maximum nanoparticle volume fraction is attained, leading to significant reductions in the evaporative mass flux. Model predictions for the evaporation rate of pure ethanol and ethanol containing suspended aluminum nanoparticles are compared to experiments from the literature with excellent agreement for the reduction in evaporation rate due to nanoparticle loading and in reasonable quantitative agreement for the evaporation rate. The maximum allowable nanoparticle volume fraction is shown to be an important parameter in governing the evaporation rate of nanofluid sessile drops.

  2. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  3. Correlation for Sessile Drop Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly-Zion, Peter; Pursell, Christopher; Wassom, Gregory; Mandelkorn, Brenton; Nkinthorn, Chris

    2016-11-01

    To better understand how the evaporation of sessile drops and small puddles is controlled by the vapor phase transport mechanisms of mass diffusion and buoyancy-induced convection, the evaporation rates of eight liquids evaporating under a broad range of ambient conditions were correlated with physical and geometrical properties. Examination of the correlation provides valuable insight into how the roles of diffusive and convective transport change with physical and geometrical parameters. The correlation predicts measured evaporation rates to within a root-mean-square error of 7.3%. The correlation is composed of two terms, a term which provides the rate of evaporation under diffusion-only conditions, and a term which provides the influence of convection. This second term suggests the manner in which the processes of diffusion and convection are coupled. Both processes are dependent on the distribution of the vapor, through the molar concentration gradient for diffusion and through the mass density gradient for convection. The term representing the influence of convection is approximately inversely proportional to the square root of diffusivity, indicating the tendency of diffusive transport to reduce convection by making the vapor distribution more uniform. Financial support was provided by the ACS Petroleum Research Fund.

  4. The surface temperature of free evaporating drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodulin, V. Y.; Letushko, V. N.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Complex experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes was performed at evaporation of free liquid drops. For theoretical calculation the emission-diffusion model was proposed. This allowed taking into account the characteristics of evaporation of small droplets, for which heat and mass transfer processes are not described in the conventional diffusion model. The calculation results of evaporation of droplets of different sizes were compared using two models: the conventional diffusion and emission-diffusion models. To verify the proposed physical model, the evaporation of droplets suspended on a polypropylene fiber was experimentally investigated. The form of droplets in the evaporation process was determined using microphotographing. The temperature was measured on the surfaces of evaporating drops using infrared thermography. The experimental results have showed good agreement with the numerical data for the time of evaporation and the temperature of evaporating drops.

  5. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  6. Experimental study of a R-407C drop-in test on an off-the-shelf air conditioner with a counter-cross-flow evaporator

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, V.C.; Domitrovic, R.; Chen, F.C.

    1998-03-01

    An off-the-shelf 2-ton window air conditioner having an energy efficiency ratio of 10 was used to perform a drop-in test with R-407C. Laboratory tests were performed using a parallel-cross-flow (PCF) evaporator and a counter-cross-flow (CCF) evaporator. The CCF configuration is designed to take advantage of the temperature glide of R-407C so that the warm evaporator inlet air will be in contact with the higher temperature part of the evaporator coils first. The test results indicated that, at the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute-rated indoor and outdoor conditions, the cooling capacity was 8% higher and system coefficient of performance about 3.8% higher for the CCF evaporator than for the PCF evaporator. The test results also showed that the latent load for CCF was 30.6% higher than for PCF. The far better dehumidification effect provided by the CCF evaporator design is desirable for areas where the latent load is high. The experimental findings should be useful for future efforts to design a dehumidifier that uses a zeotropic refrigerant that provides a significant temperature glide. R-22 test data from a previous project are included as a reference.

  7. Modeling Evaporation of Drops of Different Kerosenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the evaporation of drops of a hydrocarbon liquid composed of as many as hundreds of chemical species. The model is intended especially for application to any of several types of kerosenes commonly used as fuels. The concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of the evaporating multicomponent liquid is described by use of a probability distribution function (PDF). However, the present model is more generally applicable than is its immediate predecessor.

  8. Diffusion Of Mass In Evaporating Multicomponent Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    Report summarizes study of diffusion of mass and related phenomena occurring in evaporation of dense and dilute clusters of drops of multicomponent liquids intended to represent fuels as oil, kerosene, and gasoline. Cluster represented by simplified mathematical model, including global conservation equations for entire cluster and conditions on boundary between cluster and ambient gas. Differential equations of model integrated numerically. One of series of reports by same authors discussing evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels.

  9. Diffusion Of Mass In Evaporating Multicomponent Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    Report summarizes study of diffusion of mass and related phenomena occurring in evaporation of dense and dilute clusters of drops of multicomponent liquids intended to represent fuels as oil, kerosene, and gasoline. Cluster represented by simplified mathematical model, including global conservation equations for entire cluster and conditions on boundary between cluster and ambient gas. Differential equations of model integrated numerically. One of series of reports by same authors discussing evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels.

  10. Statistical Model of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth; LeClercq, Patrick; Bellan, Josette

    2007-01-01

    An improved statistical model has been developed to describe the chemical composition of an evaporating multicomponent- liquid drop and of the mixture of gases surrounding the drop. The model is intended for use in computational simulations of the evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels, which are typically mixtures of as many as hundreds of different hydrocarbon compounds. The present statistical model is an approximation designed to afford results that are accurate enough to contribute to understanding of the simulated physical and chemical phenomena, without imposing an unduly large computational burden.

  11. Simulations of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Le Clercq, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    A paper presents additional information on the subject matter of Model of Mixing Layer With Multicomponent Evaporating Drops (NPO-30505), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 55. To recapitulate: A mathematical model of a three-dimensional mixing layer laden with evaporating fuel drops composed of many chemical species has been derived. The model is used to perform direct numerical simulations in continuing studies directed toward understanding the behaviors of sprays of liquid petroleum fuels in furnaces, industrial combustors, and engines. The model includes governing equations formulated in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian reference frame for the gas and drops, respectively, and incorporates a concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of a fuel is described by use of a distribution function. In this investigation, the distribution function depends solely on the species molar weight. The present paper reiterates the description of the model and discusses further in-depth analysis of the previous results as well as results of additional numerical simulations assessing the effect of the mass loading. The paper reiterates the conclusions reported in the cited previous article, and states some new conclusions. Some new conclusions are: 1. The slower evaporation and the evaporation/ condensation process for multicomponent-fuel drops resulted in a reduced drop-size polydispersity compared to their single-component counterpart. 2. The inhomogeneity in the spatial distribution of the species in the layer increases with the initial mass loading. 3. As evaporation becomes faster, the assumed invariant form of the molecular- weight distribution during evaporation becomes inaccurate.

  12. Behavior Of Evaporating Liquid Drops In Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette

    1990-01-01

    Report presents critical analysis of methods, developed for calculating behavior of evaporating liquid drops in dense and dilute clusters. Essential to understanding variety of physical and chemical phenomena occurring in combustion of sprayed fuels and in sprays used in agriculture, food industry, and painting. Presents insights on important aspects of two-phase flow.

  13. Laser-printed superhydrophobic evaporating drop concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhizhchenko, Alexey; Vitrik, Oleg; Syubaev, Sergey; Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr

    2017-09-01

    We present an all-laser micro-machined superhydrophobic/hydrophilic structure for a targeted pre- concentration of analyte molecules from an deposited water drop. The design of the evaporating concentrator combines the superhydrophylic Au-coated central pillar surrounded by the high-aspect-ratio microstructures having hierarchical micro/nano roughness both fabricated in a bulk polytetrafluoroethylene substrate using by a direct micro-machining with a femtosecond-pulse filament. The surrounding high-aspect-ratio textures posseses a high contact angle exceeding 170° and hysteresis less than 1.5° for the deposited 3-μl. water drop providing controllable pre-concentration of the analyte from the evaporating drop within a small superhydrophylic area of about 80×80 µm2 and resulting in the increase of the initial analyte concentration by 104 times.

  14. An evaporation model of multicomponent solution drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Silvana; Liñán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2010-11-01

    Solutions of polymers are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as tablets coatings. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or appearance. The coating is performed by spraying and drying the tablets at moderate temperatures. The wetting of the coating solution on the pill's surface depends on the droplet Webber and Re numbers, angle of impact and on the rheological properties of the droplet. We present a model for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions droplets in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the solvent. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface the fluid in the drop increases in concentration, until reaching its saturation point. After saturation, precipitation occurs uniformly within the drop. As the surface regresses, a compacting front formed by the precipitate at its maximum packing density advances into the drop, while the solute continues precipitating uniformly. This porous shell grows fast due to the double effect of surface regression and precipitation. The evaporation rate is determined by the rates at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and at which liquid vapor diffuses away from it. When the drop is fully compacted, the evaporation is drastically reduced.

  15. Aerosol drop size correlation and corrected rainout data using models of drop evaporation, pool absorption, and pool evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    A number of aerosol rainout experiments were conducted in Oklahoma in 1989 and in Nevada in 1990 using five superheated, flashing liquids. Since some of these liquids were relatively volatile, the rained out liquid was imperfectly captured; evaporation from the capture pans was evident. This paper describes an approach to correct the rainout data for reevaporation using a reasonably rigorous model of all the pertinent phenomena involved: droplet evaporation, droplet cooling by evaporation, rainout, pool spread, dissolution in the capture liquid, and evaporation from the pool. Corrected rainout fractions are provided for chlorine, methylamine, and cyclohexane. The model used requires adjusting only two variables, solubility for capture in aqueous solution, and the initial mean drop size. Adjusting the mean drop size for each experiment provides a set of drop sizes which can then be tested against alternative drop size correlation variables. Desirable correlations force overlap between all five materials tested and have the correct behavior with overpressure. Acceptable correlations are found between drop size and superheat, partial expansion energy, and an extended flash fraction. With two different slopes bubble growth rate also provides a good correlation. Unacceptable correlation occurred using Jacob Number, flash fraction, and expansion energy.

  16. Effects of Evaporation/Condensation on Spreading and Contact Angle of a Volatile Liquid Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Effects of evaporation/condensation on spreading and contact angle were experimentally studied. A sessile drop of R-113 was tested at different vapor environments to determine the effects of evaporation/condensation on the evolution of contact diameter and contact angle of the drop. Condensation on the drop surface occurs at both the saturated and a nonsaturated vapor environments and promotes the spreading. When the drop is placed in the saturated vapor environment it tends to completely wetting and spreads rapidly. In a nonsaturated vapor environment, the evolution of the sessile drop is divided three stages: condensation-spreading stage, evaporation-retracting stage and rapid contracting stage. In the first stage the drop behaves as in the saturated environment. In the evaporation -retracting stage, the competition between spreading and evaporation of the drop determines the evolution characteristics of the contact diameter and the contact angle. A lower evaporation rate struggles against the spreading power to turn the drop from spreading to retracting with a continuous increase of the contact angle. The drop placed in open air has a much higher evaporation rate. The strong evaporation suppresses the spreading and accelerates the retraction of the drop with a linear decrease of the contact diameter. The contraction of the evaporating drops is gradually accelerated when the contact diameter decreases to 3 min and less till drying up, though the evaporation rate is gradually slowing down.

  17. Modeling evaporation of sessile drops with moving contact lines.

    PubMed

    Murisic, N; Kondic, L

    2008-12-01

    We consider evaporation of pure liquid drops on a thermally conductive substrate. Two commonly used evaporative models are considered: one that concentrates on the liquid phase in determining the evaporative flux and the other one that centers on the gas-vapor phase. A single governing equation for the evolution of drop thickness, including both models, is developed. We show how the derived governing equation can be used to predict which evaporation model is appropriate for different considered experimental conditions.

  18. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  19. Marangoni Flow Induced Evaporation Enhancement on Binary Sessile Drops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin; Harmand, Souad; Ouenzerfi, Safouene; Schiffler, Jesse

    2017-06-15

    The evaporation processes of pure water, pure 1-butanol, and 5% 1-butanol aqueous solution drops on heated hydrophobic substrates are investigated to determine the effect of temperature on the drop evaporation behavior. The evolution of the parameters (contact angle, diameter, and volume) during evaporation measured using a drop shape analyzer and the infrared thermal mapping of the drop surface recorded by an infrared camera were used in investigating the evaporation process. The pure 1-butanol drop does not show any thermal instability at different substrate temperatures, while the convection cells created by the thermal Marangoni effect appear on the surface of the pure water drop from 50 °C. Because 1-butanol and water have different surface tensions, the infrared video of the 5% 1-butanol aqueous solution drop shows that the convection cells are generated by the solutal Marangoni effect at any substrate temperature. Furthermore, when the substrate temperature exceeds 50 °C, coexistence of the thermal and solutal Marangoni flows is observed. By analyzing the relation between the ratio of the evaporation rate of pure water and 1-butanol aqueous solution drops and the Marangoni number, a series of empirical equations for predicting the evaporation rates of pure water and 1-butanol aqueous solution drops at the initial time as well as the equations for the evaporation rate of 1-butanol aqueous solution drop before the depletion of alcohol are derived. The results of these equations correspond fairly well to the experimental data.

  20. Flash evaporator systems test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  1. Analysis of the convective evaporation of nondilute clusters of drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1987-01-01

    The penetration distance of an outer flow into a drop cluster volume is the critical, evaporation mode-controlling parameter in the present model for nondilute drop clusters' convective evaporation. The model is found to perform well for such low penetration distances as those obtained for dense clusters in hot environments and low relative velocities between the outer gases and the cluster. For large penetration distances, however, the predictive power of the model deteriorates; in addition, the evaporation time is found to be a weak function of the initial relative velocity and a strong function of the initial drop temperature. The results generally show that the interior drop temperature was transient throughout the drop lifetime, although temperature nonuniformities persisted up to the first third of the total evaporation time at most.

  2. Building micro-soccer-balls with evaporating colloidal fakir drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Marín, Álvaro G.; Susarrey-Arce, Arturo; van Housselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    Drop evaporation can be used to self-assemble particles into three-dimensional microstructures on a scale where direct manipulation is impossible. We present a unique method to create highly-ordered colloidal microstructures in which we can control the amount of particles and their packing fraction. To this end, we evaporate colloidal dispersion drops from a special type of superhydrophobic microstructured surface, on which the drop remains in Cassie-Baxter state during the entire evaporative process. The remainders of the drop consist of a massive spherical cluster of the microspheres, with diameters ranging from a few tens up to several hundreds of microns. We present scaling arguments to show how the final particle packing fraction of these balls depends on the drop evaporation dynamics, particle size, and number of particles in the system.

  3. PROGRAM DROP: A computer program for prediction of evaporation from freely falling multicomponent drops

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    PROGRAM DROP consists of a series of FORTRAN routine which together are used to model the evaporation of a freely falling, multicomponent drop composed of an arbitrary number of volatile species and a single nonvolatile, inert component. The physics underlying the model are clearly identified, and the model`s relationship to previous work in the literature is described. Test cases are used to illustrate the viability of the model and to highlight its potential usefulness in the accurate prediction of multicomponent droplet vaporization in a variety of applications.

  4. Flow visualization and characterization of evaporating liquid drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F. (Inventor); Zhang, Nengli (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An optical system, consisting of drop-reflection image, reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle of a volatile-liquid drop on a non-transparent substrate. The drop-reflection image and the shadowgraphy is shown by projecting the images of a collimated laser beam partially reflected by the drop and partially passing through the drop onto a screen while the top view photograph is separately viewed by use of a camera video recorder and monitor. For a transparent liquid on a reflective solid surface, thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, can be viewed nonintrusively, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this technique clearly reveal that evaporation and thermocapillary convection greatly affect the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop.

  5. Coalescence, evaporation and particle deposition of consecutively printed colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhasatia, Viral; Yang, Xin; Shah, Jaymeen; Sun, Ying

    2012-11-01

    In applications such as inkjet printing and spray deposition, colloid drops are often used as building blocks for line and pattern printing where their interactions play important roles in determining the deposition morphology and properties. In this study, the particle deposition dynamics of two consecutively printed evaporating colloidal drops is examined using a fluorescence microscope and a synchronized side-view camera. The results show that the relaxation time of the water-air interface of the merged drop is shorter than that of a single drop impacting on a dry surface. It is also found that both morphology and particle distribution uniformity of the deposit change significantly with varying jetting delay and spatial spacing between two drops. As the drop spacing increases while keeping jetting delay constant, the circularity of the coalesced drop reduces. For the regime where the time scale for drop evaporation is comparable with the relaxation time scale for two drops to completely coalesce, the capillary flow induced by the local curvature variation of the air-water interface redistributes particles inside a merged drop, causing suppression of the coffee-ring effect for the case of a high jetting frequency while resulting in a region of particle accumulation in the middle of the merged drop at a low jetting frequency. By tuning the interplay of wetting, evaporation, capillary relaxation, and particle assembly, the deposition morphology of consecutively printed colloidal drops can be controlled.

  6. Mass Remaining During Evaporation of Sessile Drop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    to> \\fyj Greek Symbols P Contact angle of sessile drop . n Droplet shape factor = h/d 6 Non-dimensional time = t/i V Air kinematic viscosity...factor n, = h / d (where h = maximum height of the drop ), which can also be directly related to the contact angle (P) of the drop , that is r| = (l-cos(P...three drop size (initial mass or volume) conditions with all other conditions the same. These runs have a constant contact angle , (3 = 16.5° ± 1.5

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of jets laden with evaporating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    LES of a circular jet laden with evaporating liquid drops are conducted to assess computational-drop modeling and three different SGS-flux models: the Scale Similarity model (SSC), using a constant coefficient calibrated on a temporal mixing layer DNS database, and dynamic-coefficient Gradient and Smagorinsky models.

  8. Drum drop test report

    SciTech Connect

    McBeath, R.S.

    1995-02-28

    Testing was performed to determine actual damage to drums when dropped from higher than currently stacked elevations. The drum configurations were the same as they are placed in storage; single drums and four drums banded to a pallet. Maximum drop weights were selected based on successful preliminary tests. Material was lost from each of the single drum tests while only a small amount of material was lost from one of the pelletized drums. The test results are presented in this report. This report also provides recommendations for further testing to determine the appropriate drum weight which can be stored on a fourth tier.

  9. Geometrically-controlled drop evaporation: Dynamics and universal scaling law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefiane, Khellil; Saenz, Pedro; Wray, Alexander; Che, Zhizhao; Matar, Omar; Valluri, Prashant; Kim, Jungho

    2016-11-01

    The evaporation of a liquid drop on a solid substrate is a remarkably common phenomenon. Yet, the complexity of the underlying mechanisms has constrained previous studies to spherically-symmetric configurations. Here we present an investigation of well-defined, non-spherical evaporating drops of pure liquids and binary mixtures. We deduce a new universal scaling law for the evaporation rate valid for any shape and demonstrate that more curved regions lead to preferential localized depositions in particle-laden drops. Furthermore, geometry induces well-defined flow structures within the drop that change according to the driving mechanism and spatially-dependent thresholds for thermocapillary instabilities. In the case of binary mixtures, geometry dictates the spatial segregation of the more volatile component as it is depleted. In the light of our results, we believe that the drop geometry can be exploited to facilitate precise local control over the particle deposition and evaporative dynamics of pure drops and the mixing characteristics of multicomponent drops. Memphis Multiphase (EPSRC EP/K003976/1) & ThermaPOWER (EU IRSESPIRSES GA-2011-294905).

  10. Measurement of an Evaporating Drop on a Reflective Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2004-01-01

    A figure depicts an apparatus that simultaneously records magnified ordinary top-view video images and laser shadowgraph video images of a sessile drop on a flat, horizontal substrate that can be opaque or translucent and is at least partially specularly reflective. The diameter, contact angle, and rate of evaporation of the drop as functions of time can be calculated from the apparent diameters of the drop in sequences of the images acquired at known time intervals, and the shadowgrams that contain flow patterns indicative of thermocapillary convection (if any) within the drop. These time-dependent parameters and flow patterns are important for understanding the physical processes involved in the spreading and evaporation of drops. The apparatus includes a source of white light and a laser (both omitted from the figure), which are used to form the ordinary image and the shadowgram, respectively. Charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera 1 (with zoom) acquires the ordinary video images, while CCD camera 2 acquires the shadowgrams. With respect to the portion of laser light specularly reflected from the substrate, the drop acts as a plano-convex lens, focusing the laser beam to a shadowgram on the projection screen in front of CCD camera 2. The equations for calculating the diameter, contact angle, and rate of evaporation of the drop are readily derived on the basis of Snell s law of refraction and the geometry of the optics.

  11. Thermal infrared mapping of the Leidenfrost drop evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wciślik, Sylwia

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents an author complementary study on the Leidenfrost drop evaporation. The research was conducted under ambient conditions and in the film boiling regime. Large water drops were placed on the copper substrate of the constant temperature Tw ranging from 297.6 to 404oC. The initial single drop diameter and its mass was D0 ≈ 1cm and m0 ≈ 1g respectively. One of the obtained results, for each Tw are the drop thermal images versus time. They were used to calculate an average temperature over the drop upper surface (Td). For an exemplary heating surface temperature of Tw = 297.6oC the average drop temperature is approximately 11oC lower than the saturation one and equals Td = 88,95oC. This value is estimated for the first 200s of evaporation and with time step size Δt = 0,5s. The drop upper surface temperature is highly variable and indicates strong convection inside it. This is due to the complex nature of heat and mass transfer. The maximum standard deviation from Td = 88,95oC is SD = 1.21.

  12. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Here we show that the evaporation of such ternary mixtures can trigger a phase transition and the nucleation of microdroplets of one of the components of the mixture. As a model system, we pick a sessile Ouzo droplet (as known from daily life) and reveal and theoretically explain its four life phases: In phase I, the spherical cap-shaped droplet remains transparent while the more volatile ethanol is evaporating, preferentially at the rim of the drop because of the singularity there. This leads to a local ethanol concentration reduction and correspondingly to oil droplet nucleation there. This is the beginning of phase II, in which oil microdroplets quickly nucleate in the whole drop, leading to its milky color that typifies the so-called "Ouzo effect." Once all ethanol has evaporated, the drop, which now has a characteristic nonspherical cap shape, has become clear again, with a water drop sitting on an oil ring (phase III), finalizing the phase inversion. Finally, in phase IV, all water has evaporated, leaving behind a tiny spherical cap-shaped oil drop.

  13. Model of Mixing Layer With Multicomponent Evaporating Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Le Clercq, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model of a three-dimensional mixing layer laden with evaporating fuel drops composed of many chemical species has been derived. The study is motivated by the fact that typical real petroleum fuels contain hundreds of chemical species. Previously, for the sake of computational efficiency, spray studies were performed using either models based on a single representative species or models based on surrogate fuels of at most 15 species. The present multicomponent model makes it possible to perform more realistic simulations by accounting for hundreds of chemical species in a computationally efficient manner. The model is used to perform Direct Numerical Simulations in continuing studies directed toward understanding the behavior of liquid petroleum fuel sprays. The model includes governing equations formulated in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian reference frame for the gas and the drops, respectively. This representation is consistent with the expected volumetrically small loading of the drops in gas (of the order of 10 3), although the mass loading can be substantial because of the high ratio (of the order of 103) between the densities of liquid and gas. The drops are treated as point sources of mass, momentum, and energy; this representation is consistent with the drop size being smaller than the Kolmogorov scale. Unsteady drag, added-mass effects, Basset history forces, and collisions between the drops are neglected, and the gas is assumed calorically perfect. The model incorporates the concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of a fuel is described probabilistically, by use of a distribution function. Distribution functions generally depend on many parameters. However, for mixtures of homologous species, the distribution can be approximated with acceptable accuracy as a sole function of the molecular weight. The mixing layer is initially laden with drops in its lower stream, and the drops are colder than the gas

  14. Structural and evaporative evolutions in desiccating sessile drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, B.; Brutin, D.

    2011-07-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the drying of a deposited drop of whole blood. Flow motion, adhesion, gelation, and fracturation all occur during the evaporation of this complex matter, leading to a final typical pattern. Two distinct regimes of evaporation are highlighted: the first is driven by convection, diffusion, and gelation in a liquid phase, whereas the second, with a much slower rate of evaporation, is characterized by the mass transport of the liquid left over in the gellified biocomponent matter. A diffusion model of the drying process allows a prediction of the transition between these two regimes of evaporation. Moreover, the formation of cracks and other events occurring during the drying are examined and shown to be driven by critical solid mass concentrations.

  15. Structural and evaporative evolutions in desiccating sessile drops of blood.

    PubMed

    Sobac, B; Brutin, D

    2011-07-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the drying of a deposited drop of whole blood. Flow motion, adhesion, gelation, and fracturation all occur during the evaporation of this complex matter, leading to a final typical pattern. Two distinct regimes of evaporation are highlighted: the first is driven by convection, diffusion, and gelation in a liquid phase, whereas the second, with a much slower rate of evaporation, is characterized by the mass transport of the liquid left over in the gellified biocomponent matter. A diffusion model of the drying process allows a prediction of the transition between these two regimes of evaporation. Moreover, the formation of cracks and other events occurring during the drying are examined and shown to be driven by critical solid mass concentrations.

  16. Analytical solution for inviscid flow inside an evaporating sessile drop.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Hassan; Felske, James D

    2009-01-01

    Inviscid flow within an evaporating sessile drop is analyzed. The field equation E;{2}psi=0 is solved for the stream function. The exact analytical solution is obtained for arbitrary contact angle and distribution of evaporative flux along the free boundary. Specific results and computations are presented for evaporation corresponding to both uniform flux and purely diffusive gas phase transport into an infinite ambient. Wetting and nonwetting contact angles are considered, with flow patterns in each case being illustrated. The limiting behaviors of small contact angle and droplets of hemispherical shape are treated. All of the above categories are considered for the cases of droplets whose contact lines are either pinned or free to move during evaporation.

  17. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even liquid mixtures has intensively been studied over the past two decades, the evaporation of ternary mixtures of liquids with different volatilities and mutual solubilities has not yet been explored. Here we show that the evaporation of such ternary mixtures can trigger a phase transition and the nucleation of microdroplets of one of the components of the mixture. As a model system, we pick a sessile Ouzo droplet (as known from daily life—a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and anise oil) and reveal and theoretically explain its four life phases: In phase I, the spherical cap-shaped droplet remains transparent while the more volatile ethanol is evaporating, preferentially at the rim of the drop because of the singularity there. This leads to a local ethanol concentration reduction and correspondingly to oil droplet nucleation there. This is the beginning of phase II, in which oil microdroplets quickly nucleate in the whole drop, leading to its milky color that typifies the so-called “Ouzo effect.” Once all ethanol has evaporated, the drop, which now has a characteristic nonspherical cap shape, has become clear again, with a water drop sitting on an oil ring (phase III), finalizing the phase inversion. Finally, in phase IV, all water has evaporated, leaving behind a tiny spherical cap-shaped oil drop. PMID:27418601

  18. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-08-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even liquid mixtures has intensively been studied over the past two decades, the evaporation of ternary mixtures of liquids with different volatilities and mutual solubilities has not yet been explored. Here we show that the evaporation of such ternary mixtures can trigger a phase transition and the nucleation of microdroplets of one of the components of the mixture. As a model system, we pick a sessile Ouzo droplet (as known from daily life—a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and anise oil) and reveal and theoretically explain its four life phases: In phase I, the spherical cap-shaped droplet remains transparent while the more volatile ethanol is evaporating, preferentially at the rim of the drop because of the singularity there. This leads to a local ethanol concentration reduction and correspondingly to oil droplet nucleation there. This is the beginning of phase II, in which oil microdroplets quickly nucleate in the whole drop, leading to its milky color that typifies the so-called “Ouzo effect.” Once all ethanol has evaporated, the drop, which now has a characteristic nonspherical cap shape, has become clear again, with a water drop sitting on an oil ring (phase III), finalizing the phase inversion. Finally, in phase IV, all water has evaporated, leaving behind a tiny spherical cap-shaped oil drop.

  19. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo drop.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Lv, Pengyu; Kuerten, J G M; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-08-02

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even liquid mixtures has intensively been studied over the past two decades, the evaporation of ternary mixtures of liquids with different volatilities and mutual solubilities has not yet been explored. Here we show that the evaporation of such ternary mixtures can trigger a phase transition and the nucleation of microdroplets of one of the components of the mixture. As a model system, we pick a sessile Ouzo droplet (as known from daily life-a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and anise oil) and reveal and theoretically explain its four life phases: In phase I, the spherical cap-shaped droplet remains transparent while the more volatile ethanol is evaporating, preferentially at the rim of the drop because of the singularity there. This leads to a local ethanol concentration reduction and correspondingly to oil droplet nucleation there. This is the beginning of phase II, in which oil microdroplets quickly nucleate in the whole drop, leading to its milky color that typifies the so-called "Ouzo effect." Once all ethanol has evaporated, the drop, which now has a characteristic nonspherical cap shape, has become clear again, with a water drop sitting on an oil ring (phase III), finalizing the phase inversion. Finally, in phase IV, all water has evaporated, leaving behind a tiny spherical cap-shaped oil drop.

  20. Drop evaporation in a single-axis acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lierke, E. G.; Croonquist, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    A 20 kHz single-axis acoustic positioner is used to levitate aqueous-solution drops (volumes less than or approximately equal to 100 micro-liters). Drop evaporation rates are measured under ambient, isothermal conditions for different relative humidities. Acoustic convection around the levitated sample enhances the mass loss over that due to natural convection and diffusion. A theoretical treatment of the mass flow is developed in analogy to previous studies of the heat transfer from a sphere in an acoustic field. Predictions of the enhanced mass loss, in the form of Nusselt (Sherwood) numbers, are compared with observed rages of drop shrinking. The work is part of an ESA crystal growth from levitated solution drops.

  1. Hildebrand solubility parameters measurement via sessile drops evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaohua; Li, Bingquan; Sokolov, Jonathan C.; Rafailovich, Miriam H.; Gewaily, Dina

    2005-08-01

    A method for the measurement of Hildebrand solubility parameter has been developed. This method was based on the measurement of the sessile drop contact angle and contact base width during its evaporation. Experimental results showed that this method is accurate and insensitive to the measurement conditions. The major advantages of this method are that it is time efficient and requires a small amount of liquid (microliter) for the measurement.

  2. Evaporation Heat Transfer of Ammonia and Pressure Drop of Warm Water for Plate Type Evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushibe, Mitsuteru; Lkegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori; Uehara, Haruo

    The performance test of three types of plate type evaporators for spring thermal energy conversion and ocean thermal energy conversion carried out. Ammonia is utilized as working fluid and warm water is utilized as heat source. An empirical correlation is proposed in order to predict the mean evaporation heat transfer coefficient of ammonia and heat transfer coefficient of warm water for plate type evaporators. The mean heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of warm water were compared with other researches.

  3. Evaporation of pure liquid sessile and spherical suspended drops: a review.

    PubMed

    Erbil, H Yildirim

    2012-01-15

    A sessile drop is an isolated drop which has been deposited on a solid substrate where the wetted area is limited by a contact line and characterized by contact angle, contact radius and drop height. Diffusion-controlled evaporation of a sessile drop in an ambient gas is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many scientific applications such as controlling the deposition of particles on solid surfaces, in ink-jet printing, spraying of pesticides, micro/nano material fabrication, thin film coatings, biochemical assays, drop wise cooling, deposition of DNA/RNA micro-arrays, and manufacture of novel optical and electronic materials in the last decades. This paper presents a review of the published articles for a period of approximately 120 years related to the evaporation of both sessile drops and nearly spherical droplets suspended from thin fibers. After presenting a brief history of the subject, we discuss the basic theory comprising evaporation of micrometer and millimeter sized spherical drops, self cooling on the drop surface and evaporation rate of sessile drops on solids. The effects of drop cooling, resultant lateral evaporative flux and Marangoni flows on evaporation rate are also discussed. This review also has some special topics such as drop evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces, determination of the receding contact angle from drop evaporation, substrate thermal conductivity effect on drop evaporation and the rate evaporation of water in liquid marbles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaporization response of evaporating drops with finite thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, V. D.; Hammer, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical computing procedure was developed for calculating vaporization histories of evaporating drops in a combustor in which travelling transverse oscillations occurred. The liquid drop was assumed to have a finite thermal conductivity. The system of equations was solved by using a finite difference method programmed for solution on a high speed digital computer. Oscillations in the ratio of vaporization of an array of repetitivity injected drops in the combustor were obtained from summation of individual drop histories. A nonlinear in-phase frequency response factor for the entire vaporization process to oscillations in pressure was evaluated. A nonlinear out-of-phase response factor, in-phase and out-of-phase harmonic response factors, and a Princeton type 'n' and 'tau' were determined. The resulting data was correlated and is presented in graphical format. Qualitative agreement with the open literature is obtained in the behavior of the in-phase response factor. Quantitatively the results of the present finite conductivity spray analysis do not correlate with the results of a single drop model.

  5. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M

    2005-04-05

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to

  6. Simple analytical model of capillary flow in an evaporating sessile drop.

    PubMed

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu

    2005-02-01

    An analytical expression of hydrodynamic potential inside an evaporating sessile drop with pinned contact line is found. The problem is considered for a hemispherical drop (with the contact angle of 90 degrees ) at the very early stages of the evaporation process when the shape of the drop is still a hemisphere and the evaporation field is uniform. The capillary flow carries a fluid from the drop apex to the contact line. Comparison with the published calculations performed using lubrication approximation (very thin drop) suggests that qualitative picture of the capillary flow is insensitive to the ratio of initial drop height to the drop radius.

  7. On the derivation of Young's equation for sessile drops: nonequilibrium effects due to evaporation.

    PubMed

    Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Golovko, Dmytro S; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-05-17

    Sessile liquid drops have a higher vapor pressure than planar liquid surfaces, as quantified by Kelvin's equation. In classical derivations of Young's equation, this fact is often not taken into account. For an open system, a sessile liquid drop is never in thermodynamic equilibrium and will eventually evaporate. Practically, for macroscopic drops the time of evaporation is so long that nonequilibrium effects are negligible. For microscopic drops evaporation cannot be neglected. When a liquid is confined to a closed system, real equilibrium can be established. Experiments on the evaporation of water drops confirm the calculations.

  8. Biosensor design based on Marangoni flow in an evaporating drop.

    PubMed

    Trantum, Joshua R; Baglia, Mark L; Eagleton, Zachary E; Mernaugh, Raymond L; Haselton, Frederick R

    2014-01-21

    Effective point-of-care diagnostics require a biomarker detection strategy that is low-cost and simple-to-use while achieving a clinically relevant limit of detection. Here we report a biosensor that uses secondary flows arising from surface Marangoni stresses in an evaporating drop to concentrate target-mediated particle aggregates in a visually detectable spot. The spot size increases with increasing target concentration within the dynamic range of the assay. The particle deposition patterns are visually detectable and easily measured with simple optical techniques. We use optical coherence tomography to characterize the effect of cross-sectional flow fields on the motion of particles in the presence and absence of target (aggregated and non-aggregated particles, respectively). We show that choice of substrate material and the presence of salts and glycerol in solution promote the Marangoni-induced flows that are necessary to produce signal in the proposed design. These evaporation-driven flows generate signal in the assay on a PDMS substrate but not substrates with greater thermal conductivity like indium tin oxide-coated glass. In this proof-of-concept design we use the M13K07 bacteriophage as a model target and 1 μm-diameter particles surface functionalized with anti-M13 monoclonal antibodies. Using standard microscopy-based techniques to measure the final spot size, the assay has a calculated limit-of-detection of approximately 100 fM. Approximately 80% of the maximum signal is generated within 10 minutes of depositing a 1 μL drop of reacted sample on PDMS enabling a relatively quick time-to-result.

  9. Prediction of in-tube pressure drop of low GWP refrigerants during condensation and evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md. Masud Rana; Hossain, Md. Anowar; Afroz, Hasan M. M.; Miyara, Akio

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, a new in-tube two phase pressure drop correlation of low GWP refrigerants during condensation and evaporation has been proposed in this paper. This correlation for the prediction of condensation and evaporation pressure drop inside smooth horizontal tube by incorporating the effect of mass velocity, tube geometry and surface tension. By comparing with other existing well-known correlations and the newly proposed correlation of two-phase pressure drop have been used to predict the condensation and evaporation pressure drop of R1234ze(E), R32, R410A, dimethyl ether (DME), CO2/DME mixtures (10/90, 25/75 and 45/55 weight %) and R1234ze(E)/R32 mixtures (30/70 and 45/55 weight %) inside a horizontal smooth tube. The predicted results have been compared with the available experimental data which is done inside a water heated double tube heat exchanger. The test section is a horizontally installed smooth tube with effective length of 3.6m and inner diameter of 4.35mm. The experiment had been carried out under the conditions of mass flux varying from 147 to 403 kgm-2s-1 and the saturation temperatures ranging between 30 and 45°C for condensation and 5-10°C for evaporation, over the vapor quality range 0.00 to 1.00. From the analysis and results of comparison, proposed correlation shows better performance. Proposed correlation can predict all the experimental condensation and evaporation data within ±13.91%.

  10. Effect of relative humidity on contact angle and particle deposition morphology of an evaporating colloidal drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhasatia, Viral H.; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Sun, Ying

    2010-12-01

    The deposition behavior of inkjet-printed aqueous colloidal drops on a glass substrate has been investigated by using fluorescence microscopy and a high resolution goniometer. Real-time side-view images of a pinned colloidal drop show that the contact angle during evaporation is a function of the relative humidity (RH). The RH also affects the extent to which the drop is able to spread after impacting a substrate, the evaporation rate at the drop surface, and the evaporatively driven flow inside the drop that drives the suspended particles toward the contact line. Results show that the particle deposition area and pattern change significantly with the RH.

  11. Evaporation of drops on two parallel fibers: influence of the liquid morphology and fiber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Duprat, Camille; Bick, Alison D; Warren, Patrick B; Stone, Howard A

    2013-06-25

    We investigate experimentally the evaporation of liquid accumulated on a pair of parallel fibers, rigid or flexible. The liquid wetting the fibers can adopt two distinct morphologies: a compact drop shape, whose evaporation dynamics is similar to that of an isolated aerosol droplet, or a long liquid column of constant cross-section, whose evaporation dynamics depends upon the aspect ratio of the column. We thus find that the evaporation rate is constant for drops, while it increases strongly for columns as the interfiber distance decreases, and we propose a model to explain this behavior. When the fibers are flexible, the transition from drops to columns can be induced by the deformation of the fibers because of the capillary forces applied by the drop. Thus, we find that the evaporation rate increases with increasing flexibility. Furthermore, complex morphology transitions occur upon drying, which results in spreading of the drop as it evaporates.

  12. Effect of the Heat Flux Density on the Evaporation Rate of a Distilled Water Drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Konstantin; Orlova, Evgeniya; Feoktistov, Dmitry

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the experimental dependence of the evaporation rate of a nondeaerated distilled water drop from the heat flux density on the surfaces of non-ferrous metals (copper and brass). A drop was placed on a heated substrate by electronic dosing device. To obtain drop profile we use a shadow optical system; drop symmetry was controlled by a high-speed video camera. It was found that the evaporation rate of a drop on a copper substrate is greater than on a brass. The evaporation rate increases intensively with raising volume of a drop. Calculated values of the heat flux density and the corresponding evaporation rates are presented in this work. The evaporation rate is found to increase intensively on the brass substrate with raising the heat flux density.

  13. Effect of relative humidity on contact angle of inkjet-printed evaporating colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhasatia, Viral; Joshi, Abhijit; Sun, Ying

    2010-11-01

    The deposition behavior of inkjet-printed aqueous colloidal drops onto glass and polymer (PEN and PET) substrates has been investigated by using fluorescence microscopy, a high-resolution CCD camera, and scanning electron microscopy. Real-time side-view images show that the contact angle of an evaporating colloidal drop is a function of the ambient humidity. The relative humidity also affects the extent to which the drop is able to spread after impacting a substrate, the evaporation rate at the drop surface, and the evaporatively-driven flow inside the drop that drives the suspended particles towards the contact line. The difference between the contact line velocity and liquid velocity at the drop contact line induced by evaporation creates a larger contact angle compared to that of the case without evaporation. This increase in contact angle becomes more significant for a low ambient humidity. Results also show that the particle deposition area and pattern change with the ambient humidity.

  14. Evaporation of sessile water/ethanol drops in a controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanjun; Bonaccurso, Elmar; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-12-21

    The evaporation of water/ethanol drops with different mixing ratios was investigated at controlled vapor pressure of water (relative humidity) and ethanol in the background gas. Therefore, a drop of about 1 microL was deposited on a hydrophobized silicon substrate at room temperature in a closed cell. With a microscope camera we monitored the contact angle, the volume and the contact radius of the drops as function of time. Pure water drops evaporated in constant contact angle mode. The evaporation rate of water decreased with increasing humidity. In mixed drops ethanol did not evaporate completely at first, but a fraction still remained in the drop until the end of evaporation. Depending on ethanol concentration in the drop and on relative humidity in the background gas, water vapor condensed at the beginning of the evaporation of mixed drops. Also, at a high vapor pressure of ethanol, ethanol condensed at the beginning of the evaporation. The presence of ethanol vapor accelerated the total evaporation time of water drops.

  15. Self-wrapping of an ouzo drop induced by evaporation on a superamphiphobic surface.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huanshu; Diddens, Christian; Versluis, Michel; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2017-04-12

    Evaporation of multi-component drops is crucial to various technologies and has numerous potential applications because of its ubiquity in nature. Superamphiphobic surfaces, which are both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic, can give a low wettability not only for water drops but also for oil drops. In this paper, we experimentally, numerically and theoretically investigate the evaporation process of millimetric sessile ouzo drops (a transparent mixture of water, ethanol, and trans-anethole) with low wettability on a superamphiphobic surface. The evaporation-triggered ouzo effect, i.e. the spontaneous emulsification of oil microdroplets below a specific ethanol concentration, preferentially occurs at the apex of the drop due to the evaporation flux distribution and volatility difference between water and ethanol. This observation is also reproduced by numerical simulations. The volume decrease of the ouzo drop is characterized by two distinct slopes. The initial steep slope is dominantly caused by the evaporation of ethanol, followed by the slower evaporation of water. At later stages, thanks to Marangoni forces the oil wraps around the drop and an oil shell forms. We propose an approximate diffusion model for the drying characteristics, which predicts the evaporation of the drops in agreement with experiment and numerical simulation results. This work provides an advanced understanding of the evaporation process of ouzo (multi-component) drops.

  16. DIME Students Witness Test Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Students watch a test run on their experiment before the actual drop. They designed and built their apparatus to fit within a NASA-provided drop structure. This was part of the second Dropping in a Microgravity Environment (DIME) competition held April 23-25, 2002, at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Competitors included two teams from Sycamore High School, Cincinnati, OH, and one each from Bay High School, Bay Village, OH, and COSI Academy, Columbus, OH. DIME is part of NASA's education and outreach activities. Details are on line at http://microgravity.grc.nasa.gov/DIME_2002.html.

  17. Evaporation kinetics in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented; these results are applied to 18 different drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory, taking into account the chemical nature of the salt, the drop size and shape, the drop concentration, the well size, the well concentration, and the temperature. It is found that the rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and with the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves about 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  18. Dynamics and universal scaling law in geometrically-controlled sessile drop evaporation.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, P J; Wray, A W; Che, Z; Matar, O K; Valluri, P; Kim, J; Sefiane, K

    2017-03-15

    The evaporation of a liquid drop on a solid substrate is a remarkably common phenomenon. Yet, the complexity of the underlying mechanisms has constrained previous studies to spherically symmetric configurations. Here we investigate well-defined, non-spherical evaporating drops of pure liquids and binary mixtures. We deduce a universal scaling law for the evaporation rate valid for any shape and demonstrate that more curved regions lead to preferential localized depositions in particle-laden drops. Furthermore, geometry induces well-defined flow structures within the drop that change according to the driving mechanism. In the case of binary mixtures, geometry dictates the spatial segregation of the more volatile component as it is depleted. Our results suggest that the drop geometry can be exploited to prescribe the particle deposition and evaporative dynamics of pure drops and the mixing characteristics of multicomponent drops, which may be of interest to a wide range of industrial and scientific applications.

  19. Evaporation kinetics in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented; these results are applied to 18 different drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory, taking into account the chemical nature of the salt, the drop size and shape, the drop concentration, the well size, the well concentration, and the temperature. It is found that the rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and with the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves about 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  20. Dynamics and universal scaling law in geometrically-controlled sessile drop evaporation

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz, P. J.; Wray, A. W.; Che, Z.; Matar, O. K.; Valluri, P.; Kim, J.; Sefiane, K.

    2017-01-01

    The evaporation of a liquid drop on a solid substrate is a remarkably common phenomenon. Yet, the complexity of the underlying mechanisms has constrained previous studies to spherically symmetric configurations. Here we investigate well-defined, non-spherical evaporating drops of pure liquids and binary mixtures. We deduce a universal scaling law for the evaporation rate valid for any shape and demonstrate that more curved regions lead to preferential localized depositions in particle-laden drops. Furthermore, geometry induces well-defined flow structures within the drop that change according to the driving mechanism. In the case of binary mixtures, geometry dictates the spatial segregation of the more volatile component as it is depleted. Our results suggest that the drop geometry can be exploited to prescribe the particle deposition and evaporative dynamics of pure drops and the mixing characteristics of multicomponent drops, which may be of interest to a wide range of industrial and scientific applications. PMID:28294114

  1. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  2. Investigation of interfacial phenomena and thermocapillary effect on drop evaporation in reduced gravity condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jingchang; Lin, Hai

    2013-11-01

    Based on ground-based experiments, a drop evaporation experiment will fly aboard Chinese recoverable satellite in the near future This experiment will focus on the interfacial phenomena of phase chance, heat and mass transfer and the effect of thermocapillary convection on drop evaporation process Close attention will also be paid to the contact angle behavior, the triple line shifting and their relations Our ground-based experiments observed the interior flow field and the gaseous exterior of small suspended evaporating drops, the temperature distributions inside and outside the drops. Both good heat conductor and heat insulating material were used as substrate materials to investigate their influence on heat transfer and surface temperature distribution of an evaporating drop Experimental results indicate that for a drop evaporating in ambient temperature without substrate heating, temperature gradients existed along the drop surface which results in stable thermocapillary convection and cells appeared near the surface throughout entire evaporating process. The thermocapillary convection greatly changed drop's interior temperature distribution and the way of energy and mass transfer. Temperature jump or discontinuity was also measured at drop free surface.

  3. Evaporative oxidation treatability test report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act that requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity where available off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed wastes. DOE-AL manages operations at nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment capacity to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste not only must address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. On the basis of recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) are evaporative oxidation, thermal desorption, and treated wastewater evaporation. Rust Geotech, the DOE-GJPO prime contractor, was assigned to design and fabricate mobile treatment units (MTUs) for these three technologies and to deliver the MTUs to selected DOE-AL sites. To conduct treatability tests at the GJPO, Rust leased a pilot-scale evaporative oxidation unit from the Clemson Technical Center (CTC), Anderson, South Carolina. The purpose of this report is to document the findings and results of tests performed using this equipment.

  4. Evaporation Flux Distribution of Drops on a Hydrophilic or Hydrophobic Flat Surface by Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chiyu; Liu, Guangzhi; Wang, Moran

    2016-08-16

    The evaporation flux distribution of sessile drops is investigated by molecular dynamic simulations. Three evaporating modes are classified, including the diffusion dominant mode, the substrate heating mode, and the environment heating mode. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drop-substrate interactions are considered. To count the evaporation flux distribution, which is position dependent, we proposed an azimuthal-angle-based division method under the assumption of spherical crown shape of drops. The modeling results show that the edge evaporation, i.e., near the contact line, is enhanced for hydrophilic drops in all the three modes. The surface diffusion of liquid molecular absorbed on solid substrate for hydrophilic cases plays an important role as well as the space diffusion on the enhanced evaporation rate at the edge. For hydrophobic drops, the edge evaporation flux is higher for the substrate heating mode, but lower than elsewhere of the drop for the diffusion dominant mode; however, a nearly uniform distribution is found for the environment heating mode. The evidence shows that the temperature distribution inside drops plays a key role in the position-dependent evaporation flux.

  5. 49 CFR 178.1045 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.1045 Section 178.1045... Containers § 178.1045 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all... subpart. (b) Special preparation for the drop test. Flexible Bulk Containers must be filled to...

  6. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.603 Section 178.603 Transportation... Packagings and Packages § 178.603 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the... than flat drops, the center of gravity of the test packaging must be vertically over the point...

  7. Evaporation and fluid dynamics of a sessile drop of capillary size.

    PubMed

    Barash, L Yu; Bigioni, T P; Vinokur, V M; Shchur, L N

    2009-04-01

    Theoretical description and numerical simulation of an evaporating sessile drop are developed. We jointly take into account the hydrodynamics of an evaporating sessile drop, effects of the thermal conduction in the drop, and the diffusion of vapor in air. A shape of the rotationally symmetric drop is determined within the quasistationary approximation. Nonstationary effects in the diffusion of the vapor are also taken into account. Simulation results agree well with the data of evaporation rate measurements for the toluene drop. Marangoni forces associated with the temperature dependence of the surface tension generate fluid convection in the sessile drop. Our results demonstrate several dynamical stages of the convection characterized by different number of vortices in the drop. During the early stage the array of vortices arises near a surface of the drop and induces a nonmonotonic spatial distribution of the temperature over the drop surface. The initial number of near-surface vortices in the drop is controlled by the Marangoni cell size which is similar to that given by Pearson for flat fluid layers. This number quickly decreases with time resulting in three bulk vortices in the intermediate stage. The vortices finally transform into the single convection vortex in the drop existing during about 1/2 of the evaporation time.

