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Sample records for drosophila deoxyribonucleoside kinase

  1. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, Nils Egil; Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Willer, Mette; Gojkovic, Zoran

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  2. Tanshinone IIA enhances bystander cell killing of cancer cells expressing Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase in nuclei and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiyang; Zhao, Lei; Dong, Xiaoshen; He, Anning; Zheng, Caiwei; Johansson, Magnus; Karlsson, Anna; Zheng, Xinyu

    2015-09-01

    Heterologous expression of the Drosophila melanogaster multi-substrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to several cytotoxic nucleoside analogs. Thus, it may be used as a suicide gene in combined gene/chemotherapy treatment of cancer. To further characterize this potential suicide gene, we constructed two retroviral vectors that enabled the expression of Dm-dNK in cancer cells. One vector harbored the wild‑type enzyme that localized to the nucleus. The other vector harbored a mitochondrial localized mutant enzyme that was constructed by deleting the nuclear localization signal and fusing it to a mitochondrial import signal of cytochrome c oxidase. A thymidine kinase-deficient osteosarcoma cell line was transduced with the recombinant viruses. The sensitivity and bystander cell killing in the presence of pyrimidine nucleoside analogs (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)‑2'‑deoxyuridine and 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylthymine were investigated. Tanshinone IIA is a constituent of Danshen; a traditional Chinese medicine used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This study also looked at the influence of Tanshinone IIA on the bystander effect and the underlying mechanisms. We showed that sensitivity of the osteosarcoma cell line to the nucleoside analogs and the efficiency of bystander cell killing were independent of the subcellular localization of Dm-dNK. The enhanced effect of tanshinone IIA on the bystander effect was related to the increased expression of Cx43 and Cx26.

  3. Synthesis of fluorescent nucleoside analogs as probes for 2'-deoxyribonucleoside kinases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Soni, Priti B; Liu, Lingfeng; Zhang, Xiao; Liotta, Dennis C; Lutz, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    We are reporting on the synthesis of fluorescent nucleoside analogs with modified sugar moieties (e.g., sugars other than ribose and 2'-deoxyribose). Four novel derivatives of the fluorescent thymidine analog 6-methyl-3-(beta-D-2'-deoxyribofuranosyl) furano-[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2-one were synthesized via Sonogashira reaction and subsequent copper-catalyzed cycloaddition. These compounds represent promising tools for studying nucleoside metabolism inside living cells, as well as for screening directed evolution libraries of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside kinases with new and improved activity for the corresponding nucleoside analogs. PMID:20060716

  4. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  5. Insulin-induced Drosophila S6 kinase activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Jose M; Alrubaie, Saif; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Deak, Maria; Leevers, Sally J; Alessi, Dario R

    2003-01-01

    An important mechanism by which insulin regulates cell growth and protein synthesis is through activation of the p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (S6K). In mammalian cells, insulin-induced PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) activation, generates the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), which is thought to play a key role in triggering the activation of S6K. Although the major components of the insulin-signalling pathway are conserved in Drosophila, recent studies suggested that S6K activation does not require PI3K in this system. To investigate further the role of dPI3K (Drosophila PI3K) in dS6K (Drosophila S6K) activation, we examined the effect of two structurally distinct PI3K inhibitors on insulin-induced dS6K activation in Kc167 and S2 Drosophila cell lines. We found that both inhibitors prevented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation and activation of dS6K. To investigate further the role of the dPI3K pathway in regulating dS6K activation, we also used dsRNAi (double-stranded RNA-mediated interference) to decrease expression of dPI3K and the PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) phosphatase dPTEN ( Drosophila phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in Kc167 and S2 cells. Knock-down of dPI3K prevented dS6K activation, whereas knock-down of dPTEN, which would be expected to increase PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) levels, stimulated dS6K activity. Moreover, when the expression of the dPI3K target, dPKB (Drosophila protein kinase B), was decreased to undetectable levels, we found that insulin could no longer trigger dS6K activation. This observation provides the first direct demonstration that dPKB is required for insulin-stimulated dS6K activation. We also present evidence that the amino-acid-induced activation of dS6K in the absence of insulin, thought to be mediated by dTOR (Drosophila target of rapamycin), which is unaffected by the inhibition of dPI3K by wortmannin. The results of the present study support the view that, in Drosophila cells, dPI3K and dPKB, as well d

  6. Characterization of a Drosophila Ortholog of the Cdc7 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Robert; Hosler, Marcus R.; Gavande, Navnath S.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Weake, Vikki M.

    2015-01-01

    Cdc7 is a serine-threonine kinase that phosphorylates components of the pre-replication complex during DNA replication initiation. Cdc7 is highly conserved, and Cdc7 orthologs have been characterized in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. Cdc7 is activated specifically during late G1/S phase by binding to its regulatory subunit, Dbf4. Drosophila melanogaster contains a Dbf4 ortholog, Chiffon, which is essential for chorion amplification in Drosophila egg chambers. However, no Drosophila ortholog of Cdc7 has yet been characterized. Here, we report the functional and biochemical characterization of a Drosophila ortholog of Cdc7. Co-expression of Drosophila Cdc7 and Chiffon is able to complement a growth defect in yeast containing a temperature-sensitive Cdc7 mutant. Cdc7 and Chiffon physically interact and can be co-purified from insect cells. Cdc7 phosphorylates the known Cdc7 substrates Mcm2 and histone H3 in vitro, and Cdc7 kinase activity is stimulated by Chiffon and inhibited by the Cdc7-specific inhibitor XL413. Drosophila egg chamber follicle cells deficient for Cdc7 have a defect in two types of DNA replication, endoreplication and chorion gene amplification. However, follicle cells deficient for Chiffon have a defect in chorion gene amplification but still undergo endocycling. Our results show that Cdc7 interacts with Chiffon to form a functional Dbf4-dependent kinase complex and that Cdc7 is necessary for DNA replication in Drosophila egg chamber follicle cells. Additionally, we show that Chiffon is a member of an expanding subset of DNA replication initiation factors that are not strictly required for endoreplication in Drosophila. PMID:25451925

  7. Kinase active Misshapen regulates Notch signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhinava K; Sachan, Nalani; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Mukherjee, Ashim

    2015-11-15

    Notch signaling pathway represents a principal cellular communication system that plays a pivotal role during development of metazoans. Drosophila misshapen (msn) encodes a protein kinase, which is related to the budding yeast Ste20p (sterile 20 protein) kinase. In a genetic screen, using candidate gene approach to identify novel kinases involved in Notch signaling, we identified msn as a novel regulator of Notch signaling. Data presented here suggest that overexpression of kinase active form of Msn exhibits phenotypes similar to Notch loss-of-function condition and msn genetically interacts with components of Notch signaling pathway. Kinase active form of Msn associates with Notch receptor and regulate its signaling activity. We further show that kinase active Misshapen leads to accumulation of membrane-tethered form of Notch. Moreover, activated Msn also depletes Armadillo and DE-Cadherin from adherens junctions. Thus, this study provides a yet unknown mode of regulation of Notch signaling by Misshapen. PMID:26431585

  8. Structure of the kinase domain of Gilgamesh from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Han, Ni; Chen, CuiCui; Shi, Zhubing; Cheng, Dianlin

    2014-04-01

    The CK1 family kinases regulate multiple cellular aspects and play important roles in Wnt/Wingless and Hedgehog signalling. The kinase domain of Drosophila Gilgamesh isoform I (Gilgamesh-I), a homologue of human CK1-γ, was purified and crystallized. Crystals of methylated Gilgamesh-I kinase domain with a D210A mutation diffracted to 2.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.025, c = 291.727 Å. The structure of Gilgamesh-I kinase domain, which was determined by molecular replacement, has conserved catalytic elements and an active conformation. Structural comparison indicates that an extended loop between the α1 helix and the β4 strand exists in the Gilgamesh-I kinase domain. This extended loop may regulate the activity and function of Gilgamesh-I. PMID:24699734

  9. [The role of Gilgamesh protein kinase in Drosophila melanogaster spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Nerusheva, O O; Dorogova, N V; Gubanova, N V; Omel'ianchuk, L V

    2008-09-01

    The cellular function of the gilgamesh mutation (89B9-12) of casein kinase gene in Drosophila spermatogenesis was studied. It was demonstrated that the sterility resulting from this mutation is connected with the abnormalities in spermatid individualization. A phylogenetic study of the protein sequences of casein kinases 1 from various organisms was conducted. The Gilgamesh protein was shown to be phylogenetically closer to the cytoplasmic casein kinase family, represented by the YCK3, YCK2, and YCK1 proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and animal gamma-casein kinases. It is known that these yeast casein kinases are involved in vesicular trafficking, which, in turn, is related in its genetic control to the cell membrane remodeling during spermatid individualization. Thus, the data of phylogenetic analysis fit well the results obtained by studying the mutation phenotype. PMID:18846817

  10. Structure of the kinase domain of Gilgamesh from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ni; Chen, CuiCui; Shi, Zhubing; Cheng, Dianlin

    2014-01-01

    The CK1 family kinases regulate multiple cellular aspects and play important roles in Wnt/Wingless and Hedgehog signalling. The kinase domain of Drosophila Gilgamesh isoform I (Gilgamesh-I), a homologue of human CK1-γ, was purified and crystallized. Crystals of methylated Gilgamesh-I kinase domain with a D210A mutation diffracted to 2.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.025, c = 291.727 Å. The structure of Gilgamesh-I kinase domain, which was determined by molecular replacement, has conserved catalytic elements and an active conformation. Structural comparison indicates that an extended loop between the α1 helix and the β4 strand exists in the Gilgamesh-I kinase domain. This extended loop may regulate the activity and function of Gilgamesh-I. PMID:24699734

  11. Ack kinase regulates CTP synthase filaments during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Strochlic, Todd I; Stavrides, Kevin P; Thomas, Sam V; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; O'Reilly, Alana M; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    The enzyme CTP synthase (CTPS) dynamically assembles into macromolecular filaments in bacteria, yeast, Drosophila, and mammalian cells, but the role of this morphological reorganization in regulating CTPS activity is controversial. During Drosophila oogenesis, CTPS filaments are transiently apparent in ovarian germline cells during a period of intense genomic endoreplication and stockpiling of ribosomal RNA. Here, we demonstrate that CTPS filaments are catalytically active and that their assembly is regulated by the non-receptor tyrosine kinase DAck, the Drosophila homologue of mammalian Ack1 (activated cdc42-associated kinase 1), which we find also localizes to CTPS filaments. Egg chambers from flies deficient in DAck or lacking DAck catalytic activity exhibit disrupted CTPS filament architecture and morphological defects that correlate with reduced fertility. Furthermore, ovaries from these flies exhibit reduced levels of total RNA, suggesting that DAck may regulate CTP synthase activity. These findings highlight an unexpected function for DAck and provide insight into a novel pathway for the developmental control of an essential metabolic pathway governing nucleotide biosynthesis.

  12. Susi, a negative regulator of Drosophila PI3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Wittwer, Franz; Jaquenoud, Malika; Brogiolo, Walter; Zarske, Marcel; Wüstemann, Philipp; Fernandez, Rafael; Stocker, Hugo; Wymann, Matthias P; Hafen, Ernst

    2005-06-01

    The Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Protein Kinase B (PI3K/PKB) signaling pathway controls growth, metabolism, and lifespan in animals, and deregulation of its activity is associated with diabetes and cancer in humans. Here, we describe Susi, a coiled-coil domain protein that acts as a negative regulator of insulin signaling in Drosophila. Whereas loss of Susi function increases body size, overexpression of Susi reduces growth. We provide genetic evidence that Susi negatively regulates dPI3K activity. Susi directly binds to dP60, the regulatory subunit of dPI3K. Since Susi has no overt similarity to known inhibitors of PI3K/PKB signaling, it defines a novel mechanism by which this signaling cascade is kept in check. The fact that Susi is expressed in a circadian rhythm, with highest levels during the night, suggests that Susi attenuates insulin signaling during the fasting period.

  13. Drosophila Wee1 kinase rescues fission yeast from mitotic catastrophe and phosphorylates Drosophila Cdc2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, S D; Sprenger, F; Edgar, B A; O'Farrell, P H

    1995-01-01

    Cdc2 kinase activity is required for triggering entry into mitosis in all known eukaryotes. Elaborate mechanisms have evolved for regulating Cdc2 activity so that mitosis occurs in a timely manner, when preparations for its execution are complete. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Wee1 and a related Mik1 kinase are Cdc2-inhibitory kinases that are required for preventing premature activation of the mitotic program. To identify Cdc2-inhibitory kinases in Drosophila, we screened for cDNA clones that rescue S. pombe wee1- mik1- mutants from lethal mitotic catastrophe. One of the genes identified in this screen, Drosophila wee1 (Dwee1), encodes a new Wee1 homologue. Dwee1 kinase is closely related to human and Xenopus Wee1 homologues, and can inhibit Cdc2 activity by phosphorylating a critical tyrosine residue. Dwee1 mRNA is maternally provided to embryos, and is zygotically expressed during the postblastoderm divisions of embryogenesis. Expression remains high in the proliferating cells of the central nervous system well after cells in the rest of the embryo have ceased dividing. The loss of zygotically expressed Dwee1 does not lead to mitotic catastrophe during postblastoderm cycles 14 to 16. This result may indicate that maternally provided Dwee1 is sufficient for regulating Cdc2 during embryogenesis, or it may reflect the presence of a redundant Cdc2 inhibitory kinase, as in fission yeast. Images PMID:8573790

  14. Fray, a Drosophila serine/threonine kinase homologous to mammalian PASK, is required for axonal ensheathment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiserson, W. M.; Harkins, E. W.; Keshishian, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fray is a serine/threonine kinase expressed by the peripheral glia of Drosophila, whose function is required for normal axonal ensheathment. Null fray mutants die early in larval development and have nerves with severe swelling and axonal defasciculation. The phenotype is associated with a failure of the ensheathing glia to correctly wrap peripheral axons. When the fray cDNA is expressed in the ensheathing glia of fray mutants, normal nerve morphology is restored. Fray belongs to a novel family of Ser/Thr kinases, the PF kinases, whose closest relatives are the PAK kinases. Rescue of the Drosophila mutant phenotype with PASK, the rat homolog of Fray, demonstrates a functional homology among these proteins and suggests that the Fray signaling pathway is widely conserved.

  15. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  16. Src kinase function controls progenitor cell pools during regeneration and tumor onset in the Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Kohlmaier, A; Fassnacht, C; Jin, Y; Reuter, H; Begum, J; Dutta, D; Edgar, B A

    2015-04-30

    Src non-receptor kinases have been implicated in events late in tumor progression. Here, we study the role of Src kinases in the Drosophila intestinal stem cell (ISC) lineage, during tissue homeostasis and tumor onset. The adult Drosophila intestine contains only two progenitor cell types, division-capable ISCs and their daughters, postmitotic enteroblasts (EBs). We found that Drosophila Src42a and Src64b were required for optimal regenerative ISC division. Conversely, activation of Src42a, Src64b or another non-receptor kinase, Ack, promoted division of quiescent ISCs by coordinately stimulating G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phase progression. Prolonged Src kinase activation caused tissue overgrowth owing to cytokine receptor-independent Stat92E activation. This was not due to increased symmetric division of ISCs, but involved accumulation of weakly specified Notch(+) but division-capable EB-like cells. Src activation triggered expression of a mitogenic module consisting of String/Cdc25 and Cyclin E that was sufficient to elicit division not only of ISCs but also of EBs. A small pool of similarly division-capable transit-amplifying Notch(+) EBs was also identified in the wild type. Expansion of intermediate cell types that do not robustly manifest their transit-amplifying potential in the wild type may also contribute to regenerative growth and tumor development in other tissues in other organisms.

  17. Combining Genetic Perturbations and Proteomics to Examine Kinase-Phosphatase Networks in Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Foos, Marianna; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Zhai, Bo; Binari, Richard; Hu, Yanhui; Randklev, Sakara; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Gygi, Steven P.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Connecting phosphorylation events to kinases and phosphatases is key to understanding the molecular organization and signaling dynamics of networks. We have generated a validated set of transgenic RNA-interference reagents for knockdown and characterization of all protein kinases and phosphatases present during early Drosophila melanogaster development. These genetic tools enable collection of sufficient quantities of embryos depleted of single gene products for proteomics. As a demonstration of an application of the collection, we have used multiplexed isobaric-labeling for quantitative proteomics to derive global phosphorylation signatures associated with kinase-depleted embryos, in order to systematically link phosphosites with relevant kinases. We demonstrate how this strategy uncovers kinase consensus motifs and prioritizes phosphoproteins for kinase target validation. We validate this approach by providing auxiliary evidence for Wee kinase-directed regulation of the chromatin regulator Stonewall. Further, we show how correlative phosphorylation at the site level can indicate function, as exemplified by Sterile20-like kinase-dependent regulation of Stat92E. PMID:25284370

  18. Drosophila Citron Kinase Is Required for the Final Steps of CytokinesisD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Naim, Valeria; Imarisio, Sara; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying completion of cytokinesis are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the Drosophila orthologue of mammalian Citron kinases is essential for the final events of the cytokinetic process. Flies bearing mutations in the Drosophila citron kinase (dck) gene were defective in both neuroblast and spermatocyte cytokinesis. In both cell types, early cytokinetic events such as central spindle assembly and contractile ring formation were completely normal. Moreover, cytokinetic rings constricted normally, leading to complete furrow ingression. However late telophases of both cell types displayed persistent midbodies associated with disorganized F actin and anillin structures. Similar defects were observed in dck RNA interference (RNAi) telophases, which, in addition to abnormal F actin and anillin rings, also displayed aberrant membrane protrusions at the cleavage site. Together, these results indicate that mutations in the dck gene result in morphologically abnormal intercellular bridges and in delayed resolution of these structures, suggesting that the wild-type function of dck is required for abscission at the end of cytokinesis. The phenotype of Dck-depleted cells is different from those observed in most Drosophila cytokinesis mutants but extraordinarily similar to that caused by anillin RNAi, suggesting that Dck and anillin are in the same pathway for completion of cytokinesis. PMID:15371536

  19. Control of oxidative stress resistance by IP3 kinase in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Véronique; Girardot, Fabrice; Audin, Wilfried; Tricoire, Hervé

    2002-11-01

    Oxidative damage is thought to be a major causal factor of aging, and is implicated in several human pathologies such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Nevertheless the genetical determinants of in vivo oxidative stress response are still poorly understood. To identify cellular components whose deregulation leads to oxidative stress resistance, we performed a genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster. We thus identified in this screen Drosophila Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate kinase I (D-IP3K1), a Drosophila gene homologous to mammalian IP3Ks. In vertebrates, IP3Ks phosphorylate the second messenger Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) to produce Inositol 1,3,4,5 tetrakiphosphate (IP4). IP3 binding to its receptor (IP3R) triggers Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cytosol, whereas IP4 physiological role remains elusive. We show here that ubiquitous overexpression of D-IP3K1 confers resistance of flies to H(2)O(2)- but not to paraquat-induced oxidative stress. Additional genetic analysis with other members of IP3 and IP4 signaling pathways led us to propose that the D-IP3K1 protective effect is mainly mediated through the reduction of IP3 level (which probably results in reduced Ca(2+) release from internal stores), rather than through the rise of IP4 level.

  20. Drosophila Abelson kinase mediates cell invasion and proliferation via two distinct MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaskirat; Aaronson, Stuart A.; Mlodzik, Marek

    2010-01-01

    The Abelson (Abl) family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases plays important role in cell morphogenesis, motility and proliferation. Although the function of Abl has been extensively studied in leukemia, its role in epithelial cell invasion remains obscure. Using the Drosophila wing epithelium as an in-vivo model system, we demonstrate that overexpression (activation) of Drosophila Abl (dAbl) causes loss of epithelial apical/basal cell polarity and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, resulting in a cellular invasion and apoptosis. Our in vivo data indicate that dAbl acts downstream of the Src kinases, which are known regulators of cell adhesion and invasion. Downstream of dAbl, Rac GTPases activate two distinct MAPK pathways: JNK signaling (required for cell invasion and apoptosis) and ERK signaling (inducing cell proliferation). Activated Abl also increases the activity of Src members through a positive feedback loop leading to signal amplification. Thus targeting Src-Abl, using available dual inhibitors, could be of therapeutic importance in tumor cell metastasis. PMID:20453880

  1. Aurora Kinases Phosphorylate Lgl to Induce Mitotic Spindle Orientation in Drosophila Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham P.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; Brain, Ruth; Thompson, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) protein was discovered in Drosophila as a tumor suppressor in both neural stem cells (neuroblasts) and epithelia. In neuroblasts, Lgl relocalizes to the cytoplasm at mitosis, an event attributed to phosphorylation by mitotically activated aPKC kinase and thought to promote asymmetric cell division. Here we show that Lgl also relocalizes to the cytoplasm at mitosis in epithelial cells, which divide symmetrically. The Aurora A and B kinases directly phosphorylate Lgl to promote its mitotic relocalization, whereas aPKC kinase activity is required only for polarization of Lgl. A form of Lgl that is a substrate for aPKC, but not Aurora kinases, can restore cell polarity in lgl mutants but reveals defects in mitotic spindle orientation in epithelia. We propose that removal of Lgl from the plasma membrane at mitosis allows Pins/LGN to bind Dlg and thus orient the spindle in the plane of the epithelium. Our findings suggest a revised model for Lgl regulation and function in both symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. PMID:25484300

  2. Cyclin E-dependent protein kinase activity regulates niche retention of Drosophila ovarian follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu A.; Kalderon, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Whether stem cells have unique cell cycle machineries and how they integrate with niche interactions remains largely unknown. We identified a hypomorphic cyclin E allele WX that strongly impairs the maintenance of follicle stem cells (FSCs) in the Drosophila ovary but does not reduce follicle cell proliferation or germline stem cell maintenance. CycEWX protein can still bind to the cyclin-dependent kinase catalytic subunit Cdk2, but forms complexes with reduced protein kinase activity measured in vitro. By creating additional CycE variants with different degrees of kinase dysfunction and expressing these and CycEWX at different levels, we found that higher CycE-Cdk2 kinase activity is required for FSC maintenance than to support follicle cell proliferation. Surprisingly, cycEWX FSCs were lost from their niches rather than arresting proliferation. Furthermore, FSC function was substantially restored by expressing either excess DE-cadherin or excess E2F1/DP, the transcription factor normally activated by CycE-Cdk2 phosphorylation of retinoblastoma proteins. These results suggest that FSC maintenance through niche adhesion is regulated by inputs that normally control S phase entry, possibly as a quality control mechanism to ensure adequate stem cell proliferation. We speculate that a positive connection between central regulators of the cell cycle and niche retention may be a common feature of highly proliferative stem cells. PMID:19966222

  3. Syntheses of aliphatic polycarbonates from 2'-deoxyribonucleosides.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masato; Sekido, Toyokazu; Matsuoka, Shin-ichi; Takagi, Koji

    2011-05-01

    Poly(2'-deoxyadenosine) and poly(thymidine) constructed of carbonate linkages were synthesized by polycondensation between silyl ether and carbonylimidazolide at the 3'- and 5'-positions of the 2'-deoxyribonucleoside monomers. The N-benzoyl-2'-deoxyadenosine monomer afforded the corresponding polycarbonate together with the cyclic oligomers. However, the deprotection of the N-benzoyl group resulted in the scission of the polymer main chain. Thus, the N-unprotected 2'-deoxyadenosine monomers were examined for polycondensation. However, there was involved the undesired reaction between the adenine amino group and the carbonylimidazolide to form the carbamate linkage. In order to exclude this unfavorable reaction, dynamic protection was employed. Strong hydrogen bonding was used in place of the usual covalent bonding for reducing the nucleophilicity of the adenine amino group. Herein, 3',5'-O-diacylthymidines that form the complementary hydrogen bonding with the adenine amino group were added to the polymerization system of the N-unprotected 2'-deoxyadenosine monomer. Consequently, although the oligomers (M(n) = 1000-1500) were produced, the contents of the carbamate group were greatly reduced. The dynamic protection reagents were easily and quantitatively recovered as the MeOH soluble parts from the polymerization mixtures. In the polycondensation of the thymidine monomer, there tended to be involved another unfavorable reaction of carbonate exchange, which consequently formed the irregular carbonate linkages at not only the 3'-5' but also the 3'-3' and 5'-5' positions. Employing the well-designed monomer suppressed the carbonate exchange reaction to produce poly(thymidine) with the almost regular 3'-5'carbonate linkages.

  4. Binding partners of the kinase domains in Drosophila obscurin and their effect on the structure of the flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Katzemich, Anja; West, Ryan J H; Fukuzawa, Atsushi; Sweeney, Sean T; Gautel, Mathias; Sparrow, John; Bullard, Belinda

    2015-09-15

    Drosophila obscurin (Unc-89) is a titin-like protein in the M-line of the muscle sarcomere. Obscurin has two kinase domains near the C-terminus, both of which are predicted to be inactive. We have identified proteins binding to the kinase domains. Kinase domain 1 bound Bällchen (Ball, an active kinase), and both kinase domains 1 and 2 bound MASK (a 400-kDa protein with ankyrin repeats). Ball was present in the Z-disc and M-line of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) and was diffusely distributed in the sarcomere. MASK was present in both the M-line and the Z-disc. Reducing expression of Ball or MASK by siRNA resulted in abnormalities in the IFM, including missing M-lines and multiple Z-discs. Obscurin was still present, suggesting that the kinase domains act as a scaffold binding Ball and MASK. Unlike obscurin in vertebrate skeletal muscle, Drosophila obscurin is necessary for the correct assembly of the IFM sarcomere. We show that Ball and MASK act downstream of obscurin, and both are needed for development of a well defined M-line and Z-disc. The proteins have not previously been identified in Drosophila muscle.

  5. Activity of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKG) Affects Sucrose Responsiveness and Habituation in "Drosophila melanogaster"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheiner, Ricarda; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Erber, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) has many cellular functions in vertebrates and insects that affect complex behaviors such as locomotion and foraging. The "foraging" ("for") gene encodes a PKG in "Drosophila melanogaster." Here, we demonstrate a function for the "for" gene in sensory responsiveness and nonassociative learning. Larvae of the…

  6. Drosophila Tribbles Antagonizes Insulin Signaling-Mediated Growth and Metabolism via Interactions with Akt Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul; Sebo, Zachary; Pence, Laramie; Dobens, Leonard L.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Tribbles (Trbl) is the founding member of the Trib family of kinase-like docking proteins that modulate cell signaling during proliferation, migration and growth. In a wing misexpression screen for Trbl interacting proteins, we identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase Akt1. Given the central role of Akt1 in insulin signaling, we tested the function of Trbl in larval fat body, a tissue where rapid increases in size are exquisitely sensitive to insulin/insulin-like growth factor levels. Consistent with a role in antagonizing insulin-mediated growth, trbl RNAi knockdown in the fat body increased cell size, advanced the timing of pupation and increased levels of circulating triglyceride. Complementarily, overexpression of Trbl reduced fat body cell size, decreased overall larval size, delayed maturation and lowered levels of triglycerides, while circulating glucose levels increased. The conserved Trbl kinase domain is required for function in vivo and for interaction with Akt in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Consistent with direct regulation of Akt, overexpression of Trbl in the fat body decreased levels of activated Akt (pSer505-Akt) while misexpression of trbl RNAi increased phospho-Akt levels, and neither treatment affected total Akt levels. Trbl misexpression effectively suppressed Akt-mediated wing and muscle cell size increases and reduced phosphorylation of the Akt target FoxO (pSer256-FoxO). Taken together, these data show that Drosophila Trbl has a conserved role to bind Akt and block Akt-mediated insulin signaling, and implicate Trib proteins as novel sites of signaling pathway integration that link nutrient availability with cell growth and proliferation. PMID:25329475

  7. The Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate kinase1 gene affects olfactory reception in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Martin, Fernando; Alcorta, Esther

    2006-03-01

    The Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) route is one of the two main transduction cascades that mediate olfactory reception in Drosophila melanogaster. The activity of IP3 kinase1 reduces the levels of this substrate by phosphorylation into inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakiphosphate (IP4). We show here that the gene is expressed in olfactory sensory organs as well as in the rest of the head. To evaluate in vivo the olfactory functional effects of up-regulating IP3K1, individuals with directed genetic changes at the reception level only were generated using the UAS/Gal4 method. In this report, we described the consequences in olfactory perception of overexpressing the IP3Kinase1 gene at eight different olfactory receptor-neuron subsets. Six out of the eight studied Gal-4/UAS-IP3K1 hybrids displayed abnormal behavioral responses to ethyl acetate, acetone, ethanol or propionaldehyde. Specific behavioral defects corresponded to the particular neuronal olfactory profile. These data confirm the role of the IP3kinase1 gene, and consequently the IP3 transduction cascade, in mediating olfactory information at the reception level.

  8. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. MAP kinase subcellular localization controls both pattern and proliferation in the developing Drosophila wing

    PubMed Central

    Marenda, Daniel R.; Vrailas, Alysia D.; Rodrigues, Aloma B.; Cook, Summer; Powers, Maureen A.; Lorenzen, James A.; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Moses, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) phosphorylate target proteins in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, and a strong correlation exists between the subcellular localization of MAPK and resulting cellular responses. It was thought that MAPK phosphorylation was always followed by rapid nuclear translocation. However, we and others have found that MAPK phosphorylation is not always sufficient for nuclear translocation in vivo. In the developing Drosophila wing, MAPK-mediated signaling is required both for patterning and for cell proliferation, although the mechanism of this differential control is not fully understood. Here, we show that phosphorylated MAPK (pMAPK) is held in the cytoplasm in differentiating larval and pupal wing vein cells, and we show that this cytoplasmic hold is required for vein cell fate. At the same time, we show that MAPK does move into the nucleus of other wing cells where it promotes cell proliferation. We propose a novel Ras pathway bifurcation in Drosophila and our results suggest a mechanism by which MAPK phosphorylation can signal two different cellular outcomes (differentiation versus proliferation) based on the subcellular localization of MAPK. PMID:16308331

  10. A GFP trap study uncovers the functions of Gilgamesh protein kinase in Drosophila melanogaster spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nerusheva, O O; Dorogova, N V; Gubanova, N V; Yudina, O S; Omelyanchuk, L V

    2009-05-01

    The function of the gene gilgamesh (89B9-12) encoding a casein kinase in Drosophila spermatogenesis was studied. The chimeric Gilgamesh-GFP protein in spermatocytes is cortically located. In the polar and apolar spermatocytes, it concentrates at the terminal ends of the fusome, the organelle that passes through the system of ring canals of the spermatocyte cyst. At the stage of spermatid elongation, the protein associates with the nucleus. A spot of the highest Gilgamesh-GFP concentration in the nucleus co-localizes with gamma-tubulin in the basal body. At later stages, Gilgamesh is localized to the individualization complex (IC), leaving the nuclei somewhat before the IC investment cones, as detected by actin binding. The sterile mutation due to the gilgamesh gene leads to the phenotype of scattered nuclei and altered structure of actin cones in the individualizing spermatid cyst. Ultrastructural evidence confirmed defective spermatid individualization due to the mutation. The phylogenetic origin of the protein, and the connection between vesicular trafficking and spermatid individualization, are discussed. PMID:19269340

  11. Tousled-like kinase mediated a new type of cell death pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Cai, R; Zhou, R; Li, Y; Liu, L

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has an important role in sculpting organisms during development. However, much remains to be learned about the molecular mechanism of PCD. We found that ectopic expression of tousled-like kinase (tlk) in Drosophila initiated a new type of cell death. Furthermore, the TLK-induced cell death is likely to be independent of the canonical caspase pathway and other known caspase-independent pathways. Genetically, atg2 RNAi could rescue the TLK-induced cell death, and this function of atg2 was likely distinct from its role in autophagy. In the developing retina, loss of tlk resulted in reduced PCD in the interommatidial cells (IOCs). Similarly, an increased number of IOCs was present in the atg2 deletion mutant clones. However, double knockdown of tlk and atg2 by RNAi did not have a synergistic effect. These results suggested that ATG2 may function downstream of TLK. In addition to a role in development, tlk and atg2 RNAi could rescue calcium overload-induced cell death. Together, our results suggest that TLK mediates a new type of cell death pathway that occurs in both development and calcium cytotoxicity.

  12. Drosophila Spidey/Kar Regulates Oenocyte Growth via PI3-Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cinnamon, Einat; Sawala, Annick; Tittiger, Claus; Paroush, Ze'ev

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth and proliferation depend upon many different aspects of lipid metabolism. One key signaling pathway that is utilized in many different anabolic contexts involves Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and its membrane lipid products, the Phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphates. It remains unclear, however, which other branches of lipid metabolism interact with the PI3K signaling pathway. Here, we focus on specialized fat metabolizing cells in Drosophila called larval oenocytes. In the presence of dietary nutrients, oenocytes undergo PI3K-dependent cell growth and contain very few lipid droplets. In contrast, during starvation, oenocytes decrease PI3K signaling, shut down cell growth and accumulate abundant lipid droplets. We now show that PI3K in larval oenocytes, but not in fat body cells, functions to suppress lipid droplet accumulation. Several enzymes of fatty acid, triglyceride and hydrocarbon metabolism are required in oenocytes primarily for lipid droplet induction rather than for cell growth. In contrast, a very long chain fatty-acyl-CoA reductase (FarO) and a putative lipid dehydrogenase/reductase (Spidey, also known as Kar) not only promote lipid droplet induction but also inhibit oenocyte growth. In the case of Spidey/Kar, we show that the growth suppression mechanism involves inhibition of the PI3K signaling pathway upstream of Akt activity. Together, the findings in this study show how Spidey/Kar and FarO regulate the balance between the cell growth and lipid storage of larval oenocytes. PMID:27500738

  13. Tousled-like kinase mediated a new type of cell death pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Cai, R; Zhou, R; Li, Y; Liu, L

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has an important role in sculpting organisms during development. However, much remains to be learned about the molecular mechanism of PCD. We found that ectopic expression of tousled-like kinase (tlk) in Drosophila initiated a new type of cell death. Furthermore, the TLK-induced cell death is likely to be independent of the canonical caspase pathway and other known caspase-independent pathways. Genetically, atg2 RNAi could rescue the TLK-induced cell death, and this function of atg2 was likely distinct from its role in autophagy. In the developing retina, loss of tlk resulted in reduced PCD in the interommatidial cells (IOCs). Similarly, an increased number of IOCs was present in the atg2 deletion mutant clones. However, double knockdown of tlk and atg2 by RNAi did not have a synergistic effect. These results suggested that ATG2 may function downstream of TLK. In addition to a role in development, tlk and atg2 RNAi could rescue calcium overload-induced cell death. Together, our results suggest that TLK mediates a new type of cell death pathway that occurs in both development and calcium cytotoxicity. PMID:26088162

  14. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-06-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets.

  15. Salt-inducible kinases mediate nutrient-sensing to link dietary sugar and tumorigenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Susumu; Cagan, Ross L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells demand excessive nutrients to support their proliferation but how cancer cells sense and promote growth in the nutrient favorable conditions remain incompletely understood. Epidemiological studies have indicated that obesity is a risk factor for various types of cancers. Feeding Drosophila a high dietary sugar was previously demonstrated to not only direct metabolic defects including obesity and organismal insulin resistance, but also transform Ras/Src-activated cells into aggressive tumors. Here we demonstrate that Ras/Src-activated cells are sensitive to perturbations in the Hippo signaling pathway. We provide evidence that nutritional cues activate Salt-inducible kinase, leading to Hippo pathway downregulation in Ras/Src-activated cells. The result is Yorkie-dependent increase in Wingless signaling, a key mediator that promotes diet-enhanced Ras/Src-tumorigenesis in an otherwise insulin-resistant environment. Through this mechanism, Ras/Src-activated cells are positioned to efficiently respond to nutritional signals and ensure tumor growth upon nutrient rich condition including obesity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08501.001 PMID:26573956

  16. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets. PMID:23822503

  17. Drosophila Spidey/Kar Regulates Oenocyte Growth via PI3-Kinase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cinnamon, Einat; Makki, Rami; Sawala, Annick; Wickenberg, Leah P; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus; Paroush, Ze'ev; Gould, Alex P

    2016-08-01

    Cell growth and proliferation depend upon many different aspects of lipid metabolism. One key signaling pathway that is utilized in many different anabolic contexts involves Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and its membrane lipid products, the Phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphates. It remains unclear, however, which other branches of lipid metabolism interact with the PI3K signaling pathway. Here, we focus on specialized fat metabolizing cells in Drosophila called larval oenocytes. In the presence of dietary nutrients, oenocytes undergo PI3K-dependent cell growth and contain very few lipid droplets. In contrast, during starvation, oenocytes decrease PI3K signaling, shut down cell growth and accumulate abundant lipid droplets. We now show that PI3K in larval oenocytes, but not in fat body cells, functions to suppress lipid droplet accumulation. Several enzymes of fatty acid, triglyceride and hydrocarbon metabolism are required in oenocytes primarily for lipid droplet induction rather than for cell growth. In contrast, a very long chain fatty-acyl-CoA reductase (FarO) and a putative lipid dehydrogenase/reductase (Spidey, also known as Kar) not only promote lipid droplet induction but also inhibit oenocyte growth. In the case of Spidey/Kar, we show that the growth suppression mechanism involves inhibition of the PI3K signaling pathway upstream of Akt activity. Together, the findings in this study show how Spidey/Kar and FarO regulate the balance between the cell growth and lipid storage of larval oenocytes. PMID:27500738

  18. Transgenic inhibitors identify two roles for protein kinase A in Drosophila development.

    PubMed Central

    Kiger, J A; Eklund, J L; Younger, S H; O'Kane, C J

    1999-01-01

    We have initiated an analysis of protein kinase A (PKA) in Drosophila using transgenic techniques to modulate PKA activity in specific tissues during development. We have constructed GAL4/UAS-regulated transgenes in active and mutant forms that encode PKAc, the catalytic subunit of PKA, and PKI(1-31), a competitive inhibitor of PKAc. We present evidence that the wild-type transgenes are active and summarize the phenotypes produced by a number of GAL4 enhancer-detector strains. We compare the effects of transgenes encoding PKI(1-31) with those encoding PKAr*, a mutant regulatory subunit that constitutively inhibits PKAc because of its inability to bind cyclic AMP. Both inhibitors block larval growth, but only PKAr* alters pattern formation by activating the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Therefore, transgenic PKI(1-31) should provide a tool to investigate the role of PKAc in larval growth regulation without concomitant changes in pattern formation. The different effects of PKI(1-31) and PKAr* suggest two distinct roles, cytoplasmic and nuclear, for PKAc in Hedgehog signal transduction. Alternatively, PKAr* may target proteins other than PKAc, suggesting a role for free PKAr in signal transduction, a role inhibited by PKAc in reversal of the classical relationship of these subunits. PMID:10224260

  19. Drosophila S6 Kinase Like Inhibits Neuromuscular Junction Growth by Downregulating the BMP Receptor Thickveins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoli; Wu, Yingga; Du, Li; Li, Wenhua; Xiong, Ying; Yao, Aiyu; Wang, Qifu; Zhang, Yong Q.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic connections must be precisely controlled to ensure proper neural circuit formation. In Drosophila melanogaster, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) promotes growth of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) by binding and activating the BMP ligand receptors wishful thinking (Wit) and thickveins (Tkv) expressed in motor neurons. We report here that an evolutionally conserved, previously uncharacterized member of the S6 kinase (S6K) family S6K like (S6KL) acts as a negative regulator of BMP signaling. S6KL null mutants were viable and fertile but exhibited more satellite boutons, fewer and larger synaptic vesicles, larger spontaneous miniature excitatory junctional potential (mEJP) amplitudes, and reduced synaptic endocytosis at the NMJ terminals. Reducing the gene dose by half of tkv in S6KL mutant background reversed the NMJ overgrowth phenotype. The NMJ phenotypes of S6KL mutants were accompanied by an elevated level of Tkv protein and phosphorylated Mad, an effector of the BMP signaling pathway, in the nervous system. In addition, Tkv physically interacted with S6KL in cultured S2 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of S6KL enhanced Tkv expression, while S6KL overexpression downregulated Tkv in cultured S2 cells. This latter effect was blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Our results together demonstrate for the first time that S6KL regulates synaptic development and function by facilitating proteasomal degradation of the BMP receptor Tkv. PMID:25748449

  20. Spindle-F Is the Central Mediator of Ik2 Kinase-Dependent Dendrite Pruning in Drosophila Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yu-Ting; Chiang, Kai-Wen; Hsieh, Hsin-Lun; Wu, Yi-Ping; Ke, Jian-Ming; Lee, Myong-Chol; Liao, Shih-Sian; Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Tang, Chiou-Yang; Yang, Shi-Bing; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    During development, certain Drosophila sensory neurons undergo dendrite pruning that selectively eliminates their dendrites but leaves the axons intact. How these neurons regulate pruning activity in the dendrites remains unknown. Here, we identify a coiled-coil protein Spindle-F (Spn-F) that is required for dendrite pruning in Drosophila sensory neurons. Spn-F acts downstream of IKK-related kinase Ik2 in the same pathway for dendrite pruning. Spn-F exhibits a punctate pattern in larval neurons, whereas these Spn-F puncta become redistributed in pupal neurons, a step that is essential for dendrite pruning. The redistribution of Spn-F from puncta in pupal neurons requires the phosphorylation of Spn-F by Ik2 kinase to decrease Spn-F self-association, and depends on the function of microtubule motor dynein complex. Spn-F is a key component to link Ik2 kinase to dynein motor complex, and the formation of Ik2/Spn-F/dynein complex is critical for Spn-F redistribution and for dendrite pruning. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for dendrite pruning achieved by temporal activation of Ik2 kinase and dynein-mediated redistribution of Ik2/Spn-F complex in neurons. PMID:26540204

  1. Glycerol Hypersensitivity in a Drosophila Model for Glycerol Kinase Deficiency Is Affected by Mutations in Eye Pigmentation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Patrick J.; Jackson, George R.; Dipple, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol kinase plays a critical role in metabolism by converting glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate in an ATP dependent reaction. In humans, glycerol kinase deficiency results in a wide range of phenotypic variability; patients can have severe metabolic and CNS abnormalities, while others possess hyperglycerolemia and glyceroluria with no other apparent phenotype. In an effort to help understand the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic variation, we have created a Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency by RNAi targeting of dGyk (CG18374) and dGK (CG7995). As expected, RNAi flies have reduced glycerol kinase RNA expression, reduced phosphorylation activity and elevated glycerol levels. Further investigation revealed these flies to be hypersensitive to fly food supplemented with glycerol. Due to the hygroscopic nature of glycerol, we predict glycerol hypersensitivity is a result of greater susceptibility to desiccation, suggesting glycerol kinase to play an important role in desiccation resistance in insects. To evaluate a role for genetic modifier loci in determining severity of the glycerol hypersensitivity observed in knockdown flies, we performed a preliminary screen of lethal transposon insertion mutant flies using a glycerol hypersensitive survivorship assay. We demonstrate that this type of screen can identify both enhancer and suppressor genetic loci of glycerol hypersensitivity. Furthermore, we found that the glycerol hypersensitivity phenotype can be enhanced or suppressed by null mutations in eye pigmentation genes. Taken together, our data suggest proteins encoded by eye pigmentation genes play an important role in desiccation resistance and that eye pigmentation genes are strong modifiers of the glycerol hypersensitive phenotype identified in our Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency. PMID:22427807

  2. The Extracellular-Regulated Kinase Effector Lk6 is Required for Glutamate Receptor Localization at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Nizar A.; Delaney, Taylor L.; Tounsel, Brittany L.; Liebl, Faith L.W.

    2016-01-01

    The proper localization and synthesis of postsynaptic glutamate receptors are essential for synaptic plasticity. Synaptic translation initiation is thought to occur via the target of rapamycin (TOR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signal-integrating kinase (Mnk) signaling pathways, which is downstream of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK). We used the model glutamatergic synapse, the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, to better understand the roles of the Mnk and TOR signaling pathways in synapse development. These synapses contain non-NMDA receptors that are most similar to AMPA receptors. Our data show that Lk6, the Drosophila homolog of Mnk1 and Mnk2, is required in either presynaptic neurons or postsynaptic muscle for the proper localization of the GluRIIA glutamate receptor subunit. Lk6 may signal through eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E to regulate the synaptic levels of GluRIIA as either interfering with eIF4E binding to eIF4G or expression of a nonphosphorylatable isoform of eIF4E resulted in a significant reduction in GluRIIA at the synapse. We also find that Lk6 and TOR may independently regulate synaptic levels of GluRIIA. PMID:27199570

  3. S6 Kinase is essential for MYC-dependent rDNA transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Naomi C; Tchoubrieva, Elissaveta B; Chahal, Arjun; Woods, Simone; Lee, Amanda; Lin, Jane I; Parsons, Linda; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation are fundamental properties of rapidly growing and dividing malignant cells. The MYC oncoprotein drives growth predominantly via its ability to upregulate the ribosome biogenesis program, in particular stimulating the activity of the RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) machinery to increase ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. Although MYC function is known to be highly dependent on the cellular signalling context, the pathways interacting with MYC to regulate transcription of ribosomal genes (rDNA) in vivo in response to growth factor status, nutrient availability and cellular stress are only beginning to be understood. To determine factors critical to MYC-dependent stimulation of rDNA transcription in vivo, we performed a transient expression screen for known oncogenic signalling pathways in Drosophila. Strikingly, from the broad range of pathways tested, we found that ribosomal protein S6 Kinase (S6K) activity, downstream of the TOR pathway, was the only factor rate-limiting for the rapid induction of rDNA transcription due to transiently increased MYC. Further, we demonstrated that one of the mechanism(s) by which MYC and S6K cooperate is through coordinate activation of the essential Pol I transcription initiation factor TIF-1A (RRN 3). As Pol I targeted therapy is now in phase 1 clinical trials in patients with haematological malignancies, including those driven by MYC, these data suggest that therapies dually targeting Pol I transcription and S6K activity may be effective in treating MYC-driven tumours.

  4. S6 Kinase is essential for MYC-dependent rDNA transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Naomi C; Tchoubrieva, Elissaveta B; Chahal, Arjun; Woods, Simone; Lee, Amanda; Lin, Jane I; Parsons, Linda; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation are fundamental properties of rapidly growing and dividing malignant cells. The MYC oncoprotein drives growth predominantly via its ability to upregulate the ribosome biogenesis program, in particular stimulating the activity of the RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) machinery to increase ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. Although MYC function is known to be highly dependent on the cellular signalling context, the pathways interacting with MYC to regulate transcription of ribosomal genes (rDNA) in vivo in response to growth factor status, nutrient availability and cellular stress are only beginning to be understood. To determine factors critical to MYC-dependent stimulation of rDNA transcription in vivo, we performed a transient expression screen for known oncogenic signalling pathways in Drosophila. Strikingly, from the broad range of pathways tested, we found that ribosomal protein S6 Kinase (S6K) activity, downstream of the TOR pathway, was the only factor rate-limiting for the rapid induction of rDNA transcription due to transiently increased MYC. Further, we demonstrated that one of the mechanism(s) by which MYC and S6K cooperate is through coordinate activation of the essential Pol I transcription initiation factor TIF-1A (RRN 3). As Pol I targeted therapy is now in phase 1 clinical trials in patients with haematological malignancies, including those driven by MYC, these data suggest that therapies dually targeting Pol I transcription and S6K activity may be effective in treating MYC-driven tumours. PMID:26215099

  5. Dual Role of Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activity in Bone Morphogenetic Protein-Mediated Drosophila Ventral Head Development.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Yeon; Stultz, Brian G; Hursh, Deborah A

    2015-12-01

    The Drosophila bone morphogenetic protein encoded by decapentaplegic (dpp) controls ventral head morphogenesis by expression in the head primordia, eye-antennal imaginal discs. These are epithelial sacs made of two layers: columnar disc proper cells and squamous cells of the peripodial epithelium. dpp expression related to head formation occurs in the peripodial epithelium; cis-regulatory mutations disrupting this expression display defects in sensory vibrissae, rostral membrane, gena, and maxillary palps. Here we document that disruption of this dpp expression causes apoptosis in peripodial cells and underlying disc proper cells. We further show that peripodial Dpp acts directly on the disc proper, indicating that Dpp must cross the disc lumen to act. We demonstrate that palp defects are mechanistically separable from the other mutant phenotypes; both are affected by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway but in opposite ways. Slight reduction of both Jun N-terminal kinase and Dpp activity in peripodial cells causes stronger vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena defects than Dpp alone; additionally, strong reduction of Jun N-terminal kinase activity alone causes identical defects. A more severe reduction of dpp results in similar vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena defects, but also causes mutant maxillary palps. This latter defect is correlated with increased peripodial Jun N-terminal kinase activity and can be caused solely by ectopic activation of Jun N-terminal kinase. We conclude that formation of sensory vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena tissue in head morphogenesis requires the action of Jun N-terminal kinase in peripodial cells, while excessive Jun N-terminal kinase signaling in these same cells inhibits the formation of maxillary palps.

  6. Drosophila p53-related protein kinase is required for PI3K/TOR pathway-dependent growth.

    PubMed

    Ibar, Consuelo; Cataldo, Vicente F; Vásquez-Doorman, Constanza; Olguín, Patricio; Glavic, Alvaro

    2013-03-01

    Cell growth and proliferation are pivotal for final organ and body size definition. p53-related protein kinase (Bud32/PRPK) has been identified as a protein involved in proliferation through its effects on transcription in yeast and p53 stabilization in human cell culture. However, the physiological function of Bud32/PRPK in metazoans is not well understood. In this work, we have analyzed the role of PRPK in Drosophila development. Drosophila PRPK is expressed in every tissue analyzed and is required to support proliferation and cell growth. The Prpk knockdown animals show phenotypes similar to those found in mutants for positive regulators of the PI3K/TOR pathway. This pathway has been shown to be fundamental for animal growth, transducing the hormonal and nutritional status into the protein translation machinery. Functional interactions have established that Prpk operates as a transducer of the PI3K/TOR pathway, being essential for TOR kinase activation and for the regulation of its targets (S6K and 4E-BP, autophagy and bulk endocytosis). This suggests that Prpk is crucial for stimulating the basal protein biosynthetic machinery in response to insulin signaling and to changes in nutrient availability.

  7. Balance between DBT/CKIε kinase and protein phosphatase activities regulate phosphorylation and stability of Drosophila CLOCK protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Edery, Isaac

    2006-01-01

    The first circadian-relevant kinase to be identified was DOUBLE-TIME (DBT) in Drosophila, a homolog of vertebrate CKIε, which regulates the progressive phosphorylation and stability of PERIOD (PER) proteins in animals. A negative feedback loop wherein PER directly inhibits the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimer is central to the generation of molecular rhythms and normal progression of the clock in Drosophila. We show that DBT activity is required for the phase-specific hyperphosphorylation of CLK in vivo, an event that correlates with times of maximal repression in per RNA levels. The ability of DBT to hyperphosphorylate CLK, enhance its degradation, and evoke modest inhibition of CLK-dependent transactivation from circadian promoter elements was directly shown in cultured Drosophila cells. Intriguingly, DBT seems to function in close partnership with the PER-relevant protein phosphatase 2A, resulting in dynamic equilibrium between hypo- and hyperphosphorylated isoforms of CLK. This balancing mechanism might act to stabilize the limiting levels of CLK against stochastic fluctuations minimizing the propagation of “molecular noise” in the feedback circuitry. Also, the subcellular localization of CLK was altered from predominately nuclear to strong cytoplasmic staining in the presence of PER. These results suggest that, in contrast to mammalian clocks, circadian transcriptional inhibition in Drosophila involves displacement of the positive factors from chromatin. These results also demonstrate that DBT can target both negative and positive factors in circadian feedback loops and support a conserved role for dynamic regulation of reversible phosphorylation in directly modulating the activities of circadian transcription factors. PMID:16603629

  8. Brigatinib, an anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, abrogates activity and growth in ALK-positive neuroblastoma cells, Drosophila and mice

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Rivera, Victor M.; Guan, Jikui; Palmer, Ruth H.; Hallberg, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor which has been implicated in numerous solid and hematologic cancers. ALK mutations are reported in about 5-7% of neuroblastoma cases but the ALK-positive percentage increases significantly in the relapsed patient population. Crizotinib, the first clinically approved ALK inhibitor for the treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer has had less dramatic responses in neuroblastoma. Here we investigate the efficacy of a second-generation ALK inhibitor, brigatinib, in a neuroblastoma setting. Employing neuroblastoma cell lines, mouse xenograft and Drosophila melanogaster model systems expressing different constitutively active ALK variants, we show clear and efficient inhibition of ALK activity by brigatinib. Similar abrogation of ALK activity was observed in vitro employing a set of different constitutively active ALK variants in biochemical assays. These results suggest that brigatinib is an effective inhibitor of ALK kinase activity in ALK addicted neuroblastoma that should be considered as a potential future therapeutic option for ALK-positive neuroblastoma patients alone or in combination with other treatments. PMID:27049722

  9. Long term expression of Drosophila melanogaster nucleoside kinase in thymidine kinase 2-deficient mice with no lethal effects caused by nucleotide pool imbalances.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Shuba; Paredes, João A; Zhou, Xiaoshan; Kuiper, Raoul V; Hultenby, Kjell; Curbo, Sophie; Karlsson, Anna

    2014-11-21

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion caused by thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency can be compensated by a nucleoside kinase from Drosophila melanogaster (Dm-dNK) in mice. We show that transgene expression of Dm-dNK in Tk2 knock-out (Tk2(-/-)) mice extended the life span of Tk2(-/-) mice from 3 weeks to at least 20 months. The Dm-dNK(+/-)Tk2(-/-) mice maintained normal mitochondrial DNA levels throughout the observation time. A significant difference in total body weight due to the reduction of subcutaneous and visceral fat in the Dm-dNK(+/-)Tk2(-/-) mice was the only visible difference compared with control mice. This indicates an effect on fat metabolism mediated through residual Tk2 deficiency because Dm-dNK expression was low in both liver and fat tissues. Dm-dNK expression led to increased dNTP pools and an increase in the catabolism of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides but these alterations did not apparently affect the mice during the 20 months of observation. In conclusion, Dm-dNK expression in the cell nucleus expanded the total dNTP pools to levels required for efficient mitochondrial DNA synthesis, thereby compensated the Tk2 deficiency, during a normal life span of the mice. The Dm-dNK(+/-) mouse serves as a model for nucleoside gene or enzyme substitutions, nucleotide imbalances, and dNTP alterations in different tissues.

  10. The Drosophila MAST kinase Drop out is required to initiate membrane compartmentalisation during cellularisation and regulates dynein-based transport.

    PubMed

    Hain, Daniel; Langlands, Alistair; Sonnenberg, Hannah C; Bailey, Charlotte; Bullock, Simon L; Müller, H-Arno J

    2014-05-01

    Cellularisation of the Drosophila syncytial blastoderm embryo into the polarised blastoderm epithelium provides an excellent model with which to determine how cortical plasma membrane asymmetry is generated during development. Many components of the molecular machinery driving cellularisation have been identified, but cell signalling events acting at the onset of membrane asymmetry are poorly understood. Here we show that mutations in drop out (dop) disturb the segregation of membrane cortical compartments and the clustering of E-cadherin into basal adherens junctions in early cellularisation. dop is required for normal furrow formation and controls the tight localisation of furrow canal proteins and the formation of F-actin foci at the incipient furrows. We show that dop encodes the single Drosophila homologue of microtubule-associated Ser/Thr (MAST) kinases. dop interacts genetically with components of the dynein/dynactin complex and promotes dynein-dependent transport in the embryo. Loss of dop function reduces phosphorylation of Dynein intermediate chain, suggesting that dop is involved in regulating cytoplasmic dynein activity through direct or indirect mechanisms. These data suggest that Dop impinges upon the initiation of furrow formation through developmental regulation of cytoplasmic dynein.

  11. The Drosophila MAST kinase Drop out is required to initiate membrane compartmentalisation during cellularisation and regulates dynein-based transport

    PubMed Central

    Hain, Daniel; Langlands, Alistair; Sonnenberg, Hannah C.; Bailey, Charlotte; Bullock, Simon L.; Müller, H.-Arno J.

    2014-01-01

    Cellularisation of the Drosophila syncytial blastoderm embryo into the polarised blastoderm epithelium provides an excellent model with which to determine how cortical plasma membrane asymmetry is generated during development. Many components of the molecular machinery driving cellularisation have been identified, but cell signalling events acting at the onset of membrane asymmetry are poorly understood. Here we show that mutations in drop out (dop) disturb the segregation of membrane cortical compartments and the clustering of E-cadherin into basal adherens junctions in early cellularisation. dop is required for normal furrow formation and controls the tight localisation of furrow canal proteins and the formation of F-actin foci at the incipient furrows. We show that dop encodes the single Drosophila homologue of microtubule-associated Ser/Thr (MAST) kinases. dop interacts genetically with components of the dynein/dynactin complex and promotes dynein-dependent transport in the embryo. Loss of dop function reduces phosphorylation of Dynein intermediate chain, suggesting that dop is involved in regulating cytoplasmic dynein activity through direct or indirect mechanisms. These data suggest that Dop impinges upon the initiation of furrow formation through developmental regulation of cytoplasmic dynein. PMID:24803657

  12. A homologue of AMP-activated protein kinase in Drosophila melanogaster is sensitive to AMP and is activated by ATP depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, David A; Hardie, D Grahame

    2002-01-01

    We have identified single genes encoding homologues of the alpha, beta and gamma subunits of mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. Kinase activity could be detected in extracts of a Drosophila cell line using the SAMS peptide, which is a relatively specific substrate for the AMPK/SNF1 kinases in mammals and yeast. Expression of double stranded (ds) RNAs targeted at any of the putative alpha, beta or gamma subunits ablated this activity, and abolished expression of the alpha subunit. The Drosophila kinase (DmAMPK) was activated by AMP in cell-free assays (albeit to a smaller extent than mammalian AMPK), and by stresses that deplete ATP (oligomycin and hypoxia), as well as by carbohydrate deprivation, in intact cells. Using a phosphospecific antibody, we showed that activation was associated with phosphorylation of a threonine residue (Thr-184) within the 'activation loop' of the alpha subunit. We also identified a homologue of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (DmACC) in Drosophila and, using a phosphospecific antibody, showed that the site corresponding to the regulatory AMPK site on the mammalian enzyme became phosphorylated in response to oligomycin or hypoxia. By immunofluorescence microscopy of oligomycin-treated Dmel2 cells using the phosphospecific antibody, the phosphorylated DmAMPK alpha subunit was mainly detected in the nucleus. Our results show that the AMPK system is highly conserved between insects and mammals. Drosophila cells now represent an attractive system to study this pathway, because of the small, well-defined genome and the ability to ablate expression of specific gene products using interfering dsRNAs. PMID:12093363

  13. Chromosomal localization of three mouse diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) genes: Genes sharing sequence homology to the Drosophila retinal degeneration A (rdgA) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pilz, A.; Hunt, D.; Fitzgibbon, J.

    1995-04-10

    There is growing evidence to support some form of light-activated phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway in the mammalian retina. Although this pathway plays no obvious role in mammalian phototransduction, mutations in this pathway cause retinal degenerations in Drosophila. These include the retinal-degeneration A mutant, which is caused by an alteration in an eye-specific diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) gene. In our efforts to consider genes mutated in Drosophila as candidates for mammalian eye disease, we have initially determined the map position of three DAGK genes in the mouse. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Phosphorylation of the Drosophila Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channel Is Regulated by the Phototransduction Cascade and Involves Several Protein Kinases and Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Voolstra, Olaf; Bartels, Jonas-Peter; Oberegelsbacher, Claudia; Pfannstiel, Jens; Huber, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a cardinal role in regulating cellular processes in eukaryotes. Phosphorylation of proteins is controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases. We previously reported the light-dependent phosphorylation of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel at multiple sites. TRP generates the receptor potential upon stimulation of the photoreceptor cell by light. An eye-enriched protein kinase C (eye-PKC) has been implicated in the phosphorylation of TRP by in vitro studies. Other kinases and phosphatases of TRP are elusive. Using phosphospecific antibodies and mass spectrometry, we here show that phosphorylation of most TRP sites depends on the phototransduction cascade and the activity of the TRP ion channel. A candidate screen to identify kinases and phosphatases provided in vivo evidence for an involvement of eye-PKC as well as other kinases and phosphatases in TRP phosphorylation. PMID:24040070

  15. A histone code in meiosis: the histone kinase, NHK-1, is required for proper chromosomal architecture in Drosophila oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovska, Irena; Khandan, Tulasi; Ito, Takashi; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2005-01-01

    To promote faithful propagation of the genetic material during sexual reproduction, meiotic chromosomes undergo specialized morphological changes that ensure accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes. The molecular mechanisms that establish the meiotic chromosomal structures are largely unknown. We describe a mutation in a recently identified Histone H2A kinase, nhk-1, in Drosophila that leads to female sterility due to defects in the formation of the meiotic chromosomal structures. The metaphase I arrest and the karyosome, a critical prophase I chromosomal structure, require nucleosomal histone kinase-1 (NHK-1) function. The defects are a result of failure to disassemble the synaptonemal complex and to load condensin onto the mutant chromosomes. Embryos laid by nhk-1-/- mutant females arrest with aberrant polar bodies and mitotic spindles, revealing that mitosis is affected as well. We analyzed the role of Histone H2A phosphorylation with respect to the histone code hypothesis and found that it is required for acetylation of Histone H3 and Histone H4 in meiosis. These studies reveal a critical role for histone modifications in chromosome dynamics in meiosis and mitosis. PMID:16230526

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase p38b interaction with delta class glutathione transferases from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakul, Jeerang; Sukittikul, Suchada; Saisawang, Chonticha; Ketterman, Albert J

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of multifunctional enzymes involved in xenobiotic biotransformation, drug metabolism, and protection against oxidative damage. The p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase is involved in cellular stress response. This study screened interactions between Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Delta class glutathione transferases (DmGSTs) and the D. melanogaster p38b MAPK. Therefore, 12 DmGSTs and p38b kinase were obtained as recombinant proteins. The study showed that DmGSTD8 and DmGSTD11b significantly increased p38b activity toward ATF2 and jun, which are transcription factor substrates. DmGSTD3 and DmGSTD5 moderately increased p38b activity for jun. In addition, GST activity in the presence of p38b was also measured. It was found that p38b affected substrate specificity toward CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and DCNB (1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene) of several GST isoforms, i.e., DmGSTD2, DmGSTD5, DmGSTD8, and DmGSTD11b. The interaction of a GST and p38b can affect the substrate specificity of either enzyme, which suggests induced conformational changes affecting catalysis. Similar interactions do not occur for all the Delta enzymes and p38b, which suggests that these interactions could be specific. PMID:23438069

  17. Oxidation of DNA bases, deoxyribonucleosides and homopolymers by peroxyl radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Simandan, T; Sun, J; Dix, T A

    1998-01-01

    DNA base oxidation is considered to be a key event associated with disease initiation and progression in humans. Peroxyl radicals (ROO. ) are important oxidants found in cells whose ability to react with the DNA bases has not been characterized extensively. In this paper, the products resulting from ROO. oxidation of the DNA bases are determined by gas chromatography/MS in comparison with authentic standards. ROO. radicals oxidize adenine and guanine to their 8-hydroxy derivatives, which are considered biomarkers of hydroxyl radical (HO.) oxidations in cells. ROO. radicals also oxidize adenine to its hydroxylamine, a previously unidentified product. ROO. radicals oxidize cytosine and thymine to the monohydroxy and dihydroxy derivatives that are formed by oxidative damage in cells. Identical ROO. oxidation profiles are observed for each base when exposed as deoxyribonucleosides, monohomopolymers and base-paired dihomopolymers. These results have significance for the development, utilization and interpretation of DNA base-derived biomarkers of oxidative damage associated with disease initiation and propagation, and support the idea that the mutagenic potential of N-oxidized bases, when generated in cellular DNA, will require careful evaluation. Adenine hydroxylamine is proposed as a specific molecular probe for the activity of ROO. in cellular systems. PMID:9761719

  18. C-terminal Src Kinase Gates Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Regulates Fasciclin II Expression at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Ashlyn M.; Brusich, Douglas J.; Frank, C. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Forms of homeostatic plasticity stabilize neuronal outputs and promote physiologically favorable synapse function. A well-studied homeostatic system operates at the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). At the NMJ, impairment of postsynaptic glutamate receptor activity is offset by a compensatory increase in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We aim to elucidate how this process operates on a molecular level and is preserved throughout development. In this study, we identified a tyrosine kinase-driven signaling system that sustains homeostatic control of NMJ function. We identified C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk) as a potential regulator of synaptic homeostasis through an RNAi- and electrophysiology-based genetic screen. We found that Csk loss-of-function mutations impaired the sustained expression of homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ, without drastically altering synapse growth or baseline neurotransmission. Muscle-specific overexpression of Src Family Kinase (SFK) substrates that are negatively regulated by Csk also impaired NMJ homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic Csk-YFP can support homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ when expressed either in the muscle or in the nerve. However, only muscle-expressed Csk-YFP was able to localize to NMJ structures. By immunostaining, we found that Csk mutant NMJs had dysregulated expression of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule homolog Fasciclin II (FasII). By immunoblotting, we found that levels of a specific isoform of FasII were decreased in homeostatically challenged GluRIIA mutant animals–but markedly increased in Csk mutant animals. Additionally, we found that postsynaptic overexpression of FasII from its endogenous locus was sufficient to impair synaptic homeostasis, and genetically reducing FasII levels in Csk mutants fully restored synaptic homeostasis. Based on these data, we propose that Csk and its SFK substrates impinge upon homeostatic control of NMJ function by regulating

  19. The novel Smad protein Expansion regulates the receptor tyrosine kinase pathway to control Drosophila tracheal tube size.