  8. A Stable Self-Similar Singularity of Evaporating Drops: Ellipsoidal Collapse to a Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontelos, Marco A.; Hong, Seok Hyun; Hwang, Hyung Ju

    2015-08-01

    We study the problem of evaporating drops contracting to a point. Going back to Maxwell and Langmuir, the existence of a spherical solution for which evaporating drops collapse to a point in a self-similar manner is well established in the physical literature. The diameter of the drop follows the so-called D 2 law: the second power of the drop-diameter decays linearly in time. In this study we provide a complete mathematical proof of this classical law. We prove that evaporating drops which are initially small perturbations of a sphere collapse to a point and the shape of the drop converges to a self-similar ellipsoid whose center, orientation, and semi-axes are determined by the initial shape.

  9. Triple-line behavior and wettability controlled by nanocoated substrates: influence on sessile drop evaporation.

    PubMed

    Sobac, B; Brutin, D

    2011-12-20

    In this article, we investigate the influence of the surface properties of substrates on the evaporation process. Using various nanocoatings, it is possible to modify the surface properties of substrates, such as the roughness and the surface energy, while maintaining constant thermal properties. Experiments are conducted under atmospheric conditions with five fluids (methanol, ethanol, propanol, toluene and water) and four coatings (PFC, PTFE, SiOC, and SiO(x)). The various combinations of these fluids and coatings allow for a wide range of drop evaporation properties to be studied: the dynamics of the triple line, the volatility of fluids, and a large range of wettabilities (from 17 to 135°). The experimental data are in very good quantitative agreement with existing models of quasi-steady, diffusion-driven evaporation. The experimental results show that the dynamics of the evaporative rate are proportional to the dynamics of the wetting radius. Thus, the models succeed in describing the evaporative dynamics throughout the evaporation process regardless of the behavior of the triple line. Moreover, the use of various liquids reveals the validity of the models regardless of their volatility. The results also confirm the recent finding of a universal relation for the time evolution of the drop mass, independent of the drop size and initial contact angle. Finally, this study highlights the separate and coupled roles of the triple line and the wettability on the sessile drop evaporation process. Data reveal that the more wet and pinned a drop, the shorter the evaporation time.

  10. Convective rolls and hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops.

    PubMed

    Karapetsas, George; Matar, Omar K; Valluri, Prashant; Sefiane, Khellil

    2012-08-07

    Recent experiments on the evaporation of sessile droplets have revealed the spontaneous formation of various patterns including the presence of hydrothermal waves. These waves had previously been observed, in the absence of evaporation, in thin liquid layers subjected to an imposed, uniform temperature gradient. This is in contrast to the evaporating droplet case wherein these gradients arise naturally due to evaporation and are spatially and temporally varying. In the present paper, we present a theory of evaporating sessile droplets deposited on a heated surface and propose a candidate mechanism for the observed pattern formation using a linear stability analysis in the quasi-steady-state approximation. A qualitative agreement with experimental trends is observed.

  11. Irreversible entropy production in two-phase flows with evaporating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Okong'o, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    A derivation of the irreversible entropy production, that is the dissipation, in two-phase flows is presented for the purpose of examining the effect of evaporative-drop modulation of flows having turbulent features.

  12. Dual-frequency electrowetting: application to drop evaporation gauging within a digital microsystem.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Johannes; Davoust, Laurent

    2012-01-10

    This paper addresses a method to estimate the size of a sessile drop and to measure its evaporation kinetics by making use of both Michelson interferometry and coplanar electrowetting. From a high-frequency electrowetting voltage, the contact angle of the sessile droplet is monitored to permanently obtain a half-liquid sphere, thus complying perfectly with the drop evaporation theory based on a constant contact angle (Bexon, R.; Picknett, R. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 1977, 61, 336-350). Low-frequency modulation of the electrowetting actuation is also applied to cause droplet shape oscillations and capillary resonance. Interferometry allows us to measure a time-dependent capillary spectrum and, in particular, the shift in natural frequencies induced by drop evaporation. Consequently, diffusive kinetics of drop evaporation can be properly estimated, as demonstrated. Because of coplanar electrode configuration, our methodology can be integrated in open and covered microsystems, such as digital lab-on-a-chip devices.

  13. Building microscopic soccer balls with evaporating colloidal fakir drops

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Álvaro G.; Gelderblom, Hanneke; Susarrey-Arce, Arturo; van Houselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Gardeniers, Johannes G. E.; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation-driven particle self-assembly can be used to generate three-dimensional microstructures. We present a unique method to create colloidal microstructures in which we can control the amount of particles and their packing fraction. To this end, we evaporate colloidal dispersion droplets on a special type of superhydrophobic microstructured surface, on which the droplet remains in Cassie–Baxter state during the entire evaporative process. The remainders of the droplet consist of a massive spherical cluster of the microspheres, with diameters ranging from a few tens up to several hundreds of microns. We present scaling arguments to show how the final particle packing fraction of these balls depends on the dynamics of the droplet evaporation, particle size, and number of particles in the system. PMID:23010925

  14. Unsteady evaporation and combustion of a drop cluster inside a vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichot, F.; Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1993-01-01

    A model has been developed which describes the evaporation, ignition and combustion of a drop cluster embedded in a large vortex. The purpose of this model is to simulate the behavior of drops in large coherent vortices produced in the shear layer of a jet. The model treats the dynamic interactions between the drops and the vortex, and also takes into account the drop proximity to calculate the heat and mass transfers between drops and ambient gas. The gas phase outside the cluster is treated as an unsteady, reacting phase, whereas quasi-steadiness is assumed between the drops and surrounding gas inside the cluster. The results show a very complex interaction between the dynamics of the drop-loaded vortex, the flame, and the evaporation process.

  15. Drop evaporation on superhydrophobic PTFE surfaces driven by contact line dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ramos, S M M; Dias, J F; Canut, B

    2015-02-15

    In the present study, we experimentally study the evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile drops of water on highly hydrophobic surfaces (contact angle ∼160°), heated to temperatures ranging between 40° and 70 °C. These surfaces were initially constructed by means of controlled tailoring of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrates. The evaporation of droplets was observed to occur in three distinct phases, which were the same for the different substrate temperatures. The drops started to evaporate in the constant contact radius (CCR) mode, then switched to a more complex mode characterized by a set of stick-slip events accompanied by a decrease in contact angle, and finally shifted to a mixed mode in which the contact radius and contact angle decreased simultaneously until the drops had completely evaporated. It is shown that in the case of superhydrophobic surfaces, the energy barriers (per unit length) associated with the stick-slip motion of a drop ranges in the nJ m(-1) scale. Furthermore, analysis of the evaporation rates, determined from experimental data show that, even in the CCR mode, a linear relationship between V(2/3) and the evaporation time is verified. The values of the evaporation rate constants are found to be higher in the pinned contact line regime (the CCR mode) than in the moving contact line regime. This behavior is attributed to the drop's higher surface to volume ratio in the CCR mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Control of stain geometry by drop evaporation of surfactant containing dispersions.

    PubMed

    Erbil, H Yildirim

    2015-08-01

    Control of stain geometry by drop evaporation of surfactant containing dispersions is an important topic of interest because it plays a crucial role in many applications such as forming templates on solid surfaces, in ink-jet printing, spraying of pesticides, micro/nano material fabrication, thin film coatings, biochemical assays, deposition of DNA/RNA micro-arrays, and manufacture of novel optical and electronic materials. This paper presents a review of the published articles on the diffusive drop evaporation of pure liquids (water), the surfactant stains obtained from evaporating drops that do not contain dispersed particles and deposits obtained from drops containing polymer colloids and carbon based particles such as carbon nanotubes, graphite and fullerenes. Experimental results of specific systems and modeling attempts are discussed. This review also has some special subtopics such as suppression of coffee-rings by surfactant addition and "stick-slip" behavior of evaporating nanosuspension drops. In general, the drop evaporation process of a surfactant/particle/substrate system is very complex since dissolved surfactants adsorb on both the insoluble organic/inorganic micro/nanoparticles in the drop, on the air/solution interface and on the substrate surface in different extends. Meanwhile, surfactant adsorbed particles interact with the substrate giving a specific contact angle, and free surfactants create a solutal Marangoni flow in the drop which controls the location of the particle deposition together with the rate of evaporation. In some cases, the presence of a surfactant monolayer at the air/solution interface alters the rate of evaporation. At present, the magnitude of each effect cannot be predicted adequately in advance and consequently they should be carefully studied for any system in order to control the shape and size of the final deposit.

  17. Study on evaporation characteristics of a sessile drop of sulfur mustard on glass.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyunsook; Myung, Sung Min; Park, Myung Kyu; Lee, Hae Wan; Ryu, Sam Gon

    2012-05-01

    The evaporation characteristics (evaporation rates and process) of a sessile drop of sulfur mustard on glass has been studied using a laboratory-sized wind tunnel, gas chromatograph mass spectrometry, and drop shape analysis. It showed that the evaporation rates of the droplet increased with temperature and air flow. The effect of temperature on the rates was more pronounced at lower air flow. Air flow was less effective at lower temperature. The contact angle of the droplet was initially observed as θ = 19.5° ± 0.7 and decreased linearly with time until it switched to a constant mode.

  18. Prediction of pressure drops accompanying the evaporation of refrigerants inside horizontal tubes. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneham, H.G.; Saluja, S.N.; Dunn, A.

    1980-01-01

    Four of the more widely used correlations for the prediction of pressure drops were compared with published experimental data using statistical techniques. None of the correlations examined were found to be suitably accurate over the range of conditions normally encountered in direct expansion evaporators. A new correlation was developed and is presented here, that can be used with an acceptable degree of accuracy by the design engineer. The correlation is presented in a form that can be easily written into a program for solution on a programmable calculator leading to quick and accurate evaluation of the pressure drop that accompanies a refrigerant evaporatoring inside a horontal tube evaporator.

  19. Self-assembly of nanoparticles in evaporating particle-laden emulsion drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Min; Yang, Xin; Sun, Ying

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the scalable fabrication of nanostructures (e.g., nanomesh and nanoring arrays) via inkjet printing of oil-in-water emulsion drops containing nanoparticles in water. Nanoscale oil drops dispersed in water are used here as templates for assembly of nanoparticles on a substrate. The effect of oil vapor pressure on particle deposition morphologies is studied by using a variety of oils. For oil drops with a lower vapor pressure, non-uniform evaporation rate along the air-water interface drives dispersed oil drops to move and accumulate near the air/water/substrate contact line. These oil drops remain on the substrate while water is evaporating enabling nanoparticles to self-assemble into nanomeshes. While keeping the same oil concentration, oil drops with a higher vapor pressure completely evaporates near the contact line before water dries out, leading to nanoparticle deposition of coffee-ring structures. If nanoparticles are confined inside the dispersed oil drops, nanoring arrays are formed as the emulsion evaporates. The characteristics of the nanomeshes and nanorings are controlled by tuning the size and concentration of oil drops and nanoparticles, substrate wettability, surfactant concentration, and vapor pressure of oil.

  20. On the effect of marangoni flow on evaporation rates of heated water drops.

    PubMed

    Girard, F; Antoni, M; Sefiane, K

    2008-09-02

    In this letter we show that the Marangoni flow contribution to the evaporation rate of small heated water droplets resting on hot substrates is negligible. We compare data of evaporating droplet experiments with numerical results and assess the effect of Marangoni flow and its contribution to the evaporation process. We demonstrate that heat conduction inside these water droplets is sufficient to give an accurate estimate of evaporation rates. Although convection in evaporating water droplets remains an open problem, our aim in this study is to demonstrate that these effects can be neglected in the investigation of evaporation rate evaluation. It is worth noting that the presented results apply to volatile heated drops which might differ from spontaneously evaporating cases.

  1. Coffee Drops and Coffee Rings: Contact Line Deposits from Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg

    1997-03-01

    When a small drop of coffee placed on a counter top dries, it deposits a thin ring of concentrated solute at the perimeter of the drop. Similar rings form for a wide range of surfaces, solutes, and solvents, provided the contact line is pinned to the surface. An old result of Maxwell can be used to partially explain these dense rings. The predicted rate of ring deposition is shown to agree quantitatively with experimental measurements.

  2. Breakup of evaporating/burning slurry drops by additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, P. Roy; Gerstein, M.

    Single drops of silicon carbide-cumene slurry were suspended from a quartz fiber and ignited. An inert material such as silicon carbide was chosen so that the droplets can be burned until all the fuel is consumed and only the inert residue is left on the quartz fiber. Benzoyl peroxide was added to cumene and the time to disruption of the liquid drop was measured. In the case of benzoyl peroxide, the breaking up of the drop resulting from its thermal decomposition produced CO 2. Both the drop disruption time and the burning of the slurry to dryness were predicted theoretically. Radiation absorption was found to be an important factor in the case of the slurry. Benzoyl peroxide and carbamide peroxide were investigated as additives to a boron slurry to determine if effective drop break-up could be achieved. Both additives produced drop shattering. The carbamide peroxide was particularly effective due to the production of O 2. The green flame associated with boron burning was clearly evident.

  3. Evaporation dynamics of a liquid drop on a non-miscible liquid bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirat, Christophe; Ramos-Canut, Stella; Caupin, Frederic; wetting Team

    2016-11-01

    When a liquid drop sits on a solid surface, it is well known that the wetting and evaporation properties strongly depend on the environmental and wetting conditions. In this experimental study, we investigate the coupled spreading-evaporation dynamics of a liquid drop, made of a mixture of water and ethanol, gently deposited on a non-miscible oil bath. After a fast spreading stage due to a positive spreading parameter, the drop starts to recede while the evaporation is going on. Subsequently, a Marangoni instability develops as alcohol evaporates faster than water. In particular, depending on the initial alcohol-water ratio, a set of rim instabilities takes place. Radial droplet ejections can be observed, with various droplet speeds, sizes and frequencies.

  4. Diffusion-controlled evaporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate solution drops placed on a hydrophobic substrate.

    PubMed

    Doganci, Merve Dandan; Sesli, Belma Uyar; Erbil, H Yildirim

    2011-10-15

    In this work, the effect of SDS anionic surfactant on the diffusion-controlled evaporation rate of aqueous solution drops placed on TEFLON-FEP substrate was investigated with 11 different SDS concentrations. Drop evaporation was monitored in a closed chamber having a constant RH of 54-57% by a video camera. The initial contact angle, θ(i) decreased from 104±2° down to 68±1° due to the adsorption of SDS both at the water-air and the solid-water interfaces. The adsorption of SDS on the solid surface was found to be 76% of that of its adsorption at the water-air interface by applying Lucassen-Reynders approach. An equation was developed for the comparison of the evaporation rates of drops having different θ(i) on the same substrate. It was found that the addition of SDS did not alter the drop evaporation rate considerably for the first 1200 s for all the SDS concentrations. The main difference was found to be the change of the mode of drop evaporation by varying the SDS concentration. The constant θ mode was operative up to 80 mM SDS concentration, whereas constant contact area mode was operative after 200 mM SDS concentrations due to rapid drop pining on the substrate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Resolving an ostensible inconsistency in calculating the evaporation rate of sessile drops.

    PubMed

    Chini, S F; Amirfazli, A

    2016-06-04

    This paper resolves an ostensible inconsistency in the literature in calculating the evaporation rate for sessile drops in a quiescent environment. The earlier models in the literature have shown that adapting the evaporation flux model for a suspended spherical drop to calculate the evaporation rate of a sessile drop needs a correction factor; the correction factor was shown to be a function of the drop contact angle, i.e. f(θ). However, there seemed to be a problem as none of the earlier models explicitly or implicitly mentioned the evaporation flux variations along the surface of a sessile drop. The more recent evaporation models include this variation using an electrostatic analogy, i.e. the Laplace equation (steady-state continuity) in a domain with a known boundary condition value, or known as the Dirichlet problem for Laplace's equation. The challenge is that the calculated evaporation rates using the earlier models seemed to differ from that of the recent models (note both types of models were validated in the literature by experiments). We have reinvestigated the recent models and found that the mathematical simplifications in solving the Dirichlet problem in toroidal coordinates have created the inconsistency. We also proposed a closed form approximation for f(θ) which is valid in a wide range, i.e. 8°≤θ≤131°. Using the proposed model in this study, theoretically, it was shown that the evaporation rate in the CWA (constant wetted area) mode is faster than the evaporation rate in the CCA (constant contact angle) mode for a sessile drop.

  6. Simulation of evaporation of a sessile drop using a diffuse interface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefiane, Khellil; Ding, Hang; Sahu, Kirti; Matar, Omar

    2008-11-01

    We consider here the evaporation dynamics of a Newtonian liquid sessile drop using an improved diffuse interface model. The governing equations for the drop and surrounding vapour are both solved, and separated by the order parameter (i.e. volume fraction), based on the previous work of Ding et al. JCP 2007. The diffuse interface model has been shown to be successful in modelling the moving contact line problems (Jacqmin 2000; Ding and Spelt 2007, 2008). Here, a pinned contact line of the drop is assumed. The evaporative mass flux at the liquid-vapour interface is a function of local temperature constitutively and treated as a source term in the interface evolution equation, i.e. Cahn-Hilliard equation. The model is validated by comparing its predictions with data available in the literature. The evaporative dynamics are illustrated in terms of drop snapshots, and a quantitative comparison with the results using a free surface model are made.

  7. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  8. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  9. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  10. Effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on interfacial temperature during early stages of drop evaporation.

    PubMed

    Fukatani, Yuki; Orejon, Daniel; Kita, Yutaku; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-04-01

    Understanding drop evaporation mechanisms is important for many industrial, biological, and other applications. Drops of organic solvents undergoing evaporation have been found to display distinct thermal patterns, which in turn depend on the physical properties of the liquid, the substrate, and ambient conditions. These patterns have been reported previously to be bulk patterns from the solid-liquid to the liquid-gas drop interface. In the present work the effect of ambient temperature and humidity during the first stage of evaporation, i.e., pinned contact line, is studied paying special attention to the thermal information retrieved at the liquid-gas interface through IR thermography. This is coupled with drop profile monitoring to experimentally investigate the effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the drop interfacial thermal patterns and the evaporation rate. Results indicate that self-generated thermal patterns are enhanced by an increase in ambient temperature and/or a decrease in humidity. The more active thermal patterns observed at high ambient temperatures are explained in light of a greater temperature difference generated between the apex and the edge of the drop due to greater evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the presence of water humidity in the atmosphere is found to decrease the temperature difference along the drop interface due to the heat of adsorption, absorption and/or that of condensation of water onto the ethanol drops. The control, i.e., enhancement or suppression, of these thermal patterns at the drop interface by means of ambient temperature and relative humidity is quantified and reported.

  11. Effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on interfacial temperature during early stages of drop evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukatani, Yuki; Orejon, Daniel; Kita, Yutaku; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-04-01

    Understanding drop evaporation mechanisms is important for many industrial, biological, and other applications. Drops of organic solvents undergoing evaporation have been found to display distinct thermal patterns, which in turn depend on the physical properties of the liquid, the substrate, and ambient conditions. These patterns have been reported previously to be bulk patterns from the solid-liquid to the liquid-gas drop interface. In the present work the effect of ambient temperature and humidity during the first stage of evaporation, i.e., pinned contact line, is studied paying special attention to the thermal information retrieved at the liquid-gas interface through IR thermography. This is coupled with drop profile monitoring to experimentally investigate the effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the drop interfacial thermal patterns and the evaporation rate. Results indicate that self-generated thermal patterns are enhanced by an increase in ambient temperature and/or a decrease in humidity. The more active thermal patterns observed at high ambient temperatures are explained in light of a greater temperature difference generated between the apex and the edge of the drop due to greater evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the presence of water humidity in the atmosphere is found to decrease the temperature difference along the drop interface due to the heat of adsorption, absorption and/or that of condensation of water onto the ethanol drops. The control, i.e., enhancement or suppression, of these thermal patterns at the drop interface by means of ambient temperature and relative humidity is quantified and reported.

  12. Effect of contact angle and humidity on evaporation of inkjet-printed colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Bromberg, Vadim; Gawande, Sailee; Singler, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    Inkjet printing has attracted much attention in recent years due to its ability to dispense precise amounts of functional materials onto targeted areas. Although evidence exists for a multi-stage evaporation of a sessile drop, the actual evaporation behavior of an inkjetted colloidal drop is not well understood. In this study, a novel visualization technique is developed wherein aqueous suspensions of fluorescent particles are inkjetted onto transparent surfaces and the evaporation dynamics are observed in real-time using a high-power microscope. Two influencing parameters, the ambient humidity and substrate wettability, are systematically varied. It has been confirmed that jetted drops follow a pinned, dewetting, and mixed multi-stage evaporation process. The results also show that the relative humidity acts mainly to accelerate or decelerate the process whereas its relationship to contact angle is not as direct. Contact angle hysteresis plays an important role in controlling the initial pinned mode. For lower contact angle substrates, evaporation drives a flow of particles to deposit near the contact line which set the conditions for the dewetting stage that follows. Finally, a diffusion-controlled evaporation model is used to predict the time internals for each evaporation stage. The model agrees well with the experimental data, especially for the dewetting mode.

  13. A model of the evaporation of binary-fuel clusters of drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1991-01-01

    A formulation has been developed to describe the evaporation of dense or dilute clusters of binary-fuel drops. The binary fuel is assumed to be made of a solute and a solvent whose volatility is much lower than that of the solute. Convective flow effects, inducing a circulatory motion inside the drops, are taken into account, as well as turbulence external to the cluster volume. Results obtained with this model show that, similar to the conclusions for single isolated drops, the evaporation of the volatile is controlled by liquid mass diffusion when the cluster is dilute. In contrast, when the cluster is dense, the evaporation of the volatile is controlled by surface layer stripping, that is, by the regression rate of the drop, which is in fact controlled by the evaporation rate of the solvent. These conclusions are in agreement with existing experimental observations. Parametric studies show that these conclusions remain valid with changes in ambient temperature, initial slip velocity between drops and gas, initial drop size, initial cluster size, initial liquid mass fraction of the solute, and various combinations of solvent and solute. The implications of these results for computationally intensive combustor calculations are discussed.

  14. A model of the evaporation of binary-fuel clusters of drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1991-01-01

    A formulation has been developed to describe the evaporation of dense or dilute clusters of binary-fuel drops. The binary fuel is assumed to be made of a solute and a solvent whose volatility is much lower than that of the solute. Convective flow effects, inducing a circulatory motion inside the drops, are taken into account, as well as turbulence external to the cluster volume. Results obtained with this model show that, similar to the conclusions for single isolated drops, the evaporation of the volatile is controlled by liquid mass diffusion when the cluster is dilute. In contrast, when the cluster is dense, the evaporation of the volatile is controlled by surface layer stripping, that is, by the regression rate of the drop, which is in fact controlled by the evaporation rate of the solvent. These conclusions are in agreement with existing experimental observations. Parametric studies show that these conclusions remain valid with changes in ambient temperature, initial slip velocity between drops and gas, initial drop size, initial cluster size, initial liquid mass fraction of the solute, and various combinations of solvent and solute. The implications of these results for computationally intensive combustor calculations are discussed.

  15. Local analysis of the contact region of an evaporating sessile drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2014-11-01

    In experiments by Guéna et al. (2007), a drop of perfectly wetting pure liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate at a rate controlled by vapour diffusion. The drop spreads until reaching a radius a determined by initial drop volume; the apparent contact line then reverses direction. The apparent contact angle measured at reversal was found experimentally to vary as a - 1 / 6 for a < 1 mm (about); for larger drops θ decreases more strongly. Local analysis (Morris, J. Fluid Mech. 739, 308 (2014)) predicts that θ ~a - 1 / 6 ; for the smaller drops obeying the 1/6th rule, predicted values agree with experiment to within 10-30%. Though the behaviour of drops smaller than the capillary length thus appears to be understood, that of larger drops is not.

  16. Performance Tests of Shell and Plate Type Evaporator for OTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaoka, Tsutomu; Uehara, Haruo

    Performance tests on a shell and plate type evaporator (total surface area = 21.95m2, length = 1450mm, width = 235mm, plate number = 100) for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. Freon 22 (R22) and ammonia (NH3) are used as working fluid. The empirical correlations are proporsed in order to predict the boiling heat transfer when using R22 and NH3 and water side heat transfer coefficients for a shell and plate type evaporator. The water side pressure drop is about 3 m at the warm water velocity of 0.7 m/s. The water side friction factor is obtained.

  17. B-52B/DTV (Drop Test Vehicle) flight test results: Drop test missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA test airplane, B-52B-008, was a carrier for drop tests of the shuttle booster recovery parachute system. The purpose of the test support by Boeing was to monitor the vertical loads on the pylon hooks. The hooks hold the Drop Test Vehicle to the B-52 pylon during drop test missions. The loads were monitored to assure the successful completion of the flight and the safety of the crew.

  18. Evaporation of sessile drops containing colloidal rods: coffee-ring and order-disorder transition.

    PubMed

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2015-03-05

    Liquid drops containing insoluble solutes when dried on solid substrates leave distinct ring-like deposits at the periphery or along the three-phase contact line-a phenomena popularly known as the coffee-ring or the coffee stain effect. The formation of such rings as well as their suppression is shown to have applications in particle separation and disease diagnostics. We present an experimental study of the evaporation of sessile drops containing silica rods to elucidate the structural arrangement of particles in the ring, an effect of the addition of surfactant and salt. To this end, the evaporation of aqueous sessile drops containing model rod-like silica particles of aspect ratio ranging from ∼4 to 15 on a glass slide is studied. We first show that when the conditions such as (1) solvent evaporation, (2) nonzero contact angle, (3) contact line pinning, (4) no surface tension gradient driven flow, and (5) repulsive particle-particle/particle-substrate interactions, that are necessary for the formation of the coffee-ring are met, the suspension drops containing silica rods upon evaporation leave a ring-like deposit. A closer examination of the ring deposits reveals that several layers of silica rods close to the edge of the drop are ordered such that the major axis of the rods are oriented parallel to the contact line. After the first few layers of ordered arrangement of particles, a random arrangement of particles in the drop interior is observed indicating an order-disorder transition in the ring. We monitor the evolution of the ring width and particle velocity during evaporation to elucidate the mechanism of the order-disorder transition. Moreover, when the evaporation rate is lowered, the ordering of silica rods is observed to extend over large areas. We demonstrate that the nature of the deposit can be tuned by the addition of a small quantity of surfactant or salt.

  19. Flow transition within an evaporating binary mixture sessile drop.

    PubMed

    Christy, John R E; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Sefiane, Khellil

    2011-05-20

    The flow field along the base of an evaporating ethanol-water droplet and its evolution time was measured by particle image velocimetry. Three stages are revealed, a first stage dominated by multiple vortices, a second transition stage characterized by a remarkable spike in outward flow not previously identified, and a third stage dominated by outward flow identical to that found for pure water. Stage I is thought to be driven by surface tension gradients arising from local concentration variation. The spike in outward flow is explained in terms of a transition corresponding to almost total depletion of ethanol. An exponential decay in vorticity during the transition stage is explained in terms of ethanol diffusion from the bulk to the interface. We speculate on the existence of a zero-concentration wave propagating from the apex to the contact line corresponding to the final total depletion of ethanol.

  20. Pattern formation during the evaporation of a colloidal nanoliter drop: a numerical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Fang, Xiaohua; Attinger, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    An efficient way to precisely pattern particles on solid surfaces is to dispense and evaporate colloidal drops, as for bioassays. The dried deposits often exhibit complex structures exemplified by the coffee ring pattern, where most particles have accumulated at the periphery of the deposit. In this work, the formation of deposits during the drying of nanoliter colloidal drops on a flat substrate is investigated numerically and experimentally. A finite-element numerical model is developed that solves the Navier-Stokes, heat and mass transport equations in a Lagrangian framework. The diffusion of vapor in the atmosphere is solved numerically, providing an exact boundary condition for the evaporative flux at the droplet-air interface. Laplace stresses and thermal Marangoni stresses are accounted for. The particle concentration is tracked by solving a continuum advection-diffusion equation. Wetting line motion and the interaction of the free surface of the drop with the growing deposit are modeled based on criteria on wetting angles. Numerical results for evaporation times and flow field are in very good agreement with published experimental and theoretical results. We also performed transient visualization experiments of water and isopropanol drops loaded with polystyrene microspheres evaporating on glass and polydimethylsiloxane substrates, respectively. Measured evaporation times, deposit shapes and sizes and flow fields are in very good agreement with the numerical results. Different flow patterns caused by the competition of Marangoni loops and radial flow are shown to determine the deposit shape to be either a ring-like pattern or a homogeneous bump.

  1. Influence of Local Heating on Marangoni Flows and Evaporation Kinetics of Pure Water Drops.

    PubMed

    Askounis, Alexandros; Kita, Yutaku; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki; Koutsos, Vasileios; Sefiane, Khellil

    2017-06-13

    The effect of localized heating on the evaporation of pure sessile water drops was probed experimentally by a combination of infrared thermography and optical imaging. In particular, we studied the effect of three different heating powers and two different locations, directly below the center and edge of the drop. In all cases, four distinct stages were identified according to the emerging thermal patterns. In particular, depending on heating location, recirculating vortices emerge that either remain pinned or move azimuthally within the drop. Eventually, these vortices oscillate in different modes depending on heating location. Infrared data allowed extraction of temperature distribution on each drop surface. In turn, the flow velocity in each case was calculated and was found to be higher for edge heating, due to the one-directional nature of the heating. Additionally, calculation of the dimensionless Marangoni and Rayleigh numbers yielded the prevalence of Marangoni convection. Heating the water drops also affected the evaporation kinetics by promoting the "stick-slip" regime. Moreover, both the total number of depinning events and the pinning strength were found to be highly dependent on heating location. Lastly, we report a higher than predicted relationship between evaporation rate and heating temperature, due to the added influence of the recirculating flows on temperature distribution and hence evaporation flux.

  2. Flow Visualization in Evaporating Liquid Drops and Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles and Spreading Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    A new hybrid optical system, consisting of reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to visualize flow phenomena and simultaneously measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle in a volatile-liquid drop on a nontransparent substrate. Thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this unique technique clearly reveal that thermocapillary convection strongly affects the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop. Comprehensive information of a sessile drop, including the local contact angle along the periphery, the instability of the three-phase contact line, and the deformation of the drop shape is obtained and analyzed.

  3. Leaf Surface Wettability and Implications for Drop Shedding and Evaporation from Forest Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, W.; Ebner, M.; Traiser, C.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.

    2012-05-01

    Wettability and retention capacity of leaf surfaces are parameters that contribute to interception of rain, fog or dew by forest canopies. Contrary to common expectation, hydrophobicity or wettability of a leaf do not dictate the stickiness of drops to leaves. Crucial for the adhesion of drops is the contact angle hysteresis, the difference between leading edge contact angle and trailing edge contact angle for a running drop. Other parameters that are dependent on the static contact angle are the maximum volume of drops that can stick to the surface and the persistence of an adhering drop with respect to evaporation. Adaption of contact angle and contact angle hysteresis allow one to pursue different strategies of drop control, for example efficient water shedding or maximum retention of adhering water. Efficient water shedding is achieved if contact angle hysteresis is low. Retention of (isolated) large drops requires a high contact angle hysteresis and a static contact angle of 65.5°, while maximum retention by optimum spacing of drops necessitates a high contact angle hysteresis and a static contact angle of 111.6°. Maximum persistence with respect to evaporation is obtained if the static contact angle amounts to 77.5°, together with a high contact angle hysteresis. It is to be expected that knowledge of these parameters can contribute to the capacity of a forest to intercept water.

  4. CPAS Preflight Drop Test Analysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Megan E.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Romero, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) drop test program, the CPAS Analysis Team has developed a simulation and analysis process to support drop test planning and execution. This process includes multiple phases focused on developing test simulations and communicating results to all groups involved in the drop test. CPAS Engineering Development Unit (EDU) series drop test planning begins with the development of a basic operational concept for each test. Trajectory simulation tools include the Flight Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) for single bodies, and the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulation for the mated vehicle. Results are communicated to the team at the Test Configuration Review (TCR) and Test Readiness Review (TRR), as well as at Analysis Integrated Product Team (IPT) meetings in earlier and intermediate phases of the pre-test planning. The ability to plan and communicate efficiently with rapidly changing objectives and tight schedule constraints is a necessity for safe and successful drop tests.

  5. Visualization study of evaporation of single n-pentane drops in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehara, N.; Nojima, K.; Mori, Y. H.

    1993-12-01

    A laser shadowgraph system was constructed to enable successive filming of a drop or a bubble rising or falling in an immiscible liquid confined within a vertical column. The assembly was applied to a study of the evaporation of n-pentane drops in a stagnant medium of water. The liquid/vapor two-phase bubble evolving from each pentane drop was observed together with its wake, the morphology and the dynamics of which are our primary concern in considering the mechanism of the medium-to-bubble heat transfer.

  6. Two-phase DNS of evaporating drops with 3D phenomena and contact-line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Prashant; Sáenz, Pedro J.; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar K.

    2014-11-01

    A novel 3D two-phase model based on the diffuse-interface method is developed to investigate the fully-coupled two-phase dynamics of a sessile drop undergoing evaporation on a heated substrate. General transient advection-diffusion transport equations are implemented to address the conservation of energy and vapour in the gas phase, which also allows the more realistic modelling of interface mass and energy transport based on local conditions. The emphasis of this investigation is on addressing three-dimensional phenomena during evaporation of drops with non-circular contact area. Irregular drops lead to complex interface shapes with intricate contract-angle distributions along the triple line and with a three-dimensional flow which previous axisymmetric approaches cannot show. The versatility of this model also allows the simulation of the more complex case of drops evaporating with a moving contact line. Both constant-angle (CA) and constant-radius (CR) modes of pure evaporation are successfully simulated and validated against experiments. ThermaPOWER project (EU IRSES-PIRSES GA-2011-294905).

  7. Deposition from evaporating drops: Power laws and new morphologies in coffee stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed-Brown, Julian E.

    We investigate the structure of stains formed through evaporative deposition in sessile drops. Commonly, the deposited stain has a high surface density near the three phase contact line of the drying drop and much less solute in the bulk of the drop. This is known as the ``coffee ring effect'' and primarily arises due to contact line pinning. While many features of the stain depend on subtle physical phenomena within the drop, the coffee ring effect stands out as a robust feature that persists in many varied experimental realizations. In 2009, Witten predicted another robust feature of deposited stains: an asymptotic regime where a robust power law governs the fadeout profile of the stain into the interior of the drop. This power law is only controlled by geometric properties at a single point and the power does not vary along the contact line. We investigate the approach to this power law using numerical methods. For many evaporation profiles (including common experimental ones) the numerics show good agreement with the power law prediction. However, we demonstrate an intuitive scheme to construct evaporation profiles that subvert the power law prediction. We find that, in general, the approach to the power law cannot be known without full knowledge of the evaporation and height profile. We also extend this work in another way. We apply the basic arguments of the coffee ring effect to the case where the drop has a receding contact line. Here, we develop a new theoretical framework for deposition that has not previously been studied. In this context, the surface density profile can be directly calculated. Unlike a pinned contact line, receding contact lines push fluid into the interior of the drop. This effect can be overcome by strong evaporation near the contact line, but in general the intuition from contact line pinning is reversed. Following Witten's example, we find that the surface density of the stain near the center of the drop goes as eta ∝ rnu, where

  8. Resuspension of Aerosol Particles from Evaporated Rain Drops to the Coarse Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Ganguly, D.; Singh, B.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation scavenging (i.e., wet removal) has long been recognized as one of the major removal processes for tropospheric aerosol particles, and the dominant one for accumulation-mode size particles. When rain drops evaporate, the aerosol material contained in drops is resuspended, and this process has received much less attention. Unlike the resuspension from evaporated cloud droplets, the aerosol particles resuspended from evaporated rain drops have much larger sizes than most of the aerosol particles that acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), became cloud borne, and then were collected by rain drops, because each rain drop generally collects thousands of cloud droplets. Here we present some aspects of this resuspension process obtained from modeling studies. First, we investigate some details of the process using a simple drop-size resolved model of raindrop evaporation in sub-saturated air below cloud base. Using these results, we then investigate different treatments of this process in a global aerosol and climate model that employs a modal aerosol representation. Compared to the model's original treatment of this process in which rain-borne aerosol is resuspended to the mode that it came from with its original size, the new treatment that resuspends to the coarse mode produces notable reductions in global CCN concentrations, as well as sulfate, black carbon, and organic aerosol mass, because the resuspended aerosol particles have much shorter lifetimes due to their larger sizes. Somewhat surprisingly, there are also notable reductions in coarse-mode sea salt and mineral dust burdens. These species are resuspended to the coarse mode in both the original and new treatments, but these resuspended particles are fewer in number and larger in size in the new treatment. This finding highlights some issues of the modal aerosol treatment for coarse mode particles.

  9. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Shielded Cells Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T. L.; Herman, D. T.; Stone, M.E

    2005-07-01

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of evaporation of actual Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) recycle material. Samples of the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) were transferred from DWPF to the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) Shielded Cells and blended with De-Ionized (DI) water and a small amount of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product. A total of 3000 mL of this feed was concentrated to approximately 90 mL during a semi-batch evaporation test of approximately 17 hours. One interruption occurred during the run when the feed tube developed a split and was replaced. Samples of the resulting condensate and concentrate were collected and analyzed. The resulting analysis of the condensate was compared to the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits for the F/H Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). Results from the test were compared to previous testing using simulants and OLI modeling. Conclusions from this work included the following: (1) The evaporation of DWPF recycle to achieve a 30X concentration factor was successfully demonstrated. The feed blend of OGCT and SMECT material was concentrated from 3000 mL to approximately 90 mL during testing, a concentration of approximately 33X. (2) Foaming was observed during the run. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam was added seven times throughout the run at 100 parts per million (ppm) per addition. The addition of this antifoam was very effective in reducing the foam level, but the impact diminished over time and additional antifoam was required every 2 to 3 hours during the run. (3) No scale or solids formed on the evaporator vessel, but splatter was observed in the headspace of the evaporator vessel. No scaling formed on the stainless steel thermocouple. (4) The majority of the analytes met the F/H ETP WAC. However, the detection limits for selected species (Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-240, Am-243, and Cm-244) exceeded the ETP WAC limits. (5) I

  10. Wetting dynamics and particle deposition for an evaporating colloidal drop: A lattice Boltzmann study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Abhijit S.; Sun, Ying

    2010-10-01

    A three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been developed for multiphase (liquid and vapor) flows with solid particles suspended within the liquid phases. The method generalizes our recent two-dimensional model [A. Joshi and Y. Sun, Phys. Rev. E 79, 066703 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevE.79.066703] to three dimensions, extends the implicit scheme presented therein to include interparticle forces and introduces an evaporation model to simulate drying of the colloidal drop. The LBM is used to examine the dynamical wetting behavior of drops containing suspended solid particles on homogeneous and patterned substrates. The influence of the particle volume fraction and particle size on the drop spreading dynamics is studied as is the final deposition of suspended particles on the substrate after the carrier liquid evaporates. The final particle deposition can be controlled by substrate patterning, adjusting the substrate surface energies and by the rate of evaporation. Some of the envisioned applications of the model are to develop a fundamental understanding of colloidal drop dynamics, predict particle deposition during inkjet printing of functional materials and to simulate the drying of liquids in porous media.

  11. Surfactant-induced Marangoni eddies alter the coffee-rings of evaporating colloidal drops.

    PubMed

    Still, Tim; Yunker, Peter J; Yodh, Arjun G

    2012-03-20

    The influence of the small ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the evaporation of drying colloidal droplets is quantitatively investigated. The addition of SDS leads to a significantly more uniform deposition of colloidal particles after evaporation (i.e., the so-called "coffee-ring effect" is dramatically altered). We understand this phenomenon in the context of circulating radial Marangoni flows induced by the variation of SDS concentration along the air-water interface. Video microscopy permits the direct visualization of the colloidal particles involved in these flows, revealing a surprisingly stable "Marangoni eddy" that prevents particle deposition at the drop perimeter.

  12. A comprehensive analysis of the evaporation of a liquid spherical drop.

    PubMed

    Sobac, B; Talbot, P; Haut, B; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, a new comprehensive analysis of a suspended drop of a pure liquid evaporating into air is presented. Based on mass and energy conservation equations, a quasi-steady model is developed including diffusive and convective transports, and considering the non-isothermia of the gas phase. The main original feature of this simple analytical model lies in the consideration of the local dependence of the physico-chemical properties of the gas on the gas temperature, which has a significant influence on the evaporation process at high temperatures. The influence of the atmospheric conditions on the interfacial evaporation flux, molar fraction and temperature is investigated. Simplified versions of the model are developed to highlight the key mechanisms governing the evaporation process. For the conditions considered in this work, the convective transport appears to be opposed to the evaporation process leading to a decrease of the evaporation flux. However, this effect is relatively limited, the Péclet numbers happening to be small. In addition, the gas isothermia assumption never appears to be valid here, even at room temperature, due to the large temperature gradient that develops in the gas phase. These two conclusions are explained by the fact that heat transfer from the gas to the liquid appears to be the step limiting the evaporation process. Regardless of the complexity of the developed model, yet excluding extremely small droplets, the square of the drop radius decreases linearly over time (R(2) law). The assumptions of the model are rigorously discussed and general criteria are established, independently of the liquid-gas couple considered.

  13. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (T(s)≈0.96) is close to the theoretically derived value of T(s)=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  14. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (Ts≈0.96 ) is close to the theoretically derived value of Ts=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  15. Effect of nonionic surfactant on wetting behavior of an evaporating drop under a reduced pressure environment.

    PubMed

    Sefiane, Khellil

    2004-04-15

    The evaporation of sessile drops at reduced pressure is investigated. The evaporation of water droplets on aluminum and PTFE surfaces at reduced pressure was compared. It was found that water droplets on an aluminum surface exhibit a 'depinning jump' at subatmospheric pressures. This is when a pinned droplet suddenly depins, with an increase in contact angle and a simultaneous decrease in the base width. The evaporation of sessile water droplets with a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) added to an aluminum surface was then studied. The initial contact angle exhibited a minimum at 0.001 wt% Triton X-100. A maximum in the evaporation rate was also observed at the same concentration. Droplets with low surfactant concentrations are found to exhibit the 'depinning jump.' It is thought that the local concentration of the surfactant causes a gradient of surface tension. The balance at the contact angle is dictated by complex phenomena, including surfactant diffusion and adsorption processes at interfaces. Due to the strong evaporation near the triple line, an accumulation of the surfactant will lead to a surface tension gradient along the interface. The gradient of surface tension will influence the wetting behavior (Marangoni effect). At low surfactant concentrations the contact line depins under the strong effect of surface tension gradient that develops spontaneously over the droplet interface due to surfactant accumulation near the triple line. The maximum evaporation rate corresponds to a minimum contact angle for a pinned droplet.

  16. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer D.; Morton, Dana K.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  17. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop... this section, the peak resultant accelerations at the location of the accelerometers mounted in the...

  18. Reduction, partial evaporation, and spattering - Possible chemical and physical processes in fluid drop chondrule formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The major chemical differences between fluid drop chondrules and their probable parent materials may have resulted from the loss of volatiles such as S, H2O, Fe, and volatile siderophile elements by partial evaporation during the chondrule-forming process. Vertical access solar furnace experiments in vacuum and hydrogen have demonstrated such chemical fractionation trends using standard rock samples. The formation of immiscible iron droplets and spherules by in situ reduction of iron from silicate melt and the subsequent evaporation of the iron have been observed directly. During the time that the main sample bead is molten, many small spatter spherules are thrown off the main bead, thereby producing many additional chondrule-like melt spherules that cool rapidly and generate a population of spherules with size frequency distribution characteristics that closely approximate some populations of fluid drop chondrules in chondrites. It is possible that spatter-produced fluid drop chondrules dominate the meteoritic fluid drop chondrule populations. Such meteoritic chondrule populations should be chemically related by various relative amounts of iron and other volatile loss by vapor fractionation.

  19. Fluid dynamics and deposit patterns in evaporating sessile drop containing microparticles: substrate heating and wettability effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Nagesh D.; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Sharma, Atul

    2016-11-01

    The evaporation of sessile water drops containing colloidal microparticles is investigated on non-heated and heated hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Time-varying drop shapes and temperatures of liquid-gas interface are recorded using high-speed and infrared camera, respectively. In heated case, infrared-thermography shows larger temperature gradient across the liquid-gas interface and recorded motion of the particles confirm Marangoni flow from the contact line to apex inside the drop. On non-heated hydrophilic substrates, a ring-like pattern forms, as reported extensively in the literature; while on heated hydrophilic substrates, a thin ring with an inner-deposit forms. On non-heated hydrophobic substrates, the contact line depins to form inner-deposit without ring; while on heated hydrophobic substrates, the contact line pins to form inner-deposit with thin ring. This pinning transition occurs due to the particles self-pinning in a stagnation region developed by the Marangoni flow near the contact line. This work gives fundamental insights on the thermal and wettability effects on internal fluid dynamics of the evaporating sessile drop and associated deposit shape, with applications in ink-jet printing and biosensors. PhD Scholar.

  20. An experimental investigation of pressure drop in forced-convection condensation and evaporation of oil-refrigerant mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, J.A.; Duque-Rivera, J.; Macken, N.A.; Duval, W.M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental measurements of pressure drop have been made for forced-convection evaporation and condensation of oil-refrigerant (R-12) mixtures inside a horizontal tube. Data were compared to a wide range of frictional pressure drop and void fraction relationships. The best representations for the oil-free data were then modified to better correlate both oil-free and oil-refrigerant results. For condensation, a modification of the prediction given by the Lockhart-Martinelli relation for frictional pressure drop and the homogeneous void fraction model is presented. For evaporation, the prediction given by the Dukler II frictional pressure-drop correlation and the homogeneous void fraction is modified. These relationships predict the pressure drop for 85% of the data to within +- 35%. The added oil increased the pressure drop 2% to 6% for condensation and 63% to 86% for evaporation.

  1. Inverted drop testing and neck injury potential.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Stephen; Herbst, Brian; Meyer, Steve; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

    2003-01-01

    Inverted drop testing of vehicles is a methodology that has long been used by the automotive industry and researchers to test roof integrity and is currently being considered by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as a roof strength test. In 1990 a study was reported which involved 8 dolly rollover tests and 5 inverted drop tests. These studies were conducted with restrained Hybrid III instrumented Anthropometric Test Devices (ATD) in production and rollcaged vehicles to investigate the relationship between roof strength and occupant injury potential. The 5 inverted drop tests included in the study provided a methodology producing "repeatable roof impacts" exposing the ATDs to the similar impact environment as those seen in the dolly rollover tests. Authors have conducted two inverted drop test sets as part of an investigation of two real world rollover accidents. Hybrid-III ATD's were used in each test with instrumented head and necks. Both test sets confirm that reduction of roof intrusion and increased headroom can significantly enhance occupant protection. In both test pairs, the neck force of the dummy in the vehicle with less crush and more survival space was significantly lower. Reduced roof crush and dynamic preservation of the occupant survival space resulted in only minor occupant contact and minimal occupant loading, establishing a clear causal relationship between roof crush and neck injuries.

  2. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered acceptable test liquids. Test... specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, drop height must be determined according to packing group, as follows...: 0.8 m (2.6 feet). (ii) Where the materials to be transported have a specific gravity exceeding...

  3. Understanding thermal Marangoni flow in water sessile evaporating drops via 3D-PTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Marin, Alvaro; Kaehler, Christian J.

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the flow inside sessile evaporating drops is of great interest both from a fundamental and technological point of view. Despite strong research efforts in the recent years, a complete picture on the phenomena involved in this process and a way to control them is still far to be reached. This is due to a lack of reliable experimental data on the internal flow but more dramatically on the interfacial flow. A relevant open debate concerns the role played by the Marangoni flow induced by thermal gradients. We recently show how 3D particle tracking techniques are suitable to measure the internal flow of drops and to derive quantities such as surface shear and surface tension differences. Such experiments also indicated an increase of the thermal Marangoni flow as the droplet becomes thinner, in disagreement with current theoretical models and simulations. A possible reason for that could be a discrepancy of the imposed boundary conditions in the simulations and the experimental ones. This work follows up these observations with fully 3D time-resolved measurements of the flow inside drops evaporating on a quartz substrate, which temperature is controlled using a feedback temperature control and a microscope incubator system. Supported by DFG, Grant No. KA 1808/22.

  4. Orion Parachute Drop Test, July 18

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A C-17 plane dropped a test version of Orion from an altitude of 25,000 feet above the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in southwestern Arizona on July 18, 2012. This test was the second to use an Ori...

  5. Assessment of evaporation equilibrium and stability concerning an acoustically excited drop in combustion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauriot, Yves; Prud'homme, Roger

    2014-04-01

    The evaporation of drops in a sound field has been the subject of numerous studies aimed at determining its role in combustion instability. The models generally assume local equilibrium evaporation at the interface. We determine here the conditions of validity of this assumption, without calling into question other a priori assumptions of the classical model, in particular spherically symmetric quasi-steady evolution in the gas phase and liquid phase thermal unsteadiness with pure heat conduction. Another possible phenomenon concerns the differential recoil of the vapor. In the case of rapid evaporation, a pressure difference appears between both sides of the interface, even if the latter is plane. This pressure difference, usually neglected, is proportional to the square of speed and the resulting force is oriented toward the denser fluid, i.e. the liquid. A very fast evaporation may even cause local deformation, i.e. Hickman instability. The stability condition concerning this phenomenon has also been determined. This study was co-funded by CNES (French Space Agency) and ONERA and was performed in the framework of CNES-ONERA French Research &  Technology activities on the high-frequency combustion stability of liquid-propellant rocket engines.

  6. Analytic study of developing flows in a tube laden with non-evaporating and evaporating drops via a modified linearization of the two-phase momentum equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosid, S.; Tambour, Y.

    A novel modification of the classical Langhaar linearization of the mutually coupled momentum equations for developing two-phase flows in circular ducts is presented. This modification enables us to treat: (i) flows developing from spatially periodic initial velocity distributions without the presence of droplets, and (ii) two-phase flows in which monosize, non-evaporating and evaporating droplets suspended in a developing gas flow of an initially uniform velocity distribution exchange momentum with the host-gas flow. New solutions are presented for the downstream evolution in the velocity profiles which develop from spatially periodic initial velocity distributions that eventually reach the fully developed Poiseuille velocity profile. These solutions are validated by employing known numerical procedures, providing strong support for the physical underpinnings of the present modified linearization. New solutions are also presented for the evolution in drop velocities and vapour spatial distributions for evaporating droplets suspended in an initially uniform velocity profile of the host gas. Asymptotic solutions are presented for the flow region which lies very close to the inlet of the tube, where the relative velocity between the droplets and the host gas is high, and thus the velocity fields of the two phases are mutually coupled. These solutions provide new explicit formulae for the droplet velocity field as a function of the initial conditions and droplet diameter (relative to the tube diameter) for non-evaporating drops, and also as a function of evaporation rate for evaporating drops.

  7. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop heights...

  8. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop heights...

  9. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  10. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  11. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  12. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of anti-freeze. Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at... is performed with water: (i) Where the materials to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding...) Where the materials to be transported have a specific gravity exceeding 1.2, the drop height must...

  13. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of anti-freeze. Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at... is performed with water: (i) Where the materials to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding...) Where the materials to be transported have a specific gravity exceeding 1.2, the drop height must...

  14. Evaporation dynamics of non-spherical sessile drops of pure fluids and binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Pedro J.; Matar, Omar K.; Sefiane, Khellil; Valluri, Prashant; Kim, Jungho

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of pure axisymmetric volatile sessile droplets have been meticulously examined over the last four decades but remain poorly understood. Studies focusing on more realistic non-spherical configurations are virtually non-existent. The dynamics of the latter are examined in this investigation by means of experiments and numerical simulations. We show that the lifetime and bulk flow characteristics of these drops depend on their size and shape. The irregular geometries lead to the emergence preferential convection currents in the liquid as well as differential local evaporation rates noticeable along the contact line. Similarly, we inspect the thermocapillary stability of the flow, which results as the liquid volatility increases, and find that this is also affected by the non-uniform wettability along the triple line. The Marangoni-driven instabilities grow in an intricate spatio-temporal fashion leading to the emergence of different flow regimes. Finally, we also provide new insights into the evaporation process of binary-mixture drops. Memphis Multiphase (EPSRC EP/K003976/1) & ThermaPOWER (EU IRSES-PIRSES GA-2011-294905).

  15. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  16. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  17. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  18. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  19. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  20. A New Approach to Measure Contact Angle and Evaporation Rate with Flow Visualization in a Sessile Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The contact angle and the spreading process of sessile droplet are very crucial in many technological processes, such as painting and coating, material processing, film-cooling applications, lubrication, and boiling. Additionally, as it is well known that the surface free energy of polymers cannot be directly, measured for their elastic and viscous restraints. The measurements of liquid contact angle on the polymer surfaces become extremely important to evaluate the surface free energy of polymers through indirect methods linked with the contact angle data. Due to the occurrence of liquid evaporation is inevitable, the effects of evaporation on the contact angle and the spreading become very important for more complete understanding of these processes. It is of interest to note that evaporation can induce Marangoni-Benard convection in sessile drops. However, the impacts of the inside convection on the wetting and spreading processes are not clear. The experimental methods used by previous investigators cannot simultaneously measure the spreading process and visualize the convection inside. Based on the laser shadowgraphic system used by the present author, a very simple optical procedure has been developed to measure the contact angle, the spreading speed, the evaporation rate, and to visualize inside convection of a sessile drop simultaneously. Two CCD cameras were used to synchronously record the real-time diameter of the sessile drop, which is essential for determination of both spreading speed and evaporation rate, and the shadowgraphic image magnified by the sessile drop acting as a thin plano-convex lens. From the shadowgraph, the inside convection of the drop can be observed if any and the image outer diameter, which linked to the drop profile, can be measured. Simple equations have been derived to calculate the drop profile, including the instantaneous contact angle, height, and volume of the sessile drop, as well as the evaporation rate. The influence of

  1. Kinetics of Evaporation and Growth of Drops of Aqueous Solutions of Surface Active Substances at Negative Temperatures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    the numerous experiments at the present time it is established that surface-active substances (SAS), both soluble and insoluble, substantially slow...3.5 10 The matter is more complex with the investigation of soluble SAS. Some authors [3, 4] consider that the slowing of the evaporation rate, as in... soluble SAS is different than for drops with insoluble SAS. In the opinion of V. G. Morachevskiy and others [7], the slowing of the evaporation rate is

  2. Volumetric thermal measurements using thermo-liquid crystal (TLC) micro-particles in evaporating drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Rodrigo; Marin, Alvaro Gomez; Kaehler, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Freely evaporating sessile droplets develop weak temperature gradients that can generate Marangoni flows at the drop's surface. Quantitative temperature measurements of small gradients at such scales are very difficult. In this work, a method to track the temperature of individual thermo-liquid crystal (TLC) particles is employed to extract the temperature field inside an evaporating droplet. TLC thermography has been investigated for several years but the low quality of individual TLC particles, as well as the methods used to extract temperature from their color appearance, has prevented the development of a reliable approach to track their temperature individually. In order to overcome these challenges, an emulsion of stable non-encapsulated TLC micro particles with a narrower size distribution than that of commercial encapsulated TLC solutions was used along with a multi-variable calibration approach, as opposed to the direct hue-temperature relationship usually implemented (Segura et al., Microfluid Nanofluid, 2012). In addition, an optimized color space was implemented as well as circular polarization filtering to remove background noise and improve signal-to-noise ratio. Using this technique, a 3D temperature-velocity field within a droplet could be simultaneously resolved.

  3. Structural transitions in a ring stain created at the contact line of evaporating nanosuspension sessile drops.

    PubMed

    Askounis, Alexandros; Sefiane, Khellil; Koutsos, Vasileios; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2013-01-01

    Monodisperse nanosuspension droplets, placed on a flat surface, evaporated following the stick-slip motion of the three-phase contact line. Unexpectedly, a disordered region formed at the exterior edge of a closely packed nanocolloidal crystalline structure during the "stick" period. In order to assess the role of particle velocity on particle structuring, we did experiments in a reduced pressure environment which allowed the enhancement of particle velocity. These experiments revealed the promotion of hexagonal packing at the very edge of the crystallite with increasing velocity. Quantification of particle velocity and comparison with measured deposit shape for each case allowed us to provide a tentative description of the underlying mechanisms that govern particle deposition of nanoparticles at the triple line of an evaporating droplet. Behavior is governed by an interplay between the fluid, and hence particle, flow velocity (main ordering parameter) and wedge constraints, and consequently disjoining pressure (main disordering parameter). Furthermore, the formation of a second disordered particle region at the interior edge of the deposit (towards bulk fluid) was found and attributed to the rapid motion of the triple line during the "slip" regime. Additionally, the magnitude of the pinning forces acting on the triple line of the same drops was calculated. These findings provide further insight into the mechanisms of the phenomenon and could facilitate its exploitation in various nanotechnological applications.

  4. Structural transitions in a ring stain created at the contact line of evaporating nanosuspension sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askounis, Alexandros; Sefiane, Khellil; Koutsos, Vasileios; Shanahan, Martin E. R.

    2013-01-01

    Monodisperse nanosuspension droplets, placed on a flat surface, evaporated following the stick-slip motion of the three-phase contact line. Unexpectedly, a disordered region formed at the exterior edge of a closely packed nanocolloidal crystalline structure during the “stick” period. In order to assess the role of particle velocity on particle structuring, we did experiments in a reduced pressure environment which allowed the enhancement of particle velocity. These experiments revealed the promotion of hexagonal packing at the very edge of the crystallite with increasing velocity. Quantification of particle velocity and comparison with measured deposit shape for each case allowed us to provide a tentative description of the underlying mechanisms that govern particle deposition of nanoparticles at the triple line of an evaporating droplet. Behavior is governed by an interplay between the fluid, and hence particle, flow velocity (main ordering parameter) and wedge constraints, and consequently disjoining pressure (main disordering parameter). Furthermore, the formation of a second disordered particle region at the interior edge of the deposit (towards bulk fluid) was found and attributed to the rapid motion of the triple line during the “slip” regime. Additionally, the magnitude of the pinning forces acting on the triple line of the same drops was calculated. These findings provide further insight into the mechanisms of the phenomenon and could facilitate its exploitation in various nanotechnological applications.

  5. Evaporation of a water drop with a solid opaque inclusion moving through a high-temperature gaseous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, D. V.; Volkov, R. S.; Piskunov, M. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    The process of evaporation of an inhomogeneous (containing a graphite particle) water drop moving through a high-temperature (about 1100 K) gas medium has been experimentally studied using highspeed (no less than 105 fps) video recording tools, the PIV scanning optical method, and Tema Automotive software. The influences of the ratio of water and inclusion masses, shape of inclusion (by the example of cylindrical disk, cube, and parallelepiped), and its surface area on the integral characteristics of liquid evaporation when heterogeneous drops are passed through a channel (length 1 m, inner diameter 0.2 m) with high-temperature gases are established.

  6. Hollow Fiber Ground Evaporator Unit Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus

    2010-01-01

    A candidate technology for 1-atmosphere suited heat rejection was developed and tested at NASA Johnson Space Center. The concept is to use a collection of microporous hydrophobic tubes potted between inlet and outlet headers with water as coolant. A pump provides flow between headers through the tubes which are subjected to fan driven cross flow of relatively dry air. The forced ventilation would sweep out the water vapor from the evaporation of the coolant rejecting heat from the coolant stream. The hollow fibers are obtained commercially (X50-215 Celgard) which are arranged in a sheet containing 5 fibers per linear inch. Two engineering development units were produced that vary the fold direction of the fiber sheets relative to the ventilation. These units were tested at inlet water temperatures ranging from 20 deg C to 30 deg C, coolant flow rates ranging from 10 to 90 kg/hr, and at three fan speeds. These results were used to size a system that could reject heat at a rate of 340 W.

  7. Understanding evaporation characteristics of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) chemical agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates.

    PubMed

    Jung, H; Lee, H W

    2014-05-30

    We report herein the evaporation rates and mechanism of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates. For systematic analysis, we used a laboratory-sized wind tunnel, thermal desorption (TD) connected to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and drop shape analysis (DSA). We found that the evaporation rates of HD from stainless steel and aluminum increased with temperature. The rates were also linearly proportional to drop size. The time-dependent contact angle measurement showed that the evaporation of the drop of HD proceeded only by constant contact area mechanism from stainless steel surface. On the other hand, the evaporation of HD from aluminum proceeded by a combined mechanism of constant contact area mode and constant contact angle mode. Our experimental data sets and analysis could be used to predict vapor and contact hazard persistence of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the air and on exterior surfaces with chemical releases, which assists the military decision influencing personnel safety and decontamination of the site upon a chemical attack event.

  8. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  9. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  10. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  11. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  12. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  13. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  14. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  15. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  16. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  17. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  18. Ares I Upper Stage Parachute Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  19. Ares I Upper Stage Parachute Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  20. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem drop test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moog, R. D.; Sheppard, J. D.; Kross, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    An air drop test program was conducted as part of the development of a decelerator subsystem for recovering the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. This development test program consisted of six drops performed over the period from June 1977 to September 1978 at a parachute test center in California. The testing concerned a 48,000-lb drop test vehicle released from the B-52 mothership. The drop test program is described and pertinent test results are discussed. Data include snatch loads, inflation characteristics, peak inflation and disreef loads, and drag performance. Performance characteristics of the drogue parachute and the main parachute are established.

  1. Thermodynamic performance testing of the orbiter flash evaporator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaax, J. R.; Melgares, M. A.; Frahm, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    System level testing of the space shuttle orbiter's development flash evaporator system (FES) was performed in a thermal vacuum chamber capable of simulating ambient ascent, orbital, and entry temperature and pressure profiles. The test article included the evaporator assembly, high load and topping exhaust duct and nozzle assemblies, and feedwater supply assembly. Steady state and transient heat load, water pressure/temperature and ambient pressure/temperature profiles were imposed by especially designed supporting test hardware. Testing in 1978 verified evaporator and duct heater thermal design, determined FES performance boundaries, and assessed topping evaporator plume characteristics. Testing in 1979 combined the FES with the other systems in the orbiter active thermal control subsystem (ATCS). The FES met or exceeded all nominal and contingency performance requirements during operation with the integrated ATCS. During both tests stability problems were encountered during steady state operations which resulted in subsequent design changes to the water spray nozzle and valve plate assemblies.

  2. Calcium carbonate mineralization: X-ray microdiffraction probing of the interface of an evaporating drop on a superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Accardo, Angelo; Burghammer, Manfred; Di Cola, Emanuela; Reynolds, Michael; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Riekel, Christian

    2011-07-05

    The liquid/air interface of calcium bicarbonate solution drops was probed by synchrotron radiation microbeam scattering. The drops were deposited on a nanopatterned superhydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) surface and raster-scanned during evaporation by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering. The appearance of about 200-nm-size calcite crystallites at the interface could be spatially resolved at the onset of crystallization. Diffuse scattering from the interface is attributed to a dense nanoscale amorphous calcium carbonate phase. Calcite was found to be the major phase in the solid residue with vaterite as minor phase.

  3. Consistent Large-Eddy Simulation of a Temporal Mixing Layer Laden with Evaporating Drops. Part 2; A Posteriori Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboissertier, Anthony; Okong'O, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2005-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is conducted of a three-dimensional temporal mixing layer whose lower stream is initially laden with liquid drops which may evaporate during the simulation. The gas-phase equations are written in an Eulerian frame for two perfect gas species (carrier gas and vapour emanating from the drops), while the liquid-phase equations are written in a Lagrangian frame. The effect of drop evaporation on the gas phase is considered through mass, species, momentum and energy source terms. The drop evolution is modelled using physical drops, or using computational drops to represent the physical drops. Simulations are performed using various LES models previously assessed on a database obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS). These LES models are for: (i) the subgrid-scale (SGS) fluxes and (ii) the filtered source terms (FSTs) based on computational drops. The LES, which are compared to filtered-and-coarsened (FC) DNS results at the coarser LES grid, are conducted with 64 times fewer grid points than the DNS, and up to 64 times fewer computational than physical drops. It is found that both constant-coefficient and dynamic Smagorinsky SGS-flux models, though numerically stable, are overly dissipative and damp generated small-resolved-scale (SRS) turbulent structures. Although the global growth and mixing predictions of LES using Smagorinsky models are in good agreement with the FC-DNS, the spatial distributions of the drops differ significantly. In contrast, the constant-coefficient scale-similarity model and the dynamic gradient model perform well in predicting most flow features, with the latter model having the advantage of not requiring a priori calibration of the model coefficient. The ability of the dynamic models to determine the model coefficient during LES is found to be essential since the constant-coefficient gradient model, although more accurate than the Smagorinsky model, is not consistently numerically stable despite using DNS

  4. Consistent Large-Eddy Simulation of a Temporal Mixing Layer Laden with Evaporating Drops. Part 2; A Posteriori Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboissertier, Anthony; Okong'O, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2005-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is conducted of a three-dimensional temporal mixing layer whose lower stream is initially laden with liquid drops which may evaporate during the simulation. The gas-phase equations are written in an Eulerian frame for two perfect gas species (carrier gas and vapour emanating from the drops), while the liquid-phase equations are written in a Lagrangian frame. The effect of drop evaporation on the gas phase is considered through mass, species, momentum and energy source terms. The drop evolution is modelled using physical drops, or using computational drops to represent the physical drops. Simulations are performed using various LES models previously assessed on a database obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS). These LES models are for: (i) the subgrid-scale (SGS) fluxes and (ii) the filtered source terms (FSTs) based on computational drops. The LES, which are compared to filtered-and-coarsened (FC) DNS results at the coarser LES grid, are conducted with 64 times fewer grid points than the DNS, and up to 64 times fewer computational than physical drops. It is found that both constant-coefficient and dynamic Smagorinsky SGS-flux models, though numerically stable, are overly dissipative and damp generated small-resolved-scale (SRS) turbulent structures. Although the global growth and mixing predictions of LES using Smagorinsky models are in good agreement with the FC-DNS, the spatial distributions of the drops differ significantly. In contrast, the constant-coefficient scale-similarity model and the dynamic gradient model perform well in predicting most flow features, with the latter model having the advantage of not requiring a priori calibration of the model coefficient. The ability of the dynamic models to determine the model coefficient during LES is found to be essential since the constant-coefficient gradient model, although more accurate than the Smagorinsky model, is not consistently numerically stable despite using DNS

  5. Flexible and precise drop test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stämpfli, Rolf; Brühwiler, Paul A.

    2009-11-01

    A drop test system with flexibility in the choice of falling object has been constructed and characterized. Using the guided free fall principle, the system enables the study of impacts of a large range of objects on a wide selection of anvils, with high control of the position and orientation of the object. The latter is demonstrated with falls of a standard aluminium headform in mountaineering helmets on a kerbstone anvil, for which visual inspection with a high-speed camera confirms the desired accuracy. Impacts of a flat falling body on cylindrical polystyrene foam samples are used to derive stress-strain curves for materials of different density and for multilayer samples. In this case, the effects of striker orientation and placement on the resultant data are discussed, and the reproducibility of the data serves as an additional confirmation of the accuracy of the measurement apparatus and procedures. A check on the improvement in the level of positional and orientational striking precision achievable is obtained via an inter-laboratory comparison.

  6. Suppressing the coffee stain effect: how to control colloidal self-assembly in evaporating drops using electrowetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eral, Burak; Mampallil Augustine, Dileep; Duits, Michel; Mugele, Frieder; Physics of Complex Fluids Group, University of Twente Team

    2011-11-01

    We study the influence of electrowetting on the evaporative self-assembly and formation of undesired solute residues, so-called coffee stains, during the evaporation of a drop containing non-volatile solvents. Electrowetting is found to suppress coffee stains of both colloidal particles of various sizes and DNA solutions at alternating (AC) frequencies ranging from a few Hertz to a few tens of kHz. Two main effects are shown to contribute to the suppression: (i) the time-dependent electrostatic force prevents pinning of the three phase contact line and (ii) internal flow fields generated by AC electrowetting counteract the evaporation driven flux and thereby prevent the accumulation of solutes along the contact line Please see the link below for a short presentation and movies: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwipCVZnN4E We thank the Chemical Sciences division of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO-CW) for financial support (ECHO grant).

  7. Numerical simulations of evaporative instabilities in sessile drops of ethanol on heated substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Sergey; Carle, Florian; Medale, Marc; Brutin, David

    2015-11-01

    The work is focussed on numerical simulations of thermo-convective instabilities in evaporating pinned sessile droplets of ethanol on heated substrates. Computed evaporation rate of a droplet is validated against parabolic flight experiments and semi-empirical theory presented here. To the best authors' knowledge, this is the first study which combines theoretical, experimental and computational approaches in convective evaporation of sessile droplets. The influence of gravity level on evaporation rate and contributions of different mechanisms of vapor transport (diffusion, Stefan flow, natural convection) are shown. The qualitative difference (in terms of developing thermo-convective instabilities) between steady-state and unsteady numerical approaches is demonstrated.

  8. B-52B-008/DTV (Drop Test Vehicle) configuration 1 (with and without fins) flight test results - captive flight and drop test missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The B-52B-008 drop test consisted of one takeoff roll to 60 KCAS, two captive flights to accomplish limited safety of flight flutter and structural demonstration testing, and seven drop test flights. Of the seven drop test missions, one flight was aborted due to the failure of the hook mechanism to release the drop test vehicle (DTV); but the other six flights successfully dropped the DTV.

  9. Theoretical and testing performance of an innovative indirect evaporative chiller

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yi; Xie, Xiaoyun

    2010-12-15

    An indirect evaporative chiller is a device used to produce chilled water at a temperature between the wet bulb temperature and dew point of the outdoor air, which can be used in building HVAC systems. This article presents a theoretical analysis and practical performance of an innovative indirect evaporative chiller. First, the process of the indirect evaporative chiller is introduced; then, the matching characteristics of the process are presented and analyzed. It can be shown that the process that produces cold water by using dry air is a nearly-reversible process, so the ideal produced chilled water temperature of the indirect evaporative chiller can be set close to the dew point temperature of the chiller's inlet air. After the indirect evaporative chiller was designed, simulations were done to analyze the output water temperature, the cooling efficiency relative to the inlet dew point temperature, and the COP that the chiller can performance. The first installation of the indirect evaporative chiller of this kind has been run for 5 years in a building in the city of Shihezi. The tested output water temperature of the chiller is around 14-20 C, which is just in between of the outdoor wet bulb temperature and dew point. The tested COP{sub r,s} of the developed indirect evaporative chiller reaches 9.1. Compared with ordinary air conditioning systems, the indirect evaporative chiller can save more than 40% in energy consumption due to the fact that the only energy consumed is from pumps and fans. An added bonus is that the indirect evaporative chiller uses no CFCs that pollute to the aerosphere. The tested internal parameters, such as the water-air flow rate ratio and heat transfer area for each heat transfer process inside the chiller, were analyzed and compared with designed values. The tested indoor air conditions, with a room temperature of 23-27 C and relative humidity of 50-70%, proved that the developed practical indirect evaporative chiller successfully

  10. Drop Tests of the Closure Ring for the 9975 Package

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.C

    1999-09-29

    The drop tests of the closure ring for 9975 packages, described here, were performed to answer questions raised by the regulatory authority as a result of deformation of the closure ring and drum rim observed during drop tests conducted in September 1998.

  11. 14 CFR 23.725 - Limit drop tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Landing Gear... than 18.7 inches. (b) If the effect of wing lift is provided for in free drop tests, the landing gear... be determined in a rational or conservative manner, during the drop test, using a landing gear...

  12. On the uniqueness of the receding contact angle: effects of substrate roughness and humidity on evaporation of water drops.

    PubMed

    Pittoni, Paola G; Lin, Chia-Hui; Yu, Teng-Shiang; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2014-08-12

    Could a unique receding contact angle be indicated for describing the wetting properties of a real gas-liquid-solid system? Could a receding contact angle be defined if the triple line of a sessile drop is not moving at all during the whole measurement process? To what extent is the receding contact angle influenced by the intrinsic properties of the system or the measurement procedures? In order to answer these questions, a systematic investigation was conducted in this study on the effects of substrate roughness and relative humidity on the behavior of pure water drops spreading and evaporating on polycarbonate (PC) surfaces characterized by different morphologies. Dynamic, advancing, and receding contact angles were found to be strongly affected by substrate roughness. Specifically, a receding contact angle could not be measured at all for drops evaporating on the more rugged PC surfaces, since the drops were observed strongly pinning to the substrate almost until their complete disappearance. Substrate roughness and system relative humidity were also found responsible for drastic changes in the depinning time (from ∼10 to ∼60 min). Thus, for measurement observations not sufficiently long, no movement of the triple line could be noted, with, again, the failure to find a receding contact angle. Therefore, to keep using concepts such as the receding contact angle as meaningful specifications of a given gas-liquid-solid system, the imperative to carefully investigate and report the inner characteristics of the system (substrate roughness, topography, impurities, defects, chemical properties, etc.) is pointed out in this study. The necessity of establishing methodological standards (drop size, measurement method, system history, observation interval, relative humidity, etc.) is also suggested.

  13. The influence of gravity on the distribution of the deposit formed onto a substrate by sessile, hanging, and sandwiched hanging drop evaporation.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Ion; Fleaca, Claudiu Teodor

    2011-06-15

    The focus of the present article is the study of the influence of gravity on the particle deposition profiles on a solid substrate during the evaporation of sessile, hanging and sandwiched hanging drops of colloidal particle suspensions. For concentrations of nanoparticles in the colloidal solutions in the range 0.0001-1 wt.%, highly diluted suspensions will preferentially form rings while concentrated suspensions will preferentially form spots in both sessile and hanging drop evaporation. For intermediary concentrations, the particle deposition profiles will depend on the nanoparticle aggregation dynamics in the suspension during the evaporation process, gravity and on the detailed evaporation geometry. The evaporation of a drop of toluene/carbon nanoparticle suspension hanging from a pendant water drop will leave on the substrate a circular spot with no visible external ring. By contrast, a clear external ring is formed on the substrate by the sessile evaporation of a similar drop of suspension sandwiched between a water drop and the substrate. From the application viewpoint, these processes can be used to create preferential electrical conductive carbon networks and contacts for arrays of self-assembled nanostructures fabricated on solid substrates as well as on flexible polymeric substrates.

  14. Evaporation of Binary Sessile Drops: Infrared and Acoustic Methods To Track Alcohol Concentration at the Interface and on the Surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin; Toubal, Malika; Carlier, Julien; Harmand, Souad; Nongaillard, Bertrand; Bigerelle, Maxence

    2016-09-27

    Evaporation of droplets of three pure liquids (water, 1-butanol, and ethanol) and four binary solutions (5 wt % 1-butanol-water-based solution and 5, 25, and 50 wt % ethanol-water-based solutions) deposited on hydrophobic silicon was investigated. A drop shape analyzer was used to measure the contact angle, diameter, and volume of the droplets. An infrared camera was used for infrared thermal mapping of the droplet's surface. An acoustic high-frequency echography technique was, for the first time, applied to track the alcohol concentration in a binary-solution droplet. Evaporation of pure alcohol droplets was executed at different values of relative humidity (RH), among which the behavior of pure ethanol evaporation was notably influenced by the ambient humidity as a result of high hygrometry. Evaporation of droplets of water and binary solutions was performed at a temperature of 22 °C and a mean humidity of approximately 50%. The exhaustion times of alcohol in the droplets estimated by the acoustic method and the visual method were similar for the water-1-butanol mixture; however, the time estimated by the acoustic method was longer when compared with that estimated by the visual method for the water-ethanol mixture due to the residual ethanol at the bottom of the droplet.

  15. Particle Segregation at Contact Lines of Evaporating Colloidal Drops: Influence of the Substrate Wettability and Particle Charge-Mass Ratio.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Marín, Diego; Moraila-Martínez, Carmen L; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A

    2015-06-23

    Segregation of particles during capillary/convective self-assembly is interesting for self-stratification in colloidal deposits. In evaporating drops containing colloidal particles, the wettability properties of substrate and the sedimentation of particles can affect their accumulation at contact lines. In this work we studied the size segregation and discrimination of charged particles with different densities. We performed in-plane particle counting at evaporating triple lines by using fluorescence confocal microscopy. We studied separately substrates with very different wettability properties and particles with different charge-mass ratios at low ionic strength. We used binary colloidal suspensions to compare simultaneously the deposition of two different particles. The particle deposition rate strongly depends on the receding contact angle of the substrate. We further observed a singular behavior of charged polystyrene particles in binary mixtures under "salt-free" conditions explained by the "colloidal Brazil nut" effect.

  16. Modelling of multiphase flow in evaporation tests in concrete columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparro, M. Carme; Saaltink, Maarten W.; Villar, M. Victoria

    2013-04-01

    In order to characterize better the thermo-hydraulic properties and processes in concrete from a Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at El Cabril (Spain), evaporation tests in columns have been analysed by means of numerical models. The tests consisted of letting water evaporate from the top of the column while monitoring water loss by weighing the column, and monitoring temperature and relative humidity by means of sensors placed within the column. Both non-isothermal (by heating the column with a lamp) and isothermal tests (without heating) were performed. The conceptual model considers unsaturated liquid flow and transport of vapour and heat. Some models also take into account the salinity in order to study its effect on vapour pressure and evaporation. A retention curve has been obtained from relative humidity and gravimetric water content measured after dismantling the columns. The models have been calibrated by fitting permeability and a tortuosity factor for vapour diffusion to the measured water loss, relative humidity and (in the case of the non-isothermal test) temperature. Results show that vapour diffusion is dominant above an evaporation front, and liquid advection is the dominant water transport process underneath this front. The salinity slightly reduces the evaporation with a factor of at most 5%. The tortuosity factor estimated from the isothermal test is lower than that of the non-isothermal test. This can be explained by the evaporation and condensation together with the heat transport that take place at pore scale under non-isothermal conditions, which are not taken into account by the model.

  17. 14 CFR 27.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... introduced into the drop test by appropriate energy absorbing devices or by the use of an effective mass. (c... critical from the standpoint of the energy to be absorbed by it. (d) When an effective mass is used in...=specified free drop height (inches). L=ration of assumed rotor lift to the rotorcraft weight. d=deflection...

  18. 14 CFR 27.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... introduced into the drop test by appropriate energy absorbing devices or by the use of an effective mass. (c... critical from the standpoint of the energy to be absorbed by it. (d) When an effective mass is used in...=specified free drop height (inches). L=ration of assumed rotor lift to the rotorcraft weight. d=deflection...

  19. Strength of thin chemtempered lenses: drop-ball testing.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, W H; Rosenfield, A R; Gulati, S T; Rieger, R A; Hoekstra, K E

    1978-12-01

    Failure heights were measured in drop-ball tests for both chemtempered and heat-tempered plano, white crown glass lenses from five different optical laboratories. It was found that (1) failure height was proportional to the square of the lens thickness, (2) chemtempered lenses substantially thinner than 2.0 mm are as resistant to breakage as 2.0-mm-thick heat-tempered lenses, and (3) a close correlation existed between results of single-drop and multiple-drop tests and between results of tests using rigid and compliant mounts.

  20. Orion MPCV Phase 1 Drop Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Engineers conducted the first test as part of Phase 1 of the Orion MPCV boilerplate test article at NASA's Langley Research Center, on Oct. 18. The 18,000-pound (8,165 kg) test article -- represent...

  1. Orion Drop Test - Dec. 13, 2011

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Testing continues at NASA Langley Research Center as the 18,000-pound (8,165 kg) Orion test article took its eight and final splash of the year into the Hydro Impact Basin on Dec. 13. This test sim...

  2. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    SciTech Connect

    Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Childress, P.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Smith, J.V.

    1986-09-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests were designed to confirm the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. Work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory included (1) precise physical measurements of the internal poison rod configuration before assembly, (2) canister assembly and welding, (3) nondestructive examination (an initial hydrostatic pressure test and an x-ray profile of the internals before and after each drop test), (4) addition of a simulated fuel load, (5) instrumentation of the canister for each drop test, (6) fabrication of a cask simulation vessel with a developed and tested foam impact limiter, (7) use of refrigeration facilities to cool the canister to well below freezing prior to three of the drops, (8) recording the drop test with still, high-speed, and normal-speed photography, (9) recording the accelerometer measurements during impact, (10) disassembly and post-test examination with precise physical measurements, and (11) preparation of the final report.

  3. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered acceptable test liquids, and may be considered equivalent to water for test... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of...

  4. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered acceptable test liquids, and may be considered equivalent to water for test... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of...

  5. Vertical Drop Testing and Simulation of Anthropomorphic Test Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 14 vertical impact tests were conducted using Hybrid III 50th Percentile and Hybrid II 50th Percentile Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) at NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of conducting these tests was threefold: to compare and contrast the impact responses of Hybrid II and Hybrid III ATDs under two different loading conditions, to compare the impact responses of the Hybrid III configured with a nominal curved lumbar spine to that of a Hybrid III configured with a straight lumbar spine, and to generate data for comparison with predicted responses from two commercially available ATD finite element models. The two loading conditions examined were a high magnitude, short duration acceleration pulse, and a low magnitude, long duration acceleration pulse, each created by using different paper honeycomb blocks as pulse shape generators in the drop tower. The test results show that the Hybrid III results differ from the Hybrid II results more for the high magnitude, short duration pulse case. The comparison of the lumbar loads for each ATD configuration show drastic differences in the loads seen in the spine. The analytical results show major differences between the responses of the two finite element models. A detailed discussion of possible sources of the discrepancies between the two analytical models is also provided.

  6. Drop tests of the redesigned 9975 package June 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D.

    2000-06-01

    A redesigned closure for the 9975, based on that employed on the DT-22 family of packages, has been developed. The tests reported here qualify the redesigned package with respect to the requirements of 10 CFR 71. ln order to ensure that the vessel and its closure were tested in the most challenging condition, each of the packages was subjected to a Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) preconditioning test followed by the Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) 30 ft drop and puncture pin tests. The tests demonstrated the ability of the 9975 with the redesigned closure to withstand the RAC drop test sequence.

  7. Modeling evaporation of Jet A, JP-7 and RP-1 drops at 1 to 15 bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    A model describing the evaportion of an isolated drop of a multicomponent fuel containing hundreds of species has been developed. The model is based on Continuous Thermodynamics concepts wherein the composition of a fuel is statistically described using a Probability Distribution Function (PDF).

  8. Testing of the Multi-Fluid Evaporator Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; O'Connor, Ed; Riga, Ken; Anderson, Molly; Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand is under contract with the NASA Johnson Space Center to develop a scalable, evaporative heat rejection system called the Multi-Fluid Evaporator (MFE). It is being designed to support the Orion Crew Module and to support future Constellation missions. The MFE would be used from Earth sea level conditions to the vacuum of space. The current Shuttle configuration utilizes an ammonia boiler and flash evaporator system to achieve cooling at all altitudes. The MFE system combines both functions into a single compact package with significant weight reduction and improved freeze-up protection. The heat exchanger core is designed so that radial flow of the evaporant provides increasing surface area to keep the back pressure low. The multiple layer construction of the core allows for efficient scale up to the desired heat rejection rate. The full scale MFE prototype will be constructed with four core sections that, combined with a novel control scheme, manage the risk of freezing the heat exchanger cores. A sub-scale MFE engineering development unit (EDU) has been built, and is identical to one of the four sections of a full scale prototype. The EDU has completed testing at Hamilton Sundstrand. The overall test objective was to determine the thermal performance of the EDU. The first set of tests simulated how each of the four sections of the prototype would perform by varying the chamber pressure, evaporant flow rate, coolant flow rate and coolant temperature. A second set of tests was conducted with an outlet steam header in place to verify that the outlet steam orifices prevent freeze-up in the core while also allowing the desired thermal turn-down ratio. This paper discusses the EDU tests and results.

  9. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... liquids must be kept in the liquid state, if necessary, by the addition of anti-freeze. Water/anti-freeze... acceptable test liquids, and may be considered equivalent to water for test purposes. IBCs conditioned in... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of...

  10. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... liquids must be kept in the liquid state, if necessary, by the addition of anti-freeze. Water/anti-freeze... acceptable test liquids, and may be considered equivalent to water for test purposes. IBCs conditioned in... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of...

  11. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... liquids must be kept in the liquid state, if necessary, by the addition of anti-freeze. Water/anti-freeze... acceptable test liquids, and may be considered equivalent to water for test purposes. IBCs conditioned in... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of...

  12. X-38 Drop Model: Used to Test Parafoil Landing System during Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  13. X-38 Drop Model: Testing Parafoil Landing System during Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  14. X-38 Drop Model: Testing Parafoil Landing System during Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  15. X-38 Drop Model: Used to Test Parafoil Landing System during Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  16. Vertical Drop Test of a YS-11 Fuselage Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minegishi, Masakatsu; Kumakura, Ikuo; Iwasaki, Kazuo; Shoji, Hirokazu; Yoshimoto, Norio; Terada, Hiroyuki; Sashikuma, Hirofumi; Isoe, Akira; Yamaoka, Toshihiro; Katayama, Noriaki; Hayashi, Toru; Akaso, Tetsuya

    The Structures and Materials Research Center of the National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan (NAL) and Kawasaki Heavy Industories, Ltd. (KHI) conducted a vertical drop test of a fuselage section cut from a NAMIC YS-11 transport airplane at NAL vertical drop test facility in December 2001. The main objectives of this program were to obtain background data for aircraft cabin safety by drop test of a full-scale fuselage section and to develop computational method for crash simulation. The test article including seats and anthropomorphic test dummies was dropped to a rigid impact surface at a velocity of 6.1 m/s (20 ft/s). The test condition and result were considered to be severe but potentially survivable. A finite element model of this test article was also developed using the explicit nonlinear transient-dynamic analysis code, LS-DYNA3D. An outline of analytical method and comparison of analysis result with drop test data are presented in this paper.

  17. A Semiautomatic Protein Crystallization System with Preventing Evaporation of Drops and Surface Sensor of Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Niino, Ai; Ishizu, Takeshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2004-01-01

    We developed a simple, semiautomated protein crystallization system. The system performs crystallization-condition-screening experiments using commercial solution kits and crystallization plates. It is capable of dispensing a minimum of one microliter of protein solution into a protein well and a maximum of one milliliter of a mother liquor into a reservoir with high reproducibility using two syringes of different sizes. Several new instruments effective in preventing evaporation of solutions, a surface sensor of solutions, and a tube-holder box for solution kits are introduced.

  18. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... qualification of all packaging design types and performed periodically as specified in § 178.601(e). For other... height determined as follows: (1) For solids and liquids, if the test is performed with the solid or... is performed with water: (i) Where the materials to be carried have a specific gravity not...

  19. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this section, the peak resultant accelerations at the location of the accelerometers mounted in the... 225g, and not more than 275g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse are less than ten percent (zero to...

  20. 49 CFR 178.1045 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... tests are to be performed with the solid to be transported or with a non-hazardous material having... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... closures or stitch holes) upon impact is not considered a failure of the Flexible Bulk Container provided...

  1. X-38 Drop Model: Testing Parafoil Landing System during Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  2. X-38 Drop Model: Used to Test Parafoil Landing System during Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38, an experimental crew return vehicle, glides to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to Earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  3. Crystal deposition patterns from evaporating sessile drops on superhydrophobic and liquid impregnated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Samantha; Dash, Susmita; Varanasi, Kripa; Varanasi Group Team

    2016-11-01

    Accelerated corrosion and scale buildup near oceans is partially due to deposition of salty sea mist onto ships, cars, and building structures. Many corrosion preventative measures are expensive, time intensive, and/or have negative impacts on the environment. One solution is the use of specific surfaces that are engineered for scale resistance. In this work, we show that we can delay crystallization and reduce scale adhesion on specifically engineered liquid impregnated surfaces (LIS). The low contact angle hysteresis of the LIS results in a sliding contact line of the saline droplet during evaporation, and the elevated energy barrier of the smooth liquid interface delays crystallization. Experiments conducted on surfaces with different wettability also demonstrate the corresponding influence in controlling salt crystal polymorphism.

  4. Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Peter; Parker, Gary; Novak, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

  5. 14 CFR 27.725 - Limit drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Landing Gear § 27.725 Limit drop test. The... point of the landing gear to the ground; or (2) Any lesser height, not less than eight inches, resulting...) Each landing gear unit must be tested in the attitude simulating the landing condition that is...

  6. Static, Drop, and Flight Tests on Musselman Type Airwheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, William C; Beard, Albert P

    1932-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to obtain quantitative information on the shock-reducing and energy-dissipating qualities of a set of 30 by 13-6 Musselman type airwheels. The investigation consisted of static, drop, and flight tests. The static tests were made with inflation pressures of approximately 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 pounds per square inch and loadings up to 9,600 pounds. The drop tests were with the inflation pressures approximately 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 pounds per square inch and loadings of 1,840, 2,440, 3,050, and 3,585 pounds. The flight tests were made with VE-7 airplane weighing 2,153 pounds, with the tires inflated to 5, 10, and 15 pounds per square inch. The landing gears used in conjunction with airwheels were practically rigid structures. The results of the tests showed that the walls of the tires carried a considerable portion of the load, each tire supporting a load of 600 pounds with a depression of approximately 6 inches. The shock-reducing qualities, under severe tests, and the energy dissipating characteristics of the tires, under all tests, were poor. The latter was evidenced by the rebound present in all landings made. In the severe drop tests, the free rebound reached as much as 60 per cent of the free drop. The results indicate that a shock-reducing and energy-dissipating mechanism should be used in conjunction with airwheels.

  7. [Method for study of phase transitions in evaporating drop and its application for evaluation of physical-chemical properties of water and water solutions].

    PubMed

    Iakhno, T A; Sanin, A G; Sanina, O A; Iakhno, V G

    2012-01-01

    Spatial-temporal crystallization features of inorganic chlorides in evaporating drops of water solutions, considering solid surface wettability, were studied using a microscopic technique and the acoustical impedansometry. Physical-chemical mechanisms responsible for the difference in "dynamical portraits" of distilled water and salt solutions, as well as relaxation effects in water were discussed. The study demonstrated the potential use of a drying drop method in registration of changes in water properties under the action of physical and chemical factors.

  8. Investigation of injury potential through matched pair drop testing.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Steve; Orton, Tia; Pedder, Diana; Meyer, Steven E; Herbst, Brian; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

    2006-01-01

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has concluded that there is a relationship between roof intrusion and the risk of injury to belted occupants in rollovers events. Previous testing on many different production vehicle types indicates that damage consistent with field rollover accidents can be achieved through inverted drop testing from small drop heights. It has been shown in previous drop test pairs with Hybrid III dummies, that the amount of roof intrusion is related to occupant neck injury. This paper analyzes inverted drop testing performed on Ford F250 Crew Cab production and reinforced pickups. Each of these pickup tests used Hybrid III test dummies in order to evaluate the occupant injury potential in relation to roof intrusion. The reinforced truck's residual crush was an order of magnitude less than the production truck crush. These tests indicated that the reduction of roof crush resulted in a direct reduction in neck loading and therefore an increase in occupant protection. In addition, it was found that the restraint loading was inversely related to the neck loading of the dummies.

  9. The effects of surfactant dynamics on deposition patterns in evaporating colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Narina; Seo, Haewon; Kim, Pilwon; Yoo, Chun Sang

    Evaporation of a colloidal droplet typically leaves ring-like deposit patterns on a substrate, now well-known as the coffee ring effect. We investigate the effect of surfactant dynamics on the deposition process in a drying droplet. A coarse grained model has been developed to simulate cases with Marangoni stresses, adsorption kinetics, and intermolecular interaction of surfactant particles and to examine the related deposit formation of colloidal particles. By using the two-dimensional lattice for the lateral cross-section of a droplet, we are able to capture the full dynamics of recirculating flows with surfactant and colloidal particles during drying. The roles of surfactant on droplet and colloidal particle dynamics are investigated by systematically varying parameters, such as the maximum area fraction and the initial concentration of surfactant. We further highlight important factors to generate Marangoni eddies. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2015R1A2A2A01007378).

  10. Preliminary Results of Testing of Flow Effects on Evaporator Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.

    2002-02-15

    This investigation has focused on the effects of fluid flow on solids deposition from solutions that simulate the feed to the 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site. Literature studies indicate that the fluid flow (or shear) affects particle-particle and particle-surface interactions and thus the phenomena of particle aggregation in solution and particle deposition (i.e., scale formation) onto solid surfaces. Experimental tests were conducted with two configurations: (1) using a rheometer to provide controlled shear conditions and (2) using controlled flow of reactive solution through samples of stainless steel tubing. All tests were conducted at 80 C and at high silicon and aluminum concentrations, 0.133 M each, in solutions containing 4 M sodium hydroxide and 1 A4 each of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Two findings from these experiments are important for consideration in developing approaches for reducing or eliminating evaporator scaling problems: (1) The rheometer tests suggested that for the conditions studied, maximum solids deposition occurs at a moderate shear rate, approximately 12 s{sup -1}. That value is expected to be on the order of shear rates that will occur in various parts of the evaporator system; for instance, a 6 gal/min single-phase liquid flow through the 2-in. lift or gravity drain lines would result in a shear rate of approximately 16 s{sup -1}. These results imply that engineering approaches aimed at reducing deposits through increased mixing would need to generate shear near all surfaces significantly greater than 12 s{sup -1}. However, further testing is needed to set a target value for shear that is applicable to evaporator operation. This is because the measured trend is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval due to variability in the results. In addition, testing at higher temperatures and lower concentrations of aluminum and silicon would more accurately represent conditions in the evaporator. Without

  11. Long Duration Testing of a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice; Cox, Marlon; Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Colunga, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is a heat-rejection device that is being developed to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. Cooling is achieved by circulating water from the liquid cooling garment (LCG) through hollow fibers (HoFi?s), which are small hydrophobic tubes. Liquid water remains within the hydrophobic tubes, but water vapor is exhausted to space, thereby removing heat. A SWME test article was tested over the course of a year, for a total of 1200 cumulative hours. In order to evaluate SWME tolerance to contamination due to constituents caused by distillation processes, these constituents were allowed to accumulate in the water as evaporation occurred. A test article was tested over the course of a year for a total of 1200 cumulative hours. The heat rejection performance of the SWME degraded significantly--below 700 W, attributable to the accumulation of rust in the circulating loop and biofilm growth. Bubble elimination capability, a feature that was previously proven with SWME, was compromised during the test, most likely due to loss of hydrophobic properties of the hollow fibers. The utilization of water for heat rejection was shown not to be dependent on test article, life cycle, heat rejection rate, or freezing of the membranes.

  12. Long Duration Testing of a Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice; Cox, Marlon; Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Colunga, Aaron; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) is a heat-rejection device that is being developed to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. Cooling is achieved by circulating water from the liquid cooling garment (LCG) through hollow fibers (HoFi s), which are small hydrophobic tubes. Liquid water remains within the hydrophobic tubes, but water vapor is exhausted to space, thereby removing heat. A SWME test article was tested over the course of a year, for a total of 600 cumulative hours. In order to evaluate SWME tolerance to contamination due to constituents caused by distillation processes, these constituents were allowed to accumulate in the water as evaporation occurred. A test article was tested over the course of a year for a total of 600 cumulative hours. The heat rejection performance of the SWME degraded significantly--below 700 W, attributable to the accumulation of rust in the circulating loop and biofilm growth. Bubble elimination capability, a feature that was previously proven with SWME, was compromised during the test, most likely due to loss of hydrophobic properties of the hollow fibers. The utilization of water for heat rejection was shown not to be dependent on test article, life cycle, heat rejection rate, or freezing of the membranes.

  13. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Thermal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    For future lunar extravehicular activities (EVA), one method under consideration for rejecting crew and electronics heat involves evaporating water through a hydrophobic, porous Teflon(Registered Trademark) membrane. A Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) prototype using this membrane was successfully tested by Ungar and Thomas (2001) with predicted performance matching test data well. The above referenced work laid the foundation for the design of a compact sheet membrane SWME development unit for use in the Constellation System Spacesuit Element Portable Life Support System (Vogel and et. al., ICES 2008). Major design objectives included minimizing mass, volume, and manufacturing complexity while rejecting a minimum of 810 watts of heat from water flowing through the SWME at 91 kg/hr with an inlet temperature of 291K. The design meeting these objectives consisted of three concentric cylindrical water channels interlaced with four water vapor channels. Two units were manufactured for the purpose of investigating manufacturing techniques and performing thermal testing. The extensive thermal test measured SWME heat rejection as a function of water inlet temperatures, water flow-rates, water absolute pressures, water impurities, and water vapor back-pressures. This paper presents the test results and subsequent analysis, which includes a comparison of SWME heat rejection measurements to pretest predictions. In addition, test measurements were taken such that an analysis of the commercial-off-the-shelf vapor pressure control valve could be performed.

  14. 30 CFR 35.22 - Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test to determine effect of evaporation on... § 35.22 Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the effect of evaporation on the reduction of fire resistance of a hydraulic fluid...

  15. 30 CFR 35.22 - Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test to determine effect of evaporation on... § 35.22 Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the effect of evaporation on the reduction of fire resistance of a hydraulic fluid...

  16. 30 CFR 35.22 - Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test to determine effect of evaporation on... § 35.22 Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the effect of evaporation on the reduction of fire resistance of a hydraulic fluid...

  17. 30 CFR 35.22 - Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test to determine effect of evaporation on... § 35.22 Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the effect of evaporation on the reduction of fire resistance of a hydraulic fluid...

  18. LLNL small-scale drop-hammer impact sensitivity test

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives and other energetic materials is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. This testing is typically done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing ``ERL Type 12 Drop Weight Impact Sensitivity Apparatus``, or ``Drop Hammer Machine``, and the methods used to determine the impact sensitivity of energetic materials, Also discussed are changes made to both the machine and methods since the inception of impact sensitivity testing at LLNL in 1956. The accumulated data for the materials tested in not listed here, the exception being the discussion of those specific materials (primary calibrants: PETN, RDX, Comp-B3,and TNT; secondary calibrants: K-6, RX-26-AF, and TATB) used to calibrate the machine.

  19. Small Scale Drop Tower Test for Practice Torpedo Impact Modelling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    stiffener materials tested in accordance with AS1391-2005, Metallic materials – Tensile testing at ambient temperature. Available on request is a...Height [m] Drop Carriage Mass [kg] Impact Velocity [ms-1] Rebound Velocity [ms-1] Rebound / Impact Velocity Ratio1 Impac t...Ratio1 Impac t Energ y [kJ] Nose Dent Shape Nose Dent Depth [m] Plate Dent Depth [m] Velocity Data Smoothing Length [samples

  20. Results for the Brine Evaporation Bag (BEB) Brine Processing Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Shaw, Hali; Kawashima, Brian; Beeler, David; Howard, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The recent Brine Processing Test compared the NASA Forward Osmosis Brine Dewatering (FOBD), Paragon Ionomer Water Processor (IWP), UMPQUA Ultrasonic Brine Dewatering System (UBDS), and the NASA Brine Evaporation Bag (BEB). This paper reports the results of the BEB. The BEB was operated at 70 deg C and a base pressure of 12 torr. The BEB was operated in a batch mode, and processed 0.4L of brine per batch. Two different brine feeds were tested, a chromic acid-urine brine and a chromic acid-urine-hygiene mix brine. The chromic acid-urine brine, known as the ISS Alternate Pretreatment Brine, had an average processing rate of 95 mL/hr with a specific power of 5kWhr/L. The complete results of these tests will be reported within this paper.