    PubMed

    Iordanou, Ekaterini; Chandran, Rachana R; Yang, Yonghua; Essak, Mina; Blackstone, Nicholas; Jiang, Lan

    2014-09-01

    Tubes with distinct shapes and sizes are critical for the proper function of many tubular organs. Here we describe a unique phenotype caused by the loss of a novel, evolutionarily-conserved, Drosophila Smad-like protein, Expansion. In expansion mutants, unicellular and intracellular tracheal branches develop bubble-like cysts with enlarged apical membranes. Cysts in unicellular tubes are enlargements of the apical lumen, whereas cysts in intracellular tubes are cytoplasmic vacuole-like compartments. The cyst phenotype in expansion mutants is similar to, but weaker than, that observed in double mutants of Drosophila type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), Ptp4E and Ptp10D. Ptp4E and Ptp10D negatively regulate the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways, especially epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor/breathless (FGFR, Btl) signaling to maintain the proper size of unicellular and intracellular tubes. We show Exp genetically interacts with RTK signaling, the downstream targets of RPTPs. Cyst size and number in expansion mutants is enhanced by increased RTK signaling and suppressed by reduced RTK signaling. Genetic interaction studies strongly suggest that Exp negatively regulates RTK (EGFR, Btl) signaling to ensure proper tube sizes. Smad proteins generally function as intermediate components of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β, DPP) signaling pathway. However, no obvious genetic interaction between expansion and TGF-β (DPP) signaling was observed. Therefore, Expansion does not function as a typical Smad protein. The expansion phenotype demonstrates a novel role for Smad-like proteins in epithelial tube formation.

  20. β-Guanidinopropionic acid extends the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster via an AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent increase in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si; Long, Li-Hong; Li, Di; Zhang, Jian-Kang; Jin, Shan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls autophagy through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and Unc-51 like kinase 1 (ULK1/Atg1) signaling, which augments the quality of cellular housekeeping, and that β-guanidinopropionic acid (β-GPA), a creatine analog, leads to a chronic activation of AMPK. However, the relationship between β-GPA and aging remains elusive. In this study, we hypothesized that feeding β-GPA to adult Drosophila produces the lifespan extension via activation of AMPK-dependent autophagy. It was found that dietary administration of β-GPA at a concentration higher than 900 mm induced a significant extension of the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster in repeated experiments. Furthermore, we found that Atg8 protein, the homolog of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) and a biomarker of autophagy in Drosophila, was significantly upregulated by β-GPA treatment, indicating that autophagic activity plays a role in the effect of β-GPA. On the other hand, when the expression of Atg5 protein, an essential protein for autophagy, was reduced by RNA interference (RNAi), the effect of β-GPA on lifespan extension was abolished. Moreover, we found that AMPK was also involved in this process. β-GPA treatment significantly elevated the expression of phospho-T172-AMPK levels, while inhibition of AMPK by either AMPK-RNAi or compound C significantly attenuated the expression of autophagy-related proteins and lifespan extension in Drosophila. Taken together, our results suggest that β-GPA can induce an extension of the lifespan of Drosophila via AMPK-Atg1-autophagy signaling pathway.

  1. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Acts in the Drosophila Mushroom Body to Negatively Regulate Sleep.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lei; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-11-01

    Though evidence is mounting that a major function of sleep is to maintain brain plasticity and consolidate memory, little is known about the molecular pathways by which learning and sleep processes intercept. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk), the gene encoding a tyrosine receptor kinase whose inadvertent activation is the cause of many cancers, is implicated in synapse formation and cognitive functions. In particular, Alk genetically interacts with Neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1) to regulate growth and associative learning in flies. We show that Alk mutants have increased sleep. Using a targeted RNAi screen we localized the negative effects of Alk on sleep to the mushroom body, a structure important for both sleep and memory. We also report that mutations in Nf1 produce a sexually dimorphic short sleep phenotype, and suppress the long sleep phenotype of Alk. Thus Alk and Nf1 interact in both learning and sleep regulation, highlighting a common pathway in these two processes. PMID:26536237

  2. Apical accumulation of the Sevenless receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila eye development is promoted by the small GTPase Rap1.

    PubMed

    Baril, Caroline; Lefrançois, Martin; Sahmi, Malha; Knævelsrud, Helene; Therrien, Marc

    2014-08-01

    The Ras/MAPK-signaling pathway plays pivotal roles during development of metazoans by controlling cell proliferation and cell differentiation elicited, in several instances, by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). While the internal mechanism of RTK-driven Ras/MAPK signaling is well understood, far less is known regarding its interplay with other co-required signaling events involved in developmental decisions. In a genetic screen designed to identify new regulators of RTK/Ras/MAPK signaling during Drosophila eye development, we identified the small GTPase Rap1, PDZ-GEF, and Canoe as components contributing to Ras/MAPK-mediated R7 cell differentiation. Rap1 signaling has recently been found to participate in assembling cadherin-based adherens junctions in various fly epithelial tissues. Here, we show that Rap1 activity is required for the integrity of the apical domains of developing photoreceptor cells and that reduced Rap1 signaling hampers the apical accumulation of the Sevenless RTK in presumptive R7 cells. It thus appears that, in addition to its role in cell-cell adhesion, Rap1 signaling controls the partitioning of the epithelial cell membrane, which in turn influences signaling events that rely on apico-basal cell polarity.

  3. Spatial reorganization of the endoplasmic reticulum during mitosis relies on mitotic kinase cyclin A in the early Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Zane J; Mclaurin, Justin D; Eritano, Anthony S; Johnson, Brittany M; Sims, Amanda Q; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  4. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Inhibition Extends the Upper Temperature Limit of Stimulus-Evoked Calcium Responses in Motoneuronal Boutons of Drosophila melanogaster Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Dawson-Scully, Ken

    2016-01-01

    While the mammalian brain functions within a very narrow range of oxygen concentrations and temperatures, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has employed strategies to deal with a much wider range of acute environmental stressors. The foraging (for) gene encodes the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), has been shown to regulate thermotolerance in many stress-adapted species, including Drosophila, and could be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of hyperthermia in mammals. Whereas previous thermotolerance studies have looked at the effects of PKG variation on Drosophila behavior or excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), little is known about PKG effects on presynaptic mechanisms. In this study, we characterize presynaptic calcium ([Ca2+]i) dynamics at the Drosophila larval NMJ to determine the effects of high temperature stress on synaptic transmission. We investigated the neuroprotective role of PKG modulation both genetically using RNA interference (RNAi), and pharmacologically, to determine if and how PKG affects presynaptic [Ca2+]i dynamics during hyperthermia. We found that PKG activity modulates presynaptic neuronal Ca2+ responses during acute hyperthermia, where PKG activation makes neurons more sensitive to temperature-induced failure of Ca2+ flux and PKG inhibition confers thermotolerance and maintains normal Ca2+ dynamics under the same conditions. Targeted motoneuronal knockdown of PKG using RNAi demonstrated that decreased PKG expression was sufficient to confer thermoprotection. These results demonstrate that the PKG pathway regulates presynaptic motoneuronal Ca2+ signaling to influence thermotolerance of presynaptic function during acute hyperthermia. PMID:27711243

  5. Exon junction complex subunits are required to splice Drosophila MAP kinase, a large heterochromatic gene

    PubMed Central

    Roignant, Jean-Yves; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The exon junction complex (EJC) is assembled on spliced mRNAs upstream of exon-exon junctions, and can regulate their subsequent translation, localization, or degradation. We isolated mutations in Drosophila mago nashi (mago), which encodes a core EJC subunit, based on their unexpectedly specific effects on photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of Mago prevents Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, due to a large reduction in MAPK mRNA levels. MAPK expression also requires the EJC subunits Y14 and eIF4AIII, and EJC-associated splicing factors. Mago depletion does not affect the transcription or stability of MAPK mRNA, but alters its splicing pattern. MAPK expression from an exogenous promoter requires Mago only when the template includes introns. MAPK is the primary functional target of mago in eye development; in cultured cells, Mago knockdown disproportionately affects other large genes located in heterochromatin. These data support a nuclear role for EJC components in splicing a specific subset of introns. PMID:20946982

  6. Inositol phosphate kinase 2 is required for imaginal disc development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Seeds, Andrew M.; Tsui, Marco M.; Sunu, Christine; Spana, Eric P.; York, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Inositol phosphate kinase 2 (Ipk2), also known as IP multikinase IPMK, is an evolutionarily conserved protein that initiates production of inositol phosphate intracellular messengers (IPs), which are critical for regulating nuclear and cytoplasmic processes. Here we report that Ipk2 kinase activity is required for the development of the adult fruit fly epidermis. Ipk2 mutants show impaired development of their imaginal discs, the primordial tissues that form the adult epidermis. Although disk tissue seems to specify normally during early embryogenesis, loss of Ipk2 activity results in increased apoptosis and impairment of proliferation during larval and pupal development. The proliferation defect is in part attributed to a reduction in JAK/STAT signaling, possibly by controlling production or secretion of the pathway’s activating ligand, Unpaired. Constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT pathway downstream of Unpaired partially rescues the disk growth defects in Ipk2 mutants. Thus, IP production is essential for proliferation of the imaginal discs, in part, by regulating JAK/STAT signaling. Our work demonstrates an essential role for Ipk2 in producing inositide messengers required for imaginal disk tissue maturation and subsequent formation of adult body structures and provides molecular insights to signaling pathways involved in tissue growth and stability during development. PMID:26647185

  7. Inositol phosphate kinase 2 is required for imaginal disc development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Seeds, Andrew M; Tsui, Marco M; Sunu, Christine; Spana, Eric P; York, John D

    2015-12-22

    Inositol phosphate kinase 2 (Ipk2), also known as IP multikinase IPMK, is an evolutionarily conserved protein that initiates production of inositol phosphate intracellular messengers (IPs), which are critical for regulating nuclear and cytoplasmic processes. Here we report that Ipk2 kinase activity is required for the development of the adult fruit fly epidermis. Ipk2 mutants show impaired development of their imaginal discs, the primordial tissues that form the adult epidermis. Although disk tissue seems to specify normally during early embryogenesis, loss of Ipk2 activity results in increased apoptosis and impairment of proliferation during larval and pupal development. The proliferation defect is in part attributed to a reduction in JAK/STAT signaling, possibly by controlling production or secretion of the pathway's activating ligand, Unpaired. Constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT pathway downstream of Unpaired partially rescues the disk growth defects in Ipk2 mutants. Thus, IP production is essential for proliferation of the imaginal discs, in part, by regulating JAK/STAT signaling. Our work demonstrates an essential role for Ipk2 in producing inositide messengers required for imaginal disk tissue maturation and subsequent formation of adult body structures and provides molecular insights to signaling pathways involved in tissue growth and stability during development. PMID:26647185

  8. Drosophila salt-inducible kinase (SIK) regulates starvation resistance through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC).

    PubMed

    Choi, Sekyu; Kim, Wonho; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2011-01-28

    Salt-inducible kinase (SIK), one of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK)-related kinases, has been suggested to play important functions in glucose homeostasis by inhibiting the cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC). To examine the role of SIK in vivo, we generated Drosophila SIK mutant and found that the mutant flies have higher amounts of lipid and glycogen stores and are resistant to starvation. Interestingly, SIK transcripts are highly enriched in the brain, and we found that neuron-specific expression of exogenous SIK fully rescued lipid and glycogen storage phenotypes as well as starvation resistance of the mutant. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we demonstrated that CRTC Ser-157 phosphorylation by SIK is critical for inhibiting CRTC activity in vivo. Furthermore, double mutants of SIK and CRTC became sensitive to starvation, and the Ser-157 phosphomimetic mutation of CRTC reduced lipid and glycogen levels in the SIK mutant, suggesting that CRTC mediates the effects of SIK signaling. Collectively, our results strongly support the importance of the SIK-CRTC signaling axis that functions in the brain to maintain energy homeostasis in Drosophila.

  9. Binding of Drosophila Polo kinase to its regulator Matrimony is noncanonical and involves two separate functional domains

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Amanda M.; Hughes, Stacie E.; Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Smith, S. Kendall; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Collins, Kimberly A.; Friederichs, Jennifer M.; Florens, Laurence; Swanson, Selene K.; Pelot, Marissa C.; Miller, Danny E.; Washburn, Michael P.; Jaspersen, Sue L.; Hawley, R. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Polo kinase physically interacts with, and is repressed by, the Matrimony (Mtrm) protein during oogenesis. Females heterozygous for a deletion of the mtrm gene display defects in chromosome segregation at meiosis I. However, a complete absence of Mtrm results in both meiotic catastrophe and female sterility. We show that three phosphorylated residues in an N-terminal region in Mtrm are required for Mtrm::Polo binding. However, this binding is noncanonical; it does not require either a complete S-pS/pT-P motif in Mtrm or key residues in the Polo-box domain of Polo that allow Polo to bind phosphorylated substrates. By using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy to characterize the Mtrm::Polo interaction in vivo, we show that a sterile α-motif (SAM) domain located at the C terminus of Mtrm increases the stability of Mtrm::Polo binding. Although Mtrm’s C-terminal SAM domain is not required to rescue the chromosome segregation defects observed in mtrm/+ females, it is essential to prevent both meiotic catastrophe and the female sterility observed in mtrm/mtrm females. We propose that Polo’s interaction with the cluster of phosphorylated residues alone is sufficient to rescue the meiosis I defect. However, the strengthening of Mtrm::Polo binding mediated by the SAM domain is necessary to prevent meiotic catastrophe and ensure female fertility. Characterization of the Mtrm::Polo interaction, as well as that of other Polo regulators, may assist in the design of a new class of Polo inhibitors to be used as targeted anticancer therapeutic agents. PMID:23479640

  10. Energy-Dependent Modulation of Glucagon-Like Signaling in Drosophila via the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Braco, Jason T.; Gillespie, Emily L.; Alberto, Gregory E.; Brenman, Jay E.; Johnson, Erik C.

    2012-01-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is the equivalent of mammalian glucagon, as it is the primary insect hormone that causes energy mobilization. In Drosophila, current knowledge of the mechanisms regulating AKH signaling is limited. Here, we report that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for normal AKH secretion during periods of metabolic challenges. Reduction of AMPK in AKH cells causes a suite of behavioral and physiological phenotypes resembling AKH cell ablations. Specifically, reduced AMPK function increases life span during starvation and delays starvation-induced hyperactivity. Neither AKH cell survival nor gene expression is significantly impacted by reduced AMPK function. AKH immunolabeling was significantly higher in animals with reduced AMPK function; this result is paralleled by genetic inhibition of synaptic release, suggesting that AMPK promotes AKH secretion. We observed reduced secretion in AKH cells bearing AMPK mutations employing a specific secretion reporter, confirming that AMPK functions in AKH secretion. Live-cell imaging of wild-type AKH neuroendocrine cells shows heightened excitability under reduced sugar levels, and this response was delayed and reduced in AMPK-deficient backgrounds. Furthermore, AMPK activation in AKH cells increases intracellular calcium levels in constant high sugar levels, suggesting that the underlying mechanism of AMPK action is modification of ionic currents. These results demonstrate that AMPK signaling is a critical feature that regulates AKH secretion, and, ultimately, metabolic homeostasis. The significance of these findings is that AMPK is important in the regulation of glucagon signaling, suggesting that the organization of metabolic networks is highly conserved and that AMPK plays a prominent role in these networks. PMID:22798489

  11. Energy-dependent modulation of glucagon-like signaling in Drosophila via the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Braco, Jason T; Gillespie, Emily L; Alberto, Gregory E; Brenman, Jay E; Johnson, Erik C

    2012-10-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) is the equivalent of mammalian glucagon, as it is the primary insect hormone that causes energy mobilization. In Drosophila, current knowledge of the mechanisms regulating AKH signaling is limited. Here, we report that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is critical for normal AKH secretion during periods of metabolic challenges. Reduction of AMPK in AKH cells causes a suite of behavioral and physiological phenotypes resembling AKH cell ablations. Specifically, reduced AMPK function increases life span during starvation and delays starvation-induced hyperactivity. Neither AKH cell survival nor gene expression is significantly impacted by reduced AMPK function. AKH immunolabeling was significantly higher in animals with reduced AMPK function; this result is paralleled by genetic inhibition of synaptic release, suggesting that AMPK promotes AKH secretion. We observed reduced secretion in AKH cells bearing AMPK mutations employing a specific secretion reporter, confirming that AMPK functions in AKH secretion. Live-cell imaging of wild-type AKH neuroendocrine cells shows heightened excitability under reduced sugar levels, and this response was delayed and reduced in AMPK-deficient backgrounds. Furthermore, AMPK activation in AKH cells increases intracellular calcium levels in constant high sugar levels, suggesting that the underlying mechanism of AMPK action is modification of ionic currents. These results demonstrate that AMPK signaling is a critical feature that regulates AKH secretion, and, ultimately, metabolic homeostasis. The significance of these findings is that AMPK is important in the regulation of glucagon signaling, suggesting that the organization of metabolic networks is highly conserved and that AMPK plays a prominent role in these networks. PMID:22798489

  12. Distinct effects of Abelson kinase mutations on myocytes and neurons in dissociated Drosophila embryonic cultures: mimicking of high temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijuan; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) is known to regulate axon guidance, muscle development, and cell-cell interaction in vivo. The Drosophila primary culture system offers advantages in exploring the cellular mechanisms mediated by Abl with utilizing various experimental manipulations. Here we demonstrate that single-embryo cultures exhibit stage-dependent characteristics of cellular differentiation and developmental progression in neurons and myocytes, as well as nerve-muscle contacts. In particular, muscle development critically depends on the stage of dissociated embryos. In wild-type (WT) cultures derived from embryos before stage 12, muscle cells remained within cell clusters and were rarely detected. Interestingly, abundant myocytes were spotted in Abl mutant cultures, exhibiting enhanced myocyte movement and fusion, as well as neuron-muscle contacts even in cultures dissociated from younger, stage 10 embryos. Notably, Abl myocytes frequently displayed well-expanded lamellipodia. Conversely, Abl neurons were characterized with fewer large veil-like lamellipodia, but instead had increased numbers of filopodia and darker nodes along neurites. These distinct phenotypes were equally evident in both homo- and hetero-zygous cultures (Abl/Abl vs. Abl/+) of different alleles (Abl(1) and Abl(4) ) indicating dominant mutational effects. Strikingly, in WT cultures derived from stage 10 embryos, high temperature (HT) incubation promoted muscle migration and fusion, partially mimicking the advanced muscle development typical of Abl cultures. However, HT enhanced neuronal growth with increased numbers of enlarged lamellipodia, distinct from the characteristic Abl neuronal morphology. Intriguingly, HT incubation also promoted Abl lamellipodia expansion, with a much greater effect on nerve cells than muscle. Our results suggest that Abl is an essential regulator for myocyte and neuron development and that high-temperature incubation partially mimics the faster muscle development

  13. Drosophila protein kinase N (Pkn) is a negative regulator of actin-myosin activity during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tânia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-10-15

    Nurse cell dumping is an actin-myosin based process, where 15 nurse cells of a given egg chamber contract and transfer their cytoplasmic content through the ring canals into the growing oocyte. We isolated two mutant alleles of protein kinase N (pkn) and showed that Pkn negatively-regulates activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton during the onset of dumping. Using live-cell imaging analysis we observed that nurse cell dumping rates sharply increase during the onset of fast dumping. Such rate increase was severely impaired in pkn mutant nurse cells due to excessive nurse cell actin-myosin activity and/or loss of tissue integrity. Our work demonstrates that the transition between slow and fast dumping is a discrete event, with at least a five to six-fold dumping rate increase. We show that Pkn negatively regulates nurse cell actin-myosin activity. This is likely to be important for directional cytoplasmic flow. We propose Pkn provides a negative feedback loop to help avoid excessive contractility after local activation of Rho GTPase.

  14. Drosophila protein kinase N (Pkn) is a negative regulator of actin-myosin activity during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tânia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-10-15

    Nurse cell dumping is an actin-myosin based process, where 15 nurse cells of a given egg chamber contract and transfer their cytoplasmic content through the ring canals into the growing oocyte. We isolated two mutant alleles of protein kinase N (pkn) and showed that Pkn negatively-regulates activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton during the onset of dumping. Using live-cell imaging analysis we observed that nurse cell dumping rates sharply increase during the onset of fast dumping. Such rate increase was severely impaired in pkn mutant nurse cells due to excessive nurse cell actin-myosin activity and/or loss of tissue integrity. Our work demonstrates that the transition between slow and fast dumping is a discrete event, with at least a five to six-fold dumping rate increase. We show that Pkn negatively regulates nurse cell actin-myosin activity. This is likely to be important for directional cytoplasmic flow. We propose Pkn provides a negative feedback loop to help avoid excessive contractility after local activation of Rho GTPase. PMID:25131196

  15. An Amino-Terminal Polo Kinase Interaction Motif Acts in the Regulation of Centrosome Formation and Reveals a Novel Function for centrosomin (cnn) in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Eisman, Robert C; Phelps, Melissa A S; Kaufman, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The formation of the pericentriolar matrix (PCM) and a fully functional centrosome in syncytial Drosophila melanogaster embryos requires the rapid transport of Cnn during initiation of the centrosome replication cycle. We show a Cnn and Polo kinase interaction is apparently required during embryogenesis and involves the exon 1A-initiating coding exon, suggesting a subset of Cnn splice variants is regulated by Polo kinase. During PCM formation exon 1A Cnn-Long Form proteins likely bind Polo kinase before phosphorylation by Polo for Cnn transport to the centrosome. Loss of either of these interactions in a portion of the total Cnn protein pool is sufficient to remove native Cnn from the pool, thereby altering the normal localization dynamics of Cnn to the PCM. Additionally, Cnn-Short Form proteins are required for polar body formation, a process known to require Polo kinase after the completion of meiosis. Exon 1A Cnn-LF and Cnn-SF proteins, in conjunction with Polo kinase, are required at the completion of meiosis and for the formation of functional centrosomes during early embryogenesis.

  16. The C-terminal Kinase and ERK-binding Domains of Drosophila S6KII (RSK) Are Required for Phosphorylation of the Protein and Modulation of Circadian Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Tangredi, Michelle M.; Ng, Fanny S.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2012-01-01

    A detailed structure/function analysis of Drosophila p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (S6KII) or its mammalian homolog RSK has not been performed in the context of neuronal plasticity or behavior. We previously reported that S6KII is required for normal circadian periodicity. Here we report a site-directed mutagenesis of S6KII and analysis of mutants, in vivo, that identifies functional domains and phosphorylation sites critical for the regulation of circadian period. We demonstrate, for the first time, a role for the S6KII C-terminal kinase that is independent of its known role in activation of the N-terminal kinase. Both S6KII C-terminal kinase activity and its ERK-binding domain are required for wild-type circadian period and normal phosphorylation status of the protein. In contrast, the N-terminal kinase of S6KII is dispensable for modulation of circadian period and normal phosphorylation of the protein. We also show that particular sites of S6KII phosphorylation, Ser-515 and Thr-732, are essential for normal circadian behavior. Surprisingly, the phosphorylation of S6KII residues, in vivo, does not follow a strict sequential pattern, as implied by certain cell-based studies of mammalian RSK protein. PMID:22447936

  17. The kinase Sgg modulates temporal development of macrochaetes in Drosophila by phosphorylation of Scute and Pannier

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingyao; Hatton-Ellis, Emma; Simpson, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of novel structures is often made possible by changes in the timing or spatial expression of genes regulating development. Macrochaetes, large sensory bristles arranged into species-specific stereotypical patterns, are an evolutionary novelty of cyclorraphous flies and are associated with changes in both the temporal and spatial expression of the proneural genes achaete (ac) and scute (sc). Changes in spatial expression are associated with the evolution of cis-regulatory sequences, but it is not known how temporal regulation is achieved. One factor required for ac-sc expression, the expression of which coincides temporally with that of ac-sc in the notum, is Wingless (Wg; also known as Wnt). Wingless downregulates the activity of the serine/threonine kinase Shaggy (Sgg; also known as GSK-3). We demonstrate that Scute is phosphorylated by Sgg on a serine residue and that mutation of this residue results in a form of Sc with heightened proneural activity that can rescue the loss of bristles characteristic of wg mutants. We suggest that the phosphorylated form of Sc has reduced transcriptional activity such that sc is unable to autoregulate, an essential function for the segregation of bristle precursors. Sgg also phosphorylates Pannier, a transcriptional activator of ac-sc, the activity of which is similarly dampened when in the phosphorylated state. Furthermore, we show that Wg signalling does not act directly via a cis-regulatory element of the ac-sc genes. We suggest that temporal control of ac-sc activity in cyclorraphous flies is likely to be regulated by permissive factors and might therefore not be encoded at the level of ac-sc gene sequences. PMID:22159580

  18. One-pot microbial synthesis of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside from glucose, acetaldehyde, and a nucleobase.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Jun; Kawano, Takako; Sakai, Takafumi; Saito, Kyota; Matsumoto, Seiichiro; Sasaki, Mie; Mikami, Yoichi; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2006-06-01

    A one-pot enzymatic synthesis of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside from glucose, acetaldehyde, and a nucleobase was established. Glycolysis by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) generated ATP which was used to produce D: -glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate production from glucose via fructose 1,6-diphosphate. The D: -glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate produced was transformed to 2'-deoxyribonucleoside via 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate and then 2-deoxyribose 1-phosphate in the presence of acetaldehyde and a nucleobase by deoxyriboaldolase, phosphopentomutase expressed in Escherichia coli, and a commercial nucleoside phosphorylase. About 33 mM 2'-deoxyinosine was produced from 600 mM glucose, 333 mM acetaldehyde and 100 mM adenine in 24 h. 2'-Deoxyinosine was produced from adenine due to the adenosine deaminase activity of E. coli transformants.

  19. Src family kinases are required for WNT5 signaling through the Derailed/RYK receptor in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wouda, Rene R; Bansraj, Monique R K S; de Jong, Anja W M; Noordermeer, Jasprina N; Fradkin, Lee G

    2008-07-01

    Members of the RYK/Derailed family have recently been shown to regulate axon guidance in both Drosophila and mammals by acting as Wnt receptors. Little is known about how the kinase activity-deficient RYKs transduce Wnt signals. Here, we show that the non-receptor Src family tyrosine kinases, SRC64B and SRC42A, are involved in WNT5-mediated signaling through Derailed in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Analysis of animals lacking SRC64B and SRC42A reveals defects in commissure formation similar to those observed in Wnt5 and derailed mutants. Reductions in SRC64B expression levels suppress a Wnt5/derailed-dependent dominant gain-of-function phenotype, and increased levels of either SRC64B or SRC42A enhance Wnt5/derailed-mediated axon commissure switching. Derailed and SRC64B form a complex, which contains catalytically active SRC64B, the formation or stability of which requires SRC64B kinase activity. Furthermore, Derailed is phosphorylated in a SRC64B-dependent manner and coexpression of Derailed and SRC64B results in the activation of SRC64B. The mammalian orthologs of Derailed and SRC64B also form complexes, suggesting that Src roles in RYK signaling are conserved. Finally, we show that coexpression of WNT5 and Derailed has no apparent effect upon TCF/LEF-dependent transcription, suggesting that the WNT5/Derailed signaling pathway is unlikely to directly regulate canonical Wnt pathway targets. Together, these findings indicate that the Src family kinases play novel roles in WNT5/Derailed-mediated signaling. PMID:18539923

  20. Interaction of Omega, Sigma, and Theta glutathione transferases with p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakul, J; Janphen, K; Saisawang, C; Ketterman, A J

    2014-05-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of phase II detoxification enzymes found in almost all organisms. Besides playing a major role in the detoxification of xenobiotic and toxic compounds, GSTs are also involved in the regulation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction by interaction with proteins in the pathway. An in vitro study was performed for Theta, Omega, Sigma GSTs and their interaction with MAP kinase p38b protein from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The study included the effects of all five Omega class GSTs (DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, DmGSTO2b, DmGSTO3, DmGSTO4), all five Theta class GSTs (DmGSTT1, DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3a, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTT4), and one Sigma class glutathione transferase on the activity of Drosophila p38b, including the reciprocal effect of this kinase protein on glutathione transferase activity. It was found that DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTO1, and DmGSTO3 activated p38b significantly. Substrate specificities of GSTs were also altered after co-incubation with p38b. Although p38b activated DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, and DmGSTT2, it inhibited DmGSTT3b and DmGSTO3 activity toward xenobiotic and physiological substrates tested. These results suggest a novel link between Omega and Theta GSTs with the p38b MAP kinase pathway.

  1. Interaction of Omega, Sigma, and Theta Glutathione Transferases with p38b Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase from the Fruit Fly, Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wongtrakul, J.; Janphen, K.; Saisawang, C.; Ketterman, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a diverse family of phase II detoxification enzymes found in almost all organisms. Besides playing a major role in the detoxification of xenobiotic and toxic compounds, GSTs are also involved in the regulation of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction by interaction with proteins in the pathway. An in vitro study was performed for Theta, Omega, Sigma GSTs and their interaction with MAP kinase p38b protein from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The study included the effects of all five Omega class GSTs (DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, DmGSTO2b, DmGSTO3, DmGSTO4), all five Theta class GSTs (DmGSTT1, DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3a, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTT4), and one Sigma class glutathione transferase on the activity of Drosophila p38b, including the reciprocal effect of this kinase protein on glutathione transferase activity. It was found that DmGSTT2, DmGSTT3b, DmGSTO1, and DmGSTO3 activated p38b significantly. Substrate specificities of GSTs were also altered after co-incubation with p38b. Although p38b activated DmGSTO1, DmGSTO2a, and DmGSTT2, it inhibited DmGSTT3b and DmGSTO3 activity toward xenobiotic and physiological substrates tested. These results suggest a novel link between Omega and Theta GSTs with the p38b MAP kinase pathway. PMID:25373207

  2. The Drosophila TIPE family member Sigmar interacts with the Ste20-like kinase Misshapen and modulates JNK signaling, cytoskeletal remodeling and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Xu, Jing; Kuzyk, Michael; Dullat, Harpreet K.; Wilton, James; DeVorkin, Lindsay; Lebovitz, Chandra; Morin, Gregg B.; Marra, Marco A.; Gorski, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    TNFAIP8 and other mammalian TIPE family proteins have attracted increased interest due to their associations with disease-related processes including oncogenic transformation, metastasis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular functions of TIPE family proteins are still not well understood. Here we report the molecular and genetic characterization of the Drosophila TNFAIP8 homolog, CG4091/sigmar. Previous gene expression studies revealed dynamic expression of sigmar in larval salivary glands prior to histolysis. Here we demonstrate that in sigmar loss-of-function mutants, the salivary glands are morphologically abnormal with defects in the tubulin network and decreased autophagic flux. Sigmar localizes subcellularly to microtubule-containing projections in Drosophila S2 cells, and co-immunoprecipitates with the Ste20-like kinase Misshapen, a regulator of the JNK pathway. Further, the Drosophila TNF ligand Eiger can induce sigmar expression, and sigmar loss-of-function leads to altered localization of pDJNK in salivary glands. Together, these findings link Sigmar to the JNK pathway, cytoskeletal remodeling and autophagy activity during salivary gland development, and provide new insights into TIPE family member function. PMID:25836674

  3. Drosophila homeodomain-interacting protein kinase inhibits the Skp1-Cul1-F-box E3 ligase complex to dually promote Wingless and Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Sharan; Verheyen, Esther M

    2011-06-14

    Drosophila Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (Hipk) has been shown to regulate in vivo, the stability of Armadillo, the transcriptional effector of Wingless signaling. The Wingless pathway culminates in the stabilization of Armadillo that, in the absence of signaling, is sequentially phosphorylated, polyubiquitinated and degraded. Loss-of-function clones for hipk result in reduced stabilized Armadillo, whereas overexpression of hipk elevates Armadillo levels to promote Wingless-responsive target gene expression. Here, we show that overexpression of hipk can suppress the effects of negative regulators of Armadillo to prevent its degradation in the wing imaginal disc. Hipk acts to stabilize Armadillo by impeding the function of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF)(Slimb), thereby inhibiting Armadillo ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Vertebrate Hipk2 displays a similar ability to prevent β-catenin ubiquitination in a functionally conserved mechanism. We find that Hipk's ability to inhibit SCF(Slimb)-mediated ubiquitination is not restricted to Armadillo and extends to other substrates of SCF(Slimb), including the Hedgehog signaling effector Ci. Thus, similar to casein kinase 1 and glycogen synthase kinase 3, Hipk dually regulates both Wingless and Hedgehog signaling by controlling the stability of their respective signaling effectors, but it is the first kinase to our knowledge identified that promotes the stability of both Armadillo and Ci.

  4. Disruption of Glycerol Metabolism by RNAi Targeting of Genes Encoding Glycerol Kinase Results in a Range of Phenotype Severity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Patrick J.; Jackson, George R.; Dipple, Katrina M.

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, RNAi targeting of either dGyk or dGK can result in two alternative phenotypes: adult glycerol hypersensitivity or larval lethality. Here we compare these two phenotypes at the level of glycerol kinase (GK) phosphorylation activity, dGyk and dGK-RNA expression, and glycerol levels. We found both phenotypes exhibit reduced but similar levels of GK phosphorylation activity. Reduced RNA expression levels of dGyk and dGK corresponded with RNAi progeny that developed into glycerol hypersensitive adult flies. However, quantification of dGyk/dGK expression levels for the larval lethality phenotype revealed unexpected levels possibly due to a compensatory mechanism between dGyk and dGK or RNAi inhibition. The enzymatic role of glycerol kinase converts glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate. As expected, elevated glycerol levels were observed in larvae that went on to develop into glycerol hypersensitive adults. Interestingly, larvae that died before eclosion revealed extremely low glycerol levels. Further characterization identified a wing phenotype that is enhanced by a dGpdh null mutation, indicating disrupted glycerol metabolism underlies the wing phenotype. In humans, glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) exhibits a wide range of phenotypic variation with no obvious genotype-phenotype correlations. Additionally, disease severity often does not correlate with GK phosphorylation activity. It is intriguing that both human GKD patients and our GKD Drosophila model show a range of phenotype severity. Additionally, the lack of correlation between GK phosphorylation and dGyk/dGK-RNA expression with phenotypic severity suggests further study including understanding the alternative functions of the GK protein, could provide insights into the complex pathogenic mechanism observed in human GKD patients. PMID:24039719

  5. The tricornered gene, which is required for the integrity of epidermal cell extensions, encodes the Drosophila nuclear DBF2-related kinase.

    PubMed

    Geng, W; He, B; Wang, M; Adler, P N

    2000-12-01

    During their differentiation epidermal cells of Drosophila form a rich variety of polarized structures. These include the epidermal hairs that decorate much of the adult cuticular surface, the shafts of the bristle sense organs, the lateral extensions of the arista, and the larval denticles. These cuticular structures are produced by cytoskeletal-mediated outgrowths of epidermal cells. Mutations in the tricornered gene result in the splitting or branching of all of these structures. Thus, tricornered function appears to be important for maintaining the integrity of the outgrowths. tricornered mutations however do not have major effects on the growth or shape of these cellular extensions. Inhibiting actin polymerization in differentiating cells by cytochalasin D or latrunculin A treatment also induces the splitting of hairs and bristles, suggesting that the actin cytoskeleton might be a target of tricornered. However, the drugs also result in short, fat, and occasionally malformed hairs and bristles. The data suggest that the function of the actin cytoskeleton is important for maintaining the integrity of cellular extensions as well as their growth and shape. Thus, if tricornered causes the splitting of cellular extensions by interacting with the actin cytoskeleton it likely does so in a subtle way. Consistent with this possibility we found that a weak tricornered mutant is hypersensitive to cytochalasin D. We have cloned the tricornered gene and found that it encodes the Drosophila NDR kinase. This is a conserved ser/thr protein kinase found in Caenorhabditis elegans and humans that is related to a number of kinases that have been found to be important in controlling cell structure and proliferation.

  6. The tricornered gene, which is required for the integrity of epidermal cell extensions, encodes the Drosophila nuclear DBF2-related kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Geng, W; He, B; Wang, M; Adler, P N

    2000-01-01

    During their differentiation epidermal cells of Drosophila form a rich variety of polarized structures. These include the epidermal hairs that decorate much of the adult cuticular surface, the shafts of the bristle sense organs, the lateral extensions of the arista, and the larval denticles. These cuticular structures are produced by cytoskeletal-mediated outgrowths of epidermal cells. Mutations in the tricornered gene result in the splitting or branching of all of these structures. Thus, tricornered function appears to be important for maintaining the integrity of the outgrowths. tricornered mutations however do not have major effects on the growth or shape of these cellular extensions. Inhibiting actin polymerization in differentiating cells by cytochalasin D or latrunculin A treatment also induces the splitting of hairs and bristles, suggesting that the actin cytoskeleton might be a target of tricornered. However, the drugs also result in short, fat, and occasionally malformed hairs and bristles. The data suggest that the function of the actin cytoskeleton is important for maintaining the integrity of cellular extensions as well as their growth and shape. Thus, if tricornered causes the splitting of cellular extensions by interacting with the actin cytoskeleton it likely does so in a subtle way. Consistent with this possibility we found that a weak tricornered mutant is hypersensitive to cytochalasin D. We have cloned the tricornered gene and found that it encodes the Drosophila NDR kinase. This is a conserved ser/thr protein kinase found in Caenorhabditis elegans and humans that is related to a number of kinases that have been found to be important in controlling cell structure and proliferation. PMID:11102376

  7. De Novo Synthesis of Sphingolipids Is Required for Cell Survival by Down-Regulating c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase in Drosophila Imaginal Discs

    PubMed Central

    Adachi-Yamada, Takashi; Gotoh, Tomokazu; Sugimura, Isamu; Tateno, Minoru; Nishida, Yasuyoshi; Onuki, Tomoya; Date, Hideyuki

    1999-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a conserved eukaryotic signaling factor that mediates various signals, cumulating in the activation of transcription factors. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a MAPK, is activated through phosphorylation by the kinase MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK). To elucidate the extent of the involvement of ERK in various aspects of animal development, we searched for a Drosophila mutant which responds to elevated MEK activity and herein identified a lace mutant. Mutants with mild lace alleles grow to become adults with multiple aberrant morphologies in the appendages, compound eye, and bristles. These aberrations were suppressed by elevated MEK activity. Structural and transgenic analyses of the lace cDNA have revealed that the lace gene product is a membrane protein similar to the yeast protein LCB2, a subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), which catalyzes the first step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. In fact, SPT activity in the fly expressing epitope-tagged Lace was absorbed by epitope-specific antibody. The number of dead cells in various imaginal discs of a lace hypomorph was considerably increased, thereby ectopically activating c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), another MAPK. These results account for the adult phenotypes of the lace mutant and suppression of the phenotypes by elevated MEK activity: we hypothesize that mutation of lace causes decreased de novo synthesis of sphingolipid metabolites, some of which are signaling molecules, and one or more of these changes activates JNK to elicit apoptosis. The ERK pathway may be antagonistic to the JNK pathway in the control of cell survival. PMID:10490662

  8. Drosophila Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) Promotes Warts Protein to Suppress Yorkie Protein Activity for Growth Control*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lianxin; Huang, Hongling; Li, Jinhui; Yin, Meng-Xin; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Zeng, Rong; Jiang, Jin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Hippo signaling regulates Wts activity to phosphorylate and inhibit Yki in order to control tissue growth. CK2 is widely expressed and involved in a variety of signaling pathways. In this study we report that Drosophila CK2 promotes Wts activity to phosphorylate and inhibit Yki activity, which is independent of Hpo-induced Wts promotion. In vivo, CK2 overexpression suppresses hpo mutant-induced expanded (Ex) up-regulation and overgrowth phenotype, whereas it cannot affect wts mutant. Consistent with this, knockdown of CK2 up-regulates Hpo pathway target expression. We also found that Drosophila CK2 is essential for tissue growth as a cell death inhibitor as knockdown of CK2 in the developing disc induces severe growth defects as well as caspase3 signals. Taken together, our results uncover a dual role of CK2; although its major role is promoting cell survive, it may potentially be a growth inhibitor as well. PMID:25320084

  9. The phylogenetic distribution and evolution of enzymes within the thymidine kinase 2-like gene family in metazoa.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Anke; Lai, Jason; Mutahir, Zeeshan; Piškur, Jure; Liberles, David A

    2014-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) carry out the rate-determining step in the nucleoside salvage pathway within all domains of life where the pathway is present, and, hence, are an indication on whether or not a species/genus retains the ability to salvage deoxyribonucleosides. Here, a phylogenetic tree is constructed for the thymidine kinase 2-like dNK gene family in metazoa. Each enzyme class (deoxycytidine, deoxyguanosine, and deoxythymidine kinases, as well as the multisubstrate dNKs) falls into a monophyletic clade. However, in vertebrates, dCK contains an apparent duplication with one paralog lost in mammals, and a number of crustacean genomes (like Caligus rogercresseyi and Lepeophtheirus salmonis) unexpectedly contain not only the multisubstrate dNKs, related to Drosophila multisubstrate dNK, but also a TK2-like kinase. Additionally, crustaceans (Daphnia, Caligus, and Lepeophtheirus) and some insects (Tribolium, Danaus, Pediculus, and Acyrthosiphon) contain several multisubstrate dNK-like enzymes which group paraphyletically within the arthropod clade. This might suggest that the multisubstrate dNKs underwent multiple rounds of duplications with differential retention of duplicate copies between insect families and more complete retention within some crustaceans and insects. Genomes of several basal animalia contain more than one dNK-like sequence, some of which group outside the remaining eukaryotes (both plants and animals) and/or with bacterial dNKs. Within the vertebrates, the mammalian genomes do not contain the second dCK, while birds, fish, and amphibians do retain it. Phasianidae (chicken and turkey) have lost dGK, while it has been retained in other bird lineages, like zebra finch. Reconstruction of the ancestral sequence between the multisubstrate arthropod dNKs and the TK2 clade of vertebrates followed by homology modeling and discrete molecular dynamics calculations on this sequence were performed to examine the evolutionary path which led to

  10. Polo kinase regulates the localization and activity of the chromosomal passenger complex in meiosis and mitosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carmena, Mar; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Ogawa, Hiromi; Earnshaw, William C

    2014-11-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Polo and Aurora families of protein kinases. The levels of expression and localization of the key regulatory kinases are themselves subject to very tight control. There is increasing evidence that crosstalk between the mitotic kinases provides for an additional level of regulation. We have previously shown that Aurora B activates Polo kinase at the centromere in mitosis, and that the interaction between Polo and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component INCENP is essential in this activation. In this report, we show that Polo kinase is required for the correct localization and activity of the CPC in meiosis and mitosis. Study of the phenotype of different polo allele combinations compared to the effect of chemical inhibition revealed significant differences in the localization and activity of the CPC in diploid tissues. Our results shed new light on the mechanisms that control the activity of Aurora B in meiosis and mitosis.

  11. Drosophila endocytic neoplastic tumor suppressor genes regulate Sav/Wts/Hpo signaling and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Brian S; Moberg, Kenneth H

    2011-12-01

    Genetic screens in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster have identified a class of neoplastic tumor suppressor genes (endocytic nTSGs), which encode proteins that localize to endosomes and facilitate the trafficking of membrane-bound receptors and adhesion molecules into the degradative lysosome. Loss of endocytic nTSGs transforms imaginal disc epithelia into highly proliferative, invasive tissues that fail to differentiate and display defects in cellular apicobasal polarity, adhesion and tissue architecture. As vertebrate homologs of some Drosophila nTSGs are linked to tumor formation, identifying molecular changes in signaling associated with nTSG loss could inform understanding of neoplastic transformation in vertebrates. Here we show that mutations in genes that act at multiple steps of the endolysosomal pathway lead to autonomous activation of the Sav/Wts/Hpo (SWH) transcriptional effector Yki (YAP/TAZ in vertebrates) and the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is known to promote Yki activity in cells with disrupted polarity. Yki and JNK activity are elevated by mutations at multiple steps in the endolysosomal pathway including mutations in the AP-2σ gene, which encodes a component of the AP-2 adaptor complex that recruits cargoes into clathrin-coated pits for subsequent internalization. Moreover, reduction of JNK activity can decrease elevated Yki-signaling caused by altered endocytosis. These studies reveal a broad requirement for components of the endocytic pathway in regulating SWH and JNK outputs, and place Drosophila endocytic nTSGs into a network that involving two major signaling pathways implicated in oncogenesis. PMID:22101275

  12. Chromatographic and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of individual 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene--deoxyribonucleoside adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Moschel, R.C.; Pigott, M.A.; Costantino, N.; Dipple, A.

    1983-09-01

    Compared with standard Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, a newly developed high pressure liquid chromatographic separation of hydrocarbon deoxyribonucleoside adducts derived from the DNA of mouse embryo cell cultures exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) provides markedly superior resolution. Once resolved, the fluorescence spectroscopic properties of the three major DMBA--DNA adducts indicate that the fluorescence exhibited by adducts derived from a bay region syn dihydrodiol epoxide of DMBA differs subtly from that exhibited by adducts derived from the isomeric anti dihydrodiol epoxide.

  13. PTP-ER, a novel tyrosine phosphatase, functions downstream of Ras1 to downregulate MAP kinase during Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed

    Karim, F D; Rubin, G M

    1999-06-01

    Activation of ERK/MAPK is a key event downstream of RAS. The duration, extent, and timing of MAPK activity is integral to signal specificity. Consequently, inactivation of MAPK by phosphatases has emerged as a critical element in the precise control of signal output. We have cloned and characterized a novel cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-ER, which is related to mammalian PCPTP1, LC-PTP/HePTP, and STEP tyrosine phosphatases. PTP-ER mutants produce extra R7 cells and enhance activated Ras1 signaling. Ectopic expression of PTP-ER dramatically inhibits RAS1/MAPK signaling. PTP-ER binds to and inactivates Drosophila ERK/MAPK; however, it is unable to dephosphorylate and downregulate Drosophila MAPKSevenmaker. Resistance to PTP-ER activity partially accounts for the Sevenmaker mutant phenotype.

  14. Ectopic expression of the Drosophila Cdk1 inhibitory kinases, Wee1 and Myt1, interferes with the second mitotic wave and disrupts pattern formation during eye development.

    PubMed Central

    Price, Donald M; Jin, Zhigang; Rabinovitch, Simon; Campbell, Shelagh D

    2002-01-01

    Wee1 kinases catalyze inhibitory phosphorylation of the mitotic regulator Cdk1, preventing mitosis during S phase and delaying it in response to DNA damage or developmental signals during G2. Unlike yeast, metazoans have two distinct Wee1-like kinases, a nuclear protein (Wee1) and a cytoplasmic protein (Myt1). We have isolated the genes encoding Drosophila Wee1 and Myt1 and are using genetic approaches to dissect their functions during normal development. Overexpression of Dwee1 or Dmyt1 during eye development generates a rough adult eye phenotype. The phenotype can be modified by altering the gene dosage of known regulators of the G2/M transition, suggesting that we could use these transgenic strains in modifier screens to identify potential regulators of Wee1 and Myt1. To confirm this idea, we tested a collection of deletions for loci that can modify the eye overexpression phenotypes and identified several loci as dominant modifiers. Mutations affecting the Delta/Notch signaling pathway strongly enhance a GMR-Dmyt1 eye phenotype but do not affect a GMR-Dwee1 eye phenotype, suggesting that Myt1 is potentially a downstream target for Notch activity during eye development. We also observed interactions with p53, which suggest that Wee1 and Myt1 activity can block apoptosis. PMID:12072468

  15. Signaling by the Engulfment Receptor Draper: A Screen in Drosophila melanogaster Implicates Cytoskeletal Regulators, Jun N-Terminal Kinase, and Yorkie

    PubMed Central

    Fullard, John F.; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    Draper, the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the Ced-1 protein of Caenorhabditis elegans, is a cell-surface receptor required for the recognition and engulfment of apoptotic cells, glial clearance of axon fragments and dendritic pruning, and salivary gland autophagy. To further elucidate mechanisms of Draper signaling, we screened chromosomal deficiencies to identify loci that dominantly modify the phenotype of overexpression of Draper isoform II (suppressed differentiation of the posterior crossvein in the wing). We found evidence for 43 genetic modifiers of Draper II. Twenty-four of the 37 suppressor loci and 3 of the 6 enhancer loci were identified. An additional 5 suppressors and 2 enhancers were identified among mutations in functionally related genes. These studies reveal positive contributions to Drpr signaling for the Jun N-terminal Kinase pathway, supported by genetic interactions with hemipterous, basket, jun, and puckered, and for cytoskeleton regulation as indicated by genetic interactions with rac1, rac2, RhoA, myoblast city, Wiskcott–Aldrich syndrome protein, and the formin CG32138, and for yorkie and expanded. These findings indicate that Jun N-terminal Kinase activation and cytoskeletal remodeling collaborate in Draper signaling. Relationships between Draper signaling and Decapentaplegic signaling, insulin signaling, Salvador/Warts/Hippo signaling, apical-basal cell polarity, and cellular responses to mechanical forces are also discussed. PMID:25395664

  16. Evaluation of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography for the separation and detection of normal and modified deoxyribonucleosides and deoxyribonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, W.H.; Maskarinec, M.P.; Row, K.H.

    1988-10-01

    Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography allows high resolution separation with very small sample volume requirements. Deoxyribonucleotide oligomers can be resolved on the basis of chain length, nucleic base sequence, and base modification. Sensitivity for dideoxyribonucleosides in the presence of a 1000-fold excess of deoxyribonucleosides is ca. 12 pg with on-column UV absorbance detection.

  17. Polo kinase regulates the localization and activity of the chromosomal passenger complex in meiosis and mitosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Mar; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Ogawa, Hiromi; Earnshaw, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Polo and Aurora families of protein kinases. The levels of expression and localization of the key regulatory kinases are themselves subject to very tight control. There is increasing evidence that crosstalk between the mitotic kinases provides for an additional level of regulation. We have previously shown that Aurora B activates Polo kinase at the centromere in mitosis, and that the interaction between Polo and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component INCENP is essential in this activation. In this report, we show that Polo kinase is required for the correct localization and activity of the CPC in meiosis and mitosis. Study of the phenotype of different polo allele combinations compared to the effect of chemical inhibition revealed significant differences in the localization and activity of the CPC in diploid tissues. Our results shed new light on the mechanisms that control the activity of Aurora B in meiosis and mitosis. PMID:25376909

  18. The Protein Dredd Is an Essential Component of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Pathway in the Drosophila Immune Response*

    PubMed Central

    Guntermann, Silvia; Foley, Edan

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila immune deficiency (IMD) pathway mobilizes c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), caspase, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) modules to counter infection with Gram-negative bacteria. Dredd is an essential caspase in the IMD pathway, and it is widely established that NF-κB activation depends on Dredd. More recent cell culture studies suggested a role for Dredd in the activation of dJNK (Drosophila JNK). However, there are no epistatic or mechanistic data on the involvement of Dredd in dJNK activation. More importantly, there is no in vivo evidence to demonstrate a physiological requirement for Dredd in the IMD/dJNK pathway. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the role of Dredd in the IMD/dJNK pathway, and we demonstrated that Dredd is essential for the activation of IMD/dJNK in cell culture. We positioned Dredd activity at an early point of the IMD/dJNK pathway and uncovered a series of interactions between Dredd and additional proximal IMD pathway molecules. Mechanistically, we showed that the caspase activity inhibitor p35 blocked dJNK activation and the induction of dJNK-dependent genes in cell culture and in vivo. Most importantly, we demonstrated that dredd mutant flies are completely inhibited in their ability to activate dJNK or express dJNK-responsive target genes after bacterial infection in vivo. In conclusion, we established Dredd as an essential component of the IMD pathway required for the full activation of IMD/dJNK in cell culture and in vivo. Our data enhance our appreciation of Dredd-dependent IMD signal transduction events. PMID:21730059

  19. The reactivity of selected acrylate esters toward glutathione and deoxyribonucleosides in vitro: structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, T J; Hayes, E P; Schwartz, C S; Witz, G

    1994-05-01

    Acrylate esters are alpha,beta-unsaturated esters used as plastic monomers whose toxicity may involve reaction with tissue nucleophiles via Michael addition. Structure-activity relationships for reactivity of selected esters with glutathione (GSH) and deoxyribonucleosides were investigated in the present studies. The esters investigated were methyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, ethyl acrylate, ethyl methacrylate, butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, tetraethyleneglycol diacrylate, tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. To compare their reactivities toward GSH, esters were incubated for up to 1 hr at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4 with either GSH or red blood cells in phosphate-buffered saline followed by measurement of free thiol. In both systems acrylate electrophilic reactivity decreased with alpha-methyl substitution; however, the decrease in electrophilic reactivity was more evident in the cell-free system than in the red blood cell model. Increased alcohol chain length moderately affected the apparent second-order rate constant for the spontaneous reaction of acrylate esters with GSH, but did not affect potency relative to cellular GSH depletion. The apparent second-order rate constants of bifunctional esters are more than twice the rate constants of the much smaller monofunctional esters. Ethyl acrylate, a reactive acrylate ester based upon glutathione alkylation, has been designated a class 2B (suspect human) carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. To detect possible DNA alkylation by acrylate esters in vitro, ethyl acrylate was incubated with deoxyribonucleosides for up to 24 hr at pH 6.7 or 7.4 and 37 degrees C or up to 8 hr and 50 degrees C. HPLC analysis revealed no detectable adduct formation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A Drosophila homolog of the Rac- and Cdc42-activated serine/threonine kinase PAK is a potential focal adhesion and focal complex protein that colocalizes with dynamic actin structures.

    PubMed Central

    Harden, N; Lee, J; Loh, H Y; Ong, Y M; Tan, I; Leung, T; Manser, E; Lim, L

    1996-01-01

    Changes in cell morphology are essential in the development of a multicellular organism. The regulation of the cytoskeleton by the Rho subfamily of small GTP-binding proteins is an important determinant of cell shape. The Rho subfamily has been shown to participate in a variety of morphogenetic processes during Drosophila melanogaster development. We describe here a Drosophila homolog, DPAK, of the serine/threonine kinase PAK, a protein which is a target of the Rho subfamily proteins Rac and Cdc42. Rac, Cdc42, and PAK have previously been implicated in signaling by c-Jun amino-terminal kinases. DPAK bound to activated (GTP-bound) Drosophila Rac (DRacA) and Drosophila Cdc42. Similarities in the distributions of DPAK, integrin, and phosphotyrosine suggested an association of DPAK with focal adhesions and Cdc42- and Rac-induced focal adhesion-like focal complexes. DPAK was elevated in the leading edge of epidermal cells, whose morphological changes drive dorsal closure of the embryo. We have previously shown that the accumulation of cytoskeletal elements initiating cell shape changes in these cells could be inhibited by expression of a dominant-negative DRacA transgene. We show that leading-edge epidermal cells flanking segment borders, which express particularly large amounts of DPAK, undergo transient losses of cytoskeletal structures during dorsal closure. We propose that DPAK may be regulating the cytoskeleton through its association with focal adhesions and focal complexes and may be participating with DRacA in a c-Jun amino-terminal kinase signaling pathway recently demonstrated to be required for dorsal closure. PMID:8628256

  1. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  2. Torso, a Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinase, plays a novel role in the larval fat body in regulating insulin signaling and body growth.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jong Woo; Han, Gangsik; Yun, Hyun Myoung; Lee, Gang Jun; Hyun, Seogang

    2016-08-01

    Torso is a receptor tyrosine kinase whose localized activation at the termini of the Drosophila embryo is mediated by its ligand, Trunk. Recent studies have unveiled a second function of Torso in the larval prothoracic gland (PG) as the receptor for the prothoracicotropic hormone, which triggers pupariation. As such, inhibition of Torso in the PG prolongs the larval growth period, thereby increasing the final pupa size. Here, we report that Torso also acts in the larval fat body, regulating body size in a manner opposite from that of Torso in PG. We confirmed the expression of torso mRNA in the larval fat body and its reduction by RNA interference (RNAi). Fat body-specific knockdown of torso, by either of the two independent RNAi transgenes, significantly decreased the final pupal size. We found that torso knockdown suppresses insulin/target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling in the fat body, as confirmed by repression of Akt and S6K. Notably, the decrease in insulin/TOR signaling and decrease of pupal size induced by the knockdown of torso were rescued by the expression of a constitutively active form of the insulin receptor or by the knockdown of FOXO. Our study revealed a novel role for Torso in the fat body with respect to regulation of insulin/TOR signaling and body size. This finding exemplifies the contrasting effects of the same gene expressed in two different organs on organismal physiology. PMID:27126913

  3. Adenylate kinase complements nucleoside diphosphate kinase deficiency in nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Inouye, M

    1996-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is a ubiquitous nonspecific enzyme that evidently is designed to catalyze in vivo ATP-dependent synthesis of ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates from the corresponding diphosphates. Because Escherichia coli contains only one copy of ndk, the structural gene for this enzyme, we were surprised to find that ndk disruption yields bacteria that are still viable. These mutant cells contain a protein with a small amount NDP kinase activity. The protein responsible for this activity was purified and identified as adenylate kinase. This enzyme, also called myokinase, catalyzes the reversible ATP-dependent synthesis of ADP from AMP. We found that this enzyme from E. coli as well as from higher eukaryotes has a broad substrate specificity displaying dual enzymatic functions. Among the nucleoside monophosphate kinases tested, only adenylate kinase was found to have NDP kinase activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NDP kinase activity associated with adenylate kinase. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8650159

  4. Effect of deoxyribonucleosides on the hypersensitivity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes to UV-B and UV-C irradiation.

    PubMed

    Green, M H; Waugh, A P; Lowe, J E; Harcourt, S A; Cole, J; Arlett, C F

    1994-07-01

    We have previously shown that non-cycling (unstimulated) human lymphocytes from normal donors show extreme hypersensitivity to UV-B irradiation, and are killed by an excisable lesion which is not a pyrimidine dimer or 6-4 photoproduct. In this paper we show that addition of the 4 deoxyribonucleosides to the medium, each at 10(-5) M, substantially increased the survival of non-cycling normal human T-lymphocytes following UV-B irradiation and substantially reduced the frequency of excision-related strand breaks in human mononuclear cells. Addition of ribonucleosides to the medium did not enhance excision-break rejoining. The survival of fibroblasts, of cycling T-lymphocytes and of unstimulated xeroderma pigmentosum T-lymphocytes was not enhanced by deoxyribonucleosides. This suggests that the hypersensitivity is due to reduced rejoining of excision breaks as a consequence of low intracellular deoxyribonucleotide pools and that it can be redressed by supplementation of the medium with deoxyribonucleosides or upregulation of ribonucleotide reductase following mitogen stimulation. We suggest that UV-B forms an additional DNA lesion which is not a pyrimidine dimer or 6-4 photoproduct, which is relatively common, and at which incision is particularly efficient. In fibroblasts, repair of this lesion is completed with high efficiency, whereas in normal unstimulated T-lymphocytes, rapid incision exacerbates the effects of the reduced rate of strand rejoining and leads to cell death. PMID:7517007

  5. Structure-function analysis of a bacterial deoxyadenosine kinase reveals the basis for substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Welin, Martin; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Eklund, Hans

    2007-03-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from ATP to a deoxyribonucleoside (dN), a key step in DNA precursor synthesis. Recently structural information concerning dNKs has been obtained, but no structure of a bacterial dCK/dGK enzyme is known. Here we report the structure of such an enzyme, represented by deoxyadenosine kinase from Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type (Mm-dAK). Superposition of Mm-dAK with its human counterpart's deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK) and deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) reveals that the overall structures are very similar with a few amino acid alterations in the proximity of the active site. To investigate the substrate specificity, Mm-dAK has been crystallized in complex with dATP and dCTP, as well as the products dCMP and dCDP. Both dATP and dCTP bind to the enzyme in a feedback-inhibitory manner with the dN part in the deoxyribonucleoside binding site and the triphosphates in the P-loop. Substrate specificity studies with clinically important nucleoside analogs as well as several phosphate donors were performed. Thus, in this study we combine structural and kinetic data to gain a better understanding of the substrate specificity of the dCK/dGK family of enzymes. The structure of Mm-dAK provides a starting point for making new anti bacterial agents against pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Spreading depolarization in the brain of Drosophila is induced by inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase and mitigated by a decrease in activity of protein kinase G.