  1. Development of the Sasquatch Drop Test Footprint Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bledsoe, Kristin J.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is the parachute system for NASA s Orion spacecraft. CPAS is currently in the design and testing phase of development. The test program consists of numerous drop tests, wherein a test article rigged with parachutes is extracted or released from an aircraft. During such tests, range safety is paramount, as is the recoverability of the parachutes and test article. It is crucial to establish an aircraft release point that will ensure that the article and all items released from it will land in safe locations. Early in the CPAS project, a legacy tool (previously used on the X-38 project) was used to determine a safe release point and to predict the landing locations (the footprint) of the payload and all released objects. Due to increasing test complexity and the need for a more flexible tool, a new footprint predictor tool, called Sasquatch, was created in MATLAB. This tool takes in a simulated trajectory for the test article, information about all released objects, and atmospheric wind data (simulated or actual) to calculate the trajectories of the released objects. Dispersions are applied to the landing locations of those objects, taking into account the variability of winds, aircraft release point, and object descent rate. A safe aircraft release point is determined based on the landing locations of the payload and released objects. The release point, landing locations, and dispersions are plotted on a simple map of the drop zone for easy reference. To date, Sasquatch has been used for thirteen drop tests. Comparing the predictions with actual test results has allowed for significant improvements in the tool s predictive capabilities, especially the incorporation of a well-correlated horizontal throw model. Intended future improvements to the tool include tighter dispersions on the landing locations, Monte Carlo capability, direct input from trajectory simulations, and a graphical user interface.

  2. Coefficient of restitution of sports balls: A normal drop test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, Adli; Ismail, K. A.

    2012-09-01

    Dynamic behaviour of bodies during impact is investigated through impact experiment, the simplest being a normal drop test. Normally, a drop test impact experiment involves measurement of kinematic data; this includes measurement of incident and rebound velocity in order to calculate a coefficient of restitution (COR). A high speed video camera is employed for measuring the kinematic data where speed is calculated from displacement of the bodies. Alternatively, sensors can be employed to measure speeds, especially for a normal impact where there is no spin of the bodies. This paper compares experimental coefficients of restitution (COR) for various sports balls, namely golf, table tennis, hockey and cricket. The energy loss in term of measured COR and effects of target plate are discussed in relation to the material and construction of these sports balls.

  3. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the {open_quotes}sources{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}targets{close_quotes} requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  4. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the [open quotes]sources[close quotes] and [open quotes]targets[close quotes] requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  5. Evaporative deposition patterns of bacteria from a sessile drop: effect of changes in surface wettability due to exposure to a laboratory atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Kyle F; Maier, Raina M; Norris, Theresa A; Beam, Brooke M; Mudalige, Anoma; Pemberton, Jeanne E; Curry, Joan E

    2010-05-18

    Evaporative deposition from a sessile drop is a simple and appealing way to deposit materials on a surface. In this work, we deposit living, motile colloidal particles (bacteria) on mica from drops of aqueous solution. We show for the first time that it is possible to produce a continuous variation in the deposition pattern from ring deposits to cellular pattern deposits by incremental changes in surface wettability which we achieve by timed exposure of the mica surface to the atmosphere. We show that it is possible to change the contact angle of the drop from less than 5 degrees to near 20 degrees by choice of atmospheric exposure time. This controls the extent of drop spreading, which in turn determines the architecture of the deposition pattern.

  6. Description of an oscillating flow pressure drop test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. Gary; Miller, Eric L.; Gedeon, David R.; Koester, Gary E.

    1988-01-01

    A test rig designed to generate heat exchanger pressure drop information under oscillating flow conditions is described. This oscillating flow rig is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. A frequency capability of 120 hertz and a mean test pressure up to 15 mPA (2200 psi) allows for testing at flow conditions found in modern high specific power Stirling engines. An important design feature of this rig is that it utilizes a single close coupled dynamic pressure transducer to measure the pressure drop across the test sample. This eliminates instrumentation difficulties associated with the pressure sensing lines common to differential pressure transducers. Another feature of the rig is that it utilizes a single displacement piston. This allows for testing of different sample lengths and configurations without hardware modifications. All data acquisition and reduction for the rig is performed with a dedicated personal computer. Thus the overall system design efficiently integrates the testing and data reduction procedures. The design methodology and details of the test rig is described.

  7. Self-assembly by multi-drop evaporation of carbon-nanotube droplets on a polycarbonate substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machrafi, H.; Minetti, C.; Dauby, P. C.; Iorio, C. S.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are allowed to self-assemble by depositing a droplet of a water dispersion thereof and letting it evaporate on a polycarbonate substrate. The effect of the number of droplets, evaporated on the same deposition spot, on the self-assembly density is assessed to be more than proportional for the first five depositions. The obtained nanoporous nanostructures are further tested for their electrical resistance and wettability. Two concentrations are used. It is found that a higher concentration and more importantly a higher number of droplet depositions causes the electrical resistance to decrease up to four orders of magnitude and the static contact angle to decrease more than three times. The contact angle hysteresis also increases due to an increasing advancing contact angle and a decreasing receding one. This is explained by the degree of coverage of the substrate by the carbon nanotubes as is also shown by scanning electron microscope images. A better coverage is suggested to cause more pinning for an advancing droplet and a higher capillary force for a receding droplet.

  8. Quantitative testing of robustness on superomniphobic surfaces by drop impact.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Phuong Nhung; Brunet, Philippe; Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2010-12-07

    The quality of a liquid-repellent surface is quantified by both the apparent contact angle θ(0) that a sessile drop adopts on it and the value of the liquid pressure threshold the surface can withstand without being impaled by the liquid, hence maintaining a low-friction condition. We designed surfaces covered with nanowires obtained by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth technique that are able to repel most of the existing nonpolar liquids including those with very low surface tension as well as many polar liquids with moderate to high surface tension. These superomniphobic surfaces exhibit apparent contact angles ranging from 125 to 160° depending on the liquid. We tested the robustness of the surfaces against impalement by carrying out drop impact experiments. Our results show how this robustness depends on Young's contact angle θ(0) related to the surface tension of the liquid and that the orientational growth of nanowires is a favorable factor for robustness.

  9. Evaporation of Drops Containing Silica Nanoparticles of Varying Hydrophobicities: Exploiting Particle-Particle Interactions for Additive-Free Tunable Deposit Morphology.

    PubMed

    Anyfantakis, Manos; Baigl, Damien; Binks, Bernard P

    2017-05-23

    We describe the systematic and quantitative investigation of a large number of patterns that emerge after the evaporation of aqueous drops containing fumed silica nanoparticles (NPs) of varying wettabilities for an extended particle concentration range. We show that for a chosen system, the dry pattern morphology is mainly determined by particle-particle interactions (Coulomb repulsion and hydrophobic attraction) in the bulk. These depend on both particle hydrophobicity and particle concentration within the drop. For high and intermediate particle concentrations, interparticle hydrophobic attraction is the dominant factor defining the deposit morphology. With increasing particle hydrophobicity, patterns ranging from rings to domes are observed, arising from the time needed for the drop to gel compared with the total evaporation time. On the contrary, drops of dilute suspensions maintain a finite viscosity during most of the drop lifetime, resulting in dry patterns that are predominantly rings for all particle hydrophobicities. In all investigated systems, the NP concentration corresponded to a large excess of NPs in the bulk compared with the maximal amount that could be adsorbed at available interfaces, making particle-interface interactions such as adsorption of hydrophobic NPs at the air-water interface a negligible contribution over bulk particle-particle interactions. This work emphasizes the advantage of particle surface chemistry in tuning both particle-particle interactions and particle deposition onto solid substrates in a robust manner, without the need for any additive such as a surfactant.

  10. Method - Pressure drop tests for fuel system components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    Techniques are presented for testing components and improving the accuracy of such tests to meet the requirements of MIL-F-8615 or equivalent specifications. Pressure-drop tests for individual components are described generally including the single and double piezometer-tube methods, and many of the suggested improvements apply to these techniques. The test setup is presented graphically, and the procedural conditions are described. The suggestions for improving the test results include notes regarding air bubbles, pumping-source pulsations, attachment fittings, overshooting the flow rate, and the importance of precise calibration. Diagrams are given for the double piezometer-tube, the mercury-manometer, and the fuel-manometer tests, and the arithmetic computation is described for the data-reduction equation.

  11. Small Liquid Hydrogen Tank for Drop Tower Tests

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-11-21

    A researcher fills a small container used to represent a liquid hydrogen tank in preparation for a microgravity test in the 2.2-Second Drop Tower at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. For over a decade, NASA Lewis endeavored to make liquid hydrogen a viable propellant. Hydrogen’s light weight and high energy made it very appealing for rocket propulsion. One of the unknowns at the time was the behavior of fluids in the microgravity of space. Rocket designers needed to know where the propellant would be inside the fuel tank in order to pump it to the engine. NASA Lewis utilized sounding rockets, research aircraft, and the 2.2 Second Drop Tower to study liquids in microgravity. The drop tower, originally built as a fuel distillation tower in 1948, descended into a steep ravine. By early 1961 the facility was converted into an eight-floor, 100-foot tower connected to a shop and laboratory space. Small glass tanks, like this one, were installed in experiment carts with cameras to film the liquid’s behavior during freefall. Thousands of drop tower tests in the early 1960s provided an increased understanding of low-gravity processes and phenomena. The tower only afforded a relatively short experiment time but was sufficient enough that the research could be expanded upon using longer duration freefalls on sounding rockets or aircraft. The results of the early experimental fluid studies verified predictions made by Lewis researchers that the total surface energy would be minimized in microgravity.

  12. Characterization of Martian Rock Shape for MER Airbag Drop Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimaggio, E. N.; Schroeder, R.; Castle, N.; Golombek, M.

    2002-12-01

    Rock distributions for the final platforms used in airbag drop tests are currently being designed for the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) scheduled to launch in 2003. Like Mars Pathfinder (MPF), launched in 1996, MER will use a series of airbags to cushion its landing on the surface of Mars. Previous MER airbag drop tests have shown that sharp, angular (triangular) rocks >20 cm high may be hazardous. To aid in defining the rock distributions for the final airbag tests, images from the Viking Landers 1 and 2 and MPF were used to identify rocks that are >20 cm high, and characterize them as triangular, square or round. Approximately 33% of all rocks analyzed are triangular. Of the rocks analyzed that are ~20-60 cm high, ~14% are triangular. Most of these triangular rocks are small, ~20-30 cm high. Rock distributions of previous airbag platforms were similarly classified and show a greater percentage of triangular and square rocks that are ~20-60 cm high than at the landing sites. The burial of a rock (perched, partially buried or buried) was also considered because perched rocks may pose less of a threat to the airbags than those buried because perched rocks can be dislodged and roll during impact. Approximately 19% of all rocks analyzed, and ~19% of rocks that are ~20-60 cm high, are triangular and partially buried or buried. These data suggest that the platform rock distributions appropriately represented the risks to the airbags associated with triangular rocks. A similar percentage of >20 cm high triangular rocks will be added to the drop test platforms to represent landing site rock distributions.

  13. Forces and strains during drop weight tear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtremel', M. A.; Arabei, A. B.; Glebov, A. G.; Abakumov, A. I.; Esiev, T. S.; Struin, A. O.; Sarychev, B. A.

    2017-04-01

    As follows from the results of drop weight tear tests (DWTT), modern strength class K65 steels for gas-main pipelines exhibit an almost 100% fraction of ductile component in a fracture surface. The results of ground tests demonstrate that the lengths of extended fracture of a pipe made of such steels from different suppliers are substantially different. The possibility of extracting other characteristics from DWTT tests of full-thickness notched specimens and the information content in them are estimated. High-speed detection of the strain and crack growth is performed during static and dynamic loading. As follows from an analysis of fracture kinematics and force and energy balance, fracture is a multistage process, where mechanisms change during crack growth.

  14. A drop tower for controlled impact testing of biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Burgin, Leanne V; Aspden, Richard M

    2007-05-01

    Impact damage, in particular to tissues such as articular cartilage, is a recognised source of morbidity. To understand better the clinical outcomes, it is important to know the mechanics of the damage sustained and the biological response of cells to rapidly applied forces and subsequent tissue disruption. An instrumented drop tower has been designed to enable controlled impact loads to be applied to small samples of biological materials. Impact severity can be controlled by using impactors of different masses and various drop heights. Force and deceleration at impact are recorded at 50,000 samples s(-1) by a force transducer under the sample and an accelerometer on the impactor. Repeatability was tested on rubber washers and coefficients of variation were found to be better than 8% for dynamic stiffness, 3.4% for stress and 4.3% for strain. Initial tests on isolated biopsies of articular cartilage showed that at an initial strain rate of 916 s(-1), the peak dynamic modulus of human femoral head cartilage was 59 MPa, and for a bovine biopsy the initial strain rate and corresponding peak dynamic modulus were 3380 s(-1) and 130 MPa, respectively. The equipment described is capable of applying an impact load to small biopsies of tissue with a defined energy and velocity and measuring deformation and load at high rates of loading.

  15. X-38 Drop Model: Landing Sequence Collage from Cessna Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This sequence of photographs shows a 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38 gliding to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  16. X-38 Drop Model: Landing Sequence Collage from Cessna Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This sequence of photographs shows a 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38 gliding to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  17. Physical test report to drop test of a 9975 radioactive material shipping packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.S.

    1997-11-11

    This report presents the drop test results for the 9975 radioactive material shipping package being dropped 30 feet onto a unyielding surface followed by a 40-inch puncture pin drop. The purpose of these drops was to show that the package lid would remain attached to the drum. The 30-foot drop was designed to weaken the lid closure lug while still maintaining maximum extension of the lugs from the drum surface. This was accomplished by angling the drum approximately 30 degrees from horizontal in an inverted position. In this position, the drum was rotated slightly so as not to embed the closure lugs into the drum as a result of the 30-foot drop. It was determined that this orientation would maximize deformation to the closure ring around the closure lug while still maintaining the extension of the lugs from the package surface. The second drop was from 40 inches above a 40-inch tall 6-inch diameter puncture pin. The package was angled 10 degrees from vertical and aligned over the puncture pin to solidly hit the drum lug(s) in an attempt to disengage the lid when dropped.Tests were performed in response to DOE EM-76 review Q5 inquires that questioned the capability of the 9975 drum lid to remain in place under this test sequence. Two packages were dropped utilizing this sequence, a 9974 and 9975. Test results for the 9974 package are reported in WSRC-RP-97-00945. A series of 40-inch puncture pin tests were also performed on undamaged 9975 and 9974 packages.

  18. Testing of a Miniature Loop Heat Pipe with Multiple Evaporators and Multiple Condensers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagano, Hosei; Ku, Jentung

    2006-01-01

    Thermal performance of a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with two evaporators and two condensers is described. A comprehensive test program, including start-up, high power, low power, power cycle, and sink temperature cycle tests, has been executed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for potential space applications. Experimental data showed that the loop could start with heat loads as low as 2W. The loop operated stably with even and uneven evaporator heat loads, and even and uneven condenser sink temperatures. Heat load sharing between the two evaporators was also successfully demonstrated. The loop had a heat transport capability of l00W to 120W, and could recover from a dry-out by reducing the heat load to evaporators. Low power test results showed the loop could work stably for heat loads as low as 1 W to each evaporator. Excellent adaptability of the MLHP to rapid changes of evaporator power and sink temperature were also demonstrated.

  19. Standard method of drop shatter test for coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method of drop shatter test covers the determination of the relative size stability and its complement, the friability, of sized coal. It affords a means of indicating the ability of coal to withstand breakage when subjected to handling at the mine and during transit to the consumer. The test is serviceable for ascertaining the similarity of coals in respect to size stability and friability rather than for determining values within narrow limits in order to emphasize their dissimilarity. This method is considered applicable for testing a selected single size of different coals, for testing different single sizes of the same coal, and for mixed sizes of the same or different coals. This test appears best suited for measuring the relative resistance to breakage of the larger sizes of coal when handled in thin layers such as from loader to mine car, from loading boom to railroad car, from shovel to chute, etc. While it may not be so well adapted for measuring the liability to breakage of coal when handled in mass, as in unloading open-bottom cars, emptying bins, etc., it is believed that the method of test will serve also to indicate the relative size stability of composite sizes of coal where, in commercial handling, the smaller sized pieces have a cushioning effect which tends to lessen the breakage of the larger pieces of coal. The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard.

  20. The Vaporization Behavior of a Fuel Drop on a Hot Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    evaporation behavior of fuel drops 99 Figure 36. Effect of surface cleanliness on drop evaporation lifetime .. ......... . 101 Figure 37. Effect of drop...C, CD 0 C) - -C) -H _______________C_ 100 procedures that were considered during the evaluation included the surface cleanliness , fuel drop size and...evaporating surface heating rate. The effect of the studied variables on the test results was found to be as follow: Surface Cleanliness As indicated

  1. Handling test of eye drop dispenser--comparison of unit-dose pipettes with conventional eye drop bottles.

    PubMed

    Parkkari, Minna; Latvala, Terho; Ropo, Auli

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate how elderly people handle single-use eye drop dispensers (unit-dose pipettes) and to compare the performance with conventional eye drop bottles. In this open-label study, the handling of unit-dose pipettes and conventional eye drop bottles was compared in 41 elderly people who had little or no prior regular use of eye drop dispensers. The participants tested both types of dispenser once, and the following 7 variables were studied: ease/difficulty of opening the dispenser; influence of the size for handling of the dispenser; influence of the shape for handling of the dispenser; observation of the contents in the dispenser; the feeling of the dispenser in the hand; ease/difficulty of drop instillation on the eye from the dispenser; and overall performance of the eye drop dispenser. The dispensers contained isotonic saline, and a visual analog scale was used for assessment of each of the above variables. The mean age of the participants was 73 years. A statistically significant difference in favor of the unit-dose pipettes was found with respect to observation of the contents in the dispenser, ease of administration, and the overall performance. Women regarded the unit-dose pipettes generally better than the bottles, but such a difference was not seen in men. The study participants managed the unit-dose pipettes at least as well as the conventional eye drop bottles. If anything, the unit-dose pipettes appeared to be easier to use.

  2. X-38 Drop Model: Landing Sequence Collage from Cessna Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This sequence of photographs shows a 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38 gliding to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  3. Development and Testing of a Miniaturized Multi-Evaporator Hybrid Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugby, David C.; Kroliczek, Edward J.; Yun, James S.

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a miniaturized multi-evaporator hybrid loop heat pipe (ME-HLHP), a centralized thermal bus architecture proposed as the next-generation thermal management system for future small spacecraft. The ME-HLHP maximizes the advantages of capillary pumped loops (CPLs) and loop heat pipes (LHPs) and mitigates their shortcomings via the use of a secondary LHP-type evaporator that supplies a small amount of excess liquid flow ("core sweepage") to each evaporator within a multi-evaporator parallel network. To validate ME-HLHP technology, single, dual, and quad-evaporator breadboard test loops were designed, fabricated, and tested. Breadboard components included miniaturized, cylindrical Teflon wick evaporators for low control power, counter-flow condensers for freeze tolerance, a back pressure regulator for heat load sharing, a co-located flow regulator for radiator switching, a cold-biased heat exchanger for temperature control, and a secondary evaporator/reservoir for core sweepage. With ammonia as the working fluid, a total of 21 tests were carried out with the quad-evaporator test loop. The results indicated quad-evaporator transport from 8-280 W, single-evaporator transport from 2-100 W, maximum heat flux of 30 W/cm2 evaporator conductance of 5-8 W/K, heat load sharing greater than 95%, condenser switching, condenser freeze tolerant design, temperature control of +/- 0.25 K with a variable set-point, rapid start-up, control power of 2-3 W, and Teflon evaporator (233-353 K) temperature cycling for durability. This paper will detail all aspects of the study.

  4. Festoon instability of a drop of volatile insoluble liquid on the surface of other liquid under evaporation cooling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, O. A.; Gorbacheva, N. A.

    2007-02-01

    A festoon structure having the form of round hills has been observed at the periphery of a drop of o-oxylene or isooctane lying on the surface of a layer of hot water. On reaching a diameter of about 1 mm, festoons are ejected toward the drop center at a velocity of 1 2 mm/s. The growth of festoons is caused by thermocapillary flows, while their ejection is related to the capillary forces, which tend to decrease the free surface. This kind of stability substantially differs from the other known thermocapillary instabilities, since the ejection of festoons prevents the drop from spreading and thus prolongs its life.

  5. Comparison of high speed impact test of solder joints with board level drop test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruprasad, Pradosh

    Efforts have been made in this study to evaluate the characteristics of solder joint failure by using a new high speed impact tester. First, the dynamics and characteristics of the test vehicle in a board level drop test have been evaluated. A thorough understanding of the behavior of the test vehicle is examined by characterizing its response under different test profiles and board dimensions. This is done in an attempt to optimize the test procedure used to qualify electronic products subjected to high strain rate drop/shock environment. The effects of peak acceleration and change in velocity of the impact pulse on the reliability of the test vehicle have been studied. In situ strain measurements have been used to aid us in characterizing the board response under high strain rate loading conditions. Also finite element analysis has been used to better understand the board response under different loading conditions. Based on the experimental results and analysis, ways to improvise the drop test setup have been discussed. A more thorough understanding of the solder joint behavior is examined by characterizing the behavior with respect to varying impact profiles on a new pendulum fatigue and a high speed impact tester. This is done in an attempt to address solder joint failures in actual product that may be operating under high strain rate or shock environments and to reduce the actual test time needed for a board level drop test. Comparison between the high speed pendulum impact test and drop test was primarily made by evaluating the failure modes from these two tests. Energy absorbed by the solder in a single impact has been used to predict the reliability in a board level test.

  6. Drop test of the Huygens probe from a stratospheric balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäkel, E.; Rideau, P.; Nugteren, P. R.; Underwood, J.; Faucon, P.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    Huygens is an atmospheric Probe designed for the in-situ exploration of the atmosphere of Titan. Huygens is the ESA-provided element of the joint NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan. The Cassini-Huygens launch is foreseen in October 1997. After a 7-year journey through the Solar system, Huygens will separate from the mother spacecraft, the Cassini Saturn Orbiter, in early November 2004. About 3 weeks after separation, the Huygens Probe will enter into the upper atmosphere of Titan protected by its heat shield. Following the ejection of the heat shield, the parachute will be deployed for controlling the descent through the atmosphere of Titan down to the surface. The descent will last between 2 and 2 1/2 hours. For the drop test, a full scale model of the Huygens Probe, which included all flight-like mechanisms and parachutes, was developed. The main objective of the test was to demonstrate the parachute deployment sequence; a secondary objective was to characterise the science-driven probe stability and spin design features during the parachute descent phase.

  7. Simulated Waste Testing Of Glycolate Impacts On The 2H-Evaporator System

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.

    2013-08-13

    Glycolic acid is being studied as a total or partial replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste tank farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the tank farm were addressed via a literature review, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the non-radioactive simulant tests impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The testing for which non-radioactive simulants could be used involved the following: the partitioning of glycolate into the evaporator condensate, the impacts of glycolate on metal solubility, and the impacts of glycolate on the formation and dissolution of sodium aluminosilicate scale within the evaporator. The following are among the conclusions from this work: Evaporator condensate did not contain appreciable amounts of glycolate anion. Of all tests, the highest glycolate concentration in the evaporator condensate was 0.38 mg/L. A significant portion of the tests had glycolate concentration in the condensate at less than the limit of quantification (0.1 mg/L). At ambient conditions, evaporator testing did not show significant effects of glycolate on the soluble components in the evaporator concentrates. Testing with sodalite solids and silicon containing solutions did not show significant effects of glycolate on sodium aluminosilicate formation or dissolution.

  8. Spacewedge #3 Being Loaded onto Cessna for Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Crew members load a Spacewedge subscale research model into a Cessna aircraft for flight testing in 1996. The Spacewedge was drop-launched from the Cessna and then glided back to a soft landing under a steerable parafoil. From October 1991 to December 1996, NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (after 1994, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) conducted a research program know as the Spacecraft Autoland Project. This Project was designed to determine the feasibility of the autonomous recovery of a spacecraft using a ram-air parafoil system for the final stages of flight, including a precision landing. The Johnson Space Center and the U.S. Army participated in various phases of the program. The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory developed the software for Wedge 3 under contract to the Army. Four generic spacecraft (each called a Spacewedge or simply a Wedge) were built; the last one was built to test the feasibility of a parafoil for delivering Army cargoes. Technology developed during this program has applications for future spacecraft recovery systems, such as the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle demonstrator. The Spacewedge program demonstrated precision flare and landing into the wind at a predetermined location. The program showed that a flexible, deployable system using autonomous navigation and landing was a viable and practical way to recover spacecraft. NASA researchers conducted flight tests of the Spacewedge at three sites near Dryden, a hillside near Tehachapi, the Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards Air Force Base, and the California City Airport Drop Zone. During the first phase of testing 36 flights were made. Phase II consisted of 45 flights using a smaller parafoil. A third Phase of 34 flights was conducted primarily by the Army and resulted in the development of an Army guidance system for precision offset cargo delivery. The wedge used during the Army phase was not called a Spacewedge but simply a Wedge. The Spacewedge was a flattened

  9. Handling Test of Eye Drop Dispenser—Comparison of Unit-Dose Pipettes with Conventional Eye Drop Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Latvala, Terho; Ropo, Auli

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Purpose The aims of this study were to investigate how elderly people handle single-use eye drop dispensers (unit-dose pipettes) and to compare the performance with conventional eye drop bottles. Methods In this open-label study, the handling of unit-dose pipettes and conventional eye drop bottles was compared in 41 elderly people who had little or no prior regular use of eye drop dispensers. The participants tested both types of dispenser once, and the following 7 variables were studied: ease/difficulty of opening the dispenser; influence of the size for handling of the dispenser; influence of the shape for handling of the dispenser; observation of the contents in the dispenser; the feeling of the dispenser in the hand; ease/difficulty of drop instillation on the eye from the dispenser; and overall performance of the eye drop dispenser. The dispensers contained isotonic saline, and a visual analog scale was used for assessment of each of the above variables. Results The mean age of the participants was 73 years. A statistically significant difference in favor of the unit-dose pipettes was found with respect to observation of the contents in the dispenser, ease of administration, and the overall performance. Women regarded the unit-dose pipettes generally better than the bottles, but such a difference was not seen in men. Conclusions The study participants managed the unit-dose pipettes at least as well as the conventional eye drop bottles. If anything, the unit-dose pipettes appeared to be easier to use. PMID:20565314

  10. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage center section including the wheel wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested to measure structural, seat, and anthropomorphic dummy response to vertical crash loads. The specimen had nominally zero pitch, roll and yaw at impact with a sink speed of 20 ft/sec. Results from this drop test and other drop tests of different transport sections will be used to prepare for a full-scale crash test of a B-720.

  11. Order-of-magnitude increase in flow velocity driven by mass conservation during the evaporation of sessile drops.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Christy, John R E; Sefiane, Khellil

    2011-05-01

    We report on a dramatic order-of-magnitude increase in flow velocity within pinned evaporating droplets toward the end of their lifetime. The measurements were performed using high-speed microparticle image velocimetry. The study revealed interesting observations about the spatial and temporal evolution of the velocity field. The profile along the radius of the droplet is found to exhibit a maximum toward the three phase contact line with flow oscillations in time in this region. Additional optical measurements allowed further analysis of the observed trends. Analysis of the potential mechanisms responsible for the flow within the droplet demonstrated that these observations can be satisfactorily explained and accounted for by mass conservation within the droplet to compensate for evaporation.

  12. Converting Simulated Sodium-bearing Waste into a Single Solid Waste Form by Evaporation: Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale Test Results on Recycling Evaporator Overheads

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, D.; D. L. Griffith; R. J. Kirkham; L. G. Olson; S. J. Losinski

    2004-01-01

    Conversion of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radioactive sodium-bearing waste into a single solid waste form by evaporation was demonstrated in both flask-scale and pilot-scale agitated thin film evaporator tests. A sodium-bearing waste simulant was adjusted to represent an evaporator feed in which the acid from the distillate is concentrated, neutralized, and recycled back through the evaporator. The advantage to this flowsheet is that a single remote-handled transuranic waste form is produced in the evaporator bottoms without the generation of any low-level mixed secondary waste. However, use of a recycle flowsheet in sodium-bearing waste evaporation results in a 50% increase in remote-handled transuranic volume in comparison to a non-recycle flowsheet.

  13. Method and apparatus for the automated testing of vehicle fuel evaporation control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.N.; Timmerman, G.

    1993-08-31

    Apparatus is described for testing a vehicle fuel evaporation control system comprising a fuel tank, a fuel vapor collection canister and a canister purge control valve, the apparatus comprising an inert gas source, means for connecting said source to the automobile fuel evaporation control system under test, means for monitoring the flow of said inert gas into said fuel evaporation control system, means for determining the integrity of said canister by detection of the outflow of said inert gas from said canister, and monitoring means connected to the exhaust pipe of the automobile to determine the presence of said inert gas in the engine exhaust.

  14. Investigating performance of microchannel evaporators for automobile air conditioning with different port structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoliang; Su, Lin; Cheng, Qia; Wu, Longbing

    2017-08-01

    Microchannel evaporator has been widely applied in automobile air conditioning, while it faces the problem of refrigerant maldistribution which deteriorates the thermal performance of evaporator. In this study, the performances of microchannel evaporators with different port structures are experimentally investigated for purpose of reducing evaporator pressure drop. Four evaporator samples with different port number and hydraulic diameter are made for this study. The performances of the evaporator samples are tested on a psychometric calorimeter test bench with the refrigerant R-134A at a real automobile air conditioning. The results on the variations of the evaporator pressure drop and evaporator surface temperature distribution are presented and analyzed. By studying the performance of an evaporator, seeking proper port structure is an approach to reduce refrigerant pressure drop as well as improve refrigerant distribution.

  15. 14 CFR 23.725 - Limit drop tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... attitude, and applied drag loads, that represent the landing conditions. (d) The value of d used in the computation of W e in paragraph (b) of this section may not exceed the value actually obtained in the drop... center of gravity and exerts a force of 1.0 g downward and 0.33 g forward; and L= the ratio of the...

  16. Evaporative Emissions from In-Use Vehicles: Test Fleet Expansion (CRC E-77-2b) Final Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report describes the ongoing investigation into the evaporative emission performance of aging light-duty vehicles. The objective was to add additional data to the Coordinating Research Council's (CRC) E-77-2 evaporative emission/permeation test program

  17. Vertical Drop Test of a YS-11 Fuselage Section (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Kazuo; Kumakura, Ikuo; Minegishi, Masakutsu; Shoji, Hirokazu; Yoshimoto, Norio; Miyaki, Hiromitsu; Terada, Hiroyuki; Isoe, Akira; Yamaoka, Toshihiro; Katayama, Noriaki; Hayashi, Toru; Akaso, Tetsuya; Kosaka, Hideyuki

    The Structures and Materials Research Center of the National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan (NAL) and Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) conducted the 2nd vertical drop test of a fuselage section cut from a NAMC YS-11 transport airplane in July 2002. The main objective of this test program was to obtain background data for aircraft cabin safety by drop test of a full-scale fuselage section and to develop computational tool for crash simulation of aircraft fuselage structure. The test article including seats and anthropomorphic test dummies was dropped to a rigid impact surface by free-fall method at a velocity of 7.6m/s (25ft/s). The impact environment and the resultant response of the fuselage structure and the passenger dummies were considered to be severe but potentially survivable. A description of the results of the 1st drop test and the 2nd drop test is presented in this paper.

  18. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem - Air drop test vehicle/B-52 design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Drobnik, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The air drop development test program for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System required the design of a large drop test vehicle that would meet all the stringent requirements placed on it by structural loads, safety considerations, flight recovery system interfaces, and sequence. The drop test vehicle had to have the capability to test the drogue and the three main parachutes both separately and in the total flight deployment sequence and still be low-cost to fit in a low-budget development program. The design to test large ribbon parachutes to loads of 300,000 pounds required the detailed investigation and integration of several parameters such as carrier aircraft mechanical interface, drop test vehicle ground transportability, impact point ground penetration, salvageability, drop test vehicle intelligence, flight design hardware interfaces, and packaging fidelity.

  19. Internally damped, self-arresting vertical drop-weight impact test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R. (Inventor); Prasad, Chunchu B. (Inventor); Waters, Jr., William A. (Inventor); Stockum, Robert W. (Inventor); Walter, Manfred A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A vertical dropped-weight impact test machine has a dropped-weight barrel vertically supported on upper and lower support brackets. The dropped-weight barrel is chambered to receive a dropped-weight assembly having a latch pin at its upper end, a damping unit in the middle, and a tup at its lower end. The tup is adapted for gathering data during impact testing. The latch pin releasably engages a latch pin coupling assembly. The latch pin coupling assembly is attached to a winch via a halyard for raising and lowering the dropped-weight assembly. The lower end of the dropped-weight barrel is provided with a bounce-back arresting mechanism which is activated by the descending passage of the dropped-weight assembly. After striking the specimen, the dropped-weight assembly rebounds vertically and is caught by the bounce-back arresting mechanism. The damping unit of the dropped-weight assembly serves to dissipate energy from the rebounding dropped-weight assembly and prevents the dropped-weight assembly from rebounding from the self-arresting mechanism.

  20. Internally damped, self-arresting vertical drop-weight impact test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R. (Inventor); Prasad, Chunchu B. (Inventor); Stockum, Robert W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A vertical dropped-weight impact test machine has a dropped-weight barrel vertically supported on upper and lower support brackets. The dropped-weight barrel is chambered to receive a dropped-weight assembly having a latch pin at its upper end, a damping unit in the middle, and a tup at its lower end. The tup is adapted for gathering data during impact testing. The latch pin releasably engages a latch pin coupling assembly. The latch pin coupling assembly is attached to a winch via a halyard for raising and lowering the dropped-weight assembly. The lower end of the dropped-weight barrel is provided with a bounce-back arresting mechanism which is activated by the descending passage of the dropped-weight assembly. After striking the specimen, the dropped-weight assembly rebounds vertically and is caught by the bounce-back arresting mechanism. The damping unit of the dropped-weight assembly serves to dissipate energy from the rebounding dropped-weight assembly and prevents the dropped-weight assembly from rebounding from the self-arresting mechanism.

  1. Internally damped, self-arresting vertical drop-weight impact test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R. (Inventor); Prasad, Chunchu B. (Inventor); Waters, Jr., William A. (Inventor); Stockum, Robert W. (Inventor); Water, Manfred A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A vertical dropped-weight impact test machine has a dropped-weight barrel vertically supported on upper and lower support brackets. The dropped-weight barrel is chambered to receive a dropped-weight assembly having a latch pin at its upper end, a damping unit in the middle, and a tup at its lower end. The tup is adapted for gathering data during impact testing. The latch pin releasably engages a latch pin coupling assembly. The latch pin coupling assembly is attached to a winch via a halyard for raising and lowering the dropped-weight assembly. The lower end of the dropped-weight barrel is provided with a bounce-back arresting mechanism which is activated by the descending passage of the dropped-weight assembly. After striking the specimen, the dropped-weight assembly rebounds vertically and is caught by the bounce-back arresting mechanism. The damping unit of the dropped-weight assembly serves to dissipate energy from the rebounding dropped-weight assembly and prevents the dropped-weight assembly from rebounding from the self-arresting mechanism.

  2. Estimation of dynamic stability parameters from drop model flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Iliff, K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A recent NASA application of a remotely-piloted drop model to studies of the high angle-of-attack and spinning characteristics of a fighter configuration has provided an opportunity to evaluate and develop parameter estimation methods for the complex aerodynamic environment associated with high angles of attack. The paper discusses the overall drop model operation including descriptions of the model, instrumentation, launch and recovery operations, piloting concept, and parameter identification methods used. Static and dynamic stability derivatives were obtained for an angle-of-attack range from -20 deg to 53 deg. The results of the study indicated that the variations of the estimates with angle of attack were consistent for most of the static derivatives, and the effects of configuration modifications to the model (such as nose strakes) were apparent in the static derivative estimates. The dynamic derivatives exhibited greater uncertainty levels than the static derivatives, possibly due to nonlinear aerodynamics, model response characteristics, or additional derivatives.

  3. Estimation of dynamic stability parameters from drop model flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Iliff, K. W.

    1981-01-01

    The overall remotely piloted drop model operation, descriptions, instrumentation, launch and recovery operations, piloting concept, and parameter identification methods are discussed. Static and dynamic stability derivatives were obtained for an angle attack range from -20 deg to 53 deg. It is indicated that the variations of the estimates with angle of attack are consistent for most of the static derivatives, and the effects of configuration modifications to the model were apparent in the static derivative estimates.

  4. Simulating New Drop Test Vehicles and Test Techniques for the Orion CEV Parachute Assembly System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Aaron L.; Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Ray, Eric; Moore, Jim W.; Olson, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is engaged in a multi-year design and test campaign to qualify a parachute recovery system for human use on the Orion Spacecraft. Test and simulation techniques have evolved concurrently to keep up with the demands of a challenging and complex system. The primary simulations used for preflight predictions and post-test data reconstructions are Decelerator System Simulation (DSS), Decelerator System Simulation Application (DSSA), and Drop Test Vehicle Simulation (DTV-SIM). The goal of this paper is to provide a roadmap to future programs on the test technique challenges and obstacles involved in executing a large-scale, multi-year parachute test program. A focus on flight simulation modeling and correlation to test techniques executed to obtain parachute performance parameters are presented.

  5. Droplet combustion drop tower tests using models of the space flight apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, J. B.; Brace, M. H.; Kropp, J. L.; Dryer, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    An engineering model built for droplet combustion drop tower tests is described. The model was built using a design with mechanical and electrical assemblies of the same level of complexity as they will have in flight. The model was tested for functional operation and integrated into a 5-sec drop tower. Test data obtained to date are presented together with model and test cell diagrams.

  6. Droplet combustion drop tower tests using models of the space flight apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, J. B.; Brace, M. H.; Kropp, J. L.; Dryer, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    An engineering model built for droplet combustion drop tower tests is described. The model was built using a design with mechanical and electrical assemblies of the same level of complexity as they will have in flight. The model was tested for functional operation and integrated into a 5-sec drop tower. Test data obtained to date are presented together with model and test cell diagrams.

  7. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe with Two Evaporators and Two Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Birur, Gaj; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most existing Loop Heat Pipes (LHPs) consist of one single evaporator and one single condenser. LHPs with multiple evaporators will be very desirable for cooling multiple heat sources or a heat source with large thermal footprints. Extending the LHP technology to include multiple evaporators and multiple condensers faces some challenges, including the interaction between individual compensation chambers, operating temperature stability, and adaptability to rapid power and sink temperature transients. This paper describe extensive testing of an LHP with two evaporators and two condensers. Tests performed include start-up, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, reservoir temperature cycle, and capillary limit. Test results showed that the loop could operate successfully under various heat load and sink conditions. The loop operating temperature is a function of the total heat load, the heat load distribution between the two evaporators, and temperatures of the two condenser sinks. Under most conditions, only one reservoir contained two-phase fluid and the other reservoir was completely liquid filled. Moreover, control of the loop operating temperature could shift from one reservoir to the other as the test condition changed.

  8. Results of the first thirty foot drop test of the MOSAIK KfK cask

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, K.B.; Salzbrenner, R.; Wellman, G.; Uncapher, W.; Bobbe, J.

    1991-01-01

    The MOSAIK KfK cask, a ductile cast iron (DCI) nuclear material transportation cask donated to Sandia by Gesellschaft fur NuklearService (GNS), was drop tested on June 25, 1990 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Conditions of the test were; a 30 ft. drop without impact limiters onto an unyielding target, cask metal temperature {minus}16F or below, and a 0.75 inch deep flaw machined into the cask wall at the location of the highest tensile stress. The drop test was successful as judged by inspection of the machined flaw which showed no crack initiation. This drop test, in the first in a series, was designed to demonstrate the viability of using a fracture mechanics approach to design cask fabricated from ferritic materials. In addition, the test demonstrated that a DCI cask can withstand severe impacts under accident-type conditions without failing in a brittle mode. The drop test parameters were designed to produce high decelerations and yield-level stresses in the cask wall. The measured rigid body deceleration was approximately 800 gs. This compares with decelerations of 100 to 300 gs for drop tests of casks with impact limiters. The time to peak load was 1.2 to 2.8 msec., compared to 20 to 40 msec for casks dropped with impact limiters. The maximum strain during the drop test was 1400 microstrain, which equates to a maximum tensile stress of about 37000 psi. This level of stress slightly exceeds the static yield strength and is about 80% of the dynamic yield strength. The test results of this initial drop test are discussed in detail in this paper.

  9. Experimental analysis of Kevlar modification for TRUPACT-I puncture panels. [Drop tests; radiant heat tests

    SciTech Connect

    Longenbaugh, R.S.; Joseph, B.J.

    1987-05-01

    The Kevlar Test Services was initiated to determine the maximum failure force and the energy-absorbing capability of puncture panels consisting of 16, 20, and 24 layers of 3000-denier 4 x 4 basket weave Kevlar-29, bonded to a 3.41 mm 304 annealed stainless steel puncture plate. Results of these tests were compared to the TRUPACT-1 Unit-0 drop test results to determine if the existing puncture panel configuration of TRUPACT-1 could be reduced. The data indicate for 24 layers of Kevlar, the panels failed at loads greater than those recorded in the TRUPACT-1, Unit 0 tests. Energy absorbed by the 24-layer Kevlar panels was 53% greater than that measured in the TRUPACT-1, Unit 0 test. Thermal performance of 20-layer Kevlar panels was measured in a conservative test environment and exceeded the design specifications.

  10. A molecular dynamics test of the Hertz-Knudsen equation for evaporating liquids.

    PubMed

    Hołyst, Robert; Litniewski, Marek; Jakubczyk, Daniel

    2015-09-28

    The precise determination of evaporation flux from liquid surfaces gives control over evaporation-driven self-assembly in soft matter systems. The Hertz-Knudsen (HK) equation is commonly used to predict evaporation flux. This equation states that the flux is proportional to the difference between the pressure in the system and the equilibrium pressure for liquid/vapor coexistence. We applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of one component Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid to test the HK equation for a wide range of thermodynamic parameters covering more than one order of magnitude in the values of flux. The flux determined in the simulations was 3.6 times larger than that computed from the HK equation. However, the flux was constant over time while the pressures in the HK equation exhibited strong fluctuations during simulations. This observation suggests that the HK equation may not appropriately grasp the physical mechanism of evaporation. We discuss this issue in the context of momentum flux during evaporation and mechanical equilibrium in this process. Most probably the process of evaporation is driven by a tiny difference between the liquid pressure and the gas pressure. This difference is equal to the momentum flux i.e. momentum carried by the molecules leaving the surface of the liquid during evaporation. The average velocity in the evaporation flux is very small (two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the typical velocity of LJ atoms). Therefore the distribution of velocities of LJ atoms does not deviate from the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, even in the interfacial region.

  11. Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle for Testing the Crew Exploration Vehicle's Parachute Assembly System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubey, Daniel P.; Thiele, Sara R.; Gruseck, Madelyn L.; Evans, Carol T.

    2010-01-01

    Though getting astronauts safely into orbit and beyond has long been one of NASA?s chief goals, their safe return has always been equally as important. The Crew Exploration Vehicle?s (CEV) Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is designed to safely return astronauts to Earth on the next-generation manned spacecraft Orion. As one means for validating this system?s requirements and testing its functionality, a test article known as the Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle (PC-DTV) will carry a fully-loaded yet truncated CPAS Parachute Compartment (PC) in a series of drop tests. Two aerodynamic profiles for the PC-DTV currently exist, though both share the same interior structure, and both have an Orion-representative weight of 20,800 lbf. Two extraction methods have been developed as well. The first (Cradle Monorail System 2 - CMS2) uses a sliding rail technique to release the PC-DTV midair, and the second (Modified DTV Sled; MDS) features a much less constrained separation method though slightly more complex. The decision as to which aerodynamic profile and extraction method to use is still not finalized. Additional CFD and stress analysis must be undertaken in order to determine the more desirable options, though at present the "boat tail" profile and the CMS2 extraction method seem to be the favored options in their respective categories. Fabrication of the PC-DTV and the selected extraction sled is set to begin in early October 2010 with an anticipated first drop test in mid-March 2011.

  12. Surface composition and barium evaporation rate of ``pedigreed'' impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes during accelerated life testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomich, D. H.; Mescher, J. A.; Grant, J. T.

    1987-03-01

    A study has been made of the surface composition and barium evaporation rate of "pedigreed" impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes. The effect of air exposure on coated cathodes was examined and was found to have no significant effect on barium evaporation rate although in some cases longer reactivation times were required. No changes in surface topography were apparent following air exposure and reactivation. Life testing was done at 100°C above the typical operating temperature for the cathode, where the typical operating temperature was taken to be 950°C for coated cathodes and 1050°C for uncoated cathodes. The cathodes were examined at different stages of life testing, up to 1200 h. Significant decreases in barium evaporation rates were found after as few as 500 h of life testing. After 1000 h the evaporation rate had decreased more than an order of magnitude. Changes in surface composition were also found. The effects of tungsten particle size, used in manufacture of the billet, on barium evaporation rate were also studied but no correlation was found.

  13. Multi-terrain Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotirios, Kellas; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section was retrofitted with four identical blocks of deployable honeycomb energy absorber and crash tested on two different surfaces: soft soil, and water. The drop tests were conducted at the 70-ft. drop tower at the Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility of NASA Langley. Water drop tests were performed into a 15-ft-diameter pool of water that was approximately 42-in. deep. For the soft soil impact, a 15-ft-square container filled with fine-sifted, unpacked sand was located beneath the drop tower. All drop tests were vertical with a nominally flat attitude with respect to the impact surface. The measured impact velocities were 37.4, and 24.7-fps for soft soil and water, respectively. A fuselage section without energy absorbers was also drop tested onto water to provide a datum for comparison with the test, which included energy absorbers. In order to facilitate this type of comparison and to ensure fuselage survivability for the no-energy-absorber case, the velocity of the water impact tests was restricted to 25-fps nominal. While all tests described in this paper were limited to vertical impact velocities, the implications and design challenges of utilizing external energy absorbers during combined forward and vertical impact velocities are discussed. The design, testing and selection of a honeycomb cover, which was required in soft surface and water impacts to transmit the load into the honeycomb cell walls, is also presented.

  14. Multi-Terrain Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section was retrofitted with four identical blocks of deployable honeycomb energy absorber and crash tested on two different surfaces: soft soil, and water. The drop tests were conducted at the 70-ft. drop tower at the Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility of NASA Langley. Water drop tests were performed into a 15-ft-diameter pool of water that was approximately 42-in. deep. For the soft soil impact, a 15-ft-square container filled with fine-sifted, unpacked sand was located beneath the drop tower. All drop tests were vertical with a nominally flat attitude with respect to the impact surface. The measured impact velocities were 37.4, and 24.7-fps for soft soil and water, respectively. A fuselage section without energy absorbers was also drop tested onto water to provide a datum for comparison with the test, which included energy absorbers. In order to facilitate this type of comparison and to ensure fuselage survivability for the no-energy-absorber case, the velocity of the water impact tests was restricted to 25-fps nominal. While all tests described in this paper were limited to vertical impact velocities, the implications and design challenges of utilizing external energy absorbers during combined forward and vertical impact velocities are discussed. The design, testing and selection of a honeycomb cover, which was required in soft surface and water impacts to transmit the load into the honeycomb cell walls, is also presented.

  15. Puddle jumping: Spontaneous ejection of large liquid droplets from hydrophobic surfaces during drop tower tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attari, B.; Weislogel, M.; Wollman, A.; Chen, Y.; Snyder, T.

    2016-10-01

    Large droplets and puddles jump spontaneously from sufficiently hydrophobic surfaces during routine drop tower tests. The simple low-cost passive mechanism can in turn be used as an experimental device to investigate dynamic droplet phenomena for drops up to 104 times larger than their normal terrestrial counterparts. We provide and/or confirm quick and qualitative design guides for such "drop shooters" as employed in drop tower tests including relationships to predict droplet ejection durations and velocities as functions of drop volume, surface texture, surface contour, wettability pattern, and fluid properties including contact angle. The latter is determined via profile image comparisons with numerical equilibrium interface computations. Water drop volumes of 0.04-400 ml at ejection speeds of -0.007-0.12 m/s are demonstrated herein. A sample application of the drop jump method is made to the classic problem of low-gravity phase change heat transfer for large impinging drops. Many other candidate problems might be identified by the reader.

  16. Characterization of Martian Rock Shape for MER Airbag Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiMaggio, E. N.; Schroeder, R. D.; Golombek, M. P.; Haldemann, A.; Castle, N.

    2003-01-01

    Using the Viking and Mars Pathfinder landing sites as a guide, this study assessed rock shapes, sizes and burial so they could be compared with rocks on the test platforms. This work allowed comparison of the severity of the rock distributions on the test platforms with the 3 landing sites and helped guide the rocks used on the test platforms during the final airbag qualification tests.