    PubMed

    Spong, Kristin E; Rodríguez, Esteban C; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2016-09-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is characterized by a massive redistribution of ions accompanied by an arrest in electrical activity that slowly propagates through neural tissue. It has been implicated in numerous human pathologies, including migraine, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, and thus the elucidation of control mechanisms underlying the phenomenon could have many health benefits. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of SD in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster, providing a model system, whereby cellular mechanisms can be dissected using molecular genetic approaches. Propagating waves of SD were reliably induced by disrupting the extracellular potassium concentration ([K(+)]o), either directly or by inhibition of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with ouabain. The disturbance was monitored by recording the characteristic surges in [K(+)]o using K(+)-sensitive microelectrodes or by monitoring brain activity by measuring direct current potential. With the use of wild-type flies, we show that young adults are more resistant to SD compared with older adults, evidenced by shorter bouts of SD activity and attenuated [K(+)]o disturbances. Furthermore, we show that the susceptibility to SD differs between wild-type flies and w1118 mutants, demonstrating that our ouabain model is influenced by genetic strain. Lastly, flies with low levels of protein kinase G (PKG) had increased latencies to onset of both ouabain-induced SD and anoxic depolarization compared with flies with higher levels. Our findings implicate the PKG pathway as a modulator of SD in the fly brain, and given the conserved nature of the signaling pathway, it could likely play a similar role during SD in the mammalian central nervous system. PMID:27358319

  7. Genetic evidence for a protein kinase A/cubitus interruptus complex that facilitates processing of cubitus interruptus in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Kiger, J A; O'Shea, C

    2001-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) activates a signal transduction pathway regulating Cubitus interruptus (Ci). In the absence of Hh, full-length Ci (Ci-155) is bound in a complex that includes Costal2 (Cos2) and Fused (Fu). Ci-155 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA), inducing proteolysis to Ci-75, a transcriptional repressor. Hh signaling blocks proteolysis and produces an activated Ci-155 transcriptional activator. The relationship between PKA and the Ci/Cos2/Fu complex is unclear. Here we examine Hh target gene expression caused by mutant forms of PKA regulatory (PKAr) and catalytic (PKAc) subunits and by the PKAc inhibitor PKI(1-31). The mutant PKAr*, defective in binding cAMP, is shown to activate Hh target genes solely through its ability to bind and inhibit endogenous PKAc. Surprisingly, PKAcA75, a catalytically impaired mutant, also activates Hh target genes. To account for this observation, we propose that PKAc phosphorylation targeting Ci-155 for proteolysis is regulated within a complex that includes PKAc and Ci-155 and excludes PKI(1-31). This complex may permit processive phosphorylation of Ci-155 molecules, facilitating their processing to Ci-75. PMID:11454764

  8. Crystal structures of the Klenow fragment of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I complexed with deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Kong, Y.; Korolev, S.; Waksman, G.

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structures of the Klenow fragment of the Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I (Klentaq1) complexed with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTP) have been determined to 2.5 A resolution. The dNTPs bind adjacent to the O helix of Klentaq1. The triphosphate moieties are at nearly identical positions in all four complexes and are anchored by three positively charged residues, Arg659, Lys663, and Arg587, and by two polar residues, His639 and Gln613. The configuration of the base moieties in the Klentaq1/dNTP complexes demonstrates variability suggesting that dNTP binding is primarily determined by recognition and binding of the phosphate moiety. However, when superimposed on the Taq polymerase/blunt end DNA complex structure (Eom et al., 1996), two of the dNTP/Klentaq1 structures demonstrate appropriate stacking of the nucleotide base with the 3' end of the DNA primer strand, suggesting that at least in these two binary complexes, the observed dNTP conformations are functionally relevant. PMID:9605316

  9. Synthesis of 2,6-disubstituted pyridin-3-yl C-2'-deoxyribonucleosides through chemoselective transformations of bromo-chloropyridine C-nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Kubelka, Tomáš; Slavětínská, Lenka; Eigner, Václav; Hocek, Michal

    2013-07-28

    2-Bromo-6-chloro- and 6-bromo-2-chloropyridin-3-yl deoxyribonucleosides were prepared by the Heck coupling of bromo-chloro-iodopyridines with TBS-protected deoxyribose glycal. Some of their Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions proceeded chemoselectively at the position of the bromine, whereas nucleophilic substitutions were unselective and gave mixtures of products. The mono-substituted intermediates were used for another coupling or nucleophilic substitution giving rise to a small library of title 2,6-disubstituted pyridine C-deoxyribonucleosides. The title nucleosides did not exert antiviral or cytostatic effects.

  10. A novel fluorescence-based assay for the rapid detection and quantification of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Peter M.; LaBonte, Melissa J.; Russell, Jared; Louie, Stan; Ghobrial, Andrew A.; Ladner, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Current methods for measuring deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) employ reagent and labor-intensive assays utilizing radioisotopes in DNA polymerase-based assays and/or chromatography-based approaches. We have developed a rapid and sensitive 96-well fluorescence-based assay to quantify cellular dNTPs utilizing a standard real-time PCR thermocycler. This assay relies on the principle that incorporation of a limiting dNTP is required for primer-extension and Taq polymerase-mediated 5–3′ exonuclease hydrolysis of a dual-quenched fluorophore-labeled probe resulting in fluorescence. The concentration of limiting dNTP is directly proportional to the fluorescence generated. The assay demonstrated excellent linearity (R2 > 0.99) and can be modified to detect between ∼0.5 and 100 pmol of dNTP. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) for all dNTPs were defined as <0.77 and <1.3 pmol, respectively. The intra-assay and inter-assay variation coefficients were determined to be <4.6% and <10%, respectively with an accuracy of 100 ± 15% for all dNTPs. The assay quantified intracellular dNTPs with similar results obtained from a validated LC–MS/MS approach and successfully measured quantitative differences in dNTP pools in human cancer cells treated with inhibitors of thymidylate metabolism. This assay has important application in research that investigates the influence of pathological conditions or pharmacological agents on dNTP biosynthesis and regulation. PMID:21576234

  11. The Gyc76C Receptor Guanylyl Cyclase and the Foraging cGMP-Dependent Kinase Regulate Extracellular Matrix Organization and BMP Signaling in the Developing Wing of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schleede, Justin; Blair, Seth S.

    2015-01-01

    The developing crossveins of the wing of Drosophila melanogaster are specified by long-range BMP signaling and are especially sensitive to loss of extracellular modulators of BMP signaling such as the Chordin homolog Short gastrulation (Sog). However, the role of the extracellular matrix in BMP signaling and Sog activity in the crossveins has been poorly explored. Using a genetic mosaic screen for mutations that disrupt BMP signaling and posterior crossvein development, we identify Gyc76C, a member of the receptor guanylyl cyclase family that includes mammalian natriuretic peptide receptors. We show that Gyc76C and the soluble cGMP-dependent kinase Foraging, likely linked by cGMP, are necessary for normal refinement and maintenance of long-range BMP signaling in the posterior crossvein. This does not occur through cell-autonomous crosstalk between cGMP and BMP signal transduction, but likely through altered extracellular activity of Sog. We identify a novel pathway leading from Gyc76C to the organization of the wing extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases, and show that both the extracellular matrix and BMP signaling effects are largely mediated by changes in the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We discuss parallels and differences between this pathway and other examples of cGMP activity in both Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian cells and tissues. PMID:26440503

  12. The wavy Mutation Maps to the Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate 3-Kinase 2 (IP3K2) Gene of Drosophila and Interacts with IP3R to Affect Wing Development.

    PubMed

    Dean, Derek M; Maroja, Luana S; Cottrill, Sarah; Bomkamp, Brent E; Westervelt, Kathleen A; Deitcher, David L

    2015-11-27

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) regulates a host of biological processes from egg activation to cell death. When IP3-specific receptors (IP3Rs) bind to IP3, they release calcium from the ER into the cytoplasm, triggering a variety of cell type- and developmental stage-specific responses. Alternatively, inositol polyphosphate kinases can phosphorylate IP3; this limits IP3R activation by reducing IP3 levels, and also generates new signaling molecules altogether. These divergent pathways draw from the same IP3 pool yet cause very different cellular responses. Therefore, controlling the relative rates of IP3R activation vs. phosphorylation of IP3 is essential for proper cell functioning. Establishing a model system that sensitively reports the net output of IP3 signaling is crucial for identifying the controlling genes. Here we report that mutant alleles of wavy (wy), a classic locus of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, map to IP3 3-kinase 2 (IP3K2), a member of the inositol polyphosphate kinase gene family. Mutations in wy disrupt wing structure in a highly specific pattern. RNAi experiments using GAL4 and GAL80(ts) indicated that IP3K2 function is required in the wing discs of early pupae for normal wing development. Gradations in the severity of the wy phenotype provide high-resolution readouts of IP3K2 function and of overall IP3 signaling, giving this system strong potential as a model for further study of the IP3 signaling network. In proof of concept, a dominant modifier screen revealed that mutations in IP3R strongly suppress the wy phenotype, suggesting that the wy phenotype results from reduced IP4 levels, and/or excessive IP3R signaling.

  13. Synthesis of base-modified 2'-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates and their use in enzymatic synthesis of modified DNA for applications in bioanalysis and chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Hocek, Michal

    2014-11-01

    The synthesis of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) either by classical triphosphorylation of nucleosides or by aqueous cross-coupling reactions of halogenated dNTPs is discussed. Different enzymatic methods for synthesis of modified oligonucleotides and DNA by polymerase incorporation of modified nucleotides are summarized, and the applications in redox or fluorescent labeling, as well as in bioconjugations and modulation of interactions of DNA with proteins, are outlined.

  14. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates to the Active Site of the DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg{sup 2+}, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg{sup 2+} to an active site because Mg{sup 2+} is spectroscopically silent and Mg{sup 2+} binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg{sup 2+} with Mn{sup 2+}:Mn{sup 2+} that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn{sup 2+} is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn{sup 2+} that is free in solution and Mn{sup 2+} bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor.

  15. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates to the active site of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Akabayov, Barak; Richardson, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg2+, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg2+ to an active site because Mg2+ is spectroscopically silent and Mg2+ binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg2+ with Mn2+:Mn2+ that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn2+ is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn2+ that is free in solution and Mn2+ bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor. PMID:23761703

  16. Imbalanced deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate pools and spontaneous mutation rates determined during dCMP deaminase-defective bacteriophage T4 infections.

    PubMed

    Sargent, R G; Mathews, C K

    1987-04-25

    DNA precursor imbalances are known to be mutagenic in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems. Almost certainly, such mutagenesis involves competition between correctly and incorrectly base-paired precursors at replication sites. Since other factors may be involved, it is important to identify specific mutations induced by specific pool imbalances. Using bacteriophage T4, we have developed a system for such analysis. We prepare double mutants of T4; one mutation affects a phage-coded enzyme of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) metabolism, while the second is an rII mutation known to revert along a specific pathway. We determine dNTP pools in infection by such a mutant and measure both the spontaneous reversion rate of the rII mutation and, in some cases, the nucleotide sequence at the mutant site. In this paper we analyze mutations induced by a deficiency of T4-encoded deoxycytidylate deaminase. This causes pools of 5-hydroxymethyl-dCTP to expand some 30-fold, while dTTP pools contract. This specifically stimulates AT-to-GC reversion. One of the four AT-to-GC reverters tested, rIIUV215, increases its reversion rate at least 1000-fold under these pool-imbalance conditions, while the other mutants tested show increases of only about 10-fold. Therefore, factors other than dNTP competition, including local DNA sequence environment, must be invoked to fully explain mechanisms of dNTP pool imbalance-induced mutagenesis. We discuss models for this, and we also report unexpected effects of the dCMP deaminase deficiency upon pools of ribonucleoside triphosphates. PMID:3553179

  17. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  18. Yeast Dun1 Kinase Regulates Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor Sml1 in Response to Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sanvisens, Nerea; Romero, Antonia M.; An, Xiuxiang; Zhang, Caiguo; de Llanos, Rosa; Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; Bañó, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox-active cofactor in many biological processes, including DNA replication and repair. Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are Fe-dependent enzymes that catalyze deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate (dNDP) synthesis. We show here that the levels of the Sml1 protein, a yeast RNR large-subunit inhibitor, specifically decrease in response to both nutritional and genetic Fe deficiencies in a Dun1-dependent but Mec1/Rad53- and Aft1-independent manner. The decline of Sml1 protein levels upon Fe starvation depends on Dun1 forkhead-associated and kinase domains, the 26S proteasome, and the vacuolar proteolytic pathway. Depletion of core components of the mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly leads to a Dun1-dependent diminution of Sml1 protein levels. The physiological relevance of Sml1 downregulation by Dun1 under low-Fe conditions is highlighted by the synthetic growth defect observed between dun1Δ and fet3Δ fet4Δ mutants, which is rescued by SML1 deletion. Consistent with an increase in RNR function, Rnr1 protein levels are upregulated upon Fe deficiency. Finally, dun1Δ mutants display defects in deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) biosynthesis under low-Fe conditions. Taken together, these results reveal that the Dun1 checkpoint kinase promotes RNR function in response to Fe starvation by stimulating Sml1 protein degradation. PMID:24958100

  19. Drosophila spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Lacramioara; Brill, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster spermatids undergo dramatic morphological changes as they differentiate from small round cells approximately 12 μm in diameter into highly polarized, 1.8 mm long, motile sperm capable of participating in fertilization. During spermiogenesis, syncytial cysts of 64 haploid spermatids undergo synchronous differentiation. Numerous changes occur at a subcellular level, including remodeling of existing organelles (mitochondria, nuclei), formation of new organelles (flagellar axonemes, acrosomes), polarization of elongating cysts and plasma membrane addition. At the end of spermatid morphogenesis, organelles, mitochondrial DNA and cytoplasmic components not needed in mature sperm are stripped away in a caspase-dependent process called individualization that results in formation of individual sperm. Here, we review the stages of Drosophila spermiogenesis and examine our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in shaping male germ cell-specific organelles and forming mature, fertile sperm. PMID:23087837

  20. Construction of microbial platform for an energy-requiring bioprocess: practical 2′-deoxyribonucleoside production involving a C−C coupling reaction with high energy substrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reproduction and sustainability are important for future society, and bioprocesses are one technology that can be used to realize these concepts. However, there is still limited variation in bioprocesses and there are several challenges, especially in the operation of energy-requiring bioprocesses. As an example of a microbial platform for an energy-requiring bioprocess, we established a process that efficiently and enzymatically synthesizes 2′-deoxyribonucleoside from glucose, acetaldehyde, and a nucleobase. This method consists of the coupling reactions of the reversible nucleoside degradation pathway and energy generation through the yeast glycolytic pathway. Results Using E. coli that co-express deoxyriboaldolase and phosphopentomutase, a high amount of 2′-deoxyribonucleoside was produced with efficient energy transfer under phosphate-limiting reaction conditions. Keeping the nucleobase concentration low and the mixture at a low reaction temperature increased the yield of 2′-deoxyribonucleoside relative to the amount of added nucleobase, indicating that energy was efficiently generated from glucose via the yeast glycolytic pathway under these reaction conditions. Using a one-pot reaction in which small amounts of adenine, adenosine, and acetone-dried yeast were fed into the reaction, 75 mM of 2′-deoxyinosine, the deaminated product of 2′-deoxyadenosine, was produced from glucose (600 mM), acetaldehyde (250 mM), adenine (70 mM), and adenosine (20 mM) with a high yield relative to the total base moiety input (83%). Moreover, a variety of natural dNSs were further synthesized by introducing a base-exchange reaction into the process. Conclusion A critical common issue in energy-requiring bioprocess is fine control of phosphate concentration. We tried to resolve this problem, and provide the convenient recipe for establishment of energy-requiring bioprocesses. It is anticipated that the commercial demand for dNSs, which are primary

  1. Drosophila Aging 2005/06

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hui-Ying; Bodmer, Rolf; Perrin, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Drosophila continues to be a model system of choice to study the genetics of aging. It has a short lifespan and small genome size, but nevertheless contains a complex organ and endocrine system that allows studying the role of conserved signal transduction pathways with sophisticated genetic tools. Oxidative stress and metabolic changes along with intersecting signaling systems Insulin Receptor (InR), Target of Rapamycin (TOR) and Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) have emerged as some of the major players in aging. Sleep and organ-specific aging has also been the subject of recent progress in understanding aging. PMID:17126511

  2. Drosophila myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary K

    2016-09-12

    The skeletal muscle system is the largest organ in motile animals, constituting between 35 and 55% of the human body mass, and up to 75% of the body mass in flying organisms like Drosophila. The flight muscles alone in flying insects comprise up to 65% of total body mass. Not only is the musculature the largest organ system, it is also exquisitely complex, with single muscles existing in different shapes and sizes. These different morphologies allow for such different functions as the high-frequency beating of a wing in a hummingbird, the dilation of the pupil in a human eye, or the maintenance of posture in a giraffe's neck. PMID:27623256

  3. Visual Pattern Memory Requires "Foraging" Function in the Central Complex of "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhipeng; Pan, Yufeng; Li, Weizhe; Jiang, Huoqing; Chatzimanolis, Lazaros; Chang, Jianhong; Gong, Zhefeng; Liu, Li

    2008-01-01

    The role of the "foraging" ("for)" gene, which encodes a cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), in food-search behavior in "Drosophila" has been intensively studied. However, its functions in other complex behaviors have not been well-characterized. Here, we show experimentally in "Drosophila" that the "for"…

  4. Bromovinyl-deoxyuridine: A selective substrate for mitochondrial thymidine kinase in cell extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Franzolin, Elisa; Rampazzo, Chiara; Perez-Perez, Maria-Jesus; Hernandez, Ana-Isabel; Balzarini, Jan; Bianchi, Vera . E-mail: vbianchi@mail.bio.unipd.it

    2006-05-26

    Cellular models of mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) deficiency require a reliable method to measure TK2 activity in whole cell extracts containing two interfering deoxyribonucleoside kinases, thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) and deoxycytidine kinase. We tested the value of the thymidine analog (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (BVDU) as a TK2-specific substrate. With extracts of OSTTK1{sup -} cells containing TK2 as the only thymidine kinase and a highly specific TK2 inhibitor we established conditions to detect the low TK2 activity commonly present in cells. With extracts of TK1-proficient osteosarcoma cells and normal human fibroblasts we showed that BVDU, but not 1-({beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl)thymine (Ara-T), discriminates TK2 activity even in the presence of 100-fold excess TK1. A comparison with current procedures based on TK2 inhibition demonstrated the better performance of the new TK2 assay. When cultured human fibroblasts passed from proliferation to quiescence TK2 activity increased by 3-fold, stressing the importance of TK2 function in the absence of TK1.

  5. The Drosophila EKC/KEOPS complex

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Benítez, Diego; Ibar, Consuelo; Glavic, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    The TOR signaling pathway is crucial in the translation of nutritional inputs into the protein synthesis machinery regulation, allowing animal growth. We recently identified the Bud32 (yeast)/PRPK (human) ortholog in Drosophila, Prpk (p53-related protein kinase), and found that it is required for TOR kinase activity. Bud32/PRPK is an ancient and atypical kinase conserved in evolution from Archeae to humans, being essential for Archeae. It has been linked with p53 stabilization in human cell culture and its absence in yeast causes a slow-growth phenotype. This protein has been associated to KEOPS (kinase, putative endopeptidase and other proteins of small size) complex together with Kae1p (ATPase), Cgi-121 and Pcc1p. This complex has been implicated in telomere maintenance, transcriptional regulation, bud site selection and chemical modification of tRNAs (tRNAs). Bud32p and Kae1p have been related with N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A) synthesis, a particular chemical modification that occurs at position 37 of tRNAs that pair A-starting codons, required for proper translation in most species. Lack of this modification causes mistranslations and open reading frame shifts in yeast. The core constituents of the KEOPS complex are present in Drosophila, but their physical interaction has not been reported yet. Here, we present a review of the findings regarding the function of this complex in different organisms and new evidence that extends our recent observations of Prpk function in animal growth showing that depletion of Kae1 or Prpk, in accordance with their role in translation in yeast, is able to induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) in Drosophila. We suggest that EKC/KEOPS complex could be integrating t6A-modified tRNA availability with translational rates, which are ultimately reflected in animal growth. PMID:23823807

  6. Nucleolar stress in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    James, Allison; Cindass Jr, Renford; Mayer, Dana; Terhoeve, Stephanie; Mumphrey, Courtney; DiMario, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Nucleolar stress results when ribosome biogenesis is disrupted. An excellent example is the human Treacher Collins syndrome in which the loss of the nucleolar chaperone, Treacle, leads to p53-dependent apoptosis in embryonic neural crest cells and ultimately to craniofacial birth defects. Here, we show that depletion of the related nucleolar phosphoprotein, Nopp140, in Drosophila melanogaster led to nucleolar stress and eventual lethality when multiple tissues were depleted of Nopp140. We used TEM, immuno-blot analysis and metabolic protein labeling to show the loss of ribosomes. Targeted loss of Nopp140 in larval wing discs caused Caspase-dependent apoptosis which eventually led to defects in the adult wings. These defects were not rescued by a p53 gene deletion, as the craniofacial defects were in the murine model of TCS, thus suggesting that apoptosis caused by nucleolar stress in Drosophila is induced by a p53-independent mechanism. Loss of Nopp140 in larval polyploid midgut cells induced premature autophagy as marked by the accumulation of mCherry-ATG8a into autophagic vesicles. We also found elevated phenoloxidase A3 levels in whole larval lysates and within the hemolymph of Nopp140-depleted larvae vs. hemolymph from parental genotype larvae. Phenoloxidase A3 enrichment was coincident with the appearance of melanotic tumors in the Nopp140-depleted larvae. The occurrence of apoptosis, autophagy and phenoloxidase A3 release to the hemolymph upon nucleolar stress correlated well with the demonstrated activation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in Nopp140-depleted larvae. We propose that JNK is a central stress response effector that is activated by nucleolar stress in Drosophila larvae. PMID:23412656

  7. Mutations Modulating Raf Signaling in Drosophila Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, B. J.; van-der-Straten, A.; Dominguez, M.; Hafen, E.

    1996-01-01

    The R7 fate is specified during Drosophila eye development by an inductive signal transduced intracellularly via the Raf kinase. We have performed a genetic screen for dominant mutations that alter the efficiency with which cells respond to a constitutively activated Raf kinase. Such mutations may affect genes involved in signal transduction downstream of Raf. We have isolated 44 mutations that define eight genes. One of these encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase homologue; another is a putative target gene of this signaling pathway. We present the results of this screen in detail, as well as a preliminary genetic analysis of the six loci still to be characterized molecularly. PMID:8770593

  8. {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin couplings in [2`-{sup 13}C]2`-deoxyribonucleosides: Correlations with molecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, T.; Stripe, W.A.; Carmichael, I.; Serianni, A.S.; Wu, J.

    1997-02-19

    2`-Deoxyribonucleosides (2`-deoxyadenosine (1), 2`-depoxycytidine (2), thymidine (3)) singly enriched with {sup 13}C at C2` have been prepared and used to obtain one-, two-, and three-bond {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin-coupling constants involving C2`. Spin couplings in 1-3 involving C1` and C2`are also compared to corresponding values in ribonucleosides in order to assess the effects of nucleoside structure and conformation on J values within the furanose ring. {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`R} and {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`S} in 1-3 and {sup 1}J{sub C2`,H2`} in ribonucleosides depend on C-H bond orientation: {sup 1}J{sub C1`,H1`} in 1-3 and in ribonucleosides exhibits a similar dependence. The latter couplings appear to be essentially unaffected by N-glycoside torsion. {sup 1}J{sub CC} values depend on the number and distribution of electronegative substituents on the C-C fragment. A modified projection curve is proposed to aid in the interpretation of {sup 2}J{sub C2`,H1`} values; the presence of N substitution at C1` caused a shift to more negative couplings relative to the O-substituted analog. In contrast, {sup 2}J{sub C1`,H2`} is essentially unaffected by the same change in the electronegative substituent at C1`. {sup 2}J{sub CC} values within the furanose ring are determined buy two coupling pathways; in one case (i.e., {sup 2}J{sub C1`,C3`}), the observed coupling is shown to be the algebraic sum of the two couplings arising from each pathway. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Regulation of Drosophila lifespan by JNK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Biteau, Benoit; Karpac, Jason; Hwangbo, DaeSung; Jasper, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    Cellular responses to extrinsic and intrinsic insults have to be carefully regulated to properly coordinate cytoprotection, repair processes, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Stress signaling pathways, most prominently the Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway, are critical regulators of such cellular responses and have accordingly been implicated in the regulation of lifespan in various organisms. JNK signaling promotes cytoprotective gene expression, but also interacts with the Insulin signaling pathway to influence growth, metabolism, stress tolerance and regeneration. Here, we review recent studies in Drosophila that elucidate the tissue-specific and systemic consequences of JNK activation that ultimately impact lifespan of the organism. PMID:21111799

  10. The Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    A compact genome and a tiny brain make Drosophila the prime model to understand the neural substrate of behavior. The neurogenetic efforts to reveal neural circuits underlying Drosophila vision started about half a century ago, and now the field is booming with sophisticated genetic tools, rich behavioral assays, and importantly, a greater number of scientists joining from different backgrounds. This review will briefly cover the structural anatomy of the Drosophila visual system, the animal’s visual behaviors, the genes involved in assembling these circuits, the new and powerful techniques, and the challenges ahead for ultimately identifying the general principles of biological computation in the brain.   A typical brain utilizes a great many compact neural circuits to collect and process information from the internal biological and external environmental worlds and generates motor commands for observable behaviors. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, despite of its miniature body and tiny brain, can survive in almost any corner of the world.1 It can find food, court mate, fight rival conspecific, avoid predators, and amazingly fly without crashing into trees. Drosophila vision and its underlying neuronal machinery has been a key research model for at least half century for neurogeneticists.2 Given the efforts invested on the visual system, this animal model is likely to offer the first full understanding of how visual information is computed by a multi-cellular organism. Furthermore, research in Drosophila has revealed many genes that play crucial roles in the formation of functional brains across species. The architectural similarities between the visual systems of Drosophila and vertebrate at the molecular, cellular, and network levels suggest new principles discovered at the circuit level on the relationship between neurons and behavior in Drosophila shall also contribute greatly to our understanding of the general principles for how bigger brains work.3

  11. Drosophila Blastorderm Analysis Software

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-25

    PointCloudMake analyzes 3D fluorescent images of whole Drosophila embryo and produces a table-style "PointCloud" file which contains the coordinates and volumes of all the nuclei, cells, their associated relative gene expression levels along with morphological features of the embryo. See: Luengo Hendrix et at 2006 3D Morphology and Gene Expression in the Drosophila Blastoderm at Cellular Resolution manuscript submitted LBNL # LBNL-60178 Knowles DW, Keranen SVE, Biggin M. Sudar S (2002) Mapping organism expression levels at cellular resolution in developing Drosophila. In: Conchello JA, Cogswell CJ, Wilson T, editors. Three-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing IX. pp. 57-64

  12. Meiosis in male Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Bruce D.; Yan, Rihui; Tsai, Jui-He

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis entails sorting and separating both homologous and sister chromatids. The mechanisms for connecting sister chromatids and homologs during meiosis are highly conserved and include specialized forms of the cohesin complex and a tightly regulated homolog synapsis/recombination pathway designed to yield regular crossovers between homologous chromatids. Drosophila male meiosis is of special interest because it dispenses with large segments of the standard meiotic script, particularly recombination, synapsis and the associated structures. Instead, Drosophila relies on a unique protein complex composed of at least two novel proteins, SNM and MNM, to provide stable connections between homologs during meiosis I. Sister chromatid cohesion in Drosophila is mediated by cohesins, ring-shaped complexes that entrap sister chromatids. However, unlike other eukaryotes Drosophila does not rely on the highly conserved Rec8 cohesin in meiosis, but instead utilizes two novel cohesion proteins, ORD and SOLO, which interact with the SMC1/3 cohesin components in providing meiotic cohesion. PMID:23087836

  13. Heterochromatin remodeling by CDK12 contributes to learning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lixia; Xie, Wenbing; Li, Kai-Le; Yang, Zhihao; Xu, Jiang; Zhang, Wenhao; Liu, Lu-Ping; Ren, Xingjie; He, Zhimin; Wu, Junyu; Sun, Jin; Wei, Hui-Min; Wang, Daliang; Xie, Wei; Li, Wei; Ni, Jian-Quan; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2015-11-10

    Dynamic regulation of chromatin structure is required to modulate the transcription of genes in eukaryotes. However, the factors that contribute to the plasticity of heterochromatin structure are elusive. Here, we report that cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12), a transcription elongation-associated RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) kinase, antagonizes heterochromatin enrichment in Drosophila chromosomes. Notably, loss of CDK12 induces the ectopic accumulation of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) on euchromatic arms, with a prominent enrichment on the X chromosome. Furthermore, ChIP and sequencing analysis reveals that the heterochromatin enrichment on the X chromosome mainly occurs within long genes involved in neuronal functions. Consequently, heterochromatin enrichment reduces the transcription of neuronal genes in the adult brain and results in a defect in Drosophila courtship learning. Taken together, these results define a previously unidentified role of CDK12 in controlling the epigenetic transition between euchromatin and heterochromatin and suggest a chromatin regulatory mechanism in neuronal behaviors. PMID:26508632

  14. Heterochromatin remodeling by CDK12 contributes to learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lixia; Xie, Wenbing; Li, Kai-Le; Yang, Zhihao; Xu, Jiang; Zhang, Wenhao; Liu, Lu-Ping; Ren, Xingjie; He, Zhimin; Wu, Junyu; Sun, Jin; Wei, Hui-Min; Wang, Daliang; Xie, Wei; Li, Wei; Ni, Jian-Quan; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of chromatin structure is required to modulate the transcription of genes in eukaryotes. However, the factors that contribute to the plasticity of heterochromatin structure are elusive. Here, we report that cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12), a transcription elongation-associated RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) kinase, antagonizes heterochromatin enrichment in Drosophila chromosomes. Notably, loss of CDK12 induces the ectopic accumulation of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) on euchromatic arms, with a prominent enrichment on the X chromosome. Furthermore, ChIP and sequencing analysis reveals that the heterochromatin enrichment on the X chromosome mainly occurs within long genes involved in neuronal functions. Consequently, heterochromatin enrichment reduces the transcription of neuronal genes in the adult brain and results in a defect in Drosophila courtship learning. Taken together, these results define a previously unidentified role of CDK12 in controlling the epigenetic transition between euchromatin and heterochromatin and suggest a chromatin regulatory mechanism in neuronal behaviors. PMID:26508632

  15. Immunohistological techniques for studying the Drosophila male germline stem cell.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shree Ram; Hou, Steven X

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that have a remarkable ability to self-renew and produce differentiated cells that support normal development and tissue homeostasis. This unique capacity makes stem cells a powerful tool for future regenerative medicine and gene therapy. Accumulative evidence suggests that stem cell self-renewal or differentiation is controlled by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, and that deregulation of stem cell behavior results in cancer formation, tissue degeneration, and premature aging. The Drosophila testis provides an excellent in vivo model for studying and understanding the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling stem cell behavior and the relationship between niches and stem cells. At the tip of the Drosophila testes, germline stem cells (GSCs) and somatic stem cells (SSCs) contact each other and share common niches (known as a hub) to maintain spermatogenesis. Signaling pathways, such as the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), ras-associated protein-guanine nucleotide exchange factor for small GTPase (Rap-GEF), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), are known to regulate self-renewal or differentiation of Drosophila male germline stem cells. We describe the detailed in vivo immunohistological protocols that mark GSCs, SSCs, and their progeny in Drosophila testes. PMID:18370050

  16. Effects of a mitochondrial mutator mutation in yeast POS5 NADH kinase on mitochondrial nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Linda J; Mathews, Christopher K

    2012-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three NADH/NAD(+) kinases, one of which is localized in mitochondria and phosphorylates NADH in preference to NAD(+). Strand et al. reported that a yeast mutation in POS5, which encodes the mitochondrial NADH kinase, is a mutator, specific for mitochondrial genes (Strand, M. K., Stuart, G. R., Longley, M. J., Graziewicz, M. A., Dominick, O. C., and Copeland, W. C. (2003) Eukaryot. Cell 2, 809-820). Because of the involvement of NADPH in deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, we asked whether mitochondria in a pos5 deletion mutant contain abnormal deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pools. We found the pools of the four dNTPs to be more than doubled in mutant mitochondrial extracts relative to wild-type mitochondrial extracts. This might partly explain the mitochondrial mutator phenotype. However, the loss of antioxidant protection is also likely to be significant. To this end, we measured pyridine nucleotide pools in mutant and wild-type mitochondrial extracts and found NADPH levels to be diminished by ∼4-fold in Δpos5 mitochondrial extracts, with NADP(+) diminished to a lesser degree. Our data suggest that both dNTP abnormalities and lack of antioxidant protection contribute to elevated mitochondrial gene mutagenesis in cells lacking the mitochondrial NADH kinase. The data also confirm previous reports of the specific function of Pos5p in mitochondrial NADP(+) and NADPH biosynthesis.

  17. Heterologous expression of mammalian Plk1 in Drosophila reveals divergence from Polo during late mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, John . E-mail: jrobpea@upo.es; Godinho, Susana A.; Tavares, Alvaro; Glover, David M.

    2006-04-01

    Drosophila Polo kinase is the founder member of a conserved kinase family required for multiple stages of mitosis. We assessed the ability of mouse Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) to perform the multiple mitotic functions of Polo kinase, by expressing a Plk1-GFP fusion in Drosophila. Consistent with the previously reported localization of Polo kinase, Plk1-GFP was strongly localized to centrosomes and recruited to the centromeric regions of condensing chromosomes during early mitosis. However, in contrast to a functional Polo-GFP fusion, Plk1-GFP failed to localize to the central spindle midzone in both syncytial embryo mitosis and the conventional mitoses of cellularized embryos and S2 cells. Moreover, unlike endogenous Polo kinase and Polo-GFP, Plk1-GFP failed to associate with the contractile ring. Expression of Plk1-GFP enhanced the lethality of hypomorphic polo mutants and disrupted the organization of the actinomyosin cytoskeleton in a dominant-negative manner. Taken together, our results suggest that endogenous Polo kinase has specific roles in regulating actinomyosin rearrangements during Drosophila mitoses that its mammalian counterpart, Plk1, cannot fulfill. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observed defects in the cortical recruitment of myosin and myosin regulatory light chain in Polo deficient cells.

  18. Drosophila Blastorderm Analysis Software

    2006-10-25

    PointCloudMake analyzes 3D fluorescent images of whole Drosophila embryo and produces a table-style "PointCloud" file which contains the coordinates and volumes of all the nuclei, cells, their associated relative gene expression levels along with morphological features of the embryo. See: Luengo Hendrix et at 2006 3D Morphology and Gene Expression in the Drosophila Blastoderm at Cellular Resolution manuscript submitted LBNL # LBNL-60178 Knowles DW, Keranen SVE, Biggin M. Sudar S (2002) Mapping organism expression levelsmore » at cellular resolution in developing Drosophila. In: Conchello JA, Cogswell CJ, Wilson T, editors. Three-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing IX. pp. 57-64« less

  19. Studying aging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-15

    Drosophila melanogaster represents one of the most important genetically accessible model organisms for aging research. Studies in flies have identified single gene mutations that influence lifespan and have characterized endocrine signaling interactions that control homeostasis systemically. Recent studies have focused on the effects of aging on specific tissues and physiological processes, providing a comprehensive picture of age-related tissue dysfunction and the loss of systemic homeostasis. Here we review methodological aspects of this work and highlight technical considerations when using Drosophila to study aging and age-related diseases.

  20. The drosophila T-box transcription factor midline functions within Insulin/Akt and c-Jun-N terminal kinase stress-reactive signaling pathways to regulate interommatial bristle formation and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Q. Brent; Das, Sudeshna; Visic, Petra; Buford, Kendrick D.; Zong, Yan; Buti, Wisam; Odom, Kelly R.; Lee, Hannah; Leal, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that the T-box transcription factor midline (mid) functions within the Notch-Delta signaling pathway to specify sensory organ precursor (SOP) cell fates in early-staged pupal eye imaginal discs and to suppress apoptosis (Das et al.). From genetic and allelic modifier screens, we now report that mid interacts with genes downstream of the insulin receptor(InR)/Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Notch signaling pathways to regulate interommatidial bristle (IOB) formation and cell survival. One of the most significant mid-interacting genes identified from the modifier screen is dFOXO, a transcription factor exhibiting a nucleocytoplasmic subcellular distribution pattern. In common with dFOXO, we show that Mid exhibits a nucleocytoplasmic distribution pattern within WT third-instar larval (3°L) tissue homogenates. Because dFOXO is a stress-responsive factor, we assayed the effects of either oxidative or metabolic stress responses on modifying the mid mutant phenotype which is characterized by a 50% loss of IOBs within the adult compound eye. While metabolic starvation stress does not affect the mid mutant phenotype, either 1 mM paraquat or 20% coconut oil, oxidative stress inducers, partially suppresses the mid mutant phenotype resulting in a significant recovery of IOBs. Another significant mid-interacting gene we identified is groucho (gro). Mid and Gro are predicted to act as corepressors of the enhancer-of-split gene complex downstream of Notch. Immunolabeling WT and dFOXO null 3°L eye-antennal imaginal discs with anti-Mid and anti-Engrailed (En) antibodies indicate that dFOXO is required to activate Mid and En expression within photoreceptor neurons of the eye disc. Taken together, these studies show that Mid and dFOXO serve as critical effectors of cell fate specification and survival within integrated Notch, InR/dAkt, and JNK signaling pathways during 3°L and pupal eye imaginal disc development. PMID:25748605

  1. A role for Drosophila LKB1 in anterior-posterior axis formation and epithelial polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sophie G.; St Johnston, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The PAR-4 and PAR-1 kinases are necessary for the formation of the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis in Caenorhabditis elegans. PAR-1 is also required for A-P axis determination in Drosophila. Here we show that the Drosophila par-4 homologue, lkb1, is required for the early A-P polarity of the oocyte, and for the repolarization of the oocyte cytoskeleton that defines the embryonic A-P axis. LKB1 is phosphorylated by PAR-1 in vitro, and overexpression of LKB1 partially rescues the par-1 phenotype. These two kinases therefore function in a conserved pathway for axis formation in flies and worms. lkb1 mutant clones also disrupt apical-basal epithelial polarity, suggesting a general role in cell polarization. The human homologue, LKB1, is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and is regulated by prenylation and by phosphorylation by protein kinase A. We show that protein kinase A phosphorylates Drosophila LKB1 on a conserved site that is important for its activity. Thus, Drosophila and human LKB1 may be functional homologues, suggesting that loss of cell polarity may contribute to tumour formation in individuals with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

  2. BMAA neurotoxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianchong; Escala, Wilfredo; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon; Bradley, Walter G; Zhai, R Grace

    2009-01-01

    We report the establishment of an in vivo model using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the toxic effects of L-BMAA. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced the lifespan as well as the neurological functions of flies. Furthermore, we have developed an HPLC method to reliably detect both free and protein-bound BMAA in fly tissue extracts.

  3. Heritable Endosymbionts of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mateos, Mariana; Castrezana, Sergio J.; Nankivell, Becky J.; Estes, Anne M.; Markow, Therese A.; Moran, Nancy A.

    2006-01-01

    Although heritable microorganisms are increasingly recognized as widespread in insects, no systematic screens for such symbionts have been conducted in Drosophila species (the primary insect genetic models for studies of evolution, development, and innate immunity). Previous efforts screened relatively few Drosophila lineages, mainly for Wolbachia. We conducted an extensive survey of potentially heritable endosymbionts from any bacterial lineage via PCR screens of mature ovaries in 181 recently collected fly strains representing 35 species from 11 species groups. Due to our fly sampling methods, however, we are likely to have missed fly strains infected with sex ratio-distorting endosymbionts. Only Wolbachia and Spiroplasma, both widespread in insects, were confirmed as symbionts. These findings indicate that in contrast to some other insect groups, other heritable symbionts are uncommon in Drosophila species, possibly reflecting a robust innate immune response that eliminates many bacteria. A more extensive survey targeted these two symbiont types through diagnostic PCR in 1225 strains representing 225 species from 32 species groups. Of these, 19 species were infected by Wolbachia while only 3 species had Spiroplasma. Several new strains of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma were discovered, including ones divergent from any reported to date. The phylogenetic distribution of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma in Drosophila is discussed. PMID:16783009

  4. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Aging Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaning; Yolitz, Jason; Wang, Cecilia; Spangler, Edward; Zhan, Ming; Zou, Sige

    2015-01-01

    Summary Drosophila is a genetically tractable system ideal for investigating the mechanisms of aging and developing interventions for promoting healthy aging. Here we describe methods commonly used in Drosophila aging research. These include basic approaches for preparation of diets and measurements of lifespan, food intake and reproductive output. We also describe some commonly used assays to measure changes in physiological and behavioral functions of Drosophila in aging, such as stress resistance and locomotor activity. PMID:23929099

  6. Data on the phosphorylation of p38MAPK and JNK induced by chlorpyrifos in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Batista, J E S; Sousa, L R; Martins, I K; Rodrigues, N R; Posser, T; Franco, J L

    2016-12-01

    Exposure to organophosphate compounds, such as chlorpyrifos, has been linked to disturbances on cell signaling pathways. Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) are a family of protein kinases involved in a range of cellular processes, including stress response, apoptosis and survival. Therefore, changes in the activation state of these kinases may characterize key mechanisms of toxicity elicited by xenobiotics. Here we report data on the phosphorylation of p38MAPK and JNK, members of the MAPK family, in Drosophila melanogaster exposed to chlorpyrifos, as characterized by western blotting assays. PMID:27626050

  7. Temperature sensation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Belinda; Garrity, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Animals use thermosensory systems to achieve optimal temperatures for growth and reproduction and to avoid damaging extremes. Thermoregulation is particularly challenging for small animals like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whose body temperature rapidly changes in response to environmental temperature fluctuation. Recent work has uncovered some of the key molecules mediating fly thermosensation, including the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels TRPA1 and Painless, and the Gustatory Receptor Gr28b, an unanticipated thermosensory regulator normally associated with a different sensory modality. There is also evidence the Drosophila phototransduction cascade may have some role in thermosensory responses. Together, the fly's diverse thermosensory molecules act in an array of functionally distinct thermosensory neurons to drive a suite of complex, and often exceptionally thermosensitive, behaviors.

  8. Drosophila by the dozen

    SciTech Connect

    Celniker, Susan E.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2007-07-13

    This year's conference on Drosophila research illustratedwell the current focus of Drosophila genomics on the comprehensiveidentification of functional elements in the genome sequence, includingmRNA transcripts arising from multiple alternative start sites and splicesites, a multiplicity of noncoding transcripts and small RNAs,identification of binding sites for transcription factors, sequenceconservation in related species and sequence variation within species.Resources and technologies for genetics and functional genomics aresteadily being improved, including the building of collections oftransposon insertion mutants and hairpin constructs for RNA interference(RNAi). The conference also highlighted progress in the use of genomicinformation by many laboratories to study diverse aspects of biology andmodels of human disease. Here we will review a few highlights of especialinterest to readers of Genome Biology.

  9. The Drosophila Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoff-Falk, Grace; Eberl, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Development of a functional auditory system in Drosophila requires specification and differentiation of the chordotonal sensilla of Johnston’s organ (JO) in the antenna, correct axonal targeting to the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) in the brain, and synaptic connections to neurons in the downstream circuit. Chordotonal development in JO is functionally complicated by structural, molecular and functional diversity that is not yet fully understood, and construction of the auditory neural circuitry is only beginning to unfold. Here we describe our current understanding of developmental and molecular mechanisms that generate the exquisite functions of the Drosophila auditory system, emphasizing recent progress and highlighting important new questions arising from research on this remarkable sensory system. PMID:24719289

  10. Drosophila Cancer Models Identify Functional Differences between Ret Fusions.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Sarah; Cagan, Ross L

    2016-09-13

    We generated and compared Drosophila models of RET fusions CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET. Both RET fusions directed cells to migrate, delaminate, and undergo EMT, and both resulted in lethality when broadly expressed. In all phenotypes examined, NCOA4-RET was more severe than CCDC6-RET, mirroring their effects on patients. A functional screen against the Drosophila kinome and a library of cancer drugs found that CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET acted through different signaling networks and displayed distinct drug sensitivities. Combining data from the kinome and drug screens identified the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 plus the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib as a synergistic drug combination that is specific for NCOA4-RET. Our work emphasizes the importance of identifying and tailoring a patient's treatment to their specific RET fusion isoform and identifies a multi-targeted therapy that may prove effective against tumors containing the NCOA4-RET fusion. PMID:27626672

  11. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    PubMed Central

    Igboin, Christina O.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed. PMID:22368770

  13. Use of double-stranded RNA interference in Drosophila cell lines to dissect signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, James C.; Worby, Carolyn A.; Simonson-Leff, Nancy; Muda, Marco; Maehama, Tomohiko; Hemmings, Brian A.; Dixon, Jack E.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) of gene expression in generating “knock-out” phenotypes for specific proteins in several Drosophila cell lines. We prove the applicability of this technique for studying signaling cascades by dissecting the well-characterized insulin signal transduction pathway. Specifically, we demonstrate that inhibiting the expression of the DSOR1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, MAPKK) prevents the activation of the downstream ERK-A (MAPK). In contrast, blocking ERK-A expression results in increased activation of DSOR1. We also show that Drosophila AKT (DAKT) activation depends on the insulin receptor substrate, CHICO (IRS1–4). Finally, we demonstrate that blocking the expression of Drosophila PTEN results in the activation of DAKT. In all cases, the interference of the biochemical cascade by RNAi is consistent with the known steps in the pathway. We extend this powerful technique to study two proteins, DSH3PX1 and Drosophila ACK (DACK). DSH3PX1 is an SH3, phox homology domain-containing protein, and DACK is homologous to the mammalian activated Cdc42 tyrosine kinase, ACK. Using RNAi, we demonstrate that DACK is upstream of DSH3PX1 phosphorylation, making DSH3PX1 an identified downstream target/substrate of ACK-like tyrosine kinases. These experiments highlight the usefulness of RNAi in dissecting complex biochemical signaling cascades and provide a highly effective method for determining the function of the identified genes arising from the Drosophila genome sequencing project. PMID:10823906

  14. The Drosophila anatomy ontology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anatomy ontologies are query-able classifications of anatomical structures. They provide a widely-used means for standardising the annotation of phenotypes and expression in both human-readable and programmatically accessible forms. They are also frequently used to group annotations in biologically meaningful ways. Accurate annotation requires clear textual definitions for terms, ideally accompanied by images. Accurate grouping and fruitful programmatic usage requires high-quality formal definitions that can be used to automate classification and check for errors. The Drosophila anatomy ontology (DAO) consists of over 8000 classes with broad coverage of Drosophila anatomy. It has been used extensively for annotation by a range of resources, but until recently it was poorly formalised and had few textual definitions. Results We have transformed the DAO into an ontology rich in formal and textual definitions in which the majority of classifications are automated and extensive error checking ensures quality. Here we present an overview of the content of the DAO, the patterns used in its formalisation, and the various uses it has been put to. Conclusions As a result of the work described here, the DAO provides a high-quality, queryable reference for the wild-type anatomy of Drosophila melanogaster and a set of terms to annotate data related to that anatomy. Extensive, well referenced textual definitions make it both a reliable and useful reference and ensure accurate use in annotation. Wide use of formal axioms allows a large proportion of classification to be automated and the use of consistency checking to eliminate errors. This increased formalisation has resulted in significant improvements to the completeness and accuracy of classification. The broad use of both formal and informal definitions make further development of the ontology sustainable and scalable. The patterns of formalisation used in the DAO are likely to be useful to developers of other

  15. Identification of murine homologues of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene: potential activators of ras.

    PubMed Central

    Bowtell, D; Fu, P; Simon, M; Senior, P

    1992-01-01

    Several findings suggest that signals from tyrosine kinases are transduced, at least in part, through ras proteins. These findings include (i) blockage of the transforming activity of constitutively active tyrosine kinases by inhibiting ras function and (ii) genetic screens in Caenorhabditis elegans and in Drosophila that identified ras genes as downstream effectors of tyrosine kinases. The recently isolated Drosophila gene Son of sevenless (Sos) is postulated to act as a positive regulatory link between tyrosine kinase and ras proteins by catalyzing exchange of GDP for GTP on ras protein. Such exchange proteins have been reported in extracts of mammalian cells but have not been previously characterized at a molecular level. As Sos appears to function in this role in Drosophila, we sought to isolate a vertebrate counterpart(s). We have characterized two widely expressed murine genes with a high degree of homology to Sos. Hybridization with human DNA and RNA indicates a high degree of conservation of these genes in other vertebrates. Images PMID:1631150

  16. Rabaptin-5 and Rabex-5 are neoplastic tumour suppressor genes that interact to modulate Rab5 dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster☆

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Chloe; Strutt, David

    2014-01-01

    Endocytosis plays an important role in the regulation of tumour growth and metastasis. In Drosophila, a number of endocytic neoplastic tumour suppressor genes have been identified that when mutated cause epithelial disruption and over-proliferation. Here we characterise the Drosophila homologue of the Rab5 effector Rabaptin-5, and show that it is a novel neoplastic tumour suppressor. Its ability to bind Rab5 and modulate early endosomal dynamics is conserved in Drosophila, as is its interaction with the Rab5 GEF Rabex5, for which we also demonstrate neoplastic tumour suppressor characteristics. Surprisingly, we do not observe disruption of apico-basal polarity in Rabaptin-5 and Rabex-5 mutant tissues; instead the tumour phenotype is associated with upregulation of Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) and Janus Kinase (JAK)/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) signalling. PMID:24104056

  17. Genghis Khan (Gek) as a putative effector for Drosophila Cdc42 and regulator of actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Luo, L; Lee, T; Tsai, L; Tang, G; Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    1997-11-25

    The small GTPases Cdc42 and Rac regulate a variety of biological processes, including actin polymerization, cell proliferation, and JNK/mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, conceivably via distinct effectors. Whereas the effector for mitogen-activated protein kinase activation appears to be p65PAK, the identity of effector(s) for actin polymerization remains unclear. We have found a putative effector for Drosophila Cdc42, Genghis Khan (Gek), which binds to Dcdc42 in a GTP-dependent and effector domain-dependent manner. Gek contains a predicted serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain that is 63% identical to human myotonic dystrophy protein kinase and has protein kinase activities. It also possesses a large coiled-coil domain, a putative phorbol ester binding domain, a pleckstrin homology domain, and a Cdc42 binding consensus sequence that is required for its binding to Dcdc42. To study the in vivo function of gek, we generated mutations in the Drosophila gek locus. Egg chambers homozygous for gek mutations exhibit abnormal accumulation of F-actin and are defective in producing fertilized eggs. These phenotypes can be rescued by a wild-type gek transgene. Our results suggest that this multidomain protein kinase is an effector for the regulation of actin polymerization by Cdc42.

  18. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  19. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase regulates ribonucleotide reductase and mitochondrial homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Jana S.; Lin, Z. Ping; Sartorelli, Alan C.; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2007-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase orchestrates nuclear DNA damage responses but is proposed to be involved in other important and clinically relevant functions. Here, we provide evidence for what we believe are 2 novel and intertwined roles for ATM: the regulation of ribonucleotide reductase (RR), the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, and control of mitochondrial homeostasis. Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) patient fibroblasts, wild-type fibroblasts treated with the ATM inhibitor KU-55933, and cells in which RR is inhibited pharmacologically or by RNA interference (RNAi) each lead to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion under normal growth conditions. Disruption of ATM signaling in primary A-T fibroblasts also leads to global dysregulation of the R1, R2, and p53R2 subunits of RR, abrogation of RR-dependent upregulation of mtDNA in response to ionizing radiation, high mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA)/mtDNA ratios, and increased resistance to inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration and translation. Finally, there are reduced expression of the R1 subunit of RR and tissue-specific alterations of mtDNA copy number in ATM null mouse tissues, the latter being recapitulated in tissues from human A-T patients. Based on these results, we propose that disruption of RR and mitochondrial homeostasis contributes to the complex pathology of A-T and that RR genes are candidate disease loci in mtDNA-depletion syndromes. PMID:17786248

  20. Microbiota-Dependent Priming of Antiviral Intestinal Immunity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Christine L; Cohen, Jonathan; Yasunaga, Ari; Xu, Jie; Osborn, Greg; Subramanian, Harry; Gold, Beth; Buchon, Nicolas; Cherry, Sara

    2015-11-11

    Enteric pathogens must overcome intestinal defenses to establish infection. In Drosophila, the ERK signaling pathway inhibits enteric virus infection. The intestinal microflora also impacts immunity but its role in enteric viral infection is unknown. Here we show that two signals are required to activate antiviral ERK signaling in the intestinal epithelium. One signal depends on recognition of peptidoglycan from the microbiota, particularly from the commensal Acetobacter pomorum, which primes the NF-kB-dependent induction of a secreted factor, Pvf2. However, the microbiota is not sufficient to induce this pathway; a second virus-initiated signaling event involving release of transcriptional paused genes mediated by the kinase Cdk9 is also required for Pvf2 production. Pvf2 stimulates antiviral immunity by binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase PVR, which is necessary and sufficient for intestinal ERK responses. These findings demonstrate that sensing of specific commensals primes inflammatory signaling required for epithelial responses that restrict enteric viral infections.

  1. Feeding and Fasting Signals Converge on the LKB1-SIK3 Pathway to Regulate Lipid Metabolism in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sekyu; Lim, Dae-Sik; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2015-05-01

    LKB1 plays important roles in governing energy homeostasis by regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other AMPK-related kinases, including the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs). However, the roles and regulation of LKB1 in lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we show that Drosophila LKB1 mutants display decreased lipid storage and increased gene expression of brummer, the Drosophila homolog of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). These phenotypes are consistent with those of SIK3 mutants and are rescued by expression of constitutively active SIK3 in the fat body, suggesting that SIK3 is a key downstream kinase of LKB1. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we identify HDAC4, a class IIa histone deacetylase, as a lipolytic target of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway. Interestingly, we found that the LKB1-SIK3-HDAC4 signaling axis is modulated by dietary conditions. In short-term fasting, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) pathway, related to the mammalian glucagon pathway, inhibits the kinase activity of LKB1 as shown by decreased SIK3 Thr196 phosphorylation, and consequently induces HDAC4 nuclear localization and brummer gene expression. However, under prolonged fasting conditions, AKH-independent signaling decreases the activity of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway to induce lipolytic responses. We also identify that the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs) pathway, related to mammalian insulin pathway, regulates SIK3 activity in feeding conditions independently of increasing LKB1 kinase activity. Overall, these data suggest that fasting stimuli specifically control the kinase activity of LKB1 and establish the LKB1-SIK3 pathway as a converging point between feeding and fasting signals to control lipid homeostasis in Drosophila.

  2. Feeding and Fasting Signals Converge on the LKB1-SIK3 Pathway to Regulate Lipid Metabolism in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sekyu; Lim, Dae-Sik; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2015-01-01

    LKB1 plays important roles in governing energy homeostasis by regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other AMPK-related kinases, including the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs). However, the roles and regulation of LKB1 in lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we show that Drosophila LKB1 mutants display decreased lipid storage and increased gene expression of brummer, the Drosophila homolog of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). These phenotypes are consistent with those of SIK3 mutants and are rescued by expression of constitutively active SIK3 in the fat body, suggesting that SIK3 is a key downstream kinase of LKB1. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we identify HDAC4, a class IIa histone deacetylase, as a lipolytic target of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway. Interestingly, we found that the LKB1-SIK3-HDAC4 signaling axis is modulated by dietary conditions. In short-term fasting, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) pathway, related to the mammalian glucagon pathway, inhibits the kinase activity of LKB1 as shown by decreased SIK3 Thr196 phosphorylation, and consequently induces HDAC4 nuclear localization and brummer gene expression. However, under prolonged fasting conditions, AKH-independent signaling decreases the activity of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway to induce lipolytic responses. We also identify that the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs) pathway, related to mammalian insulin pathway, regulates SIK3 activity in feeding conditions independently of increasing LKB1 kinase activity. Overall, these data suggest that fasting stimuli specifically control the kinase activity of LKB1 and establish the LKB1-SIK3 pathway as a converging point between feeding and fasting signals to control lipid homeostasis in Drosophila. PMID:25996931

  3. Analysis of Drosophila segmentation network identifies a JNK pathway factor overexpressed in kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Ghanim, Murad; Xue, Lei; Brown, Christopher D; Iossifov, Ivan; Angeletti, Cesar; Hua, Sujun; Nègre, Nicolas; Ludwig, Michael; Stricker, Thomas; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Tretiakova, Maria; Camp, Robert L; Perera-Alberto, Montse; Rimm, David L; Xu, Tian; Rzhetsky, Andrey; White, Kevin P

    2009-02-27

    We constructed a large-scale functional network model in Drosophila melanogaster built around two key transcription factors involved in the process of embryonic segmentation. Analysis of the model allowed the identification of a new role for the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex factor SPOP. In Drosophila, the gene encoding SPOP is a target of segmentation transcription factors. Drosophila SPOP mediates degradation of the Jun kinase phosphatase Puckered, thereby inducing tumor necrosis factor (TNF)/Eiger-dependent apoptosis. In humans, we found that SPOP plays a conserved role in TNF-mediated JNK signaling and was highly expressed in 99% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), the most prevalent form of kidney cancer. SPOP expression distinguished histological subtypes of RCC and facilitated identification of clear cell RCC as the primary tumor for metastatic lesions.

  4. Challenge of Drosophila melanogaster with Cryptococcus neoformans and Role of the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Apidianakis, Yiorgos; Rahme, Laurence G.; Heitman, Joseph; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2004-01-01

    We found that the ingestion of Cryptococcus neoformans by Drosophila melanogaster resulted in the death of the fly but that the ingestion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the nonpathogenic Cryptococcus kuetzingii or Cryptococcus laurentii did not. The C. neoformans protein kinase A and RAS signal transduction pathways, previously shown to be involved in virulence in mammals, also played a role in killing Drosophila. Mutation of the Toll immune response pathway, the predominant antifungal pathway of the fly, did not play a role in Drosophila defense following ingestion of the yeast. However, the Toll pathway was necessary for the clearance of C. neoformans introduced directly into the hemolymph of D. melanogaster and for the survival of systemically infected flies. PMID:15075271

  5. Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Prüßing, Katja; Voigt, Aaron; Schulz, Jörg B

    2013-11-22

    Drosophila melanogaster provides an important resource for in vivo modifier screens of neurodegenerative diseases. To study the underlying pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, fly models that address Tau or amyloid toxicity have been developed. Overexpression of human wild-type or mutant Tau causes age-dependent neurodegeneration, axonal transport defects and early death. Large-scale screens utilizing a neurodegenerative phenotype induced by eye-specific overexpression of human Tau have identified several kinases and phosphatases, apoptotic regulators and cytoskeleton proteins as determinants of Tau toxicity in vivo. The APP ortholog of Drosophila (dAPPl) shares the characteristic domains with vertebrate APP family members, but does not contain the human Aβ42 domain. To circumvent this drawback, researches have developed strategies by either direct secretion of human Aβ42 or triple transgenic flies expressing human APP, β-secretase and Drosophila γ-secretase presenilin (dPsn). Here, we provide a brief overview of how fly models of AD have contributed to our knowledge of the pathomechanisms of disease.

  6. Review: Thermal preference in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Wang, George; Garrity, Paul A.; Huey, Raymond B.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental temperature strongly affects physiology of ectotherms. Small ectotherms, like Drosophila, cannot endogenously regulate body temperature so must rely on behavior to maintain body temperature within a physiologically permissive range. Here we review what is known about Drosophila thermal preference. Work on thermal behavior in this group is particularly exciting because it provides the opportunity to connect genes to neuromolecular mechanisms to behavior to fitness in the wild. PMID:20161211

  7. Deep evolutionary conservation of an intramolecular protein kinase activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingfen; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Luebbering, Nathan; Singh, Aman; Sibbet, Gary; Ferguson, Michael A J; Cleghon, Vaughn

    2012-01-01

    DYRK-family kinases employ an intramolecular mechanism to autophosphorylate a critical tyrosine residue in the activation loop. Once phosphorylated, DYRKs lose tyrosine kinase activity and function as serine/threonine kinases. DYRKs have been characterized in organisms from yeast to human; however, all entities belong to the Unikont supergroup, only one of five eukaryotic supergroups. To assess the evolutionary age and conservation of the DYRK intramolecular kinase-activation mechanism, we surveyed 21 genomes representing four of the five eukaryotic supergroups for the presence of DYRKs. We also analyzed the activation mechanism of the sole DYRK (class 2 DYRK) present in Trypanosoma brucei (TbDYRK2), a member of the excavate supergroup and separated from Drosophila by ∼850 million years. Bioinformatics showed the DYRKs clustering into five known subfamilies, class 1, class 2, Yaks, HIPKs and Prp4s. Only class 2 DYRKs were present in all four supergroups. These diverse class 2 DYRKs also exhibited conservation of N-terminal NAPA regions located outside of the kinase domain, and were shown to have an essential role in activation loop autophosphorylation of Drosophila DmDYRK2. Class 2 TbDYRK2 required the activation loop tyrosine conserved in other DYRKs, the NAPA regions were critical for this autophosphorylation event, and the NAPA-regions of Trypanosoma and human DYRK2 complemented autophosphorylation by the kinase domain of DmDYRK2 in trans. Finally, sequential deletion analysis was used to further define the minimal region required for trans-complementation. Our analysis provides strong evidence that class 2 DYRKs were present in the primordial or root eukaryote, and suggest this subgroup may be the oldest, founding member of the DYRK family. The conservation of activation loop autophosphorylation demonstrates that kinase self-activation mechanisms are also primitive.