  17. TRACT 2 Frame Drop Test AT NASA Langley Research Center's Landin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-09

    (Tract)2 Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed; Full Frame Drop Test: rotary wing crash worthiness, impact research at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility Building 1297

  18. Initial basalt target site selection evaluation for the Mars penetrator drop test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Quaide, W. L.; Polkowski, G.

    1976-01-01

    Potential basalt target sites for an air drop penetrator test were described and the criteria involved in site selection were discussed. A summary of the background field geology and recommendations for optimum sites are also presented.

  19. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  20. Drop Test Results for the Combustion Engineering Model No. ABB-2901 Fuel Pellet Package

    SciTech Connect

    Hafner, R S; Mok, G C; Hagler, L G

    2004-04-23

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) contracted with the Packaging Review Group (PRG) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct a single, 30-ft shallow-angle drop test on the Combustion Engineering ABB-2901 drum-type shipping package. The purpose of the test was to determine if bolted-ring drum closures could fail during shallow-angle drops. The PRG at LLNL planned the test, and Defense Technologies Engineering Division (DTED) personnel from LLNL's Site-300 Test Group executed the plan. The test was conducted in November 2001 using the drop-tower facility at LLNL's Site 300. Two representatives from Westinghouse Electric Company in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-SC); two USNRC staff members; and three PRG members from LLNL witnessed the preliminary test runs and the final test. The single test clearly demonstrated the vulnerability of the bolted-ring drum closure to shallow-angle drops-the test package's drum closure was easily and totally separated from the drum package. The results of the preliminary test runs and the 30-ft shallow-angle drop test offer valuable qualitative understandings of the shallow-angle impact.

  1. Report of Drop Test Container Offshore Transfer System (COTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    5 Ii Summary of Tests Conducted at Each Configuration ..................................... 36 III Minimum Demonstrated Container... Figura 5 - Test Loads In Double Tier Confi gurat ion The test loads were placed in the container bare on the container floor with the exception of...types of containers evaluated is shown in Tables III and IV, respectively. Minimum endurance at impact velo- cities other than 6 fps and 10 fps can be

  2. Results from evaporation tests to support the MWTF heat removal system design

    SciTech Connect

    Crea, B.A.

    1994-12-22

    An experimental tests program was conducted to measure the evaporative heat removal from the surface of a tank of simulated waste. The results contained in this report constitute definition design data for the latest heat removal function of the MWTF primary ventilation system.

  3. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Decelerator Subsystem Drop Test 3 - Anatomy of a failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Woodis, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A test failure dramatically points out a design weakness or the limits of the material in the test article. In a low budget test program, with a very limited number of tests, a test failure sparks supreme efforts to investigate, analyze, and/or explain the anomaly and to improve the design such that the failure will not recur. The third air drop of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System experienced such a dramatic failure. On air drop 3, the 54-ft drogue parachute was totally destroyed 0.7 sec after deployment. The parachute failure investigation, based on analysis of drop test data and supporting ground element test results is presented. Drogue design modifications are also discussed.

  4. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Decelerator Subsystem Drop Test 3 - Anatomy of a failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Woodis, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A test failure dramatically points out a design weakness or the limits of the material in the test article. In a low budget test program, with a very limited number of tests, a test failure sparks supreme efforts to investigate, analyze, and/or explain the anomaly and to improve the design such that the failure will not recur. The third air drop of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System experienced such a dramatic failure. On air drop 3, the 54-ft drogue parachute was totally destroyed 0.7 sec after deployment. The parachute failure investigation, based on analysis of drop test data and supporting ground element test results is presented. Drogue design modifications are also discussed.

  5. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-01

    (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that

  6. Characterization of Martian Rock Shape for MER Airbag Drop Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimaggio, E. N.; Schroeder, R. D.; Golombek, M. P.; Haldemann, A.; Castle, N.

    2003-03-01

    To aid in defining the rock distributions for MER airbag tests, images from the Viking Landers 1 and 2 and MPF were used to identify rocks that are >20 cm high and characterize them by their shape and burial.

  7. Tests of Four PT-415 Coolers Installed in the Drop-in Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, S.T.

    2008-07-08

    The superconducting magnets and absorbers for MICE will be cooled using PT415 pulse tube coolers. The cooler 2nd stage will be connected to magnets and the absorbers through a helium or hydrogen re-condensing system. It was proposed that the coolers be connected to the magnets in such a way that the cooler can be easily installed and removed, which permits the magnets to be shipped without the coolers. The drop-in mode requires that the cooler 1st stage be well connected to the magnet shields and leads through a low temperature drop demountable connection. The results of the PT415 drop-in cooler tests are presented.

  8. Droplet combustion experiment drop tower tests using models of the space flight apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggard, J. B.; Brace, M. H.; Kropp, J. L.; Dryer, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    The Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) is an experiment that is being developed to ultimately operate in the shuttle environment (middeck or Spacelab). The current experiment implementation is for use in the 2.2 or 5 sec drop towers at NASA Lewis Research Center. Initial results were reported in the 1986 symposium of this meeting. Since then significant progress was made in drop tower instrumentation. The 2.2 sec drop tower apparatus, a conceptual level model, was improved to give more reproducible performance as well as operate over a wider range of test conditions. Some very low velocity deployments of ignited droplets were observed. An engineering model was built at TRW. This model will be used in the 5 sec drop tower operation to obtain science data. In addition, it was built using the flight design except for changes to accommodate the drop tower requirements. The mechanical and electrical assemblies have the same level of complexity as they will have in flight. The model was tested for functional operation and then delivered to NASA Lewis. The model was then integrated into the 5 sec drop tower. The model is currently undergoing initial operational tests prior to starting the science tests.

  9. Evaluation of malodor for automobile air conditioner evaporator by using laboratory-scale test cooling bench.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jung, Young Rim; Kim, Man Goo

    2008-09-12

    As one of the measures to improve the environment in an automobile, malodor caused by the automobile air-conditioning system evaporator was evaluated and analyzed using laboratory-scale test cooling bench. The odor was simulated with an evaporator test cooling bench equipped with an airflow controller, air temperature and relative humidity controller. To simulate the same odor characteristics that occur from automobiles, one previously used automobile air conditioner evaporator associated with unpleasant odors was selected. The odor was evaluated by trained panels and collected with aluminum polyester bags. Collected samples were analyzed by thermal desorption into a cryotrap and subsequent gas chromatographic separation, followed by simultaneous olfactometry, flame ionization detector and identified by atomic emission detection and mass spectrometry. Compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, and organic acids were identified as responsible odor-active compounds. Gas chromatography/flame ionization detection/olfactometry combined sensory method with instrumental analysis was very effective as an odor evaluation method in an automobile air-conditioning system evaporator.

  10. Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) Landing Parachute Demonstrator (LPD) Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shreves, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    The Landing Parachute Demonstrator (LPD) was conceived as a low-cost, rapidly-developed means of providing soft landing for the Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) crew module (CM). Its experimental main parachute cluster deployment technique and off-the-shelf hardware necessitated a full-scale drop test prior to the MLAS mission in order to reduce overall mission risk. This test was successfully conducted at Wallops Flight Facility on March 6, 2009, with all vehicle and parachute systems functioning as planned. The results of the drop test successfully qualified the LPD system for the MLAS flight test. This document captures the design, concept of operations and results of the drop test.

  11. Drop Tests of a Type IP-2 Transport Package with a Bolted Lid

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.H.; Seo, K.S.; Jung, K.J.; Lee, K.H.; Cho, C.H.; Chung, S.H.

    2006-07-01

    IP-2 transport package for radioactive wastes shall be designed in accordance with designated regulations such as the IAEA Safety standard series TS-R-1. In general, IP-2 transport packages are used as ISO containers that have doors for a package closure. If the shielding thickness of the IP-2 package is thick, a bolted lid type may be safer or stronger than a door type. The closure mechanism of a bolted lid withstands a drop impact well. If the IP-2 package were subjected to the free drop test under the normal conditions of a transport, it should ensure the prevention of a loss or dispersal of the radioactive contents and a loss of its shielding integrity. Therefore, it is important that the integrity of the lid and its bolts are sustained under a drop impact. This paper presents the results of the type IP-2 package which undertook a vertical drop of 0.9 in height. An opening displacement of the lid and the torques of the lid bolts are changed before or after the drop impact of the type IP-2 package. Also the thicknesses of the shielding material are measured before or after the drop impact. The acceleration, strain and the bolt tension are measured during the test. The accelerations and the strains measured from a test are compared with the results from a finite element analysis. (authors)

  12. Dropping in on a Clean Room Webb Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A crane in a clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., lowers a test mass simulator (center of frame) onto the Ambient Optical Assembly Stand or AOAS to ensure it can support the James Webb Space Telescope's Optical Telescope Element during its assembly. Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Desktop Application Program to Simulate Cargo-Air-Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbert, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The DSS Application is a computer program comprising a Windows version of the UNIX-based Decelerator System Simulation (DSS) coupled with an Excel front end. The DSS is an executable code that simulates the dynamics of airdropped cargo from first motion in an aircraft through landing. The bare DSS is difficult to use; the front end makes it easy to use. All inputs to the DSS, control of execution of the DSS, and postprocessing and plotting of outputs are handled in the front end. The front end is graphics-intensive. The Excel software provides the graphical elements without need for additional programming. Categories of input parameters are divided into separate tabbed windows. Pop-up comments describe each parameter. An error-checking software component evaluates combinations of parameters and alerts the user if an error results. Case files can be created from inputs, making it possible to build cases from previous ones. Simulation output is plotted in 16 charts displayed on a separate worksheet, enabling plotting of multiple DSS cases with flight-test data. Variables assigned to each plot can be changed. Selected input parameters can be edited from the plot sheet for quick sensitivity studies.

  14. Comparative studies of hemoperfusion devices. II. Pressure drop and flow uniformity tests.

    PubMed

    Cooney, D O; Infantolino, W; Kane, R

    1979-01-01

    One resin-based hemoperfusion device and three charcoal-based hemoperfusion devices were tested to determine their pressure drop and flow uniformity characteristics. Measurements were made on pressure drop versus flow rate using distilled water and on pressure drop versus time using bovine blood. Effluent concentration curves obtained after the step-change introduction of a high molecular weight dye solution to each unit were used to determine the priming volumes of the devices and were interpreted to yield information regarding the uniformities of flow in each device. The pressure drop and priming volume values for the resin-based device were significantly higher than the corresponding values for the charcoal-based units.

  15. Clinical Importance of the Heel Drop Test and a New Clinical Score for Adult Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Hyeji; Choi, Wookjin; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Jung-Suk; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Lim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective We tried to evaluate the accuracy of the heel drop test in patients with suspected appendicitis and tried to develop a new clinical score, which incorporates the heel drop test and other parameters, for the diagnosis of this condition. Methods We performed a prospective observational study on adult patients with suspected appendicitis at two academic urban emergency departments between January and August 2015. The predictive characteristics of each parameter, along with heel drop test results were calculated. A composite score was generated by logistic regression analysis. The performance of the generated score was compared to that of the Alvarado score. Results Of the 292 enrolled patients, 165 (56.5%) had acute appendicitis. The heel drop test had a higher predictive value than rebound tenderness. Variables and their points included in the new (MESH) score were pain migration (2), elevated white blood cell (WBC) >10,000/μL (3), shift to left (2), and positive heel drop test (3). The MESH score had a higher AUC than the Alvarado score (0.805 vs. 0.701). Scores of 5 and 11 were chosen as cut-off values; a MESH score ≥5 compared to an Alvarado score ≥5, and a MESH score ≥8 compared to an Alvarado score ≥7 showed better performance in diagnosing appendicitis. Conclusion MESH (migration, elevated WBC, shift to left, and heel drop test) is a simple clinical scoring system for assessing patients with suspected appendicitis and is more accurate than the Alvarado score. Further validation studies are needed. PMID:27723842

  16. The pressure hold/drop integrity test; its correlation to diffusive flow.

    PubMed

    Trotter, A M; Meltzer, T H

    1998-01-01

    The pressure-drop/hold procedure enables the diffusive flow integrity testing of filters to be performed without breaching the system downstream of the filter. It is not necessary to measure volumetrically the diffused gas on the downstream side of the filter. By means of pressure transducers the pressure loss is determined upstream; thus eliminating the threat of sepsis due to down-stream invasions. The pressure decay exercise can be used to characterize the various filter types. A constancy of filter manufacture is required for a given filter type. Unless the pressure drop exceeds the value established as the maximum allowable decay, the filter is judged to be integral. It qualifies as a sterilizing grade filter. Excessive pressure decays will also eventuate from leaks, as from improperly sealed housings. Performed prior to the filtration, the procedure serves to eliminate the wasteful use of an imperfect system, whether caused by faulty sealing, incorrect filter type or flawed filters. Where leaks are detected, the filter can be reexamined for its integrity. To enable the pressure-drop procedure to serve as an integrity test, the measured pressure decays require being correlated with organism retention data. This is made possible by the arithmetic conversion of the pressure decay curve into the conventional diffusive airflow curve established to have such a correlation. The transformation of the pressure-drop curve into the differential airflow plot is automatically performed by certain of the automated integrity test machines. These devices, utilizing pressure transducers, are capable of measuring small pressure drops with requisite sensitivity; gauges commonly are not. Moreover, as previously stated, the measurements are advantageously made on the upside of the filter. The use of automated test machines is, therefore, recommended for the performance of the pressure hold/drop integrity test in furtherance of the practice of filter integrity testing.

  17. Drop-Weight Impact Test on U-Shape Concrete Specimens with Statistical and Regression Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xue-Chao; Zhu, Han; Li, Hao-Ran

    2015-01-01

    According to the principle and method of drop-weight impact test, the impact resistance of concrete was measured using self-designed U-shape specimens and a newly designed drop-weight impact test apparatus. A series of drop-weight impact tests were carried out with four different masses of drop hammers (0.875, 0.8, 0.675 and 0.5 kg). The test results show that the impact resistance results fail to follow a normal distribution. As expected, U-shaped specimens can predetermine the location of the cracks very well. It is also easy to record the cracks propagation during the test. The maximum of coefficient of variation in this study is 31.2%; it is lower than the values obtained from the American Concrete Institute (ACI) impact tests in the literature. By regression analysis, the linear relationship between the first-crack and ultimate failure impact resistance is good. It can suggested that a minimum number of specimens is required to reliably measure the properties of the material based on the observed levels of variation. PMID:28793540

  18. Design, manufacture, and testing of the Armstrong Hall drop tower decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Jaime Andres

    A decelerator was needed for the Armstrong Hall Microgravity tower. Three designs were considered as concepts and the one chosen was an airbag. The airbag is 5 feet tall and 4.5 feet in diameter due to floor constraints. The deceleration was controlled by designing the vent system to provide the needed vent area as a function of time. This dynamics vent area controls the rate at which volume is expelled from the airbag. The volume expelled depends on the pressure inside the airbag, thus, a direct relation between the vent area and the deceleration profile was determined. The airbag and associated infrastructure was designed, manufactured, and tested. This system includes an airbag with a cushion on top to prevent wear, cart and rails, a drop package, and a latch and release system. More than forty tests were done with different drop height and drop weight combinations culminating in three drops of 200 lbs from the third floor. The drop weight was varied by adjusting the water level in a plastic barrel in the drop package. Pressure measurements inside the bag and vent were taken using two pressure transducers. The pressure transducers sampled the pressure at one of the exit vents and at the center of the bottom of the airbag. The signals were low-pass filtered for noise and scaled for pressure. The pressure traces were processed to find the mean deceleration. The deceleration was found to be independent of drop weight, only depending on drop height. The traces were also integrated to find a momentum per unit area. This value was then compared to the momentum of the drop package. From these two results an effective impact area can be found. It was found that the cushion not only reduced wear but also increased the effective impact area substantially. This increase in area reduced the value of the mean deceleration by reducing the pressure inside the airbag. The airbag proved to work well for the drops, decelerating the package and preventing a direct hit with the

  19. Drop Test Results for the Combustion Engineering Model No. ABB-2901 Fuel Pellet Shipping Package

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, G; Hagler, L

    2002-06-01

    Steel cylindrical drums have been used for many years to transport radioactive materials. The radioactive material inserted into the drum cavity for shipping is usually restrained within its own container or containment vessel. For additional protection, the container is surrounded or supported by components made of impact-absorbent and/or thermal-insulation materials. The components are expected to protect the container and its radioactive contents under severe transportation conditions like free drops and fires. Due to its simplicity and convenience, bolted-ring drum closures are commonly used to close many drum packages. Because the structural integrity of the drum and drum closure often play a significant role in determining the package's ability to maintain sub-criticality, shielding, and containment of the radioactive contents, regulations require that the complete drum package be tested for safety performance. The structural integrity of the drum body is relatively simple to understand and analyze, whereas analyzing the integrity of the drum closure is not so simple. In summary, the drop test accomplished its mission. Because the lid and closure device separated from the drum body in the 30-ft 17.5{sup o} shallow-angle drop, the drop test confirmed that the common drum closure with a bolted ring is vulnerable to damage by a shallow-angle drop, even though the closure has been shown to survive much steeper-angle drops. The test program also demonstrated one of the mechanisms by which the shallow-angle drop opens the common bolted-ring drum closure. The separation of the drum lid and closure device from the drum body was initiated by a large outward buckling deformation of the lid and completed with minimal assistance by the round plywood boards behind the lid. The energy spent to complete the separation appeared to be only a small fraction of the total impact energy. Limited to only one test, the present test program could not explore all possible mechanisms

  20. Drop-in capsule testing of plutonium-based fuels in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Terry, W.K.; Ambrosek, R.G.; Palmer, A.J.; Roesener, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    The most attractive way to dispose of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) is to use it as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PuO[sub 2]) mixed with urania (UO[sub 2]). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. The proposed weapons-grade MOX fuel is unusual, even relative to ongoing foreign experience with reactor-grade MOX power reactor fuel. Some demonstration of the in- reactor thermal, mechanical, and fission gas release behavior of the prototype fuel will most likely be required in a limited number of test reactor irradiations. The application to license operation with MOX fuel must be amply supported by experimental data. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is capable of playing a key role in the irradiation, development, and licensing of these new fuel types. The ATR is a 250- MW (thermal) LWR designed to study the effects of intense radiation on reactor fuels and materials. For 25 years, the primary role of the ATR has been to serve in experimental investigations for the development of advanced nuclear fuels. Both large- and small-volume test positions in the ATR could be used for MOX fuel irradiation. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, these data can be obtained more quickly by using ATR instead of testing in a commercial LWR. Our previous work in this area has demonstrated that it is technically feasible to perform MOX fuel testing in the ATR. This report documents our analyses of sealed drop-in capsules containing plutonium-based test specimens placed in various ATR positions.

  1. Football helmet drop tests on different fields using an instrumented Hybrid III head.

    PubMed

    Viano, David C; Withnall, Chris; Wonnacott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    An instrumented Hybrid III head was placed in a Schutt ION 4D football helmet and dropped on different turfs to study field types and temperature on head responses. The head was dropped 0.91 and 1.83 m giving impacts of 4.2 and 6.0 m/s on nine different football fields (natural, Astroplay, Fieldturf, or Gameday turfs) at turf temperatures of -2.7 to 23.9 °C. Six repeat tests were conducted for each surface at 0.3 m (1') intervals. The Hybrid III was instrumented with triaxial accelerometers to determine head responses for the different playing surfaces. For the 0.91-m drops, peak head acceleration varied from 63.3 to 117.1 g and HIC(15) from 195 to 478 with the different playing surfaces. The lowest response was with Astroplay, followed by the engineered natural turf. Gameday and Fieldturf involved higher responses. The differences between surfaces decreased in the 1.83 m tests. The cold weather testing involved higher accelerations, HIC(15) and delta V for each surface. The helmet drop test used in this study provides a simple and convenient means of evaluating the compliance and energy absorption of football playing surfaces. The type and temperature of the playing surface influence head responses.

  2. Analysis of pressure drop and heat transfer data from the reversing flow test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, P D; Bell, K J

    1989-05-01

    The Reversing Flow Test Facility is part of the heat engine R and D capabilities at Argonne National Laboratory. The facility permits the study of heat transfer and pressure drop under conditions of rapidly reversing flow. This report summarizes the results that have been obtained to date from more than 100 data sets that cover a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and frequencies. Pressure drop data are presented as normalized pressure drop vs. the Reynolds number calculated from the amplitude of the oscillatory flow. Heat transfer data for the regenerators are presented as regenerator effectiveness vs. Reynolds number. Three significant conclusions are derived from our analysis of the data: (1) no frequency dependence is observed in either the pressure drop or the heat transfer data, (2) the measured pressure drops for the heater and coolers are distinctly higher than those calculated from steady-flow correlations, and (3) the heat transfer coefficient in the heater is about 80 percent of that predicted by steady-flow correlations. The correlations presented here provide the basis for improving existing models. 4 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Crash Simulation of a Boeing 737 Fuselage Section Vertical Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Jones, Yvonne T.; Frings, Gary; Vu, Tong

    2004-01-01

    A 30-ft/s vertical drop test of a fuselage section of a Boeing 737 aircraft was conducted in October of 1999 at the FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ. This test was performed to evaluate the structural integrity of a conformable auxiliary fuel tank mounted beneath the floor and to determine its effect on the impact response of the airframe structure and the occupants. The test data were used to compare with a finite element simulation of the fuselage structure and to gain a better understanding of the impact physics through analytical/experimental correlation. To perform this simulation, a full-scale 3-dimensional finite element model of the fuselage section was developed using the explicit, nonlinear transient-dynamic finite element code, MSC.Dytran. The emphasis of the simulation was to predict the structural deformation and floor-level acceleration responses obtained from the drop test of the B737 fuselage section with the auxiliary fuel tank.

  4. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located forward of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crack loads. Post-test inspection showed that the section bottom collapsed inward approximately 2 ft. Preliminary data traces indicated maximum normal accelerations of 20 g on the fuselage bottom, 10 to 12 g on the cabin floor, and 6.5 to 8 g in the pelvises of the anthropomorphic dummies.

  5. Comparison of hemagglutination inhibition test and ELISA in quantification of antibodies to egg drop syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Ratnapraba, S; Matheswaran, K; Nachimuthu, K

    2004-01-01

    A single-serum dilution ELISA for egg drop syndrome (EDS) virus-specific antibodies was developed. In testing 425 chicken sera it was found to have a 93.6% sensitivity and 98.7% specificity relative to a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. The correlation coefficient for ELISA and HI titers was 0.793. The ELISA was efficacious in quantification of both vaccinal and infection antibodies and could routinely be used for screening large numbers of field sera.

  6. Evaporative cooling: effective latent heat of evaporation in relation to evaporation distance from the skin.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Bröde, Peter; den Hartog, Emiel; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar; Rossi, Rene M; Richards, Mark; Farnworth, Brian; Wang, Xiaoxin

    2013-03-15

    Calculation of evaporative heat loss is essential to heat balance calculations. Despite recognition that the value for latent heat of evaporation, used in these calculations, may not always reflect the real cooling benefit to the body, only limited quantitative data on this is available, which has found little use in recent literature. In this experiment a thermal manikin, (MTNW, Seattle, WA) was used to determine the effective cooling power of moisture evaporation. The manikin measures both heat loss and mass loss independently, allowing a direct calculation of an effective latent heat of evaporation (λeff). The location of the evaporation was varied: from the skin or from the underwear or from the outerwear. Outerwear of different permeabilities was used, and different numbers of layers were used. Tests took place in 20°C, 0.5 m/s at different humidities and were performed both dry and with a wet layer, allowing the breakdown of heat loss in dry and evaporative components. For evaporation from the skin, λeff is close to the theoretical value (2,430 J/g) but starts to drop when more clothing is worn, e.g., by 11% for underwear and permeable coverall. When evaporation is from the underwear, λeff reduction is 28% wearing a permeable outer. When evaporation is from the outermost layer only, the reduction exceeds 62% (no base layer), increasing toward 80% with more layers between skin and wet outerwear. In semi- and impermeable outerwear, the added effect of condensation in the clothing opposes this effect. A general formula for the calculation of λeff was developed.

  7. Testing of a 4 K to 2 K heat exchanger with an intermediate pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2015-12-01

    Most large sub-atmospheric helium refrigeration systems incorporate a heat exchanger at the load, or in the distribution system, to counter-flow the sub-atmospheric return with the super-critical or liquid supply. A significant process improvement is theoretically obtainable by handling the exergy loss across the Joule-Thompson throttling valve supplying the flow to the load in a simple but different manner. As briefly outlined in previous publications, the exergy loss can be minimized by allowing the supply flow pressure to decrease to a sub-atmospheric pressure concurrent with heat exchange flow from the load. One practical implementation is to sub-divide the supply flow pressure drop between two heat exchanger sections, incorporating an intermediate pressure drop. Such a test is being performed at Jefferson Lab's Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF). This paper will briefly discuss the theory, practical implementation and test results and analysis obtained to date.

  8. Testing of Commercial Hollow Fiber Membranes for Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Hanford, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Three commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane evaporators, modified for low pressure, were tested in a vacuum chamber at pressures below 33 pascals as potential space suit water membrane evaporator (SWME) heat rejection technologies. Water quality was controlled in a series of 25 tests, first simulating potable water reclaimed from waste water and then changing periodically to simulate the ever concentrating make-up of the circulating coolant over that is predicted over the course of 100 EVAs. Two of the systems, comprised of non-porous tubes with hydrophilic molecular channels as the water vapor transport mechanism, were severely impacted by the increasing concentrations of cations in the water. One of the systems, based on hydrophobic porous polypropylene tubes was not affected by the degrading water quality, or the presence of microbes. The polypropylene system, called SWME 1, was selected for further testing. An inverse flow configuration was also tested with SWME 1, with vacuum exposure on the inside of the tubes, provided only 20% of the performance of the standard configuration. SWME 1 was also modified to block 50% and 90% of the central tube layers, and tested to investigate performance efficiency. Performance curves were also developed in back-pressure regulation tests, and revealed important design considerations arising from the fully closed valve. SWME 1 was shown to be insensitive to air bubbles injected into the coolant loop. Development and testing of a full-scale prototype based on this technology and these test results is in progress.

  9. Testing of Commercial Hollow Fiber Membranes for Space Suit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Hanford, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Three commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane evaporators, modified for low pressure, were tested in a vacuum chamber at pressures below 33 pascals as potential space suit water membrane evaporator (SWME) heat rejection technologies. Water quality was controlled in a series of 25 tests, first simulating potable water reclaimed from waste water and then changing periodically to simulate the ever concentrating make-up of the circulating coolant over that is predicted over the course of 100 EVAs. Two of the systems, comprised of non-porous tubes with hydrophilic molecular channels as the water vapor transport mechanism, were severely impacted by the increasing concentrations of cations in the water. One of the systems, based on hydrophobic porous polypropylene tubes was not affected by the degrading water quality, or the presence of microbes. The polypropylene system, called SWME 1, was selected for further testing. An inverse flow configuration was also tested with SWME 1, with vacuum exposure on the inside of the tubes, provided only 20% of the performance of the standard configuration. SWME 1 was also modified to block 50% and 90% of the central tube layers, and tested to investigate performance efficiency. Performance curves were also developed in back-pressure regulation tests, and revealed important design considerations arising from the fully closed valve. SWME 1 was shown to be insensitive to air bubbles injected into the coolant loop. Development and testing of a full-scale prototype based on this technology and these test results is in progress.

  10. Experimental and numerical study of drill bit drop tests on Kuru granite.

    PubMed

    Fourmeau, Marion; Kane, Alexandre; Hokka, Mikko

    2017-01-28

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of Kuru grey granite impacted with a seven-buttons drill bit mounted on an instrumented drop test machine. The force versus displacement curves during the impact, so-called bit-rock interaction (BRI) curves, were obtained using strain gauge measurements for two levels of impact energy. Moreover, the volume of removed rock after each drop test was evaluated by stereo-lithography (three-dimensional surface reconstruction). A modified version of the Holmquist-Johnson-Cook (MHJC) material model was calibrated using Kuru granite test results available from the literature. Numerical simulations of the single drop tests were carried out using the MHJC model available in the LS-DYNA explicit finite-element solver. The influence of the impact energy and additional confining pressure on the BRI curves and the volume of the removed rock is discussed. In addition, the influence of the rock surface shape before impact was evaluated using two different mesh geometries: a flat surface and a hyperbolic surface. The experimental and numerical results are compared and discussed in terms of drilling efficiency through the mechanical specific energy.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of drill bit drop tests on Kuru granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmeau, Marion; Kane, Alexandre; Hokka, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of Kuru grey granite impacted with a seven-buttons drill bit mounted on an instrumented drop test machine. The force versus displacement curves during the impact, so-called bit-rock interaction (BRI) curves, were obtained using strain gauge measurements for two levels of impact energy. Moreover, the volume of removed rock after each drop test was evaluated by stereo-lithography (three-dimensional surface reconstruction). A modified version of the Holmquist-Johnson-Cook (MHJC) material model was calibrated using Kuru granite test results available from the literature. Numerical simulations of the single drop tests were carried out using the MHJC model available in the LS-DYNA explicit finite-element solver. The influence of the impact energy and additional confining pressure on the BRI curves and the volume of the removed rock is discussed. In addition, the influence of the rock surface shape before impact was evaluated using two different mesh geometries: a flat surface and a hyperbolic surface. The experimental and numerical results are compared and discussed in terms of drilling efficiency through the mechanical specific energy. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  12. Detailed Theoretical Preparation of the Drop Test of an Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paščenko, Petr; Kanický, V.

    The article deals with the preparation and execution of the drop test of the electron microscope assembly. Based on the finite element method (FEM), the simplified numerical model of the assembly is created for this purpose. The aim of the nonlinear dynamic analysis has been to obtain the size and direction of maximum inertia forces in the system during the simulated impact of the model on basis. Calculated values are verified by actual drop tests of the assembly, where the microscope is replaced by a dummy body with similar inertial characteristics. During the real tests, accelerations and strains have been measured by accelerometers and strain gauges placed in selected locations. Theoretical results are re-adjusted according to the test results. The conditions of the drop tests are governed by the internal regulations of the manufacturer. Based on the knowledge of the actual load, the load carrying structural parts of the assembly (supporting frame, horizontal frame) may be properly designed. Sufficient strength and rigidity must be guaranteed especially with regard to the transportation where rough treatment can be expected.

  13. Design and testing of photonic band gap channel-drop-filters

    SciTech Connect

    Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Earley, Lawrence M; Health, Cynthia E; Smirnova, Evgenya I

    2009-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and tested several novel passive mm-wave spectrometers based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures. Our spectrometers were designed to operate in the frequency ranges of 90-130 and 220-300 GHz. We built and tested both metallic and dielectric silicon Channel-Drop-Filter (CDF) structures at 90-130 GHz. We are currently fabricating a dielectric CDF structure to operate at 220-300 GHz. The complete recent test results for the metal version and preliminary test results for the higher frequency silicon versions will be presented at the conference.

  14. Development of Drop/Shock Test in Microelectronics and Impact Dynamic Analysis for Uniform Board Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallolimath, Sharan Chandrashekar

    For the past several years, many researchers are constantly developing and improving board level drop test procedures and specifications to quantify the solder joint reliability performance of consumer electronics products. Predictive finite element analysis (FEA) by utilizing simulation software has become widely acceptable verification method which can reduce time and cost of the real-time test process. However, due to testing and metrological limitations it is difficult not only to simulate exact drop condition and capture critical measurement data but also tedious to calibrate the system to improve test methods. Moreover, some of the important ever changing factors such as board flexural rigidity, damping, drop height, and drop orientation results in non-uniform stress/strain distribution throughout the test board. In addition, one of the most challenging tasks is to quantify uniform stress and strain distribution throughout the test board and identify critical failure factors. The major contributions of this work are in the four aspects of the drop test in electronics as following. First of all, an analytical FEA model was developed to study the board natural frequencies and responses of the system with the consideration of dynamic stiffness, damping behavior of the material and effect of impact loading condition. An approach to find the key parameters that affect stress and strain distributions under predominate mode responses was proposed and verified with theoretical solutions. Input-G method was adopted to study board response behavior and cut boundary interpolation methods was used to analyze local model solder joint stresses with the development of global/local FEA model in ANSYS software. Second, no ring phenomenon during the drop test was identified theoretically when the test board was modeled as both discrete system and continuous system. Numerical analysis was then conducted by FEA method for detailed geometry of attached chips with solder

  15. Full-Scale Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Prototype Development and Testing for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Mitchell, Keith; Dillon, Paul; Weaver, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. Principles of a sheet membrane SWME design were demonstrated using a prototypic test article that was tested in a vacuum chamber at JSC in July 1999. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent contamination tests as the superior candidate among commercial alternatives for HoFi SWME prototype development. Although a number of design variants were considered, one that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was deemed best for further development. An analysis of test data showed that eight layer stacks of the HoFi sheets that had good exposure on each side of the stack would evaporate water with high efficiency. A design that has 15,000 tubes, with 18 cm of exposed tubes between headers has been built and tested that meets the size, weight, and performance requirements of the SWME. This full-scale prototype consists of 30 stacks, each of which are formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of ten nested stacks. Testing has been performed to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the distillation processes. Other tests showed the sensitivity to surfactants.

  16. Full-Scale Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Prototype Development and Testing for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Mitchell, Keith; Dillon, Paul; Weaver, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. Principles of a sheet membrane SWME design were demonstrated using a prototypic test article that was tested in a vacuum chamber at JSC in July 1999. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent contamination tests as the superior candidate among commercial alternatives for HoFi SWME prototype development. Although a number of design variants were considered, one that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was deemed best for further development. An analysis of test data showed that eight layer stacks of the HoFi sheets that had good exposure on each side of the stack would evaporate water with high efficiency. A design that has 15,000 tubes, with 18 cm of exposed tubes between headers has been built and tested that meets the size, weight, and performance requirements of the SWME. This full-scale prototype consists of 30 stacks, each of which are formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of ten nested stacks. Testing has been performed to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the distillation processes. Other tests showed the sensitivity to surfactants.

  17. Evaporation into Couette Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    v Yi Statistical analysis dependent variable Greek Symbols 13 Contact angle of sessile drop a Concentration thickness A Evaporated vapor penetration...31 5 FIGURES 1. Configuration of Three Sessile Drops ............................................. 10 2. Sketch of...Droplet Geometry ............................................................. 11 3. Shape Factor as a Function of Contact Angle

  18. Assessment of fall-arrest systems for scissor lift operators: computer modeling and manikin drop testing.

    PubMed

    Pan, Christopher S; Powers, John R; Hartsell, Jared J; Harris, James R; Wimer, Bryan M; Dong, Renguang G; Wu, John Z

    2012-06-01

    The current study is intended to evaluate the stability of a scissor lift and the performance of various fall-arrest harnesses/lanyards during drop/fall-arrest conditions and to quantify the dynamic loading to the head/ neck caused by fall-arrest forces. No data exist that establish the efficacy of fall-arrest systems for use on scissor lifts or the injury potential from the fall incidents using a fall-arrest system. The authors developed a multibody dynamic model of the scissor lift and a human lift operator model using ADAMS and LifeMOD Biomechanics Human Modeler. They evaluated lift stability for four fall-arrest system products and quantified biomechanical impacts on operators during drop/fall arrest, using manikin drop tests. Test conditions were constrained to flat surfaces to isolate the effect of manikin-lanyard interaction. The fully extended scissor lift maintained structural and dynamic stability for all manikin drop test conditions. The maximum arrest forces from the harnesses/lanyards were all within the limits of ANSI Z359.1. The dynamic loading in the lower neck during the fall impact reached a level that is typically observed in automobile crash tests, indicating a potential injury risk for vulnerable participants. Fall-arrest systems may function as an effective mechanism for fall injury protection for operators of scissor lifts. However, operators may be subjected to significant biomechanical loadings on the lower neck during fall impact. Results suggest that scissor lifts retain stability under test conditions approximating human falls from predefined distances but injury could occur to vulnerable body structures.

  19. Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Development and Testing for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis; Tsioulos, Gus; Settles, Joseph; Colunga, Aaron; Vogel, Matthew; Vonau, Walt

    2010-01-01

    Grant Bue and Matthew Vogel presented the two types of Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporators (SWME) that were developed based on hydrophobic microporous membranes. One type, the Sheet Membrane (SaM) SWME, is composed of six concentric Teflon sheet membranes fixed on cylindrical-supporting screens to form three concentric annular water channels. Those water channels are surrounded by vacuum passages to draw off the water vapor that passes through the membrane. The other type, the Hollow Fiber (HoFi) SWME, is composed of more than 14,000 tubes. Water flows through the tubes and water vapor passes through the tube wall to the shell side that vents to the vacuum of space. Both SWME types have undergone testing to baseline the performance at predicted operating temperatures and flow rates; the units also have been subjected to contamination testing and other conditions to test resiliency.

  20. A drop in performance on a fluid intelligence test due to instructed-rule mindset.

    PubMed

    ErEl, Hadas; Meiran, Nachshon

    2017-09-01

    A 'mindset' is a configuration of processing resources that are made available for the task at hand as well as their suitable tuning for carrying it out. Of special interest, remote-relation abstract mindsets are introduced by activities sharing only general control processes with the task. To test the effect of a remote-relation mindset on performance on a Fluid Intelligence test (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, RAPM), we induced a mindset associated with little usage of executive processing by requiring participants to execute a well-defined classification rule 12 times, a manipulation known from previous work to drastically impair rule-generation performance and associated cognitive processes. In Experiment 1, this manipulation led to a drop in RAPM performance equivalent to 10.1 IQ points. No drop was observed in a General Knowledge task. In Experiment 2, a similar drop in RAPM performance was observed (equivalent to 7.9 and 9.2 IQ points) regardless if participants were pre-informed about the upcoming RAPM test. These results indicate strong (most likely, transient) adverse effects of a remote-relation mindset on test performance. They imply that although the trait of Fluid Intelligence has probably not changed, mindsets can severely distort estimates of this trait.

  1. Numerical simulation and field test study of desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment through flue gas.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jia-Jia; Pan, Liang-Ming; Chen, De-Qi; Dong, Yu-Quan; Wang, Cheng-Mu; Liu, Hang; Kang, Mei-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at cost saving and pollution reduction, a novel desulfurization wastewater evaporation treatment system (DWETS) for handling wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) wastewater of a coal-fired power plant was studied. The system's advantages include simple process, and less investment and space. The feasibility of this system has been proven and the appropriate position and number of nozzles, the spray droplet size and flue gas temperature limitation have been obtained by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The simulation results show that a longer duct, smaller diameter and higher flue gas temperature could help to increase the evaporation rate. The optimal DWETS design of Shangdu plant is 100 μm droplet sprayed by two nozzles located at the long duct when the flue gas temperature is 130 °C. Field tests were carried out based on the simulation results. The effects of running DWETS on the downstream devices have been studied. The results show that DWETS has a positive impact on ash removal efficiency and does not have any negative impact on the electrostatic precipitator (ESP), flue gas heat exchanger and WFGD. The pH values of the slurry of WFGD slightly increase when the DWETS is running. The simulation and field test of the DWETS show that it is a feasible future technology for desulfurization wastewater treatment.

  2. Syracuse University Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Z; Zhang, J S

    2010-09-01

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in{sup 3} (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft{sup 3} (24.1 m{sup 3}). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can at a height of 8 feet from the bottom of the can to the impacting surface. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 μm and 20

  3. Vertical Drop Testing and Analysis of the Wasp Helicopter Skid Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fuchs, Yvonne T.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes an experimental program to assess the impact performance of a skid gear for use on the Wasp kit-built helicopter, which is marketed by HeloWerks, Inc. of Hampton, Virginia. In total, five vertical drop tests were performed. The test article consisted of a skid gear mounted beneath a steel plate. A seating platform was attached to the upper surface of the steel plate, and two 95th percentile Hybrid III male Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were seated on the platform and secured using a four-point restraint system. The test article also included ballast weights to ensure the correct position of the Center-of-Gravity (CG). Twenty-six channels of acceleration data were collected per test at 50,000 samples per second. The five drop tests were conducted on two different gear configurations. The details of these test programs are presented, as well as an occupant injury assessment. Finally, a finite element model of the skid gear test article was developed for execution in LS-DYNA, an explicit nonlinear transient dynamic code, for predicting the skid gear and occupant dynamic responses due to impact.

  4. Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Multi-Evaporator Miniature Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Nagano, Hosei

    2008-01-01

    Under NASA's New Millennium Program Space Technology 8 Project, four experiments are being developed for future small system applications requiring low mass, low power, and compactness. GSFC is responsible for developing the Thermal Loop experiment, which is an advanced thermal control system consisting of a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with multiple evaporators and condensers. The objective is to validate the operation of an MLHP, including reliable start-ups, steady operation, heat load sharing, and tight temperature control over the range of 273K to 308K. An MLHP Breadboard has been built and tested for 1200 hours under the laboratory environment and 500 hours in a thermal vacuum chamber. Results of the TV tests are presented here.

  5. Hollow Fiber Space Water Membrane Evaporator Flight Prototype Design and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice; Vogel, Mtthew; Honas, Matt; Dillon, Paul; Colunga, Aaron; Truong, Lily; Porwitz, Darwin; Tsioulos, Gus

    2011-01-01

    The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits and to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology. This results in a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. The current design was based on a previous design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape. This was developed into a full-scale prototype consisting of 14,300 tube bundled into 30 stacks, each of which is formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of 10 nested stacks. The new design replaced metal components with plastic ones, eliminated the spacers, and has a custom built flight like backpressure valve mounted on the side of the SWME housing to reduce backpressure when fully open. A number of tests were performed in order to improve the strength of the polyurethane header that holds the fibers in place while the system is pressurized. Vacuum chamber testing showed similar heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor backpressure was similar to the previous design. Other tests pushed the limits of tolerance to freezing and showed suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment with and without a sweep gas. Tolerance to contamination by constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by distillation processes was tested in a conventional way by allowing constituents to accumulate in the coolant as evaporation occurs. For this purpose, the SWME cartridge has endured an equivalent of 30 EVAs exposure and demonstrated acceptable performance decline.

  6. Hollow Fiber Flight Prototype Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Design and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Vogel, Matt; Makinen, Janice; Tsioulos, Gus

    2010-01-01

    The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits and to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology. This results in a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow-fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent extensive testing as the most suitable candidate among commercial alternatives for continued SWME prototype development. The current design was based on a previous design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape. This was developed into a full-scale prototype consisting of 14,300 tube bundled into 30 stacks, each of which is formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of 10 nested stacks. The new design replaced metal components with plastic ones, and has a custom built flight like backpressure valve mounted on the side of the SWME housing to reduce backpressure when fully open. The spacers that provided separation of the chevron fiber stacks were eliminated. Vacuum chamber testing showed improved heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor backpressure compared with the previous design. Other tests pushed the limits of tolerance to freezing and showed suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment with and without a sweep gas. Tolerance to contamination by constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by distillation processes was tested in a conventional way by allowing constituents to accumulate in the coolant as evaporation occurs. For this purpose, the SWME cartridge has endured an equivalent of 30 EVAs exposure and demonstrated minimal performance decline.

  7. FTIR study of hydrogen bonds in coal under drop weight impact testing.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Wu; Wang, Jin-Gui; Xie, Bei-Jing; Dong, Li-Hui; Sun, Ying-Feng; Cao, Xu

    2014-11-01

    There are many hydrogen bonds in coal, which affect the chemical structure and properties of coal. FTIR has been applied to the characterization study of the hydrogen bonds of Dongpang coals, which were under drop weight impact. There exists five kinds of hydrogen bonds in the coal: free OH groups, OH...π, OH...OH, cyclic OH tetramers and OH...N. Absorption strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonds markedly declined after impact. Free OH groups mechanical-power chemical reacted in drop weight impact testing. The infrared spectrum were curve-resolved into their component bands. The absorption strength of various hydrogen bonds decreased with the increase of impact energy, but the trend was slowing. By statistical relationship between then, we find then complying with power function relationship. By comparing the exponents of fitted equations, we concluded that failure sensitivity sequence of hydrogen bonds to the impact: free OH groups > cyclic OH tetramers > OH...N > OH...π > OH...OH.

  8. Analysis and testing of a new method for drop size measurement using laser scatter interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research was conducted on a laser light scatter detection method for measuring the size and velocity of spherical particles. The method is based upon the measurement of the interference fringe pattern produced by spheres passing through the intersection of two laser beams. A theoretical analysis of the method was carried out using the geometrical optics theory. Experimental verification of the theory was obtained by using monodisperse droplet streams. Several optical configurations were tested to identify all of the parametric effects upon the size measurements. Both off-axis forward and backscatter light detection were utilized. Simulated spray environments and fuel spray nozzles were used in the evaluation of the method. The measurements of the monodisperse drops showed complete agreement with the theoretical predictions. The method was demonstrated to be independent of the beam intensity and extinction resulting from the surrounding drops. Signal processing concepts were considered and a method was selected for development.

  9. Drop and Flight Tests on NY-2 Landing Gears Including Measurements of Vertical Velocities at Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, W D; Beard, A P

    1933-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to obtain quantitative information on the effectiveness of three landing gears for the NY-2 (consolidated training) airplane. The investigation consisted of static, drop, and flight tests on landing gears of the oleo-rubber-disk and the mercury rubber-chord types, and flight tests only on a landing gear of the conventional split-axle rubber-cord type. The results show that the oleo gear is the most effective of the three landing gears in minimizing impact forces and in dissipating the energy taken.

  10. Quasi-Uniform High Speed Foam Crush Testing Using a Guided Drop Mass Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa E. (Technical Monitor); Kellas, Sotiris

    2004-01-01

    A relatively simple method for measuring the dynamic crush response of foam materials at various loading rates is described. The method utilizes a drop mass impact configuration with mass and impact velocity selected such that the crush speed remains approximately uniform during the entire sample crushing event. Instrumentation, data acquisition, and data processing techniques are presented, and limitations of the test method are discussed. The objective of the test method is to produce input data for dynamic finite element modeling involving crash and energy absorption characteristics of foam materials.

  11. An alternative to the Drop Ball Test for the measurement of ophthalmic glass fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Scaief, A L

    1975-11-01

    The Drop Ball Test (DBT) has some distinct disadvantages both as a standard measurement for ophthalmic lens fracture resistance and as a research tool. The Static Test (ST) was devised to allow a load and enzrgy analysis of the DBT and enable more rapid and accurate testing of large ophthalmic lens samples. It was found that over 50% of the energy generated in the DBT is absorbed by the lens mount instead of the test lens. This means that the standard DBT height of 50 inches is more an indication of DBT components than lens fracture resistance. Static testing of non-tempered, heat tempered and chemically tempered lenses correlated well with former DBT studies. The ST, however, allowed lens fracture resistance to be represented in pounds-load, a value better understood practically and mathematically.

  12. Hollow Fiber Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator Development and Testing for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Trevino, Luis A.; Tsioulos, Gus; Settles, Joseph; Colunga, Aaron; Vogel, Matthew; Vonau, Walt

    2010-01-01

    The spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME) is being developed to perform the thermal control function for advanced spacesuits to take advantage of recent advances in micropore membrane technology in providing a robust heat-rejection device that is potentially less sensitive to contamination than is the sublimator. Principles of a sheet membrane SWME design were demonstrated using a prototypic test article that was tested in a vacuum chamber at JSC in July 1999. The Membrana Celgard X50-215 microporous hollow fiber (HoFi) membrane was selected after recent contamination tests as the most suitable candidate among commercial alternatives for HoFi SWME prototype development. A design that grouped the fiber layers into stacks, which were separated by small spaces and packaged into a cylindrical shape, was developed into a full-scale prototype consisting 14,300 tube bundled into 30 stacks, each of which are formed into a chevron shape and separated by spacers and organized into three sectors of ten nested stacks. Vacuum chamber testing has been performed characterize heat rejection as a function of inlet water temperature and water vapor backpressure and to show contamination resistance to the constituents expected to be found in potable water produced by the distillation processes. Other tests showed the tolerance to freezing and suitability to reject heat in a Mars pressure environment.

  13. The influence of the equivalent hydraulic diameter on the pressure drop prediction of annular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kayiem, A. H. H.; Ibrahim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The flow behaviour and the pressure drop throughout an annular flow test section was investigated in order to evaluate and justify the reliability of experimental flow loop for wax deposition studies. The specific objective of the present paper is to assess and highlight the influence of the equivalent diameter method on the analysis of the hydrodynamic behaviour of the flow and the pressure drop throughout the annular test section. The test section has annular shape of 3 m length with three flow passages, namely; outer thermal control jacket, oil annular flow and inner pipe flow of a coolant. The oil annular flow has internal and external diameters of 0.0422 m and 0.0801 m, respectively. Oil was re-circulated in the annular passage while a cold water-glycol mixture was re-circulated in the inner pipe counter currently to the oil flow. The experiments were carried out at oil Reynolds number range of 2000 to 17000, covering laminar, transition and turbulent flow regimes. Four different methods of equivalent diameter of the annulus have been considered in this hydraulic analysis. The correction factor model for frictional pressure drop was also considered in the investigations. All methods addressed the high deviation of the prediction from the experimental data, which justified the need of a suitable pressure prediction correlation for the annular test section. The conventional hydraulic diameter method is a convenient substitute for characterizing physical dimension of a non-circular duct, and it leads to fairly good correlation between turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer characteristic of annular ducts.