  8. The visual orientation memory of Drosophila requires Foraging (PKG) upstream of Ignorant (RSK2) in ring neurons of the central complex

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Sara; Poeck, Burkhard; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Strauss, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Orientation and navigation in a complex environment requires path planning and recall to exert goal-driven behavior. Walking Drosophila flies possess a visual orientation memory for attractive targets which is localized in the central complex of the adult brain. Here we show that this type of working memory requires the cGMP-dependent protein kinase encoded by the foraging gene in just one type of ellipsoid-body ring neurons. Moreover, genetic and epistatic interaction studies provide evidence that Foraging functions upstream of the Ignorant Ribosomal-S6 Kinase 2, thus revealing a novel neuronal signaling pathway necessary for this type of memory in Drosophila. PMID:22815538

  9. Purification of Drosophila snRNPs and characterization of two populations of functional U1 particles.

    PubMed Central

    Labourier, E; Rio, D C

    2001-01-01

    U1 snRNP is required at an early stage during assembly of the spliceosome, the dynamic ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that performs nuclear pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we report the purification of U1 snRNP particles from Drosophila nuclear extracts and the characterization of their biochemical properties, polypeptide contents, and splicing activities. On the basis of their antigenicity, apparent molecular weight, and by peptide sequencing, the Drosophila 70K, SNF, B, U1-C, D1, D2, D3, E, F, and G proteins are shown to be integral components of these particles. Sequence database searches revealed that both the U1-specific and the Sm proteins are extensively conserved between human and Drosophila snRNPs. Furthermore, both species possess a conserved intrinsic U1-associated kinase activity with identical substrate specificity in vitro. Finally, our results demonstrate that a second type of functional U1 particle, completely lacking the U1/U2-specific protein SNF and the associated protein kinase activity, can be isolated from cultured Kc cell or Canton S embryonic nuclear extracts. This work describes the first characterization of a purified Drosophila snRNP particle and reinforces the view that their activity and composition, with the exception of the atypical bifunctional U1-A/U2-B" SNF protein, are highly conserved in metazoans. PMID:11333025

  10. Optogenetics in Drosophila Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Kittel, Robert J; Fiala, André

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable one to target specific neurons with light-sensitive proteins, e.g., ion channels, ion pumps, or enzymes, and to manipulate their physiological state through illumination. Such artificial interference with selected elements of complex neuronal circuits can help to determine causal relationships between neuronal activity and the effect on the functioning of neuronal circuits controlling animal behavior. The advantages of optogenetics can best be exploited in genetically tractable animals whose nervous systems are, on the one hand, small enough in terms of cell numbers and to a certain degree stereotypically organized, such that distinct and identifiable neurons can be targeted reproducibly. On the other hand, the neuronal circuitry and the behavioral repertoire should be complex enough to enable one to address interesting questions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model organism in this regard. However, the application of optogenetic tools to depolarize or hyperpolarize neurons through light-induced ionic currents has been difficult in adult flies. Only recently, several variants of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have been introduced that provide sufficient light sensitivity, expression, and stability to depolarize central brain neurons efficiently in adult Drosophila. Here, we focus on the version currently providing highest photostimulation efficiency, ChR2-XXL. We exemplify the use of this optogenetic tool by applying it to a widely used aversive olfactory learning paradigm. Optogenetic activation of a population of dopamine-releasing neurons mimics the reinforcing properties of a punitive electric shock typically used as an unconditioned stimulus. In temporal coincidence with an odor stimulus this artificially induced neuronal activity causes learning of the odor signal, thereby creating a light-induced memory.

  11. Protein Kinases of the Hippo Pathway: Regulation and Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Avruch, Joseph; Zhou, Dawang; Fitamant, Julien; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Mou, Fan; Barrufet, Laura Regué

    2012-01-01

    The “Hippo” signaling pathway has emerged as a major regulator of cell proliferation and survival in metazoans. The pathway, as delineated by genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila, consists of a kinase cascade regulated by cell-cell contact and cell polarity that inhibits the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie and its proliferative, anti-differentiation, antiapoptotic transcriptional program. The core pathway components are the GC kinase Hippo, which phosphorylates the noncatalytic polypeptide Mats/Mob1 and, with the assistance of the scaffold protein Salvador, phosphorylates the ndr-family kinase Lats. In turn phospho-Lats, after binding to phospho-Mats, autoactivates and phosphorylates Yorkie, resulting in its nuclear exit. Hippo also uses the scaffold protein Furry and a different Mob protein to control another ndr-like kinase, the morphogenetic regulator Tricornered. Architecturally homologous kinase cascades consisting of a GC kinase, a Mob protein, a scaffolding polypeptide and an ndr-like kinase are well described in yeast; in S. cerevisiae e.g., the MEN pathway promotes mitotic exit whereas the RAM network, using a different GC kinase, Mob protein, scaffold and ndr-like kinase, regulates cell polarity and morphogenesis. In mammals, the Hippo orthologues Mst1 and Mst2 utilize the Salvador ortholog WW45/Sav1 and other scaffolds to regulate the kinases Lats1/Lats2 and ndr1/ndr2. As in Drosophila, murine Mst1/Mst2, in a redundant manner, negatively regulate the Yorkie ortholog YAP in the epithelial cells of the liver and gut; loss of both Mst1 and Mst2 results in hyperproliferation and tumorigenesis that can be largely negated by reduction or elimination of YAP. Despite this conservation, considerable diversification in pathway composition and regulation is already evident; in skin e.g., YAP phosphorylation is independent of Mst1Mst2 and Lats1Lats2. Moreover, in lymphoid cells, Mst1/Mst2, under the control of the Rap1 GTPase and independent of YAP

  12. Rho1-Wnd signaling regulates loss-of-cell polarity-induced cell invasion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Chen, Y; Zhang, S; Xu, W; Shao, Y; Yang, Y; Li, W; Li, M; Xue, L

    2016-02-18

    Both cell polarity and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity are essential to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, and disruption of either is commonly seen in cancer progression. Despite the established connection between loss-of-cell polarity and JNK activation, much less is known about the molecular mechanism by which aberrant cell polarity induces JNK-mediated cell migration and tumor invasion. Here we show results from a genetic screen using an in vivo invasion model via knocking down cell polarity gene in Drosophila wing discs, and identify Rho1-Wnd signaling as an important molecular link that mediates loss-of-cell polarity-triggered JNK activation and cell invasion. We show that Wallenda (Wnd), a protein kinase of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family, by forming a complex with the GTPase Rho1, is both necessary and sufficient for Rho1-induced JNK-dependent cell invasion, MMP1 activation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, Wnd promotes cell proliferation and tissue growth through wingless production when apoptosis is inhibited by p35. Finally, Wnd shows oncogenic cooperation with Ras(V12) to trigger tumor growth in eye discs and causes invasion into the ventral nerve cord. Together, our data not only provides a novel mechanistic insight on how cell polarity loss contributes to cell invasion, but also highlights the value of the Drosophila model system to explore human cancer biology.

  13. [COMPARATIVE STUDY OF Hrs AND OTHER ENDOSOMAL MARKERS CELLULAR LOCALIZATION IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER SPERMATOGENESIS BY GFP-CHIMERICAL PROTEIN APPROACH].

    PubMed

    Marilovtseva, E V; Dubatolova, T D; Galimova, J A; Kopyl, S A; Omelyanchuk, L V

    2015-01-01

    Acrosome is a special organelle in spermatozoids necessary for fertilizing oocyte and originates, according to various theories, either from Golgi apparatus, or from endosomes and lysosomes. One of the proteins, found at mammalian acrosome, is Hgs, a homologue of Drosophila melanogaster Hrs (Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate), a known marker of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). However, although Drosophila acrosome was extensively studied, it is yet unknown whether Hrs localizes at acrosome similar to Hgs and, more generally, whether the spectrum of acrosomal proteins in Drosophila is the same as in mammals. Hrs (hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate) is the multidomain vesicular protein participating in the endosome-lysosome protein sorting. We demonstrated that two protein variants of the Drosophila Hrs are expressed in testes: a longer isoform B, and a shorter isoform A, which lacks VHS and FYVE domains that are necessary for anchoring Hrs in endosomes. We found that Hrs isoform B is concentrated at fusoma of spermatocytes in contrast to mammalian Hrs. This localization requires the C-terminus of the protein, starting from the aminoacid residue 383. In situ hybridization of hrs RNA probe showed that the gene is expressed early in spermatogenesis consistently with Hrs localization in early fusoma. Additionally, we demonstrated that Hrs is dispensable for cytokinesis. Finally, it was found that although Drosophila Hrs does not localize at acrosome, the other endosomal markers--Rab4, Rab7, and Rab11--are detected at the organelle. PMID:26591063

  14. Two Kinase Family Dramas

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Hurley, James H.

    2007-01-01

    In this issue, Lietha and colleagues (2007) report the structure of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and reveal how FAK maintains an autoinhibited state. Together with the structure of another tyrosine kinase, ZAP-70 (Deindl et al., 2007), this work highlights the diversity of mechanisms that nature has evolved within the kinase superfamily to regulate their activity through autoinhibition. PMID:17574014

  15. Genome of Drosophila suzukii, the spotted wing drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Joanna C; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhao, Li; Hamm, Christopher A; Cridland, Julie M; Saelao, Perot; Hamby, Kelly A; Lee, Ernest K; Kwok, Rosanna S; Zhang, Guojie; Zalom, Frank G; Walton, Vaughn M; Begun, David J

    2013-12-09

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (spotted wing drosophila) has recently become a serious pest of a wide variety of fruit crops in the United States as well as in Europe, leading to substantial yearly crop losses. To enable basic and applied research of this important pest, we sequenced the D. suzukii genome to obtain a high-quality reference sequence. Here, we discuss the basic properties of the genome and transcriptome and describe patterns of genome evolution in D. suzukii and its close relatives. Our analyses and genome annotations are presented in a web portal, SpottedWingFlyBase, to facilitate public access.

  16. Genome of Drosophila suzukii, the Spotted Wing Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanna C.; Jiang, Xuanting; Zhao, Li; Hamm, Christopher A.; Cridland, Julie M.; Saelao, Perot; Hamby, Kelly A.; Lee, Ernest K.; Kwok, Rosanna S.; Zhang, Guojie; Zalom, Frank G.; Walton, Vaughn M.; Begun, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (spotted wing drosophila) has recently become a serious pest of a wide variety of fruit crops in the United States as well as in Europe, leading to substantial yearly crop losses. To enable basic and applied research of this important pest, we sequenced the D. suzukii genome to obtain a high-quality reference sequence. Here, we discuss the basic properties of the genome and transcriptome and describe patterns of genome evolution in D. suzukii and its close relatives. Our analyses and genome annotations are presented in a web portal, SpottedWingFlyBase, to facilitate public access. PMID:24142924

  17. The Roles of NDR Protein Kinases in Hippo Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hergovich, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo tumour suppressor pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of tissue growth through controlling cellular processes such as cell proliferation, death, differentiation and stemness. Traditionally, the core cassette of the Hippo pathway includes the MST1/2 protein kinases, the LATS1/2 protein kinases, and the MOB1 scaffold signal transducer, which together regulate the transcriptional co-activator functions of the proto-oncoproteins YAP and TAZ through LATS1/2-mediated phosphorylation of YAP/TAZ. Recent research has identified additional kinases, such as NDR1/2 (also known as STK38/STK38L) and MAP4Ks, which should be considered as novel members of the Hippo core cassette. While these efforts helped to expand our understanding of Hippo core signalling, they also began to provide insights into the complexity and redundancy of the Hippo signalling network. Here, we focus on summarising our current knowledge of the regulation and functions of mammalian NDR kinases, discussing parallels between the NDR pathways in Drosophila and mammals. Initially, we provide a general overview of the cellular functions of NDR kinases in cell cycle progression, centrosome biology, apoptosis, autophagy, DNA damage signalling, immunology and neurobiology. Finally, we put particular emphasis on discussing NDR1/2 as YAP kinases downstream of MST1/2 and MOB1 signalling in Hippo signalling. PMID:27213455

  18. Collective synchronization of divisions in Drosophila development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergassola, Massimo

    Mitoses in the early development of most metazoans are rapid and synchronized across the entire embryo. While diffusion is too slow, in vitro experiments have shown that waves of the cell-cycle regulator Cdk1 can transfer information rapidly across hundreds of microns. However, the signaling dynamics and the physical properties of chemical waves during embryonic development remain unclear. We develop FRET biosensors for the activity of Cdk1 and the checkpoint kinase Chk1 in Drosophila embryos and exploit them to measure waves in vivo. We demonstrate that Cdk1 chemical waves control mitotic waves and that their speed is regulated by the activity of Cdk1 during the S-phase (and not mitosis). We quantify the progressive slowdown of the waves with developmental cycles and identify its underlying control mechanism by the DNA replication checkpoint through the Chk1/Wee1 pathway. The global dynamics of the mitotic signaling network illustrates a novel control principle: the S-phase activity of Cdk1 regulates the speed of the mitotic wave, while the Cdk1 positive feedback ensures an invariantly rapid onset of mitosis. Mathematical modeling captures the speed of the waves and predicts a fundamental distinction between the S-phase Cdk1 trigger waves and the mitotic phase waves, which is illustrated by embryonic ablation experiments. In collaboration with Victoria Deneke1, Anna Melbinger2, and Stefano Di Talia1 1 Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center 2 Department of Physics, University of California San Diego.

  19. Why Drosophila to Study Phototransduction?

    PubMed Central

    Pak, William L.

    2010-01-01

    This review recounts the early history of Drosophila phototransduction genetics, covering the period between approximately 1966 to 1979. Early in this period, the author felt that there was an urgent need for a new approach in phototransduction research. Through inputs from a number of colleagues, he was led to consider isolating Drosophila mutants that are defective in the electroretinogram. Thanks to the efforts of dedicated associates and technical staff, by the end of this period, he was able to accumulate a large number of such mutants. Particularly important in this effort was the use of the mutant assay protocol based on the “prolonged depolarizing afterpotential.” This collection of mutants formed the basis of the subsequent intensive investigations of the Drosophila phototransduction cascade by many investigators. PMID:20536286

  20. The Chromosomal Passenger Complex Activates Polo Kinase at Centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Mar; Pinson, Xavier; Platani, Melpi; Salloum, Zeina; Xu, Zhenjie; Clark, Anthony; MacIsaac, Fiona; Ogawa, Hiromi; Eggert, Ulrike; Glover, David M.; Archambault, Vincent; Earnshaw, William C.

    2012-01-01

    The coordinated activities at centromeres of two key cell cycle kinases, Polo and Aurora B, are critical for ensuring that the two sister kinetochores of each chromosome are attached to microtubules from opposite spindle poles prior to chromosome segregation at anaphase. Initial attachments of chromosomes to the spindle involve random interactions between kinetochores and dynamic microtubules, and errors occur frequently during early stages of the process. The balance between microtubule binding and error correction (e.g., release of bound microtubules) requires the activities of Polo and Aurora B kinases, with Polo promoting stable attachments and Aurora B promoting detachment. Our study concerns the coordination of the activities of these two kinases in vivo. We show that INCENP, a key scaffolding subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), which consists of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin, and Borealin/Dasra B, also interacts with Polo kinase in Drosophila cells. It was known that Aurora A/Bora activates Polo at centrosomes during late G2. However, the kinase that activates Polo on chromosomes for its critical functions at kinetochores was not known. We show here that Aurora B kinase phosphorylates Polo on its activation loop at the centromere in early mitosis. This phosphorylation requires both INCENP and Aurora B activity (but not Aurora A activity) and is critical for Polo function at kinetochores. Our results demonstrate clearly that Polo kinase is regulated differently at centrosomes and centromeres and suggest that INCENP acts as a platform for kinase crosstalk at the centromere. This crosstalk may enable Polo and Aurora B to achieve a balance wherein microtubule mis-attachments are corrected, but proper attachments are stabilized allowing proper chromosome segregation. PMID:22291575

  1. Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Busto, Germain U.; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Davis, Ronald L.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of olfactory learning in Drosophila have provided key insights into the brain mechanisms underlying learning and memory. One type of olfactory learning, olfactory classical conditioning, consists of learning the contingency between an odor with an aversive or appetitive stimulus. This conditioning requires the activity of molecules that can integrate the two types of sensory information, the odorant as the conditioned stimulus and the aversive or appetitive stimulus as the unconditioned stimulus, in brain regions where the neural pathways for the two stimuli intersect. Compelling data indicate that a particular form of adenylyl cyclase functions as a molecular integrator of the sensory information in the mushroom body neurons. The neuronal pathway carrying the olfactory information from the antennal lobes to the mushroom body is well described. Accumulating data now show that some dopaminergic neurons provide information about aversive stimuli and octopaminergic neurons about appetitive stimuli to the mushroom body neurons. Inhibitory inputs from the GABAergic system appear to gate olfactory information to the mushroom bodies and thus control the ability to learn about odors. Emerging data obtained by functional imaging procedures indicate that distinct memory traces form in different brain regions and correlate with different phases of memory. The results from these and other experiments also indicate that cross talk between mushroom bodies and several other brain regions is critical for memory formation. PMID:21186278

  2. Aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Edward A; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz

    2015-10-01

    Aggression is used by essentially all species of animals to gain access to desired resources, including territory, food, and potential mates: Fruit flies are no exception. In Drosophila, both males and females compete in same sex fights for resources, but only males establish hierarchical relationships. Many investigators now study aggression using the fruit fly model, mainly because (a) aggression in fruit flies is a quantifiable well-defined and easily evoked behavior; (b) powerful genetic methods allow investigators to manipulate genes of interest at any place or time during embryonic, larval, pupal or adult life, and while flies are behaving; (c) the growth of the relatively new field of optogenetics makes physiological studies possible at single neuron levels despite the small sizes of neurons and other types of cells in fly brains; and (d) the rearing of fly stocks with their short generation times and limited growth space requirements can easily be performed at relatively low cost in most laboratories. This review begins with an examination of the behavior, both from a historical perspective and then from the birth of the "modern" era of studies of aggression in fruit flies including its quantitative analysis. The review continues with examinations of the roles of genes, neurotransmitters and neurohormones, peptides, nutritional and metabolic status, and surface cuticular hydrocarbons in the initiation and maintenance of aggression. It concludes with suggestions for future studies with this important model system.

  3. Micromechanics of Drosophila Audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göpfert, M. C.; Robert, D.

    2003-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the auditory micromechanics of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this animal, the distal part of the antenna constitutes a resonantly tuned sound receiver, the vibrations of which are transduced by a chordotonal sense organ in the antenna's base. Analyzing the mechanical behavior of the antennal receiver by means of microscanning laser Doppler vibrometry, we show that the auditory system of wild-type flies exhibits a hardening stiffness nonlinearity and spontaneously generates oscillations in the absence of external stimuli. According to the deprivation of these mechanical properties in mechanosensory mutants, the receiver's nonlinearity and oscillation activity are introduced by chordotonal auditory neurons. Requiring the mechanoreceptor-specific extracellular linker protein No-mechanoreceptor-potential-A (NompA), NompC mechanosensory transduction channels, Beethoven (Btv), and Touch-insensitive-larva-B (TilB), nonlinearity and oscillation activity of the fly's antennal receiver depend on prominent components of the auditory transduction machinery and seem to originate from motility of auditory receptor cilia.

  4. Modeling Dilated Cardiomyopathies in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past hundred years, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has provided tremendous insights into genetics and human biology. Drosophila-based research utilizes powerful, genetically-tractable approaches to identify new genes and pathways that potentially contribute to human diseases. New resources available in the fly research community have advanced the ability to examine genome-wide effects on cardiac function and facilitate the identification of structural, contractile, and signaling molecules that contribute to cardiomyopathies. This powerful model system continues to provide discoveries of novel genes and signaling pathways that are conserved among species and translatable to human pathophysiology. PMID:22863366

  5. Prokaryotic Diacylglycerol Kinase and Undecaprenol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) and undecaprenol kinase (UDPK) are the lone members of a family of multispan membrane enzymes that are very small, lack relationships to any other family of proteins—including water soluble kinases, and that exhibit an unusual structure and active site architecture. Escherichia coli DAGK plays an important role in recycling diacylglycerol produced as a byproduct of biosynthesis of molecules located in the periplasmic space. UDPK seems to play an analogous role in Gram-positive bacteria, where its importance is evident by the fact that UDPK is essential for biofilm formation by the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. DAGK has also long served as a model system for studies of membrane protein biocatalysis, folding, stability, and structure. This review explores our current understanding of the microbial physiology, enzymology, structural biology, and folding of the prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase family, which is based on over 40 years of studies. PMID:22224599

  6. Comparative genomics on nemo-like kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2005-06-01

    WNT signals are transduced to the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway or the beta-catenin pathway. Drosophila Frizzled (Fz), Starry night (Stan), Van Gogh (Vang), Dishevelled (Dsh), Prickle (Pk), Diego (Dgo) and Nemo (Nmo) are implicated in the PCP signaling pathway. Choi and Benzer identified Drosophila Nmo in 1994, and Brott et al identified mouse Nemo-like kinase (Nlk) in 1998. Nlk positively regulates the PCP pathway, and negatively regulates the beta-catenin pathway. Here, we identified and characterized rat Nlk gene, Nlk2 gene and Nlkp pseudogene by using bioinformatics. Nlk gene, consisting of 11 exons, was mapped to rat chromosome 10q25. Rat Nlk gene encoded 515-aa Nlk protein with the serine/threonine kinase domain, poly(His) tracts and poly(Ala) tract, which showed 100, 99.8, 97.1 and 89.5% total-amino-acid identity with mouse Nlk, human NLK, Xenopus nlk and zebrafish nlk, respectively. Rat Nlk2 gene and Nlkp pseudogene were mapped to rat chromosome 13p13 and 2q44, respectively. Nlk2 gene and Nlkp pseudogene, consisting of a single exon, were not evolutionarily conserved. Nlk2 gene and Nlkp pseudogene were predicted as retrotransposed Nlk homologs within the rat genome. Nlk2 gene encoded a 480-aa Nlk2 protein with partial deletion within the kinase domain, which was predicted as the dominant negative Nlk homolog. This is the first report on the Nlk gene and retrotransposed Nlk homologs within the rat genome.

  7. Cyclin G Functions as a Positive Regulator of Growth and Metabolism in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Adriana; Preiss, Anette; Nagel, Anja C.

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, growth and proliferation is adjusted to nutritional conditions by a complex signaling network. The Insulin receptor/target of rapamycin (InR/TOR) signaling cascade plays a pivotal role in nutrient dependent growth regulation in Drosophila and mammals alike. Here we identify Cyclin G (CycG) as a regulator of growth and metabolism in Drosophila. CycG mutants have a reduced body size and weight and show signs of starvation accompanied by a disturbed fat metabolism. InR/TOR signaling activity is impaired in cycG mutants, combined with a reduced phosphorylation status of the kinase Akt1 and the downstream factors S6-kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein (4E-BP). Moreover, the expression and accumulation of Drosophila insulin like peptides (dILPs) is disturbed in cycG mutant brains. Using a reporter assay, we show that the activity of one of the first effectors of InR signaling, Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K92E), is unaffected in cycG mutants. However, the metabolic defects and weight loss in cycG mutants were rescued by overexpression of Akt1 specifically in the fat body and by mutants in widerborst (wdb), the B'-subunit of the phosphatase PP2A, known to downregulate Akt1 by dephosphorylation. Together, our data suggest that CycG acts at the level of Akt1 to regulate growth and metabolism via PP2A in Drosophila. PMID:26274446

  8. Multifunctional RNA Processing Protein SRm160 Induces Apoptosis and Regulates Eye and Genital Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yu-Jie; Gittis, Aryn H.; Juge, François; Qiu, Chen; Xu, Yong-Zhen; Rabinow, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    SRm160 is an SR-like protein implicated in multiple steps of RNA processing and nucleocytoplasmic export. Although its biochemical functions have been extensively described, its genetic interactions and potential participation in signaling pathways remain largely unknown, despite the fact that it is highly phosphorylated in both mammalian cells and Drosophila. To begin elucidating the functions of the protein in signaling and its potential role in developmental processes, we characterized mutant and overexpression SRm160 phenotypes in Drosophila and their interactions with the locus encoding the LAMMER protein kinase, Doa. SRm160 mutations are recessive lethal, while its overexpression generates phenotypes including roughened eyes and highly disorganized internal eye structure, which are due at least in part to aberrantly high levels of apoptosis. SRm160 is required for normal somatic sex determination, since its alleles strongly enhance a subtle sex transformation phenotype induced by Doa kinase alleles. Moreover, modification of SRm160 by DOA kinase appears to be necessary for its activity, since Doa alleles suppress phenotypes induced by SRm160 overexpression in the eye and enhance those in genital discs. Modification of SRm160 may occur through direct interaction because DOA kinase phosphorylates it in vitro. Remarkably, SRm160 protein was concentrated in the nuclei of precellular embryos but was very rapidly excluded from nuclei or degraded coincident with cellularization. Also of interest, transcripts are restricted almost exclusively to the developing nervous system in mature embryos. PMID:24907259

  9. Multifunctional RNA processing protein SRm160 induces apoptosis and regulates eye and genital development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Jie; Gittis, Aryn H; Juge, François; Qiu, Chen; Xu, Yong-Zhen; Rabinow, Leonard

    2014-08-01

    SRm160 is an SR-like protein implicated in multiple steps of RNA processing and nucleocytoplasmic export. Although its biochemical functions have been extensively described, its genetic interactions and potential participation in signaling pathways remain largely unknown, despite the fact that it is highly phosphorylated in both mammalian cells and Drosophila. To begin elucidating the functions of the protein in signaling and its potential role in developmental processes, we characterized mutant and overexpression SRm160 phenotypes in Drosophila and their interactions with the locus encoding the LAMMER protein kinase, Doa. SRm160 mutations are recessive lethal, while its overexpression generates phenotypes including roughened eyes and highly disorganized internal eye structure, which are due at least in part to aberrantly high levels of apoptosis. SRm160 is required for normal somatic sex determination, since its alleles strongly enhance a subtle sex transformation phenotype induced by Doa kinase alleles. Moreover, modification of SRm160 by DOA kinase appears to be necessary for its activity, since Doa alleles suppress phenotypes induced by SRm160 overexpression in the eye and enhance those in genital discs. Modification of SRm160 may occur through direct interaction because DOA kinase phosphorylates it in vitro. Remarkably, SRm160 protein was concentrated in the nuclei of precellular embryos but was very rapidly excluded from nuclei or degraded coincident with cellularization. Also of interest, transcripts are restricted almost exclusively to the developing nervous system in mature embryos. PMID:24907259

  10. Drosophila's contribution to stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gyanesh

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of Drosophila stem cells with striking similarities to mammalian stem cells has brought new hope for stem cell research. Recent developments in Drosophila stem cell research is bringing wider opportunities for contemporary stem cell biologists. In this regard, Drosophila germ cells are becoming a popular model of stem cell research. In several cases, genes that controlled Drosophila stem cells were later discovered to have functional homologs in mammalian stem cells. Like mammals, Drosophila germline stem cells (GSCs) are controlled by both intrinsic as well as external signals. Inside the Drosophila testes, germline and somatic stem cells form a cluster of cells (the hub). Hub cells depend on JAK-STAT signaling, and, in absence of this signal, they do not self-renew. In Drosophila, significant changes occur within the stem cell niche that contributes to a decline in stem cell number over time. In case of aging Drosophila, somatic niche cells show reduced DE-cadherin and unpaired (Upd) proteins. Unpaired proteins are known to directly decrease stem cell number within the niches, and, overexpression of upd within niche cells restored GSCs in older males also . Stem cells in the midgut of Drosophila are also very promising. Reduced Notch signaling was found to increase the number of midgut progenitor cells. On the other hand, activation of the Notch pathway decreased proliferation of these cells. Further research in this area should lead to the discovery of additional factors that regulate stem and progenitor cells in Drosophila. PMID:26180635

  11. Drosophila's contribution to stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gyanesh

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of Drosophila stem cells with striking similarities to mammalian stem cells has brought new hope for stem cell research. Recent developments in Drosophila stem cell research is bringing wider opportunities for contemporary stem cell biologists. In this regard, Drosophila germ cells are becoming a popular model of stem cell research. In several cases, genes that controlled Drosophila stem cells were later discovered to have functional homologs in mammalian stem cells. Like mammals, Drosophila germline stem cells (GSCs) are controlled by both intrinsic as well as external signals. Inside the Drosophila testes, germline and somatic stem cells form a cluster of cells (the hub). Hub cells depend on JAK-STAT signaling, and, in absence of this signal, they do not self-renew. In Drosophila, significant changes occur within the stem cell niche that contributes to a decline in stem cell number over time. In case of aging Drosophila, somatic niche cells show reduced DE-cadherin and unpaired (Upd) proteins. Unpaired proteins are known to directly decrease stem cell number within the niches, and, overexpression of upd within niche cells restored GSCs in older males also . Stem cells in the midgut of Drosophila are also very promising. Reduced Notch signaling was found to increase the number of midgut progenitor cells. On the other hand, activation of the Notch pathway decreased proliferation of these cells. Further research in this area should lead to the discovery of additional factors that regulate stem and progenitor cells in Drosophila. PMID:26180635

  12. A DNA Virus of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Unckless, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the viruses infecting most species. Even in groups as well-studied as Drosophila, only a handful of viruses have been well-characterized. A viral metagenomic approach was used to explore viral diversity in 83 wild-caught Drosophila innubila, a mushroom feeding member of the quinaria group. A single fly that was injected with, and died from, Drosophila C Virus (DCV) was added to the sample as a control. Two-thirds of reads in the infected sample had DCV as the best BLAST hit, suggesting that the protocol developed is highly sensitive. In addition to the DCV hits, several sequences had Oryctes rhinoceros Nudivirus, a double-stranded DNA virus, as a best BLAST hit. The virus associated with these sequences was termed Drosophila innubila Nudivirus (DiNV). PCR screens of natural populations showed that DiNV was both common and widespread taxonomically and geographically. Electron microscopy confirms the presence of virions in fly fecal material similar in structure to other described Nudiviruses. In 2 species, D. innubila and D. falleni, the virus is associated with a severe (∼80–90%) loss of fecundity and significantly decreased lifespan. PMID:22053195

  13. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  14. Antibody Staining in Drosophila Germaria.

    PubMed

    Lie-Jensen, Anette; Haglund, Kaisa

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila oogenesis is a powerful model for studying a wide spectrum of cellular and developmental processes in vivo. Oogenesis starts in a specialized structure called the germarium, which harbors the stem cells for both germ and somatic cells. The germarium produces egg chambers, each of which will develop into an egg. Active areas of research in Drosophila germaria include stem cell self-renewal, division, and maintenance, cell cycle control and differentiation, oocyte specification, intercellular communication, and signaling, among others. The solid knowledge base, the genetic tractability of the Drosophila model, as well as the availability and fast development of tools and imaging techniques for oogenesis research ensure that studies in this model will keep being instrumental for novel discoveries within cell and developmental biology also in the future. This chapter focuses on antibody staining in Drosophila germaria and provides a protocol for immunostaining as well as an overview of commonly used antibodies for visualization of different cell types and cellular structures. The protocol is well-suited for subsequent confocal microscopy analyses, and in addition we present key adaptations of the protocol that are useful when performing structured illumination microscopy (SIM) super-resolution imaging. PMID:27557571

  15. Methods to assay Drosophila behavior.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Charles D; Becnel, Jaime; Pandey, Udai B

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, has been used to study molecular mechanisms of a wide range of human diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and various neurological diseases(1). We have optimized simple and robust behavioral assays for determining larval locomotion, adult climbing ability (RING assay), and courtship behaviors of Drosophila. These behavioral assays are widely applicable for studying the role of genetic and environmental factors on fly behavior. Larval crawling ability can be reliably used for determining early stage changes in the crawling abilities of Drosophila larvae and also for examining effect of drugs or human disease genes (in transgenic flies) on their locomotion. The larval crawling assay becomes more applicable if expression or abolition of a gene causes lethality in pupal or adult stages, as these flies do not survive to adulthood where they otherwise could be assessed. This basic assay can also be used in conjunction with bright light or stress to examine additional behavioral responses in Drosophila larvae. Courtship behavior has been widely used to investigate genetic basis of sexual behavior, and can also be used to examine activity and coordination, as well as learning and memory. Drosophila courtship behavior involves the exchange of various sensory stimuli including visual, auditory, and chemosensory signals between males and females that lead to a complex series of well characterized motor behaviors culminating in successful copulation. Traditional adult climbing assays (negative geotaxis) are tedious, labor intensive, and time consuming, with significant variation between different trials(2-4). The rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay(5) has many advantages over more widely employed protocols, providing a reproducible, sensitive, and high throughput approach to quantify adult locomotor and negative geotaxis behaviors. In the RING assay, several genotypes or drug treatments can be tested simultaneously

  16. The Secretory Pathway Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Anju; Kinch, Lisa N.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a nearly universal post-translation modification involved in a plethora of cellular events. Even though phosphorylation of extracellular proteins had been observed, the identity of the kinases that phosphorylate secreted proteins remained a mystery until recently. Advances in genome sequencing and genetic studies have paved the way for the discovery of a new class of kinases that localize within the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and the extracellular space. These novel kinases phosphorylate proteins and proteoglycans in the secretory pathway and appear to regulate various extracellular processes. Mutations in these kinases cause human disease, thus underscoring the biological importance of phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. PMID:25862977

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of human JNKK2, a novel Jun NH2-terminal kinase-specific kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z; Wu, J; Jacinto, E; Karin, M

    1997-01-01

    At least three mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades were identified in mammals, each consisting of a well-defined three-kinase module composed of a MAPK, a MAPK kinase (MAPKK), and a MAPKK kinase (MAPKKK). These cascades play key roles in relaying various physiological, environmental, or pathological signals from the environment to the transcriptional machinery in the nucleus. One of these MAPKs, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), stimulates the transcriptional activity of c-Jun in response to growth factors, proinflammatory cytokines, and certain environmental stresses, such as short wavelength UV light or osmotic shock. The JNKs are directly activated by the MAPKK JNKK1/SEK1/MKK4. However, inactivation of the gene encoding this MAPKK by homologous recombination suggested the existence of at least one more JNK-activating kinase. Recently, the JNK cascade was found to be structurally and functionally conserved in Drosophila, where DJNK is activated by the MAPKK DJNKK (hep). By a database search, we identified an expressed sequence tag (EST) encoding a portion of human MAPKK that is highly related to DJNKK (hep). We used this EST to isolate a full-length cDNA clone encoding a human JNKK2. We show that JNKK2 is a highly specific JNK kinase. Unlike JNKK1, it does not activate the related MAPK, p38. Although the regulation of JNKK1 activities and that of JNKK2 activities could be very similar, the two kinases may play somewhat different regulatory roles in a cell-type-dependent manner. PMID:9372971

  18. The Drosophila EKC/KEOPS complex: roles in protein synthesis homeostasis and animal growth.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Benítez, Diego; Ibar, Consuelo; Glavic, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    The TOR signaling pathway is crucial in the translation of nutritional inputs into the protein synthesis machinery regulation, allowing animal growth. We recently identified the Bud32 (yeast)/PRPK (human) ortholog in Drosophila, Prpk (p53-related protein kinase), and found that it is required for TOR kinase activity. Bud32/PRPK is an ancient and atypical kinase conserved in evolution from Archeae to humans, being essential for Archeae. It has been linked with p53 stabilization in human cell culture and its absence in yeast causes a slow-growth phenotype. This protein has been associated to KEOPS (kinase, putative endopeptidase and other proteins of small size) complex together with Kae1p (ATPase), Cgi-121 and Pcc1p. This complex has been implicated in telomere maintenance, transcriptional regulation, bud site selection and chemical modification of tRNAs (tRNAs). Bud32p and Kae1p have been related with N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t (6)A) synthesis, a particular chemical modification that occurs at position 37 of tRNAs that pair A-starting codons, required for proper translation in most species. Lack of this modification causes mistranslations and open reading frame shifts in yeast. The core constituents of the KEOPS complex are present in Drosophila, but their physical interaction has not been reported yet. Here, we present a review of the findings regarding the function of this complex in different organisms and new evidence that extends our recent observations of Prpk function in animal growth showing that depletion of Kae1 or Prpk, in accordance with their role in translation in yeast, is able to induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) in Drosophila. We suggest that EKC/KEOPS complex could be integrating t (6)A-modified tRNA availability with translational rates, which are ultimately reflected in animal growth.

  19. Aurora Kinases and Potential Medical Applications of Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gavriilidis, Paschalis; Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinases (AKs) represent a novel group of serine/threonine kinases. They were originally described in 1995 by David Glover in the course of studies of mutant alleles characterized with unusual spindle pole configuration in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus far, three AKs A, B, and C have been discovered in human healthy and neoplastic cells. Each one locates in different subcellular locations and they are all nuclear proteins. AKs are playing an essential role in mitotic events such as monitoring of the mitotic checkpoint, creation of bipolar mitotic spindle and alignment of centrosomes on it, also regulating centrosome separation, bio-orientation of chromosomes and cytokinesis. Any inactivation of them can have catastrophic consequences on mitotic events of spindle formation, alignment of centrosomes and cytokinesis, resulting in apoptosis. Overexpression of AKs has been detected in diverse solid and hematological cancers and has been linked with a dismal prognosis. After discovery and identification of the first aurora kinase inhibitor (AKI) ZM447439 as a potential drug for targeted therapy in cancer treatment, approximately 30 AKIs have been introduced in cancer treatment. PMID:26345296

  20. Circular DNA Molecules in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini, E. C.; Schultz, J.

    1972-01-01

    The satellite DNA's from the embryos of five species of Drosophila (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. nasuta, D. virilis and D. hydei) have been analyzed for the presence of closed circular duplex DNA molecules, as determined by CsCl-EBr gradients. Circular DNA molecules were found in every species but D. melanogaster. Analyses of cell fractions from adult Drosophila and organ fractions from Drosophila larvae show that fractions containing mitochondria are highly enriched in these molecules. PMID:4643820

  1. Spindle checkpoint-independent inhibition of mitotic chromosome segregation by Drosophila Mps1.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Friederike; Karess, Roger E; Lehner, Christian F

    2012-06-01

    Monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) is essential for the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which prevents anaphase onset in the presence of misaligned chromosomes. Moreover, Mps1 kinase contributes in a SAC-independent manner to the correction of erroneous initial attachments of chromosomes to the spindle. Our characterization of the Drosophila homologue reveals yet another SAC-independent role. As in yeast, modest overexpression of Drosophila Mps1 is sufficient to delay progression through mitosis during metaphase, even though chromosome congression and metaphase alignment do not appear to be affected. This delay in metaphase depends on the SAC component Mad2. Although Mps1 overexpression in mad2 mutants no longer causes a metaphase delay, it perturbs anaphase. Sister kinetochores barely move apart toward spindle poles. However, kinetochore movements can be restored experimentally by separase-independent resolution of sister chromatid cohesion. We propose therefore that Mps1 inhibits sister chromatid separation in a SAC-independent manner. Moreover, we report unexpected results concerning the requirement of Mps1 dimerization and kinase activity for its kinetochore localization in Drosophila. These findings further expand Mps1's significance for faithful mitotic chromosome segregation and emphasize the importance of its careful regulation.

  2. TORC2 mediates the heat stress response in Drosophila by promoting the formation of stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Jevtov, Irena; Zacharogianni, Margarita; van Oorschot, Marinke M.; van Zadelhoff, Guus; Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; Vuillez, Igor; Braakman, Ineke; Hafen, Ernst; Stocker, Hugo; Rabouille, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The kinase TOR is found in two complexes, TORC1, which is involved in growth control, and TORC2, whose roles are less well defined. Here, we asked whether TORC2 has a role in sustaining cellular stress. We show that TORC2 inhibition in Drosophila melanogaster leads to a reduced tolerance to heat stress, whereas sensitivity to other stresses is not affected. Accordingly, we show that upon heat stress, both in the animal and Drosophila cultured S2 cells, TORC2 is activated and is required for maintaining the level of its known target, Akt1 (also known as PKB). We show that the phosphorylation of the stress-activated protein kinases is not modulated by TORC2 nor is the heat-induced upregulation of heat-shock proteins. Instead, we show, both in vivo and in cultured cells, that TORC2 is required for the assembly of heat-induced cytoprotective ribonucleoprotein particles, the pro-survival stress granules. These granules are formed in response to protein translation inhibition imposed by heat stress that appears to be less efficient in the absence of TORC2 function. We propose that TORC2 mediates heat resistance in Drosophila by promoting the cell autonomous formation of stress granules. PMID:26054799

  3. Characterization of free endogenous C14 and C16 sphingoid bases from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fyrst, Henrik; Herr, Deron R; Harris, Greg L; Saba, Julie D

    2004-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites function as signaling molecules in mammalian cells, influencing cell proliferation, migration, and death. Recently, sphingolipid signaling has been implicated in the regulation of developmental processes in Drosophila melanogaster. However, biochemical analysis of endogenous Drosophila sphingoid bases has not been reported. In this study, a rapid HPLC-based method was developed for the analysis of free sphingoid bases endogenous to Drosophila. Four molecular species of endogenous free sphingoid bases were observed in adult flies and identified as C14 and C16 sphingosine (Sph) and C14 and C16 dihydrosphingosine (DHS). The C14 molecular species were the most prevalent, accounting for approximately 94% of the total free sphingoid bases in adult wild-type flies. An Sph kinase (SK) mutant demonstrated significant accumulation of all four sphingoid bases, whereas a serine palmitoyltransferase mutant demonstrated low but detectable levels. When endogenous sphingoid bases were evaluated at different stages of development, the observed ratio of Sph to DHS increased significantly from early embryo to adulthood. Throughout development, this ratio was significantly lower in the SK mutant as compared with the wild-type. This is the first report describing analysis of free C14 and C16 sphingoid bases from Drosophila. The biochemical characterization of these lipids from mutant models of sphingolipid metabolism should greatly facilitate the analysis of the biological significance of these signaling molecules.

  4. Misexpression screen for genes altering the olfactory map in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongsheng; Zhou, Weiguang; Yin, Chong; Chen, Weitao; Ozawa, Rie; Ang, Lay-Hong; Anandan, Lavanya; Aigaki, Toshiro; Hing, Huey

    2006-04-01

    Despite the identification of a number of guidance molecules, a comprehensive picture has yet to emerge to explain the precise anatomy of the olfactory map. From a misexpression screen of 1,515 P{GS} lines, we identified 23 genes that, when forcibly expressed in the olfactory receptor neurons, disrupted the stereotyped anatomy of the Drosophila antennal lobes. These genes, which have not been shown previously to control olfactory map development, encode novel proteins as well as proteins with known roles in axonal outgrowth and cytoskeletal remodeling. We analyzed Akap200, which encodes a Protein Kinase A-binding protein. Overexpression of Akap200 resulted in fusion of the glomeruli, while its loss resulted in misshapen and ectopic glomeruli. The requirement of Akap200 validates our screen as an effective approach for recovering genes controlling glomerular map patterning. Our finding of diverse classes of genes reveals the complexity of the mechanisms that underlie olfactory map development.

  5. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  6. Retrograde neurotrophin signaling through Tollo regulates synaptic growth in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel L.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are best characterized for their roles in mediating dorsoventral patterning and the innate immune response. However, recent studies indicate that TLRs are also involved in regulating neuronal growth and development. Here, we demonstrate that the TLR Tollo positively regulates growth of the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Tollo mutants exhibited NMJ undergrowth, whereas increased expression of Tollo led to NMJ overgrowth. Tollo expression in the motoneuron was both necessary and sufficient for regulating NMJ growth. Dominant genetic interactions together with altered levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and puc-lacZ expression revealed that Tollo signals through the JNK pathway at the NMJ. Genetic interactions also revealed that the neurotrophin Spätzle3 (Spz3) is a likely Tollo ligand. Spz3 expression in muscle and proteolytic activation via the Easter protease was necessary and sufficient to promote NMJ growth. These results demonstrate the existence of a novel neurotrophin signaling pathway that is required for synaptic development in Drosophila. PMID:24662564

  7. Activity-dependent facilitation of Synaptojanin and synaptic vesicle recycling by the Minibrain kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Kan; Bregere, Catherine; Paluch, Jeremy; Lu, Jason F; Dickman, Dion K; Chang, Karen T

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation has emerged as a crucial regulatory mechanism in the nervous system to integrate the dynamic signalling required for proper synaptic development, function and plasticity, particularly during changes in neuronal activity. Here we present evidence that Minibrain (Mnb; also known as Dyrk1A), a serine/threonine kinase implicated in autism spectrum disorder and Down syndrome, is required presynaptically for normal synaptic growth and rapid synaptic vesicle endocytosis at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We find that Mnb-dependent phosphorylation of Synaptojanin (Synj) is required, in vivo, for complex endocytic protein interactions and to enhance Synj activity. Neuronal stimulation drives Mnb mobilization to endocytic zones and triggers Mnb-dependent phosphorylation of Synj. Our data identify Mnb as a synaptic kinase that promotes efficient synaptic vesicle recycling by dynamically calibrating Synj function at the Drosophila NMJ, and in turn endocytic capacity, to adapt to conditions of high synaptic activity. PMID:24977345

  8. The novel SAM domain protein Aveugle is required for Raf activation in the Drosophila EGF receptor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Roignant, Jean-Yves; Hamel, Sophie; Janody, Florence; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the Raf kinase by GTP-bound Ras is a poorly understood step in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. One such pathway, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, is critical for cell differentiation, survival, and cell cycle regulation in many systems, including the Drosophila eye. We have identified a mutation in a novel gene, aveugle, based on its requirement for normal photoreceptor differentiation. The phenotypes of aveugle mutant cells in the eye and wing imaginal discs resemble those caused by reduction of EGFR pathway function. We show that aveugle is required between ras and raf for EGFR signaling in the eye and for mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in cell culture. aveugle encodes a small protein with a sterile α motif (SAM) domain that can physically interact with the scaffold protein connector enhancer of Ksr (Cnk). We propose that Aveugle acts together with Cnk to promote Raf activation, perhaps by recruiting an activating kinase. PMID:16600911

  9. Limited taste discrimination in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Masek, Pavel; Scott, Kristin

    2010-08-17

    In the gustatory systems of mammals and flies, different populations of sensory cells recognize different taste modalities, such that there are cells that respond selectively to sugars and others to bitter compounds. This organization readily allows animals to distinguish compounds of different modalities but may limit the ability to distinguish compounds within one taste modality. Here, we developed a behavioral paradigm in Drosophila melanogaster to evaluate directly the tastes that a fly distinguishes. These studies reveal that flies do not discriminate among different sugars, or among different bitter compounds, based on chemical identity. Instead, flies show a limited ability to distinguish compounds within a modality based on intensity or palatability. Taste associative learning, similar to olfactory learning, requires the mushroom bodies, suggesting fundamental similarities in brain mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity. Overall, these studies provide insight into the discriminative capacity of the Drosophila gustatory system and the modulation of taste behavior.

  10. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  11. The Drosophila 7SK snRNP and the essential role of dHEXIM in development

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duy; Krueger, Brian J.; Sedore, Stanley C.; Brogie, John E.; Rogers, Jason T.; Rajendra, T. K.; Saunders, Abbie; Matera, A. Greg; Lis, John T.; Uguen, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of the positive transcription elongation factor, P-TEFb, plays a major role in controlling mammalian transcription and this is accomplished in part by controlled release of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP that sequesters the kinase in an inactive state. We demonstrate here that a similar P-TEFb control system exists in Drosophila. We show that an RNA previously suggested to be a 7SK homolog is, in fact, associated with P-TEFb, through the action of a homolog of the human HEXIM1/2 proteins (dHEXIM). In addition, a Drosophila La related protein (now called dLARP7) is shown to be the functional homolog of human LARP7. The Drosophila 7SK snRNP (d7SK snRNP) responded to treatment of cells with P-TEFb inhibitors and to nuclease treatment of cell lysates by releasing P-TEFb. Supporting a critical role for the d7SK snRNP in Drosophila development, dLARP7 and dHEXIM were found to be ubiquitously expressed throughout embryos and tissues at all stages. Importantly, knockdown of dHEXIM was embryonic lethal, and reduction of dHEXIM in specific tissues led to serious developmental defects. Our results suggest that regulation of P-TEFb by the d7SK snRNP is essential for the growth and differentiation of tissues required during Drosophila development. PMID:22379134

  12. A Drosophila complementary DNA resource

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Gerald M.; Hong, Ling; Brokstein, Peter; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Stapleton, Mark; Harvey, Damon A.

    2000-03-24

    Collections of nonredundant, full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for each of the model organisms and humans will be important resources for studies of gene structure and function. We describe a general strategy for producing such collections and its implementation, which so far has generated a set of cDNAs corresponding to over 40% of the genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

  13. Chromatin assembly using Drosophila systems.

    PubMed

    Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Levenstein, Mark E

    2002-05-01

    To successfully study chromatin structure and activity in vitro, it is essential to have a chromatin assembly system that will prepare extended nucleosome arrays with highly defined protein content that resemble bulk chromatin isolated from living cell nuclei in terms of periodicity and nucleosome positioning. The Drosophila ATP-dependent chromatin assembly system described in this unit meets these requirements. The end product of the reaction described here has highly periodic extended arrays with physiologic spacing and positioning of the nucleosomes.

  14. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  15. Recent advances in the development of Aurora kinases inhibitors in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Choudary, Iqra; Barr, Paul M.; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, since the discovery of Drosophila mutants in 1995, much effort has been made to understand Aurora kinase biology. Three mammalian subtypes have been identified thus far which include the Aurora A, B and C kinases. These regulatory proteins specifically work at the cytoskeleton and chromosomal structures between the kinetochores and have vital functions in the early phases of the mitotic cell cycle. Today, there are multiple phase I and phase II clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical studies taking place looking at Aurora kinase inhibitors in both hematologic and solid malignancies. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of Aurora kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancy and discusses their therapeutic potential. PMID:26622997

  16. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently the gold standard for cardiac pacing. However, it is invasive and nonspecific for cardiac tissues. We recently developed a noninvasive cardiac pacing technique using optogenetic tools, which are widely used in neuroscience. Optogenetic pacing of the heart provides high spatial and temporal precisions, is specific for cardiac tissues, avoids artifacts associated with electrical stimulation, and therefore promises to be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research. We demonstrated optogenetic control of heart rhythm in a well-established model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We developed transgenic flies expressing a light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), specifically in their hearts and demonstrated successful optogenetic pacing of ChR2-expressing Drosophila at different developmental stages, including the larva, pupa, and adult stages. A high-speed and ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy imaging system that is capable of providing images at a rate of 130 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 1.5 and 3.9 μm, respectively, was used to noninvasively monitor Drosophila cardiac function and its response to pacing stimulation. The development of a noninvasive integrated optical pacing and imaging system provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology. PMID:26601299

  17. Drosophila's view on insect vision.

    PubMed

    Borst, Alexander

    2009-01-13

    Within the last 400 million years, insects have radiated into at least a million species, accounting for more than half of all known living organisms: they are the most successful group in the animal kingdom, found in almost all environments of the planet, ranging in body size from a mere 0.1 mm up to half a meter. Their eyes, together with the respective parts of the nervous system dedicated to the processing of visual information, have long been the subject of intense investigation but, with the exception of some very basic reflexes, it is still not possible to link an insect's visual input to its behavioral output. Fortunately for the field, the fruit fly Drosophila is an insect, too. This genetic workhorse holds great promise for the insect vision field, offering the possibility of recording, suppressing or stimulating any single neuron in its nervous system. Here, I shall give a brief synopsis of what we currently know about insect vision, describe the genetic toolset available in Drosophila and give some recent examples of how the application of these tools have furthered our understanding of color and motion vision in Drosophila.

  18. Rapid evolution of a cyclin A inhibitor gene, roughex, in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Avedisov, S N; Rogozin, I B; Koonin, E V; Thomas, B J

    2001-11-01

    The recent sequencing of the complete genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has yielded about 30% of the predicted genes with no obvious counterparts in other organisms. These rapidly evolving genes remain largely unexplored. Here, we present evidence for a striking variability in an important Drosophila cell cycle regulator encoded by the gene roughex (rux) in closely related fly species. The unusual level of Rux protein variability indicates that there are very low overall constraints on amino acid substitutions. Despite the lack of sequence similarity, certain common features, including the presence of a C-terminal nuclear localization signal and a functionally important N-terminal RXL cyclin-binding motif, exist between Rux and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors of the Cip/Kip family. These results indicate that even some genes involved in key regulatory processes in eukaryotes evolve at extremely high rates.

  19. The Hippo signalling pathway maintains quiescence in Drosophila neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Rouven; Weynans, Kevin; Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S.; Berger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells control their mitotic activity to decide whether to proliferate or to stay in quiescence. Drosophila neural stem cells (NSCs) are quiescent at early larval stages, when they are reactivated in response to metabolic changes. Here we report that cell-contact inhibition of growth through the canonical Hippo signalling pathway maintains NSC quiescence. Loss of the core kinases hippo or warts leads to premature nuclear localization of the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie and initiation of growth and proliferation in NSCs. Yorkie is necessary and sufficient for NSC reactivation, growth and proliferation. The Hippo pathway activity is modulated via inter-cellular transmembrane proteins Crumbs and Echinoid that are both expressed in a nutrient-dependent way in niche glial cells and NSCs. Loss of crumbs or echinoid in the niche only is sufficient to reactivate NSCs. Finally, we provide evidence that the Hippo pathway activity discriminates quiescent from non-quiescent NSCs in the Drosophila nervous system. PMID:26821647

  20. The Hippo signalling pathway maintains quiescence in Drosophila neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Rouven; Weynans, Kevin; Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S; Berger, Christian

    2016-01-29

    Stem cells control their mitotic activity to decide whether to proliferate or to stay in quiescence. Drosophila neural stem cells (NSCs) are quiescent at early larval stages, when they are reactivated in response to metabolic changes. Here we report that cell-contact inhibition of growth through the canonical Hippo signalling pathway maintains NSC quiescence. Loss of the core kinases hippo or warts leads to premature nuclear localization of the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie and initiation of growth and proliferation in NSCs. Yorkie is necessary and sufficient for NSC reactivation, growth and proliferation. The Hippo pathway activity is modulated via inter-cellular transmembrane proteins Crumbs and Echinoid that are both expressed in a nutrient-dependent way in niche glial cells and NSCs. Loss of crumbs or echinoid in the niche only is sufficient to reactivate NSCs. Finally, we provide evidence that the Hippo pathway activity discriminates quiescent from non-quiescent NSCs in the Drosophila nervous system.

  1. Changes in Drosophila melanogaster midgut proteins in response to dietary Bowman-Birk inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, H-M; Margam, V; Muir, W M; Murdock, L L; Pittendrigh, B R

    2007-10-01

    The midgut proteome of Drosophila melanogaster was compared in larvae fed dietary Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) vs. larvae fed a control diet. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, nine differentially expressed proteins were observed, which were associated with enzymes or transport functions such as sterol carrier protein X (SCPX), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, endopeptidase, receptor signalling protein kinase, ATP-dependent RNA helicase and alpha-tocopherol transport. Quantitative real-time PCR verified differential expression of transcripts coding for six of the proteins observed from the proteomic analysis. BBI evidently affects expression of proteins associated with protein degradation, transport and fatty acid catabolism. We then tested the hypothesis that SCPX was critical for the Drosophila third instars' response to BBI treatment. Inhibition of SCPX caused the third instars to become more susceptible to dietary BBI. PMID:17725801

  2. Loss of Drosophila Vps16A enhances autophagosome formation through reduced Tor activity

    PubMed Central

    Takáts, Szabolcs; Varga, Ágnes; Pircs, Karolina; Juhász, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    The HOPS tethering complex facilitates autophagosome-lysosome fusion by binding to Syx17 (Syntaxin 17), the autophagosomal SNARE. Here we show that loss of the core HOPS complex subunit Vps16A enhances autophagosome formation and slows down Drosophila development. Mechanistically, Tor kinase is less active in Vps16A mutants likely due to impaired endocytic and biosynthetic transport to the lysosome, a site of its activation. Tor reactivation by overexpression of Rheb suppresses autophagosome formation and restores growth and developmental timing in these animals. Thus, Vps16A reduces autophagosome numbers both by indirectly restricting their formation rate and by directly promoting their clearance. In contrast, the loss of Syx17 blocks autophagic flux without affecting the induction step in Drosophila. PMID:26061715

  3. Phosphorylation of the fused protein kinase in response to signaling from hedgehog.

    PubMed Central

    Thérond, P P; Knight, J D; Kornberg, T B; Bishop, J M

    1996-01-01

    The hedgehog gene (hh) of Drosophila melanogaster exerts both short- and long-range effects on cell patterning during development. The product of hedgehog is a secreted protein that apparently acts by triggering an intra-cellular signaling pathway, but little is known about the details of that pathway. The Drosophila gene fused (fu) encodes a serine/threonine-protein kinase that genetic experiments have implicated in signaling initiated by hedgehog. Here we report that the fused protein is phosphorylated during the course of Drosophila embryogenesis, as a result of hedgehog activity. In cell culture, phosphorylation of fused protein occurs in response to the biologically active form of hedgehog and cannot be blocked by activation of protein kinase A, which is thought to be an antagonist of signaling from hedgehog. These results suggest that fused and protein kinase A function downstream of hedgehog but in parallel pathways that eventually converge distal to fused. The reconstruction of signaling from hedgehog in cell culture should provide further access to the mechanisms by which hedgehog acts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8633045

  4. Drosophila and Beer: An Experimental Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurvink, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a popular organism for studying genetics and development. Maintaining Drosophila on medium prepared with varying concentrations of beer and evaluating the effects on reproduction, life cycle stages and other factors is one of the exercises that is versatile and applicable to many student levels.

  5. Using Drosophila for Studies of Intermediate Filaments.

    PubMed

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Thiemann, Dylan A; Magin, Thomas M; Wallrath, Lori L

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a useful organism for determining protein function and modeling human disease. Drosophila offers a rapid generation time and an abundance of genomic resources and genetic tools. Conservation in protein structure, signaling pathways, and developmental processes make studies performed in Drosophila relevant to other species, including humans. Drosophila models have been generated for neurodegenerative diseases, muscular dystrophy, cancer, and many other disorders. Recently, intermediate filament protein diseases have been modeled in Drosophila. These models have revealed novel mechanisms of pathology, illuminated potential new routes of therapy, and make whole organism compound screens feasible. The goal of this chapter is to outline steps to study intermediate filament function and model intermediate filament-associated diseases in Drosophila. The steps are general and can be applied to study the function of almost any protein. The protocols outlined here are for both the novice and experienced Drosophila researcher, allowing the rich developmental and cell biology that Drosophila offers to be applied to studies of intermediate filaments.

  6. Pickle Flavors Relish in Drosophila Immunity.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Tiina Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-09-14

    Immune responses must be tightly controlled to avoid host damage. In Drosophila, two NF-κB signaling pathways, Toll and Imd, mediate host immune responses. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Morris et al. (2016) introduce Pickle, a nuclear IκB that inhibits Drosophila immune signaling by modulating the NF-κB Relish. PMID:27631694

  7. Aurora A inhibition by MNL8054 promotes centriole elongation during Drosophila male meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gottardo, Marco; Callaini, Giuliano; Riparbelli, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Aurora A kinase plays an important role in several aspects of cell division, including centrosome maturation and separation, a crucial step for the correct organization of the bipolar spindle. Although it has long been showed that this kinase accumulates at the centrosome throughout mitosis its precise contribution to centriole biogenesis and structure has until now not been reported. It is not surprising that so little is known, due to the small size of somatic centrioles, where only dramatic structural changes may be identified by careful electron microscopy analysis. Conversely, centrioles of Drosophila primary spermatocytes increase tenfold in length during the first prophase, thus making any change easily detectable. Therefore, we examined the consequence of the pharmacological inhibition of Aurora A by MLN8054 on centriole biogenesis during early Drosophila gametogenesis. Here, we show that depletion of this kinase results in longer centrioles, mainly during transition from prophase to prometaphase of the first meiosis. We also found abnormal ciliogenesis characterized by irregularly growing axonemal doublets. Our results represent the first documentation of a potential requirement of Aurora A in centriole integrity and elongation. PMID:25785740

  8. Genome-wide identification of phospho-regulators of Wnt signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Sharan; Pradhan-Sundd, Tirthadipa; Verheyen, Esther M

    2015-04-15

    Evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling pathways regulate embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in metazoans. The precise control of the state and amplitude of signaling pathways is achieved in part through the kinase- and phosphatase-mediated reversible phosphorylation of proteins. In this study, we performed a genome-wide in vivo RNAi screen for kinases and phosphatases that regulate the Wnt pathway under physiological conditions in the Drosophila wing disc. Our analyses have identified 54 high-confidence kinases and phosphatases capable of modulating the Wnt pathway, including 22 novel regulators. These candidates were also assayed for a role in the Notch pathway, and numerous phospho-regulators were identified. Additionally, each regulator of the Wnt pathway was evaluated in the wing disc for its ability to affect the mechanistically similar Hedgehog pathway. We identified 29 dual regulators that have the same effect on the Wnt and Hedgehog pathways. As proof of principle, we established that Cdc37 and Gilgamesh/CK1γ inhibit and promote signaling, respectively, by functioning at analogous levels of these pathways in both Drosophila and mammalian cells. The Wnt and Hedgehog pathways function in tandem in multiple developmental contexts, and the identification of several shared phospho-regulators serve as potential nodes of control under conditions of aberrant signaling and disease. PMID:25852200

  9. Aurora A inhibition by MNL8054 promotes centriole elongation during Drosophila male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, Marco; Callaini, Giuliano; Riparbelli, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Aurora A kinase plays an important role in several aspects of cell division, including centrosome maturation and separation, a crucial step for the correct organization of the bipolar spindle. Although it has long been showed that this kinase accumulates at the centrosome throughout mitosis its precise contribution to centriole biogenesis and structure has until now not been reported. It is not surprising that so little is known, due to the small size of somatic centrioles, where only dramatic structural changes may be identified by careful electron microscopy analysis. Conversely, centrioles of Drosophila primary spermatocytes increase tenfold in length during the first prophase, thus making any change easily detectable. Therefore, we examined the consequence of the pharmacological inhibition of Aurora A by MLN8054 on centriole biogenesis during early Drosophila gametogenesis. Here, we show that depletion of this kinase results in longer centrioles, mainly during transition from prophase to prometaphase of the first meiosis. We also found abnormal ciliogenesis characterized by irregularly growing axonemal doublets. Our results represent the first documentation of a potential requirement of Aurora A in centriole integrity and elongation.

  10. Mobile phone electromagnetic radiation activates MAPK signaling and regulates viability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Choi, Jong-Soon; Hong, Sae-Yong; Son, Tae-Ho; Yu, Kweon

    2008-07-01

    Mobile phones are widely used in the modern world. However, biological effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phones are largely unknown. In this report, we show biological effects of the mobile phone 835 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) in the Drosophila model system. When flies were exposed to the specific absorption rate (SAR) 1.6 W/kg, which is the proposed exposure limit by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), more than 90% of the flies were viable even after the 30 h exposure. However, in the SAR 4.0 W/kg strong EMF exposure, viability dropped from the 12 h exposure. These EMF exposures triggered stress response and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. The EMF exposures also activated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, but not p38 kinase signaling. Interestingly, SAR 1.6 W/kg activated mainly ERK signaling and expression of an anti-apoptotic gene, whereas SAR 4.0 W/kg strongly activated JNK signaling and expression of apoptotic genes. In addition, SAR 4.0 W/kg amplified the number of apoptotic cells in the fly brain. These findings demonstrate that the exposure limit on electromagnetic radiation proposed by ANSI triggered ERK-survival signaling but the strong electromagnetic radiation activated JNK-apoptotic signaling in Drosophila.