  14. A study on the method of Taila Bindu Pariksha (oil drop test).

    PubMed

    Kar, Anukul C; Sharma, Reetu; Panda, Bimal K; Singh, Virendra P

    2012-07-01

    Taila Bindu Pariksha, an ancient method of urine examination for ascertaining the prognosis of diseases, was very popular in the medieval period, the use of which became obsolete after 17(th) Century AD. Technique of this test is very crude and there are chances of variations in the observations. To revive this technique, it is necessary that the methodology of this test should be standardized so that the observations could be reproducible. To standardize the technique, apparently healthy volunteers were selected and various parameters were standardized for doing this test, i.e., shape and size of Patra (testing containers), volume of the urine, size of the oil drop, height of the oil drop from the surface of urine, variety of sesame oil, etc., Based on the literature, the parameters were changed one by one and observations were noted down. The whole method was recorded in the form of video clips for proper evaluation. The parameters standardized on the basis of observations can be considered as standard to be referred in future studies.

  15. A study on the method of Taila Bindu Pariksha (oil drop test)

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Anukul C.; Sharma, Reetu; Panda, Bimal K.; Singh, Virendra P.

    2012-01-01

    Taila Bindu Pariksha, an ancient method of urine examination for ascertaining the prognosis of diseases, was very popular in the medieval period, the use of which became obsolete after 17th Century AD. Technique of this test is very crude and there are chances of variations in the observations. To revive this technique, it is necessary that the methodology of this test should be standardized so that the observations could be reproducible. To standardize the technique, apparently healthy volunteers were selected and various parameters were standardized for doing this test, i.e., shape and size of Patra (testing containers), volume of the urine, size of the oil drop, height of the oil drop from the surface of urine, variety of sesame oil, etc., Based on the literature, the parameters were changed one by one and observations were noted down. The whole method was recorded in the form of video clips for proper evaluation. The parameters standardized on the basis of observations can be considered as standard to be referred in future studies. PMID:23723648

  16. Evaporative emissions in three-day diurnal breathing loss tests on passenger cars for the Japanese market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Breakthrough emissions that dominate diurnal evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles were observed in continuous 3-day diurnal breathing loss (DBL) tests. These measurements were conducted on nine vehicles for the Japanese market. Two of these vehicles, made by US and European manufacturers, also meet regulations in their countries of origin. Four vehicles exhibited marked emissions caused by breakthrough emissions during the experimental period, all made by Japanese manufacturers. Using our experimental results, we estimate the total diurnal evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles in Japan to be 32,792 t y-1. The compositions of the breakthrough and permeation emissions were analyzed in real time using proton transfer reaction plus switchable reagent ion mass spectrometry to estimate the ozone formation potential for the evaporative emissions. The real-time measurements showed that the adsorption of hydrocarbons in a sealed housing evaporative determination unit can result in underestimation, when concentrations are only monitored before and after a DBL test. The composition analysis gave an estimated maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) 20% higher for the breakthrough emissions than for the gasoline that was tested, while the MIR for the permeation emissions was almost the same as the MIR for the fuel. Evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles in Japan were found to contribute 4.2% to emissions from stationary sources using a mass-based estimate, or 6.1% of emissions from stationary sources using a MIR-based estimate.

  17. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 μm and 20 μm were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition

  18. Deployment and Drop Test of Inflatable Aeroshell for Atmospheric Entry Capsule with using Large Scientific Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Kojiro; Honma, Naohiko; Abe, Daisuke; Makino, Hitoshi; Nagata, Yasunori; Kimura, Yusuke; Koyama, Masashi; Akita, Daisuke; Hayashi, Koichi; Abe, Takashi

    A deployable and flexible aeroshell for atmospheric entry vehicles has attracted attention as an innovative space transportation system in the near future, because the large-area, low-mass aeroshell dramatically reduces aerodynamic heating and achieves a soft landing without a conventional parachute system thanks to its low ballistic coefficient. Various concepts of flexible aeroshell have been proposed in the past. Our group are researching and developing a flare-type membrane aeroshell sustained by inflatable torus. As a part of the development, a deployment and drop test of a capsule-type experimental vehicle with a 1.264-m-diameter flare-type membrane aeroshell sustained by inflatable torus was carried out using a large scientific balloon in August, 2009. The objectives of this experiment are 1) to demonstrate the remote inflation system of inflatable aeroshell, 2) to acquire aerodynamic performance of a low ballistic coefficient vehicle including an inflatable structure in subsonic region, and 3) to observe behavior and deformation of the flexible aeroshell during free flight. In this test, the inflatable aeroshell was deployed at an altitude 24.6km by radio command from ground station. After deployment, the experimental vehicle was dropped from the balloon and underwent free flight. The flight data and images of the aeroshell collected using onboard sensors were transmitted successfully during the flight by the telemetry system. The data showed that the vehicle was almost stable in free flight condition and the inflatable aeroshell was collapsed at expected altitude. This deployment and drop test was very successful and useful data for design of actual atmospheric-entry vehicles with inflatable structure was acquired as planned.

  19. Testing the density matrix expansion against ab initio calculations of trapped neutron drops

    SciTech Connect

    Bogner, S. K.; Hergert, H.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Kortelainen, Erno M; Stoitsov, M. V.; Maris, Pieter; Vary, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic input to a universal nuclear energy density functional can be provided through the density matrix expansion (DME), which has recently been revived and improved. Several DME implementation strategies are tested for neutron drop systems in harmonic traps by comparing to Hartree-Fock (HF) and ab initio no-core full configuration (NCFC) calculations with a model interaction (Minnesota potential). The new DME with exact treatment of Hartree contributions is found to best reproduce HF results and supplementing the functional with fit Skyrme-like contact terms shows systematic improvement toward the full NCFC results.

  20. Effects of Lumbar Spine Assemblies and Body-Borne Equipment Mass on Anthropomorphic Test Device Responses During Drop Tests.

    PubMed

    Aggromito, Daniel; Jaffrey, Mark; Chhor, Allen; Chen, Bernard; Yan, Wenyi

    2017-10-01

    When simulating or conducting land mine blast tests on armored vehicles to assess potential occupant injury, the preference is to use the Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD). In land blast events, neither the effect of body-borne equipment (BBE) on the ATD response nor the dynamic response index (DRI) is well understood. An experimental study was carried out using a drop tower test rig, with a rigid seat mounted on a carriage table undergoing average accelerations of 161 g and 232 g over 3 ms. A key aspect of the work looked at the various lumbar spine assemblies available for a Hybrid III ATD. These can result in different load cell orientations for the ATD which in turn can affect the load measurement in the vertical and horizontal planes. Thirty-two tests were carried out using two BBE mass conditions and three variations of ATDs. The latter were the Hybrid III with the curved (conventional) spine, the Hybrid III with the pedestrian (straight) spine, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Hybrid III which also has a straight spine. The results showed that the straight lumbar spine assemblies produced similar ATD responses in drop tower tests using a rigid seat. In contrast, the curved lumbar spine assembly generated a lower pelvis acceleration and a higher lumbar load than the straight lumbar spine assemblies. The maximum relative displacement of the lumbar spine occurred after the peak loading event, suggesting that the DRI is not suitable for assessing injury when the impact duration is short and an ATD is seated on a rigid seat on a drop tower. The peak vertical lumbar loads did not change with increasing BBE mass because the equipment mass effects did not become a factor during the peak loading event.

  1. Fibre optic sensors for high speed hypervelocity impact studies and low velocity drop tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, D. A.; Cole, M. J.; Burchell, M. J.; Webb, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    The initial aim of this project was to develop a non-contact fibre optic based displacement sensor to operate in the harsh environment of a 'Light Gas Gun' (LGG), which can 'fire' small particles at velocities ranging from 1-8.4 km/s. The LGG is used extensively for research in aerospace to analyze the effects of high speed impacts on materials. Ideally the measurement should be made close to the centre of the impact to minimise corruption of the data from edge effects and survive the impact. A further requirement is that it should operate at a stand-off distance of ~ 8cm. For these reasons we chose to develop a pseudo con-focal intensity sensor, which demonstrated resolution comparable with conventional PVDF sensors combined with high survivability and low cost. A second sensor was developed based on 'Fibre Bragg Gratings' (FBG) which although requiring contact with the target the low weight and very small contact area had minimal effect on the dynamics of the target. The FBG was mounted either on the surface of the target or tangentially between a fixed location. The output signals from the FBG were interrogated in time by a new method. Measurements were made on composite and aluminium plates in the LGG and on low speed drop tests. The particle momentum for the drop tests was chosen to be similar to that of the particles used in the LGG.

  2. Drop test analysis of fuselage section of R80 commuter aircraft by using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, Agus Dwi; Ardianto, Adik Nofa Rochma Wahyu

    2017-04-01

    In commercial aerospace development, feasibility accidents design or crashworthiness is a major concern in aviation safety. Fuselage structure plays an important role in absorbing energy during an accident. The research aims are to determine drop test phenomenon on the fuselage, to investigate deformation occurred in the structure of the fuselage, and to know the influence of the airframe falls position to the stress strain which occurred in the structure of the fuselage. This research was conducted by varying the fall angle of the fuselage in a vertical position or 0° and 15°. Fuselage design was modeled by using SolidWorks. Then the model is imported to the Abaqus for drop test simulation. From the simulation results, it can be obtained the phenomenon of deformation on the structure of the fuselage when it comes in contact with the rigid ground. The high deformation occurs shows the structure capabilities in order to absorb the impact. It could be happened because the deformation is influenced by internal energy and strain energy. The various positions shows the structure capability in order to withstand impact loads during periods of 4-8 seconds and the maximum deformation was reached in 12 seconds. The experiment on the vertical position and the position falls of 15° angle was delivered the highest stress strain. The stress was 483 MPa in struts section, 400.78 MPa in skin section, 358.28 MPa in the floor and 483 MPa in the cargo frame section.

  3. Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Proto-flight Miniature Loop Heat Pipe with Two Evaporators and Two Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes thermal vacuum testing of a proto-flight miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with two evaporators and two condensers designed for future small systems applications requiring low mass, low power and compactness. Each evaporator contains a wick with an outer diameter of 6.35 mm, and each has its own integral compensation chamber (CC). Miniaturization of the loop components reduces the volume and mass of the thermal system. Multiple evaporators provide flexibility for placement of instruments that need to be maintained at the same temperature, and facilitate heat load sharing among instruments, reducing the auxiliary heater power requirement. A flow regulator is used to regulate heat dissipations between the two condensers, allowing flexible placement of radiators on the spacecraft. A thermoelectric converter (TEC) is attached to each CC for control of the operating temperature and enhancement of start-up success. Tests performed include start-up, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, high power and low power operation, heat load sharing, and operating temperature control. The proto-flight MLHP demonstrated excellent performance in the thermal vacuum test. The loop started successfully and operated stably under various evaporator heat loads and condenser sink temperatures. The TECs were able to maintain the loop operating temperature within b1K of the desired set point temperature at all power levels and all sink temperatures. The un-powered evaporator would automatically share heat from the other powered evaporator. The flow regulator was able to regulate the heat dissipation among the radiators and prevent vapor from flowing into the liquid line.

  4. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located aft of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, E. L.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1986-01-01

    A 12-foot long Boeing 707 aft fuselage section with a tapering cross section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crash laods and to provide data for nonlinear finite element modeling. This was the final test in a series of three different transport fuselage sections tested under identical conditions. The test parameters at impact were: 20 ft/s velocity, and zero pitch, roll, and yaw. In addition, the test was an operational shock test of the data acquisition system used for the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) of a remotely piloted Boeing 720 that was crash tested at NASA Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility on December 1, 1984. Post-test measurements of the crush showed that the front of the section (with larger diameter) crushed vertically approximately 14 inches while the rear crushed 18 inches. Analysis of the data traces indicate the maximum peak normal (vertical) accelerations at the bottom of the frames were approximately 109 G at body station 1040 and 64 G at body station 1120. The peak floor acceleration varied from 14 G near the wall to 25 G near the center where high frequency oscillations of the floor were evident. The peak anthropomorphic dummy pelvis normal (vertical) acceleration was 19 G's.

  5. Vertical Drop Testing and Analysis of the WASP Helicopter Skid Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Yvonne T.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    Human occupant modeling and injury risk assessment have been identified as areas of research for improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness within the NASA Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Rotary Wing Project. As part of this effort, an experimental program was conducted to assess the impact performance of a skid gear for use on the WASP kit-built helicopter, which is marketed by HeloWerks, Inc. of Hampton, Virginia. Test data from a drop test at an impact velocity of 8.4 feet-per-second were used to assess a finite element model of the skid gear test article. This assessment included human occupant analytic models developed for execution in LS-DYNA. The test article consisted of an aluminum skid gear mounted beneath a steel plate. A seating platform was attached to the upper surface of the steel plate, and two 95th percentile Hybrid III male Aerospace Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were seated on the platform and secured using a four-point restraint system. The goal of the test-analysis correlation is to further the understanding of LS-DYNA ATD occupant models and responses in the vertical (or spinal) direction. By correlating human occupant experimental test data for a purely vertical impact with the LS-DYNA occupant responses, improved confidence in the use of these tools and better understanding of the limitations of the automotive-based occupant models for aerospace application can begin to be developed.

  6. Vertical Drop Testing and Analysis of the WASP Helicopter Skid Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Yvonne T.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    Human occupant modeling and injury risk assessment have been identified as areas of research for improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness within the NASA Aeronautics Program's Subsonic Rotary Wing Project. As part of this effort, an experimental program was conducted to assess the impact performance of a skid gear for use on the WASP kit-built helicopter, which is marketed by HeloWerks, Inc. of Hampton, Virginia. Test data from a drop test at an impact velocity of 8.4 feet-per-second were used to assess a finite element model of the skid gear test article. This assessment included human occupant analytic models developed for execution in LS-DYNA. The test article consisted of an aluminum skid gear mounted beneath a steel plate. A seating platform was attached to the upper surface of the steel plate, and two 95th percentile Hybrid III male Aerospace Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were seated on the platform and secured using a four-point restraint system. The goal of the test-analysis correlation is to further the understanding of LS-DYNA ATD occupant models and responses in the vertical (or spinal) direction. By correlating human occupant experimental test data for a purely vertical impact with the LS-DYNA occupant responses, improved confidence in the use of these tools and better understanding of the limitations of the automotive-based occupant models for aerospace application can begin to be developed.

  7. Testing of the Safety and the Effectiveness of Using SamjeongPharmacopuncture Solution as Eye drops

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This experimental study was designed to investigate the safety and the effectiveness of Samjeong pharmacopuncture solution (SPS) manufactured by using a the lowtemperature extract on process. Methods: To identify the safety and the effectiveness of using SPS as eye drops, we performed applied eye irritation tests on rabbits and antibacterial tests for Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Candida albicans. The eye irritation test was performed according to the toxicity testing regulation of the Korea Food & Drug Administration (2009. 8. 24, KFDA 2009-116). After SPS had been applied on the left eye of the rabbits, eye irritation in the cornea, iris and conjunctiva was observed on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th & 7th day. After SPS had been dropped on bacterial species that cause keratitis, the minimum inhibition concentration and the size of the inhibition zone were measured. The anti-bacterial potency was also measured by taking the size of inhibition zone. Results: After SPS had been administered on the left eye of the rabbits, none of nine rabbits were found to show abnormal signs or weight changes. After SPS had been administered on the left eye of the rabbits, no eye irritation in the cornea, iris and conjunctiva was observed on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th & 7th day. No specific response was detected in MIC for bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Candida albicans after SPS had been applied. Conclusions: This study suggests that SPS is a non-toxic and non-irritant medicine that does not cause any of eye irritation in rabbits, but it has no antibacterial effects on bacterial species that are well known to cause keratitis. These results suggest that more research is required on extracts from herbal medicines for treating keratitis. PMID:25780632

  8. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the drop impact test for helicopter fuel tank.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Jialing; Sun, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    The crashworthiness of helicopter fuel tank is vital to the survivability of the passengers and structures. In order to understand and improve the crashworthiness of the soft fuel tank of helicopter during the crash, this paper investigated the dynamic behavior of the nylon woven fabric composite fuel tank striking on the ground. A fluid-structure interaction finite element model of the fuel tank based on the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method was constructed to elucidate the dynamic failure behavior. The drop impact tests were conducted to validate the accuracy of the numerical simulation. Good agreement was achieved between the experimental and numerical results of the impact force with the ground. The influences of the impact velocity, the impact angle, the thickness of the fuel tank wall and the volume fraction of water on the dynamic responses of the dropped fuel tank were studied. The results indicated that the corner of the fuel tank is the most vulnerable location during the impact with ground.

  9. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  10. The influence of increased roof strength on belted and unbelted dummies in rollover and drop tests.

    PubMed

    Bahling, G S; Bundorf, R T; Moffatt, E A; Orlowski, K F

    1995-04-01

    This report condenses and summarizes two related and previously published reports. These two reports analyzed the effect of added roof strength on both belted and unbelted dummies. The reports, which have been dubbed Malibu I and Malibu II, respectively, presented data from a total of 16 rollover crash tests and four test conditions in which vehicles were dropped on their roofs. To evaluate the effect of roof strength, half of all test vehicles were modified to incorporate rigid rollcages, the other half were production vehicles. To evaluate the effect of belt restraints, half of all tests incorporated restrained dummies, the other half were unrestrained. The data from these tests clearly demonstrated that increased roof strength provided no reduction in dummy neck loads for belted or unbelted dummies when they were located over the area of the roof that impacted the ground. The tests also demonstrated that the neck loads resulted from "diving" type impacts, where the head stops and the torso momentum loads the neck. Roof deformation never caused the dummy to be compressed between the roof and seat.

  11. Large scale steam flow test: Pressure drop data and calculated pressure loss coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.B.; Spears, J.R.; Feder, A.R.; Moore, B.P.; Young, C.E.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the result of large scale steam flow testing, 3 million to 7 million lbs/hr., conducted at approximate steam qualities of 25, 45, 70 and 100 percent (dry, saturated). It is concluded from the test data that reasonable estimates of piping component pressure loss coefficients for single phase flow in complex piping geometries can be calculated using available engineering literature. This includes the effects of nearby upstream and downstream components, compressibility, and internal obstructions, such as splitters, and ladder rungs on individual piping components. Despite expected uncertainties in the data resulting from the complexity of the piping geometry and two-phase flow, the test data support the conclusion that the predicted dry steam K-factors are accurate and provide useful insight into the effect of entrained liquid on the flow resistance. The K-factors calculated from the wet steam test data were compared to two-phase K-factors based on the Martinelli-Nelson pressure drop correlations. This comparison supports the concept of a two-phase multiplier for estimating the resistance of piping with liquid entrained into the flow. The test data in general appears to be reasonably consistent with the shape of a curve based on the Martinelli-Nelson correlation over the tested range of steam quality.

  12. Test-Analysis Correlation of a Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a Commuter-Category Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    A finite element model of an ATR42-300 commuter-class aircraft was developed and a crash simulation was executed. Analytical predictions were correlated with data obtained from a 30-feet per second (9.14-meters per second) vertical drop test of the aircraft. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the structural response of the aircraft when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. The aircraft was configured with seats, dummies, luggage, and other ballast. The wings were filled with 8,700 lb. (3,946 kilograms) of water to represent the fuel. The finite element model, which consisted of 57,643 nodes and 62,979 elements, was developed from direct measurements of the airframe geometry. The seats, dummies, luggage, simulated engines and fuel, and other ballast were represented using concentrated masses. The model was executed in LS-DYNA, a commercial finite element code for performing explicit transient dynamic simulations. Analytical predictions of structural deformation and selected time-history responses were correlated with experimental data from the drop test to validate the simulation.

  13. Statistical variations in impact resistance of steel fiber-reinforced concrete subjected to drop weight test

    SciTech Connect

    Nataraja, M.C.; Dhang, N.; Gupta, A.P.

    1999-07-01

    The variation in impact resistance of steel fiber-reinforced concrete and plain concrete as determined from a drop weight test is reported. The observed coefficients of variation are about 57 and 46% for first-crack resistance and the ultimate resistance in the case of fiber concrete and the corresponding values for plain concrete are 54 and 51%, respectively. The goodness-of-fit test indicated poor fitness of the impact-resistance test results produced in this study to normal distribution at 95% level of confidence for both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete. However, the percentage increase in number of blows from first crack to failure for both fiber-reinforced concrete and as well as plain concrete fit to normal distribution as indicated by the goodness-of-fit test. The coefficient of variation in percentage increase in the number of blows beyond first crack for fiber-reinforced concrete and plain concrete is 51.9 and 43.1%, respectively. Minimum number of tests required to reliably measure the properties of the material can be suggested based on the observed levels of variation.

  14. Separation occurring during the drop weight tear test of thick-walled X80 pipeline steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Qing-yun; Li, Da-hang; Huang, Guo-jian; Guan, Ju

    2013-08-01

    A separation phenomenon occurring during the drop weight tear test of commercial thick-walled API (American Petroleum Institute) X80 strip steel was investigated in this work. Microstructural analysis showed that the band structure of bainite elongated along the rolling direction works as the initiation sites of separation. The propagation of separation can be promoted not only by the occurrence of the band structure of martensite/austenite constituent, prior austenite grain boundaries, and elongated bainite, but also by fine acicular ferrite and bainite. Wide separation formed in the former case, while the narrow one appeared in the latter case. Some methods were proposed to obtain fine and homogeneous acicular ferrite in thick-walled X80 pipeline steel in order to minimize the occurrence of separation.

  15. Numerical Investigation of the Influence of Convection in a Mixture of Combustion Products on the Integral Characteristics of the Evaporation of a Finely Atomized Water Drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    A model of the heat-and-mass transfer in the neighborhood of a finely atomized water drop moving through the high-temperature products of combustion of materials has been developed for numerical analysis of the macroscopic mechanisms of movement of such a drop in a mixture of combustion products and water vapor with account for the complex of interrelated physical processes and phase transitions taking place in this case. The influence of the convection on the integral characteristics of the evaporation of the indicated drop was analyzed and the sizes of its "temperature" and "concentration" wakes were estimated. The conditions under which the integral characteristics of the evaporation of this drop can be calculated in the diffusion approximation were determined.

  16. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for evaporating multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiufeng; Kong, Song-Charng

    2017-09-01

    The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been increasingly used for simulating fluid flows; however, its ability to simulate evaporating flow requires significant improvements. This paper proposes an SPH method for evaporating multiphase flows. The present SPH method can simulate the heat and mass transfers across the liquid-gas interfaces. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy were reformulated based on SPH, then were used to govern the fluid flow and heat transfer in both the liquid and gas phases. The continuity equation of the vapor species was employed to simulate the vapor mass fraction in the gas phase. The vapor mass fraction at the interface was predicted by the Clausius-Clapeyron correlation. An evaporation rate was derived to predict the mass transfer from the liquid phase to the gas phase at the interface. Because of the mass transfer across the liquid-gas interface, the mass of an SPH particle was allowed to change. Alternative particle splitting and merging techniques were developed to avoid large mass difference between SPH particles of the same phase. The proposed method was tested by simulating three problems, including the Stefan problem, evaporation of a static drop, and evaporation of a drop impacting a hot surface. For the Stefan problem, the SPH results of the evaporation rate at the interface agreed well with the analytical solution. For drop evaporation, the SPH result was compared with the result predicted by a level-set method from the literature. In the case of drop impact on a hot surface, the evolution of the shape of the drop, temperature, and vapor mass fraction were predicted.

  17. Design, fabrication, and testing of a sodium evaporator for the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Rawlinson, K.S.; Adkins, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a compact heat-pipe heat exchanger kW(e) designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases. The liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine, where energy is transferred to the engine`s helium working fluid. Tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15 kW(t) of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760 C. Four of these prototype units were eventually used to power a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this report.

  18. Water evaporation on highly viscoelastic polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pu, Gang; Severtson, Steven J

    2012-07-03

    Results are reported for a study on the evaporation of water droplets from a highly viscoelastic acrylic polymer surface. These are contrasted with those collected for the same measurements carried out on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). For PDMS, the evaporation process involves the expected multistep process including constant drop area, constant contact angle, and finally a combination of these steps until the liquid is gone. In contrast, water evaporation from the acrylic polymer shows a constant drop area mode throughout. Furthermore, during the evaporation process, the drop area actually expands on the acrylic polymer. The single mode evaporation process is consistent with formation of wetting structures, which cannot be propagated by the capillary forces. Expansion of the drop area is attributed to the influence of the drop capillary pressure. Furthermore, the rate of drop area expansion is shown to be dependent on the thickness of the polymer film.

  19. Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a Commuter-Class Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    A finite element model of an ATR42-300 commuter-class aircraft was developed and a crash simulation was executed. Analytical predictions were correlated with data obtained from a 30-ft/s (9.14-m/s) vertical drop test of the aircraft. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the structural response of the aircraft when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. The aircraft was configured with seats, dummies, luggage, and other ballast. The wings were filled with 8,700 lb. (3,946 kg) of water to represent the fuel. The finite element model, which consisted of 57,643 nodes and 62,979 elements, was developed from direct measurements of the airframe geometry. The seats, dummies, luggage, fuel, and other ballast were represented using concentrated masses. The model was executed in LS-DYNA, a commercial code for performing explicit transient dynamic simulations. Predictions of structural deformation and selected time-history responses were generated. The simulation was successfully validated through extensive test-analysis correlation.

  20. Kinetic parameters for the oxidation of pulverised coal as measured from drop tube tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, J.; Jimenez, S.

    2005-08-01

    The methodology for measuring the oxidation parameters for pulverised coal combustion from drop-tube tests is reviewed, and some modifications to the traditional procedure (based on Arrhenius plots) are proposed. The work includes the experimental characterisation of an anthracite's combustion in a drop-tube furnace, which will be used as the reference data. One of the main points in the discussion is the consideration of a particle-size distribution instead of a single representative diameter. Since a true monosized sample cannot be obtained by sieving, the particles injected always display a size distribution and, therefore, the experimental results are the outcome of a range of oxidation rates. As a result, the assumption of a single particle size cannot explain some aspects of the experimental results (e.g., the 'curvature' of the burnoff curve) and may lead to significant deviations in the calculated parameters. On the other hand, an alternative method for deriving the parameters, based on calculating the particle's full combustion history, is proposed. The analysis presented here enables a more systematic and unambiguous approach for deriving the kinetic parameters for oxidation from experimental measurements. If the actual particle-size distribution is taken into account, the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results and, in particular, reproduce the progressive decay in apparent oxidation rate while the fuel burns. Even though the deviations might still be reduced by using a more sophisticated model (e.g., accounting for heterogeneity in the particles' properties, or deactivation phenomena), the results obtained suggest that such corrections should be relatively small, the correct treatment of the size distribution of the particles being more important in this case.

  1. Drop testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. [TRUPACT-I and a TMI-2 defueling canister

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Box, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    Two different types of packages, the TRUPACT-I shipping system and a TMI-2 defueling canister, were recently subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The testing programs for the two packages are described.

  2. Taking the Easy Way Out: How the GED Testing Program Induces Students to Drop Out. NBER Working Paper No. 14044

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckman, James J.; LaFontaine, Paul A.; Rodriguez, Pedro L.

    2008-01-01

    We exploit an exogenous increase in General Educational Development (GED) testing requirements to determine whether raising the difficulty of the test causes students to finish high school rather than drop out and GED certify. We find that a six point decrease in GED pass rates induces a 1.3 point decline in overall dropout rates. The effect size…

  3. Comparison of drop size data from ground and aerial application nozzles at three testing laboratories

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spray drop size is a critical factor in the performance of any agrochemical solution and is a function of spray solution, nozzle selection, and nozzle operation. Applicators generally base their selection of a particular nozzle based on the drop size reported by manufacturers and researchers. Like m...

  4. Sample Analysis Results for a Benchscale Evaporator Test Using a Hanford Tank 241-AN-102 Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrara, D.M.

    2003-08-25

    This report provides the analytical results of samples taken during the low-activity waste evaporator process demonstration conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center with a 15-liter sample of Hanford tank 241-AN102 pretreated radioactive supernate. The objective of the task was to determine the concentration of various organic, inorganic and radionuclide constituents of potential concern and physical properties of the evaporator feed, concentrate, condensate and off gas for the Hanford River Protection Project. Over 150 samples and blanks were collected and analyzed in accordance with EPA methods. One hundred nineteen target organic analyze concentrations were shown to be less than the minimum quantitative limits in all samples (feed, concentrate, condensate, and off gas samples).Tetrahydrofuran (THF) was present in evaporator samples. THF was the most concentrated volatile compound detected in the off gas. No pesticides or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were detected in any evaporator sample. Very low levels of some dioxins and furans were reported in the off-gas samples, but are thought to have been due to contamination. Most of the sample collection, sample preparation, and sample analyses provided results with sufficient pedigree to support the rigor associated with regulatory application of these results.

  5. Development and testing of a method for efficient simulation of evaporation from a seepage face

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Ghezzehei, Teamrat; Finsterle, Stefan

    2003-05-12

    Evaporation from the surface of a porous medium is a complex process, governed by interplay between (1) coupled liquid and vapor flow in the porous medium, and (2) relative humidity, temperature, and aerodynamic conditions in the surrounding air. In order to avoid the computational expense of explicitly simulating liquid, gas, and heat flow in the porous medium (and the possible further expense of simulating the flow of water vapor in the atmosphere), evaporative potentials can be treated in a simplified manner within a model where liquid is the only active phase. In the case of limited air mixing, evaporation can be approximated as a diffusion process with a linear vapor-concentration gradient. We have incorporated a simplified scheme into the EOS9 module of iTOUGH2 to represent evaporation as isothermal Fickian diffusion. This is notable because the EOS9 module solves a single equation describing saturated and unsaturated flow, i.e., phase transitions and vapor flow are not explicitly simulated. The new approach was applied to three simple problems and the results were compared to those obtained with analytical solutions or the EOS4 module, which explicitly considers advective and diffusive vapor flow. Where vapor flow within the porous medium can be neglected, this new scheme represents significant improvement over the computational expense of explicitly simulating liquid, gas, and heat flow, while providing an adequate reproduction of the overall hydrologic system. The scheme is set up to allow parallel flow of liquid and vapor, so that evaporation from an actively seeping face can be simulated. In addition, dynamic relative humidity boundary conditions can be simulated using standard iTOUGH2 features.

  6. Drop Tower tests in preparation of a Tethered Electromagnetic Docking space demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, Lorenzo; Francesconi, Alessandro; Antonello, Andrea; Bettiol, Laura; Branz, Francesco; Duzzi, Matteo; Mantellato, Riccardo; Sansone, Francesco; Savioli, Livia

    2016-07-01

    A group of students of the University of Padova is recently developing some technologies to implement a Tethered Electromagnetic Docking (TED) experiment, a novel system for close rendezvous and mating manoeuvres between two spacecraft, consisting in a small tethered probe ejected by the chaser and magnetically guided by a receiving electromagnet mounted on the target. Because of the generated magnetic field, automatic self-alignment and mating are possible; then, as the tether is rewinded, the chaser is able to dock with the target. This concept allows to simplify standard docking procedures, thanks to the reduction of proximity navigation and guidance requirements, as well as consequent fuel reduction. Other interesting applications are expected, from active debris removal to space tugging; in particular, the utilization of the tethered connection for detumbling operations is considered. The realization of a space demonstrator requires a preliminary verification of the critical technologies employed in TED, in particular the magnetic guidance and the probe deploy and retrieve; in the framework of ESA "Drop your Thesis!" 2014 and 2016 campaigns the experiments FELDs (Flexible Electromagnetic Leash Docking system) and STAR (System for Tether Automatic Retrieval) have been focused on the test of such critical elements in the relevant microgravity environment of ZARM Drop Tower in Bremen. In particular, FELDs consisted in a simplified model of TED with a magnetic target interface, a passive tethered probe and its launch system: the experiment allowed to assess the passive self-alignment of the probe with respect to the target and to study the effect of friction between the tether and the release system. Similarly, STAR is investigating the tether actively controlled deployment and retrieval, with the experiment campaign planned on November 2016. In addition, another microgravity experiment is in preparation for the investigation of active magnetic navigation: PACMAN

  7. Effect of External Pressure Drop on Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentung, Ku; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of the pressure drop on the operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP). Because the evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) both contain two-phase fluid, a thermodynamic constraint exists between the temperature difference and the pressure drop for these two components. As the pressure drop increases, so will the temperature difference. The temperature difference in turn causes an increase of the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, resulting in a higher CC temperature. Furthermore, the heat leak strongly depends on the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core. Tests were conducted by installing a valve on the vapor line so as to vary the pressure drop, and by charging the LHP with various amounts of fluid. Test results verify that the LHP operating temperature increases with an increasing differential pressure, and the temperature increase is a strong function of the fluid inventory in the loop.

  8. Design and Certification of Targets for Drop Tests at the NTRC Packaging Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, S.B.

    2003-06-05

    This report provides documentation of the design and certification of drop pad (targets) at the National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) Packaging Research Facility(PRF). Based on the evaluation performed, it has been demonstrated that the small (interior) drop pad (target) meets the regulatory definition of a flat, essentially unyielding, horizontal surface for packages weighing up to 3,150 lb (1,432 kg). The large (exterior) drop pad (target) meets the regulatory definition of a flat, essentially unyielding, horizontal surface for packages weighing up to 28,184 lb (12,811 kg).

  9. Vertical Force-deflection Characteristics of a Pair of 56-inch-diameter Aircraft Tires from Static and Drop Tests with and Without Prerotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiley, Robert F; Horne, Walter B

    1957-01-01

    The vertical force-deflection characteristics were experimentally determined for a pair of 56-inch-diameter tires under static and drop-test conditions with and without prerotation. For increasing force, the tires were found to be least stiff for static tests, almost the same as for the static case for prerotation drop tests as long as the tires remain rotating, and appreciably stiffer for drop tests without prerotation.

  10. Tests of the fission-evaporation competition in the deexcitation of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Skwira, I.; Wilczynski, J.

    2005-09-01

    In order to verify methods of calculating the fission-evaporation competition in reactions used to synthesize new super-heavy nuclei in 'cold' (1n) and 'hot' (3n,4n) fusion reactions, we present an analysis of existing experimental data on the evaporation-residue cross sections in two selected reactions, {sup 208}Pb({sup 16}O, xn) and {sup 236}U({sup 12}C, xn), for which complementary experimental information necessary to unambiguously calculate the survival probabilities is available: precisely measured fusion excitation functions and saddle-point energies of the fissioning nuclei, deduced from experiments. Standard statistical model calculations, with shell effects accounted for by the Ignatyuk formula, were carried out assuming the ground state shell corrections of Moeller et al., and zero shell correction at the saddle configuration (resulting from the presented systematics). Good agreement of the calculated evaporation-residue cross sections with experimental data for different xn reaction channels at low excitation energies leaves no room for modifications of the conventional way of calculating the {gamma}{sub n}/{gamma}{sub f} ratio, particularly for including into this ratio an additional preexponential factor (such as the Kramers fission hindrance factor or an effective collective factor) significantly different from 1.

  11. Workplace field testing of the pressure drop of particulate respirators using welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that respirator testing with a sodium chloride aerosol gave a conservative estimate of filter penetration for welding fume aerosols. A rapid increase in the pressure drop (PD) of some respirators was observed as fumes accumulated on the filters. The present study evaluated particulate respirator PD based on workplace field tests. A field PD tester was designed and validated using the TSI 8130 Automatic Filter Tester, designed in compliance with National Institute for Occupational and Safety and Health regulation 42 CFR part 84. Three models (two replaceable dual-type filters and one replaceable single-type filter) were evaluated against CO(2) gas arc welding on mild steel in confined booths in the workplace. Field tests were performed under four airborne concentrations (27.5, 15.4, 7.9, and 2.1 mg m(-3)). The mass concentration was measured by the gravimetric method, and number concentration was monitored using P-Trak (Model 8525, TSI, USA). Additionally, photos and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to visualize and analyze the composition of welding fumes trapped in the filters. The field PD tester showed no significant difference compared with the TSI tester. There was no significant difference in the initial PD between laboratory and field results. The PD increased as a function of fume load on the respirator filters for all tested models. The increasing PD trend differed by models, and PD increased rapidly at high concentrations because greater amount of fumes accumulated on the filters in a given time. The increase in PD as a function of fume load on the filters showed a similar pattern as fume load varied for a particular model, but different patterns were observed for different models. Images and elemental analyses of fumes trapped on the respirator filters showed that most welding fumes were trapped within the first layer, outer web cover, and second layer, in order, while no fumes

  12. Drop Hammer Tests with Three Oleo Strut Models and Three Different Shock Strut Oils at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, M

    1954-01-01

    Drop hammer tests with different shock strut models and shock strut oils were performed at temperatures ranging to -40 C. The various shock strut models do not differ essentially regarding their springing and damping properties at low temperatures; however, the influence of the different shock strut oils on the springing properties at low temperatures varies greatly.

  13. European type-approval test procedure for evaporative emissions from passenger cars against real-world mobility data from two Italian provinces.

    PubMed

    Martini, Giorgio; Paffumi, Elena; De Gennaro, Michele; Mellios, Giorgos

    2014-07-15

    This paper presents an evaluation of the European type-approval test procedure for evaporative emissions from passenger cars based on real-world mobility data. The study relies on two large databases of driving patterns from conventional fuel vehicles collected by means of on-board GPS systems in the Italian provinces of Modena and Firenze. Approximately 28,000 vehicles were monitored, corresponding to approximately 36 million kilometres over a period of one month. The driving pattern of each vehicle was processed to derive the relation between trip length and parking duration, and the rate of occurrence of parking events against multiple evaporative cycles, defined on the basis of the type-approval test procedure as 12-hour diurnal time windows. These results are used as input for an emission simulation model, which calculates the total evaporative emissions given the characteristics of the evaporative emission control system of the vehicle and the ambient temperature conditions. The results suggest that the evaporative emission control system, fitted to the vehicles from Euro 3 step and optimised for the current type-approval test procedure, could not efficiently work under real-world conditions, resulting in evaporative emissions well above the type-approval limit, especially for small size vehicles and warm climate conditions. This calls for a revision of the type-approval test procedure in order to address real-world evaporative emissions.

  14. Load and dynamic assessment of B-52B-008 carrier aircraft for finned configuration 1 space shuttle solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem drop test vehicle. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The B-52B airplane was identified for use in solid rocket booster (RSB) parachute drop flight testing. The purpose of this study was to determine by theoretical analysis methods the compatability and structural capability of B-52B drop test vehicle configuration (with fins) to accomplish the drop test mission. This document consist of four volumes. This volume presents a summary of airplane flutter and load strength evaluation analysis results and a comparative study of the pylon loading resulting from drop test vehicle inertia and aerodynamic considerations.

  15. Large scale characterization of unsaturated soil properties in a semi-arid region combining infiltration, pedotransfer functions and evaporation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabou, Marouen; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Lassabatère, Laurent; Boulet, Gilles; Mougenot, Bernard; Lili Chabaane, Zohra; Zribi, Mehrez

    2016-04-01

    Water resource management is a major issue in semi-arid regions, especially where irrigated agriculture is dominant on soils with highly variable clay content. Indeed, topsoil clay content has a significant importance on infiltration and evaporation processes and therefore in the estimation of the volume of water needed for crops. In this poster we present several methods to estimate wilting point, field capacity volumetric water contents and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the Kairouan plain (680 km2), central Tunisia (North Africa). The first method relies on the Beerkan Estimation of Soil Transfer parameters (BEST) method, which consists in local estimate of unsaturated soil hydraulic properties from a single-ring infiltration test, combined with the use of pedotransfer functions applied to the Kairouan plain different soil types. Results are obtained over six different topsoil texture classes along the Kairouan plain. Saturated hydraulic conductivity is high for coarse textured and some of the fine textured soils due to shrinkage cracking-macropore soil structure. The saturated hydraulic conductivity values are respectively 1.31E-5 m.s-1 and 1.71E-05 m.s-1. The second method is based on evaporation tests on different test plots. It consists of analyzing soil moisture profile changes during the dry down periods to detect the time-to-stress that can be obtained from observation of soil moisture variation, albedo measurements and variation of soil temperature. Results show that the estimated parameters with the evaporation method are close to those obtained by combining the BEST method and pedotransfer functions. The results validate that combining local infiltration tests and pedotransfer functions is a promising tool for the large scale hydraulic characterization of region with strong spatial variability of soils properties.

  16. Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a B737 Fuselage Section with Overhead Bins and Luggage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe a crash simulation of a 30-ft/s vertical drop test of a Boeing 737 (B737) fuselage section. The drop test of the 10-ft. long fuselage section of a B737 aircraft was conducted in November of 2000 at the FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ. The fuselage section was outfitted with two different commercial overhead stowage bins. In addition, 3,229-lbs. of luggage were packed in the cargo hold to represent a maximum take-off weight condition. The main objective of the test was to evaluate the response and failure modes of the overhead stowage bins in a narrow-body transport fuselage section when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. A secondary objective of the test was to generate experimental data for correlation with the crash simulation. A full-scale 3-dimensional finite element model of the fuselage section was developed and a crash simulation was conducted using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic code, MSC.Dytran. Pre-test predictions of the fuselage and overhead bin responses were generated for correlation with the drop test data. A description of the finite element model and an assessment of the analytical/experimental correlation are presented. In addition, suggestions for modifications to the model to improve correlation are proposed.

  17. Crash Simulation of a Vertical Drop Test of a B737 Fuselage Section with Overhead Bins and Luggage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe a crash simulation of a 30-ft/s vertical drop test of a Boeing 737 (B737) fuselage section. The drop test of the 10-ft. long fuselage section of a B737 aircraft was conducted in November of 2000 at the FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ. The fuselage section was outfitted with two different commercial overhead stowage bins. In addition, 3,229-lbs. of luggage were packed in the cargo hold to represent a maximum take-off weight condition. The main objective of the test was to evaluate the response and failure modes of the overhead stowage bins in a narrow-body transport fuselage section when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. A secondary objective of the test was to generate experimental data for correlation with the crash simulation. A full-scale 3-dimensional finite element model of the fuselage section was developed and a crash simulation was conducted using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic code, MSC.Dytran. Pre-test predictions of the fuselage and overhead bin responses were generated for correlation with the drop test data. A description of the finite element model and an assessment of the analytical/experimental correlation are presented. In addition, suggestions for modifications to the model to improve correlation are proposed.

  18. Particle-size dependence of immersion freezing: Investigation of INUIT test aerosol particles with freely suspended water drops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Debertshäuser, Michael; Eppers, Oliver; Jantsch, Evelyn; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    One goal of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) is to investigate the efficiencies of several test ice nuclei under comparable conditions but with different experimental techniques. In the present studies, two methods are used: the Mainz vertical wind tunnel and an acoustic levitator placed inside a cold chamber. In both cases drops are freely levitated, either at their terminal velocity in the wind tunnel updraft or around the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave in the acoustic levitator. Thus, heat transfer conditions are well approximated, and wall contact effects on freezing as well as electrical charges of the drops are avoided. Drop radii are 370 μm and 1 mm, respectively. In the wind tunnel, drops are investigated at constant temperatures within a certain time period and the onset of freezing is observed directly. In the acoustic levitator, the drop temperature decreases during the experiments and is measured by an in-situ calibrated Infrared thermometer. The onset of freezing is indicated by a rapid rise of the drop surface temperature because of the release of latent heat. Investigated test ice nuclei are Snomax® as a proxy of biological particles and illite NX as well as K-feldspar as represents of mineral dust. The particle concentrations are 1 × 10-12 to 3 × 10-6 g Snomax® per drop and 5 × 10-9 to 5 × 10-5 g mineral dust per drop. Freezing temperatures are between -2 and -18° C in case of Snomax® and between -14 and -26° C in case of mineral dust. The lower the particle masses per drop the lower are the freezing temperatures. For similar particle concentrations in the drops, the median freezing temperatures determined by the two techniques agree well within the measurement errors. With the knowledge of the specific particle surface area of the mineral dusts, the results are interpreted also in terms of particle surface area per drop. Results from the wind tunnel experiments which are performed at constant temperatures indicate

  19. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across a Blowbox: Gin Testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox. Ho...

  20. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across the Blowbox: Gin Testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox usi...

  1. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  2. Evaporation of inclined water droplets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-02-16

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets.

  3. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  4. Development and test of the CO2 evaporative cooling system for the LHCb UT Tracker Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelli, S.

    2017-03-01

    The LHCb upgrade requires a new silicon strip tracker detector placed between the vertex locator and the magnet. The new detector will have improved performance in charged particle tracking and triggering. The front-end electronics will be in the active area, close to the sensors: this is a key feature driving the mechanical and cooling detector design, together with the requirement to make the sensors work below -5°C, to withstand radiation damage. The new design exploits a cooling system based on CO2 evaporation at temperatures around -25°C. The support structure for the sensor modules is a lightweight carbon fiber mechanical structure embedding a cooling pipe, designed to pass underneath the read-out ASICs, which are the main thermal power sources to be cooled down. Here a description of the detector will be given, with a main focus on the cooling system and on the progress done to its qualification.

  5. Testing pilocarpine drops for dry mouth in advanced cancer using n-of-1 trials: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Nikles, Jane; Mitchell, Geoffrey K; Hardy, Janet; Agar, Meera; Senior, Hugh; Carmont, Sue-Ann; Schluter, Philip J; Good, Phillip; Vora, Rohan; Currow, David

    2015-12-01

    Dry mouth is a common and troublesome symptom in palliative care. Pilocarpine is a cholinergic agent that promotes salivation. This study aimed to test the feasibility of using n-of-1 trials to test pilocarpine drops compared to placebo, for patients of palliative care units with advanced cancer, who experienced dry mouth. This was an N-of-1 study, in which each participant was offered three cycles of pilocarpine drops 4% (6 mg tds) (3 days) and placebo drops (3 days) in random order. Participants were patients of specialist palliative care services with advanced cancer assessed as having a dry mouth, defined as having a score of ⩾ 3 on an 11-point self-rated xerostomia numerical rating scale, from any cause. Patients self-completed a diary using validated symptom and quality-of-life scores. The randomisation order was unmasked at the end of each person's trial by a clinician independent of the trial to allow a treatment decisions for individual patients to be made. Nine patients completed at least 1 cycle; 33 cycles of data were completed in total, comprising 438 doses of pilocarpine. Four patients completed the trial: two responded and two did not. Most withdrawals related to deteriorating condition, unacceptable toxicity, non-compliance with study procedures or withdrawal of consent. Many issues contributed to slow recruitment and high withdrawal rate. The formulation of pilocarpine drops proved unacceptable to most participants. More work is required to determine an appropriate formulation, dose and method of delivery and then a retest of pilocarpine drops for this symptom. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Leidenfrost Drop on a Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2008-11-01

    When deposited on a hot plate, a water droplet evaporates quickly. However, a vapor film appears under the drop above a critical temperature, called Leidenfrost temperature, which insulates the drop from its substrate. Linke & al (2006) reported a spontaneous movement of such a drop, when deposited on a ratchet. We study here the case of a flat substrate decorated with a single micrometric step. The drop is deposited on the lower part of the plate and pushed towards the step at small constant velocity. If the kinetic energy of the drop is sufficient, it can climb up the step. In that case, depending on the substrate temperature, the drop can either be decelerated or accelerated by the step. We try to understand the dynamics of these drops, especially the regime where they accelerate. Taking advantage of this phenomenon, we could then build a multiple-step setup, making it possible for a Leidenfrost drop to climb stairs.

  7. Investigations of levitated helium drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Dwight Lawrence

    1999-11-01

    We report on the development of two systems capable of levitating drops of liquid helium. Helium drops of ˜20 mum have been levitated with the radiation pressure from two counter-propagating Nd:YAG laser beams. Drops are produced with a submerged piezoelectric transducer, and could be held for up to three minutes in our optical trap. Calculations show that Brillouin and Raman scattering of the laser light in the liquid helium produces a negligible rate of evaporation of the drop. Evaporation caused by the enhanced vapor pressure of the curved drop surfaces appears to be a significant effect limiting the drop lifetimes. Helium drops as large as 2 cm in diameter have been suspended in the earth's gravitational field with a magnetic field. A commercial superconducting solenoid provides the necessary field, field-gradient product required to levitate the drops. Drops are cooled to 0.5 K with a helium-3 refrigerator, and can be held in the trap indefinitely. We have found that when two or more drops are levitated in the same magnetic trap, the drops often remain in a state of apparent contact without coalescing. This effect is a result of the evaporation of liquid from between the two drops, and is found to occur only for normal fluid drops. We can induce shape oscillations in charged, levitated drops with an applied ac electric field. We have measured the resonance frequencies and damping rates for the l = 2 mode of oscillation as function of temperature. We have also developed a theory to describe the small amplitude shape oscillations of a He II drop surrounded by its saturated vapor. In our theory, we have considered two sets of boundary conditions---one where the drop does not evaporate and another in which the liquid and vapor are in thermodynamic equilibrium. We have found that both solutions give a frequency that agrees well with experiment, but that the data for the damping rate agree better with the solution without evaporation.

  8. Eye drop neurology.

    PubMed

    Bennetto, Luke; Guly, Catherine; Ormerod, Ian; Plant, Gordon T

    2014-06-01

    Eye drops can help to diagnose and prevent complications of neurological disorders. Guttae ophthalmicae (eye drops) are generally safe because the drugs rarely achieve significant systemic concentrations, although there are rare exceptions. This article covers contemporary pharmacological pupil testing; how to dilate a pupil safely; common reasons why pupils do not respond to drops; and corneal lubrication to prevent complications of weak eye closure.