  11. Rhodopsin 7-The unusual Rhodopsin in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Senthilan, Pingkalai R; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Rhodopsins are the major photopigments in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila express six well-characterized Rhodopsins (Rh1-Rh6) with distinct absorption maxima and expression pattern. In 2000, when the Drosophila genome was published, a novel Rhodopsin gene was discovered: Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7). Rh7 is highly conserved among the Drosophila genus and is also found in other arthropods. Phylogenetic trees based on protein sequences suggest that the seven Drosophila Rhodopsins cluster in three different groups. While Rh1, Rh2 and Rh6 form a "vertebrate-melanopsin-type"-cluster, and Rh3, Rh4 and Rh5 form an "insect-type"-Rhodopsin cluster, Rh7 seem to form its own cluster. Although Rh7 has nearly all important features of a functional Rhodopsin, it differs from other Rhodopsins in its genomic and structural properties, suggesting it might have an overall different role than other known Rhodopsins. PMID:27651995

  12. Modulation of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in Drosophila by a cAMP-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, A; Gu, G G; Singh, S

    1999-06-15

    Drosophila has proved to be a valuable system for studying the structure and function of ion channels. However, relatively little is known about the regulation of ion channels, particularly that of Ca2+ channels, in Drosophila. Physiological and pharmacological differences between invertebrate and mammalian L-type Ca2+ channels raise questions on the extent of conservation of Ca2+ channel modulatory pathways. We have examined the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) cascade in modulating the dihydropyridine (DHP)-sensitive Ca2+ channels in the larval muscles of Drosophila, using mutations and drugs that disrupt specific steps in this pathway. The L-type (DHP-sensitive) Ca2+ channel current was increased in the dunce mutants, which have high cAMP concentration owing to cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) disruption. The current was decreased in the rutabaga mutants, where adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity is altered thereby decreasing the cAMP concentration. The dunce effect was mimicked by 8-Br-cAMP, a cAMP analog, and IBMX, a PDE inhibitor. The rutabaga effect was rescued by forskolin, an AC activator. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase-A (PKA), reduced the current and inhibited the effect of 8-Br-cAMP. The data suggest modulation of L-type Ca2+ channels of Drosophila via a cAMP-PKA mediated pathway. While there are differences in L-type channels, as well as in components of cAMP cascade, between Drosophila and vertebrates, main features of the modulatory pathway have been conserved. The data also raise questions on the likely role of DHP-sensitive Ca2+ channel modulation in synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory, processes disrupted by the dnc and the rut mutations. PMID:10380071

  13. Proteomic and functional genomic landscape of receptor tyrosine kinase and ras to extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam A; Tucker, George; Singh, Rohit; Yan, Dong; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Hu, Yanhui; Binari, Richard; Hong, Pengyu; Sun, Xiaoyun; Porto, Maura; Pacifico, Svetlana; Murali, Thilakam; Finley, Russell L; Asara, John M; Berger, Bonnie; Perrimon, Norbert

    2011-10-25

    Characterizing the extent and logic of signaling networks is essential to understanding specificity in such physiological and pathophysiological contexts as cell fate decisions and mechanisms of oncogenesis and resistance to chemotherapy. Cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) screens enable the inference of large numbers of genes that regulate signaling pathways, but these screens cannot provide network structure directly. We describe an integrated network around the canonical receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway, generated by combining parallel genome-wide RNAi screens with protein-protein interaction (PPI) mapping by tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry. We found that only a small fraction of the total number of PPI or RNAi screen hits was isolated under all conditions tested and that most of these represented the known canonical pathway components, suggesting that much of the core canonical ERK pathway is known. Because most of the newly identified regulators are likely cell type- and RTK-specific, our analysis provides a resource for understanding how output through this clinically relevant pathway is regulated in different contexts. We report in vivo roles for several of the previously unknown regulators, including CG10289 and PpV, the Drosophila orthologs of two components of the serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 6 complex; the Drosophila ortholog of TepIV, a glycophosphatidylinositol-linked protein mutated in human cancers; CG6453, a noncatalytic subunit of glucosidase II; and Rtf1, a histone methyltransferase.

  14. Repositioning of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor GW8510 as a ribonucleotide reductase M2 inhibitor to treat human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y-Y; Chou, C-J; Lo, H-L; Yang, P-M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males and females in the world. It is of immediate importance to develop novel therapeutics. Human ribonucleotide reductase (RRM1/RRM2) has an essential role in converting ribonucleoside diphosphate to 2'-deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate to maintain the homeostasis of nucleotide pools. RRM2 is a prognostic biomarker and predicts poor survival of CRC. In addition, increased RRM2 activity is associated with malignant transformation and tumor cell growth. Bioinformatics analyses show that RRM2 was overexpressed in CRC and might be an attractive target for treating CRC. Therefore, we attempted to search novel RRM2 inhibitors by using a gene expression signature-based approach, connectivity MAP (CMAP). The result predicted GW8510, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, as a potential RRM2 inhibitor. Western blot analysis indicated that GW8510 inhibited RRM2 expression through promoting its proteasomal degradation. In addition, GW8510 induced autophagic cell death. In addition, the sensitivities of CRC cells to GW8510 were associated with the levels of RRM2 and endogenous autophagic flux. Taken together, our study indicates that GW8510 could be a potential anti-CRC agent through targeting RRM2. PMID:27551518

  15. Repositioning of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor GW8510 as a ribonucleotide reductase M2 inhibitor to treat human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Y-Y; Chou, C-J; Lo, H-L; Yang, P-M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males and females in the world. It is of immediate importance to develop novel therapeutics. Human ribonucleotide reductase (RRM1/RRM2) has an essential role in converting ribonucleoside diphosphate to 2′-deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate to maintain the homeostasis of nucleotide pools. RRM2 is a prognostic biomarker and predicts poor survival of CRC. In addition, increased RRM2 activity is associated with malignant transformation and tumor cell growth. Bioinformatics analyses show that RRM2 was overexpressed in CRC and might be an attractive target for treating CRC. Therefore, we attempted to search novel RRM2 inhibitors by using a gene expression signature-based approach, connectivity MAP (CMAP). The result predicted GW8510, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, as a potential RRM2 inhibitor. Western blot analysis indicated that GW8510 inhibited RRM2 expression through promoting its proteasomal degradation. In addition, GW8510 induced autophagic cell death. In addition, the sensitivities of CRC cells to GW8510 were associated with the levels of RRM2 and endogenous autophagic flux. Taken together, our study indicates that GW8510 could be a potential anti-CRC agent through targeting RRM2. PMID:27551518

  16. Taste processing in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A.; Rist, Anna; Thum, Andreas S.

    2015-01-01

    The sense of taste allows animals to detect chemical substances in their environment to initiate appropriate behaviors: to find food or a mate, to avoid hostile environments and predators. Drosophila larvae are a promising model organism to study gustation. Their simple nervous system triggers stereotypic behavioral responses, and the coding of taste can be studied by genetic tools at the single cell level. This review briefly summarizes recent progress on how taste information is sensed and processed by larval cephalic and pharyngeal sense organs. The focus lies on several studies, which revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms required to process sugar, salt, and bitter substances. PMID:26528147

  17. Geotaxis baseline data for Drosophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnebel, E. M.; Bhargava, R.; Grossfield, J.

    1987-01-01

    Geotaxis profiles for 20 Drosophila species and semispecies at different ages have been examined using a calibrated, adjustable slant board device. Measurements were taken at 5 deg intervals ranging from 0 deg to 85 deg. Clear strain and species differences are observed, with some groups tending to move upward (- geotaxis) with increasing angles, while others move downward (+ geotaxis). Geotactic responses change with age in some, but not all experimental groups. Sample geotaxis profiles are presented and their application to ecological and aging studies are discussed. Data provide a baseline for future evaluations of the biological effects of microgravity.

  18. Chromosome Conformation Capture in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Linear chromatin fiber is packed inside the nuclei as a complex three-dimensional structure, and the organization of the chromatin has important roles in the appropriate spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression. To understand how chromatin organizes inside nuclei, and how regulatory proteins physically interact with genes, chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique provides a powerful and sensitive tool to detect both short- and long-range DNA-DNA interaction. Here I describe the 3C technique to detect the DNA-DNA interactions mediated by insulator proteins that are closely related to PcG in Drosophila, which is also broadly applicable to other systems. PMID:27659987

  19. Cryobiological preservation of Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Schreuders, P.D.; Cole, K.W.; Hall, J.W. ); Mahowald, A.P. )

    1992-12-18

    The inability to cryobiologically preserve the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has required that fly stocks be maintained by frequent transfer of adults. This method is costly in terms of time and can lead to loss of stocks. Traditional slow freezing methods do not succeed because the embryos are highly sensitive to chilling. With the procedures described here, 68 percent of precisely staged 15-hour Oregon R (wild-type) embryos hatch after vitrification at -205[degree]C, and 40 percent of the resulting larvae develop into normal adult flies. These embryos are among the most complex organisms successfully preserved by cryobiology.

  20. Macrophages and cellular immunity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gold, Katrina S; Brückner, Katja

    2015-12-01

    The invertebrate Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful model for understanding blood cell development and immunity. Drosophila is a holometabolous insect, which transitions through a series of life stages from embryo, larva and pupa to adulthood. In spite of this, remarkable parallels exist between Drosophila and vertebrate macrophages, both in terms of development and function. More than 90% of Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes) are macrophages (plasmatocytes), making this highly tractable genetic system attractive for studying a variety of questions in macrophage biology. In vertebrates, recent findings revealed that macrophages have two independent origins: self-renewing macrophages, which reside and proliferate in local microenvironments in a variety of tissues, and macrophages of the monocyte lineage, which derive from hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses two macrophage lineages with a conserved dual ontogeny. These parallels allow us to take advantage of the Drosophila model when investigating macrophage lineage specification, maintenance and amplification, and the induction of macrophages and their progenitors by local microenvironments and systemic cues. Beyond macrophage development, Drosophila further serves as a paradigm for understanding the mechanisms underlying macrophage function and cellular immunity in infection, tissue homeostasis and cancer, throughout development and adult life. PMID:27117654

  1. Neuronal Cell Shape and Neurite Initiation Are Regulated by the Ndr Kinase SAX-1, a Member of the Orb6/COT-1/Warts Serine/Threonine Kinase Family

    PubMed Central

    Zallen, Jennifer A.; Peckol, Erin L.; Tobin, David M.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2000-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans sax-1 gene regulates several aspects of neuronal cell shape. sax-1 mutants have expanded cell bodies and ectopic neurites in many classes of neurons, suggesting that SAX-1 functions to restrict cell and neurite growth. The ectopic neurites in sensory neurons of sax-1 mutants resemble the defects caused by decreased sensory activity. However, the activity-dependent pathway, mediated in part by the UNC-43 calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, functions in parallel with SAX-1 to suppress neurite initiation. sax-1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase in the Ndr family that is related to the Orb6 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), Warts/Lats (Drosophila), and COT-1 (Neurospora) kinases that function in cell shape regulation. These kinases have similarity to Rho kinases but lack consensus Rho-binding domains. Dominant negative mutations in the C. elegans RhoA GTPase cause neuronal cell shape defects similar to those of sax-1 mutants, and genetic interactions between rhoA and sax-1 suggest shared functions. These results suggest that SAX-1/Ndr kinases are endogenous inhibitors of neurite initiation and cell spreading. PMID:10982409

  2. Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens.

    PubMed

    Chao, Rubén; Macía-Vázquez, Germán; Zalama, Eduardo; Gómez-García-Bermejo, Jaime; Perán, José-Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster has become a model organism in the study of neurobiology and behavior patterns. The analysis of the way the fly moves and its behavior is of great scientific interest for research on aspects such as drug tolerance, aggression or ageing in humans. In this article, a procedure for detecting, identifying and tracking numerous specimens of Drosophila by means of computer vision-based sensing systems is presented. This procedure allows dynamic information about each specimen to be collected at each moment, and then for its behavior to be quantitatively characterized. The proposed algorithm operates in three main steps: a pre-processing step, a detection and segmentation step, and tracking shape. The pre-processing and segmentation steps allow some limits of the image acquisition system and some visual artifacts (such as shadows and reflections) to be dealt with. The improvements introduced in the tracking step allow the problems corresponding to identity loss and swaps, caused by the interaction between individual flies, to be solved efficiently. Thus, a robust method that compares favorably to other existing methods is obtained. PMID:26258779

  3. Drosophila Models of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Nicole; Wessells, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a useful model for cardiac diseases, both developmental abnormalities and adult functional impairment. Using the tools of both classical and molecular genetics, the study of the developing fly heart has been instrumental in identifying the major signaling events of cardiac field formation, cardiomyocyte specification, and the formation of the functioning heart tube. The larval stage of fly cardiac development has become an important model system for testing isolated preparations of living hearts for the effects of biological and pharmacological compounds on cardiac activity. Meanwhile, the recent development of effective techniques to study adult cardiac performance in the fly has opened new uses for the Drosophila model system. The fly system is now being used to study long-term alterations in adult performance caused by factors such as diet, exercise, and normal aging. The fly is a unique and valuable system for the study of such complex, long-term interactions, as it is the only invertebrate genetic model system with a working heart developmentally homologous to the vertebrate heart. Thus, the fly model combines the advantages of invertebrate genetics (such as large populations, facile molecular genetic techniques, and short lifespan) with physiological measurement techniques that allow meaningful comparisons with data from vertebrate model systems. As such, the fly model is well situated to make important contributions to the understanding of complicated interactions between environmental factors and genetics in the long-term regulation of cardiac performance. PMID:21377627

  4. Drosophila genetics in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Sofer, W; Tompkins, L

    1994-01-01

    Drosophila has long been useful for demonstrating the principles of classical Mendelian genetics in the classroom. In recent years, the organism has also helped students understand biochemical and behavioral genetics. In this connection, this article describes the development of a set of integrated laboratory exercises and descriptive materials--a laboratory module--in biochemical genetics for use by high-school students. The module focuses on the Adh gene and its product, the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme. Among other activities, students using the module get to measure alcohol tolerance and to assay alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Adh-negative and -positive flies. To effectively present the module in the classroom, teachers attend a month-long Dissemination Institute in the summer. During this period, they learn about other research activities that can be adapted for classroom use. One such activity that has proved popular with teachers and students utilizes Drosophila to introduce some of the concepts of behavioral genetics to the high-school student. By establishing closer interactions between high-school educators and research scientists, the gulf between the two communities can begin to be bridged. It is anticipated that the result of a closer relationship will be that the excitement and creativity of science will be more effectively conveyed to students.

  5. Monoamines and sleep in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nall, Aleksandra; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-06-01

    Sleep is an important physiological state, but its function and regulation remain elusive. Drosophila melanogaster is a useful model organism for studying sleep because it has a well-established diurnal activity pattern, including consolidated periods of quiescence that share many characteristics with human sleep. Sleep behavior is regulated by circadian and homeostatic processes and is modulated by environmental and physiological context cues. These cues are communicated to sleep circuits by neurohormones and neuromodulators. A major class of neuromodulators, monoamines, has been found to be essential in various aspects of sleep regulation. Dopamine promotes arousal and sleep-dependent memory formation as well as daily activity. Octopamine, the insect homolog of norepinephrine, promotes wake and may play a role in circadian clock-dependent sleep and arousal. Serotonin promotes sleep and modulates circadian entrainment to light. The different monoamines each signal through multiple receptors in various brain regions in response to different conditions. How these separate circuits integrate their inputs into a single program of behavior is an open field of study for which Drosophila will continue to be a useful model. Monoamine biosynthetic pathways and receptors are conserved between flies and humans, and, thus far, their roles in modulating sleep also appear to be conserved. PMID:24886188

  6. Automated Tracking of Drosophila Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Rubén; Macía-Vázquez, Germán; Zalama, Eduardo; Gómez-García-Bermejo, Jaime; Perán, José-Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster has become a model organism in the study of neurobiology and behavior patterns. The analysis of the way the fly moves and its behavior is of great scientific interest for research on aspects such as drug tolerance, aggression or ageing in humans. In this article, a procedure for detecting, identifying and tracking numerous specimens of Drosophila by means of computer vision-based sensing systems is presented. This procedure allows dynamic information about each specimen to be collected at each moment, and then for its behavior to be quantitatively characterized. The proposed algorithm operates in three main steps: a pre-processing step, a detection and segmentation step, and tracking shape. The pre-processing and segmentation steps allow some limits of the image acquisition system and some visual artifacts (such as shadows and reflections) to be dealt with. The improvements introduced in the tracking step allow the problems corresponding to identity loss and swaps, caused by the interaction between individual flies, to be solved efficiently. Thus, a robust method that compares favorably to other existing methods is obtained. PMID:26258779

  7. Gilgamesh is required for rutabaga-independent olfactory learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ying; Yu, Dinghui; Pletting, Jennifer; Davis, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cyclic AMP signaling in Drosophila mushroom body neurons, anchored by the adenylyl cyclase encoded by the rutabaga gene, is indispensable for olfactory memory formation. From a novel screen for new memory mutants, we identified alleles of the gilgamesh (gish) gene, which encodes a casein kinase Iγ homologue that is preferentially expressed in the mushroom body neurons. The gish-encoded kinase participates in the physiology of these neurons underlying memory formation since the mutant memory deficit was rescued with expression of a gish cDNA in these neurons only during adulthood. A cellular memory trace, detected as increased calcium influx into the α′/β′ neuron processes in response to the odor used for conditioning, was disrupted in gish mutants. Epistasis experiments indicated a lack of genetic interactions between gish and rutabaga. Therefore, gish participates in a rutabaga-independent pathway for memory formation and accounts for some of the residual learning that occurs in rutabaga mutants. PMID:20826312

  8. Gilgamesh is required for rutabaga-independent olfactory learning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Yu, Dinghui; Pletting, Jennifer; Davis, Ronald L

    2010-09-01

    Cyclic AMP signaling in Drosophila mushroom body neurons, anchored by the adenylyl cyclase encoded by the rutabaga gene, is indispensable for olfactory memory formation. From a screen for new memory mutants, we identified alleles of the gilgamesh (gish) gene, which encodes a casein kinase Iγ homolog that is preferentially expressed in the mushroom body neurons. The gish-encoded kinase participates in the physiology of these neurons underlying memory formation since the mutant memory deficit was rescued with expression of a gish cDNA in these neurons only during adulthood. A cellular memory trace, detected as increased calcium influx into the α'/β' neuron processes in response to the odor used for conditioning, was disrupted in gish mutants. Epistasis experiments indicated a lack of genetic interactions between gish and rutabaga. Therefore, gish participates in a rutabaga-independent pathway for memory formation and accounts for some of the residual learning that occurs in rutabaga mutants. PMID:20826312

  9. The bHLH transcription factor Hand is regulated by Alk in the Drosophila embryonic gut

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Palmer, Ruth H. . E-mail: Ruth.Palmer@ucmp.umu.se

    2006-12-29

    During embryonic development the midgut visceral muscle is formed by fusion of cells within the visceral mesoderm, a process initiated by the specification of a specialised cell type, the founder cell, within this tissue. Activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) in the developing visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster initiates a signal transduction pathway required for muscle fusion. In this paper, we have investigated downstream components which are regulated by this novel signalling pathway. Here we show that Alk-mediated signal transduction drives the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Hand in vivo. Loss of Alk function results in a complete lack of Hand expression in this tissue, whereas Alk gain of function results in an expansion of Hand expression. Finally, we have investigated the process of muscle fusion in the gut of Hand mutant animals and can find no obvious defects in this process, suggesting that Hand is not critical for visceral muscle fusion per se.

  10. Rotation of photoreceptor clusters in the developing Drosophila eye requires the nemo gene.

    PubMed

    Choi, K W; Benzer, S

    1994-07-15

    The Drosophila eye consists of a reiterative hexagonal array of photoreceptor cell clusters, the ommatidia. During normal morphogenesis, the clusters in the dorsal or ventral halves of the disc rotate 90 degrees in opposite directions, forming mirror images across a dorsoventral equator. In the mutant nemo (nmo), there is an initial turning of approximately 45 degrees, but further rotation is blocked. Genetic mosaic analysis indicates that the nmo gene acts upon each cluster as a whole; normal nmo function in one or more photoreceptor cells appears to be sufficient to induce full rotation. The nmo gene sequence encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase homolog, suggesting that the kinase is required to initiate the second step of rotation. In another mutant, roulette, excessive rotation through varying angles occurs in many ommatidia. This defect is suppressed by nmo, indicating that nmo acts upstream in a rotation-regulating pathway.

  11. Drosophila PI4KIIIalpha is required in follicle cells for oocyte polarization and Hippo signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Denef, Natalie; Tang, Charm; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2011-01-01

    In a genetic screen we isolated mutations in CG10260, which encodes a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4KIIIalpha), and found that PI4KIIIalpha is required for Hippo signaling in Drosophila ovarian follicle cells. PI4KIIIalpha mutations in the posterior follicle cells lead to oocyte polarization defects similar to those caused by mutations in the Hippo signaling pathway. PI4KIIIalpha mutations also cause misexpression of well-established Hippo signaling targets. The Merlin-Expanded-Kibra complex is required at the apical membrane for Hippo activity. In PI4KIIIalpha mutant follicle cells, Merlin fails to localize to the apical domain. Our analysis of PI4KIIIalpha mutants provides a new link in Hippo signal transduction from the cell membrane to its core kinase cascade. PMID:21429988

  12. Domain Specificity of MAP3K Family Members, MLK and Tak1, for JNK Signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Stronach, Beth; Lennox, Ashley L.; Garlena, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    A highly diverse set of protein kinases functions as early responders in the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase (MAPK/SAPK) signaling pathways. For instance, humans possess 14 MAPK kinase kinases (MAP3Ks) that activate Jun kinase (JNK) signaling downstream. A major challenge is to decipher the selective and redundant functions of these upstream MAP3Ks. Taking advantage of the relative simplicity of Drosophila melanogaster as a model system, we assessed MAP3K signaling specificity in several JNK-dependent processes during development and stress response. Our approach was to generate molecular chimeras between two MAP3K family members, the mixed lineage kinase, Slpr, and the TGF-β activated kinase, Tak1, which share 32% amino acid identity across the kinase domain but otherwise differ in sequence and domain structure, and then test the contributions of various domains for protein localization, complementation of mutants, and activation of signaling. We found that overexpression of the wild-type kinases stimulated JNK signaling in alternate contexts, so cells were capable of responding to both MAP3Ks, but with distinct outcomes. Relative to wild-type, the catalytic domain swaps compensated weakly or not at all, despite having a shared substrate, the JNK kinase Hep. Tak1 C-terminal domain-containing constructs were inhibitory in Tak1 signaling contexts, including tumor necrosis factor-dependent cell death and innate immune signaling; however, depressing antimicrobial gene expression did not necessarily cause phenotypic susceptibility to infection. These same constructs were neutral in the context of Slpr-dependent developmental signaling, reflecting differential subcellular protein localization and by inference, point of activation. Altogether, our findings suggest that the selective deployment of a particular MAP3K can be attributed in part to its inherent sequence differences, cellular localization, and binding partner availability. PMID:24429281

  13. Gene Regulation Networks for Modeling Drosophila Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, E.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila Melanogaster.

  14. Drosophila Cajal bodies: accessories not included

    PubMed Central

    Matera, A. Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear sites of small ribonucleoprotein (RNP) remodeling and maturation. A recent study describes the discovery of the Drosophila Cajal body, revealing some interesting insights into the subnuclear organization of RNA processing machineries among different species. PMID:16533940

  15. Circadian light-input pathways in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Taishi; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Light is the most important environmental cue to entrain the circadian clock in most animals. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the light entrainment mechanisms of the clock have been well-studied. The Drosophila brain contains approximately 150 neurons that rhythmically express circadian clock genes. These neurons are called "clock neurons" and control behavioral activity rhythms. Many clock neurons express the Cryptochrome (CRY) protein, which is sensitive to UV and blue light, and thus enables clock neurons deep in the brain to directly perceive light. In addition to the CRY protein, external photoreceptors in the Drosophila eyes play an important role in circadian light-input pathways. Recent studies have provided new insights into the mechanisms that integrate these light inputs into the circadian network of the brain. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the light entrainment pathways in the Drosophila circadian clock. PMID:27066180

  16. Drosophila RNAi screening in a postgenomic world

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has a long history as a model organism with several unique features that make it an ideal research tool for the study of the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Importantly fundamental genetic principles as well as key human disease genes have been uncovered through the use of Drosophila. The contribution of the fruit fly to science and medicine continues in the postgenomic era as cell-based Drosophila RNAi screens are a cost-effective and scalable enabling technology that can be used to quantify the contribution of different genes to diverse cellular processes. Drosophila high-throughput screens can also be used as integral part of systems-level approaches to describe the architecture and dynamics of cellular networks. PMID:21752787

  17. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  18. Colour vision: parallel pathways intersect in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Almut; Henze, Miriam J

    2013-12-01

    In the last one hundred years, colour vision has been demonstrated in bees and many other insects. But the underlying neural wiring remained elusive. A new study on Drosophila melanogaster combining behavioural and genetic tools yields surprising insights. PMID:24309280

  19. JAK/Stat signaling regulates heart precursor diversification in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Aaron N.; Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Haden, Tom N.; Olson, Eric N.

    2011-01-01

    Intercellular signal transduction pathways regulate the NK-2 family of transcription factors in a conserved gene regulatory network that directs cardiogenesis in both flies and mammals. The Drosophila NK-2 protein Tinman (Tin) was recently shown to regulate Stat92E, the Janus kinase (JAK) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) pathway effector, in the developing mesoderm. To understand whether the JAK/Stat pathway also regulates cardiogenesis, we performed a systematic characterization of JAK/Stat signaling during mesoderm development. Drosophila embryos with mutations in the JAK/Stat ligand upd or in Stat92E have non-functional hearts with luminal defects and inappropriate cell aggregations. Using strong Stat92E loss-of-function alleles, we show that the JAK/Stat pathway regulates tin expression prior to heart precursor cell diversification. tin expression can be subdivided into four phases and, in Stat92E mutant embryos, the broad phase 2 expression pattern in the dorsal mesoderm does not restrict to the constrained phase 3 pattern. These embryos also have an expanded pericardial cell domain. We show the E(spl)-C gene HLHm5 is expressed in a pattern complementary to tin during phase 3 and that this expression is JAK/Stat dependent. In addition, E(spl)-C mutant embryos phenocopy the cardiac defects of Stat92E embryos. Mechanistically, JAK/Stat signals activate E(spl)-C genes to restrict Tin expression and the subsequent expression of the T-box transcription factor H15 to direct heart precursor diversification. This study is the first to characterize a role for the JAK/Stat pathway during cardiogenesis and identifies an autoregulatory circuit in which tin limits its own expression domain. PMID:21965617

  20. Phosphatidylinositol kinase from rabbit reticulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, P.T.; Heng, A.B.W.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase was isolated from the postribosomal supernatant of rabbit reticulocytes. This activity was identified by the formation of a product that comigrated with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) when purified PI was phosphorylated in the presence of (/sup 32/P)ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. Three major peaks of PI kinase activity were resolved by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The first peak eluted at 50-100 mM NaCl together with several serine protein kinases, casein kinase (CK) I and protease activated kinase (PAK) I and II. The PI kinase was subsequently separated from the protein kinases by chromatography on phosphocellulose. The second peak eluted at 125-160 mM NaCl and contained another lipid kinase activity that produced a product which comigrated with phosphatidic acid on thin layer chromatography. The third peak, which eluted at 165-200 mM NaCl, partly comigrated with casein kinase (CK) II and an active protein kinase(s) which phosphorylated mixed histone and histone I. CK II and the histone kinase activities were also separated by chromatography on phosphocelluslose. The different forms of PI kinase were characterized and compared with respect to substrate and salt requirements.

  1. Microbial Protein-tyrosine Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Joseph D.; Wong, Dennis; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2014-01-01

    Microbial ester kinases identified in the past 3 decades came as a surprise, as protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr, and Tyr amino acids was thought to be unique to eukaryotes. Current analysis of available microbial genomes reveals that “eukaryote-like” protein kinases are prevalent in prokaryotes and can converge in the same signaling pathway with the classical microbial “two-component” systems. Most microbial tyrosine kinases lack the “eukaryotic” Hanks domain signature and are designated tyrosine kinases based upon their biochemical activity. These include the tyrosine kinases termed bacterial tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases), which are responsible for the majority of known bacterial tyrosine phosphorylation events. Although termed generally as bacterial tyrosine kinases, BY-kinases can be considered as one family belonging to the superfamily of prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases in bacteria. Other members of this superfamily include atypical “odd” tyrosine kinases with diverse mechanisms of protein phosphorylation and the “eukaryote-like” Hanks-type tyrosine kinases. Here, we discuss the distribution, phylogeny, and function of the various prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases, focusing on the recently discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis PtkA and its relationship with other members of this diverse family of proteins. PMID:24554699

  2. Aging and CaMKII alter intracellular Ca2+ transients and heart rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility.

  3. Functional characterisation of human synaptic genes expressed in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Zografos, Lysimachos; Tang, Joanne; Hesse, Franziska; Wanker, Erich E; Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B; Davies, R Wayne; Armstrong, J Douglas

    2016-05-15

    Drosophila melanogaster is an established and versatile model organism. Here we describe and make available a collection of transgenic Drosophila strains expressing human synaptic genes. The collection can be used to study and characterise human synaptic genes and their interactions and as controls for mutant studies. It was generated in a way that allows the easy addition of new strains, as well as their combination. In order to highlight the potential value of the collection for the characterisation of human synaptic genes we also use two assays, investigating any gain-of-function motor and/or cognitive phenotypes in the strains in this collection. Using these assays we show that among the strains made there are both types of gain-of-function phenotypes investigated. As an example, we focus on the three strains expressing human tyrosine protein kinase Fyn, the small GTPase Rap1a and human Arc, respectively. Of the three, the first shows a cognitive gain-of-function phenotype while the second a motor gain-of-function phenotype. By contrast, Arc, which has no Drosophila ortholog, shows no gain-of-function phenotype.

  4. Functional characterisation of human synaptic genes expressed in the Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Zografos, Lysimachos; Tang, Joanne; Hesse, Franziska; Wanker, Erich E.; Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B.; Davies, R. Wayne; Armstrong, J. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drosophila melanogaster is an established and versatile model organism. Here we describe and make available a collection of transgenic Drosophila strains expressing human synaptic genes. The collection can be used to study and characterise human synaptic genes and their interactions and as controls for mutant studies. It was generated in a way that allows the easy addition of new strains, as well as their combination. In order to highlight the potential value of the collection for the characterisation of human synaptic genes we also use two assays, investigating any gain-of-function motor and/or cognitive phenotypes in the strains in this collection. Using these assays we show that among the strains made there are both types of gain-of-function phenotypes investigated. As an example, we focus on the three strains expressing human tyrosine protein kinase Fyn, the small GTPase Rap1a and human Arc, respectively. Of the three, the first shows a cognitive gain-of-function phenotype while the second a motor gain-of-function phenotype. By contrast, Arc, which has no Drosophila ortholog, shows no gain-of-function phenotype. PMID:27069252

  5. Genetic Dissection of Aversive Associative Olfactory Learning and Memory in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Widmann, Annekathrin; Artinger, Marc; Biesinger, Lukas; Boepple, Kathrin; Schlechter, Jana; Selcho, Mareike; Thum, Andreas S.

    2016-01-01

    Memory formation is a highly complex and dynamic process. It consists of different phases, which depend on various neuronal and molecular mechanisms. In adult Drosophila it was shown that memory formation after aversive Pavlovian conditioning includes—besides other forms—a labile short-term component that consolidates within hours to a longer-lasting memory. Accordingly, memory formation requires the timely controlled action of different neuronal circuits, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and molecules that were initially identified by classical forward genetic approaches. Compared to adult Drosophila, memory formation was only sporadically analyzed at its larval stage. Here we deconstruct the larval mnemonic organization after aversive olfactory conditioning. We show that after odor-high salt conditioning larvae form two parallel memory phases; a short lasting component that depends on cyclic adenosine 3’5’-monophosphate (cAMP) signaling and synapsin gene function. In addition, we show for the first time for Drosophila larvae an anesthesia resistant component, which relies on radish and bruchpilot gene function, protein kinase C activity, requires presynaptic output of mushroom body Kenyon cells and dopamine function. Given the numerical simplicity of the larval nervous system this work offers a unique prospect for studying memory formation of defined specifications, at full-brain scope with single-cell, and single-synapse resolution. PMID:27768692

  6. Invasive and indigenous microbiota impact intestinal stem cell activity through multiple pathways in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Buchon, Nicolas; Broderick, Nichole A.; Chakrabarti, Sveta; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Gut homeostasis is controlled by both immune and developmental mechanisms, and its disruption can lead to inflammatory disorders or cancerous lesions of the intestine. While the impact of bacteria on the mucosal immune system is beginning to be precisely understood, little is known about the effects of bacteria on gut epithelium renewal. Here, we addressed how both infectious and indigenous bacteria modulate stem cell activity in Drosophila. We show that the increased epithelium renewal observed upon some bacterial infections is a consequence of the oxidative burst, a major defense of the Drosophila gut. Additionally, we provide evidence that the JAK–STAT (Janus kinase–signal transducers and activators of transcription) and JNK (c-Jun NH2 terminal kinase) pathways are both required for bacteria-induced stem cell proliferation. Similarly, we demonstrate that indigenous gut microbiota activate the same, albeit reduced, program at basal levels. Altered control of gut microbiota in immune-deficient or aged flies correlates with increased epithelium renewal. Finally, we show that epithelium renewal is an essential component of Drosophila defense against oral bacterial infection. Altogether, these results indicate that gut homeostasis is achieved by a complex interregulation of the immune response, gut microbiota, and stem cell activity. PMID:19797770

  7. Aging and CaMKII Alter Intracellular Ca2+ Transients and Heart Rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A.; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  8. A Drosophila Reporter for the Translational Activation of ATF4 Marks Stressed Cells during Development.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kwonyoon; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Park, Jung-Eun; Yoon, Jee-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved signaling pathways that help to restore cellular homeostasis in response to various physiological or pathological conditions. ATF4 is a transcription factor whose mRNA translation is stimulated in response to stress-activated eIF2alpha kinases. Established conditions that activate eIF2alpha phosphorylation and ATF4 translation include excessive stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and amino acid deprivation. ATF4 is activated through a unique translational activation mechanism that involves multiple upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR), which is conserved from yeast to mammals. Taking advantage of this, we developed a translational activation reporter of ATF4 in Drosophila, in which the dsRed reporter coding sequence was placed downstream of the Drosophila ATF4 5' UTR. This reporter remained inactive in most tissues under normal conditions, but showed dsRed expression when starved, or when challenged with conditions that imposed ER stress. In normally developing flies, a small number of cell types showed reporter expression even without exogenous stress, which included the salivary gland, gut, the male reproductive organ, and the photoreceptor cells, suggestive of inherent stress during the normal development of these cell types. These results establish a new tool to study ATF4-mediated stress response in Drosophila development and disease.

  9. [18F]CFA as a clinically translatable probe for PET imaging of deoxycytidine kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woosuk; Le, Thuc M.; Wei, Liu; Poddar, Soumya; Bazzy, Jimmy; Wang, Xuemeng; Uong, Nhu T.; Abt, Evan R.; Capri, Joseph R.; Austin, Wayne R.; Van Valkenburgh, Juno S.; Steele, Dalton; Gipson, Raymond M.; Slavik, Roger; Cabebe, Anthony E.; Taechariyakul, Thotsophon; Yaghoubi, Shahriar S.; Lee, Jason T.; Sadeghi, Saman; Lavie, Arnon; Faull, Kym F.; Witte, Owen N.; Donahue, Timothy R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Herrmann, Ken; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a rate-limiting enzyme in the cytosolic deoxyribonucleoside (dN) salvage pathway, is an important therapeutic and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging target in cancer. PET probes for dCK have been developed and are effective in mice but have suboptimal specificity and sensitivity in humans. To identify a more suitable probe for clinical dCK PET imaging, we compared the selectivity of two candidate compounds—[18F]Clofarabine; 2-chloro-2′-deoxy-2′-[18F]fluoro-9-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-adenine ([18F]CFA) and 2′-deoxy-2′-[18F]fluoro-9-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-guanine ([18F]F-AraG)—for dCK and deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK), a dCK-related mitochondrial enzyme. We demonstrate that, in the tracer concentration range used for PET imaging, [18F]CFA is primarily a substrate for dCK, with minimal cross-reactivity. In contrast, [18F]F-AraG is a better substrate for dGK than for dCK. [18F]CFA accumulation in leukemia cells correlated with dCK expression and was abrogated by treatment with a dCK inhibitor. Although [18F]CFA uptake was reduced by deoxycytidine (dC) competition, this inhibition required high dC concentrations present in murine, but not human, plasma. Expression of cytidine deaminase, a dC-catabolizing enzyme, in leukemia cells both in cell culture and in mice reduced the competition between dC and [18F]CFA, leading to increased dCK-dependent probe accumulation. First-in-human, to our knowledge, [18F]CFA PET/CT studies showed probe accumulation in tissues with high dCK expression: e.g., hematopoietic bone marrow and secondary lymphoid organs. The selectivity of [18F]CFA for dCK and its favorable biodistribution in humans justify further studies to validate [18F]CFA PET as a new cancer biomarker for treatment stratification and monitoring. PMID:27035974

  10. Unraveling the genetic complexity of Drosophila stardust during photoreceptor morphogenesis and prevention of light-induced degeneration.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandra; Bulgakova, Natalia A; Grawe, Ferdi; Johnson, Kevin; Knust, Elisabeth

    2007-08-01

    Drosophila Stardust, a membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK), recruits the transmembrane protein Crumbs and the cytoplasmic proteins DPATJ and DLin-7 into an apically localized protein scaffold. This evolutionarily conserved complex is required for epithelial cell polarity in Drosophila embryos and mammalian cells in culture. In addition, mutations in Drosophila crumbs and DPATJ impair morphogenesis of photoreceptor cells (PRCs) and result in light-dependent retinal degeneration. Here we show that stardust is a genetically complex locus. While all alleles tested perturb epithelial cell polarity in the embryo, only a subset of them affects morphogenesis of PRCs or induces light-dependent retinal degeneration. Alleles retaining particular postembryonic functions still express some Stardust protein in pupal and/or adult eyes. The phenotypic complexity is reflected by the expression of distinct splice variants at different developmental stages. All proteins expressed in the retina contain the PSD95, Discs Large, ZO-1 (PDZ), Src homology 3 (SH3), and guanylate kinase (GUK) domain, but lack a large region in the N terminus encoded by one exon. These results suggest that Stardust-based protein scaffolds are dynamic, which is not only mediated by multiple interaction partners, but in addition by various forms of the Stardust protein itself.

  11. The emerging normal and disease-related roles of anaplastic lymphoma kinase.

    PubMed

    Pulford, K; Lamant, L; Espinos, E; Jiang, Q; Xue, L; Turturro, F; Delsol, G; Morris, S W

    2004-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase, the normal role of which remains to be completely elucidated. Although work carried out in mammals suggests a function in neural development, results from studies in Drosophila indicate an additional role in visceral muscle differentiation. The aberrant expression of full-length ALK receptor proteins has been reported in neuroblastomas and glioblastomas, while the occurrence of ALK fusion proteins in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) has resulted in the identification of the new tumor entity, ALK-positive ALCL. ALK represents one of few examples of a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in oncogenesis in both haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic tumors, given that ALK fusions also occur in the mesenchymal tumor known as inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). The study of ALK fusion proteins, besides demonstrating their importance in tumor development, has also raised the possibility of new therapeutic treatments for patients with ALK-positive malignancies.

  12. A Drosophila Model for Screening Antiobesity Agents

    PubMed Central

    Men, Tran Thanh; Thanh, Duong Ngoc Van; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Hattori, Gen; Arii, Masayuki; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Kamei, Kaeko

    2016-01-01

    Although triacylglycerol, the major component for lipid storage, is essential for normal physiology, its excessive accumulation causes obesity in adipose tissue and is associated with organ dysfunction in nonadipose tissue. Here, we focused on the Drosophila model to develop therapeutics for preventing obesity. The brummer (bmm) gene in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be homologous with human adipocyte triglyceride lipase, which is related to the regulation of lipid storage. We established a Drosophila model for monitoring bmm expression by introducing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene as a downstream reporter of the bmm promoter. The third-instar larvae of Drosophila showed the GFP signal in all tissues observed and specifically in the salivary gland nucleus. To confirm the relationship between bmm expression and obesity, the effect of oral administration of glucose diets on bmm promoter activity was analyzed. The Drosophila flies given high-glucose diets showed higher lipid contents, indicating the obesity phenotype; this was suggested by a weaker intensity of the GFP signal as well as reduced bmm mRNA expression. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Drosophila model established in this study is useful for screening antiobesity agents. We also report the effects of oral administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors and some vegetables on the bmm promoter activity. PMID:27247940

  13. Saccadic body turns in walking Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Geurten, Bart R. H.; Jähde, Philipp; Corthals, Kristina; Göpfert, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster structures its optic flow during flight by interspersing translational movements with abrupt body rotations. Whether these “body saccades” are accompanied by steering movements of the head is a matter of debate. By tracking single flies moving freely in an arena, we now discovered that walking Drosophila also perform saccades. Movement analysis revealed that the flies separate rotational from translational movements by quickly turning their bodies by 15 degrees within a tenth of a second. Although walking flies moved their heads by up to 20 degrees about their bodies, their heads moved with the bodies during saccadic turns. This saccadic strategy contrasts with the head saccades reported for e.g., blowflies and honeybees, presumably reflecting optical constraints: modeling revealed that head saccades as described for these latter insects would hardly affect the retinal input in Drosophila because of the lower acuity of its compound eye. The absence of head saccades in Drosophila was associated with the absence of haltere oscillations, which seem to guide head movements in other flies. In addition to adding new twists to Drosophila walking behavior, our analysis shows that Drosophila does not turn its head relative to its body when turning during walking. PMID:25386124

  14. Metabolome Analysis of Drosophila melanogaster during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    An, Phan Nguyen Thuy; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster embryo has been widely utilized as a model for genetics and developmental biology due to its small size, short generation time, and large brood size. Information on embryonic metabolism during developmental progression is important for further understanding the mechanisms of Drosophila embryogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the changes in embryos’ metabolome that occur at different stages of the Drosophila embryonic development. Time course samples of Drosophila embryos were subjected to GC/MS-based metabolome analysis for profiling of low molecular weight hydrophilic metabolites, including sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. The results showed that the metabolic profiles of Drosophila embryo varied during the course of development and there was a strong correlation between the metabolome and different embryonic stages. Using the metabolome information, we were able to establish a prediction model for developmental stages of embryos starting from their high-resolution quantitative metabolite composition. Among the important metabolites revealed from our model, we suggest that different amino acids appear to play distinct roles in different developmental stages and an appropriate balance in trehalose-glucose ratio is crucial to supply the carbohydrate source for the development of Drosophila embryo. PMID:25121768

  15. Two retrotransposons maintain telomeres in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pardue, M.-L.; Rashkova, S.; Casacuberta, E.; DeBaryshe, P.G.; George, J. A.; Traverse, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    Telomeres across the genus Drosophila are maintained, not by telomerase, but by two non-LTR retrotransposons, HeT-A and TART, that transpose specifically to chromosome ends. Successive transpositions result in long head-to-tail arrays of these elements. Thus Drosophila telomeres, like those produced by telomerase, consist of repeated sequences reverse transcribed from RNA templates. The Drosophila repeats, complete and 5′-truncated copies of HeT-A and TART, are more complex than telomerase repeats; nevertheless these evolutionary variants have functional similarities to the more common telomeres. Like other telomeres, the Drosophila arrays are dynamic, fluctuating around an average length that can be changed by changes in the genetic background. Several proteins that interact with telomeres in other species have been found to have homologues that interact with Drosophila telomeres. Although they have hallmarks of non-LTR retrotransposons, HeT-A and TART appear to have a special relationship to Drosophila. Their Gag proteins are efficiently transported into diploid nuclei where HeT-A Gag recruits TART Gag to chromosome ends. Gags of other non-LTR elements remain predominantly in the cytoplasm. These studies provide intriguing evolutionary links between telomeres and retrotransposable elements. PMID:16132810

  16. Visualizing autophosphorylation in histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the most widespread regulatory mechanism in signal transduction. Autophosphorylation in a dimeric sensor histidine kinase is the first step in two-component signalling, the predominant signal-transduction device in bacteria. Despite being the most abundant sensor kinases in nature, the molecular bases of the histidine kinase autophosphorylation mechanism are still unknown. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that autophosphorylation can occur in two directions, cis (intrasubunit) or trans (intersubunit) within the dimeric histidine kinase. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete catalytic machinery of a chimeric histidine kinase. The structure shows an asymmetric histidine kinase dimer where one subunit is caught performing the autophosphorylation reaction. A structure-guided functional analysis on HK853 and EnvZ, two prototypical cis- and trans-phosphorylating histidine kinases, has allowed us to decipher the catalytic mechanism of histidine kinase autophosphorylation, which seems to be common independently of the reaction directionality.

  17. Behavioral and antennal responses of spotted wing drosophila, drosophila suzukii, to volatiles from fruit extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Native to Southeast Asia, the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, has become a serious pest of soft-skinned fruit crops since its introduction into North America and Europe in 2008. Current monitoring strategies use baits based on fermentation products; however, to date, no fruit-based vola...

  18. Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura)(Diptera: drosophilidae), trapped with combinations of wines and vinegars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field trapping experiments evaluated wine and vinegar baits for spotted wing drosophila flies, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), and assessed variance in biat attractiveness with wit type, vinegar type, and bait age. A mixture of apple cider vinegar and a Merlot wine attracted more flies than a mixtur...

  19. Invasion biology of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii): a global perspective and future priorities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian vinegar fly species Drosophila suzukii (spotted-wing Drosophila or SWD) has emerged as an important invasive insect pest of small and stone fruits in both the Americas and Europe since the late 2000’s. While research efforts have rapidly progressed in Asia, North America, and Europe over ...

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Linn, Anning

    1996-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK.

  1. Plant 5-Methylthioribose Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, Andrzej

    1983-01-01

    Activity of 5-methylthioribose kinase, the enzyme which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of 1-phospho-5-methylthioribose, has been revealed in the extracts from various higher plant species. Almost 2,000-fold-purified enzyme has been obtained from yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L. cv Topaz) seed extract. Molecular weight of the native enzyme is 70,000 as judged by gel filtration. The lupin 5-methylthioribose kinase exhibits a strict requirement for divalent metal ions. Among the ions tested, only Mg2+ and Mn2+ acted as cofactors. The curve of kinase initial velocity versus pH reaches plateau at pH 10 to 10.5. The Km values calculated for 5-methylthioribose and ATP are 4.3 and 8.3 micromolar, respectively. Among nucleoside triphosphates tested as potential phosphate donors, only dATP could substitute in the reaction for ATP. 5-Isobutylthioribose, an analog of 5-methylthioribose, proved to be the γ-ATP-phosphate acceptor, too. The compound inhibits competitively synthesis of 1-phospho-5-methylthioribose (Ki = 1.4 micromolar). Lupin 5-methylthioribose kinase is completely and irreversibly inhibited by the antisulfhydryl reagent, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. As in bacteria (Ferro, Barrett, Shapiro 1978 J Biol Chem 253: 6021-6025), the enzyme may be involved in a new, alternative pathway of methionine synthesis in plant tissues. PMID:16662931

  2. Drosophila Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bingwei; Vogel, Hannes

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect specific cellular populations in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although most cases are sporadic, genes associated with familial cases have been identified, thus enabling the development of animal models. Invertebrates such as Drosophila have recently emerged as model systems for studying mechanisms of neurodegeneration in several major neurodegenerative diseases. These models are also excellent in vivo systems for the testing of therapeutic compounds. Genetic studies using these animal models have provided novel insights into the disease process. We anticipate that further exploration of the animal models will further our understanding of mechanisms of neurodegeneration as well as facilitate the development of rational treatments for debilitating degenerative diseases. PMID:18842101

  3. Imaginal Disc Transplantation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Tomonori; Paro, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Since Ephrussi and Beadle introduced imaginal disc transplantation to Drosophila research in 1936, the method played an important part towards a better understanding of disc patterning, tissue regeneration, and reprogramming phenomena like transdetermination. Despite increasing usage of high-throughput approaches towards solving biological problems this classical manual method is still in use for studying disc development in a semi-physiological context. Here we describe in detail a protocol and provide recommendations on the procedure in particular for analyzing the regenerative potential of imaginal disks. The steps consist of disc dissection and fragmentation, transplantation into the larval or adult abdomen, and the recovery of implants from the host abdomen. Additionally, we also describe how to make the special transplantation needle from a glass capillary. PMID:27659995

  4. Molecular neurobiology of Drosophila taste

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Erica Gene; Dahanukar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila is a powerful model in which to study the molecular and cellular basis of taste coding. Flies sense tastants via populations of taste neurons that are activated by compounds of distinct categories. The past few years have borne witness to studies that define the properties of taste neurons, identifying functionally distinct classes of sweet and bitter taste neurons that express unique subsets of gustatory receptor (Gr) genes, as well as water, salt, and pheromone sensing neurons that express members of the pickpocket (ppk) or ionotropic receptor (Ir) families. There has also been significant progress in terms of understanding how tastant information is processed and conveyed to higher brain centers, and modulated by prior dietary experience or starvation. PMID:26102453

  5. Drosophila as a Model for Intractable Epilepsy: Gilgamesh Suppresses Seizures in parabss1 Heterozygote Flies

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Iris C.; Rusan, Zeid M.; Parker, Louise; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Intractable epilepsies, that is, seizure disorders that do not respond to currently available therapies, are difficult, often tragic, neurological disorders. Na+ channelopathies have been implicated in some intractable epilepsies, including Dravet syndrome (Dravet 1978), but little progress has been forthcoming in therapeutics. Here we examine a Drosophila model for intractable epilepsy, the Na+ channel gain-of-function mutant parabss1 that resembles Dravet syndrome in some aspects (parker et al. 2011a). In particular, we identify second-site mutations that interact with parabss1, seizure enhancers, and seizure suppressors. We describe one seizure-enhancer mutation named charlatan (chn). The chn gene normally encodes an Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor/RE1-Silencing Transcription factor transcriptional repressor of neuronal-specific genes. We identify a second-site seizure-suppressor mutation, gilgamesh (gish), that reduces the severity of several seizure-like phenotypes of parabss1/+ heterozygotes. The gish gene normally encodes the Drosophila ortholog of casein kinase CK1g3, a member of the CK1 family of serine-threonine kinases. We suggest that CK1g3 is an unexpected but promising new target for seizure therapeutics. PMID:23797108

  6. ATM is required for telomere maintenance and chromosome stability during Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elizabeth; Tiong, Stanley; Pedersen, Michael; Homola, Ellen; Royou, Anne; Fasulo, Barbara; Siriaco, Giorgia; Campbell, Shelagh D

    2004-08-10

    ATM is a large, multifunctional protein kinase that regulates responses required for surviving DNA damage: including DNA repair, apoptosis, and cell cycle checkpoints. Here, we show that Drosophila ATM function is essential for normal adult development. Extensive, inappropriate apoptosis occurs in proliferating atm mutant tissues, and in clonally derived atm mutant embryos, frequent mitotic defects were seen. At a cellular level, spontaneous telomere fusions and other chromosomal abnormalities are common in atm larval neuroblasts, suggesting a conserved and essential role for dATM in the maintenance of normal telomeres and chromosome stability. Evidence from other systems supports the idea that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair functions of ATM kinases promote telomere maintenance by inhibition of illegitimate recombination or fusion events between the legitimate ends of chromosomes and spontaneous DSBs. Drosophila will be an excellent model system for investigating how these ATM-dependent chromosome structural maintenance functions are deployed during development. Because neurons appear to be particularly sensitive to loss of ATM in both flies and humans, this system should be particularly useful for identifying cell-specific factors that influence sensitivity to loss of dATM and are relevant for understanding the human disease, ataxia-telangiectasia.

  7. Phenotypic analysis of separation-of-function alleles of MEI-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR.

    PubMed Central

    Laurençon, Anne; Purdy, Amanda; Sekelsky, Jeff; Hawley, R Scott; Su, Tin Tin

    2003-01-01

    ATM/ATR kinases act as signal transducers in eukaryotic DNA damage and replication checkpoints. Mutations in ATM/ATR homologs have pleiotropic effects that range from sterility to increased killing by genotoxins in humans, mice, and Drosophila. Here we report the generation of a null allele of mei-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR homolog, and the use of it to document a semidominant effect on a larval mitotic checkpoint and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) sensitivity. We also tested the role of mei-41 in a recently characterized checkpoint that delays metaphase/anaphase transition after DNA damage in cellular embryos. We then compare five existing mei-41 alleles to the null with respect to known phenotypes (female sterility, cell cycle checkpoints, and MMS resistance). We find that not all phenotypes are affected equally by each allele, i.e., the functions of MEI-41 in ensuring fertility, cell cycle regulation, and resistance to genotoxins are genetically separable. We propose that MEI-41 acts not in a single rigid signal transduction pathway, but in multiple molecular contexts to carry out its many functions. Sequence analysis identified mutations, which, for most alleles, fall in the poorly characterized region outside the kinase domain; this allowed us to tentatively identify additional functional domains of MEI-41 that could be subjected to future structure-function studies of this key molecule. PMID:12807779

  8. A Maternal Screen for Genes Regulating Drosophila Oocyte Polarity Uncovers New Steps in Meiotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Vitor; Kimm, Naomi; Lehmann, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Meiotic checkpoints monitor chromosome status to ensure correct homologous recombination, genomic integrity, and chromosome segregation. In Drosophila, the persistent presence of double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) activates the ATR/Mei-41 checkpoint, delays progression through meiosis, and causes defects in DNA condensation of the oocyte nucleus, the karyosome. Checkpoint activation has also been linked to decreased levels of the TGFα-like molecule Gurken, which controls normal eggshell patterning. We used this easy-to-score eggshell phenotype in a germ-line mosaic screen in Drosophila to identify new genes affecting meiotic progression, DNA condensation, and Gurken signaling. One hundred eighteen new ventralizing mutants on the second chromosome fell into 17 complementation groups. Here we describe the analysis of 8 complementation groups, including Kinesin heavy chain, the SR protein kinase cuaba, the cohesin-related gene dPds5/cohiba, and the Tudor-domain gene montecristo. Our findings challenge the hypothesis that checkpoint activation upon persistent DSBs is exclusively mediated by ATR/Mei-41 kinase and instead reveal a more complex network of interactions that link DSB formation, checkpoint activation, meiotic delay, DNA condensation, and Gurken protein synthesis. PMID:17507684

  9. Combinatorial signaling codes for the progressive determination of cell fates in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Carmena, A; Gisselbrecht, S; Harrison, J; Jiménez, F; Michelson, A M

    1998-12-15

    Mesodermal progenitors arise in the Drosophila embryo from discrete clusters of lethal of scute (l'sc)-expressing cells. Using both genetic loss-of-function and targeted ectopic expression approaches, we demonstrate here that individual progenitors are specified by the sequential deployment of unique combinations of intercellular signals. Initially, the intersection between the Wingless (Wg) and Decapentaplegic (Dpp) expression domains demarcate an ectodermal prepattern that is imprinted on the adjacent mesoderm in the form of a L'sc precluster. All mesodermal cells within this precluster are competent to respond to a subsequent instructive signal mediated by two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), the Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (DER) and the Heartless (Htl) fibroblast growth factor receptor. By monitoring the expression of the diphosphorylated form of mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK), we found that these RTKs are activated in small clusters of cells within the original competence domain. Each cluster represents an equivalence group because all members initially resemble progenitors in their expression of both L'sc and mesodermal identity genes. Thus, localized RTK activity induces the formation of mesodermal equivalence groups. The RTKs remain active in the single progenitor that emerges from each cluster under the subsequent inhibitory influence of the neurogenic genes. Moreover, DER and Htl are differentially involved in the specification of particular progenitors. We conclude that distinct cellular identity codes are generated by the combinatorial activities of Wg, Dpp, EGF, and FGF signals in the progressive determination of embryonic mesodermal cells.

  10. The HIV-1 Vpu protein induces apoptosis in Drosophila via activation of JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Christelle; Vinatier, Gérald; Sanial, Matthieu; Plessis, Anne; Pret, Anne-Marie; Limbourg-Bouchon, Bernadette; Théodore, Laurent; Netter, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    The genome of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes the canonical retroviral proteins, as well as additional accessory proteins that enhance the expression of viral genes, the infectivity of the virus and the production of virions. The accessory Viral Protein U (Vpu), in particular, enhances viral particle production, while also promoting apoptosis of HIV-infected human T lymphocytes. Some Vpu effects rely on its interaction with the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system, but the mechanisms responsible for its pro-apoptotic effects in vivo are complex and remain largely to be elucidated.We took advantage of the Drosophila model to study the effects of Vpu activity in vivo. Expression of Vpu in the developing Drosophila wing provoked tissue loss due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, Vpu induced expression of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper, known to down-regulate Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) which are caspase-antagonizing E3 ubiquitin ligases. Indeed, Vpu also reduced accumulation of Drosophila IAP1 (DIAP1). Though our results demonstrate a physical interaction between Vpu and the proteasome-addressing SLIMB/β-TrCP protein, as in mammals, both SLIMB/βTrCP-dependent and -independent Vpu effects were observed in the Drosophila wing. Lastly, the pro-apoptotic effect of Vpu in this tissue was abrogated upon inactivation of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway. Our results in the fly thus provide the first functional evidence linking Vpu pro-apoptotic effects to activation of the conserved JNK pathway.

  11. Resources for Biological Annotation of the Drosophila Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald M. Rubin

    2005-08-08

    This project supported seed money for the development of cDNA and genetic resources to support studies of the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Key publications supported by this work that provide additional detail: (1) ''The Drosophila gene collection: identification of putative full-length cDNAs for 70% of D. melanogaster genes''; and (2) ''The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project gene disruption project: Single P-element insertions mutating 25% of vital Drosophila genes''.

  12. The BTB/POZ-ZF Transcription Factor dPLZF Is Involved in Ras/ERK Signaling During Drosophila Wing Development

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Oky; Son, Wonseok; Chung, Jongkyeong; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Lee, Young-Ha; Yoo, Ook-Joon; Cha, Guang-Ho; Paik, Sang-Gi

    2012-01-01

    In Drosophila, broad complex, tramtrack, bric à brac (BTB)/ poxvirus and zinc finger (POZ) transcription factors are essential regulators of development. We searched the Drosophila genome for BTB/POZ-ZF domains and discovered an unknown Drosophila gene, dPLZF, which encodes an orthologue of human PLZF. We then characterized the biological function of the dPLZF via genetic interaction analysis. Ectopic expression of dPLZF in the wing induced extra vein formation during wing development in Drosophila. Genetic interactions between dPLZF and Ras or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly enhanced the formation of vein cells. On the other hand, loss-of-function mutations in dPLZF resulted in a dramatic suppression of the extra and ectopic vein formation induced by elevated Ras/ERK signaling. Moreover, dPLZF activity upregulated the expression of rhomboid (rho) and spitz, which perform crucial functions in vein cell formation in the developing wing. These results indicate that dPLZF is a transcription factor controlled by the Ras/ERK signaling pathway, which is a prominent regulator of vein cell formation during wing development in Drosophila. PMID:22544070

  13. Enhancing Undergraduate Teaching and Research with a "Drosophila" Virginizing System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venema, Dennis R.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory exercises using "Drosophila" crosses are an effective pedagogical method to complement traditional lecture and textbook presentations of genetics. Undergraduate thesis research is another common setting for using "Drosophila." A significant barrier to using "Drosophila" for undergraduate teaching or research is the time and skill…

  14. Happyhour, a Ste20 family kinase, implicates EGFR signaling in ethanol-induced behaviors.

    PubMed

    Corl, Ammon B; Berger, Karen H; Ophir-Shohat, Galit; Gesch, Julie; Simms, Jeffrey A; Bartlett, Selena E; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2009-05-29

    The consequences of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are devastating to individuals and society, yet few treatments are currently available. To identify genes regulating the behavioral effects of ethanol, we conducted a genetic screen in Drosophila and identified a mutant, happyhour (hppy), due to its increased resistance to the sedative effects of ethanol. Hppy protein shows strong homology to mammalian Ste20 family kinases of the GCK-1 subfamily. Genetic and biochemical experiments revealed that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-signaling pathway regulates ethanol sensitivity in Drosophila and that Hppy functions as an inhibitor of the pathway. Acute pharmacological inhibition of the EGF receptor (EGFR) in adult animals altered acute ethanol sensitivity in both flies and mice and reduced ethanol consumption in a preclinical rat model of alcoholism. Inhibitors of the EGFR or components of its signaling pathway are thus potential pharmacotherapies for AUDs.

  15. Identification of Mob2, a novel regulator of larval neuromuscular junction morphology, in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Megan; Ganetzky, Barry

    2013-11-01

    Although evolutionary changes must take place in neural connectivity and synaptic architecture as nervous systems become more complex, we lack understanding of the general principles and specific mechanisms by which these changes occur. Previously, we found that morphology of the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) varies extensively among different species of Drosophila but is relatively conserved within a species. To identify specific genes as candidates that might underlie phenotypic differences in NMJ morphology among Drosophila species, we performed a genetic analysis on one of two phenotypic variants we found among 20 natural isolates of Drosophila melanogaster. We discovered genetic polymorphisms for both positive and negative regulators of NMJ growth segregating within the variant line. Focusing on one subline, that displayed NMJ overgrowth, we mapped the phenotype to Mob2 [Monopolar spindle (Mps) one binding protein 2)], a gene encoding a Nuclear Dbf2 (Dumbbell formation 2)-Related (NDR) kinase activator. We confirmed this identification by transformation rescue experiments and showed that presynaptic expression of Mob2 is necessary and sufficient to regulate NMJ growth. Mob2 interacts in a dominant, dose-dependent manner with tricornered but not with warts, to cause NMJ overgrowth, suggesting that Mob2 specifically functions in combination with the former NDR kinase to regulate NMJ development. These results demonstrate the feasibility and utility of identifying genetic variants affecting NMJ morphology in natural populations of Drosophila. These variants can lead to discovery of new genes and molecular mechanisms that regulate NMJ development while also providing new information that can advance our understanding of mechanisms that underlie nervous system evolution. PMID:23979583

  16. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  17. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  18. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  19. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  1. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  2. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  3. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  4. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  6. Environmental ethanol as an ecological constraint on dietary breadth of Spotted-Wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Mat. (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted-wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is a recent fruit pest of the Americas whose destructiveness stems from its subcutaneous insertion of eggs into cultivated berries via a female’s prominent double bladed and serrated ovipositor. Atypical of most other Drosophila, D. suzukii adults a...

  7. Drosophila melanogaster in the Study of Human Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Human neurodegenerative diseases are devastating illnesses that predominantly affect elderly people. The majority of the diseases are associated with pathogenic oligomers from misfolded proteins, eventually causing the formation of aggregates and the progressive loss of neurons in the brain and nervous system. Several of these proteinopathies are sporadic and the cause of pathogenesis remains elusive. Heritable forms are associated with genetic defects, suggesting that the affected protein is causally related to disease formation and/or progression. The limitations of human genetics, however, make it necessary to use model systems to analyse affected genes and pathways in more detail. During the last two decades, research using the genetically amenable fruitfly has established Drosophila melanogaster as a valuable model system in the study of human neurodegeneration. These studies offer reliable models for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and motor neuron diseases, as well as models for trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases, including ataxias and Huntington’s disease. As a result of these studies, several signalling pathways including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and target of rapamycin (TOR), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling, have been shown to be deregulated in models of proteinopathies, suggesting that two or more initiating events may trigger disease formation in an age-related manner. Moreover, these studies also demonstrate that the fruitfly can be used to screen chemical compounds for their potential to prevent or ameliorate the disease, which in turn can directly guide clinical research and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20522007

  8. Integrin adhesions suppress syncytium formation in the Drosophila larval epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Antunes, Marco; Anderson, Aimee E.; Kadrmas, Julie L.; Jacinto, Antonio; Galko, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Integrins are critical for barrier epithelial architecture. Integrin loss in vertebrate skin leads to blistering and wound healing defects. However, how Integrins and associated proteins maintain the regular morphology of epithelia is not well understood. We found that targeted knockdown of the integrin focal adhesion (FA) complex components βIntegrin, PINCH, and Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), caused formation of multinucleate epidermal cells within the Drosophila larval epidermis. This phenotype was specific to the Integrin FA complex and not due to secondary effects on polarity or junctional structures. The multinucleate cells resembled the syncytia caused by physical wounding. Live imaging of wound-induced syncytium formation in the pupal epidermis suggested direct membrane breakdown leading to cell-cell fusion and consequent mixing of cytoplasmic contents. Activation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which occurs upon wounding, also correlated with syncytium formation induced by PINCH knockdown. Further, ectopic JNK activation directly caused epidermal syncytium formation. No mode of syncytium formation including that induced by wounding, genetic loss-of FA-proteins, or local JNK hyperactivation, involved misregulation of mitosis or apoptosis. Finally, the mechanism of epidermal syncytium formation following JNK hyperactivation and wounding appeared to be direct disassembly of FA complexes. In conclusion, the loss of function phenotype of Integrin FA components in the larval epidermis resembles a wound. Integrin FA loss in mouse and human skin also causes a wound-like appearance. Our results reveal a novel and unexpected role for proper Integrin-based adhesion in suppressing larval epidermal cell-cell fusion– a role that may be conserved in other epithelia. PMID:26255846

  9. Drosophila melanogaster in the study of human neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Human neurodegenerative diseases are devastating illnesses that predominantly affect elderly people. The majority of the diseases are associated with pathogenic oligomers from misfolded proteins, eventually causing the formation of aggregates and the progressive loss of neurons in the brain and nervous system. Several of these proteinopathies are sporadic and the cause of pathogenesis remains elusive. Heritable forms are associated with genetic defects, suggesting that the affected protein is causally related to disease formation and/or progression. The limitations of human genetics, however, make it necessary to use model systems to analyse affected genes and pathways in more detail. During the last two decades, research using the genetically amenable fruitfly has established Drosophila melanogaster as a valuable model system in the study of human neurodegeneration. These studies offer reliable models for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and motor neuron diseases, as well as models for trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases, including ataxias and Huntington's disease. As a result of these studies, several signalling pathways including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and target of rapamycin (TOR), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling, have been shown to be deregulated in models of proteinopathies, suggesting that two or more initiating events may trigger disease formation in an age-related manner. Moreover, these studies also demonstrate that the fruitfly can be used to screen chemical compounds for their potential to prevent or ameliorate the disease, which in turn can directly guide clinical research and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Integrin Adhesions Suppress Syncytium Formation in the Drosophila Larval Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Antunes, Marco; Anderson, Aimee E; Kadrmas, Julie L; Jacinto, Antonio; Galko, Michael J

    2015-08-31

    Integrins are critical for barrier epithelial architecture. Integrin loss in vertebrate skin leads to blistering and wound healing defects. However, how integrins and associated proteins maintain the regular morphology of epithelia is not well understood. We found that targeted knockdown of the integrin focal adhesion (FA) complex components β-integrin, PINCH, and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) caused formation of multinucleate epidermal cells within the Drosophila larval epidermis. This phenotype was specific to the integrin FA complex and not due to secondary effects on polarity or junctional structures. The multinucleate cells resembled the syncytia caused by physical wounding. Live imaging of wound-induced syncytium formation in the pupal epidermis suggested direct membrane breakdown leading to cell-cell fusion and consequent mixing of cytoplasmic contents. Activation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which occurs upon wounding, also correlated with syncytium formation induced by PINCH knockdown. Further, ectopic JNK activation directly caused epidermal syncytium formation. No mode of syncytium formation, including that induced by wounding, genetic loss of FA proteins, or local JNK hyperactivation, involved misregulation of mitosis or apoptosis. Finally, the mechanism of epidermal syncytium formation following JNK hyperactivation and wounding appeared to be direct disassembly of FA complexes. In conclusion, the loss-of-function phenotype of integrin FA components in the larval epidermis resembles a wound. Integrin FA loss in mouse and human skin also causes a wound-like appearance. Our results reveal a novel and unexpected role for proper integrin-based adhesion in suppressing larval epidermal cell-cell fusion--a role that may be conserved in other epithelia.

  11. In vivo tracking of phosphoinositides in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, Roger C.; Liu, Che-Hsiung; Randall, Alexander S.; Sengupta, Sukanya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to monitor phosphoinositide turnover during phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated Drosophila phototransduction, fluorescently tagged lipid probes were expressed in photoreceptors and imaged both in dissociated cells, and in eyes of intact living flies. Of six probes tested, TbR332H (a mutant of the Tubby protein pleckstrin homology domain) was judged the best reporter for phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], and the P4M domain from Legionella SidM for phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P). Using accurately calibrated illumination, we found that only ∼50% of PtdIns(4,5)P2 and very little PtdIns4P were depleted by full daylight intensities in wild-type flies, but both were severely depleted by ∼100-fold dimmer intensities in mutants lacking Ca2+-permeable transient receptor potential (TRP) channels or protein kinase C (PKC). Resynthesis of PtdIns4P (t½ ∼12 s) was faster than PtdIns(4,5)P2 (t½ ∼40 s), but both were greatly slowed in mutants of DAG kinase (rdgA) or PtdIns transfer protein (rdgB). The results indicate that Ca2+- and PKC-dependent inhibition of PLC is required for enabling photoreceptors to maintain phosphoinositide levels despite high rates of hydrolysis by PLC, and suggest that phosphorylation of PtdIns4P to PtdIns(4,5)P2 is the rate-limiting step of the cycle. PMID:26483384

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Malumbres, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  13. 31 Flavors of Drosophila Rab proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Schulze, Karen L.; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Suyama, Kaye; Wang, Stream; Fish, Matthew; Acar, Melih; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, HugoJ.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2007-04-03

    Rab proteins are small GTPases that play important roles intransport of vesicle cargo and recruitment, association of motor andother proteins with vesicles, and docking and fusion of vesicles atdefined locations. In vertebrates, more than 75 Rab genes have beenidentified, some of which have been intensively studied for their rolesin endosome and synaptic vesicle trafficking. Recent studies of thefunctions of certain Rab proteins have revealed specific roles inmediating developmental signal transduction. We have begun a systematicgenetic study of the 33 Rab genes in Drosophila. Most of the fly proteinsare clearly related to specific vertebrate proteins. We report here thecreation of a set of transgenic fly lines that allow spatially andtemporally regulated expression of Drosophila Rab proteins. We generatedfluorescent protein-tagged wild-type, dominant-negative, andconstitutively active forms of 31 Drosophila Rab proteins. We describeDrosophila Rab expression patterns during embryogenesis, the subcellularlocalization of some Rab proteins, and comparisons of the localization ofwild-type, dominant-negative, and constitutively active forms of selectedRab proteins. The high evolutionary conservation and low redundancy ofDrosophila Rab proteins make these transgenic lines a useful toolkit forinvestigating Rab functions in vivo.

  14. Gut-associated microbes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Nichole; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in using Drosophila melanogaster to elucidate mechanisms that underlie the complex relationships between a host and its microbiota. In addition to the many genetic resources and tools Drosophila provides, its associated microbiota is relatively simple (1–30 taxa), in contrast to the complex diversity associated with vertebrates (> 500 taxa). These attributes highlight the potential of this system to dissect the complex cellular and molecular interactions that occur between a host and its microbiota. In this review, we summarize what is known regarding the composition of gut-associated microbes of Drosophila and their impact on host physiology. We also discuss these interactions in the context of their natural history and ecology and describe some recent insights into mechanisms by which Drosophila and its gut microbiota interact. “Workers with Drosophila have been considered fortunate in that they deal with the first multicellular invertebrate to be cultured monoxenically (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910); the first to be handled axenically on a semisynthetic diet (Guyenot, 1917); and the first to be grown on a defined diet (Schultz et al., 1946). This list of advantages is somewhat embarrassing, since it implies an interest in nutrition that, in reality, was only secondary. The very first studies were concerned with the reduction of variability in genetic experiments (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910) and standardization of the nutritional environment.” -James Sang, 1959 Ann NY Acad 1 PMID:22572876

  15. Phosphorylation of the RNA-binding protein Dazl by MAPKAP kinase 2 regulates spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Patrick A.; Krug, Michael S.; McMillan, Emily A.; Peake, Jasmine D.; Davis, Tara L.; Cocklin, Simon; Strochlic, Todd I.

    2016-01-01

    Developing male germ cells are exquisitely sensitive to environmental insults such as heat and oxidative stress. An additional characteristic of these cells is their unique dependence on RNA-binding proteins for regulating posttranscriptional gene expression and translational control. Here we provide a mechanistic link unifying these two features. We show that the germ cell–specific RNA-binding protein deleted in azoospermia-like (Dazl) is phosphorylated by MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2), a stress-induced protein kinase activated downstream of p38 MAPK. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of Dazl by MK2 on an evolutionarily conserved serine residue inhibits its interaction with poly(A)-binding protein, resulting in reduced translation of Dazl-regulated target RNAs. We further show that transgenic expression of wild-type human Dazl but not a phosphomimetic form in the Drosophila male germline can restore fertility to flies deficient in boule, the Drosophila orthologue of human Dazl. These results illuminate a novel role for MK2 in spermatogenesis, expand the repertoire of RNA-binding proteins phosphorylated by this kinase, and suggest that signaling by the p38-MK2 pathway is a negative regulator of spermatogenesis via phosphorylation of Dazl. PMID:27280388

  16. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  17. Natural polymorphism affecting learning and memory in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mery, Frederic; Belay, Amsale T; So, Anthony K-C; Sokolowski, Marla B; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2007-08-01

    Knowing which genes contribute to natural variation in learning and memory would help us understand how differences in these cognitive traits evolve among populations and species. We show that a natural polymorphism at the foraging (for) locus, which encodes a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), affects associative olfactory learning in Drosophila melanogaster. In an assay that tests the ability to associate an odor with mechanical shock, flies homozygous for one natural allelic variant of this gene (forR) showed better short-term but poorer long-term memory than flies homozygous for another natural allele (fors). The fors allele is characterized by reduced PKG activity. We showed that forR-like levels of both short-term learning and long-term memory can be induced in fors flies by selectively increasing the level of PKG in the mushroom bodies, which are centers of olfactory learning in the fly brain. Thus, the natural polymorphism at for may mediate an evolutionary tradeoff between short- and long-term memory. The respective strengths of learning performance of the two genotypes seem coadapted with their effects on foraging behavior: forR flies move more between food patches and so could particularly benefit from fast learning, whereas fors flies are more sedentary, which should favor good long-term memory.

  18. GLAD: an Online Database of Gene List Annotation for Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanhui; Comjean, Aram; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Perrimon, Norbert; Mohr, Stephanie E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a resource of high quality lists of functionally related Drosophila genes, e.g. based on protein domains (kinases, transcription factors, etc.) or cellular function (e.g. autophagy, signal transduction). To establish these lists, we relied on different inputs, including curation from databases or the literature and mapping from other species. Moreover, as an added curation and quality control step, we asked experts in relevant fields to review many of the lists. The resource is available online for scientists to search and view, and is editable based on community input. Annotation of gene groups is an ongoing effort and scientific need will typically drive decisions regarding which gene lists to pursue. We anticipate that the number of lists will increase over time; that the composition of some lists will grow and/or change over time as new information becomes available; and that the lists will benefit the scientific community, e.g. at experimental design and data analysis stages. Based on this, we present an easily updatable online database, available at www.flyrnai.org/glad, at which gene group lists can be viewed, searched and downloaded. PMID:26157507

  19. Antagonistic functions of two stardust isoforms in Drosophila photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Bulgakova, Natalia A; Rentsch, Michaela; Knust, Elisabeth

    2010-11-15

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are scaffolding proteins that organize supramolecular protein complexes, thereby partitioning the plasma membrane into spatially and functionally distinct subdomains. Their modular organization is ideally suited to organize protein complexes with cell type- or stage-specific composition, or both. Often more than one MAGUK isoform is expressed by one gene in the same cell, yet very little is known about their individual in vivo functions. Here, we show that two isoforms of Drosophila stardust, Sdt-H (formerly called Sdt-B2) and Sdt-D, which differ in their N terminus, are expressed in adult photoreceptors. Both isoforms associate with Crumbs and PATJ, constituents of the conserved Crumbs-Stardust complex. However, they form distinct complexes, localized at the stalk, a restricted region of the apical plasma membrane. Strikingly, Sdt-H and Sdt-D have antagonistic functions. While Sdt-H overexpression increases stalk membrane length and prevents light-dependent retinal degeneration, Sdt-D overexpression reduces stalk length and enhances light-dependent retinal degeneration. These results suggest that a fine-tuned balance of different Crumbs complexes regulates photoreceptor homeostasis.

  20. Antagonistic Functions of Two Stardust Isoforms in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bulgakova, Natalia A.; Rentsch, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are scaffolding proteins that organize supramolecular protein complexes, thereby partitioning the plasma membrane into spatially and functionally distinct subdomains. Their modular organization is ideally suited to organize protein complexes with cell type- or stage-specific composition, or both. Often more than one MAGUK isoform is expressed by one gene in the same cell, yet very little is known about their individual in vivo functions. Here, we show that two isoforms of Drosophila stardust, Sdt-H (formerly called Sdt-B2) and Sdt-D, which differ in their N terminus, are expressed in adult photoreceptors. Both isoforms associate with Crumbs and PATJ, constituents of the conserved Crumbs–Stardust complex. However, they form distinct complexes, localized at the stalk, a restricted region of the apical plasma membrane. Strikingly, Sdt-H and Sdt-D have antagonistic functions. While Sdt-H overexpression increases stalk membrane length and prevents light-dependent retinal degeneration, Sdt-D overexpression reduces stalk length and enhances light-dependent retinal degeneration. These results suggest that a fine-tuned balance of different Crumbs complexes regulates photoreceptor homeostasis. PMID:20861315

  1. The Hippo pathway regulates hematopoiesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Milton, Claire C; Grusche, Felix A; Degoutin, Joffrey L; Yu, Eefang; Dai, Qi; Lai, Eric C; Harvey, Kieran F

    2014-11-17

    The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (Hippo) pathway is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ growth and cell fate. It performs these functions in epithelial and neural tissues of both insects and mammals, as well as in mammalian organs such as the liver and heart. Despite rapid advances in Hippo pathway research, a definitive role for this pathway in hematopoiesis has remained enigmatic. The hematopoietic compartments of Drosophila melanogaster and mammals possess several conserved features. D. melanogaster possess three types of hematopoietic cells that most closely resemble mammalian myeloid cells: plasmatocytes (macrophage-like cells), crystal cells (involved in wound healing), and lamellocytes (which encapsulate parasites). The proteins that control differentiation of these cells also control important blood lineage decisions in mammals. Here, we define the Hippo pathway as a key mediator of hematopoiesis by showing that it controls differentiation and proliferation of the two major types of D. melanogaster blood cells, plasmatocytes and crystal cells. In animals lacking the downstream Hippo pathway kinase Warts, lymph gland cells overproliferated, differentiated prematurely, and often adopted a mixed lineage fate. The Hippo pathway regulated crystal cell numbers by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. Yorkie and its partner transcription factor Scalloped were found to regulate transcription of the Runx family transcription factor Lozenge, which is a key regulator of crystal cell fate. Further, Yorkie or Scalloped hyperactivation induced ectopic crystal cells in a non-cell-autonomous and Notch-pathway-dependent fashion. PMID:25454587

  2. Genetic analysis of the Drosophila Gs(alpha) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, W J; Hoskote, A; Roberts, I J; Jackson, S; Forte, M

    2001-01-01

    One of the best understood signal transduction pathways activated by receptors containing seven transmembrane domains involves activation of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes containing Gs(alpha), the subsequent stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, production of cAMP, activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and the phosphorylation of substrates that control a wide variety of cellular responses. Here, we report the identification of "loss-of-function" mutations in the Drosophila Gs(alpha) gene (dgs). Seven mutants have been identified that are either complemented by transgenes representing the wild-type dgs gene or contain nucleotide sequence changes resulting in the production of altered Gs(alpha) protein. Examination of mutant alleles representing loss-of-Gs(alpha) function indicates that the phenotypes generated do not mimic those created by mutational elimination of PKA. These results are consistent with the conclusion reached in previous studies that activation of PKA, at least in these developmental contexts, does not depend on receptor-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP, in contrast to the predictions of models developed primarily on the basis of studies in cultured cells. PMID:11454767

  3. The Hippo pathway regulates hematopoiesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Milton, Claire C; Grusche, Felix A; Degoutin, Joffrey L; Yu, Eefang; Dai, Qi; Lai, Eric C; Harvey, Kieran F

    2014-11-17

    The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (Hippo) pathway is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ growth and cell fate. It performs these functions in epithelial and neural tissues of both insects and mammals, as well as in mammalian organs such as the liver and heart. Despite rapid advances in Hippo pathway research, a definitive role for this pathway in hematopoiesis has remained enigmatic. The hematopoietic compartments of Drosophila melanogaster and mammals possess several conserved features. D. melanogaster possess three types of hematopoietic cells that most closely resemble mammalian myeloid cells: plasmatocytes (macrophage-like cells), crystal cells (involved in wound healing), and lamellocytes (which encapsulate parasites). The proteins that control differentiation of these cells also control important blood lineage decisions in mammals. Here, we define the Hippo pathway as a key mediator of hematopoiesis by showing that it controls differentiation and proliferation of the two major types of D. melanogaster blood cells, plasmatocytes and crystal cells. In animals lacking the downstream Hippo pathway kinase Warts, lymph gland cells overproliferated, differentiated prematurely, and often adopted a mixed lineage fate. The Hippo pathway regulated crystal cell numbers by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. Yorkie and its partner transcription factor Scalloped were found to regulate transcription of the Runx family transcription factor Lozenge, which is a key regulator of crystal cell fate. Further, Yorkie or Scalloped hyperactivation induced ectopic crystal cells in a non-cell-autonomous and Notch-pathway-dependent fashion.

  4. Switching cell fates in the developing Drosophila eye.

    PubMed

    Mavromatakis, Yannis Emmanuel; Tomlinson, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The developing Drosophila ommatidium is characterized by two distinct waves of pattern formation. In the first wave, a precluster of five cells is formed by a complex cellular interaction mechanism. In the second wave, cells are systematically recruited to the cluster and directed to their fates by developmental cues presented by differentiating precluster cells. These developmental cues are mediated through the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and Notch (N) signaling pathways and their combined activities are crucial in specifying cell type. The transcription factor Lozenge (Lz) is expressed exclusively in second wave cells. Here, we ectopically supply Lz to precluster cells and concomitantly supply the various RTK/N codes that specify each of three second wave cell fates. We thereby reproduce molecular markers of each of the second wave cell types in precluster cells and draw three inferences. First, we confirm that Lz provides key intrinsic information to second wave cells. We can now combine this with the RTK/N signaling to provide a cell fate specification code that entails both extrinsic and intrinsic information. Second, the reproduction of each second wave cell type in the precluster confirms the accuracy of the RTK/N signaling code. Third, RTK/N signaling and Lz need only be presented to the cells for a short period of time in order to specify their fate. PMID:24067351

  5. Nucleosome organization in the Drosophila genome.

    PubMed

    Mavrich, Travis N; Jiang, Cizhong; Ioshikhes, Ilya P; Li, Xiaoyong; Venters, Bryan J; Zanton, Sara J; Tomsho, Lynn P; Qi, Ji; Glaser, Robert L; Schuster, Stephan C; Gilmour, David S; Albert, Istvan; Pugh, B Franklin

    2008-05-15

    Comparative genomics of nucleosome positions provides a powerful means for understanding how the organization of chromatin and the transcription machinery co-evolve. Here we produce a high-resolution reference map of H2A.Z and bulk nucleosome locations across the genome of the fly Drosophila melanogaster and compare it to that from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Like Saccharomyces, Drosophila nucleosomes are organized around active transcription start sites in a canonical -1, nucleosome-free region, +1 arrangement. However, Drosophila does not incorporate H2A.Z into the -1 nucleosome and does not bury its transcriptional start site in the +1 nucleosome. At thousands of genes, RNA polymerase II engages the +1 nucleosome and pauses. How the transcription initiation machinery contends with the +1 nucleosome seems to be fundamentally different across major eukaryotic lines.

  6. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    PubMed

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human.

  7. A taste of the Drosophila gustatory receptors.

    PubMed

    Montell, Craig

    2009-08-01

    Insects such as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, rely on contact chemosensation to detect nutrient-rich foods, to avoid consuming toxic chemicals, and to select mates and hospitable zones to deposit eggs. Flies sense tastants and nonvolatile pheromones through gustatory bristles and pegs distributed on multiple body parts including the proboscis, wing margins, legs, and ovipositor. The sensilla house gustatory receptor neurons, which express members of the family of 68 gustatory receptors (GRs). In contrast to mammalian chemosensation or Drosophila olfaction, which are initiated by receptors composed of dimers of one or two receptor types, the functional Drosophila GRs may include three or more subunits. Several GRs appear to be expressed in multiple cell types that are not associated with contact chemosensation raising the possibility that these proteins may have roles that extend beyond the detection of tastants and pheromones. PMID:19660932

  8. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    PubMed

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human. PMID:26679112

  9. Viruses and Antiviral Immunity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Viral pathogens present many challenges to organisms, driving the evolution of a myriad of antiviral strategies to combat infections. A wide variety of viruses infect invertebrates, including both natural pathogens that are insect-restricted, and viruses that are transmitted to vertebrates. Studies using the powerful tools available in the model organism Drosophila have expanded our understanding of antiviral defenses against diverse viruses. In this review, we will cover three major areas. First, we will describe the tools used to study viruses in Drosophila. Second, we will survey the major viruses that have been studied in Drosophila. And lastly, we will discuss the well-characterized mechanisms that are active against these diverse pathogens, focusing on non-RNAi mediated antiviral mechanisms. Antiviral RNAi is discussed in another paper in this issue. PMID:23680639

  10. Transgenic inhibitors of RNA interference in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-ting; Tam, Bergin; Linay, Fabien; Lai, Eric C

    2007-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as an adaptive antiviral defense in both plants and animals. In turn, viruses commonly encode suppressors of RNA silencing, which enable them to mount productive infection. These inhibitor proteins may be exploited as reagents with which to probe mechanisms and functions of RNA silencing pathways. In this report, we describe transgenic Drosophila strains that allow inducible expression of the viral RNA silencing inhibitors Flock House virus-B2, Nodamura virus-B2, vaccinia virus-E3L, influenza A virus-NS1 and tombusvirus P19. Some of these, especially the B2 proteins, are effective transgenic inhibitors of double strand RNA-induced gene silencing in flies. On the other hand, none of them is effective against the Drosophila microRNA pathway. Their functional selectivity makes these viral silencing proteins useful reagents with which to study biological functions of the Drosophila RNA interference pathway.

  11. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila. PMID:20360379

  12. Conspecific sperm precedence in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Price, C S

    1997-08-14

    Traits that influence the interactions between males and females can evolve very rapidly through sexual selection or sexually antagonistic coevolution. Rapid change in the fertilization systems of independent populations can give rise to reproductive incompatibilities between populations, and may contribute to speciation. Here I provide evidence for cryptic reproductive divergence among three sibling species of Drosophila that leads to a form of postmating isolation. When a female mates with both a conspecific and a heterospecific male, the conspecific sperm fertilize the vast majority of the eggs, regardless of the order of the matings. Heterospecific sperm fertilize fewer eggs after these double matings than after single matings. Experiments using spermless males show that the seminal fluid of the conspecific male is largely responsible for this conspecific sperm precedence. Moreover, when two males of the same species mate sequentially with a female from a different species, a highly variable pattern of sperm precedence replaces the second-male sperm precedence that is consistently found within species. These results indicate that females mediate sperm competition, and that second-male sperm precedence is not an automatic consequence of the mechanics of sperm storage.

  13. Sexual Behavior of Drosophila suzukii.

    PubMed

    Revadi, Santosh; Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Anfora, Gianfranco; Dekker, Teun; Becher, Paul G

    2015-03-09

    A high reproductive potential is one reason for the rapid spread of Drosophila suzukii in Europe and in the United States. In order to identify mechanisms that mediate mating and reproduction in D. suzukii we studied the fly's reproductive behavior, diurnal mating activity and sexual maturation. Furthermore, we studied the change of female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) with age and conducted a preliminary investigation on the role of female-derived chemical signals in male mating behavior. Sexual behavior in D. suzukii is characterized by distinct elements of male courtship leading to female acceptance for mating. Time of day and age modulate D. suzukii mating activity. As with other drosophilids, female sexual maturity is paralleled by a quantitative increase in CHCs. Neither female CHCs nor other olfactory signals were required to induce male courtship, however, presence of those signals significantly increased male sexual behavior. With this pilot study we hope to stimulate research on the reproductive biology of D. suzukii, which is relevant for the development of pest management tools.

  14. Biomarkers of ageing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Jake; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald; Magwere, Tapiwanashe; Miwa, Satomi; Driege, Yasmine; Brand, Martin D.; Partridge, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Summary Low environmental temperature and dietary restriction (DR) extend lifespan in diverse organisms. In the fruit fly Drosophila, switching flies between temperatures alters the rate at which mortality subsequently increases with age but does not reverse mortality rate. In contrast, DR acts acutely to lower mortality risk; flies switched between control feeding and DR show a rapid reversal of mortality rate. DR thus does not slow accumulation of ageing-related damage. Molecular species that track the effects of temperatures on mortality but are unaltered with switches in diet are therefore potential biomarkers of ageing-related damage. However, molecular species that switch upon instigation or withdrawal of DR are thus potential biomarkers of mechanisms underlying risk of mortality, but not of ageing-related damage. Using this approach, we assessed several commonly used biomarkers of ageing-related damage. Accumulation of fluorescent advanced glycation end products (AGEs) correlated strongly with mortality rate of flies at different temperatures but was independent of diet. Hence fluorescent AGEs are biomarkers of ageing-related damage in flies. In contrast, five oxidised and glycated protein adducts accumulated with age, but were reversible with both temperature and diet, and are therefore not markers either of acute risk of dying or of ageing-related damage. Our approach provides a powerful method for identification of biomarkers of ageing. PMID:20367621

  15. Contour extraction of Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Kambhamettu, Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Contour extraction of Drosophila (fruit fly) embryos is an important step to build a computational system for matching expression pattern of embryonic images to assist the discovery of the nature of genes. Automatic contour extraction of embryos is challenging due to severe image variations, including 1) the size, orientation, shape, and appearance of an embryo of interest; 2) the neighboring context of an embryo of interest (such as nontouching and touching neighboring embryos); and 3) illumination circumstance. In this paper, we propose an automatic framework for contour extraction of the embryo of interest in an embryonic image. The proposed framework contains three components. Its first component applies a mixture model of quadratic curves, with statistical features, to initialize the contour of the embryo of interest. An efficient method based on imbalanced image points is proposed to compute model parameters. The second component applies active contour model to refine embryo contours. The third component applies eigen-shape modeling to smooth jaggy contours caused by blurred embryo boundaries. We test the proposed framework on a data set of 8,000 embryonic images, and achieve promising accuracy (88 percent), that is, substantially higher than the-state-of-the-art results.

  16. Principles of Drosophila Eye Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cagan, Ross

    2010-01-01

    The Drosophila eye is one of nature's most beautiful structures and one of its most useful. It has emerged as a favored model for understanding the processes that direct cell fate specification, patterning, and morphogenesis. Though composed of thousands of cells, each fly eye is a simple repeating pattern of perhaps a dozen cell types arranged in a hexagonal array that optimizes coverage of the visual field. This simple structure combined with powerful genetic tools make the fly eye an ideal model to explore the relationships between local cell fate specification and global tissue patterning. In this chapter, I discuss the basic principles that have emerged from three decades of close study. We now understand at a useful level some of the basic principles of cell fate selection and the importance of local cell–cell communication. We understand less of the processes by which signaling combines with morphogenesis and basic cell biology to create a correctly patterned neuroepithelium. Progress is being made on these fundamental issues, and in this chapter I discuss some of the principles that are beginning to emerge. PMID:19737644

  17. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C.; Tokuda, Joshua M.; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation. PMID:24297896

  18. Evaluation of Traditional Medicines for Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Drosophila Models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soojin; Bang, Se Min; Lee, Joon Woo; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila is one of the oldest and most powerful genetic models and has led to novel insights into a variety of biological processes. Recently, Drosophila has emerged as a model system to study human diseases, including several important neurodegenerative diseases. Because of the genomic similarity between Drosophila and humans, Drosophila neurodegenerative disease models exhibit a variety of human-disease-like phenotypes, facilitating fast and cost-effective in vivo genetic modifier screening and drug evaluation. Using these models, many disease-associated genetic factors have been identified, leading to the identification of compelling drug candidates. Recently, the safety and efficacy of traditional medicines for human diseases have been evaluated in various animal disease models. Despite the advantages of the Drosophila model, its usage in the evaluation of traditional medicines is only nascent. Here, we introduce the Drosophila model for neurodegenerative diseases and some examples demonstrating the successful application of Drosophila models in the evaluation of traditional medicines. PMID:24790636

  19. Cas9-based genome editing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Housden, Benjamin E; Lin, Shuailiang; Perrimon, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to modify the Drosophila genome has recently been revolutionized by the development of the CRISPR system. The simplicity and high efficiency of this system allows its widespread use for many different applications, greatly increasing the range of genome modification experiments that can be performed. Here, we first discuss some general design principles for genome engineering experiments in Drosophila and then present detailed protocols for the production of CRISPR reagents and screening strategies to detect successful genome modification events in both tissue culture cells and animals. PMID:25398351

  20. Cardiac gene regulatory networks in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bryantsev, Anton L.; Cripps, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila system has proven a powerful tool to help unlock the regulatory processes that occur during specification and differentiation of the embryonic heart. In this review, we focus upon a temporal analysis of the molecular events that result in heart formation in Drosophila, with a particular emphasis upon how genomic and other cuttingedge approaches are being brought to bear upon the subject. We anticipate that systemslevel approaches will contribute greatly to our comprehension of heart development and disease in the animal kingdom. PMID:18849017

  1. Cas9-based genome editing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Housden, Benjamin E; Lin, Shuailiang; Perrimon, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to modify the Drosophila genome has recently been revolutionized by the development of the CRISPR system. The simplicity and high efficiency of this system allows its widespread use for many different applications, greatly increasing the range of genome modification experiments that can be performed. Here, we first discuss some general design principles for genome engineering experiments in Drosophila and then present detailed protocols for the production of CRISPR reagents and screening strategies to detect successful genome modification events in both tissue culture cells and animals.

  2. Visualizing new dimensions in Drosophila myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brian; Beckett, Karen; Baylies, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Summary Over several years, genetic studies in the model system, Drosophila melanogastor, have uncovered genes that when mutated, lead to a block in myoblast fusion. Analyses of these gene products have suggested that Arp2/3-mediated regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is crucial to myoblast fusion in the fly. Recent advances in imaging in Drosophila embryos, both in fixed and live preparations, have led to a new appreciation of both the three-dimensional organization of the somatic mesoderm and the cell biology underlying myoblast fusion. PMID:18404690

  3. Neural control of aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hoopfer, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Like most animal species, fruit flies fight to obtain and defend resources essential to survival and reproduction. Aggressive behavior in Drosophila is genetically specified and also strongly influenced by the fly's social context, past experiences and internal states, making it an excellent framework for investigating the neural mechanisms that regulate complex social behaviors. Here, I summarize our current knowledge of the neural control of aggression in Drosophila and discuss recent advances in understanding the sensory pathways that influence the decision to fight or court, the neuromodulatory control of aggression, the neural basis by which internal states can influence both fighting and courtship, and how social experience modifies aggressive behavior. PMID:27179788

  4. Map kinases in fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xu, J R

    2000-12-01

    MAP kinases in eukaryotic cells are well known for transducing a variety of extracellular signals to regulate cell growth and differentiation. Recently, MAP kinases homologous to the yeast Fus3/Kss1 MAP kinases have been identified in several fungal pathogens and found to be important for appressorium formation, invasive hyphal growth, and fungal pathogenesis. This MAP kinase pathway also controls diverse growth or differentiation processes, including conidiation, conidial germination, and female fertility. MAP kinases homologous to yeast Slt2 and Hog1 have also been characterized in Candida albicans and Magnaporthe grisea. Mutants disrupted of the Slt2 homologues have weak cell walls, altered hyphal growth, and reduced virulence. The Hog1 homologues are dispensable for growth but are essential for regulating responses to hyperosmotic stress in C. albicans and M. grisea. Overall, recent studies have indicated that MAP kinase pathways may play important roles in regulating growth, differentiation, survival, and pathogenesis in fungal pathogens. PMID:11273677

  5. Aurora A Kinase Amplifies a Midzone Phosphorylation Gradient to Promote High-Fidelity Cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Anna A; Torabi, Julia; Maresca, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    During cytokinesis, aurora B kinase (ABK) relocalizes from centromeres to the spindle midzone, where it is thought to provide a spatial cue for cytokinesis. While global ABK inhibition in Drosophila S2 cells results in macro- and multi-nucleated large cells, mislocalization of midzone ABK (mABK) by depletion of Subito (Drosophila MKLP2) does not cause notable cytokinesis defects. Subito depletion was, therefore, used to investigate the contribution of other molecules and redundant pathways to cytokinesis in the absence of mABK. Inhibiting potential polar relaxation pathways via removal of centrosomes (CNN RNAi) or a kinetochore-based phosphatase gradient (Sds22 RNAi) did not result in cytokinesis defects on their own or in combination with loss of mABK. Disruption of aurora A kinase (AAK) activity resulted in midzone assembly defects, but did not significantly affect contractile ring positioning or cytokinesis. Live-cell imaging of a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based aurora kinase phosphorylation sensor revealed that midzone substrates were less phosphorylated in AAK-inhibited cells, despite the fact that midzone levels of active phosphorylated ABK (pABK) were normal. Interestingly, in the absence of mABK, an increased number of binucleated cells were observed following AAK inhibition. The data suggest that equatorial stimulation rather than polar relaxation mechanisms is the major determinant of contractile ring positioning and high-fidelity cytokinesis in Drosophila S2 cells. Furthermore, we propose that equatorial stimulation is mediated primarily by the delivery of factors to the cortex by noncentrosomal microtubules (MTs), as well as a midzone-derived phosphorylation gradient that is amplified by the concerted activities of mABK and a soluble pool of AAK. PMID:27638695

  6. Differential expression of a novel protein kinase in human B lymphocytes. Preferential localization in the germinal center.

    PubMed

    Katz, P; Whalen, G; Kehrl, J H

    1994-06-17

    B lymphocytes which reside in the germinal center region of lymphoid follicles are functionally and phenotypically distinct from the surrounding mantle zone B cells. We have isolated cDNA clones for several genes that are differentially expressed between these two populations of B lymphocytes. One such gene, BL44, is preferentially expressed in germinal center B cells. The nucleotide sequence of a 2,874-base pair BL44 cDNA was determined and a 2,451-bp open reading frame found that encodes for a 97-kDa serine/threonine protein kinase referred to as GC kinase. It has an NH2-terminal catalytic domain most similar to that of the Drosophila NinaC protein and the yeast STE20 protein. GC kinase mRNA transcripts are not unique to germinal center B cells and are found in several other tissues, including brain, lung, and placenta. The GC kinase protein was immunoprecipitated from transfected COS cells and from the Burkitt cell line RAMOS. GC kinase immunoprecipitated from transfected COS cells phosphorylated the substrates casein and myelin basic protein. In addition, a 97-kDa phosphoprotein likely to be GC kinase itself was detected. GC kinase may participate in an important signal transduction pathway in germinal center B cells.

  7. A protein kinase that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J M; Greenleaf, A L

    1989-01-01

    The unique C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (IIa) of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II consists of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide consensus sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser. The number of repeats ranges from 26 in yeast to 42 in Drosophila to 52 in mouse. The CTD is essential in vivo, but its structure and function are not yet understood. The CTD can be phosphorylated at multiple serine and threonine residues, generating a form of the largest subunit (II0) with markedly reduced mobility in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. To investigate this extensive phosphorylation, which presumably modulates functional properties of RNA polymerase II, we began efforts to purify a specific CTD kinase. Using CTD-containing fusion proteins as substrates, we have purified a CTD kinase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme extensively phosphorylates the CTD portion of both the fusion proteins and intact subunit IIa, producing products with reduced electrophoretic mobilities. The properties of the CTD kinase suggest that it is distinct from previously described protein kinases. Analogous activities were also detected in Drosophila and HeLa cell extracts. Images PMID:2657724

  8. Tissue-Specific Expression Phenotypes of Hawaiian Drosophila Adh Genes in Drosophila Melanogaster Transformants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C. Y.; Mote-Jr., J.; Brennan, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Interspecific differences in the tissue-specific patterns of expression displayed by the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes within the Hawaiian picture-winged Drosophila represent a rich source of evolutionary variation in gene regulation. Study of the cis-acting elements responsible for regulatory differences between Adh genes from various species is greatly facilitated by analyzing the behavior of the different Adh genes in a homogeneous background. Accordingly, the Adh gene from Drosophila grimshawi was introduced into the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster by means of P element-mediated transformation, and transformants carrying this gene were compared to transformants carrying the Adh genes from Drosophila affinidisjuncta and Drosophila hawaiiensis. The results indicate that the D. affinidisjuncta and D. grimshawi genes have relatively higher levels of expression and broader tissue distribution of expression than the D. hawaiiensis gene in larvae. All three genes are expressed at similar overall levels in adults, with differences in tissue distribution of enzyme activity corresponding to the pattern in the donor species. However, certain systematic differences between Adh gene expression in transformants and in the Hawaiian Drosophila are noted along with tissue-specific position effects in some cases. The implications of these findings for the understanding of evolved regulatory variation are discussed. PMID:2165967

  9. Drosophila Bitter Taste(s)

    PubMed Central

    French, Alice; Ali Agha, Moutaz; Mitra, Aniruddha; Yanagawa, Aya; Sellier, Marie-Jeanne; Marion-Poll, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Most animals possess taste receptors neurons detecting potentially noxious compounds. In humans, the ligands which activate these neurons define a sensory space called “bitter”. By extension, this term has been used in animals and insects to define molecules which induce aversive responses. In this review, based on our observations carried out in Drosophila, we examine how bitter compounds are detected and if bitter-sensitive neurons respond only to molecules bitter to humans. Like most animals, flies detect bitter chemicals through a specific population of taste neurons, distinct from those responding to sugars or to other modalities. Activating bitter-sensitive taste neurons induces aversive reactions and inhibits feeding. Bitter molecules also contribute to the suppression of sugar-neuron responses and can lead to a complete inhibition of the responses to sugar at the periphery. Since some bitter molecules activate bitter-sensitive neurons and some inhibit sugar detection, bitter molecules are represented by two sensory spaces which are only partially congruent. In addition to molecules which impact feeding, we recently discovered that the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons also induces grooming. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the wings and of the legs can sense chemicals from the gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, thus adding another biological function to these receptors. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the proboscis also respond to the inhibitory pheromone, 7-tricosene. Activating these neurons by bitter molecules in the context of sexual encounter inhibits courting and sexual reproduction, while activating these neurons with 7-tricosene in a feeding context will inhibit feeding. The picture that emerges from these observations is that the taste system is composed of detectors which monitor different “categories” of ligands, which facilitate or inhibit behaviors depending on the context (feeding, sexual reproduction, hygienic behavior), thus

  10. Drosophila Bitter Taste(s).

    PubMed

    French, Alice; Ali Agha, Moutaz; Mitra, Aniruddha; Yanagawa, Aya; Sellier, Marie-Jeanne; Marion-Poll, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Most animals possess taste receptors neurons detecting potentially noxious compounds. In humans, the ligands which activate these neurons define a sensory space called "bitter". By extension, this term has been used in animals and insects to define molecules which induce aversive responses. In this review, based on our observations carried out in Drosophila, we examine how bitter compounds are detected and if bitter-sensitive neurons respond only to molecules bitter to humans. Like most animals, flies detect bitter chemicals through a specific population of taste neurons, distinct from those responding to sugars or to other modalities. Activating bitter-sensitive taste neurons induces aversive reactions and inhibits feeding. Bitter molecules also contribute to the suppression of sugar-neuron responses and can lead to a complete inhibition of the responses to sugar at the periphery. Since some bitter molecules activate bitter-sensitive neurons and some inhibit sugar detection, bitter molecules are represented by two sensory spaces which are only partially congruent. In addition to molecules which impact feeding, we recently discovered that the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons also induces grooming. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the wings and of the legs can sense chemicals from the gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, thus adding another biological function to these receptors. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the proboscis also respond to the inhibitory pheromone, 7-tricosene. Activating these neurons by bitter molecules in the context of sexual encounter inhibits courting and sexual reproduction, while activating these neurons with 7-tricosene in a feeding context will inhibit feeding. The picture that emerges from these observations is that the taste system is composed of detectors which monitor different "categories" of ligands, which facilitate or inhibit behaviors depending on the context (feeding, sexual reproduction, hygienic behavior), thus considerably

  11. Myt1 inhibition of Cyclin A/Cdk1 is essential for fusome integrity and premeiotic centriole engagement in Drosophila spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Varadarajan, Ramya; Ayeni, Joseph; Jin, Zhigang; Homola, Ellen; Campbell, Shelagh D

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of cell cycle arrest in premeiotic G2 phase coordinates germ cell maturation and meiotic cell division with hormonal and developmental signals by mechanisms that control Cyclin B synthesis and inhibitory phosphorylation of the M-phase kinase, Cdk1. In this study, we investigated how inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk1 by Myt1 kinase regulates premeiotic G2 phase of Drosophila male meiosis. Immature spermatocytes lacking Myt1 activity exhibit two distinct defects: disrupted intercellular bridges (fusomes) and premature centriole disengagement. As a result, the myt1 mutant spermatocytes enter meiosis with multipolar spindles. These myt1 defects can be suppressed by depletion of Cyclin A activity or ectopic expression of Wee1 (a partially redundant Cdk1 inhibitory kinase) and phenocopied by expression of a Cdk1F mutant defective for inhibitory phosphorylation. We therefore conclude that Myt1 inhibition of Cyclin A/Cdk1 is essential for normal fusome behavior and centriole engagement during premeiotic G2 arrest of Drosophila male meiosis. The novel meiotic functions we discovered for Myt1 kinase are spatially and temporally distinct from previously described functions of Myt1 as an inhibitor of Cyclin B/Cdk1 to regulate G2/MI timing. PMID:27170181

  12. Myt1 inhibition of Cyclin A/Cdk1 is essential for fusome integrity and premeiotic centriole engagement in Drosophila spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, Ramya; Ayeni, Joseph; Jin, Zhigang; Homola, Ellen; Campbell, Shelagh D.

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell cycle arrest in premeiotic G2 phase coordinates germ cell maturation and meiotic cell division with hormonal and developmental signals by mechanisms that control Cyclin B synthesis and inhibitory phosphorylation of the M-phase kinase, Cdk1. In this study, we investigated how inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk1 by Myt1 kinase regulates premeiotic G2 phase of Drosophila male meiosis. Immature spermatocytes lacking Myt1 activity exhibit two distinct defects: disrupted intercellular bridges (fusomes) and premature centriole disengagement. As a result, the myt1 mutant spermatocytes enter meiosis with multipolar spindles. These myt1 defects can be suppressed by depletion of Cyclin A activity or ectopic expression of Wee1 (a partially redundant Cdk1 inhibitory kinase) and phenocopied by expression of a Cdk1F mutant defective for inhibitory phosphorylation. We therefore conclude that Myt1 inhibition of Cyclin A/Cdk1 is essential for normal fusome behavior and centriole engagement during premeiotic G2 arrest of Drosophila male meiosis. The novel meiotic functions we discovered for Myt1 kinase are spatially and temporally distinct from previously described functions of Myt1 as an inhibitor of Cyclin B/Cdk1 to regulate G2/MI timing. PMID:27170181

  13. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  14. Open-Ended Laboratory Investigations with Drosophila.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Thomas R.

    1983-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures (including matings performed), and results are presented for an open-ended investigation using the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Once data are collected, students develop hypotheses to explain results as well as devise additional experiments to test their hypotheses. Calculation of chi-square for…

  15. Drosophila Melanogaster as an Experimental Organism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of the fruit fly in genetics research requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Describes embryological and genetic methods used in the experimental analysis of this organism. Outlines the use of Drosophila in the study of the development and function of the nervous system. (RT)

  16. Functional Neuroanatomy of "Drosophila" Olfactory Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying "Drosophila" learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive…

  17. Organization of descending neurons in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cynthia T; Bhandawat, Vikas

    2016-02-03

    Neural processing in the brain controls behavior through descending neurons (DNs) - neurons which carry signals from the brain to the spinal cord (or thoracic ganglia in insects). Because DNs arise from multiple circuits in the brain, the numerical simplicity and availability of genetic tools make Drosophila a tractable model for understanding descending motor control. As a first step towards a comprehensive study of descending motor control, here we estimate the number and distribution of DNs in the Drosophila brain. We labeled DNs by backfilling them with dextran dye applied to the neck connective and estimated that there are ~1100 DNs distributed in 6 clusters in Drosophila. To assess the distribution of DNs by neurotransmitters, we labeled DNs in flies in which neurons expressing the major neurotransmitters were also labeled. We found DNs belonging to every neurotransmitter class we tested: acetylcholine, GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine and octopamine. Both the major excitatory neurotransmitter (acetylcholine) and the major inhibitory neurotransmitter (GABA) are employed equally; this stands in contrast to vertebrate DNs which are predominantly excitatory. By comparing the distribution of DNs in Drosophila to those reported previously in other insects, we conclude that the organization of DNs in insects is highly conserved.

  18. Organization of descending neurons in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cynthia T; Bhandawat, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Neural processing in the brain controls behavior through descending neurons (DNs) - neurons which carry signals from the brain to the spinal cord (or thoracic ganglia in insects). Because DNs arise from multiple circuits in the brain, the numerical simplicity and availability of genetic tools make Drosophila a tractable model for understanding descending motor control. As a first step towards a comprehensive study of descending motor control, here we estimate the number and distribution of DNs in the Drosophila brain. We labeled DNs by backfilling them with dextran dye applied to the neck connective and estimated that there are ~1100 DNs distributed in 6 clusters in Drosophila. To assess the distribution of DNs by neurotransmitters, we labeled DNs in flies in which neurons expressing the major neurotransmitters were also labeled. We found DNs belonging to every neurotransmitter class we tested: acetylcholine, GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine and octopamine. Both the major excitatory neurotransmitter (acetylcholine) and the major inhibitory neurotransmitter (GABA) are employed equally; this stands in contrast to vertebrate DNs which are predominantly excitatory. By comparing the distribution of DNs in Drosophila to those reported previously in other insects, we conclude that the organization of DNs in insects is highly conserved. PMID:26837716

  19. The 5S genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Artavanis-Tsakonas, S; Schedl, P; Tschudi, C; Pirrotta, V; Steward, R; Gehring, W J

    1977-12-01

    We have cloned embryonic Drosophila DNA using the poly (dA-DT) connector method (Lobban and Kaiser, 1973) and the ampicillin-resistant plasmid pSF2124 (So, Gill and Falkow, 1975) as a cloning vehicle. Two clones, containing hybrid plasmids with sequences complementary to a 5S RNA probe isolated from Drosophila tissue culture cells, were identified by the Grunstein and Hogness (1975) colony hybridization procedure. One hybrid plasmid has a Drosophila insert which is comprised solely of tandem repeats of the 5S gene plus spacer sequences. The other plasmid contains an insert which has about 20 tandem 5S repeat units plus an additional 4 kilobases of adjacent sequences. The size of the 5S repeat unit was determined by gel electrophoresis and was found to be approximately 375 base pairs. We present a restriction map of both plasmids, and a detailed map of of the5S repeat unit. The 5S repat unit shows slight length and sequence heterogeneity. We present evidence suggesting that the 5S genes in Drosophila melanogaster may be arranged in a single continuous cluster. PMID:413625

  20. Visual Place Learning in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ofstad, Tyler A.; Zuker, Charles S.; Reiser, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of insects to learn and navigate to specific locations in the environment has fascinated naturalists for decades. While the impressive navigation abilities of ants, bees, wasps, and other insects clearly demonstrate that insects are capable of visual place learning1–4, little is known about the underlying neural circuits that mediate these behaviors. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model organism for dissecting the neural circuitry underlying complex behaviors, from sensory perception to learning and memory. Flies can identify and remember visual features such as size, color, and contour orientation5, 6. However, the extent to which they use vision to recall specific locations remains unclear. Here we describe a visual place-learning platform and demonstrate that Drosophila are capable of forming and retaining visual place memories to guide selective navigation. By targeted genetic silencing of small subsets of cells in the Drosophila brain we show that neurons in the ellipsoid body, but not in the mushroom bodies, are necessary for visual place learning. Together, these studies reveal distinct neuroanatomical substrates for spatial versus non-spatial learning, and substantiate Drosophila as a powerful model for the study of spatial memories. PMID:21654803

  1. Measurement of Cytoplasmic Streaming in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sujoy; Williams, Lucy; Palacios, Isabel; Goldstein, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    During stage 9 of Drosophila melanogastor oogenesis flow of the oocyte cytoplasm, driven by kinesin 1 motor protein is observed. This cytoplasmic streaming is analyzed by PIV in both wild type and kinesin light chain mutants, revealing striking statistical differences. Further measurements of the rheology of the oocyte allow for estimations of the mechanical energy needed to generate the observed flows.

  2. Analysis of Phagocytosis in the Drosophila Ovary.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Tracy L; Serizier, Sandy B; Kleinsorge, Sarah E; McCall, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for health and development. Generally, the last step of PCD is clearance, or engulfment, by phagocytes. Engulfment can be broken down into five basic steps: attraction of the phagocyte, recognition of the dying cell, internalization, phagosome maturation, and acidification of the engulfed material. The Drosophila melanogaster ovary serves as an excellent model to study diverse types of PCD and engulfment by epithelial cells. Here, we describe several methods to detect and analyze multiple steps of engulfment in the Drosophila ovary: recognition, vesicle uptake, phagosome maturation, and acidification. Annexin V detects phosphatidylserine, which is flipped to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of apoptotic cells, serving as an "eat me" signal. Several germline markers including tral-GFP, Orb, and cleaved Dcp-1 can all be used to label the germline and visualize its uptake into engulfing follicle cells. Drosophila strains expressing GFP and mCherry protein fusions can enable a detailed analysis of phagosome maturation. LysoTracker labels highly acidified compartments, marking phagolysosomes. Together these labels can be used to mark the progression of engulfment in Drosophila follicle cells. PMID:27557574

  3. Organization of descending neurons in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cynthia T.; Bhandawat, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Neural processing in the brain controls behavior through descending neurons (DNs) - neurons which carry signals from the brain to the spinal cord (or thoracic ganglia in insects). Because DNs arise from multiple circuits in the brain, the numerical simplicity and availability of genetic tools make Drosophila a tractable model for understanding descending motor control. As a first step towards a comprehensive study of descending motor control, here we estimate the number and distribution of DNs in the Drosophila brain. We labeled DNs by backfilling them with dextran dye applied to the neck connective and estimated that there are ~1100 DNs distributed in 6 clusters in Drosophila. To assess the distribution of DNs by neurotransmitters, we labeled DNs in flies in which neurons expressing the major neurotransmitters were also labeled. We found DNs belonging to every neurotransmitter class we tested: acetylcholine, GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine and octopamine. Both the major excitatory neurotransmitter (acetylcholine) and the major inhibitory neurotransmitter (GABA) are employed equally; this stands in contrast to vertebrate DNs which are predominantly excitatory. By comparing the distribution of DNs in Drosophila to those reported previously in other insects, we conclude that the organization of DNs in insects is highly conserved. PMID:26837716

  4. PDK1 regulates growth through Akt and S6K in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Rintelen, Felix; Stocker, Hugo; Thomas, George; Hafen, Ernst

    2001-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway promotes growth in invertebrates and vertebrates by increasing the levels of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate through the activation of p110 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Two key effectors of this pathway are the phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) and Akt/PKB. Although genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans has implicated Akt as the only relevant PDK1 substrate, cell culture studies have suggested that PDK1 has additional targets. Here we show that, in Drosophila, dPDK1 controls cellular and organism growth by activating dAkt and S6 kinase, dS6K. Furthermore, dPDK1 genetically interacts with dRSK but not with dPKN, encoding two substrates of PDK1 in vitro. Thus, the results suggest that dPDK1 is required for dRSK but not dPKN activation and that it regulates insulin-mediated growth through two main effector branches, dAkt and dS6K. PMID:11752451

  5. Drosophila ATM and ATR have distinct activities in the regulation of meiotic DNA damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Eric F.; Pedersen, Michael; Tiong, Stanley; White-Brown, Sanese K.; Paul, Anshu; Campbell, Shelagh D.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia–related (ATR) kinases are conserved regulators of cellular responses to double strand breaks (DSBs). During meiosis, however, the functions of these kinases in DSB repair and the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage checkpoint are unclear. In this paper, we show that ATM and ATR have unique roles in the repair of meiotic DSBs in Drosophila melanogaster. ATR mutant analysis indicated that it is required for checkpoint activity, whereas ATM may not be. Both kinases phosphorylate H2AV (γ-H2AV), and, using this as a reporter for ATM/ATR activity, we found that the DSB repair response is surprisingly dynamic at the site of DNA damage. γ-H2AV is continuously exchanged, requiring new phosphorylation at the break site until repair is completed. However, most surprising is that the number of γ-H2AV foci is dramatically increased in the absence of ATM, but not ATR, suggesting that the number of DSBs is increased. Thus, we conclude that ATM is primarily required for the meiotic DSB repair response, which includes functions in DNA damage repair and negative feedback control over the level of programmed DSBs during meiosis. PMID:22024169

  6. Drosophila Dyrk2 plays a role in the development of the visual system.

    PubMed

    Luebbering, Nathan; Charlton-Perkins, Mark; Kumar, Justin P; Lochead, Pamela A; Rollmann, Stephanie M; Cook, Tiffany; Cleghon, Vaughn

    2013-01-01

    The DYRKs (dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinases) are a conserved family of protein kinases that are associated with a number of neurological disorders, but whose biological targets are poorly understood. Drosophila encodes three Dyrks: minibrain/Dyrk1A, DmDyrk2, and DmDyrk3. Here we describe the creation and characterization of a DmDyrk2 null allele, DmDyrk2(1w17) . We provide evidence that the smell impaired allele smi35A(1) , is likely to encode DmDyrk2. We also demonstrate that DmDyrk2 is expressed late in the developing third antennal segment, an anatomical structure associated with smell. In addition, we find that DmDyrk2 is expressed in the morphogenetic furrow of the developing eye, that loss of DmDyrk2 in the eye produced a subtle but measurable defect, and that ectopic DmDyrk2 expression in the eye produced a strong rough eye phenotype characterized by increased secondary, tertiary and bristle interommatidial cells. This phenotype was dependent on DmDyrk2 kinase activity and was only manifest when expressed in post-mitotic non-neuronal progenitors. Together, these data indicate that DmDyrk2 is expressed in developing sensory systems, that it is required for the development of the visual system, and that the eye is a good model to identify DmDyrk2 targets. PMID:24146926

  7. Genetic and evolutionary analysis of the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Megan

    Although evolution of brains and behaviors is of fundamental biological importance, we lack comprehensive understanding of the general principles governing these processes or the specific mechanisms and molecules through which the evolutionary changes are effected. Because synapses are the basic structural and functional units of nervous systems, one way to address these problems is to dissect the genetic and molecular pathways responsible for morphological evolution of a defined synapse. I have undertaken such an analysis by examining morphology of the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in wild caught D. melanogaster as well as in over 20 other species of Drosophila. Whereas variation in NMJ morphology within a species is limited, I discovered a surprisingly extensive variation among different species. Compared with evolution of other morphological traits, NMJ morphology appears to be evolving very rapidly. Moreover, my data indicate that natural selection rather than genetic drift is primarily responsible for evolution of NMJ morphology. To dissect underlying molecular mechanisms that may govern NMJ growth and evolutionary divergence, I focused on a naturally occurring variant in D. melanogaster that causes NMJ overgrowth. I discovered that the variant mapped to Mob2, a gene encoding a kinase adapter protein originally described in yeast as a member of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN). I have subsequently examined mutations in the Drosophila orthologs of all the core components of the yeast MEN and found that all of them function as part of a common pathway that acts presynaptically to negatively regulate NMJ growth. As in the regulation of yeast cytokinesis, these components of the MEN appear to act ultimately by regulating actin dynamics during the process of bouton growth and division. These studies have thus led to the discovery of an entirely new role for the MEN---regulation of synaptic growth---that is separate from its function in cell division. This work

  8. Genomics of ecological adaptation in cactophilic Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G; Dias, Guilherme B; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P; Kuhn, Gustavo C S; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene-environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches. PMID:25552534

  9. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  10. Genomics of ecological adaptation in cactophilic Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G; Dias, Guilherme B; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P; Kuhn, Gustavo C S; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2014-12-31

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene-environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii-D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches.

  11. Genomics of Ecological Adaptation in Cactophilic Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G.; Dias, Guilherme B.; Ruiz, Jeronimo C.; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G.; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P.; Kuhn, Gustavo C.S.; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G.; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene–environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches. PMID:25552534

  12. Organization and Evolution of Drosophila Terminin: Similarities and Differences between Drosophila and Human Telomeres.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Grazia D; Cenci, Giovanni; Ciapponi, Laura; Gatti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila lacks telomerase and fly telomeres are elongated by occasional transposition of three specialized retroelements. Drosophila telomeres do not terminate with GC-rich repeats and are assembled independently of the sequence of chromosome ends. Recent work has shown that Drosophila telomeres are capped by the terminin complex, which includes the fast-evolving proteins HOAP, HipHop, Moi, and Ver. These proteins, which are not conserved outside Drosophilidae and closely related Diptera, localize and function exclusively at telomeres, protecting them from fusion events. Other proteins required to prevent end-to-end fusion in flies include HP1, Eff/UbcD1, ATM, the components of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs (MRN) complex, and the Woc transcription factor. These proteins do not share the terminin properties; they are evolutionarily conserved non-fast-evolving proteins that do not accumulate only at telomeres and do not serve telomere-specific functions. We propose that following telomerase loss, Drosophila rapidly evolved terminin to bind chromosome ends in a sequence-independent manner. This hypothesis suggests that terminin is the functional analog of the shelterin complex that protects human telomeres. The non-terminin proteins are instead likely to correspond to ancestral telomere-associated proteins that did not evolve as rapidly as terminin because of the functional constraints imposed by their involvement in diverse cellular processes. Thus, it appears that the main difference between Drosophila and human telomeres is in the protective complexes that specifically associate with the DNA termini. We believe that Drosophila telomeres offer excellent opportunities for investigations on human telomere biology. The identification of additional Drosophila genes encoding non-terminin proteins involved in telomere protection might lead to the discovery of novel components of human telomeres. PMID:23675571

  13. Organization and Evolution of Drosophila Terminin: Similarities and Differences between Drosophila and Human Telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Grazia D.; Cenci, Giovanni; Ciapponi, Laura; Gatti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila lacks telomerase and fly telomeres are elongated by occasional transposition of three specialized retroelements. Drosophila telomeres do not terminate with GC-rich repeats and are assembled independently of the sequence of chromosome ends. Recent work has shown that Drosophila telomeres are capped by the terminin complex, which includes the fast-evolving proteins HOAP, HipHop, Moi, and Ver. These proteins, which are not conserved outside Drosophilidae and closely related Diptera, localize and function exclusively at telomeres, protecting them from fusion events. Other proteins required to prevent end-to-end fusion in flies include HP1, Eff/UbcD1, ATM, the components of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs (MRN) complex, and the Woc transcription factor. These proteins do not share the terminin properties; they are evolutionarily conserved non-fast-evolving proteins that do not accumulate only at telomeres and do not serve telomere-specific functions. We propose that following telomerase loss, Drosophila rapidly evolved terminin to bind chromosome ends in a sequence-independent manner. This hypothesis suggests that terminin is the functional analog of the shelterin complex that protects human telomeres. The non-terminin proteins are instead likely to correspond to ancestral telomere-associated proteins that did not evolve as rapidly as terminin because of the functional constraints imposed by their involvement in diverse cellular processes. Thus, it appears that the main difference between Drosophila and human telomeres is in the protective complexes that specifically associate with the DNA termini. We believe that Drosophila telomeres offer excellent opportunities for investigations on human telomere biology. The identification of additional Drosophila genes encoding non-terminin proteins involved in telomere protection might lead to the discovery of novel components of human telomeres. PMID:23675571

  14. Organization and Evolution of Drosophila Terminin: Similarities and Differences between Drosophila and Human Telomeres.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Grazia D; Cenci, Giovanni; Ciapponi, Laura; Gatti, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila lacks telomerase and fly telomeres are elongated by occasional transposition of three specialized retroelements. Drosophila telomeres do not terminate with GC-rich repeats and are assembled independently of the sequence of chromosome ends. Recent work has shown that Drosophila telomeres are capped by the terminin complex, which includes the fast-evolving proteins HOAP, HipHop, Moi, and Ver. These proteins, which are not conserved outside Drosophilidae and closely related Diptera, localize and function exclusively at telomeres, protecting them from fusion events. Other proteins required to prevent end-to-end fusion in flies include HP1, Eff/UbcD1, ATM, the components of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs (MRN) complex, and the Woc transcription factor. These proteins do not share the terminin properties; they are evolutionarily conserved non-fast-evolving proteins that do not accumulate only at telomeres and do not serve telomere-specific functions. We propose that following telomerase loss, Drosophila rapidly evolved terminin to bind chromosome ends in a sequence-independent manner. This hypothesis suggests that terminin is the functional analog of the shelterin complex that protects human telomeres. The non-terminin proteins are instead likely to correspond to ancestral telomere-associated proteins that did not evolve as rapidly as terminin because of the functional constraints imposed by their involvement in diverse cellular processes. Thus, it appears that the main difference between Drosophila and human telomeres is in the protective complexes that specifically associate with the DNA termini. We believe that Drosophila telomeres offer excellent opportunities for investigations on human telomere biology. The identification of additional Drosophila genes encoding non-terminin proteins involved in telomere protection might lead to the discovery of novel components of human telomeres.