  9. Fate of sulfur mustard on soil: Evaporation, degradation, and vapor emission.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyunsook; Kah, Dongha; Chan Lim, Kyoung; Lee, Jin Young

    2017-01-01

    After application of sulfur mustard to the soil surface, its possible fate via evaporation, degradation following absorption, and vapor emission after decontamination was studied. We used a laboratory-sized wind tunnel, thermal desorber, gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) for systematic analysis. When a drop of neat HD was deposited on the soil surface, it evaporated slowly while being absorbed immediately into the matrix. The initial evaporation or drying rates of the HD drop were found to be power-dependent on temperature and initial drop volume. Moreover, drops of neat HD, ranging in size from 1 to 6 μL, applied to soil, evaporated at different rates, with the smaller drops evaporating relatively quicker. HD absorbed into soil remained for a month, degrading eventually to nontoxic thiodiglycol via hydrolysis through the formation of sulfonium ions. Finally, a vapor emission test was performed for HD contaminant after a decontamination process, the results of which suggest potential risk from the release of trace chemical quantities of HD into the environment.

  10. Advanced Evaporators for Lunar Lander and Lunar Habitat Thermal Control Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenic, Tadej

    2010-01-01

    Six 20.3 cm×20.3 cm (8 in×8 in) evaporators for Lunar Lander and Lunar Habitat thermal control applications were designed, fabricated and tested in a vapor compression loop at heat loads in the range of 3-6 kW. The evaporator heated area was 826 cm2 and their total mass ranged from 1.0 kg to 3.2 kg depending on the design. The primary objective of the study was to investigate different evaporator designs and identify and characterize the evaporator design with the lowest temperature, most uniform temperature, smallest mass, and lowest pressure drop. The results obtained using serpentine evaporators showed excellent temperature uniformity (+/-3° C) across the evaporator surface at these relatively high heat loads. The temperature lift from the evaporator surface to the average condenser coolant temperature was also measured and ranged from 30 to 50° C depending on the heat load. The Coefficient of Performance (COP), defined as the ratio of the heat load to the compressor work at 6 kW, was 1.9. The best evaporator out of six evaporators tested transferred heat at one half of the thermal resistance of the baseline evaporator, while maintaining the same system COP.

  11. An evaporation test based on Thermal Infra Red remote-sensing to select appropriate soil hydraulic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulet, Gilles; Mougenot, Bernard; Abdelouahab, Tarik Ben

    2009-10-01

    SummaryPedotransfer functions are the most widely used method to estimate common soil hydraulic properties at regional scale. Since they rely on an empirical link between textural and structural soil properties observed in the laboratory on undisturbed soil samples, one must check whether the pedotransfer functions built elsewhere also apply to the location of interest. Alternative methods to laboratory analysis, such as infiltration tests, exist but are difficult to carry out at large scales. Here we propose a method for selecting the appropriate hydraulic properties based on the physical link between the soil water diffusion properties and the plant water stress, which has been named the "evaporation test". It consists in (i) detecting water stress from remote-sensing data in the Thermal Infra Red spectrum and a simulated unstressed surface temperature, then (ii) estimating the date of the last irrigation/rainfall event, the water content at the end of this irrigation/rainfall event, the unstressed evapotranspiration rate and the average root depth and (iii) reducing the range of possible values of the hydraulic parameters to those that compute a time-to-stress that is consistent with the observed one, i.e. the difference between the observed water stress date and the date of the end of the last irrigation/rainfall event. The performance of this method is then checked for two sites within the frame of the SudMed and SALSA experiments by comparing the resulting properties to those obtained by other methods, namely the Beerkan infiltration test and the most commonly used pedotransfer functions. While not providing a unique set of hydraulic properties, the "evaporation test" is a good mean to refine the range of appropriate hydraulic parameter values at the scale of the Thermal Infra Red data.

  12. Taking the Easy Way Out: How the GED Testing Program Induces Students to Drop Out.

    PubMed

    Heckman, James J; Humphries, John Eric; Lafontaine, Paul A; Rodríguez, Pedro L

    2012-07-01

    The option to obtain a General Education Development (GED) certificate changes the incentives facing high school students. This paper evaluates the effect of three different GED policy innovations on high school graduation rates. A six point decrease in the GED pass rate due to an increase in passing standards produced a 1.3 point decline in overall dropout rates. The introduction of a GED certification program in high schools in Oregon produced a four percent decrease in graduation rates. Introduction of GED certificates in California increased dropout rates by 3 points. The GED program induces high school students to drop out.

  13. Taking the Easy Way Out: How the GED Testing Program Induces Students to Drop Out

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, James J.; Humphries, John Eric; LaFontaine, Paul A.; Rodríguez, Pedro L.

    2011-01-01

    The option to obtain a General Education Development (GED) certificate changes the incentives facing high school students. This paper evaluates the effect of three different GED policy innovations on high school graduation rates. A six point decrease in the GED pass rate due to an increase in passing standards produced a 1.3 point decline in overall dropout rates. The introduction of a GED certification program in high schools in Oregon produced a four percent decrease in graduation rates. Introduction of GED certificates in California increased dropout rates by 3 points. The GED program induces high school students to drop out. PMID:24634564

  14. The Ability of an Aftermarket Helmet Add-On Device to Reduce Impact-Force Accelerations During Drop Tests.

    PubMed

    Breedlove, Katherine; Breedlove, Evan; Nauman, Eric; Bowman, Thomas; Lininger, Monica R

    2017-08-03

      The Guardian Cap provides a soft covering intended to mitigate energy transfer to the head during football contact. Yet how well it attenuates impacts remains unknown.   To evaluate the changes in the Gadd Severity Index (GSI) and linear acceleration during drop tests on helmeted headforms with or without Guardian Caps.   Crossover study.   Laboratory.   Nine new football helmets sent directly from the manufacturer.   We dropped the helmets at 3 velocities on 6 helmet locations (front, side, right front boss, top, rear right boss, and rear) as prescribed by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment. Helmets were tested with facemasks in place but no Guardian Cap and then retested with the facemasks in place and the Guardian Cap affixed.   The GSI scores and linear accelerations measured in g forces.   For the GSI, we found a significant interaction among drop location, Guardian Cap presence, and helmet brand at the high velocity (F10,50 = 3.01, P = .005) but not at the low (F3.23,16.15 = 0.84, P = .50) or medium (F10,50 = 1.29, P = .26) velocities. Similarly for linear accelerations, we found a significant interaction among drop location, Guardian Cap presence, and helmet brand at the high velocity (F10,50 = 3.01, P = .002, ω(2) = 0.05) but not at the low (F10,50 = 0.49, P = .89, ω(2) < 0.01, 1-β = 0.16) or medium (F5.20,26.01 = 2.43, P = .06, ω(2) < 0.01, 1-β = 0.68) velocities.   The Guardian Cap failed to significantly improve the helmets' ability to mitigate impact forces at most locations. Limited evidence indicates how a reduction in GSI would provide clinically relevant benefits beyond reducing the risk of skull fracture or a similar catastrophic event.

  15. How drops bounce and dance on ice: the role of sublimating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Carlo; Bernagozzi, Ilaria; Jung, Stefan; Poulikakos, Dimos; Marengo, Marco; Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies Team; Themal Physics Laboratory Team

    2013-11-01

    Drop rebound is a spectacular event that appears after impact on superhydrophobic surfaces, due to low drop-solid substrate adhesion, and on hot substrates in Leidenfrost conditions, thanks to a vapor layer forming at the liquid-substrate interface, caused by drop evaporation. However, at temperatures below water freezing temperature, i.e. 0C, even superhydrophobicity can get lost. In the present work, we demonstrate that drop rebound can also be originated by another physical phenomenon, i.e. the solid substrate sublimation, at temperatures as low as -79C. To prove this mechanism, drop impact experiments were conducted on solid carbon dioxide, commonly known as dry ice. Drop dynamics and rebound were analyzed, together with the cases of drop impacting on a superhydrophobic surface and on a hot plate, to show how three different physical mechanisms, which apparently share nothing in common, i.e. superhydrophobicity, evaporation and sublimation, can all lead to drop rebound, in an extremely wide temperature range, from 300C down to even below -79C. Additional glycol drop impact tests proved the independence of the observed phenomena from the chosen liquid. Finally, the formation and visualization of an air vortex ring around an impacting drop is also reported. The authors acknowledge funding from Regione Lombardia and European Community (Marie Curie Fellowship).

  16. The Ex Vivo Eye Irritation Test (EVEIT) in evaluation of artificial tears: Purite-preserved versus unpreserved eye drops.

    PubMed

    Schrage, N; Frentz, M; Spoeler, F

    2012-09-01

    Preservatives in artificial tears cause controversy. New developments such as the Purite system have been introduced into the market, with the promise of little damage to the corneal surface. We wanted to give insight into the differences in the effect of preserved and unpreserved artifical tears on rabbit corneas cultured with the Ex Vivo Eye Irritation Test (EVEIT) system. We compared the two artifical tears products Hylo Comod and Optive being dropped for 72 hours each hour one drop onto the corneal surface. Each cornea was mechanically wounded with four epithelial defects on each cornea with a size of 3 to 4.5 mm(2). With n = 4 corneas in the Hylo-Comod and n = 4 corneas in the Optive group, we exposed the corneal surfaces to repeated doses of these artificial tears for 3 days. We observed healing of corneal erosions and surface epithelial integrity with sodium-fluoresceine staining under cobalt blue light illumination. We found nearly complete healing of epithelial defects with both artificial tears. The Hylo-Comod group healed significantly faster. After 72 hours, the vast majority of epithelial defects were closed. All corneas exposed to Purite showed superficial stippling, whereas the HyloComod group did not show any stippling of the cornea; this difference was significant. Epithelial healing and recovery in the EVEIT system is observed in both groups, confirming the concept of artificial tears as a supporting factor of corneal health and healing. The superficial stippling of the corneal epithelium was observed only in the Optive group. This effect is considered as a marker of dry eye syndrome, and should be prevented by the application of artificial tears. Preservative-free eye drops such as HyloComod improve healing, and prevent symptoms of dry eye syndrome in the EVEITsystem. Compared to EVEIT results of former experiments with benzalconium chloride-preserved eye drops, Optive promoted healing of corneal erosions.

  17. PILOT-SCALE TEST RESULTS OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA -11364

    SciTech Connect

    CORBETT JE; TEDESCH AR; WILSON RA; BECK TH; LARKIN J

    2011-02-14

    A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORPIDOE), through Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper summarizes results of a pilot-scale test program conducted during calendar year 2010 as part of the ongoing technology maturation development scope for the WFE.

  18. Evaporation from a meniscus within a capillary tube in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallinan, K. P.

    1993-01-01

    The following represents a summary of progress made on the project 'Evaporation from a Capillary Meniscus in Microgravity' being conducted at the University of Dayton during the period 1 Dec. 1992 to 30 Nov. 1993. The efforts during this first year of the grant focused upon the following specific tasks: (1) application of a 3-D scattering particle image velocimetry technique to thin film velocity field measurement; (2) modeling the thermo-fluid behavior of the evaporating meniscus in 0-g within large diameter capillaries; (3) conceptualization of the space flight test cell (loop) configuration; (4) construction of prototypes of the test loop configuration; (5) conduct of experiments in 0-g in the 2.2 second drop tower at NASA-LeRC to study evaporation from a capillary meniscus within a square cuvette; and (6) investigation of the effect of vibrations on the stability of the meniscus. An overview of the work completed within these six task areas is presented.

  19. Model for determining vapor equilibrium rates in the hanging drop method for protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented. Results are applied to 18 drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory. The chemical nature of the salt, drop size and shape, drop concentration, well size, well concentration, and temperature are taken into account. The rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation in this model possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  20. Model for determining vapor equilibrium rates in the hanging drop method for protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented. Results are applied to 18 drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory. The chemical nature of the salt, drop size and shape, drop concentration, well size, well concentration, and temperature are taken into account. The rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation in this model possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  1. Failure Analysis of Board-Level Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnections Under JEDEC Standard Drop Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Xi, Jing Si; Liu, Pin Kuan; Ding, Han

    2013-09-01

    This work investigates the board-level drop reliability of printed circuit boards (PCBs) assembled using three chip-size packages subjected to Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC) standard drop test condition B. The acceleration and dynamic strain responses at several locations of the board-level package in the time and frequency domain are comprehensively investigated. The results in the time domain suggest that the dynamic response of the board-level package has two phases: forced vibration and free vibration. The maximum response occurs at the first half free vibration cycle. The acceleration response at the center of the PCB is larger than at the edges, whereas the dynamic strain response is just the opposite. The results in the frequency domain show that the first mode is fundamental. In addition, failure analysis is performed using the dye-and-pry test and cross-section test, suggesting that the brittle cracking occurs at the layer between the integrated circuit (IC) pad and the solder, not only through intermetallic compound (IMC) but also along the surface between the IC pad and IMC.

  2. In vitro comparison of Günther Tulip and Celect filters: testing filtering efficiency and pressure drop.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, M; Malvé, M; Peña, E; Martínez, M A; Leask, R

    2015-02-05

    In this study, the trapping ability of the Günther Tulip and Celect inferior vena cava filters was evaluated. Thrombus capture rates of the filters were tested in vitro in horizontal position with thrombus diameters of 3 and 6mm and tube diameter of 19mm. The filters were tested in centered and tilted positions. Sets of 30 clots were injected into the model and the same process was repeated 20 times for each different condition simulated. Pressure drop experienced along the system was also measured and the percentage of clots captured was recorded. The Günther Tulip filter showed superiority in all cases, trapping almost 100% of 6mm clots both in an eccentric and tilted position and trapping 81.7% of the 3mm clots in a centered position and 69.3% in a maximum tilted position. The efficiency of all filters tested decreased as the size of the embolus decreased and as the filter was tilted. The injection of 6 clots raised the pressure drop to 4.1mmHg, which is a reasonable value that does not cause the obstruction of blood flow through the system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Results of Dynamic Data Acquisition During Mars Pathfinder Prototype Airbag Drop Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gregory L.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission, scheduled for launch in December 1996, will use an airbag system to safely deliver a lander to the Martian surface.The airbag landing system has undergone a comprehensive test program during its evolution from initial design phase to final qualification and acceptance testing. This paper outlines the test approach used in the airbag development program, describes the data acquisition system used to obtain and evaluate airbag performance data, and presents test results.

  4. A Comparison of Quasi-Static Indentation and Drop-Weight Impact Testing on Carbon/Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.; Douglas, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    This project was initiated to investigate the damage tolerance of polymer matrix composites (PMC). After a low velocity impact-such as the ones that can occur during manufacturing or service there is usually very little visual damage. There are two possible methods to simulate foreign object impact on PMC: static indentation and drop weight impact. A static method for modeling low velocity foreign object impact events for composites can prove to be very beneficial to researchers since much more data can be obtained from a static test than from an impact test. In order to examine if this is feasible, a series of static indentation and low velocity impact tests were performed and compared. Square specimens of different sizes and thicknesses were tested to cover a wide array of low velocity impact events. Laminates with a 45 degree stacking sequence were used since this is a common type of engineering laminate. Three distinct flexural rigidities under two different boundary conditions were tested in order to obtain damage due to large deflections. Comparisons between static indentation and low velocity impact tests were based on the maximum applied transverse load. The dependent parameters examined were dent depth, back surface crack length, delamination area, and load-deflection behavior. Results showed that no distinct differences could be seen between the static indentation tests and the low velocity impact tests, indicating that static indentation tests can be used to simulate low velocity impact events.

  5. Critical processes and parameters in the development of accident tolerant fuels drop-in capsule irradiation tests

    DOE PAGES

    Barrett, K. E.; Ellis, K. D.; Glass, C. R.; ...

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program is to develop the next generation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels with improved performance, reliability, and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions and with reduced waste generation. An irradiation test series has been defined to assess the performance of proposed ATF concepts under normal LWR operating conditions. The Phase I ATF irradiation test series is planned to be performed as a series of drop-in capsule tests to be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) operated by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Design, analysis, and fabrication processes formore » ATR drop-in capsule experiment preparation are presented in this paper to demonstrate the importance of special design considerations, parameter sensitivity analysis, and precise fabrication and inspection techniques for figure innovative materials used in ATF experiment assemblies. A Taylor Series Method sensitivity analysis approach was used to identify the most critical variables in cladding and rodlet stress, temperature, and pressure calculations for design analyses. The results showed that internal rodlet pressure calculations are most sensitive to the fission gas release rate uncertainty while temperature calculations are most sensitive to cladding I.D. and O.D. dimensional uncertainty. The analysis showed that stress calculations are most sensitive to rodlet internal pressure uncertainties, however the results also indicated that the inside radius, outside radius, and internal pressure were all magnified as they propagate through the stress equation. This study demonstrates the importance for ATF concept development teams to provide the fabricators as much information as possible about the material properties and behavior observed in prototype testing, mock-up fabrication and assembly, and chemical and mechanical testing of the materials that may have been performed in the concept development phase

  6. Critical processes and parameters in the development of accident tolerant fuels drop-in capsule irradiation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, K. E.; Ellis, K. D.; Glass, C. R.; Roth, G. A.; Teague, M. P.; Johns, J.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program is to develop the next generation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels with improved performance, reliability, and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions and with reduced waste generation. An irradiation test series has been defined to assess the performance of proposed ATF concepts under normal LWR operating conditions. The Phase I ATF irradiation test series is planned to be performed as a series of drop-in capsule tests to be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) operated by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Design, analysis, and fabrication processes for ATR drop-in capsule experiment preparation are presented in this paper to demonstrate the importance of special design considerations, parameter sensitivity analysis, and precise fabrication and inspection techniques for figure innovative materials used in ATF experiment assemblies. A Taylor Series Method sensitivity analysis approach was used to identify the most critical variables in cladding and rodlet stress, temperature, and pressure calculations for design analyses. The results showed that internal rodlet pressure calculations are most sensitive to the fission gas release rate uncertainty while temperature calculations are most sensitive to cladding I.D. and O.D. dimensional uncertainty. The analysis showed that stress calculations are most sensitive to rodlet internal pressure uncertainties, however the results also indicated that the inside radius, outside radius, and internal pressure were all magnified as they propagate through the stress equation. This study demonstrates the importance for ATF concept development teams to provide the fabricators as much information as possible about the material properties and behavior observed in prototype testing, mock-up fabrication and assembly, and chemical and mechanical testing of the materials that may have been performed in the concept development phase. Special

  7. Comparison of explicit finite element and mechanical simulation of the proximal femur during dynamic drop-tower testing.

    PubMed

    Ariza, O; Gilchrist, S; Widmer, R P; Guy, P; Ferguson, S J; Cripton, P A; Helgason, B

    2015-01-21

    Current screening techniques based on areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measurements are unable to identify the majority of people who sustain hip fractures. Biomechanical examination of such events may help determine what predisposes a hip to be susceptible to fracture. Recently, drop-tower simulations of in-vitro sideways falls have allowed the study of the mechanical response of the proximal human femur at realistic impact speeds. This technique has created an opportunity to validate explicit finite element (FE) models against dynamic test data. This study compared the outcomes of 15 human femoral specimens fractured using a drop tower with complementary specimen-specific explicit FE analysis. Correlation coefficient and root mean square error (RMSE) were found to be moderate for whole bone stiffness comparison (R(2)=0.3476 and 22.85% respectively). No correlation was found between experimentally and computationally predicted peak force, however, energy absorption comparison produced moderate correlation and RMSE (R(2)=0.4781 and 29.14% respectively). By comparing predicted strain maps to high speed video data we demonstrated the ability of the FE models to detect vulnerable portions of the bones. Based on our observations, we conclude that there exists a need to extend the current apparent level material models for bone to cover higher strain rates than previously tested experimentally.

  8. Reduction effect of surface temperature of baked bricks with different pore shapes during absorption-evaporation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Chiaki T.; Shinozuka, Katsumi

    2017-04-01

    To study the effect of decreasing in surface temperature of baked bricks with various pore shapes, the present study performed several experiments such as water absorbance test and heating test. For the preparation of experimental specimens, bricks with artificial spherical pores, artificial linear pores and non-additional artificial pores were made. The bricks were examined their properties of bulk density, Equotip hardness and absorbing properties by putting in the water. Wet bricks were also put in the incubator set at 50 °C, and monitored the increasing of surface temperature of each brick. Brick with linear pores shows higher water absorption rate in a short time than those with spherical pores. They evaporated moisture faster than those with a spherical pores. They kept the temperature by 11.7 °C lower than the setting temperature, whereas the bricks with a spherical pores kept the temperature by 10.5 °C . Bricks with linear pores has about 10% higher effectiveness of decreasing in surface temperature than those with spheroidal pores.

  9. Scanning drop sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Shinde, Aniketa A.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Jones, Ryan J.; Marcin, Martin R.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical or electrochemical and photochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  10. Scanning drop sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  11. Higher Drop in Speed during a Repeated Sprint Test in Soccer Players Reporting Former Hamstring Strain Injury.

    PubMed

    Røksund, Ola D; Kristoffersen, Morten; Bogen, Bård E; Wisnes, Alexander; Engeseth, Merete S; Nilsen, Ann-Kristin; Iversen, Vegard V; Mæland, Silje; Gundersen, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Hamstring strain injury is common in soccer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical capacity of players who have and have not suffered from hamstring strain injury in a sample of semi-professional and professional Norwegian soccer players in order to evaluate characteristics and to identify possible indications of insufficient rehabilitation. Method: Seventy-five semi-professional and professional soccer players (19 ± 3 years) playing at the second and third level in the Norwegian league participated in the study. All players answered a questionnaire, including one question about hamstring strain injury (yes/no) during the previous 2 years. They also performed a 40 m maximal sprint test, a repeated sprint test (8 × 20 m), a countermovement jump, a maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test, strength tests and flexibility tests. Independent sample t-tests were used to evaluate differences in the physical capacity of the players who had suffered from hamstring strain injury and those who had not. Mixed between-within subject's analyses of variance was used to compare changes in speed during the repeated sprint test between groups. Results: Players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous two years (16%) had a significantly higher drop in speed (0.07 vs. 0.02 s, p = 0.007) during the repeated sprint test, compared to players reporting no previous hamstring strain injury. In addition, there was a significant interaction (groups × time) (F = 3.22, p = 0.002), showing that speed in the two groups changed differently during the repeated sprint test. There were no significant differences in relations to age, weight, height, body fat, linear speed, countermovement jump height, leg strength, VO2max, or hamstring flexibility between the groups. Conclusion: Soccer players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous 2 years showed significant higher drop in speed during the repeated sprint test compared to players with no hamstring

  12. Higher Drop in Speed during a Repeated Sprint Test in Soccer Players Reporting Former Hamstring Strain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Røksund, Ola D.; Kristoffersen, Morten; Bogen, Bård E.; Wisnes, Alexander; Engeseth, Merete S.; Nilsen, Ann-Kristin; Iversen, Vegard V.; Mæland, Silje; Gundersen, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Hamstring strain injury is common in soccer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical capacity of players who have and have not suffered from hamstring strain injury in a sample of semi-professional and professional Norwegian soccer players in order to evaluate characteristics and to identify possible indications of insufficient rehabilitation. Method: Seventy-five semi-professional and professional soccer players (19 ± 3 years) playing at the second and third level in the Norwegian league participated in the study. All players answered a questionnaire, including one question about hamstring strain injury (yes/no) during the previous 2 years. They also performed a 40 m maximal sprint test, a repeated sprint test (8 × 20 m), a countermovement jump, a maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test, strength tests and flexibility tests. Independent sample t-tests were used to evaluate differences in the physical capacity of the players who had suffered from hamstring strain injury and those who had not. Mixed between-within subject's analyses of variance was used to compare changes in speed during the repeated sprint test between groups. Results: Players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous two years (16%) had a significantly higher drop in speed (0.07 vs. 0.02 s, p = 0.007) during the repeated sprint test, compared to players reporting no previous hamstring strain injury. In addition, there was a significant interaction (groups × time) (F = 3.22, p = 0.002), showing that speed in the two groups changed differently during the repeated sprint test. There were no significant differences in relations to age, weight, height, body fat, linear speed, countermovement jump height, leg strength, VO2max, or hamstring flexibility between the groups. Conclusion: Soccer players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous 2 years showed significant higher drop in speed during the repeated sprint test compared to players with no hamstring

  13. Representative shuttle evaporative heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a representative shuttle evaporative heat sink (RSEHS) system which vaporizes an expendable fluid to provide cooling for the shuttle heat transport fluid loop is reported. The optimized RSEHS minimum weight design meets or exceeds the shuttle flash evaporator system requirements. A cold trap which cryo-pumps flash evaporator exhaust water from the CSD vacuum chamber test facility to prevent water contamination of the chamber pumping equipment is also described.

  14. A Comparison of Quasi-Static Indentation and Drop-Weight Impact Testing on Carbon-Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.

    2001-01-01

    The project had two objectives: 1) The primary objective was to characterize damage tolerance of composite materials. To accomplish this, polymer matrix composites were to be subjected to static indentation as well as low-velocity impacts and the results analyzed. 2) A second objective was to investigate the effects of laser shock peening on the damage tolerance of aerospace materials, such as aluminum alloys, in terms of crack nucleation and crack propagation. The impact testing was proposed to be performed using a Dynatup drop tower. The specimens were to be placed over a square opening in a steel platen and impacted with a hemispherical tup. The damage was to be characterized in the laminate specimens. The damage tolerance of aerospace alloys was to be studied by conducting fatigue tests on aluminum alloy specimens with prior shock peening treatment. The crack length was to be monitored by a microscope and the crack propagation rate, da/dN, determined.

  15. Comparison of ALE and SPH Simulations of Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section into Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fuchs, Yvonne T.

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of multi-terrain impact has been identified as an important research area for improved prediction of rotorcraft crashworthiness within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program on Rotorcraft Crashworthiness. As part of this effort, two vertical drop tests were conducted of a 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section into water. For the first test, the fuselage section was impacted in a baseline configuration without energy absorbers. For the second test, the fuselage section was retrofitted with a composite honeycomb energy absorber. Both tests were conducted at a nominal velocity of 25-ft/s. A detailed finite element model was developed to represent each test article and water impact was simulated using both Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) approaches in LS-DYNA, a nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Analytical predictions were correlated with experimental data for both test configurations. In addition, studies were performed to evaluate the influence of mesh density on test-analysis correlation.

  16. International Space Station (ISS) Bacterial Filter Elements (BFEs): Filter Efficiency and Pressure Drop Testing of Returned Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert D.; Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.; Berger, Gordon M.; Perry, Jay L.

    2017-01-01

    The air quality control equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and future deep space exploration vehicles provide the vital function of maintaining a clean cabin environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of sedimentation. The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system architecture in the U.S. Segment uses a distributed particulate filtration approach consisting of traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters deployed at multiple locations in each U.S. Seg-ment module; these filters are referred to as Bacterial Filter Elements, or BFEs. In our previous work, we presented results of efficiency and pressure drop measurements for a sample set of two returned BFEs with a service life of 2.5 years. In this follow-on work, we present similar efficiency, pressure drop, and leak tests results for a larger sample set of six returned BFEs. The results of this work can aid the ISS Program in managing BFE logistics inventory through the stations planned lifetime as well as provide insight for managing filter element logistics for future exploration missions. These results also can provide meaningful guidance for particulate filter designs under consideration for future deep space exploration missions.

  17. Orion Swing Drop 6

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-25

    Water impact test of an 18,000-pound (8,165 kilogram) test version of the Orion spacecraft at NASA's Langley Research Center. NASA is swing drop testing this Orion capsule mock-up at Langley's Hydro Impact Basin to certify the actual Orion spacecraft for water landings. In a series of tests, Orion is being dropped in a variety of different conditions to help fine-tune NASA's predictions of Orion's landing loads.

  18. Testing data evaluation strategies for estimating precipitation and actual evaporation from precision lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Frederik; Durner, Wolfgang; Fank, Johann; Pütz, Thomas; Wollschläger, Ute

    2014-05-01

    across the soil-atmosphere boundary from lysimeter data. To test how different strategies of data processing perform under various circumstances, we used numerical simulation to generate synthetic data and corrupted these with three different noise patterns of increasing complexity. We found that traditional low-pass filtering approaches are not very well suited for our use case. However, an additional threshold-based separation of P and ET after initial smoothing appears to work considerably better and more robust, while still being straightforward to implement. A third, more sophisticated approach proposed by Peters (2013) that extends on this method by data driven parameter scaling, should be subject to further research. Based on our preliminary findings, we suggest reducing degrees-of-freedom of this strategy.

  19. Burning Of Dense Clusters Of Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents theoretical study of evaporation, ignition, and combustion of rich and relatively dense clusters of drops of liquid fuel. Focus on interactions between heterogenous liquid/gas mixture in cluster and flame surrounding it. Theoretical model of evaporation, ignition, and combustion presented.

  20. Effects of crack starter bead preparation in drop-weight test of nil-ductility transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Iida, K.

    1999-05-01

    The procedure for making crack starter weld deposits on drop-weight test (DWT) specimens was altered from two passes to one pass in about 1990. The effects of some parameters of crack starter weld process on drop-weight test results were studied. Results of this study indicated that length of overlap of the second pass and height of crack starter beads were most effective on mil-ductility temperature (T{sub NDT}). When overlap length and bead height of two-pass deposit were small enough, T{sub NDT} obtained by two-pass deposit became lower than one-pass T{sub NDT}, the discrepancy being by as much as 25 C. T{sub NDT} values for 24 Japanese steels were determined using two different DWT methods, one-pass deposit and two-pass deposit having small overlap length and bead height. The difference of T{sub NDT} depending on DWT method could be seen only for high-toughness low-alloy steel base metals. For other materials (i.e., low-to-medium-toughness low-alloy steel base metals, weld metals, and high-toughness carbon steels), T{sub NDT}s by two-pass and one-pass deposits were essentially the same. For lower-toughness steels, T{sub NDT}s by two-pass and one-pass deposits were essentially the same. For lower-toughness steels, T{sub NDT} was frequently lower than the temperature of ({sub v}T{sub cv} {minus} 33 C), and thus, the reference nil-ductility temperature (RT{sub NDT}) was determined from Charpy impact test results. These results can be taken as a way of interpreting the past toughness evaluations made for operating plants using the two-pass T{sub NDT}.

  1. Testing the generalized complementary relationship of evaporation with continental-scale long-term water-balance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Crago, Richard; Qualls, Russell J.

    2016-09-01

    The original and revised versions of the generalized complementary relationship (GCR) of evaporation (ET) were tested with six-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC6) level long-term (1981-2010) water-balance data (sample size of 334). The two versions of the GCR were calibrated with Parameter-Elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) mean annual precipitation (P) data and validated against water-balance ET (ETwb) as the difference of mean annual HUC6-averaged P and United States Geological Survey HUC6 runoff (Q) rates. The original GCR overestimates P in about 18% of the PRISM grid points covering the contiguous United States in contrast with 12% of the revised version. With HUC6-averaged data the original version has a bias of -25 mm yr-1 vs the revised version's -17 mm yr-1, and it tends to more significantly underestimate ETwb at high values than the revised one (slope of the best fit line is 0.78 vs 0.91). At the same time it slightly outperforms the revised version in terms of the linear correlation coefficient (0.94 vs 0.93) and the root-mean-square error (90 vs 92 mm yr-1).

  2. Evaporating firewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In this note, we begin by presenting an argument suggesting that large AdS black holes dual to typical high-energy pure states of a single holographic CFT must have some structure at the horizon, i.e. a fuzzball/firewall, unless the procedure to probe physics behind the horizon is state-dependent. By weakly coupling the CFT to an auxiliary system, such a black hole can be made to evaporate. In a case where the auxiliary system is a second identical CFT, it is possible (for specific initial states) that the system evolves to precisely the thermofield double state as the original black hole evaporates. In this case, the dual geometry should include the "late-time" part of the eternal AdS black hole spacetime which includes smooth spacetime behind the horizon of the original black hole. Thus, if a firewall is present initially, it evaporates. This provides a specific realization of the recent ideas of Maldacena and Susskind that the existence of smooth spacetime behind the horizon of an evaporating black hole can be enabled by maximal entanglement with a Hawking radiation system (in our case the second CFT) rather than prevented by it. For initial states which are not finely-tuned to produce the thermofield double state, the question of whether a late-time infalling observer experiences a firewall translates to a question about the gravity dual of a typical high-energy state of a two-CFT system.

  3. The leading edge of evaporating droplets.

    PubMed

    Guéna, G; Poulard, C; Cazabat, A M

    2007-08-01

    New experiments on drops evaporating in normal atmosphere from smooth substrates in the situation of complete wetting are reported and compared with the available theoretical model. They are the continuation of previous work with alkane or water sessile drops, which is first briefly summarized. The model accounts very well for the dynamics of the drop radius, but the predictions are only qualitative for the contact angle, especially for small angles. Experiments with hanging drops allow us first to discard any influence of convection in the gas phase on the drops dynamics. Then the main part of the paper concerns new experiments with polydimethylsiloxane oligomers. These silicone oils are similar to alkanes as far as evaporation rate is concerned, but have lower surface tensions, and therefore smaller dynamic contact angles. The purity of the oils appears to be critical for the experiments, and requires a preliminary investigation. Then a systematic study of the drops dynamics is presented, as a basis for forthcoming theoretical work.

  4. Droplet evaporation with complexity of evaporation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Jin Young; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation of a sessile droplet often exhibits a mixed evaporation mode, where the contact radius and the contact angle simultaneously vary with time. For sessile water droplets containing polymers with different initial polymer concentrations, we experimentally study their evaporation dynamics by measuring mass and volume changes. We show how diffusion-limited evaporation governs droplet evaporation, regardless of the complexity of evaporation behavior, and how the evaporation rate depends on the polymer concentration. Finally, we suggest a unified expression for a diffusion-limited evaporation rate for a sessile droplet with complexity in evaporation dynamics.

  5. Pressure drop testing of corrugated stainless steel pliable gas tubing (PLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bharadwaj

    An experimental program was initiated to determine the Darcy friction factor in straight corrugated stainless steel pliable gas tubing (PLT). Pressure loss tests were conducted on PLT per I.S. EN 15266:2007. A power law least-squares curve fit was used to relate pressure loss per unit length as a function of volume flow rate. The calculated coefficient of determination values for the straight PLT exceeded 0.90 indicating suitable correlation. Darcy friction factors were calculated from test data for each case and plotted on a Moody diagram as a function of Reynolds number based on the minimum PLT cross section. For Reynolds numbers less than 2300 the pressure loss data for PLT yielded an inverse relationship between the Darcy friction factor and the Reynolds number, with a proportionality coefficient of 49. The measurement uncertainty estimates for straight sections was performed with a 95% confidence level. Straight PLT flow rates for air and representative fuel gases that would yield a pressure loss Deltap = 1 mbar were calculated as a function of PLT length and diameter. Fitting pressure loss tests were performed for elbows, tees, and bullhead tees. The loss coefficients were evaluated and tabulated. The calculated coefficient of determination values for the fittings was found to be low. The measurement uncertainty was calculated using the root sum square error method and was found to be very high because of the low flow rates considered in this experiment.

  6. Performance evaluation of Space Shuttle SRB parachutes from air drop and scaled model wind tunnel tests. [Solid Rocket Booster recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moog, R. D.; Bacchus, D. L.; Utreja, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance characteristics have been determined for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster drogue, main, and pilot parachutes. The performance evaluation on the 20-degree conical ribbon parachutes is based primarily on air drop tests of full scale prototype parachutes. In addition, parametric wind tunnel tests were performed and used in parachute configuration development and preliminary performance assessments. The wind tunnel test data are compared to the drop test results and both sets of data are used to determine the predicted performance of the Solid Rocket Booster flight parachutes. Data from other drop tests of large ribbon parachutes are also compared with the Solid Rocket Booster parachute performance characteristics. Parameters assessed include full open terminal drag coefficients, reefed drag area, opening characteristics, clustering effects, and forebody interference.

  7. Drop dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The drop dynamics module is a Spacelab-compatible acoustic positioning and control system for conducting drop dynamics experiments in space. It consists basically of a chamber, a drop injector system, an acoustic positioning system, and a data collection system. The principal means of collecting data is by a cinegraphic camera. The drop is positioned in the center of the chamber by forces created by standing acoustic waves generated in the nearly cubical chamber (about 12 cm on a side). The drop can be spun or oscillated up to fission by varying the phse and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The system is designed to perform its experiments unattended, except for start-up and shutdown events and other unique events that require the attention of the Spacelab payload specialist.

  8. F-106B airplane active control landing gear drop test performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, William E.; Mcgehee, John R.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Vogler, William A.

    1990-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic loads and vibrations resulting from landing impact and from runway and taxiway unevenness are recognized as significant factors in causing fatigue damage, dynamic stress on the airframe, crew and passenger discomfort, and reduction of the pilot's ability to control the aircraft during ground operations. One potential method for improving operational characteristics of aircraft on the ground is the application of active control technology to the landing gears to reduce ground loads applied to the airframe. An experimental investigation was conducted on series-hydraulic active control nose gear. The experiments involved testing the gear in both passive and active control modes. Results of this investigation show that a series-hydraulic active control gear is feasible and that such a gear is effective in reducing the loads transmitted by the gear to the airframe during ground operations.

  9. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    PubMed Central

    Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Schut, Marthe F. L.; Desarnaud, Julie; Prat, Marc; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls , but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, de-icing of airplanes, inkjet printing and coating applications. In many of these processes, a phase change happens within the drop because of solvent evaporation, temperature changes or chemical reactions, which consequently lead to liquid to solid transitions in the droplets. Here we show that crystallization patterns of evaporating of water drops containing dissolved salts are different from the stains reported for evaporating colloidal suspensions. This happens because during the solvent evaporation, the salts crystallize and grow during the drying. Our results show that the patterns of the resulting salt crystal stains are mainly governed by wetting properties of the emerging crystal as well as the pathway of nucleation and growth, and are independent of the evaporation rate and thermal conductivity of the substrates. PMID:26012481

  10. An Experimental Study of Pressure Oscillation in a Capillary Pumped Loop with Multiple Evaporators and Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jen-Tung; Hoang, Triem T.

    1998-01-01

    The heat transport capability of a capillary pumped loop (CPL) is limited by the pressure drop that its evaporator wick can sustain. The pressure drop in a CPL is not constant even under seemingly steady operation, but rather exhibits an oscillatory behavior. A hydrodynamic theory based on a mass-spring-dashpot model was previously developed to predict the pressure oscillation in a CPL with a single evaporator and a single condenser. The theory states that the pressure oscillation is a function of physical dimensions of the CPL components and operating conditions. Experimental data agreed very well with theoretical predictions. The hydrodynamic stability theory has recently been extended to predict the pressure oscillations in CPLs with multiple evaporators and multiple condensers. Concurrently, an experimental study was conducted to verify the theory and to investigate the effects of various parameters on the pressure oscillation. Four evaporators with different wick properties were tested using a test loop containing two condenser plates. The test loop allowed the four evaporators to be tested in a single-pump, two-pump or four-pump configuration, and the two condenser plates to be plumbed either in parallel or in series. Test conditions included varying the power input, the reservoir set point temperature, the condenser sink temperature, and the flow resistance between the reservoir and the loop. Experimental results agreed well with theoretical predictions.

  11. Blast Mitigation Sea Analysis - Evaluation of Lumbar Compression Data Trends in 5th Percentile Female Anthropomorphic Test Device Performance Compared to 50th Percentile Male Anthropomorphic Test Device in Drop Tower Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-21

    Reference Values (IARVs) • ATD data channels recorded include: – Accelerations • Head (Resultant, HIC15, HIC36) • Chest (Resultant) • Pelvis (DRI) – Forces...Moments • Upper Neck • Lumbar • Femur • Upper Tibia • Lower Tibia Testing Background 2 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Testing Background 3 • Drop tower

  12. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Nerney, S. F.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of heating near the top of streamers in ideal Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models, where the plasma is weakly contained by the magnetic field. Heating causes slow opening of field lines and release of new solar wind. It was discovered in simulations and, due to the absence of loss mechanisms, the ultimate end point is the complete evaporation of the streamer. Of course streamers do not behave in this way because there are losses by thermal conduction and radiation. Physically, heating is also expected to depend on ambient conditions. We use our global MHD model with thermal conduction to examine the effect of changing the heating scale height. We also apply and extend an analytic model of streamers developed by Pneuman (1968) to show that steady streamers are unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than approximately 2 x 10(exp 6) K.

  13. Relationship between Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure Drop During the Sit-to-stand Test in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Hideo; Sumida, Koichiro; Suzuki, Shota; Kagimoto, Minako; Okuyama, Yuki; Ehara, Yosuke; Katsumata, Mari; Fujita, Megumi; Fujiwara, Akira; Saka, Sanae; Yatsu, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuo; Kuji, Tadashi; Hirawa, Nobuhito; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Yasuda, Gen; Umemura, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Patients with orthostatic hypotension (OH) have high arterial stiffness. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) often have cardiac autonomic neuropathy that leads to OH; however, whether OH is an indicator of arterial stiffness progression is unclear. We aimed to investigate whether the cardioankle vascular index (CAVI) varies between DM patients with and without OH using the sit-to-stand test (STST). Methods: One hundred and fifty-nine patients with DM underwent CAVI assessment and blood pressure (BP) and heart rate change evaluation during the STST. OH was defined as a decline in systolic BP (SBP) and/or diastolic BP of at least 20 mmHg or 10 mmHg, respectively, in the initial and late upright positions compared with that in the sitting position. Results: OH was diagnosed in 42 patients (26.4%). DM patients with OH had significantly higher CAVI (9.36 ± 1.15 versus 8.89 ± 1.18, p = 0.026) than those without OH. CAVI was significantly inversely correlated with systolic and diastolic BP changes (R = −0.347, p <0.001 and R = −0.314, p <0.001, respectively) in the initial upright position. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that age, SBP changes, and low frequency component in the initial upright position were independent determinants of CAVI. Conclusion: Patients with DM having large BP drops occurring when moving from sitting to standing have high arterial stiffness. A significant BP drop during the STST necessitates careful evaluation of advanced arterial stiffness in patient with DM. PMID:27453255

  14. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  15. Testing an in-line digital holography ‘inverse method’ for the Lagrangian tracking of evaporating droplets in homogeneous nearly isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chareyron, D.; Marié, J. L.; Fournier, C.; Gire, J.; Grosjean, N.; Denis, L.; Lance, M.; Méès, L.

    2012-04-01

    An in-line digital holography technique is tested, the objective being to measure Lagrangian three-dimensional (3D) trajectories and the size evolution of droplets evaporating in high-Reλ strong turbulence. The experiment is performed in homogeneous, nearly isotropic turbulence (50 × 50 × 50 mm3) created by the meeting of six synthetic jets. The holograms of droplets are recorded with a single high-speed camera at frame rates of 1-3 kHz. While hologram time series are generally processed using a classical approach based on the Fresnel transform, we follow an ‘inverse problem’ approach leading to improved size and 3D position accuracy and both in-field and out-of-field detection. The reconstruction method is validated with 60 μm diameter water droplets released from a piezoelectric injector ‘on-demand’ and which do not appreciably evaporate in the sample volume. Lagrangian statistics on 1000 reconstructed tracks are presented. Although improved, uncertainty on the depth positions remains higher, as expected in in-line digital holography. An additional filter is used to reduce the effect of this uncertainty when calculating the droplet velocities and accelerations along this direction. The diameters measured along the trajectories remain constant within ±1.6%, thus indicating that accuracy on size is high enough for evaporation studies. The method is then tested with R114 freon droplets at an early stage of evaporation. The striking feature is the presence on each hologram of a thermal wake image, aligned with the relative velocity fluctuations ‘seen’ by the droplets (visualization of the Lagrangian fluid motion about the droplet). Its orientation compares rather well with that calculated by using a dynamical equation for describing the droplet motion. A decrease of size due to evaporation is measured for the droplet that remains longest in the turbulence domain.

  16. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  17. Analysis and testing of a new method for drop size and velocity measurements using laser light scatter interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Drop size and velocity can be measured simultaneously using an optical system which is the same as a laser Doppler velocimeter except that three detectors are located at selected spacings behind the receiver aperture. Drops passing through the intersection of the two beams scatter light which produces an interferrence fringe pattern. The temporal frequency of the fringe pattern is the Doppler difference frequency which is linearly proportional to the drop velocity while the spatial frequency is linearly related to the drop diameter. The spacing of the fringes is also dependent upon the light wavelength, beam intersection angle, drop refractive index (unless reflected light is measured), and the location of the receiver. The theoretical analysis was verified, signal phase processing methods were evaluated, and the effects of signal quality upon the measurements were investigated.

  18. Desiccation of a Sessile Drop of Blood: Cracks Formation and Delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Brutin, David

    2011-11-01

    The evaporation of drops of biological fluids has been studied since few years du to several applications in medical fields such as medical tests, drug screening, biostabilization... The evaporation of a drop of whole blood leads to the formation of final typical pattern of cracks. Flow motion, adhesion, gelation and fracturation all occur during the evaporation of this complex matter. During the drying, a sol-gel transition develops. The drying kinetics is explained by a simple model of evaporation taking account of the evolution of the gelation front. The system solidifies and when stresses are too important, cracks nucleate. The cracks formation and the structure of the crack pattern are investigated. The initial crack spacing is found in good agreement with the implementation in open geometry of the model of cracks formation induced by evaporation proposed by Allain and Limat. Finally, the drop is still drying after the end of the formation of cracks which leads, like in the situation of colloid suspensions, to the observation of a delamination phenomenon.

  19. Evaporation-induced failure of hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Liu, T.; Ma, J.; Wang, P.; Wang, Y.; Leprince-Wang, Y.; Jing, G.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrophobic coatings have tremendous applications in many fields of industries, and their robustness is an important subject of investigation. Here we experimentally demonstrate the detachment of hydrophobic coating and the formation of the residual deposit resulting from an evaporating drop of water. A hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT) coating is employed to enhance the hydrophobicity of ZnO nanowire arrays (advancing and receding contact angle of 165° and 128°, respectively). Being a model system of the unique bonding interaction between ODT and ZnO, water drop drying on the structure of ODT/ZnO is examined. Our experimental results showed the significant depression and even failure of the hydrophobicity on this composite surface resulting from collecting the deposits of ODT molecules during the drop drying. By analyzing energy criterion and force balance, surface tension at the moving contact line is identified as a dominating destructive force to unstick the coating molecules. Interestingly, a normal rinsing stream does not damage this coating to alter its hydrophobicity, but rather is overshadowed by the evaporation of the tinny water drop. The drops of rain or condensed water outdoor may thus play the same role to damage the functional coatings after their evaporation. Our findings indicate that more delicate designs are needed to prevent the destructive effects of drop evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  20. The effect of overhead target on the lower limb biomechanics during a vertical drop jump test in elite female athletes.

    PubMed

    Mok, K-M; Bahr, R; Krosshaug, T

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of an overhead target on the jump height and lower limb biomechanics in all three planes of motion in a vertical drop jump (VDJ) task among elite female handball and football (soccer) players. The hypothesis was that adding an overhead target to the VDJ task improves jump height, increases joint loading, and decreases frontal plane knee control. Five hundred and twenty-three female handball and football players (mean ± SD: 21 ± 4 years, 168 ± 6 cm, 65 ± 8 kg) completed the test. The overhead target increased jumping height by 5.8%. Furthermore, the overhead target led to statistically significant changes in many of the lower limb biomechanical variables examined. However, all the changes in kinematics and kinetics were clinically insignificant, as indicated by the small effect sizes. Strong to moderate positive Spearman's rank correlations were found between the two conditions. Therefore, an overhead target is unlikely to increase the range of responses in biomechanical variables in elite female handball and football athletes.

  1. 3D FEM Simulations of Drop Test Reliability on 3D-WLP: Effects of Solder Reflow Residual Stress and Molding Resin Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhenini, Soufyane; Tougui, Abdellah; Bouchou, Abdelhake; Mohan, Ranganathan; Dosseul, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Numerous three-dimensional (3D) packaging technologies are currently used for 3D integration. 3D-wafer level package (3D-WLP) appears to be a way to keep increasing the density of the microelectronic components. The reliability of 3D components has to be evaluated on mechanical demonstrators with daisy chains before real production. Numerical modeling is acknowledged as a very efficient tool for design optimization. In this paper, 3D finite-elements calculations are carried out to analyze the effects of molding resin's mechanical properties and thickness on the 3D component's dynamic response under drop loading conditions. Residual stress generated by solder reflow is also discussed. The influences of residual stresses on the numerical estimation of the component behavior during drop loading are studied. Solder reflow residual stresses have an impact on solder plastic strain and die equivalent stress calculations. We have compared the result of two numerical drop test models. Stress-free initial conduction is introduced for the first model. Solder reflow residual stresses are considered as the initial condition for the second drop test model. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons are carried out to show the effect of residual stress in drop test calculations. For the effect of molding resin thickness on the component behavior under drop loading, the stress-free initial condition is considered. The effect of the molding resin's thickness on critical area location is discussed. The solder bump maximum plastic shear strain and the silicon die maximum equivalent stress are used as reliability criteria. Numerical submodeling techniques are used to increase calculation accuracy. Numerical results have contributed to the design optimization of the 3D-WLP component.

  2. Evaporation dehydrator

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, L.