  15. Focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Rebecca L; Baggerly, Keith A; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Kang, Yu; Sanguino, Angela M; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Dalton, Heather J; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Zand, Behrouz; Akbani, Rehan; Diao, Lixia; Nick, Alpa M; DeGeest, Koen; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Coleman, Robert L; Lutgendorf, Susan; Sood, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    This investigation describes the clinical significance of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at the major activating tyrosine site (Y397) in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells. FAK gene amplification as a mechanism for FAK overexpression and the effects of FAK tyrosine kinase inhibitor VS-6062 on tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis were examined. FAK and phospho-FAKY397 were quantified in tumor (FAK-T; pFAK-T) and tumor-associated endothelial (FAK-endo; pFAK-endo) cell compartments of EOCs using immunostaining and qRT-PCR. Associations between expression levels and clinical variables were evaluated. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas were used to correlate FAK gene copy number and expression levels in EOC specimens. The in vitro and in vivo effects of VS-6062 were assayed in preclinical models. FAK-T and pFAK-T overexpression was significantly associated with advanced stage disease and increased microvessel density (MVD). High MVD was observed in tumors with elevated endothelial cell FAK (59%) and pFAK (44%). Survival was adversely affected by FAK-T overexpression (3.03 vs 2.06 y, P = 0.004), pFAK-T (2.83 vs 1.78 y, P < 0.001), and pFAK-endo (2.33 vs 2.17 y, P = 0.005). FAK gene copy number was increased in 34% of tumors and correlated with expression levels (P < 0.001). VS-6062 significantly blocked EOC and endothelial cell migration as well as endothelial cell tube formation in vitro. VS-6062 reduced mean tumor weight by 56% (P = 0.005), tumor MVD by 40% (P = 0.0001), and extraovarian metastasis (P < 0.01) in orthotopic EOC mouse models. FAK may be a unique therapeutic target in EOC given the dual anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic potential of FAK inhibitors. PMID:24755674

  16. LexA chimeras reveal the function of Drosophila Fos as a context-dependent transcriptional activator

    PubMed Central

    Szüts, David; Bienz, Mariann

    2000-01-01

    The transcriptional activation potential of proteins can be assayed in chimeras containing a heterologous DNA-binding domain that mediates their recruitment to reporter genes. This approach has been widely used in yeast and in transient mammalian cell assays. Here, we applied it to assay the transactivation potential of proteins in transgenic Drosophila embryos. We found that a chimera between the DNA-binding bacterial LexA protein and the transactivation domain from yeast GAL4 behaved as a potent synthetic activator in all embryonic tissues. In contrast, a LexA chimera containing Drosophila Fos (Dfos) required an unexpected degree of context to function as a transcriptional activator. We provide evidence to suggest that this context is provided by Djun and Mad (a Drosophila Smad), and that these partner factors need to be activated by signaling from Jun N-terminal kinase and decapentaplegic, respectively. Because Dfos behaves as an autonomous transcriptional activator in more artificial assays systems, our data suggest that context-dependence of transcription factors may be more prevalent than previously thought. PMID:10805795

  17. Partial venom gland transcriptome of a Drosophila parasitoid wasp, Leptopilina heterotoma, reveals novel and shared bioactive profiles with stinging Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Heavner, Mary E.; Gueguen, Gwenaelle; Rajwani, Roma; Pagan, Pedro E.; Small, Chiyedza; Govind, Shubha

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of natural host-parasite relationships reveals the evolutionary forces that shape the delicate and unique specificity characteristic of such interactions. The accessory long gland-reservoir complex of the wasp Leptopilina heterotoma (Figitidae) produces venom with virus-like particles. Upon delivery, venom components delay host larval development and completely block host immune responses. The host range of this Drosophila endoparasitoid notably includes the highly-studied model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. Categorization of 827 unigenes, using similarity as an indicator of putative homology, reveals that approximately 25% are novel or classified as hypothetical proteins. Most of the remaining unigenes are related to processes involved in signaling, cell cycle, and cell physiology including detoxification, protein biogenesis, and hormone production. Analysis of L. heterotoma’s predicted venom gland proteins demonstrates conservation among endo- and ectoparasitoids within the Apocrita (e.g., this wasp and the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis) and stinging aculeates (e.g., the honey bee and ants). Enzyme and KEGG pathway profiling predicts that kinases, esterases, and hydrolases may contribute to venom activity in this unique wasp. To our knowledge, this investigation marks the first functional genomic study for a natural parasitic wasp of Drosophila. Our findings will help explain how L. heterotoma shuts down its hosts’ immunity and shed light on the molecular basis of a natural arms race between these insects. PMID:23688557

  18. Modulation of the Ras/MAPK signalling pathway by the redox function of selenoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Morey, M; Serras, F; Baguñà, J; Hafen, E; Corominas, M

    2001-10-01

    Modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in signal transduction pathways. Selenoproteins act controlling the redox balance of the cell. We have studied how the alteration of the redox balance caused by patufet (selD(ptuf)), a null mutation in the Drosophila melanogaster selenophosphate synthetase 1 (sps1) gene, which codes for the SelD enzyme of the selenoprotein biosynthesis, affects the Ras/MAPK signalling pathway. The selD(ptuf) mutation dominantly suppresses the phenotypes in the eye and the wing caused by hyperactivation of the Ras/MAPK cassette and the activated forms of the Drosophila EGF receptor (DER) and Sevenless (Sev) receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), which signal in the eye and wing, respectively. No dominant interaction is observed with sensitized conditions in the Wnt, Notch, Insulin-Pi3K, and DPP signalling pathways. Our current hypothesis is that selenoproteins selectively modulate the Ras/MAPK signalling pathway through their antioxidant function. This is further supported by the fact that a selenoprotein-independent increase in ROS caused by the catalase amorphic Cat(n1) allele also reduces Ras/MAPK signalling. Here, we present the first evidence for the role of intracellular redox environment in signalling pathways in Drosophila as a whole organism.

  19. A Drosophila XPD model links cell cycle coordination with neuro-development and suggests links to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stettler, Karin; Li, Xiaoming; Sandrock, Björn; Braga-Lagache, Sophie; Heller, Manfred; Dümbgen, Lutz; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    XPD functions in transcription, DNA repair and in cell cycle control. Mutations in human XPD (also known as ERCC2) mainly cause three clinical phenotypes: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD), and only XP patients have a high predisposition to developing cancer. Hence, we developed a fly model to obtain novel insights into the defects caused by individual hypomorphic alleles identified in human XP-D patients. This model revealed that the mutations that displayed the greatest in vivo UV sensitivity in Drosophila did not correlate with those that led to tumor formation in humans. Immunoprecipitations followed by targeted quantitative MS/MS analysis showed how different xpd mutations affected the formation or stability of different transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) subcomplexes. The XP mutants most clearly linked to high cancer risk, Xpd R683W and R601L, showed a reduced interaction with the core TFIIH and also an abnormal interaction with the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex. Interestingly, these two XP alleles additionally displayed high levels of chromatin loss and free centrosomes during the rapid nuclear division phase of the Drosophila embryo. Finally, the xpd mutations showing defects in the coordination of cell cycle timing during the Drosophila embryonic divisions correlated with those human mutations that cause the neurodevelopmental abnormalities and developmental growth defects observed in XP/CS and TTD patients. PMID:25431422

  20. The Drosophila F-box protein dSkp2 regulates cell proliferation by targeting Dacapo for degradation.

    PubMed

    Dui, Wen; Wei, Bin; He, Feng; Lu, Wei; Li, Changqing; Liang, Xuehong; Ma, Jun; Jiao, Renjie

    2013-06-01

    Cell cycle progression is controlled by a complex regulatory network consisting of interacting positive and negative factors. In humans, the positive regulator Skp2, an F-box protein, has been a subject of intense investigation in part because of its oncogenic activity. By contrast, the molecular and developmental functions of its Drosophila homologue, dSkp2, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the role of dSkp2 by focusing on its functional relationship with Dacapo (Dap), the Drosophila homologue of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(cip1)/p27(kip1)/p57(kip2). We show that dSkp2 interacts physically with Dap and has a role in targeting Dap for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. We present evidence that dSkp2 regulates cell cycle progression by antagonizing Dap in vivo. dSkp2 knockdown reduces cell density in the wing by prolonging the cell doubling time. In addition, the wing phenotype caused by dSkp2 knockdown resembles that caused by dap overexpression and can be partially suppressed by reducing the gene dose of dap. Our study thus documents a conserved functional relationship between dSkp2 and Dap in their control of cell cycle progression, suggesting the possibility of using Drosophila as a model system to study Skp2-mediated tumorigenesis.

  1. Partial venom gland transcriptome of a Drosophila parasitoid wasp, Leptopilina heterotoma, reveals novel and shared bioactive profiles with stinging Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Heavner, Mary E; Gueguen, Gwenaelle; Rajwani, Roma; Pagan, Pedro E; Small, Chiyedza; Govind, Shubha

    2013-09-10

    Analysis of natural host-parasite relationships reveals the evolutionary forces that shape the delicate and unique specificity characteristic of such interactions. The accessory long gland-reservoir complex of the wasp Leptopilina heterotoma (Figitidae) produces venom with virus-like particles. Upon delivery, venom components delay host larval development and completely block host immune responses. The host range of this Drosophila endoparasitoid notably includes the highly-studied model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. Categorization of 827 unigenes, using similarity as an indicator of putative homology, reveals that approximately 25% are novel or classified as hypothetical proteins. Most of the remaining unigenes are related to processes involved in signaling, cell cycle, and cell physiology including detoxification, protein biogenesis, and hormone production. Analysis of L. heterotoma's predicted venom gland proteins demonstrates conservation among endo- and ectoparasitoids within the Apocrita (e.g., this wasp and the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis) and stinging aculeates (e.g., the honey bee and ants). Enzyme and KEGG pathway profiling predicts that kinases, esterases, and hydrolases may contribute to venom activity in this unique wasp. To our knowledge, this investigation is among the first functional genomic studies for a natural parasitic wasp of Drosophila. Our findings will help explain how L. heterotoma shuts down its hosts' immunity and shed light on the molecular basis of a natural arms race between these insects. PMID:23688557

  2. Immunocytochemical Localization of Synaptic Proteins to Photoreceptor Synapses of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    The location of proteins that contribute to synaptic function has been widely studied in vertebrate synapses, far more than at model synapses of the genetically manipulable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster . Drosophila photoreceptor terminals have been extensively exploited to characterize the actions of synaptic genes, and their distinct and repetitive synaptic ultrastructure is anatomically well suited for such studies. Synaptic release sites include a bipartite T-bar ribbon, comprising a platform surmounting a pedestal. So far, little is known about the composition and precise location of proteins at either the T-bar ribbon or its associated synaptic organelles, knowledge of which is required to understand many details of synaptic function. We studied the localization of candidate proteins to pre- or postsynaptic organelles, by using immuno-electron microscopy with the pre-embedding method, after first validating immunolabeling by confocal microscopy. We used monoclonal antibodies against Bruchpilot, epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate clone 15 (EPS-15), and cysteine string protein (CSP), all raised against a fly head homogenate, as well as sea urchin kinesin (antibody SUK4) and Discs large (DLG). All these antibodies labeled distinct synaptic structures in photoreceptor terminals in the first optic neuropil, the lamina, as did rabbit anti-DPAK ( Drosophila p21 activated kinase) and anti-Dynamin. Validating reports from light microscopy, immunoreactivity to Bruchpilot localized to the edge of the platform, and immunoreactivity to SUK4 localized to the pedestal of the T-bar ribbon. Anti-DLG recognized the photoreceptor head of capitate projections, invaginating organelles from surrounding glia. For synaptic vesicles, immunoreactivity to EPS-15 localized to sites of endocytosis, and anti-CSP labeled vesicles lying close to the T-bar ribbon. These results provide markers for synaptic sites, and a basis for further functional studies. PMID:20127822

  3. Drosophila neural stem cells in brain development and tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanrui; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblasts, the neural stem cells in Drosophila, generate the complex neural structure of the central nervous system. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms regulating the self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation in Drosophila neuroblast lineages. Deregulation of these mechanisms can lead to severe developmental defects and the formation of malignant brain tumors. Here, the authors review the molecular genetics of Drosophila neuroblasts and discuss some recent advances in stem cell and cancer biology using this model system.

  4. A gene related to the proto-oncogene fps/fes is expressed at diverse times during the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Katzen, A L; Montarras, D; Jackson, J; Paulson, R F; Kornberg, T; Bishop, J M

    1991-01-01

    The proto-oncogene fps/fes encodes a distinctive type of protein-tyrosine kinase. We identified a Drosophila gene (dfps85D) whose product resembles the proteins encoded by vertebrate fps/fes and the closely related gene fer. dfps85D is located at chromosomal position 85D10-13 and is unlikely to correspond to any previously defined genetic locus in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of the gene is entirely zygotic in origin and occurs throughout the life cycle. But hybridization in situ revealed that the pattern of expression is specialized and evolves in a provocative manner. The most notable feature of expression is the diversity of developmental periods, tissues, and cells in which it occurs. In some tissues, expression is transient; in others, it is continuous. Expression occurs in both mitotic and terminally differentiated tissue and, at various times in development, is prominent in imaginal disks, gut, muscle, testes, ovaries, retina, and other neural tissues. It appears that the use of dfps85D is more diversified than that of other Drosophila protein-tyrosine kinases reported to date and contrasts sharply with the restricted expression of fps itself in vertebrates. The detailed description of expression provided here will help guide the search for mutants in dfps85D. Images PMID:1898762

  5. Casein kinase 1 gamma couples Wnt receptor activation to cytoplasmic signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Gary; Wu, Wei; Shen, Jinlong; Bilic, Josipa; Fenger, Ursula; Stannek, Peter; Glinka, Andrei; Niehrs, Christof

    2005-12-01

    Signalling by Wnt proteins (Wingless in Drosophila) has diverse roles during embryonic development and in adults, and is implicated in human diseases, including cancer. LDL-receptor-related proteins 5 and 6 (LRP5 and LRP6; Arrow in Drosophila) are key receptors required for transmission of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling in metazoa. Although the role of these receptors in Wnt signalling is well established, their coupling with the cytoplasmic signalling apparatus remains poorly defined. Using a protein modification screen for regulators of LRP6, we describe the identification of Xenopus Casein kinase 1 gamma (CK1gamma), a membrane-bound member of the CK1 family. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments show that CK1gamma is both necessary and sufficient to transduce LRP6 signalling in vertebrates and Drosophila cells. In Xenopus embryos, CK1gamma is required during anterio-posterior patterning to promote posteriorizing Wnt/beta-catenin signalling. CK1gamma is associated with LRP6, which has multiple, modular CK1 phosphorylation sites. Wnt treatment induces the rapid CK1gamma-mediated phosphorylation of these sites within LRP6, which, in turn, promotes the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin. Our results reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that couples Wnt receptor activation to the cytoplasmic signal transduction apparatus. PMID:16341016

  6. The Drosophila insulin-degrading enzyme restricts growth by modulating the PI3K pathway in a cell-autonomous manner

    PubMed Central

    Galagovsky, Diego; Katz, Maximiliano J.; Acevedo, Julieta M.; Sorianello, Eleonora; Glavic, Alvaro; Wappner, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) cleaves insulin, among other peptidic substrates, but its function in insulin signaling is elusive. We use the Drosophila system to define the function of IDE in the regulation of growth and metabolism. We find that either loss or gain of function of Drosophila IDE (dIDE) can restrict growth in a cell-autonomous manner by affecting both cell size and cell number. dIDE can modulate Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 levels, thereby restricting activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase pathway and promoting activation of Drosophila forkhead box, subgroup O transcription factor. Larvae reared in high sucrose exhibit delayed developmental timing due to insulin resistance. We find that dIDE loss of function exacerbates this phenotype and that mutants display increased levels of circulating sugar, along with augmented expression of a lipid biosynthesis marker. We propose that dIDE is a modulator of insulin signaling and that its loss of function favors insulin resistance, a hallmark of diabetes mellitus type II. PMID:24430872

  7. Genome-wide RNAi screening implicates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Sherpa in mediating innate immune signaling by Toll in Drosophila adults.

    PubMed

    Kanoh, Hirotaka; Tong, Li-Li; Kuraishi, Takayuki; Suda, Yamato; Momiuchi, Yoshiki; Shishido, Fumi; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2015-10-27

    The Drosophila Toll pathway plays important roles in innate immune responses against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. To identify previously uncharacterized components of this pathway, we performed comparative, ex vivo, genome-wide RNA interference screening. In four screens, we overexpressed the Toll adaptor protein dMyd88, the downstream kinase Pelle, or the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) homolog Dif, or we knocked down Cactus, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian inhibitor of NF-κB. On the basis of these screens, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Sherpa as being necessary for the activation of Toll signaling. A loss-of-function sherpa mutant fly exhibited compromised production of antimicrobial peptides and enhanced susceptibility to infection by Gram-positive bacteria. In cultured cells, Sherpa mediated ubiquitylation of dMyd88 and Sherpa itself, and Sherpa and Drosophila SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) were required for the proper membrane localization of an adaptor complex containing dMyd88. These findings highlight a role for Sherpa in Drosophila host defense and suggest the SUMOylation-mediated regulation of dMyd88 functions in Toll innate immune signaling. PMID:26508789

  8. The Drosophila insulin-degrading enzyme restricts growth by modulating the PI3K pathway in a cell-autonomous manner.

    PubMed

    Galagovsky, Diego; Katz, Maximiliano J; Acevedo, Julieta M; Sorianello, Eleonora; Glavic, Alvaro; Wappner, Pablo

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) cleaves insulin, among other peptidic substrates, but its function in insulin signaling is elusive. We use the Drosophila system to define the function of IDE in the regulation of growth and metabolism. We find that either loss or gain of function of Drosophila IDE (dIDE) can restrict growth in a cell-autonomous manner by affecting both cell size and cell number. dIDE can modulate Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 levels, thereby restricting activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase pathway and promoting activation of Drosophila forkhead box, subgroup O transcription factor. Larvae reared in high sucrose exhibit delayed developmental timing due to insulin resistance. We find that dIDE loss of function exacerbates this phenotype and that mutants display increased levels of circulating sugar, along with augmented expression of a lipid biosynthesis marker. We propose that dIDE is a modulator of insulin signaling and that its loss of function favors insulin resistance, a hallmark of diabetes mellitus type II.

  9. p38 MAPK-dependent phagocytic encapsulation confers infection tolerance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa, Naoaki; Nelson, Bryce; Aonuma, Hiroka; Okado, Kiyoshi; Fukumoto, Shinya; Miura, Masayuki; Kanuka, Hirotaka

    2009-09-17

    Hosts employ a combination of two distinct yet compatible strategies to defend themselves against parasites: resistance, the ability to limit parasite burden, and tolerance, the ability to limit damage caused by a given parasite burden. Animals typically exhibit considerable genetic variation in resistance to a variety of pathogens; however, little is known about whether animals can evolve tolerance. Using a bacterial infection model in Drosophila, we uncovered a p38 MAP kinase-mediated mechanism of tolerance to intracellular bacterial infection as measured by the extent to which the host's survival rate increased or was maintained despite increasing bacterial burden. This increased survival was conferred primarily by a tolerance strategy whereby p38-dependent phagocytic encapsulation of bacteria resulted in enlarged phagocytes that trap bacteria. These results suggest that phagocytic responses are not restricted to resistance mechanisms but can also be applied to tolerance strategies for intracellular encapsulation of pathogens during the invertebrate immune response.

  10. Increased longevity mediated by yeast NDI1 expression in Drosophila intestinal stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jae H.; Bahadorani, Sepehr; Graniel, Jacqueline; Koehler, Christopher L.; Ulgherait, Matthew; Rera, Michael; Jones, D. Leanne; Walker, David W.

    2013-01-01

    A functional decline in tissue stem cells and mitochondrial dysfunction have each been linked to aging and multiple aging-associated pathologies. However, the interplay between energy homeostasis, stem cells, and organismal aging remains poorly understood. Here, we report that expression of the single-subunit yeast alternative NADH dehydrogenase, ndi1, in Drosophila intestinal stem and progenitor cells delays the onset of multiple markers of intestinal aging and extends lifespan. In addition, expression of ndi1 in the intestine increases feeding behavior and results in organismal weight gain. Consistent with increased nutrient uptake, flies expressing ndi1 in the digestive tract display a systemic reduction in the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key cellular energy sensor. Together, these results demonstrate that ndi1 expression in the intestinal epithelium is an effective strategy to delay tissue and organismal aging. PMID:24038661

  11. The Atg1-Tor pathway regulates yolk catabolism in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Hallie; Sopko, Richelle; Coughlin, Margaret; Perrimon, Norbert; Mitchison, Tim

    2015-11-15

    Yolk provides an important source of nutrients during the early development of oviparous organisms. It is composed mainly of vitellogenin proteins packed into membrane-bound compartments called yolk platelets. Catabolism of yolk is initiated by acidification of the yolk platelet, leading to the activation of Cathepsin-like proteinases, but it is unknown how this process is triggered. Yolk catabolism initiates at cellularization in Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Using maternal shRNA technology we found that yolk catabolism depends on the Tor pathway and on the autophagy-initiating kinase Atg1. Whereas Atg1 was required for a burst of spatially regulated autophagy during late cellularization, autophagy was not required for initiating yolk catabolism. We propose that the conserved Tor metabolic sensing pathway regulates yolk catabolism, similar to Tor-dependent metabolic regulation on the lysosome.

  12. Drosophila Stardust interacts with Crumbs to control polarity of epithelia but not neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y; Stronach, B; Perrimon, N; Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    2001-12-01

    Establishing cellular polarity is critical for tissue organization and function. Initially discovered in the landmark genetic screen for Drosophila developmental mutants, bazooka, crumbs, shotgun and stardust mutants exhibit severe disruption in apicobasal polarity in embryonic epithelia, resulting in multilayered epithelia, tissue disintegration, and defects in cuticle formation. Here we report that stardust encodes single PDZ domain MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase) proteins that are expressed in all primary embryonic epithelia from the onset of gastrulation. Stardust colocalizes with Crumbs at the apicolateral boundary, although their expression patterns in sensory organs differ. Stardust binds to the carboxy terminus of Crumbs in vitro, and Stardust and Crumbs are mutually dependent in their stability, localization and function in controlling the apicobasal polarity of epithelial cells. However, for the subset of ectodermal cells that delaminate and form neuroblasts, their polarity requires the function of Bazooka, but not of Stardust or Crumbs.

  13. The novel plant homeodomain protein rhinoceros antagonizes Ras signaling in the Drosophila eye.

    PubMed Central

    Voas, Matthew G; Rebay, Ilaria

    2003-01-01

    The sequential specification of cell fates in the Drosophila eye requires repeated activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/Ras/MAP kinase (MAPK) pathway. Equally important are the multiple layers of inhibitory regulation that prevent excessive or inappropriate signaling. Here we describe the molecular and genetic analysis of a previously uncharacterized gene, rhinoceros (rno), that we propose functions to restrict EGFR signaling in the eye. Loss of rno results in the overproduction of photoreceptors, cone cells, and pigment cells and a corresponding reduction in programmed cell death, all phenotypes characteristic of hyperactivated EGFR signaling. Genetic interactions between rno and multiple EGFR pathway components support this hypothesis. rno encodes a novel but evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein with a PHD zinc-finger domain, a motif commonly found in chromatin-remodeling factors. Future analyses of rno will help to elucidate the regulatory strategies that modulate EGFR signaling in the fly eye. PMID:14704181

  14. Dynamics of cell polarity in tissue morphogenesis: a comparative view from Drosophila and Ciona.

    PubMed

    Veeman, Michael T; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-01-01

    Tissues in developing embryos exhibit complex and dynamic rearrangements that shape forming organs, limbs, and body axes. Directed migration, mediolateral intercalation, lumen formation, and other rearrangements influence the topology and topography of developing tissues. These collective cell behaviors are distinct phenomena but all involve the fine-grained control of cell polarity. Here we review recent findings in the dynamics of polarized cell behavior in both the Drosophila ovarian border cells and the Ciona notochord. These studies reveal the remarkable reorganization of cell polarity during organ formation and underscore conserved mechanisms of developmental cell polarity including the Par/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) and planar cell polarity pathways. These two very different model systems demonstrate important commonalities but also key differences in how cell polarity is controlled in tissue morphogenesis. Together, these systems raise important, broader questions on how the developmental control of cell polarity contributes to morphogenesis of diverse tissues across the metazoa.

  15. Dynamics of cell polarity in tissue morphogenesis: a comparative view from Drosophila and Ciona

    PubMed Central

    Veeman, Michael T.; McDonald, Jocelyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissues in developing embryos exhibit complex and dynamic rearrangements that shape forming organs, limbs, and body axes. Directed migration, mediolateral intercalation, lumen formation, and other rearrangements influence the topology and topography of developing tissues. These collective cell behaviors are distinct phenomena but all involve the fine-grained control of cell polarity. Here we review recent findings in the dynamics of polarized cell behavior in both the Drosophila ovarian border cells and the Ciona notochord. These studies reveal the remarkable reorganization of cell polarity during organ formation and underscore conserved mechanisms of developmental cell polarity including the Par/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) and planar cell polarity pathways. These two very different model systems demonstrate important commonalities but also key differences in how cell polarity is controlled in tissue morphogenesis. Together, these systems raise important, broader questions on how the developmental control of cell polarity contributes to morphogenesis of diverse tissues across the metazoa. PMID:27303647

  16. Human wild-type tau interacts with wingless pathway components and produces neurofibrillary pathology in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jackson, George R; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Wagle, Naveed; Brown, Carlos A; Massachi, Sasan; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2002-05-16

    Pathologic alterations in the microtubule-associated protein tau have been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here, we show that tau overexpression, in combination with phosphorylation by the Drosophila glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) homolog and wingless pathway component (Shaggy), exacerbated neurodegeneration induced by tau overexpression alone, leading to neurofibrillary pathology in the fly. Furthermore, manipulation of other wingless signaling molecules downstream from shaggy demonstrated that components of the Wnt signaling pathway modulate neurodegeneration induced by tau pathology in vivo but suggested that tau phosphorylation by GSK-3beta differs from canonical Wnt effects on beta-catenin stability and TCF activity. The genetic system we have established provides a powerful reagent for identification of novel modifiers of tau-induced neurodegeneration that may serve as future therapeutic targets. PMID:12062036

  17. Tie-mediated signal from apoptotic cells protects stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yalan; Su, Tin Tin; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Many types of normal and cancer stem cells are resistant to killing by genotoxins, but the mechanism for this resistance is poorly understood. Here we show that adult stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster germline and midgut are resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) or chemically induced apoptosis and dissect the mechanism for this protection. We find that upon IR the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie/Tie-2 is activated, leading to the upregulation of microRNA bantam that represses FOXO-mediated transcription of pro-apoptotic Smac/DIABLO orthologue, Hid in germline stem cells. Knockdown of the IR-induced putative Tie ligand, Pvf1, a functional homologue of human Angiopoietin, in differentiating daughter cells renders germline stem cells sensitive to IR, suggesting that the dying daughters send a survival signal to protect their stem cells for future repopulation of the tissue. If conserved in cancer stem cells, this mechanism may provide therapeutic options for the eradication of cancer. PMID:25959206

  18. Wispy, the Drosophila homolog of GLD-2, is required during oogenesis and egg activation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jun; Sackton, Katharine L; Horner, Vanessa L; Kumar, Kritika E; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2008-04-01

    Egg activation is the process that modifies mature, arrested oocytes so that embryo development can proceed. One key aspect of egg activation is the cytoplasmic polyadenylation of certain maternal mRNAs to permit or enhance their translation. wispy (wisp) maternal-effect mutations in Drosophila block development during the egg-to-embryo transition. We show here that the wisp gene encodes a member of the GLD-2 family of cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerases (PAPs). The WISP protein is required for poly(A) tail elongation of bicoid, Toll, and torso mRNAs upon egg activation. In Drosophila, WISP and Smaug (SMG) have previously been reported to be required to trigger the destabilization of maternal mRNAs during egg activation. SMG is the major regulator of this activity. We report here that SMG is still translated in activated eggs from wisp mutant mothers, indicating that WISP does not regulate mRNA stability by controlling the translation of smg mRNA. We have also analyzed in detail the very early developmental arrest associated with wisp mutations. Pronuclear migration does not occur in activated eggs laid by wisp mutant females. Finally, we find that WISP function is also needed during oogenesis to regulate the poly(A) tail length of dmos during oocyte maturation and to maintain a high level of active (phospho-) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs).

  19. Spindle assembly and cytokinesis in the absence of chromosomes during Drosophila male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Bucciarelli, Elisabetta; Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Gatti, Maurizio

    2003-03-31

    A large body of work indicates that chromosomes play a key role in the assembly of both a centrosomal and centrosome-containing spindles. In animal systems, the absence of chromosomes either prevents spindle formation or allows the assembly of a metaphase-like spindle that fails to evolve into an ana-telophase spindle. Here, we show that Drosophila secondary spermatocytes can assemble morphologically normal spindles in the absence of chromosomes. The Drosophila mutants fusolo and solofuso are severely defective in chromosome segregation and produce secondary spermatocytes that are devoid of chromosomes. The centrosomes of these anucleated cells form robust asters that give rise to bipolar spindles that undergo the same ana-telophase morphological transformations that characterize normal spindles. The cells containing chromosome-free spindles are also able to assemble regular cytokinetic structures and cleave normally. In addition, chromosome-free spindles normally accumulate the Aurora B kinase at their midzones. This suggests that the association of Aurora B with chromosomes is not a prerequisite for its accumulation at the central spindle, or for its function during cytokinesis.

  20. MUMMY, A UDP-N-ACETYLGLUCOSAMINE PYROPHOSPHORYLASE, MODULATES DPP SIGNALING IN THE EMBRYONIC EPIDERMIS OF DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    HUMPHREYS, GREGORY B.; JUD, MOLLY C.; MONROE, KATHRYN M.; KIMBALL, SUZANNE S.; HIGLEY, MATTHEW; SHIPLEY, DANIELLE; VRABLIK, MARIE CLOUGHERTY; BATES, KATHERINE L.; LETSOU, ANTHEA

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved JNK/AP-1 (Jun N-terminal kinase/activator protein 1) and BMP (Bone Morphogenetic Protein) signaling cascades are deployed hierarchically to regulate dorsal closure in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this developmental context, the JNK/AP-1 signaling cascade transcriptionally activates BMP signaling in leading edge epidermal cells. Here we show that the mummy (mmy) gene product, which is required for dorsal closure, functions as a BMP signaling antagonist. Genetic and biochemical tests of Mmy’s role as a BMP-antagonist indicate that its function is independent of AP-1, the transcriptional trigger of BMP signal transduction in leading edge cells. pMAD (phosphorylated Mothers Against Dpp) activity data show the mmy gene product to be a new type of epidermal BMP regulator – one which transforms a BMP ligand from a long- to a short-range signal. mmy codes for the single UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase in Drosophila, and its requirement for attenuating epidermal BMP signaling during dorsal closure points to a new role for glycosylation in defining a highly restricted BMP activity field in the fly. These findings add a new dimension to our understanding of mechanisms modulating the BMP signaling gradient. PMID:23796903

  1. Dynamic Switch of Negative Feedback Regulation in Drosophila Akt–TOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kockel, Lutz; Kerr, Kimberly S.; Melnick, Michael; Brückner, Katja; Hebrok, Matthias; Perrimon, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Akt represents a nodal point between the Insulin receptor and TOR signaling, and its activation by phosphorylation controls cell proliferation, cell size, and metabolism. The activity of Akt must be carefully balanced, as increased Akt signaling is frequently associated with cancer and as insufficient Akt signaling is linked to metabolic disease and diabetes mellitus. Using a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila cells in culture, and in vivo analyses in the third instar wing imaginal disc, we studied the regulatory circuitries that define dAkt activation. We provide evidence that negative feedback regulation of dAkt occurs during normal Drosophila development in vivo. Whereas in cell culture dAkt is regulated by S6 Kinase (S6K)–dependent negative feedback, this feedback inhibition only plays a minor role in vivo. In contrast, dAkt activation under wild-type conditions is defined by feedback inhibition that depends on TOR Complex 1 (TORC1), but is S6K–independent. This feedback inhibition is switched from TORC1 to S6K only in the context of enhanced TORC1 activity, as triggered by mutations in tsc2. These results illustrate how the Akt–TOR pathway dynamically adapts the routing of negative feedback in response to the activity load of its signaling circuit in vivo. PMID:20585550

  2. Regulation of the activity of the tumor suppressor PTEN by thioredoxin in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zuohe; Saghafi, Negin; Gokhale, Vijay; Brabant, Marc; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J. . E-mail: emeuillet@azcc.arizona.edu

    2007-04-01

    Human Thioredoxin-1 (hTrx-1) is a small redox protein with a molecular weight of 12 kDa that contains two cysteine residues found in its catalytic site. HTrx-1 plays an important role in cell growth, apoptosis, and cancer patient prognosis. Recently, we have demonstrated that hTrx-1 binds to the C2 domain of the human tumor suppressor, PTEN, in a redox dependent manner. This binding leads to the inhibition of PTEN lipid phosphatase activity in mammalian tissue culture systems. In this study, we show that over-expression of hTrx-1 in Drosophila melanogaster promotes cell growth and proliferation during eye development as measured by eye size and ommatidia size. Furthermore, hTrx-1 rescues the small eye phenotype induced by the over-expression of PTEN. We demonstrate that this rescue of the PTEN-induced eye size phenotype requires cysteine-218 in the C2 domain of PTEN. We also show that hTrx-1 over-expression results in increased Akt phosphorylation in fly head extracts supporting our observations that the hTrx-1-induced eye size increase results from the inhibition of PTEN activity. Our study confirms the redox regulation of PTEN through disulfide bond formation with the hTrx-1 in Drosophila and suggests conserved mechanisms for thioredoxins and their interactions with the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling pathway in humans and fruit flies.

  3. Temperature and functional plasticity of L-type Ca2+ channels in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Roman V; Singh, Satpal

    2013-10-01

    The question of optimization of ion channel function to surrounding temperatures in poikilothermic organisms remains largely uninvestigated. Here, we addressed it by studying the temperature-dependence of L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) in Drosophila larval muscles in the context of their modulation by protein kinase A (PKA). LTCC currents were recorded between 4 and 30°C. Different aspects of LTCC function reached maxima between 15 and 25°C: conductance, tail current amplitude, inactivation rate, and the level of basal up-regulation by PKA (26% at 21°C). Anomalous temperature-dependencies of LTCC conductance and kinetics were similar in control and in the presence of the PKA inhibitor H-89. Analysis of deactivation kinetics revealed excessive tail currents at lower temperatures (up to 15°C), indicative of voltage-dependent facilitation of LTCCs. Tail current magnitude gradually decreased with temperature from a maximum at 15°C until a nearly complete disappearance at 30°C. Elimination of excessive tail currents at higher temperatures coincided with unusual slowing of inactivation, suggesting disruption of the facilitation by rising temperature, possibly through depletion of the pool of contributing channels. Overall, these results suggest the presence of a physiological plasticity optimum of LTCC function in the temperature range of normal Drosophila development.

  4. Ras-activated Dsor1 promotes Wnt signaling in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric T; Verheyen, Esther M

    2015-12-15

    Wnt/Wingless (Wg) and Ras-MAPK signaling both play fundamental roles in growth and cell fate determination, and when dysregulated, can lead to tumorigenesis. Several conflicting modes of interaction between Ras-MAPK and Wnt signaling have been identified in specific cellular contexts, causing synergistic or antagonistic effects on target genes. We find novel evidence that the Drosophila homolog of the dual specificity kinases MEK1/2 (also known as MAP2K1/2), Downstream of Raf1 (Dsor1), is required for Wnt signaling. Knockdown of Dsor1 results in loss of Wg target gene expression, as well as reductions in stabilized Armadillo (Arm; Drosophila β-catenin). We identify a close physical interaction between Dsor1 and Arm, and find that catalytically inactive Dsor1 causes a reduction in active Arm. These results suggest that Dsor1 normally counteracts the Axin-mediated destruction of Arm. We find that Ras-Dsor1 activity is independent of upstream activation by EGFR, and instead it appears to be activated by the insulin-like growth factor receptor to promote Wg signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a new crosstalk pathway between insulin and Wg signaling that is mediated by Dsor1. PMID:26542023

  5. Phagocytosis genes nonautonomously promote developmental cell death in the Drosophila ovary

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Allison K.; Mondragon, Albert A.; Schenkel, Claire E.; Yalonetskaya, Alla; Taylor, Jeffrey D.; Moynihan, Katherine E.; Etchegaray, Jon Iker; Meehan, Tracy L.; McCall, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is usually considered a cell-autonomous suicide program, synonymous with apoptosis. Recent research has revealed that PCD is complex, with at least a dozen cell death modalities. Here, we demonstrate that the large-scale nonapoptotic developmental PCD in the Drosophila ovary occurs by an alternative cell death program where the surrounding follicle cells nonautonomously promote death of the germ line. The phagocytic machinery of the follicle cells, including Draper, cell death abnormality (Ced)-12, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), is essential for the death and removal of germ-line–derived nurse cells during late oogenesis. Cell death events including acidification, nuclear envelope permeabilization, and DNA fragmentation of the nurse cells are impaired when phagocytosis is inhibited. Moreover, elimination of a small subset of follicle cells prevents nurse cell death and cytoplasmic dumping. Developmental PCD in the Drosophila ovary is an intriguing example of nonapoptotic, nonautonomous PCD, providing insight on the diversity of cell death mechanisms. PMID:26884181

  6. A dual function for Deep orange in programmed autophagy in the Drosophila melanogaster fat body

    SciTech Connect

    Lindmo, Karine; Simonsen, Anne; Brech, Andreas; Finley, Kim; Rusten, Tor Erik; Stenmark, Harald . E-mail: stenmark@ulrik.uio.no

    2006-07-01

    Lysosomal degradation of cytoplasm by way of autophagy is essential for cellular amino acid homeostasis and for tissue remodeling. In insects such as Drosophila, autophagy is developmentally upregulated in the larval fat body prior to metamorphosis. Here, autophagy is induced by the hormone ecdysone through down-regulation of the autophagy-suppressive phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. In yeast, Vps18 and other members of the HOPS complex have been found essential for autophagic degradation. In Drosophila, the Vps18 homologue Deep orange (Dor) has previously been shown to mediate fusion of multivesicular endosomes with lysosomes. A requirement of Dor for ecdysone-mediated chromosome puffing has also been reported. In the present report, we have tested the hypothesis that Dor may control programmed autophagy at the level of ecdysone signaling as well as by mediating autophagosome-to-lysosome fusion. We show that dor mutants are defective in programmed autophagy and provide evidence that autophagy is blocked at two levels. First, PI3K activity was not down-regulated correctly in dor larvae, which correlated with a decrease in ecdysone reporter activity. The down-regulation of PI3K activity was restored by feeding ecdysone to the mutant larvae. Second, neither exogenous ecdysone nor overexpression of PTEN, a silencer of PI3K signaling, restored fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes in the fat body of dor mutants. These results indicate that Dor controls autophagy indirectly, via ecdysone signaling, as well as directly, via autolysosomal fusion.

  7. Mutations that alter the timing and pattern of cubitus interruptus gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Slusarski, D.C.; Motzny, C.K.; Holmgren, R.

    1995-01-01

    The cubitus interruptus (ci) gene is a member of the Drosophila segment polarity gene family and encodes a protein with a zinc finger domain homologous to the vertebrate Gli genes and the nematode tra-1 gene. Three classes of existing mutations in the ci locus alter the regulation of ci expression and can be used to examine ci function during development. The first class of ci mutations causes interruptions in wing veins four and five due to inappropriate expression of the ci product in the posterior compartment of imaginal discs. The second class of mutations eliminates ci protein early in embryogenesis and causes the deletion of structures that are derived from the region including and adjacent to the engrailed expressing cells. The third class of mutations eliminates ci protein later in embryogenesis and blocks the formation of the ventral naked cuticle. The loss of ci expression at these two different stages in embryonic development correlates with the subsequent elimination of wingless expression. Adults heterozygous for the unique ci{sup Ce} mutation have deletions between wing veins three and four. A similar wing defect is present in animals mutant for the segment polarity gene fused that encodes a putative serine/threonine kinase. In ci{sup Ce}/+ and fused mutants, the deletions between wing veins three and four correlate with increased ci protein levels in the anterior compartment. Thus, proper regulation of both the ci mRNA and protein appears to be critical for normal Drosophila development. 47 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. PKC in motorneurons underlies self-learning, a form of motor learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Colomb, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Tethering a fly for stationary flight allows for exquisite control of its sensory input, such as visual or olfactory stimuli or a punishing infrared laser beam. A torque meter measures the turning attempts of the tethered fly around its vertical body axis. By punishing, say, left turning attempts (in a homogeneous environment), one can train a fly to restrict its behaviour to right turning attempts. It was recently discovered that this form of operant conditioning (called operant self-learning), may constitute a form of motor learning in Drosophila. Previous work had shown that Protein Kinase C (PKC) and the transcription factor dFoxP were specifically involved in self-learning, but not in other forms of learning. These molecules are specifically involved in various forms of motor learning in other animals, such as compulsive biting in Aplysia, song-learning in birds, procedural learning in mice or language acquisition in humans. Here we describe our efforts to decipher which PKC gene is involved in self-learning in Drosophila. We also provide evidence that motorneurons may be one part of the neuronal network modified during self-learning experiments. The collected evidence is reminiscent of one of the simplest, clinically relevant forms of motor learning in humans, operant reflex conditioning, which also relies on motorneuron plasticity. PMID:27168980

  9. The Drosophila Homologue of the Amyloid Precursor Protein Is a Conserved Modulator of Wnt PCP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Alessia; Okray, Zeynep; Janovska, Pavlina; Tmejová, Kateřina; Reynaud, Elodie; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; De Strooper, Bart; Dura, Jean-Maurice; Bryja, Vítězslav; Hassan, Bassem A.

    2013-01-01

    Wnt Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling is a universal regulator of polarity in epithelial cells, but it regulates axon outgrowth in neurons, suggesting the existence of axonal modulators of Wnt-PCP activity. The Amyloid precursor proteins (APPs) are intensely investigated because of their link to Alzheimer's disease (AD). APP's in vivo function in the brain and the mechanisms underlying it remain unclear and controversial. Drosophila possesses a single APP homologue called APP Like, or APPL. APPL is expressed in all neurons throughout development, but has no established function in neuronal development. We therefore investigated the role of Drosophila APPL during brain development. We find that APPL is involved in the development of the Mushroom Body αβ neurons and, in particular, is required cell-autonomously for the β-axons and non-cell autonomously for the α-axons growth. Moreover, we find that APPL is a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway required for axonal outgrowth, but not cell polarity. Molecularly, both human APP and fly APPL form complexes with PCP receptors, thus suggesting that APPs are part of the membrane protein complex upstream of PCP signaling. Moreover, we show that APPL regulates PCP pathway activation by modulating the phosphorylation of the Wnt adaptor protein Dishevelled (Dsh) by Abelson kinase (Abl). Taken together our data suggest that APPL is the first example of a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway specifically required for axon outgrowth. PMID:23690751

  10. Phagocytosis genes nonautonomously promote developmental cell death in the Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Allison K; Mondragon, Albert A; Schenkel, Claire E; Yalonetskaya, Alla; Taylor, Jeffrey D; Moynihan, Katherine E; Etchegaray, Jon Iker; Meehan, Tracy L; McCall, Kimberly

    2016-03-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is usually considered a cell-autonomous suicide program, synonymous with apoptosis. Recent research has revealed that PCD is complex, with at least a dozen cell death modalities. Here, we demonstrate that the large-scale nonapoptotic developmental PCD in the Drosophila ovary occurs by an alternative cell death program where the surrounding follicle cells nonautonomously promote death of the germ line. The phagocytic machinery of the follicle cells, including Draper, cell death abnormality (Ced)-12, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), is essential for the death and removal of germ-line-derived nurse cells during late oogenesis. Cell death events including acidification, nuclear envelope permeabilization, and DNA fragmentation of the nurse cells are impaired when phagocytosis is inhibited. Moreover, elimination of a small subset of follicle cells prevents nurse cell death and cytoplasmic dumping. Developmental PCD in the Drosophila ovary is an intriguing example of nonapoptotic, nonautonomous PCD, providing insight on the diversity of cell death mechanisms. PMID:26884181

  11. PKC in motorneurons underlies self-learning, a form of motor learning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Colomb, Julien; Brembs, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Tethering a fly for stationary flight allows for exquisite control of its sensory input, such as visual or olfactory stimuli or a punishing infrared laser beam. A torque meter measures the turning attempts of the tethered fly around its vertical body axis. By punishing, say, left turning attempts (in a homogeneous environment), one can train a fly to restrict its behaviour to right turning attempts. It was recently discovered that this form of operant conditioning (called operant self-learning), may constitute a form of motor learning in Drosophila. Previous work had shown that Protein Kinase C (PKC) and the transcription factor dFoxP were specifically involved in self-learning, but not in other forms of learning. These molecules are specifically involved in various forms of motor learning in other animals, such as compulsive biting in Aplysia, song-learning in birds, procedural learning in mice or language acquisition in humans. Here we describe our efforts to decipher which PKC gene is involved in self-learning in Drosophila. We also provide evidence that motorneurons may be one part of the neuronal network modified during self-learning experiments. The collected evidence is reminiscent of one of the simplest, clinically relevant forms of motor learning in humans, operant reflex conditioning, which also relies on motorneuron plasticity. PMID:27168980

  12. Phagocytosis genes nonautonomously promote developmental cell death in the Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Allison K; Mondragon, Albert A; Schenkel, Claire E; Yalonetskaya, Alla; Taylor, Jeffrey D; Moynihan, Katherine E; Etchegaray, Jon Iker; Meehan, Tracy L; McCall, Kimberly

    2016-03-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is usually considered a cell-autonomous suicide program, synonymous with apoptosis. Recent research has revealed that PCD is complex, with at least a dozen cell death modalities. Here, we demonstrate that the large-scale nonapoptotic developmental PCD in the Drosophila ovary occurs by an alternative cell death program where the surrounding follicle cells nonautonomously promote death of the germ line. The phagocytic machinery of the follicle cells, including Draper, cell death abnormality (Ced)-12, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), is essential for the death and removal of germ-line-derived nurse cells during late oogenesis. Cell death events including acidification, nuclear envelope permeabilization, and DNA fragmentation of the nurse cells are impaired when phagocytosis is inhibited. Moreover, elimination of a small subset of follicle cells prevents nurse cell death and cytoplasmic dumping. Developmental PCD in the Drosophila ovary is an intriguing example of nonapoptotic, nonautonomous PCD, providing insight on the diversity of cell death mechanisms.

  13. Temperature and functional plasticity of L-type Ca2+ channels in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Roman V; Singh, Satpal

    2013-10-01

    The question of optimization of ion channel function to surrounding temperatures in poikilothermic organisms remains largely uninvestigated. Here, we addressed it by studying the temperature-dependence of L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) in Drosophila larval muscles in the context of their modulation by protein kinase A (PKA). LTCC currents were recorded between 4 and 30°C. Different aspects of LTCC function reached maxima between 15 and 25°C: conductance, tail current amplitude, inactivation rate, and the level of basal up-regulation by PKA (26% at 21°C). Anomalous temperature-dependencies of LTCC conductance and kinetics were similar in control and in the presence of the PKA inhibitor H-89. Analysis of deactivation kinetics revealed excessive tail currents at lower temperatures (up to 15°C), indicative of voltage-dependent facilitation of LTCCs. Tail current magnitude gradually decreased with temperature from a maximum at 15°C until a nearly complete disappearance at 30°C. Elimination of excessive tail currents at higher temperatures coincided with unusual slowing of inactivation, suggesting disruption of the facilitation by rising temperature, possibly through depletion of the pool of contributing channels. Overall, these results suggest the presence of a physiological plasticity optimum of LTCC function in the temperature range of normal Drosophila development. PMID:23993048

  14. Neto-Mediated Intracellular Interactions Shape Postsynaptic Composition at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Cathy I.; Igiesuorobo, Oghomwen; Wang, Qi; Serpe, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the subunit composition of glutamate receptors are crucial for the formation of neural circuits and for the long-term plasticity underlying learning and memory. Here we use the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) to examine how specific receptor subtypes are recruited and stabilized at synaptic locations. In flies, clustering of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) requires Neto (Neuropillin and Tolloid-like), a highly conserved auxiliary subunit that is essential for NMJ assembly and development. Drosophila neto encodes two isoforms, Neto-α and Neto-β, with common extracellular parts and distinct cytoplasmic domains. Mutations that specifically eliminate Neto-β or its intracellular domain were generated. When Neto-β is missing or is truncated, the larval NMJs show profound changes in the subtype composition of iGluRs due to reduced synaptic accumulation of the GluRIIA subunit. Furthermore, neto-β mutant NMJs fail to accumulate p21-activated kinase (PAK), a critical postsynaptic component implicated in the synaptic stabilization of GluRIIA. Muscle expression of either Neto-α or Neto-β rescued the synaptic transmission at neto null NMJs, indicating that Neto conserved domains mediate iGluRs clustering. However, only Neto-β restored PAK synaptic accumulation at neto null NMJs. Thus, Neto engages in intracellular interactions that regulate the iGluR subtype composition by preferentially recruiting and/or stabilizing selective receptor subtypes. PMID:25905467

  15. Coordinated niche-associated signals promote germline homeostasis in the Drosophila ovary

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhong, Guohua; Chai, Phing Chian; Luo, Lichao; Liu, Sen; Yang, Ying; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell niches provide localized signaling molecules to promote stem cell fate and to suppress differentiation. The Drosophila melanogaster ovarian niche is established by several types of stromal cells, including terminal filament cells, cap cells, and escort cells (ECs). Here, we show that, in addition to its well-known function as a niche factor expressed in cap cells, the Drosophila transforming growth factor β molecule Decapentaplegic (Dpp) is expressed at a low level in ECs to maintain a pool of partially differentiated germline cells that may dedifferentiate to replenish germline stem cells upon their depletion under normal and stress conditions. Our study further reveals that the Dpp level in ECs is modulated by Hedgehog (Hh) ligands, which originate from both cap cells and ECs. We also demonstrate that Hh signaling exerts its function by suppressing Janus kinase/signal transducer activity, which promotes Dpp expression in ECs. Collectively, our data suggest a complex interplay of niche-associated signals that controls the development of a stem cell lineage. PMID:26504174

  16. Drosophila blood as a model system for stress sensing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jiwon

    2015-04-01

    The Drosophila lymph gland is the hematopoietic organ in which stem-like progenitors proliferate and give rise to myeloid-type blood cells. Mechanisms involved in Drosophila hematopoiesis are well established and known to be conserved in the vertebrate system. Recent studies in Drosophila lymph gland have provided novel insights into how external and internal stresses integrate into blood progenitor maintenance mechanisms and the control of blood cell fate decision. In this review, I will introduce a developmental overview of the Drosophila hematopoietic system, and recent understandings of how the system uses developmental signals not only for hematopoiesis but also as sensors for stress and environmental changes to elicit necessary blood responses.

  17. Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Carrie M.; Chang, Matthew E. K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are key players in a large number of cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulated kinase activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, and members of this enzyme family are of therapeutic interest. However, due to the fact that most inhibitors interact with the highly conserved ATP-binding sites of kinases, it is a significant challenge to develop pharmacological agents that target only one of the greater than 500 kinases present in humans. A potential solution to this problem is the development of bisubstrate and bivalent kinase inhibitors, in which an active site-directed moiety is tethered to another ligand that targets a location outside of the ATP-binding cleft. Because kinase signaling specificity is modulated by regions outside of the ATP-binding site, strategies that exploit these interactions have the potential to provide reagents with high target selectivity. This review highlights examples of kinase interaction sites that can potentially be exploited by bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors. Furthermore, an overview of efforts to target these interactions with bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors is provided. Finally, several examples of the successful application of these reagents in a cellular setting are described. PMID:24564382

  18. Gain-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans lin-1 ETS gene identify a C-terminal regulatory domain phosphorylated by ERK MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, D; Beitel, G J; Clark, S G; Horvitz, H R; Kornfeld, K

    1998-01-01

    Genetic analysis of lin-1 loss-of-function mutations suggests that lin-1 controls multiple cell-fate decisions during Caenorhabditis elegans development and is negatively regulated by a conserved receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-ERK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction pathway. LIN-1 protein contains an ETS domain and presumably regulates transcription. We identified and characterized six gain-of-function mutations that define a new class of lin-1 allele. These lin-1 alleles appeared to be constitutively active and unresponsive to negative regulation. Each allele has a single-base change that affects the predicted C terminus of LIN-1, suggesting this region is required for negative regulation. The C terminus of LIN-1 was a high-affinity substrate for Erk2 in vitro, suggesting that LIN-1 is directly regulated by ERK MAP kinase. Because mpk-1 ERK MAP kinase controls at least one cell-fate decision that does not require lin-1, our results suggest that MPK-1 contributes to the specificity of this receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-MAP kinase signal transduction pathway by phosphorylating different proteins in different developmental contexts. These lin-1 mutations all affect a four-amino-acid motif, FQFP, that is conserved in vertebrate and Drosophila ETS proteins that are also phosphorylated by ERK MAP kinase. This sequence may be a substrate recognition motif for the ERK subfamily of MAP kinases. PMID:9691039

  19. MDS1, a dosage suppressor of an mck1 mutant, encodes a putative yeast homolog of glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    PubMed Central

    Puziss, J W; Hardy, T A; Johnson, R B; Roach, P J; Hieter, P

    1994-01-01

    The yeast gene MCK1 encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase that is thought to function in regulating kinetochore activity and entry into meiosis. Disruption of MCK1 confers a cold-sensitive phenotype, a temperature-sensitive phenotype, and sensitivity to the microtubule-destabilizing drug benomyl and leads to loss of chromosomes during growth on benomyl. A dosage suppression selection was used to identify genes that, when present at high copy number, could suppress the cold-sensitive phenotype of mck1::HIS3 mutant cells. Several unique classes of clones were identified, and one of these, designated MDS1, has been characterized in some detail. Nucleotide sequence data reveal that MDS1 encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase that is highly homologous to the shaggy/zw3 kinase in Drosophila melanogaster and its functional homolog, glycogen synthase kinase 3, in rats. The presence of MDS1 in high copy number rescues both the cold-sensitive and the temperature-sensitive phenotypes, but not the benomyl-sensitive phenotype, associated with the disruption of MCK1. Analysis of strains harboring an mds1 null mutation demonstrates that MDS1 is not essential during normal vegetative growth but appears to be required for meiosis. Finally, in vitro experiments indicate that the proteins encoded by both MCK1 and MDS1 possess protein kinase activity with substrate specificity similar to that of mammalian glycogen synthase kinase 3. Images PMID:8264650

  20. Drosophila as a model for intractable epilepsy: gilgamesh suppresses seizures in para(bss1) heterozygote flies.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Iris C; Rusan, Zeid M; Parker, Louise; Tanouye, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    Intractable epilepsies, that is, seizure disorders that do not respond to currently available therapies, are difficult, often tragic, neurological disorders. Na(+) channelopathies have been implicated in some intractable epilepsies, including Dravet syndrome (Dravet 1978), but little progress has been forthcoming in therapeutics. Here we examine a Drosophila model for intractable epilepsy, the Na(+) channel gain-of-function mutant para(bss1) that resembles Dravet syndrome in some aspects (parker et al. 2011a). In particular, we identify second-site mutations that interact with para(bss1), seizure enhancers, and seizure suppressors. We describe one seizure-enhancer mutation named charlatan (chn). The chn gene normally encodes an Neuron-Restrictive Silencer Factor/RE1-Silencing Transcription factor transcriptional repressor of neuronal-specific genes. We identify a second-site seizure-suppressor mutation, gilgamesh (gish), that reduces the severity of several seizure-like phenotypes of para(bss1)/+ heterozygotes. The gish gene normally encodes the Drosophila ortholog of casein kinase CK1g3, a member of the CK1 family of serine-threonine kinases. We suggest that CK1g3 is an unexpected but promising new target for seizure therapeutics. PMID:23797108

  1. Loss of the starvation-induced gene Rack1 leads to glycogen deficiency and impaired autophagic responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Érdi, Balázs; Nagy, Péter; Zvara, Ágnes; Varga, Ágnes; Pircs, Karolina; Ménesi, Dalma; Puskás, László G.; Juhász, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy delivers cytoplasmic material for lysosomal degradation in eukaryotic cells. Starvation induces high levels of autophagy to promote survival in the lack of nutrients. We compared genome-wide transcriptional profiles of fed and starved control, autophagy-deficient Atg7 and Atg1 null mutant Drosophila larvae to search for novel regulators of autophagy. Genes involved in catabolic processes including autophagy were transcriptionally upregulated in all cases. We also detected repression of genes involved in DNA replication in autophagy mutants compared with control animals. The expression of Rack1 (receptor of activated protein kinase C 1) increased 4.1- to 5.5-fold during nutrient deprivation in all three genotypes. The scaffold protein Rack1 plays a role in a wide range of processes including translation, cell adhesion and migration, cell survival and cancer. Loss of Rack1 led to attenuated autophagic response to starvation, and glycogen stores were decreased 11.8-fold in Rack1 mutant cells. Endogenous Rack1 partially colocalized with GFP-Atg8a and early autophagic structures on the ultrastructural level, suggesting its involvement in autophagosome formation. Endogenous Rack1 also showed a high degree of colocalization with glycogen particles in the larval fat body, and with Shaggy, the Drosophila homolog of glycogen synthase kinase 3B (GSK-3B). Our results, for the first time, demonstrated the fundamental role of Rack1 in autophagy and glycogen synthesis. PMID:22562043

  2. Spermatid Cyst Polarization in Drosophila Depends upon apkc and the CPEB Family Translational Regulator orb2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuwa; Tyagi, Sanjay; Schedl, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mature Drosophila sperm are highly polarized cells—on one side is a nearly 2 mm long flagellar tail that comprises most of the cell, while on the other is the sperm head, which carries the gamete's genetic information. The polarization of the sperm cells commences after meiosis is complete and the 64-cell spermatid cyst begins the process of differentiation. The spermatid nuclei cluster to one side of the cyst, while the flagellar axonemes grows from the other. The elongating spermatid bundles are also polarized with respect to the main axis of the testis; the sperm heads are always oriented basally, while the growing tails extend apically. This orientation within the testes is important for transferring the mature sperm into the seminal vesicles. We show here that orienting cyst polarization with respect to the main axis of the testis depends upon atypical Protein Kinase C (aPKC), a factor implicated in polarity decisions in many different biological contexts. When apkc activity is compromised in the male germline, the direction of cyst polarization within this organ is randomized. Significantly, the mechanisms used to spatially restrict apkc activity to the apical side of the spermatid cyst are different from the canonical cross-regulatory interactions between this kinase and other cell polarity proteins that normally orchestrate polarization. We show that the asymmetric accumulation of aPKC protein in the cyst depends on an mRNA localization pathway that is regulated by the Drosophila CPEB protein Orb2. orb2 is required to properly localize and activate the translation of apkc mRNAs in polarizing spermatid cysts. We also show that orb2 functions not only in orienting cyst polarization with respect to the apical-basal axis of the testis, but also in the process of polarization itself. One of the orb2 targets in this process is its own mRNA. Moreover, the proper execution of this orb2 autoregulatory pathway depends upon apkc. PMID:24830287

  3. The Drosophila Forkhead transcription factor FOXO mediates the reduction in cell number associated with reduced insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jünger, Martin A; Rintelen, Felix; Stocker, Hugo; Wasserman, Jonathan D; Végh, Mátyás; Radimerski, Thomas; Greenberg, Michael E; Hafen, Ernst

    2003-01-01

    Background Forkhead transcription factors belonging to the FOXO subfamily are negatively regulated by protein kinase B (PKB) in response to signaling by insulin and insulin-like growth factor in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals. In Drosophila, the insulin-signaling pathway regulates the size of cells, organs, and the entire body in response to nutrient availability, by controlling both cell size and cell number. In this study, we present a genetic characterization of dFOXO, the only Drosophila FOXO ortholog. Results Ectopic expression of dFOXO and human FOXO3a induced organ-size reduction and cell death in a manner dependent on phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase and nutrient levels. Surprisingly, flies homozygous for dFOXO null alleles are viable and of normal size. They are, however, more sensitive to oxidative stress. Furthermore, dFOXO function is required for growth inhibition associated with reduced insulin signaling. Loss of dFOXO suppresses the reduction in cell number but not the cell-size reduction elicited by mutations in the insulin-signaling pathway. By microarray analysis and subsequent genetic validation, we have identified d4E-BP, which encodes a translation inhibitor, as a relevant dFOXO target gene. Conclusion Our results show that dFOXO is a crucial mediator of insulin signaling in Drosophila, mediating the reduction in cell number in insulin-signaling mutants. We propose that in response to cellular stresses, such as nutrient deprivation or increased levels of reactive oxygen species, dFOXO is activated and inhibits growth through the action of target genes such as d4E-BP. PMID:12908874

  4. Localization and characterization of X chromosome inversion breakpoints separating Drosophila mojavensis and Drosophila arizonae.

    PubMed

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Noor, Mohamed A F

    2007-01-01

    Ectopic exchange between transposable elements or other repetitive sequences along a chromosome can produce chromosomal inversions. As a result, genome sequence studies typically find sequence similarity between corresponding inversion breakpoint regions. Here, we identify and investigate the breakpoint regions of the X chromosome inversion distinguishing Drosophila mojavensis and Drosophila arizonae. We localize one inversion breakpoint to 13.7 kb and localize the other to a 1-Mb interval. Using this localization and assuming microsynteny between Drosophila melanogaster and D. arizonae, we pinpoint likely positions of the inversion breakpoints to windows of less than 3000 bp. These breakpoints define the size of the inversion to approximately 11 Mb. However, in contrast to many other studies, we fail to find significant sequence similarity between the 2 breakpoint regions. The localization of these inversion breakpoints will facilitate future genetic and molecular evolutionary studies in this species group, an emerging model system for ecological genetics.