    1985-08-06

    A method and apparatus for the treatment of oilfield heavy oil emulsions is provided. The method utilizes, in combination, the steps of evaporation, vapor/liquid separation, and solids settling to dehydrate, degassify and remove solids from the heavy oil emulsion and produce oil having less than 0.5% by volume basic solids and water. The apparatus comprises an insulated, horizontal, cylindrical vessel. Mounted in the upper end of the vessel chamber is an inclined, tubular member having a closed upper end and an open lower end. At its closed end, the member forms a receiving chamber. A mechanical foam breaker extends transversely across the interior of the tubular member, downstream of the chamber. A stack of angularly inclined, heated trays, arranged in zigzag fashion, are positioned beneath the tubular member, to provide an elongate flowpath. The lower end of the tubular member is positioned to feed onto the upper end of the first tray. The flowpath formed by the stack of trays terminates at a level above the bottom of the vessel, so that a quiescent settling sump is provided by the base of the vessel. The vessel includes a feed inlet opening into the receiving chamber, a vapor outlet leading from the top of said vessel, and liquid and solids outlets leading from the sump. A stream of pre-heated heavy oil emulsion is fed to the receiving chamber, wherein part of the contained water in the vapor form breaks out. The foaming stream is contained by the tubular member and is substantially disintegrated by the foam breaker. The stream then issues onto the upper end of the stack of trays and is heated as it passes as a shallow, broad layer over the trays, to gradually evaporate the remaining water from the emulsion and solids. The dehydrated solids are settled out in the sump, leaving oil containing less than 0.5% basic solids and water.

  3. Streamer Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A. H.; Wu, Shi T.; Nerney, S.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporation is the consequence of slow plasma heating near the tops of streamers where the plasma is only weakly contained by the magnetic field. The form it takes is the slow opening of field lines at the top of the streamer and transient formation of new solar wind. It was discovered in polytropic model calculations, where due to the absence of other energy loss mechanisms in magnetostatic streamers, its ultimate endpoint is the complete evaporation of the streamer. This takes, for plausible heating rates, weeks to months in these models. Of course streamers do not behave this way, for more than one reason. One is that there are losses due to thermal conduction to the base of the streamer and radiation from the transition region. Another is that streamer heating must have a characteristic time constant and depend on the ambient physical conditions. We use our global Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model with thermal conduction to examine a few examples of the effect of changing the heating scale height and of making ad hoc choices for how the heating depends on ambient conditions. At the same time, we apply and extend the analytic model of streamers, which showed that streamers will be unable to contain plasma for temperatures near the cusp greater than about 2xl0(exp 6) K. Slow solar wind is observed to come from streamers through transient releases. A scenario for this that is consistent with the above physical process is that heating increases the near-cusp temperature until field lines there are forced open. The subsequent evacuation of the flux tubes by the newly forming slow wind decreases the temperature and heating until the flux tubes are able to reclose. Then, over a longer time scale, heating begins to again refill the flux tubes with plasma and increase the temperature until the cycle repeats itself. The calculations we report here are first steps towards quantitative evaluation of this scenario.

  4. Polycrystalline structures formed in evaporating droplets as a parameter to test the action of Zincum metallicum 30c in a wheat seed model.

    PubMed

    Kokornaczyk, Maria Olga; Baumgartner, Stephan; Betti, Lucietta

    2016-05-01

    Polycrystalline structures formed inside evaporating droplets of different biological fluids have been shown sensitive towards various influences, including ultra high dilutions (UHDs), representing so a new approach potentially useful for basic research in homeopathy. In the present study we tested on a wheat seed model Zincum metallicum 30c efficacy versus lactose 30c and water. Stressed and non-stressed wheat seeds were watered with the three treatments. Seed-leakage droplets were evaporated and the polycrystalline structures formed inside the droplet residues were analyzed for their local connected fractal dimensions (LCFDs) (measure of complexity) using the software ImageJ. We have found significant differences in LCFD values of polycrystalline structures obtained from stressed seeds following the treatments (p<0.0001); Zincum metallicum 30c lowered the structures' complexity compared to lactose 30c and water. In non-stressed seeds no significant differences were found. The droplet evaporation method (DEM) might represent a potentially useful tool in basic research in homeopathy. Furthermore our results suggest a sensitization of the stressed model towards the treatment action, which is conforming to previous findings. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrostatic Positioning System for a free fall test at drop tower Bremen and an overview of tests for the Weak Equivalence Principle in past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondag, Andrea; Dittus, Hansjörg

    2016-08-01

    The Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) is at the basis of General Relativity - the best theory for gravitation today. It has been and still is tested with different methods and accuracies. In this paper an overview of tests of the Weak Equivalence Principle done in the past, developed in the present and planned for the future is given. The best result up to now is derived from the data of torsion balance experiments by Schlamminger et al. (2008). An intuitive test of the WEP consists of the comparison of the accelerations of two free falling test masses of different composition. This has been carried through by Kuroda & Mio (1989, 1990) with the up to date most precise result for this setup. There is still more potential in this method, especially with a longer free fall time and sensors with a higher resolution. Providing a free fall time of 4.74 s (9.3 s using the catapult) the drop tower of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) at the University of Bremen is a perfect facility for further improvements. In 2001 a free fall experiment with high sensitive SQUID (Superconductive QUantum Interference Device) sensors tested the WEP with an accuracy of 10-7 (Nietzsche, 2001). For optimal conditions one could reach an accuracy of 10-13 with this setup (Vodel et al., 2001). A description of this experiment and its results is given in the next part of this paper. For the free fall of macroscopic test masses it is important to start with precisely defined starting conditions concerning the positions and velocities of the test masses. An Electrostatic Positioning System (EPS) has been developed to this purpose. It is described in the last part of this paper.

  6. Drop Reliability of Epoxy-contained Sn-58 wt.%Bi Solder Joint with ENIG and ENEPIG Surface Finish Under Temperature and Humidity Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Woo-Ram; Kim, Yongil; Kim, Kyung-Yeol; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2016-07-01

    The influence of two kinds of surface finish, namely electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) and electroless nickel electroless palladium immersion gold (ENEPIG), on the interfacial reactions and drop reliability of epoxy-enhanced Sn-58 wt.%Bi solder has been investigated after temperature-humidity storage tests. The chemical composition and morphology of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Also, the mechanical reliability of solder joints was evaluated using board-level drop tests. The Sn-Bi epoxy solder/ENEPIG joint exhibited higher IMC growth rate than the Sn-Bi epoxy solder/ENIG joint. After 500 h at 85°C/85% RH storage condition, new IMCs were formed on the Ni3Sn4 layer in samples with both surface finishes. The results of board-level drop tests showed that the number of drops was higher for the ENIG than the ENEPIG surface finish. Solder joint fracture occurred along the interface between the solder and IMC layer for the ENIG surface finish. However, with the ENEPIG surface finish, the crack propagated between the IMCs.

  7. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  8. Droplet evaporation on a soluble substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailleur, Alexandra; Pirat, Christophe; Colombani, Jean; CNES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Stains left by evaporated droplets are ubiquitous in everyday life as well as in industrial processes. Whatever the composition of the evaporating liquid (colloidal suspensions, biological fluids...), the stains are mostly constituted by a deposit at the periphery of the dried drop, similar to a coffee stain (Deegan, 1997). All these studies have been carried with non-reacting solids. In this presentation, we focus on the behavior of a pure-water droplet evaporating on a soluble substrate which is more complex, since three phenomena are strongly interacting: the dissolution of the substrate, the diffusion/convection of the dissolved species into the drop and the evaporation of the liquid. NaCl and KCl single crystals have been chosen for this experimental study as they are fast-dissolving solids. We have observed that the dissolution induces a pinning of the triple line from the beginning of the evaporation, leading to a decrease of the contact angle in time. At the end of the evaporation, a peripheral deposit is always formed, proof of an outward flow inside the drop (coffee-ring effect). The authors would like to thank the CNES for the financial support.

  9. SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR BATCH ACCEPTABILITY AND TEST CASES OF THE PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH THORIUM AS A REPORTABLE ELEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.

    2010-10-07

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is operated by Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), has recently begun processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) by combining it with Frit 418 at a nominal waste loading (WL) of 36%. A unique feature of the SB6/Frit 418 glass system, as compared to the previous glass systems processed in DWPF, is that thorium will be a reportable element (i.e., concentrations of elemental thorium in the final glass product greater than 0.5 weight percent (wt%)) for the resulting wasteform. Several activities were initiated based upon this unique aspect of SB6. One of these was an investigation into the impact of thorium on the models utilized in DWPF's Product Composition and Control System (PCCS). While the PCCS is described in more detail below, for now note that it is utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to evaluate the acceptability of each batch of material in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) before this material is passed on to the melter. The evaluation employs models that predict properties associated with processability and product quality from the composition of vitrified samples of the SME material. The investigation of the impact of thorium on these models was conducted by Peeler and Edwards [1] and led to a recommendation that DWPF can process the SB6/Frit 418 glass system with ThO{sub 2} concentrations up to 1.8 wt% in glass. Questions also arose regarding the handling of thorium in the SME batch acceptability process as documented by Brown, Postles, and Edwards [2]. Specifically, that document is the technical bases of PCCS, and while Peeler and Edwards confirmed the reliability of the models, there is a need to confirm that the current implementation of DWPF's PCCS appropriately handles thorium as a reportable element. Realization of this need led to a Technical Task Request (TTR) prepared by Bricker [3] that identified some specific SME-related activities that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was

  10. Large charged drop levitation against gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang Kun; Hyson, Michael T.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Elleman, Daniel D.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid electrostatic-acoustic levitator that can levitate and manipulate a large liquid drop in one gravity is presented. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time such large drops (up to 4 mm in diameter in the case of water) have been levitated against 1-gravity. This makes possible, for the first time, many new experiments both in space and in ground-based laboratories, such as 1)supercooling and superheating, 2) containerless crystal growth from various salt solutions or melts, 3) drop dynamics of oscillating or rotating liquid drops, 4) drop evaporation and Rayleigh bursting, and 5) containerless material processing in space. The digital control system, liquid drop launch process, principles of electrode design, and design of a multipurpose room temperature levitation chamber are described. Preliminary results that demonstrate drop oscillation and rotation, and crystal growth from supersaturated salt solutions are presented.

  11. Development drop test results of the 15-ft-dia ribbon parachute and 73-ft-dia cross parachute for the US Army Natick Laboratory UHLCADS system

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, W.B.

    1985-09-01

    During 1984 a series of 12 drop tests was conducted at the US Army Yuma Proving Ground near Yuma, Arizona to develop a new system to recover a 2200-lb resupply container from high altitude. The parachute system consists of a 15-ft-dia ribbon parachute reefed for 10 s and a 73-ft-dia cross parachute with no reefing. The system has been successfully demonstrated by flight tests. The impact velocity is 30 fps.

  12. The evaporation of the water-sodium chlorides solution droplets on the heated substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Evgenija; Kuznetsov, Geniy; Feoktistov, Dmitriy

    2014-08-01

    This work presents an experimental study of the evaporation of a sessile water- sodium chlorides solution drop to open atmosphere on the solid substrate (anodized aluminum) under the varying heat flux. The main parameters defining drop profile were obtained: contact diameter, contact angle, height of the drop. The specific evaporation rate was calculated. The influence of the initial concentration of the evaporated solution to a value of the specific evaporation rate has been found out. The specific evaporation rate decreases with increasing of the concentration.

  13. Evaluation of a locally homogeneous model of spray evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    A model of spray evaporation which employs a second-order turbulence model in conjunction with the locally homogeneous flow approximation, which implies infinitely fast interphase transport rates is presented. Measurements to test the model were completed for single phase constant and variable density jets, as well as an evaporating spray in stagnant air. Profiles of mean velocity, composition, temperature and drop size distribution as well as velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress, were measured within the spray. Predictions were in agreement with measurements in single phase flows and also with many characteristics of the spray, e.g. flow width, radial profiles of mean and turbulent quantities, and the axial rate of decay of mean velocity and mixture fraction.

  14. A modified version of the Millikan oil drop experiment to test the probable existence of a new electrodynamic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curé, Jorge C.

    1982-10-01

    The probable existence of a new electrodynamic field is obtained by analogy with the general theory of relativity. The new field is derived from a scalar electrodynamic potential which is similar to the Edwards potential discovered experimentally in recent years. A modification of the Millikan oil drop experiment is also suggested to empirically verify the new field avoiding misinterpretations of Edwards' results.

  15. Extrapolating the Trends of Test Drop Data with Opening Shock Factor Calculations: the Case of the Orion Main and Drogue Parachutes Inflating to 1st Reefed Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potvin, Jean; Ray, Eric

    2017-01-01

    We describe a new calculation of the opening shock factor C (sub k) characterizing the inflation performance of NASA's Orion spacecraft main and drogue parachutes opening under a reefing constraint (1st stage reefing), as currently tested in the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) program. This calculation is based on an application of the Momentum-Impulse Theorem at low mass ratio (R (sub m) is less than 10 (sup -1)) and on an earlier analysis of the opening performance of drogues decelerating point masses and inflating along horizontal trajectories. Herein we extend the reach of the Theorem to include the effects of payload drag and gravitational impulse during near-vertical motion - both important pre-requisites for CPAS parachute analysis. The result is a family of C (sub k) versus R (sub m) curves which can be used for extrapolating beyond the drop-tested envelope. The paper proves this claim in the case of the CPAS Mains and Drogues opening while trailing either a Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle or a Parachute Test Vehicle (an Orion capsule boiler plate). It is seen that in all cases the values of the opening shock factor can be extrapolated over a range in mass ratio that is at least twice that of the test drop data.

  16. Leidenfrost drops on liquid baths : experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Duchesne, Alexis; Brandenbourger, Martin; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Grasp, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium Team; Tips, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles, Belgium Team

    2015-11-01

    In the Leidenfrost effect, a liquid drop stands above a very hot substrate and levitates over a bed of its own vapor. Recently, the use of these drops has shown rather interesting possibilities, and better understanding of this effect thus appears necessary. Roughness generally leads to an increase of the Leidenfrost temperature. Therefore, the idea of our work is to use the smoothest substrate possible: a liquid bath. Indeed, we observed stable Leidenfrost drops with superheat (difference between the temperature of the bath and the boiling temperature of the drop's liquid) down to 1°C. This remarquable behavior has been seen notably for ethanol drops on silicon oil baths. However, the viscosity of the liquid of the bath seems to play an important role as no ethanol drop can be in the Leidenfrost state over high viscosity baths (kinematic viscosity ν ~ 200 cSt). This may be due to local cooling of the substrate under the drop. We also investigate the evaporation of these drops, and find scalings markably different from those applying in the case of a solid substrate. We also observe that the drop can enter in contact with the bath before its complete evaporation if the temperature is not high enough.

  17. 'Drug users stick together': HIV testing in peer-based drop-in centres among people who inject drugs in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ti, Lianping; Hayashi, Kanna; Hattirat, Sattara; Suwannawong, Paisan; Kaplan, Karyn; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Introduction Although there is a well recognised need for novel approaches to HIV testing, particularly for marginalised populations at high risk for HIV infection, there remains a dearth of information on the acceptability of peer-based HIV testing among people who inject drugs (PWID). Between July 2011 and June 2012, 22 in-depth interviews were conducted with PWID participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok, Thailand. Semi-structured interviews explored willingness to access rapid HIV testing delivered by a healthcare professional or a trained peer within peer-based drop-in centres. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. All participants indicated interest in accessing rapid HIV testing by a healthcare professional at peer-based drop-in centres due to the advantage of receiving immediate results. Experiencing stigma and discrimination by healthcare workers and wanting to avoid administrative barriers in hospitals were also reported as reasons for why PWID preferred HIV testing in peer-based settings. Peer support and shared lived experiences were repeatedly mentioned as benefits of peer-based testing. However, some concerns regarding peer-delivered testing were expressed and included a fear of peers' violating confidentiality and concerns regarding peers' qualifications for conducting an HIV test. Many PWID in this study sample noted the value of a peer-based approach to receiving testing and indicated their willingness to access rapid HIV testing in peer-based drop-in centres. The findings from this study highlight the potential for novel peer-based methods to complement existing HIV services in an effort to improve access to testing among this population.

  18. Evaporation control research, 1959-60

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1963-01-01

    Two hundred and forty-five dispersions of long-chain alkanols were formulated by using various emulsifiers and alkanols. The dispensing and spreading ability of each of these formulations was tested. The most promising emulsifier that could be used with any of the alkanols was glyceryl monostearate (self-emulsifying). However, the concentration of the alkanol in the dispersion form varied somewhat: with the length of the carbon chain. A maximum concentration of 16 percent was obtained using the longer chain alkanols in the dispersion form without losing any of the properties of a fluid. Nine field tests were undertaken on small stock tanks. The retardant materials used in these tests were dodecanol, hexadecanol, and octadecanol. These materials were applied in either liquid or dispersion form. Four types of dispensing equipment were tested. The first type used a pressure system which sprayed a liquid onto the surface of the water. An anemometer and wind-controlled vane, operated by an electrical system, determined the length End frequency of application. The second type was similar to the first except that gravity was utilized to force the liquid onto the surface. The third type. used a drip system with rates of about 10 drops per minute. The fourth type used a gravity feed and a wind-controlled valve which allowed the dispersion material to flow onto the surface of the water when the wind was in the proper direction. In the field tests, the best reduction in evaporation was obtained using octadecanol in dispersion form and dispensed with the wind-controlled valve and gravity feed system. The maximum reduction in evaporation for a 2-week period was 27 percent. However, the economics of suppressing evaporation from stock tanks is questionable because of the short travel time across the tank by the film. There are still many problems unsolved. Some of these can be resolved in the laboratory whereas others can be resolved only in the field. Some of the more serious

  19. Organization of microbeads in Leidenfrost drops.

    PubMed

    Maquet, Laurent; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2014-06-21

    We investigated the organization of micrometric hydrophilic beads (glass or basalt) immersed in Leidenfrost drops. Starting from a large volume of water compared to the volume of the beads, while the liquid evaporates, we observed that the grains are eventually trapped at the interface of the droplet and accumulate. At a moment, the grains entirely cover the droplet. We measured the surface area at this moment as a function of the total mass of particles inserted in the droplet. We concluded that the grains form a monolayer around the droplet assuming (i) that the packing of the beads at the surface is a random close packing and (ii) that the initial surface of the drop is larger than the maximum surface that the beads can cover. Regarding the evaporation dynamics, the beads are found to reduce the evaporation rate of the drop. The slowdown of the evaporation is interpreted as being the consequence of the dewetting of the particles located at the droplet interface which makes the effective surface of evaporation smaller. As a matter of fact, contact angles of the beads with the water deduced from the evaporation rates are consistent with contact angles of beads directly measured at a flat air-water interface of water in a container.

  20. DROP TESTS RESULTS OF REVISED CLOSURE BOLT CONFIGURATION OF THE STANDARD WASTE BOX, STANDARD LARGE BOX 2, AND TEN DRUM OVERPACK PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    May, C.; Opperman, E.; Mckeel, C.

    2010-04-15

    The Transuranic (TRU) Disposition Project at Savannah River Site will require numerous transfers of radioactive materials within the site boundaries for sorting and repackaging. The three DOT Type A shipping packagings planned for this work have numerous bolts for securing the lids to the body of the packagings. In an effort to reduce operator time to open and close the packages during onsite transfers, thus reducing personnel exposure and costs, an evaluation was performed to analyze the effects of reducing the number of bolts required to secure the lid to the packaging body. The evaluation showed the reduction to one-third of the original number of bolts had no effect on the packagings capability to sustain vibratory loads, shipping loads, internal pressure loads, and the loads resulting from a 4-ft drop. However, the loads caused by the 4-ft drop are difficult to estimate and the study recommended each of the packages be dropped to show the actual effects on the package closure. Even with reduced bolting, the packagings were still required to meet the 49 CFR 178.350 performance criteria for Type A packaging. This paper discusses the effects and results of the drop testing of the three packagings.

  1. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension.

  2. A Test of Outreach and Drop-in Linkage Versus Shelter Linkage for Connecting Homeless Youth to Services.

    PubMed

    Slesnick, Natasha; Feng, Xin; Guo, Xiamei; Brakenhoff, Brittany; Carmona, Jasmin; Murnan, Aaron; Cash, Scottye; McRee, Annie-Laurie

    2016-05-01

    Outreach and service linkage are key for engaging marginalized populations, such as homeless youth, in services. Research to date has focused primarily on engaging individuals already receiving some services through emergency shelters, clinics, or other programs. Less is known about those who are not connected to services and, thus, likely the most vulnerable and in need of assistance. The current study sought to engage non-service-connected homeless youth (N = 79) into a strengths-based outreach and advocacy intervention. Youth were randomly assigned to receive 6 months of advocacy that focused on linking youth to a drop-in center (n = 40) or to a crisis shelter (n = 39). All youth were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 9 months post-baseline. Findings indicated that youth prefer drop-in center services to the shelter. Also, the drop-in center linkage condition was associated with more service linkage overall (B = 0.34, SE = 0.04, p < 0.01) and better alcohol-l [B = -0.39, SE = 0.09, t(75) = -4.48, p < 0.001] and HIV-related outcomes [B = 0.62, SE = 0.10, t(78) = 6.34, p < 0.001] compared to the shelter linkage condition. Findings highlight the importance of outreach and service linkage for reconnecting service-marginalized youth, and drop-in centers as a primary service option for homeless youth.

  3. Lake Evaporation: a Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amayreh, Jumah Ahmad

    1995-01-01

    Reliable evaporation data are an essential requirement in any water and/or energy budget studies. This includes operation and management of both urban and agricultural water resources. Evaporation from large, open water surfaces such as lakes and reservoirs may influence many agricultural and irrigation decisions. In this study evaporation from Bear Lake in the states of Idaho and Utah was measured using advanced research instruments (Bowen Ratio and Eddy Correlation). Actual over-lake evaporation and weather data measurements were used to understand the mechanism of evaporation in the lake, determine lake-related parameters (such as roughness lengths, heat storage, net radiation, etc.), and examine and evaluate existing lake evaporation methods. This enabled the development of a modified and flexible model incorporating the tested methods for hourly and daily best estimates of lake evaporation using nearby simple land-based weather data and, if available, remotely sensed data. Average evaporation from Bear Lake was about 2 mm/day during the summer season (March-October) of this two-year (1993-1994) study. This value reflects the large amount of energy consumed in heating the water body of the lake. Moreover, evaporation from the lake was not directly related to solar radiation. This observation was clear during night time when the evaporation continued with almost the same rate as daytime evaporation. This explains the vital role of heat storage in the lake as the main driving energy for evaporation during night time and day time cloudy sky conditions. When comparing over-lake and nearby land-based weather parameters, land-based wind speed was the only weather parameter that had a significant difference of about 50% lower than over-lake measurements. Other weather parameters were quite similar. The study showed that evaporation from the lake can be accurately estimated using Penman-type equations if related parameters such as net radiation, heat storage, and

  4. Star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Liétor-Santos, Juan-José; Burton, Justin C.

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the self-sustained, star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a heated, curved surface. We observe modes with n =2 -13 lobes around the drop periphery. We find that the wavelength of the oscillations depends only on the capillary length of the liquid and is independent of the drop radius and substrate temperature. However, the number of observed modes depends sensitively on the liquid viscosity. The dominant frequency of pressure variations in the vapor layer is approximately twice the drop oscillation frequency, consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. Our results show that the star-shaped oscillations are driven by capillary waves of a characteristic wavelength beneath the drop and that the waves are generated by a large shear stress at the liquid-vapor interface.

  5. Microcantilever sensors for monitoring the evaporation of microdrops of pure liquids and mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanjun; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    We describe in detail a nonimaging technique that allows the measurement of the mass, the radius, and the contact angle of evaporating sessile microdrops of pure liquids and binary mixtures. The microdrops were deposited onto hydrophobized silicon microcantilevers whose bending and resonance frequency were monitored during drop evaporation. We verify the laws of evaporation kinetics for microdrops with diameters from 80 down to 10 microm. The evaporation of mixtures of water/ethanol drops confirmed previous results with millimeter sized drops. N,N-dimethylformamide drops undergo a transformation from an initial spherical shape to a thin film. Flattening of the drop causes a slowdown of the evaporation kinetics at the end. Two concurring factors are at its origin: the rising disjoining pressure stabilizes the thin liquid film and the increasing radius of curvature of the drop reduces the vapor pressure.

  6. Microcantilever sensors for monitoring the evaporation of microdrops of pure liquids and mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanjun; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    We describe in detail a nonimaging technique that allows the measurement of the mass, the radius, and the contact angle of evaporating sessile microdrops of pure liquids and binary mixtures. The microdrops were deposited onto hydrophobized silicon microcantilevers whose bending and resonance frequency were monitored during drop evaporation. We verify the laws of evaporation kinetics for microdrops with diameters from 80 down to 10 μm. The evaporation of mixtures of water/ethanol drops confirmed previous results with millimeter sized drops. N,N-dimethylformamide drops undergo a transformation from an initial spherical shape to a thin film. Flattening of the drop causes a slowdown of the evaporation kinetics at the end. Two concurring factors are at its origin: the rising disjoining pressure stabilizes the thin liquid film and the increasing radius of curvature of the drop reduces the vapor pressure.

  7. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  8. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, David K.; McKoon, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  9. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, D.K.; McKoon, R.H.

    1993-03-23

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  10. Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  11. Polycrystalline lead iodide films produced by solution evaporation and tested in the mammography X-ray energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condeles, J. F.; Mulato, M.

    2016-02-01

    Lead iodide polycrystalline films have been deposited on corning glass substrates using solution evaporation in oven. Films 6 μm-thick were obtained with full coverage of the substrates as verified by scanning electron microscopy. Some pin-holes were observable. X-ray diffraction revealed a crystalline structure corresponding to the 4 H-PbI2 polytype formation. Polarized Raman scattering experiments indicated a lamellar structure. Anisotropy was also investigated using depolarization ratio calculations. The optical and electrical properties of the samples were investigated using photoluminescence and dark conductivity as a function of temperature, respectively. Activation energies of 0.10 up to 0.89 eV were related to two main electrical transport mechanisms. Films were also exposed to X-ray irradiation in the mammography X-ray energy range. The detector produced was also exposed to X-ray from 5 mR up to 1450 mR. A linear response was observed as a function of dose with a slope of 0.52 nA/mm2 per mR.

  12. Preparticipation physical examination using a box drop vertical jump test in young athletes: the effects of puberty and sex.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Timothy E; Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Slauterbeck, James R

    2006-07-01

    Neuromuscular performance increases rapidly in males throughout pubertal development, whereas no similar neuromuscular spurt occurs in females. This fact may underlie neuromuscular imbalances related to increased risk of injury in females. The hypothesis: female athletes would demonstrate mismatched landing force to power production compared with males. This study used a cross-sectional study design to compare cohorts of pubertal stage-matched males and females during preparticipation physical examination. An onsite preparticipation physical examination at a Texas High School. Two hundred seventy-five middle school and high school athletes (Tanner Stages 2 to 5) volunteered to participate (87 females, 188 males) in a preseason physical screening. Vertical ground reaction forces were used to determine the effects of sex and pubertal stage on the calculated measures. Subjects performed 3 drop vertical jumps onto a portable force platform. Females demonstrated no increase in vertical jump height whereas males increased on average 12.5% between pubertal stages (P=0.002). The ratios of the drop landing force to drop take-off and maximum landing force to maximum take-off force were decreased in males as they matured (P<0.05) whereas females did not change between pubertal stages. Preparticipation physical examination may be used to determine potential high-risk landing force profiles in young athletes before participation. Female athletes may exhibit high-risk landing profiles at all stages of pubertal development that may increase risk of injury during landing compared with males. Preseason intervention may be warranted for females with high-risk landing profiles identified during preparticipation physical examination.

  13. Evaluation of impact limiter performance during end-on and slapdown drop tests of a one-third scale model storage/transport cask system

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Bronowski, D.R.; Uncapher, W.L.; Attaway, S.W.; Bateman, V.I.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L. ); Huerta, M. )

    1990-12-01

    This report describes drop testing of a one-third scale model shipping cask system. Two casks were designed and fabricated by Transnuclear, Inc., to ship spent fuel from the former Nuclear Fuel Services West Valley reprocessing facility in New York to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for a long-term spent fuel dry storage demonstration project. As part of the NRC's regulatory certification process, one-third scale model tests were performed to obtain experimental data on impact limiter performance during impact testing. The objectives of the testing program were to (1) obtain deceleration and displacement information for the cask and impact limiter system, (2) obtain dynamic force-displacement data for the impact limiters, (3) verify the integrity of the impact limiter retention system, and (4) examine the crush behavior of the limiters. Two 30-ft (9-m) drop tests were conducted on a mass model of the cask body and scaled balsa and redwood-filled impact limiters. This report describes the results of both tests in terms of measured decelerations, posttest deformation measurements, and the general structural response of the system. 3 refs., 32 figs.

  14. Internal dynamics of evaporating droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaeeli, A.; Arpaci, V.; Chai, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    The full Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation are solved for the fluid inside and outside of a droplet using a front tracking/finite difference method. The boundaries of the domain are taken periodic in the horizontal direction and wall bounded in the vertical direction. The behavior of a two-dimensional deformable liquid drop in zero gravity is studied and the dynamics of the flow is analyzed. The effects of governing nondimensional parameters on the evaporation rate are also discussed.

  15. Interfacial phenomena in droplet evaporation and nanoparticle-cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaohua

    2005-11-01

    The factors affecting droplet evaporation are discussed. It is found that the droplet morphology at a specific temperature is controlled by the physical properties of the liquid itself, such as the molecular weight, density, diffusion coefficient in air, and heat of vaporization. Two processes are included in droplet evaporation: (1) diffusion of liquid molecules into the air (diffusion part) and (2) flow of the liquid molecules from inside the droplet to the free outer shell liquid layer within the liquid-vapor interface (energy part). The diffusion part remains steady during drying and was not sensitive to the variation of temperature. The energy part, however, was an active factor and determined the differences in drop evaporation behaviors. A model is developed to measure the solubility parameters of the solvents via droplet evaporation. Droplets were deposited on Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) covered silicon surfaces and the contact angle and overall drop morphology are observed using a KSV contact angle goniometer as a function of time. OTS is considered a non-absorbing surface for the solvents examined and does not affect the accuracy of the measured results. This method allows determination of the attraction forces between solvent molecules in the condensed phases. The solubility parameter values of droplets containing pure water, methanol, ethanol and butanol are measured. The test results are independent of the droplet size. The evaporation kinetics of droplets containing DNA is studied. Simultaneously, the DNA re-distribution and adsorption kinetics are measured by confocal microscopy. The DNA droplets are stained with ethidium bromide solution and deposited on OTS covered silicon surfaces. The results showed that the drying behavior depended on the DNA concentration. During drying, DNA relocation inside of the drop affects the internal forces of the liquid. A ring is formed at the air/solid/liquid interface. The absorbed amount of DNA was obtained by

  16. Treatment of digestate from a co-digestion biogas plant by means of vacuum evaporation: tests for process optimization and environmental sustainability.

    PubMed

    Chiumenti, A; da Borso, F; Chiumenti, R; Teri, F; Segantin, P

    2013-06-01

    Vacuum evaporation consists in the boiling of a liquid substrate at negative pressure, at a temperature lower than typical boiling temperature at atmospheric conditions. Condensed vapor represents the so called condensate, while the remaining substrate represents the concentrate. This technology is derived from other sectors and is mainly dedicated to the recovery of chemicals from industrial by-products, while it has not been widely implemented yet in the field of agricultural digestate treatment. The present paper relates on experimental tests performed in pilot-scale vacuum evaporation plants (0.100 and 0.025 m(3)), treating filtered digestate (liquid fraction of digestate filtered by a screw-press separator). Digestate was produced by a 1 MWe anaerobic digestion plant fed with swine manure, corn silage and other biomasses. Different system and process configurations were tested (single-stage and two-stage, with and without acidification) with the main objectives of assessing the technical feasibility and of optimizing process parameters for an eventual technology transfer to full scale systems. The inputs and outputs of the process were subject to characterization and mass and nutrients balances were determined. The vacuum evaporation process determined a relevant mass reduction of digestate. The single stage configuration determined the production of a concentrate, still in liquid phase, with a total solid (TS) mean concentration of 15.0%, representing, in terms of mass, 20.2% of the input; the remaining 79.8% was represented by condensate. The introduction of the second stage allowed to obtain a solid concentrate, characterized by a content of TS of 59.0% and representing 5.6% of initial mass. Nitrogen balance was influenced by digestate pH: in order to limit the stripping of ammonia and its transfer to condensate it was necessary to reduce the pH. At pH 5, 97.5% of total nitrogen remained in the concentrate. This product was characterized by very high

  17. A theoretical and experimental study of turbulent evaporating sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Shuen, J. S.; Zhang, Q. F.; Faeth, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements and analysis limited to the dilute portions of turbulent evaporating sprays, injected into a still air environment were completed. Mean and fluctuating velocities and Reynolds stress were measured in the continuous phase. Liquid phase measurements included liquid mass fluxes, drop sizes and drop size and velocity correlation. Initial conditions needed for model evaluation were measured at a location as close to the injector exit as possible. The test sprays showed significant effects of slip and turbulent dispersion of the discrete phase. The measurements were used to evaluate three typical models of these processes: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, where slip between the phases were neglected; (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, where slip was considered but effects of drop dispersion by turbulence were ignored; and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model, where effects of interphase slip and turbulent dispersion were considered using random-walk computations for drop motion. For all three models, a k-epsilon model as used to find the properties of the continuous phase. The LHF and DSF models did not provide very satisfactory predictions for the present measurements. In contrast, the SSF model performed reasonably well--with no modifications in the prescription of eddy properties from its original calibration.

  18. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquet, L.; Sobac, B.; Darbois-Texier, B.; Duchesne, A.; Brandenbourger, M.; Rednikov, A.; Colinet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a nonvolatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can be held in a Leidenfrost state even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.053011] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the liquid substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness profile. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different, and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrease linearly with time whatever the drop size, which differs from the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For high superheats, the characteristic lifetime of the drops versus the superheat follows a scaling law that is derived from the model, but, at low superheats, it deviates from this scaling by rather saturating.

  19. Vapor compression evaporator concentrates, recovers alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.N.; Robe, K.; Bacchetti, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    This article focuses on presenting a solution to the high energy cost of operating a steam heated, single effect evaporator used by Monsanto Industrial Chemical Company at a plant in Seattle, Wash., to produce vanillin from pulp and paper mill sulfite. Use of the single effect flash evaporator resulted in high energy usage due not only to the ''single effect'' use of steam, but also because energy consumption was reduced only slightly at low operating rates. The solution to this problem was the replacement of the single effect evaporator with a vapor recompression evaporator. Operating for over 1 1/2 years, the vapor recompression evaporator system has had no significant maintenance problems. The system operates with only 1/60th the steam consumption and 15% of the total energy consumption of the previous evaporator and has had no tube fouling. Also, since the distillate is condensed within the evaporator, less cooling water is required, allowing two heat exchangers to be taken out of service. When operating at less than design capacity, the energy consumption drops almost linearly with the feed rate. At low feed rates, a by-pass valve unloads the compressor to reduce energy consumption. Total energy consumption, now 15% of the previous level, results in an estimated pay-back of less than three years.

  20. Electrical/instrumentation acceptance test report for Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant condensate treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Compau, R.A. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    This project is part of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. The acceptance test procedure describes test methods for leak detection units, pump flow switches, pump level control valves, room air temperature monitor, leachate pump status contacts, basin pump status contacts, catch basin leak detector, leachate level monitors, and basin level monitors. These are all components of the C-018H Collection System.

  1. 242-A Evaporator/plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) effluent treatment facility (ETF) nonradioactive air emission test report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-10

    This report shows the methods used to test the stack gas outlet concentration and emission rate of Volatile Organic Compounds as Total Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in parts per million by volume,grams per dry standard cubic meter, and grams per minute from the PUREX ETF stream number G6 on the Hanford Site. Test results are shown in Appendix B.1.

  2. Behavior of sulfur mustard in sand, concrete, and asphalt matrices: Evaporation, degradation, and decontamination.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyunsook; Choi, Seungki

    2017-07-24

    The evaporation, degradation, and decontamination of sulfur mustard on environmental matrices including sand, concrete, and asphalt are described. A specially designed wind tunnel and thermal desorber in combination with gas chromatograph (GC) produced profiles of vapor concentration obtained from samples of the chemical agent deposited as a drop on the surfaces of the matrices. The matrices were exposed to the chemical agent at room temperature, and the degradation reactions were monitored and characterized. A vapor emission test was also performed after a decontamination process. The results showed that on sand, the drop of agent spread laterally while evaporating. On concrete, the drop of the agent was absorbed immediately into the matrix while spreading and evaporating. However, the asphalt surface conserved the agent and slowly released parts of the agent over an extended period of time. The degradation reactions of the agent followed pseudo first order behavior on the matrices. Trace amounts of the residual agent present at the surface were also released as vapor after decontamination, posing a threat to the exposed individual and environment.

  3. Crystallization of proteins by dynamic control of evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. G.; Bray, T. L.; Suddath, F. L.

    1991-03-01

    It is expected that the kinetics of supersaturation, which is directly related to the evaporation of solvent from a crystallization solution, will greatly affect both nucleation and crystal growth processes. Therefore, a novel device has been developed which allows computer regulation of the flow of N 2(g) over a hanging drop to dynamically control the evaporation of solvent. A thermal conductivity detector is used to monitor the amount of water vapor transferred from the drop to the gas stream and provides closed loop control of the evaporation process. Data acquisition and control are accomplished using a custom program written with LabVIEW software (National Instruments) on a Macintosh II microcomputer. Quantitation of several evaporation protocols has been accomplished using both the thermal conductivity detector and a novel conductance cell that allows continuous measurement of solution analyte concentrations. Crystals of hen egg white lysozyme have been grown at different evaporation rates and analyzed according to size and number of single crystals.

  4. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Tcherneshoff, L. M.; Straits, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results for the Critical Point Wetting CPW Drop Tower Experiment are produced with immiscible systems. Much of the observed phenomena conformed to the anticipated behavior. More drops will be needed to test the CPW theory with these immiscible systems.

  5. Evaluation of a locally homogeneous model of spray evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.; Tamura, H.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements were conducted on an evaporating spray in a stagnant environment. The spray was formed using an air-atomizing injector to yield a Sauter mean diameter of the order of 30 microns. The region where evaporation occurred extended approximately 1 m from the injector for the test conditions. Profiles of mean velocity, temperature, composition, and drop size distribution, as well as velocity fluctuations and Reynolds stress, were measured. The results are compared with a locally homogeneous two-phase flow model which implies no velocity difference and thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases. The flow was represented by a k-epsilon-g turbulence model employing a clipped Gaussian probability density function for mixture fraction fluctuations. The model provides a good representation of earlier single-phase jet measurements, but generally overestimates the rate of development of the spray. Using the model predictions to represent conditions along the centerline of the spray, drop life-history calculations were conducted which indicate that these discrepancies are due to slip and loss of thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases.

  6. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.; Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-11-01

    Evaporating suspensions of colloidal particles lead to the formation of a variety of patterns, ranging from rings left behind a coffee drop to periodic bands or uniform solid films deposited on a substrate suspended vertically in a container of the colloidal solution. To characterize the transition between different types of patterns, we develop minimal models of the liquid meniscus deformation due to the evaporation and colloidal deposition. A complementary multiphase model allows us to investigate the detailed dynamics of patterning in a drying solvent. This approach couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving liquid-air interface to the dynamics inside the suspension, i.e. the liquid flow, local variations of the particle concentration, and the propagation of the deposition front where the solute forms a wet, incompressible porous medium at high concentrations. The results of our theory are in good agreement with direct observations. This research was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award FA9550-09-1-0669-DOD35CAP and the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard University.

  7. Instabilities of volatile films and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa

    2008-12-01

    We report on instabilities during spreading of volatile liquids, with emphasis on the novel instability observed when isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is deposited on a monocrystalline silicon (Si) wafer. This instability is characterized by emission of drops ahead of the expanding front, with each drop followed by smaller, satellite droplets, forming the structures which we nickname "octopi" due to their appearance. A less volatile liquid, or a substrate of larger heat conductivity, suppress this instability. In addition, we examine the spreading of drops of water (DIW)-IPA mixtures on both Si wafers and plain glass slides, and describe the variety of contact line instabilities which appear. We find that the decrease of IPA concentration in mixtures leads to transition from "octopi" to mushroom-like instabilities. Through manipulation of our experimental set up, we also find that the mechanism responsible for these instabilities appears to be mostly insensitive to both the external application of convection to the gas phase, and the doping of the gas phase with vapor in order to create the saturated environment. In order to better understand the "octopi" instability, we develop a theoretical model for evaporation of a pure liquid drop on a thermally conductive solid substrate. This model includes all relevant physical effects, including evaporation, thermal conductivity in both liquid and solid, (thermocapillary) Marangoni effect, vapor recoil, disjoining pressure, and gravity. The crucial ingredient in this problem is the evaporation model, since it influences both the motion of the drop contact line, and the temperature profiles along the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interfaces. We consider two evaporation models: the equilibrium "lens" model and the non-equilibrium one-sided (NEOS) model. Along with the assumption of equilibrium at the liquid-gas interface, the "lens" model also assumes that evaporation proceeds in a (vapor) diffusion-limited regime, therefore bringing

  8. Evaluation of Petrifilm™ aerobic count plates as an equivalent alternative to drop plating on R2A agar plates in a biofilm disinfectant efficacy test.

    PubMed

    Fritz, B G; Walker, D K; Goveia, D E; Parker, A E; Goeres, D M

    2015-03-01

    This paper compares Petrifilm™ aerobic count (AC) plates to drop plating on R2A agar plates as an alternative method for biofilm bacteria enumeration after application of a disinfectant. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm was grown in a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention biofilm reactor (ASTM E2562) and treated with 123 ppm sodium hypochlorite (as free chlorine) according to the Single Tube Method (ASTM E2871). Aliquots from the same dilution tubes were plated on Petrifilm™ AC plates and drop plated on R2A agar plates. The Petrifilm™ AC and R2A plates were incubated for 48 and 24 h, respectively, at 36 ± 1 °C. After nine experimental runs performed by two technicians, the mean difference in biofilm log densities [log biofilm density (LD) = log10(CFU/cm(2))] between the two methods for control coupons, treated coupons, and log reduction (LR) was 0.052 (p = 0.451), -0.102 (p = 0.303), and 0.152 (p = 0.313). Equivalence testing was used to assess equivalence of the two plating methods. The 90 % confidence intervals for the difference in control and treated mean LDs between methods were (-0.065, 0.170) and (-0.270, 0.064), both of which fall within a (-0.5, +0.5) equivalence criterion. The 90 % confidence interval for the mean LR difference (-0.113, 0.420) also falls within this equivalence criterion. Thus, Petrifilm™ AC plates were shown to be statistically equivalent to drop plating on R2A agar for the determination of control LDs, treated LDs, and LR values in an anti-biofilm efficacy test. These are the first published results that establish equivalency to a traditional plate counting technique for biofilms and for a disinfectant assay.

  9. Orion Capsule Mockup is Dropped

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An Orion capsule mockup is dropped from a plane 25,000 feet above the Arizona desert to test its parachute design. Orion will return to Earth at speeds faster than previous human spacecraft, and wi...

  10. Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Nurtaç

    2006-12-01

    This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written responses and to further probe their understandings of the questions asked in the test. The findings revealed a number of misconceptions, many of which have not been previously documented. The results have implications for tertiary level teaching suggesting that a substantial review of teaching strategies is needed.

  11. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the rate of solvent equilibration in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, William W.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The principles of the hanging-drop method of crystal growth are discussed, and the rate of water evaporation in a water droplet (containing protein, buffer, and a precipitating agent) suspended above a well containing a double concentration of precipitating agent is investigated theoretically. It is shown that, on earth, the rate of evaporation may be determined from diffusion theory and the colligative properties of solutions. The parameters affecting the rate of evaporation include the temperature, the vapor pressure of water, the ionization constant of the salt, the volume of the drop, the contact angle between the droplet and the coverslip, the number of moles of salt in the droplet, the number of moles of water and salt in the well, the molar volumes of water and salt, the distance from the droplet to the well, and the coefficient of diffusion of water vapor through air. To test the theoretical equations, hanging-drop experiments were conducted using various reagent concentrations in 25-microliter droplets and measuring the evaporation times at 4 C and 25 C. The results showed good agreement with the theory.

  12. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the rate of solvent equilibration in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, William W.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The principles of the hanging-drop method of crystal growth are discussed, and the rate of water evaporation in a water droplet (containing protein, buffer, and a precipitating agent) suspended above a well containing a double concentration of precipitating agent is investigated theoretically. It is shown that, on earth, the rate of evaporation may be determined from diffusion theory and the colligative properties of solutions. The parameters affecting the rate of evaporation include the temperature, the vapor pressure of water, the ionization constant of the salt, the volume of the drop, the contact angle between the droplet and the coverslip, the number of moles of salt in the droplet, the number of moles of water and salt in the well, the molar volumes of water and salt, the distance from the droplet to the well, and the coefficient of diffusion of water vapor through air. To test the theoretical equations, hanging-drop experiments were conducted using various reagent concentrations in 25-microliter droplets and measuring the evaporation times at 4 C and 25 C. The results showed good agreement with the theory.

  13. Standard test method for water in lint cotton by oven evaporation combined with volumetric Karl Fischer Titration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The referenced test method for total water content and water regain in lint cotton was developed by USDA scientists in New Orleans at the request of the cotton industry. The method covers the determination of the total water (free and bound) in raw and lint cotton at moisture equilibrium from con...

  14. Acceptance test procedure for C-018H, 242-A evaporator/PUREX plant process condensate treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, D.E.

    1994-08-16

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation system function as required for this facility. Each company or organization participating in this ATP will designate personnel to assume the responsibilities and duties as defined herein for their respective roles.

  15. Controlling Vapor Pressure In Hanging-Drop Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Smith, Robbie

    1988-01-01

    Rate of evaporation adjusted to produce larger crystals. Device helps to control vapor pressure of water and other solvents in vicinity of hanging drop of solution containing dissolved enzyme protein. Well of porous frit (sintered glass) holds solution in proximity to drop of solution containing protein or enzyme. Vapor from solution in frit controls evaporation of solvent from drop to control precipitation of protein or enzyme. With device, rate of nucleation limited to decrease number and increase size (and perhaps quality) of crystals - large crystals of higher quality needed for x-ray diffraction studies of macromolecules.

  16. Evaporative heat transfer and enhancement performance of serpentine tubes with strip-type inserts using refrigerant-134a

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, S.S.; Jang, K.J.; Huang, M.T.

    1999-08-01

    Recent technological implications have given rise to increased interest in enhancement of the in-tube evaporation used in many air conditioning and refrigeration systems. Although many past studies have examined in-tube evaporative heat transfer enhancement and the associated pressure drop with internally finned tubes, in-tube evaporations with strip-type inserts, using R-134a as a refrigerant, have not been conducted. In addition, the fundamental phenomenon of nucleate boiling from a heated wall subject to a strip-type insert is as yet not well understood, especially for the flow in serpentine tubes. In this study, flow boiling tests were conducted in serpentine coil with inserts. To accomplish these tasks, experiments were performed in a seven-pass serpentine test tube with longitudinal strip and cross-strip types inserts, 10.6-mm inside diameter with R-134a as the boiling fluid immersed in a hot water bath.

  17. Evaporation in space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    'Normal evaporation' equations for predicting the compositional changes with time and temperature have been developed and correlated with actual experimental data. An evaporative congruent temperature is defined and used to explain, predict, or plan space experiments on anomalous constitutional melting (on cooling) or solidification (on heating). Uneven evaporation causes reactive jetting forces capable of initiating new convection currents, nongravitational accelerations, surface vibrations, or other disturbances. Applications of evaporation to space manufacturing are described concerning evaporative purification, surface cooling, specimen selection, particles splitting, freezing data interpretation, material loss and dimensional control, and surface contamination or compositional changes.

  18. Electrochemistry in an acoustically levitated drop.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Edward T; Ngo, Khanh T; Scheeline, Alexander

    2013-02-19

    Levitated drops show potential as microreactors, especially when radicals are present as reactants or products. Solid/liquid interfaces are absent or minimized, avoiding adsorption and interfacial reaction of conventional microfluidics. We report amperometric detection in an acoustically levitated drop with simultaneous ballistic addition of reactant. A gold microelectrode sensor was fabricated with a lithographic process; active electrode area was defined by a photosensitive polyimide mask. The microdisk gold working electrode of radius 19 μm was characterized using ferrocenemethanol in aqueous buffer. Using cyclic voltammetry, the electrochemically active surface area was estimated by combining a recessed microdisk electrode model with the Randles-Sevcik equation. Computer-controlled ballistic introduction of reactant droplets into the levitated drop was developed. Chronoamperometric measurements of ferrocyanide added ballistically demonstrate electrochemical monitoring using the microfabricated electrode in a levitated drop. Although concentration increases with time due to drop evaporation, the extent of concentration is predictable with a linear evaporation model. Comparison of diffusion-limited currents in pendant and levitated drops show that convection arising from acoustic levitation causes an enhancement of diffusion-limited current on the order of 16%.

  19. Do High-Stakes Tests Affect Students' Decisions To Drop Out of School? Evidence from NELS. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Galindo, Claudia

    This paper considers the effect of high stakes promotion tests on early high school dropout patterns. Analysis of data from the National Educational Longitudinal Survey of 1988, a nationally representative survey of 8th grade students in the United States, indicates that the presence of an 8th grade promotion test requirement is strongly…

  20. Exploratory tests of washing radioactive sludge samples from the Melton Valley and evaporator facility storage tanks at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, M.B.; Botts, J.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1991-09-01

    Exploratory tests were initiated to wash radioactive sludge samples from the waste storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose was to provide preliminary information about (1) the anions in the sludge phase that are soluble in water or dilute acid (e.g., the anions in the interstitial liquid) and (2) the solubilities of sludge constituents in water under process conditions. The experiments were terminated before completion due to changing priorities by the Department of Energy (DOE). This memorandum was prepared primarily for documentation purposes and presents the incomplete data. 3 refs., 13 tabs.