  5. Counting calories in Drosophila diet restriction.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-Jin; Flatt, Thomas; Kulaots, Indrek; Tatar, Marc

    2007-03-01

    The extension of life span by diet restriction in Drosophila has been argued to occur without limiting calories. Here we directly measure the calories assimilated by flies when maintained on full- and restricted-diets. We find that caloric intake is reduced on all diets that extend life span. Flies on low-yeast diet are long-lived and consume about half the calories of flies on high-yeast diets, regardless of the energetic content of the diet itself. Since caloric intake correlates with yeast concentration and thus with the intake of every metabolite in this dietary component, it is premature to conclude for Drosophila that calories do not explain extension of life span. PMID:17125951

  6. Imaging Calcium in Drosophila at Egg Activation.

    PubMed

    Derrick, Christopher J; York-Andersen, Anna H; Weil, Timothy T

    2016-01-01

    Egg activation is a universal process that includes a series of events to allow the fertilized egg to complete meiosis and initiate embryonic development. One aspect of egg activation, conserved across all organisms examined, is a change in the intracellular concentration of calcium (Ca(2+)) often termed a 'Ca(2+) wave'. While the speed and number of oscillations of the Ca(2+) wave varies between species, the change in intracellular Ca(2+) is key in bringing about essential events for embryonic development. These changes include resumption of the cell cycle, mRNA regulation, cortical granule exocytosis, and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. In the mature Drosophila egg, activation occurs in the female oviduct prior to fertilization, initiating a series of Ca(2+)-dependent events. Here we present a protocol for imaging the Ca(2+) wave in Drosophila. This approach provides a manipulable model system to interrogate the mechanism of the Ca(2+) wave and the downstream changes associated with it. PMID:27584955

  7. Motor control of Drosophila courtship song.

    PubMed

    Shirangi, Troy R; Stern, David L; Truman, James W

    2013-11-14

    Many animals utilize acoustic signals-or songs-to attract mates. During courtship, Drosophila melanogaster males vibrate a wing to produce trains of pulses and extended tone, called pulse and sine song, respectively. Courtship songs in the genus Drosophila are exceedingly diverse, and different song features appear to have evolved independently of each other. How the nervous system allows such diversity to evolve is not understood. Here, we identify a wing muscle in D. melanogaster (hg1) that is uniquely male-enlarged. The hg1 motoneuron and the sexually dimorphic development of the hg1 muscle are required specifically for the sine component of the male song. In contrast, the motoneuron innervating a sexually monomorphic wing muscle, ps1, is required specifically for a feature of pulse song. Thus, individual wing motor pathways can control separate aspects of courtship song and may provide a "modular" anatomical substrate for the evolution of diverse songs.

  8. Predatory cannibalism in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Vijendravarma, Roshan K; Narasimha, Sunitha; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2013-01-01

    Hunting live prey is risky and thought to require specialized adaptations. Therefore, observations of predatory cannibalism in otherwise non-carnivorous animals raise questions about its function, adaptive significance and evolutionary potential. Here we document predatory cannibalism on larger conspecifics in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and address its evolutionary significance. We found that under crowded laboratory conditions younger larvae regularly attack and consume 'wandering-stage' conspecifics, forming aggregations mediated by chemical cues from the attacked victim. Nutrition gained this way can be significant: an exclusively cannibalistic diet was sufficient for normal development from eggs to fertile adults. Cannibalistic diet also induced plasticity of larval mouth parts. Finally, during 118 generations of experimental evolution, replicated populations maintained under larval malnutrition evolved enhanced propensity towards cannibalism. These results suggest that, at least under laboratory conditions, predation on conspecifics in Drosophila is a functional, adaptive behaviour, which can rapidly evolve in response to nutritional conditions.

  9. A holidic medium for Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Piper, Matthew D W; Blanc, Eric; Leitão-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Yang, Mingyao; He, Xiaoli; Linford, Nancy J; Hoddinott, Matthew P; Hopfen, Corinna; Soultoukis, George A; Niemeyer, Christine; Kerr, Fiona; Pletcher, Scott D; Ribeiro, Carlos; Partridge, Linda

    2014-01-01

    A critical requirement for research using model organisms is a well-defined and consistent diet. There is currently no complete chemically defined (holidic) diet available for Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a holidic medium that is equal in performance to an oligidic diet optimized for adult fecundity and lifespan. This holidic diet supports development over multiple generations but at a reduced rate. Over 7 years of experiments, the holidic diet yielded more consistent experimental outcomes than did oligidic food for egg laying by females. Nutrients and drugs were more available to flies in holidic medium and, similar to dietary restriction on oligidic food, amino acid dilution increased fly lifespan. We used this holidic medium to investigate amino acid-specific effects on food-choice behavior and report that folic acid from the microbiota is sufficient for Drosophila development.

  10. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Buescher, Jessica L; Musselman, Laura P; Wilson, Christina A; Lang, Tieming; Keleher, Madeline; Baranski, Thomas J; Duncan, Jennifer G

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie) feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon.

  11. Quantifying and predicting Drosophila larvae crawling phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Günther, Maximilian N; Nettesheim, Guilherme; Shubeita, George T

    2016-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model for cell biology, development, disease, and neuroscience. The fly's power as a genetic model for disease and neuroscience can be augmented by a quantitative description of its behavior. Here we show that we can accurately account for the complex and unique crawling patterns exhibited by individual Drosophila larvae using a small set of four parameters obtained from the trajectories of a few crawling larvae. The values of these parameters change for larvae from different genetic mutants, as we demonstrate for fly models of Alzheimer's disease and the Fragile X syndrome, allowing applications such as genetic or drug screens. Using the quantitative model of larval crawling developed here we use the mutant-specific parameters to robustly simulate larval crawling, which allows estimating the feasibility of laborious experimental assays and aids in their design. PMID:27323901

  12. [The comeback of mitochondria in Drosophila apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    The role of the mitochondrion in mammalian cell apoptosis has been established since the mid-1990s. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, notably because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and apoptosis in Drosophila cell death occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins that appear key for Drosophila apoptosis regulation constitutively or transiently bind to mitochondria. They participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of an IAP caspase inhibitor, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. The aim of this review is to take stock of these events that might have their counterpart in humans. PMID:27225920

  13. Flightless Flies: Drosophila models of neuromuscular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Thomas E.; Taylor, J. Paul

    2010-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has a long and rich history as an important model organism for biologists. In particular, study of the fruit fly has been essential to much of our fundamental understanding of the development and function of the nervous system. In recent years, studies using fruit flies have provided important insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Fly models of spinal muscular atrophy, spinobulbar muscular atrophy, myotonic dystrophy, dystrophinopathies and other inherited neuromuscular diseases recapitulate many of the key pathologic features of the human disease. The ability to perform genetic screens holds promise for uncovering the molecular mechanisms of disease, and indeed, for identifying novel therapeutic targets. This review will summarize recent progress in developing fly models of neuromuscular diseases and will emphasize the contribution that Drosophila has made to our understanding of these diseases. PMID:20329357

  14. The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster.

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-24

    The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the {approximately}120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes {approximately}13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.

  15. Quantifying and predicting Drosophila larvae crawling phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Maximilian N.; Nettesheim, Guilherme; Shubeita, George T.

    2016-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model for cell biology, development, disease, and neuroscience. The fly’s power as a genetic model for disease and neuroscience can be augmented by a quantitative description of its behavior. Here we show that we can accurately account for the complex and unique crawling patterns exhibited by individual Drosophila larvae using a small set of four parameters obtained from the trajectories of a few crawling larvae. The values of these parameters change for larvae from different genetic mutants, as we demonstrate for fly models of Alzheimer’s disease and the Fragile X syndrome, allowing applications such as genetic or drug screens. Using the quantitative model of larval crawling developed here we use the mutant-specific parameters to robustly simulate larval crawling, which allows estimating the feasibility of laborious experimental assays and aids in their design. PMID:27323901

  16. The secret lives of Drosophila flies

    PubMed Central

    Markow, Therese Ann

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Flies of the genus Drosophila, and particularly those of the species Drosophila melanogaster, are best known as laboratory organisms. As with all model organisms, they were domesticated for empirical studies, but they also continue to exist as wild populations. Decades of research on these flies in the laboratory have produced astounding and important insights into basic biological processes, but we have only scratched the surface of what they have to offer as research organisms. An outstanding challenge now is to build on this knowledge and explore how natural history has shaped D. melanogaster in order to advance our understanding of biology more generally. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06793.001 PMID:26041333

  17. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Buescher, Jessica L.; Musselman, Laura P.; Wilson, Christina A.; Lang, Tieming; Keleher, Madeline; Baranski, Thomas J.; Duncan, Jennifer G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie) feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon. PMID:23649823

  18. microRNA-encoded behaviour in Drosophila+

    PubMed Central

    Picao-Osorio, Joao; Johnston, Jamie; Landgraf, Matthias; Berni, Jimena; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between microRNA regulation and the specification of behaviour is only beginning to be explored. Here we find that mutation of a single microRNA locus (miR-iab4/8) in Drosophila larvae affects the animal’s capacity to correct its orientation if turned upside-down (self-righting). One of the microRNA targets involved in this behaviour is the Hox gene Ultrabithorax whose derepression in two metameric neurons leads to self-righting defects. In vivo neural activity analysis reveals that these neurons, the self-righting node (SRN), have different activity patterns in wild type and miRNA mutants whilst thermogenetic manipulation of SRN activity results in changes in self-righting behaviour. Our work thus reveals a microRNA-encoded behaviour and suggests that other microRNAs might also be involved in behavioural control in Drosophila and other species. PMID:26494171

  19. Maintenance of a Drosophila melanogaster Population Cage

    PubMed Central

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Lei, Elissa P.

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of DNA, RNA, proteins and other cellular components are often required for biochemistry and molecular biology experiments. The short life cycle of Drosophila enables collection of large quantities of material from embryos, larvae, pupae and adult flies, in a synchronized way, at a low economic cost. A major strategy for propagating large numbers of flies is the use of a fly population cage. This useful and common tool in the Drososphila community is an efficient way to regularly produce milligrams to tens of grams of embryos, depending on uniformity of developmental stage desired. While a population cage can be time consuming to set up, maintaining a cage over months takes much less time and enables rapid collection of biological material in a short period. This paper describes a detailed and flexible protocol for the maintenance of a Drosophila melanogaster population cage, starting with 1.5 g of harvested material from the previous cycle. PMID:27023790

  20. Remembering Components of Food in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Das, Gaurav; Lin, Suewei; Waddell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons (DANs) that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies (MBs). This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a potential cellular substrate through which the fly might learn to value a variety of food components. In addition, such an arrangement predicts that individual component memories reside in unique locations. DANs are also critical for food memory consolidation and deprivation-state dependent motivational control of the expression of food-relevant memories. Here, we review our current knowledge of how nutrient-specific memories are formed, consolidated and specifically retrieved in insects, with a particular emphasis on Drosophila. PMID:26924969

  1. Progress Towards Drosophila Epithelial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila epithelial research is at the forefront of the field; however, there are no well-characterized epithelial cell lines that could provide a complementary in vitro model for studies conducted in vivo. Here, a protocol is described that produces epithelial cell lines. The method uses genetic manipulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressors to induce embryonic primary culture cells to rapidly progress to permanent cell lines. It is, however, a general method and the type of cells that comprise a given line is not controlled experimentally. Indeed, only a small fraction of the lines produced are epithelial in character. For this reason, additional work needs to be done to develop a more robust epithelial cell-specific protocol. It is expected that Drosophila epithelial cell lines will have great utility for in vitro analysis of epithelial biology, particularly high-throughput analyses such as RNAi screens. PMID:23097097

  2. Studying circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Emery, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a profound influence on most bodily functions: from metabolism to complex behaviors. They ensure that all these biological processes are optimized with the time-of-day. They are generated by endogenous molecular oscillators that have a period that closely, but not exactly, matches day length. These molecular clocks are synchronized by environmental cycles such as light intensity and temperature. Drosophila melanogaster has been a model organism of choice to understand genetically, molecularly and at the level of neural circuits how circadian rhythms are generated, how they are synchronized by environmental cues, and how they drive behavioral cycles such as locomotor rhythms. This review will cover a wide range of techniques that have been instrumental to our understanding of Drosophila circadian rhythms, and that are essential for current and future research. PMID:24412370

  3. Exquisite Light Sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vinayak, Pooja; Coupar, Jamie; Hughes, S. Emile; Fozdar, Preeya; Kilby, Jack; Garren, Emma; Yoshii, Taishi; Hirsh, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY) have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM) shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles. PMID:23874218

  4. Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph; Glaser, Alex E.; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In response to stress and extracellular signals, the heart undergoes a process called cardiac hypertrophy during which cardiomyocytes increase in size. If untreated, cardiac hypertrophy can progress to overt heart failure that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The identification of molecular signals that cause or modify cardiomyopathies is necessary to understand how the normal heart progresses to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is essential for normal human cardiac function, and the inhibition of RTKs can cause dilated cardiomyopathies. However, neither investigations of activated RTK signaling pathways nor the characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the adult fly heart has been previously described. Therefore, we developed strategies using Drosophila as a model to circumvent some of the complexities associated with mammalian models of cardiovascular disease. Transgenes encoding activated EGFRA887T, Ras85DV12 and Ras85DV12S35, which preferentially signal to Raf, or constitutively active human or fly Raf caused hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as determined by decreased end diastolic lumen dimensions, abnormal cardiomyocyte fiber morphology and increased heart wall thicknesses. There were no changes in cardiomyocyte cell numbers. Additionally, activated Raf also induced an increase in cardiomyocyte ploidy compared with control hearts. However, preventing increases in cardiomyocyte ploidy using fizzy-related (Fzr) RNAi did not rescue Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that Raf-mediated polyploidization is not required for cardiac hypertrophy. Similar to mammals, the cardiac-specific expression of RNAi directed against MEK or ERK rescued Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. However, the cardiac-specific expression of activated ERKD334N, which promotes hyperplasia in non-cardiac tissues, did not cause myocyte hypertrophy. These results suggest that ERK is necessary, but not sufficient, for

  5. Sex-biased transcriptome evolution in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Assis, Raquel; Zhou, Qi; Bachtrog, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Sex-biased genes are thought to drive phenotypic differences between males and females. The recent availability of high-throughput gene expression data for many related species has led to a burst of investigations into the genomic and evolutionary properties of sex-biased genes. In Drosophila, a number of studies have found that X chromosomes are deficient in male-biased genes (demasculinized) and enriched for female-biased genes (feminized) and that male-biased genes evolve faster than female-biased genes. However, studies have yielded vastly different conclusions regarding the numbers of sex-biased genes and forces shaping their evolution. Here, we use RNA-seq data from multiple tissues of Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura, a species with a recently evolved X chromosome, to explore the evolution of sex-biased genes in Drosophila. First, we compare several independent metrics for classifying sex-biased genes and find that the overlap of genes identified by different metrics is small, particularly for female-biased genes. Second, we investigate genome-wide expression patterns and uncover evidence of demasculinization and feminization of both ancestral and new X chromosomes, demonstrating that gene content on sex chromosomes evolves rapidly. Third, we examine the evolutionary rates of sex-biased genes and show that male-biased genes evolve much faster than female-biased genes, which evolve at similar rates to unbiased genes. Analysis of gene expression among tissues reveals that this trend may be partially due to pleiotropic effects of female-biased genes, which limits their evolutionary potential. Thus, our findings illustrate the importance of accurately identifying sex-biased genes and provide insight into their evolutionary dynamics in Drosophila.

  6. Psychomotor Behavior: A Practical Approach in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Iliadi, Konstantin G.; Gluscencova, Oxana B.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.

    2016-01-01

    Psychomotor behaviors are governed by fine relationships between physical activity and cognitive functions. Disturbances in psychomotor development and performance are a hallmark of many mental illnesses and often appear as observable and measurable behaviors. Here, we describe a new method called an “equilibrist test,” which can be used to quantify psychomotor learning and performance in Drosophila. We also show how this test can be used to quantify motor disturbances at relatively early stages in the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. A Drosophila model to image phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Shandala, Tetyana; Lim, Chiaoxin; Sorvina, Alexandra; Brooks, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosis involves the internalization of extracellular material by invagination of the plasma membrane to form intracellular vesicles called phagosomes, which have functions that include pathogen degradation. The degradative properties of phagosomes are thought to be conferred by sequential fusion with endosomes and lysosomes; however, this maturation process has not been studied in vivo. We employed Drosophila hemocytes, which are similar to mammalian professional macrophages, to establish a model of phagosome maturation. Adult Drosophila females, carrying transgenic Rab7-GFP endosome and Lamp1-GFP lysosome markers, were injected with E. coli DH5α and the hemocytes were collected at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after infection. In wild-type females, E. coli were detected within enlarged Rab7-GFP positive phagosomes at 15 to 45 minutes after infection; and were also observed in enlarged Lamp1-GFP positive phagolysosomes at 45 minutes. Two-photon imaging of hemocytes in vivo confirmed this vesicle morphology, including enlargement of Rab7-GFP and Lamp1-GFP structures that often appeared to protrude from hemocytes. The interaction of endosomes and lysosomes with E. coli phagosomes observed in Drosophila hemocytes was consistent with that previously described for phagosome maturation in human ex vivo macrophages. We also tested our model as a tool for genetic analysis using 14-3-3e mutants, and demonstrated altered phagosome maturation with delayed E. coli internalization, trafficking and/or degradation. These findings demonstrate that Drosophila hemocytes provide an appropriate, genetically amenable, model for analyzing phagosome maturation ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:24709696

  8. Psychomotor Behavior: A Practical Approach in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Iliadi, Konstantin G; Gluscencova, Oxana B; Boulianne, Gabrielle L

    2016-01-01

    Psychomotor behaviors are governed by fine relationships between physical activity and cognitive functions. Disturbances in psychomotor development and performance are a hallmark of many mental illnesses and often appear as observable and measurable behaviors. Here, we describe a new method called an "equilibrist test," which can be used to quantify psychomotor learning and performance in Drosophila. We also show how this test can be used to quantify motor disturbances at relatively early stages in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27630583

  9. Queuine metabolism and cadmium toxicity in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, W.R.; Siard, T. ); Jacobson, K.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Queuine is a derivative of guanine found in the first position of the anticodon of the transfer RNAs for Asp, Asn, His and Tyr. The transcripts of these tRNAs contain a guanine in this position. This guanine is enzymatically excised and replaced by queuine. The ratio of queuine-containing or (q+) tRNA to its precursor or (q{minus}) tRNA changes throughout the Drosophila life cycle. in the egg 10% of the tRNA is (q+). During the three larval stages this ratio drops to zero. In the one day old adult it is about 10%. It has previously been shown that when flies are selected for the ability to grow in the presence of cadmium, the tolerant flies had 100% (q+) tRNA at the first day after pupation instead of 10%. However, it was not known whether the elevated level of (q+) tRNA was a coincidence or if the elevated levels of (q+) tRNA was protective. The authors explored this problem using germfree Drosophila. The first thing was to determine if Drosophila can synthesize queuine. Sterilized eggs were seeded onto sterile chemically defined medium. The flies were grown to the adult stage. This study showed that Drosophila like mammals cannot synthesize queuine. A second result of this research was the demonstration that the authors could alter the ratio of (q+) to (q{minus}) tRNA by adding exogenous queuine to the medium e.g. at 0.008 mM queuine the (q+) tRNA was 95% instead of {lt} 5% in the last instar stage. Finally, the authors investigated whether or not queuine gave protection against cadmium. The results were that when the flies were grown in the presence of 0.2 mM cadmium queuine at 0.008 mM gave a statistically significant increase in the number of survivors.

  10. Dimethylnitrosamine demethylase activity in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.C.; Nix, C.E.; Epler, J.L.

    1982-06-15

    A dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) demethylase with levels of activity comparable to that in uninduced rat liver was demonstrated in both larval and adult forms of the Hikone-R strain of Drosophila. A microsomal enzyme, it has many properties of a cytochrome P-450-containing mixed-function oxidase. Kinetic analysis indicates only a single enzyme with an apparent K/sub m/ of 10.5 mM DMN.

  11. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  12. Protein Crystals of Raf Kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image shows crystals of the protein raf kinase grown on Earth (photo a) and on USML-2 (photo b). The space-grown crystals are an order of magnitude larger. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals

  13. Navigational decision-making in Drosophila thermotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Linjiao; Gershow, Marc; Rosenzweig, Mark; Kang, KyeongJin; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Garrity, Paul A.; Samuel, Aravinthan

    2010-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of animal navigation requires quantitative assessment of the sensorimotor strategies used during navigation and quantitative assessment of how these strategies are regulated by cellular sensors. Here, we examine thermotactic behavior of the Drosophila melanogaster larva using a tracking microscope to study individual larval movements on defined temperature gradients. We discover that larval thermotaxis involves a larger repertoire of strategies than navigation in smaller organisms such as motile bacteria and C. elegans. Beyond regulating run length (i.e., biasing a random walk), the Drosophila melanogaster larva also regulates the size and direction of turns to achieve and maintain favorable orientations. Thus, the sharp turns in a larva's trajectory represent decision points for selecting new directions of forward movement. The larva uses the same strategies to move up temperature gradients during positive thermotaxis and to move down temperature gradients during negative thermotaxis. Disrupting positive thermotaxis by inactivating cold-sensitive neurons in the larva's terminal organ weakens all regulation of turning decisions, suggesting that information from one set of temperature sensors is used to regulate all aspects of turning decisions. The Drosophila melanogaster larva performs thermotaxis by biasing stochastic turning decisions on the basis of temporal variations in thermosensory input, thereby augmenting the likelihood of heading towards favorable temperatures at all times. PMID:20335462

  14. Contrasting evolutionary patterns in Drosophila immune receptors.

    PubMed

    Jiggins, Francis M; Kim, Kang-Wook

    2006-12-01

    Vertebrate immune system molecules that bind directly to parasites are commonly subject to strong directional natural selection, probably because they are engaged in an evolutionary arms race with parasites. We have investigated whether similar patterns of evolution are seen in components of the Drosophila immune system that bind parasite-derived molecules. In insects, TEPs (thioester-containing proteins) function as opsonins, binding to parasites and promoting their phagocytosis or encapsulation. The Drosophila melanogaster genome encodes four TEPs, three of which are upregulated after an immune challenge. We report that two of these three Drosophila genes evolve rapidly under positive selection and that, in both TepI and TepII, the "bait-like region" (also known as the variable region) shows the strongest signature of positive selection. This region may be the site of proteolytic cleavage that leads to the activation of the molecule. It is possible that the proteolytic activation of TEPs is a target of host-parasite coevolution, with parasites evolving to prevent proteolysis, which in turn favors mutations in the bait-like region that restore the response. We also sequenced three gram-negative binding proteins (GNBPs) and two immune-induced peptides with strong homology to the GNBPs. In contrast to the Tep genes, the GNBP genes are highly conserved. We discuss the reasons why different components of the immune system have such different patterns of evolution.

  15. Intron loss and gain in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Majewski, Jacek

    2007-12-01

    Although introns were first discovered almost 30 years ago, their evolutionary origin remains elusive. In this work, we used multispecies whole-genome alignments to map Drosophila melanogaster introns onto 10 other fully sequenced Drosophila genomes. We were able to find 1,944 sites where an intron was missing in one or more species. We show that for most (>80%) of these cases, there is no leftover intronic sequence or any missing exonic sequence, indicating exact intron loss or gain events. We used parsimony to classify these differences as 1,754 intron loss events and 213 gain events. We show that lost and gained introns are significantly shorter than average and flanked by longer than average exons. They also display quite distinct phase distributions and show greater than average similarity between the 5' splice site and its 3' partner splice site. Introns that have been lost in one or more species evolve faster than other introns, occur in slowly evolving genes, and are found adjacent to each other more often than would be expected for independent single losses. Our results support the cDNA recombination mechanism of intron loss, suggest that selective pressures affect site-specific loss rates, and show conclusively that intron gain has occurred within the Drosophila lineage, solidifying the "introns-middle" hypothesis and providing some hints about the gain mechanism.

  16. The Ran Pathway in Drosophila melanogaster Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jack W. C.; Barker, Amy R.; Wakefield, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance, and regulation of the microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs)—a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation. PMID:26636083

  17. Imprinted control of gene activity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Golic, K G; Golic, M M; Pimpinelli, S

    1998-11-19

    Genetic imprinting is defined as a reversible, differential marking of genes or chromosomes that is determined by the sex of the parent from whom the genetic material is inherited [1]. Imprinting was first observed in insects where, in some species, most notably among the coccoids (scale insects and allies), the differential marking of paternally and maternally transmitted chromosome sets leads to inactivation or elimination of paternal chromosomes [2]. Imprinting is also widespread in plants and mammals [3,4], in which paternally and maternally inherited alleles may be differentially expressed. Despite imprinting having been discovered in insects, clear examples of parental imprinting are scarce in the model insect species Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a case of imprint-mediated control of gene expression in Drosophila. The imprinted gene - the white+ eye-color gene - is expressed at a low level when transmitted by males, and at a high level when transmitted by females. Thus, in common with coccoids, Drosophila is capable of generating an imprint, and can respond to that imprint by silencing the paternal allele. PMID:9822579

  18. Colorectal cancer progression: lessons from Drosophila?

    PubMed

    Bell, Graham P; Thompson, Barry J

    2014-04-01

    Human colorectal cancers arise as benign adenomas, tumours that retain their epithelial character, and then progress to malignant adenocarcinomas and carcinomas in which the epithelium becomes disrupted. Carcinomas often exhibit transcriptional downregulation of E-cadherin and other epithelial genes in an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism first discovered in Drosophila to be mediated by the transcription factors Twist and Snail. In contrast, adenocarcinomas retain expression of E-cadherin and disruption of the epithelium occurs through formation of progressively smaller epithelial cysts with apical Crumbs/CRB3, Stardust/PALS1, and Bazooka/PAR3 localised to the inner lumen. Results from Drosophila show that morphologically similar cysts form upon induction of clonal heterogeneity in Wnt, Smad, or Ras signalling levels, which causes extrusion of epithelial cells at clonal boundaries. Thus, intratumour heterogeneity might also promote formation of adenocarcinomas in humans. Finally, epithelial cysts can collectively migrate, as in the case of Drosophila border cells, a potential model system for the invasive migration of adenocarcinoma cells.

  19. The Soluble Proteome of the Drosophila Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Taufika Islam

    2010-01-01

    The olfactory system of Drosophila melanogaster is one of the best characterized chemosensory systems. Identification of proteins contained in the third antennal segment, the main olfactory organ, has previously relied primarily on immunohistochemistry, and although such studies and in situ hybridization studies are informative, they focus generally on one or few gene products at a time, and quantification is difficult. In addition, purification of native proteins from the antenna is challenging because it is small and encased in a hard cuticle. Here, we describe a simple method for the large-scale detection of soluble proteins from the Drosophila antenna by chromatographic separation of tryptic peptides followed by tandem mass spectrometry with femtomole detection sensitivities. Examination of the identities of these proteins indicates that they originate both from the extracellular perilymph and from the cytoplasm of disrupted cells. We identified enzymes involved with intermediary metabolism, proteins associated with regulation of gene expression, nucleic acid metabolism and protein metabolism, proteins associated with microtubular transport, 8 odorant-binding proteins, protective enzymes associated with antibacterial defense and defense against oxidative damage, cuticular proteins, and proteins of unknown function, which represented about one-third of all soluble proteins. The procedure described here opens the way for precise quantification of any target protein in the Drosophila antenna and should be readily applicable to antennae from other insects. PMID:19917591

  20. Specification of the somatic musculature in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dobi, Krista C; Schulman, Victoria K; Baylies, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    The somatic muscle system formed during Drosophila embryogenesis is required for larvae to hatch, feed, and crawl. This system is replaced in the pupa by a new adult muscle set, responsible for activities such as feeding, walking, and flight. Both the larval and adult muscle systems are comprised of distinct muscle fibers to serve these specific motor functions. In this way, the Drosophila musculature is a valuable model for patterning within a single tissue: while all muscle cells share properties such as the contractile apparatus, properties such as size, position, and number of nuclei are unique for a particular muscle. In the embryo, diversification of muscle fibers relies first on signaling cascades that pattern the mesoderm. Subsequently, the combinatorial expression of specific transcription factors leads muscle fibers to adopt particular sizes, shapes, and orientations. Adult muscle precursors (AMPs), set aside during embryonic development, proliferate during the larval phases and seed the formation of the abdominal, leg, and flight muscles in the adult fly. Adult muscle fibers may either be formed de novo from the fusion of the AMPs, or are created by the binding of AMPs to an existing larval muscle. While less is known about adult muscle specification compared to the larva, expression of specific transcription factors is also important for its diversification. Increasingly, the mechanisms required for the diversification of fly muscle have found parallels in vertebrate systems and mark Drosophila as a robust model system to examine questions about how diverse cell types are generated within an organism.

  1. SPARC–Dependent Cardiomyopathy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Bodmer, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background— The Drosophila heart is an important model for studying the genetics underpinning mammalian cardiac function. The system comprises contractile cardiomyocytes, adjacent to which are pairs of highly endocytic pericardial nephrocytes that modulate cardiac function by uncharacterized mechanisms. Identifying these mechanisms and the molecules involved is important because they may be relevant to human cardiac physiology. Methods and Results— This work aimed to identify circulating cardiomodulatory factors of potential relevance to humans using the Drosophila nephrocyte–cardiomyocyte system. A Kruppel-like factor 15 (dKlf15) loss-of-function strategy was used to ablate nephrocytes and then heart function and the hemolymph proteome were analyzed. Ablation of nephrocytes led to a severe cardiomyopathy characterized by a lengthening of diastolic interval. Rendering adult nephrocytes dysfunctional by disrupting their endocytic function or temporally conditional knockdown of dKlf15 led to a similar cardiomyopathy. Proteomics revealed that nephrocytes regulate the circulating levels of many secreted proteins, the most notable of which was the evolutionarily conserved matricellular protein Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC), a protein involved in mammalian cardiac function. Finally, reducing SPARC gene dosage ameliorated the cardiomyopathy that developed in the absence of nephrocytes. Conclusions— The data implicate SPARC in the noncell autonomous control of cardiac function in Drosophila and suggest that modulation of SPARC gene expression may ameliorate cardiac dysfunction in humans. PMID:26839388

  2. dachshund Potentiates Hedgehog Signaling during Drosophila Retinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Stein; Casares, Fernando; Janody, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Proper organ patterning depends on a tight coordination between cell proliferation and differentiation. The patterning of Drosophila retina occurs both very fast and with high precision. This process is driven by the dynamic changes in signaling activity of the conserved Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which coordinates cell fate determination, cell cycle and tissue morphogenesis. Here we show that during Drosophila retinogenesis, the retinal determination gene dachshund (dac) is not only a target of the Hh signaling pathway, but is also a modulator of its activity. Using developmental genetics techniques, we demonstrate that dac enhances Hh signaling by promoting the accumulation of the Gli transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci) parallel to or downstream of fused. In the absence of dac, all Hh-mediated events associated to the morphogenetic furrow are delayed. One of the consequences is that, posterior to the furrow, dac- cells cannot activate a Roadkill-Cullin3 negative feedback loop that attenuates Hh signaling and which is necessary for retinal cells to continue normal differentiation. Therefore, dac is part of an essential positive feedback loop in the Hh pathway, guaranteeing the speed and the accuracy of Drosophila retinogenesis. PMID:27442438

  3. Transcriptional regulation of xenobiotic detoxification in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Jyoti R.; Horner, Michael A.; Lam, Geanette; Thummel, Carl S.

    2011-01-01

    Living organisms, from bacteria to humans, display a coordinated transcriptional response to xenobiotic exposure, inducing enzymes and transporters that facilitate detoxification. Several transcription factors have been identified in vertebrates that contribute to this regulatory response. In contrast, little is known about this pathway in insects. Here we show that the Drosophila Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) ortholog CncC (cap ‘n’ collar isoform-C) is a central regulator of xenobiotic detoxification responses. A binding site for CncC and its heterodimer partner Maf (muscle aponeurosis fibromatosis) is sufficient and necessary for robust transcriptional responses to three xenobiotic compounds: phenobarbital (PB), chlorpromazine, and caffeine. Genetic manipulations that alter the levels of CncC or its negative regulator, Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1), lead to predictable changes in xenobiotic-inducible gene expression. Transcriptional profiling studies reveal that more than half of the genes regulated by PB are also controlled by CncC. Consistent with these effects on detoxification gene expression, activation of the CncC/Keap1 pathway in Drosophila is sufficient to confer resistance to the lethal effects of the pesticide malathion. These studies establish a molecular mechanism for the regulation of xenobiotic detoxification in Drosophila and have implications for controlling insect populations and the spread of insect-borne human diseases. PMID:21896655

  4. Interdomain allosteric regulation of Polo kinase by Aurora B and Map205 is required for cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Kachaner, David; Pinson, Xavier; El Kadhi, Khaled Ben; Normandin, Karine; Talje, Lama; Lavoie, Hugo; Lépine, Guillaume; Carréno, Sébastien; Kwok, Benjamin H; Hickson, Gilles R; Archambault, Vincent

    2014-10-27

    Drosophila melanogaster Polo and its human orthologue Polo-like kinase 1 fulfill essential roles during cell division. Members of the Polo-like kinase (Plk) family contain an N-terminal kinase domain (KD) and a C-terminal Polo-Box domain (PBD), which mediates protein interactions. How Plks are regulated in cytokinesis is poorly understood. Here we show that phosphorylation of Polo by Aurora B is required for cytokinesis. This phosphorylation in the activation loop of the KD promotes the dissociation of Polo from the PBD-bound microtubule-associated protein Map205, which acts as an allosteric inhibitor of Polo kinase activity. This mechanism allows the release of active Polo from microtubules of the central spindle and its recruitment to the site of cytokinesis. Failure in Polo phosphorylation results in both early and late cytokinesis defects. Importantly, the antagonistic regulation of Polo by Aurora B and Map205 in cytokinesis reveals that interdomain allosteric mechanisms can play important roles in controlling the cellular functions of Plks.

  5. The Drosophila Midkine/Pleiotrophin Homologues Miple1 and Miple2 Affect Adult Lifespan but Are Dispensable for Alk Signaling during Embryonic Gut Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hugosson, Fredrik; Sjögren, Camilla; Birve, Anna; Hedlund, Ludmilla; Eriksson, Therese; Palmer, Ruth H.

    2014-01-01

    Midkine (MDK) and Pleiotrophin (PTN) are small heparin-binding cytokines with closely related structures. The Drosophila genome harbours two genes encoding members of the MDK/PTN family of proteins, known as miple1 and miple2. We have investigated the role of Miple proteins in vivo, in particular with regard to their proposed role as ligands for the Alk receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Here we show that Miple proteins are neither required to drive Alk signaling during Drosophila embryogenesis, nor are they essential for development in the fruit fly. Additionally we show that neither MDK nor PTN can activate hALK in vivo when ectopically co-expressed in the fly. In conclusion, our data suggest that Alk is not activated by MDK/PTN related growth factors Miple1 and Miple 2 in vivo. PMID:25380037

  6. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alice T; Hsu, Peggy P; Awad, Mark M; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as 'druggable' targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours.

  7. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Hsu, Peggy P.; Awad, Mark M.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as ‘druggable’ targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours. PMID:24132104

  8. First foreign exploration for asian parasitoids of Drosophila suzukii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The invasive spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Dipt.: Drosophilidae), is a native of East Asia and is now widely established in North America and Europe, where it is a serious pest of small and stone fruit crops. The lack of effective indigenous parasitoids of D. suzukii in the ...

  9. Drosophila suzukii population response to environment and management strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, quickly emerged as a devastating invasive pest of small and stone fruits in the Americas and Europe. To better understand the population dynamics of D. suzukii, we reviewed recent work on juvenile development, adult reproduction, and seasonal variation in...

  10. Susceptibility of cranberries to Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drosophila suzukii Mastsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae), commonly referred to as the spotted-wing drosophila, is an exotic species that has proven a troublesome pest of fruit production in the U.S. The fly targets small fruit and thus represents a concern for the U.S. cranberry industry. Two studies ...

  11. A product of the bicistronic Drosophila melanogaster gene CG31241, which also encodes a trimethylguanosine synthase, plays a role in telomere protection.

    PubMed

    Komonyi, Orban; Schauer, Tamas; Papai, Gabor; Deak, Peter; Boros, Imre M

    2009-03-15

    Although telomere formation occurs through a different mechanism in Drosophila compared with other organisms, telomere associations result from mutations in homologous genes, indicating the involvement of similar pathways in chromosome end protection. We report here that mutations of the Drosophila melanogaster gene CG31241 lead to high frequency chromosome end fusions. CG31241 is a bicistronic gene that encodes trimethylguanosine synthase (TGS1), which forms the m3G caps of noncoding small RNAs, and a novel protein, DTL. We show that although TGS1 has no role in telomere protection, DTL is localized at specific sites, including the ends of polytene chromosomes, and its loss results in telomere associations. Mutations of ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase suppress telomere fusions in the absence of DTL. Thus, genetic interactions place DTL in an ATR-related pathway in telomere protection. In contrast to ATR kinase, mutations of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) kinase, which acts in a partially overlapping pathway of telomere protection, do not suppress formation of telomere associations in the absence of DTL. Thus, uncovering the role of DTL will help to dissect the evolutionary conserved pathway(s) controlling ATM-ATR-related telomere protection.

  12. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most well studied genetic model organisms; nonetheless, its genome still contains unannotated coding and non-coding genes, transcripts, exons and RNA editing sites. Full discovery and annotation are pre-requisites for understanding how the regulation of transcription, splicing and RNA editing directs the development of this complex organism. Here we used RNA-Seq, tiling microarrays and cDNA sequencing to explore the transcriptome in 30 distinct developmental stages. We identified 111,195 new elements, including thousands of genes, coding and non-coding transcripts, exons, splicing and editing events, and inferred protein isoforms that previously eluded discovery using established experimental, prediction and conservation-based approaches. These data substantially expand the number of known transcribed elements in the Drosophila genome and provide a high-resolution view of transcriptome dynamics throughout development. Drosophila melanogaster is an important non-mammalian model system that has had a critical role in basic biological discoveries, such as identifying chromosomes as the carriers of genetic information and uncovering the role of genes in development. Because it shares a substantial genic content with humans, Drosophila is increasingly used as a translational model for human development, homeostasis and disease. High-quality maps are needed for all functional genomic elements. Previous studies demonstrated that a rich collection of genes is deployed during the life cycle of the fly. Although expression profiling using microarrays has revealed the expression of, 13,000 annotated genes, it is difficult to map splice junctions and individual base modifications generated by RNA editing using such approaches. Single-base resolution is essential to define precisely the elements that comprise the Drosophila transcriptome. Estimates of the number of transcript isoforms are less accurate than estimates of the number of genes

  13. An inventory of peroxisomal proteins and pathways in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Joseph E.; Verma, Avani; Peng, Chengwei; McNew, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles housing a variety of essential biochemical pathways. Peroxisome dysfunction causes a spectrum of human diseases known as peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD). While much is known regarding the mechanism of peroxisome biogenesis, it is still unclear how peroxisome dysfunction leads to the disease state. Several recent studies have shown that mutations in Drosophila peroxin genes cause phenotypes similar to those seen in humans with PBDs suggesting that Drosophila might be a useful system to model PBDs. We have analyzed the proteome of Drosophila to identify the proteins involved in peroxisomal biogenesis and homeostasis as well as metabolic enzymes that function within the organelle. The subcellular localization of five of these predicted peroxisomal proteins was confirmed. Similar to C. elegans, Drosophila appears to only utilize the peroxisome targeting signal (PTS) type 1 system for matrix protein import. This work will further our understanding of peroxisomes in Drosophila and add to the usefulness of this emerging model system. PMID:22758915

  14. A screen for fast evolving genes from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schmid, K J; Tautz, D

    1997-09-01

    In an attempt to quantify the rates of protein sequence divergence in Drosophila, we have devised a screen to differentiate between slow and fast evolving genes. We find that over one-third of randomly drawn cDNAs from a Drosophila melanogaster library do not cross-hybridize with Drosophila virilis DNA, indicating that they evolve with a very high rate. To determine the evolutionary characteristics of such protein sequences, we sequenced their homologs from a more closely related species (Drosophila yakuba). The amino acid substitution rates among these cDNAs are among the fastest known and several are only about 2-fold lower than the corresponding values for silent substitutions. An analysis of within-species polymorphisms for one of these sequences reveals an exceptionally high number of polymorphic amino acid positions, indicating that the protein is not under strong negative selection. We conclude that the Drosophila genome harbors a substantial proportion of genes with a very high divergence rate.

  15. Rhodopsin 7–The unusual Rhodopsin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rhodopsins are the major photopigments in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila express six well-characterized Rhodopsins (Rh1–Rh6) with distinct absorption maxima and expression pattern. In 2000, when the Drosophila genome was published, a novel Rhodopsin gene was discovered: Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7). Rh7 is highly conserved among the Drosophila genus and is also found in other arthropods. Phylogenetic trees based on protein sequences suggest that the seven Drosophila Rhodopsins cluster in three different groups. While Rh1, Rh2 and Rh6 form a “vertebrate-melanopsin-type”–cluster, and Rh3, Rh4 and Rh5 form an “insect-type”-Rhodopsin cluster, Rh7 seem to form its own cluster. Although Rh7 has nearly all important features of a functional Rhodopsin, it differs from other Rhodopsins in its genomic and structural properties, suggesting it might have an overall different role than other known Rhodopsins.

  16. Rhodopsin 7–The unusual Rhodopsin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rhodopsins are the major photopigments in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila express six well-characterized Rhodopsins (Rh1–Rh6) with distinct absorption maxima and expression pattern. In 2000, when the Drosophila genome was published, a novel Rhodopsin gene was discovered: Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7). Rh7 is highly conserved among the Drosophila genus and is also found in other arthropods. Phylogenetic trees based on protein sequences suggest that the seven Drosophila Rhodopsins cluster in three different groups. While Rh1, Rh2 and Rh6 form a “vertebrate-melanopsin-type”–cluster, and Rh3, Rh4 and Rh5 form an “insect-type”-Rhodopsin cluster, Rh7 seem to form its own cluster. Although Rh7 has nearly all important features of a functional Rhodopsin, it differs from other Rhodopsins in its genomic and structural properties, suggesting it might have an overall different role than other known Rhodopsins. PMID:27651995

  17. Immune resistance of Drosophila hosts against Asobara parasitoids: cellular aspects.

    PubMed

    Eslin, Patrice; Prévost, Geneviève; Havard, Sébastien; Doury, Géraldine

    2009-01-01

    The immunity of Drosophila relies on a variety of defenses cooperating to fight parasites and pathogens. The encapsulation reaction is the main hemocytic response neutralizing large parasites like endophagous parasitoids. The diversity of the mechanisms of immunoevasion evolved by Asobara parasitoids, together with the wide spectrum of Drosophila host species they can parasitize, make them ideal models to study and unravel the physiological and cellular aspects of host immunity. This chapter summarizes what could be learnt on the cellular features of the encapsulation process in various Drosophila spp., and also on the major role played by Drosophila hosts hemocytes subpopulations, both in a quantitative and qualitative manner, regarding the issue of the immune Asobara-Drosophila interactions.

  18. Discovery of Trypanosomatid Parasites in Globally Distributed Drosophila Species

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, James Angus; James, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial parasites of animals include bacteria, viruses, and various unicellular eukaryotes. Because of the difficulty in studying these microorganisms in both humans and disease vectors, laboratory models are commonly used for experimental analysis of host-parasite interactions. Drosophila is one such model that has made significant contributions to our knowledge of bacterial, fungal, and viral infections. Despite this, less is known about other potential parasites associated with natural Drosophila populations. Here, we surveyed sixteen Drosophila populations comprising thirteen species from four continents and Hawaii and found that they are associated with an extensive diversity of trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa, Kinetoplastea). Phylogenetic analysis finds that Drosophila-associated trypanosomatids are closely related to taxa that are responsible for various types of leishmaniases and more distantly related to the taxa responsible for human African trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease. We suggest that Drosophila may provide a powerful system for studying the interactions between trypanosomatids and their hosts. PMID:23658617

  19. In vitro protein phosphorylation in head preparations from normal and mutant Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, J D; Dudai, Y

    1987-10-01

    We have characterized protein phosphorylation in vitro in subcellular fractions from Drosophila melanogaster heads. Optimal conditions for the incorporation of 32P into proteins, and its dependence on ATP, divalent cations, and cyclic nucleotides have been determined, as well as the effect of inhibitors of ATPase, protein phosphatase, and protein kinase on protein phosphorylation. Among these inhibitors, Zn2+ was found to affect the incorporation of 32P into specific bands and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate was found to be most suited for freezing the activity of both kinases and phosphatases. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-dPK) activity was present in both supernatant (S2) and particulate (P2) fractions, with the majority (60-85%, depending on the homogenization medium) being associated with S2, as determined by phosphorylation of exogenous synapsin I. cAMP-dPK catalyzed the phosphorylation of at least 18 endogenous polypeptides in S2 and at least 10 endogenous polypeptides in P2. These proteins could be classified on the basis of the extent of stimulation of phosphorylation by cyclic nucleotides, dependence on cyclic nucleotide concentration, and rate of phosphorylation. A phosphoprotein of 51 kilodaltons (pp51) was a major component of the S2 and P2 fractions and displayed properties expected from the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dPK, R-II. A phosphoprotein doublet of approximately 37 kilodaltons (pp37) was stimulated to the largest extent by cAMP in the P2 and S2 fractions. The phosphorylation of several proteins in both fractions was significantly lowered by the mammalian Walsh inhibitor of cAMP-dPK, whereas in some cases the stimulation of phosphorylation of the same proteins by exogeneous cAMP was relatively small. Phosphoproteins from two learning mutants known to be deficient in cAMP metabolism, dnc and rut, were analyzed for their extent of phosphorylation in the presence of a stable cAMP analogue; no significant differences from normal were

  20. The influence of temperature and photoperiod on the reproductive diapause and cold tolerance of spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge regarding the reproductive status of spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura)(Diptera: Drosophilidae) is of critical importance in predicting potential infestations of this invasive pest, as eggs are laid in ripe or ripening fruit of several commercially important small frui...

  1. Optimizing postharvest methyl bromide treatments to control spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, in sweet cherries from Western USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide (MB) chamber fumigations were evaluated for postharvest control of spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), in fresh sweet cherry exports from Western USA. Sweet cherries were infested with SWD, incubated to maximize numbers of the most M...

  2. S6 Kinase Reflects and Regulates Ethanol-Induced Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Summer F.; Peru y Colón de Portugal, Raniero L.; Gonzalez, Dante A.; Rodan, Aylin R.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) affect people at great individual and societal cost. Individuals at risk for AUDs are sensitive to alcohol's rewarding effects and/or resistant to its aversive and sedating effects. The molecular basis for these traits is poorly understood. Here, we show that p70 S6 kinase (S6k), acting downstream of the insulin receptor (InR) and the small GTPase Arf6, is a key mediator of ethanol-induced sedation in Drosophila. S6k signaling in the adult nervous system determines flies' sensitivity to sedation. Furthermore, S6k activity, measured via levels of phosphorylation (P-S6k), is a molecular marker for sedation and overall neuronal activity: P-S6k levels are decreased when neurons are silenced, as well as after acute ethanol sedation. Conversely, P-S6k levels rebound upon recovery from sedation and are increased when neuronal activity is enhanced. Reducing neural activity increases sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation, whereas neuronal activation decreases ethanol sensitivity. These data suggest that ethanol has acute silencing effects on adult neuronal activity, which suppresses InR/Arf6/S6k signaling and results in behavioral sedation. In addition, we show that activity of InR/Arf6/S6k signaling determines flies' behavioral sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation, highlighting this pathway in acute responses to ethanol. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Genetic factors play a major role in the development of addiction. Identifying these genes and understanding their molecular mechanisms is a necessary first step in the development of targeted therapeutic intervention. Here, we show that signaling from the insulin receptor in Drosophila neurons determines flies' sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation. We show that this signaling cascade includes the small GTPase Arf6 and S6 kinase (S6k). In addition, activity of S6k is regulated by acute ethanol exposure and by neuronal activity. S6k activity is therefore both an acute target of ethanol exposure and

  3. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson’s group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src–transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src–associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month. PMID:26130799

  4. Induction of focal adhesions and motility in Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Susana A; D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Vale, Ronald D

    2014-12-01

    Focal adhesions are dynamic structures that interact with the extracellular matrix on the cell exterior and actin filaments on the cell interior, enabling cells to adhere and crawl along surfaces. We describe a system for inducing the formation of focal adhesions in normally non-ECM-adherent, nonmotile Drosophila S2 cells. These focal adhesions contain the expected molecular markers such as talin, vinculin, and p130Cas, and they require talin for their formation. The S2 cells with induced focal adhesions also display a nonpolarized form of motility on vitronectin-coated substrates. Consistent with findings in mammalian cells, the degree of motility can be tuned by changing the stiffness of the substrate and was increased after the depletion of PAK3, a p21-activated kinase. A subset of nonmotile, nonpolarized cells also exhibited focal adhesions that rapidly assembled and disassembled around the cell perimeter. Such cooperative and dynamic fluctuations of focal adhesions were decreased by RNA interference (RNAi) depletion of myosin II and focal adhesion kinase, suggesting that this behavior requires force and focal adhesion maturation. These results demonstrate that S2 cells, a cell line that is well studied for cytoskeletal dynamics and readily amenable to protein manipulation by RNAi, can be used to study the assembly and dynamics of focal adhesions and mechanosensitive cell motility.

  5. Drosophila Stardust is a partner of Crumbs in the control of epithelial cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, A; Schneider, M; Theilenberg, E; Grawe, F; Knust, E

    2001-12-01

    The polarized architecture of epithelial cells depends on the highly stereotypic distribution of cellular junctions and other membrane-associated protein complexes. In epithelial cells of the Drosophila embryo, three distinct domains subdivide the lateral plasma membrane. The most apical one comprises the subapical complex (SAC). It is followed by the zonula adherens (ZA) and, further basally, by the septate junction. A core component of the SAC is the transmembrane protein Crumbs, the cytoplasmic domain of which recruits the PDZ-protein Discs Lost into the complex. Cells lacking crumbs or the functionally related gene stardust fail to organize a continuous ZA and to maintain cell polarity. Here we show that stardust provides an essential component of the SAC. Stardust proteins colocalize with Crumbs and bind to the carboxy-terminal amino acids of its cytoplasmic tail. We introduce two different Stardust proteins here: one MAGUK protein, characterized by a PDZ domain, an SH3 domain and a guanylate kinase domain; and a second isoform comprising only the guanylate kinase domain. The Stardust proteins represent versatile candidates as structural and possibly regulatory constituents of the SAC, a crucial element in the control of epithelial cell polarity.

  6. Combover/CG10732, a Novel PCP Effector for Drosophila Wing Hair Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Jeremy K.; Dollar, Gretchen; Lu, Qiuheng; Barnett, Austen; Pechuan Jorge, Joaquin; Schlosser, Andreas; Pfleger, Cathie; Adler, Paul; Jenny, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The polarization of cells is essential for the proper functioning of most organs. Planar Cell Polarity (PCP), the polarization within the plane of an epithelium, is perpendicular to apical-basal polarity and established by the non-canonical Wnt/Fz-PCP signaling pathway. Within each tissue, downstream PCP effectors link the signal to tissue specific readouts such as stereocilia orientation in the inner ear and hair follicle orientation in vertebrates or the polarization of ommatidia and wing hairs in Drosophila melanogaster. Specific PCP effectors in the wing such as Multiple wing hairs (Mwh) and Rho Kinase (Rok) are required to position the hair at the correct position and to prevent ectopic actin hairs. In a genome-wide screen in vitro, we identified Combover (Cmb)/CG10732 as a novel Rho kinase substrate. Overexpression of Cmb causes the formation of a multiple hair cell phenotype (MHC), similar to loss of rok and mwh. This MHC phenotype is dominantly enhanced by removal of rok or of other members of the PCP effector gene family. Furthermore, we show that Cmb physically interacts with Mwh, and cmb null mutants suppress the MHC phenotype of mwh alleles. Our data indicate that Cmb is a novel PCP effector that promotes to wing hair formation, a function that is antagonized by Mwh. PMID:25207969

  7. Coordinate regulation of IkappaB kinases by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 and NF-kappaB-inducing kinase.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, S; DiDonato, J A; Lin, A

    1998-12-01

    IkappaB kinases (IKKalpha and IKKbeta) are key components of the IKK complex that mediates activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in response to extracellular stimuli such as inflammatory cytokines, viral and bacterial infection, and UV irradiation. Although NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) interacts with and activates the IKKs, the upstream kinases for the IKKs still remain obscure. We identified mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1) as an immediate upstream kinase of the IKK complex. MEKK1 is activated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 and can potentiate the stimulatory effect of TNF-alpha on IKK and NF-kappaB activation. The dominant negative mutant of MEKK1, on the other hand, partially blocks activation of IKK by TNF-alpha. MEKK1 interacts with and stimulates the activities of both IKKalpha and IKKbeta in transfected HeLa and COS-1 cells and directly phosphorylates the IKKs in vitro. Furthermore, MEKK1 appears to act in parallel to NIK, leading to synergistic activation of the IKK complex. The formation of the MEKK1-IKK complex versus the NIK-IKK complex may provide a molecular basis for regulation of the IKK complex by various extracellular signals.

  8. Modelling the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase on adenylate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, L; Vertommen, D; Depiereux, E; Hue, L; Rider, M H; Feytmans, E

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple alignment of available sequences of the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase revealed several segments of conserved residues in the 2-kinase domain. The sequence of the kinase domain was also compared with proteins of known three-dimensional structure. No similarity was found between the kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. This questions the modelling of the 2-kinase domain on bacterial 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase that has previously been proposed [Bazan, Fletterick and Pilkis (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 9642-9646]. However, sequence similarities were found between the 2-kinase domain and several nucleotide-binding proteins, the most similar being adenylate kinase. A structural model of the 2-kinase domain based on adenylate kinase is proposed. It accommodates all the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies carried out to date on residues in the 2-kinase domain. It also allows residues potentially involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding to be predicted. PMID:9032445

  9. Gene family evolution across 12 Drosophila genomes.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Matthew W; Han, Mira V; Han, Sang-Gook

    2007-11-01

    Comparison of whole genomes has revealed large and frequent changes in the size of gene families. These changes occur because of high rates of both gene gain (via duplication) and loss (via deletion or pseudogenization), as well as the evolution of entirely new genes. Here we use the genomes of 12 fully sequenced Drosophila species to study the gain and loss of genes at unprecedented resolution. We find large numbers of both gains and losses, with over 40% of all gene families differing in size among the Drosophila. Approximately 17 genes are estimated to be duplicated and fixed in a genome every million years, a rate on par with that previously found in both yeast and mammals. We find many instances of extreme expansions or contractions in the size of gene families, including the expansion of several sex- and spermatogenesis-related families in D. melanogaster that also evolve under positive selection at the nucleotide level. Newly evolved gene families in our dataset are associated with a class of testes-expressed genes known to have evolved de novo in a number of cases. Gene family comparisons also allow us to identify a number of annotated D. melanogaster genes that are unlikely to encode functional proteins, as well as to identify dozens of previously unannotated D. melanogaster genes with conserved homologs in the other Drosophila. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the apparent stasis in total gene number among species has masked rapid turnover in individual gene gain and loss. It is likely that this genomic revolving door has played a large role in shaping the morphological, physiological, and metabolic differences among species.

  10. Temperature representation in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Frank, Dominic D; Jouandet, Genevieve C; Kearney, Patrick J; Macpherson, Lindsey J; Gallio, Marco

    2015-03-19

    In Drosophila, rapid temperature changes are detected at the periphery by dedicated receptors forming a simple sensory map for hot and cold in the brain. However, flies show a host of complex innate and learned responses to temperature, indicating that they are able to extract a range of information from this simple input. Here we define the anatomical and physiological repertoire for temperature representation in the Drosophila brain. First, we use a photolabelling strategy to trace the connections that relay peripheral thermosensory information to higher brain centres, and show that they largely converge onto three target regions: the mushroom body, the lateral horn (both of which are well known centres for sensory processing) and the posterior lateral protocerebrum, a region we now define as a major site of thermosensory representation. Next, using in vivo calcium imaging, we describe the thermosensory projection neurons selectively activated by hot or cold stimuli. Fast-adapting neurons display transient ON and OFF responses and track rapid temperature shifts remarkably well, while slow-adapting cell responses better reflect the magnitude of simple thermal changes. Unexpectedly, we also find a population of broadly tuned cells that respond to both heating and cooling, and show that they are required for normal behavioural avoidance of both hot and cold in a simple two-choice temperature preference assay. Taken together, our results uncover a coordinated ensemble of neural responses to temperature in the Drosophila brain, demonstrate that a broadly tuned thermal line contributes to rapid avoidance behaviour, and illustrate how stimulus quality, temporal structure, and intensity can be extracted from a simple glomerular map at a single synaptic station.

  11. Appetitive associative olfactory learning in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A; Widmann, Annekathrin; Rohwedder, Astrid; Pfitzenmaier, Johanna E; Thum, Andreas S

    2013-02-18

    In the following we describe the methodological details of appetitive associative olfactory learning in Drosophila larvae. The setup, in combination with genetic interference, provides a handle to analyze the neuronal and molecular fundamentals of specifically associative learning in a simple larval brain. Organisms can use past experience to adjust present behavior. Such acquisition of behavioral potential can be defined as learning, and the physical bases of these potentials as memory traces. Neuroscientists try to understand how these processes are organized in terms of molecular and neuronal changes in the brain by using a variety of methods in model organisms ranging from insects to vertebrates. For such endeavors it is helpful to use model systems that are simple and experimentally accessible. The Drosophila larva has turned out to satisfy these demands based on the availability of robust behavioral assays, the existence of a variety of transgenic techniques and the elementary organization of the nervous system comprising only about 10,000 neurons (albeit with some concessions: cognitive limitations, few behavioral options, and richness of experience questionable). Drosophila larvae can form associations between odors and appetitive gustatory reinforcement like sugar. In a standard assay, established in the lab of B. Gerber, animals receive a two-odor reciprocal training: A first group of larvae is exposed to an odor A together with a gustatory reinforcer (sugar reward) and is subsequently exposed to an odor B without reinforcement. Meanwhile a second group of larvae receives reciprocal training while experiencing odor A without reinforcement and subsequently being exposed to odor B with reinforcement (sugar reward). In the following both groups are tested for their preference between the two odors. Relatively higher preferences for the rewarded odor reflect associative learning--presented as a performance index (PI). The conclusion regarding the associative

  12. Spatiotemporal rescue of memory dysfunction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Sean E; Le, Phuong T; Osborn, Alexander J; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Davis, Ronald L

    2003-12-01

    We have developed a method for temporal and regional gene expression targeting (TARGET) in Drosophila and show the simultaneous spatial and temporal rescue of a memory defect. The transient expression of the rutabaga-encoded adenylyl cyclase in the mushroom bodies of the adult brain was necessary and sufficient to rescue the rutabaga memory deficit, which rules out a developmental brain defect in the etiology of this deficit and demonstrates an acute role for rutabaga in memory formation in these neurons. The TARGET system offers general utility in simultaneously addressing issues of when and where gene products are required. PMID:14657498

  13. A connectionist model of the Drosophila blastoderm

    SciTech Connect

    Reinitz, J. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Mjolsness, E. . Dept. of Computer Science); Sharp, D.H. . Theoretical Div.)

    1990-11-01

    The authors present a phenomenological modeling framework for development, and apply it to the network of segmentation genes operating in the blastoderm of Drosophila. Their purpose is to provide a systematic method for discovering and expressing correlations in experimental data on gene expression and other developmental processes. The modeling framework is based on a connectionist or neural net dynamics for biochemical regulators, coupled to grammatical rules which describe certain features of the birth, growth, and death of cells, synapses and other biological entities. They present preliminary numerical results regarding regulatory interactions between the genes Kruppel and knirps that demonstrate the potential utility of the model. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  15. The intimate genetics of Drosophila fertilization.

    PubMed

    Loppin, Benjamin; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Horard, Béatrice

    2015-08-01

    The union of haploid gametes at fertilization initiates the formation of the diploid zygote in sexually reproducing animals. This founding event of embryogenesis includes several fascinating cellular and nuclear processes, such as sperm-egg cellular interactions, sperm chromatin remodelling, centrosome formation or pronuclear migration. In comparison with other aspects of development, the exploration of animal fertilization at the functional level has remained so far relatively limited, even in classical model organisms. Here, we have reviewed our current knowledge of fertilization in Drosophila melanogaster, with a special emphasis on the genes involved in the complex transformation of the fertilizing sperm nucleus into a replicated set of paternal chromosomes.

  16. Acetylation regulates Jun protein turnover in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daoyong; Suganuma, Tamaki; Workman, Jerry L

    2013-11-01

    C-Jun is a major transcription factor belonging to the activating protein 1 (AP-1) family. Phosphorylation has been shown to be critical for c-Jun activation and stability. Here, we report that Jra, the Drosophila Jun protein, is acetylated in vivo. We demonstrate that the acetylation of Jra leads to its rapid degradation in response to osmotic stress. Intriguingly, we also found that Jra phosphorylation antagonized its acetylation, indicating the opposite roles of acetylation and phosphorylation in Jra degradation process under osmotic stress. Our results provide new insights into how c-Jun proteins are precisely regulated by the interplay of different posttranslational modifications.

  17. Research resources for Drosophila: the expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kathleen A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Gelbart, William M

    2005-03-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been the subject of research into central questions about biological mechanisms for almost a century. The experimental tools and resources that are available or under development for D. melanogaster and its related species, particularly those for genomic analysis, are truly outstanding. Here we review three types of resource that have been developed for D. melanogaster research: databases and other sources of information, biological materials and experimental services. These resources are there to be exploited and we hope that this guide will encourage new uses for D. melanogaster information, materials and services, both by those new to flies and by experienced D. melanogaster researchers.

  18. Preventing neurodegeneration in the Drosophila mutant bubblegum.

    PubMed

    Min, K T; Benzer, S

    1999-06-18

    The Drosophila melanogaster recessive mutant bubblegum (bgm) exhibits adult neurodegeneration, with marked dilation of photoreceptor axons. The bubblegum mutant shows elevated levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), as seen in the human disease adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). In ALD, the excess can be lowered by dietary treatment with "Lorenzo's oil," a mixture of unsaturated fatty acids. Feeding the fly mutant one of the components, glyceryl trioleate oil, blocked the accumulation of excess VLCFAs as well as development of the pathology. Mutant flies thus provide a potential model system for studying mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and screening drugs for treatment.

  19. Psychomotor Behavior: A Practical Approach in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Iliadi, Konstantin G.; Gluscencova, Oxana B.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.

    2016-01-01

    Psychomotor behaviors are governed by fine relationships between physical activity and cognitive functions. Disturbances in psychomotor development and performance are a hallmark of many mental illnesses and often appear as observable and measurable behaviors. Here, we describe a new method called an “equilibrist test,” which can be used to quantify psychomotor learning and performance in Drosophila. We also show how this test can be used to quantify motor disturbances at relatively early stages in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27630583

  20. Drosophila mechanotransduction--linking proteins and functions.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jörg T; Nadrowski, Björn; Göpfert, Martin C

    2007-01-01

    The sensation of touch, gravity, and sound all rely on dedicated ion channels that transduce mechanical stimulus forces into electrical signals. The functional workings and molecular identities of these mechanotransducer channels are little understood. Recent work shows that the mechanotransducers for fly and vertebrate hearing share equivalent gating mechanisms, whereby this mechanism can be probed non-invasively in the mechanics of the Drosophila ear. Here, we describe how this mechanics can be used to evaluate the roles of identified proteins in the process of mechanosensation and, specifically, their contributions to mechanotransduction. PMID:18820433